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Sample records for lanthanide-induced phosphorus-31 nmr

  1. Phosphorus solubility of agricultural soils: a surface charge and phosphorus-31 NMR speciation study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated ten soils from six states in United States to determine the relationship between potentiometric titration derived soil surface charge and Phosphorus-31 (P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) speciation with the concentration of water-extractable P (WEP). The surface charge value at the...

  2. Nucleophilic Substitution Reactions Using Phosphine Nucleophiles: An Introduction to Phosphorus-31 NMR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibbald, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is commonly used in modern synthetic chemistry to monitor the conversion of reactants to products. Since instruction in the use of NMR spectroscopy typically does not occur until after the introduction of nucleophilic substitution reactions, organic chemistry students are not able to take advantage of…

  3. Nucleophilic Substitution Reactions Using Phosphine Nucleophiles: An Introduction to Phosphorus-31 NMR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibbald, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is commonly used in modern synthetic chemistry to monitor the conversion of reactants to products. Since instruction in the use of NMR spectroscopy typically does not occur until after the introduction of nucleophilic substitution reactions, organic chemistry students are not able to take advantage of…

  4. Synthesis and characterization of polyphosphazene copolymers using phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, F.F.; Peterson, E.S.; Stone, M.L.; Singler, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    It was observed that competitive nucleophilic addition processes may be observed by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy. Methoxyethoxyethanol (MEE) and p-methoxyphenol readily substitute for chlorineonto phosphorus and the relative rates are generally comparable to each other. Sterically, the phenol presents is slightly larger than MEE but this does not appear to effect substitution judging by the observed PN(OAr){sub 2} NMR signal. These processes are still being studied.

  5. Phosphorus-31 NMR visibility and characterization of rat liver mitochondrial matrix adenine nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, S.M.; Berkich, D.; Williams, G.D.; LaNoue, K.F.; Briggs, R.W. )

    1989-05-16

    Compartmentation and NMR visibility of mitochondrial adenine nucleotides were quantitated in isolated rat liver mitochondria respiring on succinate and glutamate in vitro at 8 and 25{degree}C. Intra- and extramitochondrial nucleotides were discriminated by adding the chelator trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetraacetic acid (CDTA). T{sub 1} values of about 0.2-0.3 s for magnesium-bound matrix nucleotides were determined. Adenine nucleotide T{sub 1} values were influenced by the ionic environment; only magnesium-free ATP T{sub 1}'s were affected by temperature. Intra- and extramitochondrial adenine nucleotide ratios were varied in ATP-loaded mitochondria with added ATP and phosphate using the mitochondrial inhibitors oligomycin and carboxyatractyloside, and adenine nucleotides were quantitated by using NMR and enzymatic analysis. There was good agreement between matrix ATP concentrations (magnesium-bound ATP) calculated by using NMR and standard biochemical techniques. Although matrix ADP could be detected by NMR, it was difficult to quantitate accurately by NMR. The data indicate that mitochondrial ATP is NMR-visible in isolated mitochondria in vitro.

  6. Phosphorus-31 NMR study of the effects of UV on squirrel lenses.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D M; Papadopoulou, O; Mahendroo, P P; Zigman, S

    1993-07-01

    In a series of 31P NMR experiments the effects of near-UV radiation on the phosphorus metabolites in pigmented lenses from grey squirrels were studied; UV radiation ranged from 300 to 400 nm, peaking at 365 nm. Squirrels were killed, intact lenses removed, exposed to UV, put in an NMR perfusion cell, and 31P NMR spectra were recorded. In vitro exposure of squirrel lenses for periods ranging from 4 to 22 hr were made. ATP levels, as measured by NMR, decreased as the radiation dose increased. For a 22-hr exposure (121 J cm-2) ATP levels decreased by 67% relative to control values. At lower dose levels there was a correspondingly smaller decrease in ATP levels. Histological examination showed UV-irradiated lenses had disrupted epithelium, loss of attachment to cortical fiber cells and fluid accumulation under the capsule. It is clear that lenticular exposure to near-UV, predominantly at 365 nm (UV-A), does cause metabolic deterioration through degradation of normal ATP energy levels. The grey squirrel pigmented lens strongly absorbs near-UV radiation which enhances the observed metabolic changes and observed opacities. The results demonstrate the utility of using 31P NMR to evaluate metabolic changes associated with near-UV irradiation. PMID:8405173

  7. Contribution of protein phosphorylation to binding-induced folding of the SLBP–histone mRNA complex probed by phosphorus-31 NMR

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus-31 (31P) NMR can be used to characterize the structure and dynamics of phosphorylated proteins. Here, I use 31P NMR to report on the chemical nature of a phosphothreonine that lies in the RNA binding domain of SLBP (stem-loop binding protein). SLBP is an intrinsically disordered protein and phosphorylation at this threonine promotes the assembly of the SLBP–RNA complex. The data show that the 31P chemical shift can be a good spectroscopic probe for phosphate-coupled folding and binding processes in intrinsically disordered proteins, particularly where the phosphate exhibits torsional strain and is involved in a network of hydrogen-bonding interactions. PMID:25379382

  8. Phosphorus-31 NMR magnetization-transfer measurements of ATP turnover during steady-state isometric muscle contraction in the rat hind limb in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Brindle, K.M.; Blackledge, M.J.; Challiss, R.A.J.; Radda, G.K. )

    1989-05-30

    Phosphorus-31 NMR magnetization-transfer measurement have been used to measure the flux between ATP and inorganic phosphate during steady-state isometric muscle contraction in the rat hind limb in vivo. Steady-state contraction was obtained by supramaximal sciatic nerve stimulation. Increasing the stimulation pulse width from 10 to 90 ms, at a pulse frequency of 1 Hz, or increasing the frequency of a 10-ms pulse from 0.5 to 2 Hz resulted in an increase in the flux which was an approximately linear function of the increase in the tension-time integral. The flux showed an approximately linear dependence on the calculated free cytosolic ADP concentration up to an ADP concentration of about 90 {mu}M. The data are consistent with control of mitochondrial ATP synthesis by the cytosolic ADP concentration and indicate that the apparent K{sub m} of the mitochondria for ADP is at least 30 {mu}M.

  9. Phosphorus-31 NMR magnetization transfer measurements of metabolic reaction rates in the rat heart and kidney in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Koretsky, A.P.

    1984-08-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the measurement of the rates of ATP synthesis in the rat kidney and of the creatine kinase catalyzed reaction in the rat heart in situ. Chronically implanted detection coils, employing a balanced matching configuration of capacitors in the tuned circuit, were used to obtain /sup 31/P NMR spectra from heart, kidney, and liver in situ. Gated spectra of heart obtained at systole and diastole and the effects of fructose on kidney and liver were studied. The ability to observe other nuclei using implanted coils is illustrated with /sup 39/K NMR spectra from kidney and muscle. The theoretical considerations of applying magnetization transfer techniques to intact organs are discussed with emphasis on the problems associated with multiple exchange reactions and compartmentation of reactants. Experimental measurements of the ATP synthesis rate (13 ..mu..mol/min/gm tissue) were compared to whole kidney oxygen consumption and Na/sup +/ reabsorption rates to derive ATP/O (0.8 to 1.7) and Na/sup +//ATP (4 to 10) values. The problems associated with ATP synthesis rate measurements in kidney, e.g., the heterogeneity of the inorganic phosphate resonance, are discussed and experiments to overcome these problems proposed.

  10. Phosphorus-31 NMR magnetization transfer measurements of metabolic reaction rates in the rat heart and kidney in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Koretsky, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    /sup 31/P NMR is a unique tool to study bioenergetics in living cells. The application of magnetization transfer techniques to the measurement of steady-state enzyme reaction rates provides a new approach to understanding the regulation of high energy phosphate metabolism. This dissertation is concerned with the measurement of the rates of ATP synthesis in the rat kidney and of the creatine kinase catalyzed reaction in the rat heart in situ. The theoretical considerations of applying magnetization transfer techniques to intact organs are discussed with emphasis on the problems associated with multiple exchange reactions and compartmentation of reactants. Experimental measurements of the ATP synthesis rate were compared to whole kidney oxygen consumption and Na/sup +/ reabsorption rates to derive ATP/O values. The problems associated with ATP synthesis rate measurements in kidney, e.g. the heterogeneity of the inorganic phosphate resonance, are discussed and experiments to overcome these problems proposed. In heart, the forward rate through creatine kinase was measured to be larger than the reverse rate. To account for the difference in forward and reverse rates a model is proposed based on the compartmentation of a small pool of ATP.

  11. Characteristics and assessment of biogenic phosphorus in sediments from the multi-polluted Haihe River, China, using phosphorus fractionation and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. Q.; Zhang, H.; Tang, W. Z.; Shan, B. Q.

    2013-10-01

    We studied the phosphorus (P) pollution, as described by concentrations, distribution and transformation potential, of sediments of the water scarce and heavily polluted Fuyang River, a tributary of the Haihe River, using P fractionation and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR).The sediments of the Fuyang River accumulate significant amounts of inorganic phosphorus (Pi) and organic phosphorus (Po) from industrial and domestic wastewater and agricultural non-point pollution. In terms of their contribution to total phosphorus, the rank order of the P fractions was as follows: H2SO4-P > NaOH-Pi > Res-P > NaOH-Po > KCl-P and their average relative proportions were 69.7:47.5:15.9:2.9:1.0 (the proportion was based on the average proportion of the KCl-P). Seven P compounds were detected by the 31P-NMR analysis. Orthophosphate (Ortho-P: 45.2-92.4%) and orthophosphate monoesters (mono-P: 6.6-45.7%) were the dominant forms. Smaller amounts of pyrophosphates (pyro-P: 0.1-6.6%), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA-P: 0.3-3.9%), phosphonates (phon-P: 0-3.3%), phospholipids (lipids-P: 0-2.7%) and polyphosphate (poly-P: 0-0.04%) were observed in the sediments. Results of P fractionation and 31P-NMR analysis showed that 35% of Pi was labile P, including KCl-P and NaOH-Pi (Fe-P and Al-P). Biogenic-P accounted for 24% of P in the sediments. Analysis of the relationships between P species and water quality indicated that the Po compounds would mineralize to form ortho-P and would be potentially bioavailable for recycling to surface water, supporting further growth of phytoplankton and leading to algal blooms.

  12. Phosphorus-31, sup 15 N, and sup 13 C NMR of glyphosate: Comparison of pH titrations to the herbicidal dead-end complex with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Castellino, S.; Leo, G.C.; Sammons, R.D.; Sikorski, J.A. )

    1989-05-02

    The herbicidal dead-end ternary complex (E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph}) of glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) has been characterized by {sup 31}P, {sup 15}N, and {sup 13}C NMR. The NMR spectra of EPSPS-bound glyphosate show unique chemical shifts ({delta}) for each of the three nuclei. By {sup 31}P NMR, glyphosate in the dead-end complex is a distinct species 3.5 ppm downfield from free glyphosate. The {sup 13}C signal of glyphosate in the dead-end complex is shifted 4 ppm downfield from that of free glyphosate. The {sup 15}N signal for glyphosate (99%) in the dead-end complex is 5 ppm further downfield than that of any free zwitterionic species and 10 ppm downfield from that of the average free species at pH 10.1. The structures of each ionic state of glyphosate are modeled with force field calculations by using MacroModel. A correlation is made for the {sup 31}P {delta} and the C-P-O bond angle, and the {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N {delta} values are postulated to be related to C-C-O and C-N-C bond angles, respectively. The downfield {sup 31}P chemical shift perturbation for S3P in the EPSPS binary complex is consistent with ionization of the 3-phosphate of S3P upon binding. Comparison with the S3P {sup 31}P {delta} vs pH titration curve specifies predominantly the dianion of the 3-phosphate in the E{sup S3P} binary complex, while the E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph} complex indicates net protonation at the 3-phosphate. Chemical shift perturbations of this latter type may be explained by changes in the O-P-O bond angle.

  13. Flavodoxin from Anabaena 7120: uniform nitrogen-15 enrichment and hydrogen-1, nitrogen-15, and phosphorus-31 NMR investigation of the flavin mononucleotide binding site in the reduced and oxidized states

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, B.J.; Westler, W.M.; Mooberry, E.S.; Markley, J.L.

    1988-01-12

    Interactions between flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and apoprotein have been investigated in the reduced and oxidized states of the flavodoxin isolated from Anabaena 7120 (M/sub r/ approx. 21,000). /sup 1/H, /sup 15/N, and /sup 31/P NMR have been used to characterize the FMN-protein interactions in both redox states. These are compared with those seen in other flavodoxins. Uniformly enriched (/sup 15/N) flavodoxin was isolated from Anabaena 7120 grown on K/sup 15/NO/sub 3/ as the sole nitrogen source. /sup 15/N insensitive nucleus enhanced by polarization transfer (INEPT) and nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) studies of this sample provided information regarding protein structure and dynamics. A /sup 1/H-detected /sup 15/N experiment allowed the correlation of nitrogen resonances to those of their attached protons. Over 90% of the expected N-H cross peaks could be resolved in this experiment.

  14. Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance examination of female reproductive tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Noyszewski, E.A.; Raman, J.; Trupin, S.R.; McFarlin, B.L.; Dawson, M.J. )

    1989-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful method of investigating the relationship between metabolism and function in living tissues. We present evidence that the phosphorus 31 spectra of myometrium and placenta are functions of physiologic state and gestational age. Specific spectroscopic abnormalities are observed in association with disorders of pregnancy and gynecologic diseases. Our results suggest that noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy examinations may sometimes be a useful addition to magnetic resonance imaging examinations, and that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of biopsy specimens could become a cost-effective method of evaluating certain biochemical abnormalities.

  15. The solution structure of Ln (DOTP) 5- complexxes. A comparison of lanthanide-induced paramagnetic shifts with the MMX energy-minimized structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldes, Carlos F. G. C.; Sherry, A. Dean; Kiefer, Garry E.

    Complexes between the trivalent lanthanide ions and the macrocyclic chelate 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane- N,N',N″,N‴-tetra(methylene phosphonate) (DOTP) have been examined by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. The proton spectra of the diamagnetic La(DOTP) 5- and Lu(DOTP) 5- complexes provide evidence for very rigid chelate structures with the ethylenediamine-containing chelate rings essentially locked into a single conformation at room temperature. The activation energy for ethylenediamine chelate ring interconversions in these complexes is approximately 100 kJ mol -1, considerably higher than that reported previously for the corresponding Ln(DOTA) - complexes (DOTA is the tetraacetate analog of DOTP). Lanthanide-induced shifts are reported for all 1H, 13C, and 31P nuclei in 11 Ln(DOTP) 5- complexes. The proton spectra of these complexes display unusually large lanthanide-induced shifts, one showing a spectrum in which the 1H resonances span 900 ppm. The contact and pseudocontact contributions to these shifts were separated using Reilley's temperature-independent method and the resulting pseudocontact lanthanide-induced NMR shifts were in excellent agreement with those calculated for a structure derived using MMX molecular modeling methods. The pseudocontact shifts provide evidence for Ln (DOTP) 5- chelates which have virtually identical structures along the lanthanide series, with the possible exception of Tm(DOTP) 5-.

  16. Soil and litter phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: extractants, metals, and phosphorus relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Cade-Menun, B J; Liu, C W; Nunlist, R; McColl, J G

    2002-01-01

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an excellent tool with which to study soil organic P, allowing quantitative, comparative analysis of P forms. However, for 31P NMR to be tative, all peaks must be completely visible, and in their correct relative proportions. There must be no line broadening, and adequate delay times must be used to avoid saturation of peaks. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of extractants on delay times and peak saturation. Two samples (a forest litter and a mineral soil sample) and three extractants (0.25 M NaOH, NaOH plus Chelex (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Hercules, CA), and NaOH plus EDTA) were used to determine the differences in the concentration of P and cations solubilized by each extractant, and to measure spin-lattice (T1) relaxation times of P peaks in each extract. For both soil and litter, NaOH-Chelex extracted the lowest concentrations of P. For the litter sample, T1 values were short for all extractants due to the high Fe concentration remaining after extraction. For the soil sample, there were noticeable differences among the extractants. The NaOH-Chelex sample had less Fe and Mn remaining in solution after extraction than the other extractants, and the longest delay times used in the study, 6.4 s, were not long enough for quantitative analysis. Delay times of 1.5 to 2 s for the NaOH and NaOH-EDTA were adequate. Line broadening was highest in the NaOH extracts, which had the highest concentration of Fe. On the basis of these results, recommendations for future analyses of soil and litter samples by solution 31P NMR spectroscopy include: careful selection of an extractant; measurement of paramagnetic ions extracted with P; use of appropriate delay times and the minimum number of scans; and measurement of T1 values whenever possible. PMID:11931434

  17. A conformational study of nucleic acid phosphate ester bonds using phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Haasnoot, C A; Altona, C

    1979-01-01

    A systematic phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance study of some nucleic acid constituents (6-N-(dimethyl)adenylyl-(3',5')-uridine and some nucleotide methyl esters) is presented. The temperature dependent phosphorus-31 chemical shifts were analyzed by standard thermodynamic procedures. It is shown that gt conformations about the P-O ester bonds have a lower free energy content relative to gg conformers. PMID:440971

  18. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cellular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Robitaille, P.M.L.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, /sup 31/P-NMR spectroscopy was applied to the study of (1) sipunculan erythrocytes, (2) spermatozoa isolated from several vertebrate and invertebrate species, and (3) unfertilized eggs isolated from the blue crab and the horseshoe crab. /sup 31/P-NMR results center on the identification of key metabolites and on the determination of intracellular pH. In studies involving fish spermatozoa, emphasis was also placed on examining changes in metabolic profiles following (1) an anaerobic insult, (2) motility initiation, or (3) short-term storage. This study also captures several difficulties in spectral interpretation which a spectroscopist is likely to encounter.

  19. Deuterium and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance study of the interaction of melittin with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers and the effects of contaminating phospholipase A/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, C.E.; Watts, A.

    1987-09-08

    The interaction of bee venom melittin with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) selectively deuteriated in the choline head group has been studied by deuterium and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The action of residual phospholipase A/sub 2/ in melittin samples resulted in mixtures of DMPC and its hydrolytic products that underwent reversible transitions at temperatures between 30 and 35/sup 0/C from extended bilayers to micellar particles which gave narrow single-line deuterium and phosphorus-31 NMR spectra. Similar transitions were observed in DMPC-myristoyllysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC)-myristic acid mixtures containing melittin but not in melittin-free mixtures, indicating that melittin is able to stabilize extended bilayers containing DMPC and its hydrolytic products in the liquid-crystalline phase. Melittin, free of phospholipase A/sub 2/ activity, and at 3-5 mol % relative to DMPC, induced reversible transitions between extended bilayers and micellar particles on passing through the liquid-crystalline to gel phase transition temperature of the lipid, effects similar to those observed in melittin-acyl chain deuteriated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) mixtures. LysoPC at concentrations of 20 mol % or greater relative to DMPC induced transitions between extended bilayers and micellar particles with characteristics similar to those induced by melittin. It is proposed that these melittin- and lysoPC-induced transitions share similar mechanisms. The effects of melittin on the quadrupole splittings and T/sub 1/ relaxation times of head-group-deuteriated DMPC in the liquid-crystalline phase share features similar to the effects of metal ions on DPPC head groups, indicating that the conformational properties of the choline head group in PC bilayers may be affected by melittin and by metal ions in a similar manner.

  20. In vivo phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance reveals lowered ATP during heat shock of Tetrahymena

    SciTech Connect

    Findly, R.C.; Gillies, R.J.; Shulman, R.G.

    1983-03-11

    Cells synthesize a characteristic set of proteins--heat shock proteins--in response to a rapid temperature jump or certain other stress treatments. The technique of phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to examine in vivo the effects of temperature jump on two species of Tetrahymena that initiate the heat shock response at different temperatures. An immediate 50 percent decrease in cellular adenosine triphosphate was observed when either species was jumped to a temperature that strongly induces synthesis of heat shock proteins. This new adenosine triphosphate concentration was maintained at the heat shock temperature.

  1. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance of double- and triple-helical nucleic acids. Phosphorus-31 chemical shifts as a probe of phosphorus-oxygen ester bond torsional angles

    SciTech Connect

    Gorenstein, D.G.; Luxon, B.A.; Goldfield, E.M.; Lai, K.; Vegeais, D.

    1982-02-02

    The temperature dependence to the /sup 31/P NMR spectra of poly(d(GC))-poly(d(GC)), d(GC)/sub 4/, phenylalanine tRNA (yeast) and mixtures of poly(A) + oligo(U) is presented. The /sup 31/P NMR spectra of mixtures of complementary RNA and of the poly d(GC) self-complementary DNA provide torsional information on the phosphate ester conformation in the double, triple, and ''Z'' helix. The increasing downfield shift with temperature for the single-strand nucleic acids provides a measure of the change in the phosphate ester conformation in the single helix to coil conversion. A seperate upfield peak (20-26% of the total phosphates) is observed at lower temperatures in the oligo(U)-poly(A) mixtures which is assigned to the double helix/triple helix. Proton NMR and UV spectra confirm the presence of the multistrand forms. The /sup 31/P chemical shift for the double helix/triple helix is 0.2-0.5 ppm upfield from the chemical shift for the single helix which in turn is 1.0 ppm upfield from the chemical shift for the random coil conformation.

  2. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the canine pancreas: applications to acute alcoholic pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Janes, N.; Clemens, J.A.; Glickson, J.D.; Cameron, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The first nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the canine pancreas is described. Both in-vivo, ex-vivo protocols and NMR observables are discussed. The stability of the ex-vivo preparation based on the NMR observables is established for at least four hours. The spectra obtained from the in-vivo and ex-vivo preparations exhibited similar metabolite ratios, further validating the model. Metabolite levels were unchanged by a 50% increase in perfusion rate. Only trace amounts of phosphocreatine were observed either in the intact gland or in extracts. Acute alcoholic pancreatitis was mimicked by free fatty acid infusion. Injury resulted in hyperamylasemia, edema (weight gain), increased hematocrit and perfusion pressure, and depressed levels of high energy phosphates.

  3. Optimizing phosphorus characterization in animal manures by solution phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Turner, Benjamin L

    2004-01-01

    A procedure involving alkaline extraction and solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was developed and optimized for the characterization of P in animal manures (broiler, swine, beef cattle). Inclusion of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in the alkaline extraction solution recovered between 82 and 97% of the total P from the three manures, which represented a significant improvement on recovery in NaOH alone. Low concentrations of paramagnetic ions in all manure extracts meant that relatively long delay times (> 5 s) were required for quantitative analysis by solution 31P NMR spectroscopy. The manures contained inorganic orthophosphate, orthophosphate monoesters, orthophosphate diesters, and inorganic polyphosphates, but results were markedly influenced by the concentration of NaOH in the extractant, which affected both spectral resolution and the apparent P composition of the extracts. For example, extraction of swine manure and broiler litter with 0.5 M NaOH + 50 mM EDTA produced remarkable spectral resolution that allowed accurate quantification of the four signals from phytic acid, the major organic P compound in these manures. In contrast, more dilute NaOH concentrations produced considerable line broadening that obscured individual signals in the orthophosphate monoester region of the spectra. Spectral resolution of cattle manure extracts was relatively unaffected by NaOH concentration. Improvements in spectral resolution of more concentrated NaOH extracts were, however, compromised by the disappearance of phospholipids and inorganic polyphosphates, notably in swine and cattle manure extracts, which indicated either degradation or a change in solubility. The optimum extraction conditions will therefore vary depending on the manure type and the objectives of the study. Phytic acid can be accurately quantified in swine manure and broiler litter by extraction with 0.5 M NaOH + 50 mM EDTA, while a more dilute NaOH concentration should be used for complete P characterization or comparison among different manure types. PMID:15074830

  4. Transport and phosphorylation of choline in higher plant cells. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bligny, R.; Foray, M.F.; Roby, C.; Douce, R.

    1989-03-25

    When sycamore cells were suspended in basal medium containing choline, the latter was taken up by the cells very rapidly. A facilitated diffusion system appertained at low concentrations of choline and exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. At higher choline concentrations simple diffusion appeared to be the principal mode of uptake. Addition of choline to the perfusate of compressed sycamore cells monitored by /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy resulted in a dramatic accumulation of P-choline in the cytoplasmic compartment containing choline kinase and not in the vacuole. The total accumulation of P-choline over a 10-h period exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. During this period, in the absence of Pi in the perfusion medium there was a marked depletion of glucose-6-P, and the cytoplasmic Pi resonance disappeared almost completely. When a threshold of cytoplasmic Pi was attained, the phosphorylation of choline was sustained by the continuous release of Pi from the vacuole although at a much lower rate. However, when 100 microM inorganic phosphate was present in the perfusion medium, externally added Pi was preferentially used to sustain P-choline synthesis. It is clear, therefore, that cytosolic choline kinase associated with a carrier-mediated transport system for choline uptake appeared as effective systems for continuously trapping cytoplasmic Pi including vacuolar Pi entering the cytoplasm.

  5. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy transect study of poultry operations on the Delmarva Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jane E; Cade-Menun, Barbara J

    2009-01-01

    Nonpoint source phosphorus (P) pollution into the Chesapeake Bay watershed from poultry operations contributes to the algal blooms, hypoxia, anoxia, and fish kill events that occur there most years. A major source of soluble, bioavailable P species is poultry litter, which is used as a crop fertilizer on fields adjacent to the tributaries of the Bay. A potentially significant source of orthophosphate in the litter is the heavily phosphorylated compound myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate), which is indigestible by poultry and thus becomes a major component of their excreta. Phytate evaluation in environmental samples is expensive; hence, its impact is not captured in standard farmer-friendly eutrophication potential guides, like Delaware's Phosphorus Site Index. In this transect study of two poultry operations on the Delmarva Peninsula, we measured the incidence of all P compounds using solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and extracts, relating them to relevant geochemical properties. The contribution of phytate to the overall pool of P declined from around 50% in manures to between 2 and 13% in down-gradient soils and sediments, corresponding to a rise in the relative proportion of orthophosphate (increasing from 39% to 65-88%). The results show that the large pool of phytate P spread onto croplands during standard operating practice at poultry farms on the Delmarva Peninsula does not appear to accumulate; rather, phytate decreases in down-gradient locations, most likely due to transport off-site and/or through in situ biological activity. PMID:19141802

  6. Preliminary Study on Hepatocyte-Targeted Phosphorus-31 MRS Using ATP-Loaded Galactosylated Chitosan Oligosaccharide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ri-Sheng; Zhu, Xiu-Liang; Sun, Jian-Zhong; Shi, Dan; Chen, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Kang; Tang, Ke-Zhong; Du, Yong-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background. The clinical applications of hepatic phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) remain to be difficult because the changes of phosphates between normal hepatic tissues and pathological tissues are not so obvious, and furthermore, up to now there is few literature on hepatocyte-targeted 31P MRS. Materials and Methods. The ATP-loaded Gal-CSO (Gal-CSO/ATP) nanoparticles were prepared and the special cellular uptake of them as evaluated by using HepG-2 tumor cells and A549 tumor cells, respectively. Two kinds of cells were incubated with the nanoparticles suspension, respectively. Then were prepared the cell samples and the enhancement efficiency of ATP peaks detected by 31P MRS was evaluated. Results. The cellular uptake rate of Gal-CSO/ATP nanoparticles in HepG-2 cells was higher than that in A549 cells. Furthermore, the enlarged ATP peaks of Gal-CSO/ATP nanoparticles in HepG-2 cells were higher than those in A549 cells in vitro detected by 31P MRS. Conclusions. Gal-CSO/ATP nanoparticles have significant targeting efficiency in hepatic cells in vitro and enhancement efficiency of ATP peaks in HepG-2 cells. Furthermore, 31P MRS could be applied in the research of hepatic molecular imaging. PMID:24363667

  7. Frontal lobe bioenergetic metabolism in depressed adolescents with bipolar disorder: a phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xian-Feng; Kondo, Douglas G; Sung, Young-Hoon; Hellem, Tracy L; Fiedler, Kristen K; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Huber, Rebekah S; Renshaw, Perry F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare the concentrations of high-energy phosphorus metabolites associated with mitochondrial function in the frontal lobe of depressed adolescents with bipolar disorder (BD) and healthy controls (HC). Methods We used in vivo phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) at 3 Tesla to measure phosphocreatine (PCr), beta-nucleoside triphosphate (?-NTP), inorganic phosphate (Pi), and other neurometabolites in the frontal lobe of eight unmedicated and six medicated adolescents with bipolar depression and 24 adolescent HCs. Results Analysis of covariance, including age as a covariate, revealed differences in PCr (p = 0.037), Pi (p = 0.017), and PCr/Pi (p = 0.002) between participant groups. Percentage neurochemical differences were calculated with respect to mean metabolite concentrations in the HC group. Post-hoc Tukey–Kramer analysis showed that unmedicated BD participants had decreased Pi compared with both HC (17%; p = 0.038) and medicated BD (24%; p = 0.022). The unmedicated BD group had increased PCr compared with medicated BD (11%; p = 0.032). The PCr/Pi ratio was increased in unmedicated BD compared with HC (24%; p = 0.013) and with medicated BD (39%; p = 0.002). No differences in ?-NTP or pH were observed. Conclusions Our results support the view that frontal lobe mitochondrial function is altered in adolescent BD and may have implications for the use of Pi as a biomarker. These findings join volumetric studies of the amygdala, and proton MRS studies of n-acetyl aspartate in pointing to potential differences in neurobiology between pediatric and adult BD. PMID:22816670

  8. Permeabilization of plant cells: (31)P NMR studies on the permeability of the tonoplast.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, P; Linsefors, L; Vogel, H J; Brodelius, P

    1986-02-01

    A suspension culture of Catharanthus roseus has been used to study the permeability of cell membranes after treatment with various concentrations of a permeabilizing agent (DMSO). The uptake and release (after permeabilization) of inorganic phosphate (Pi) by cells have been investigated by (32)P radiotracer and non-invasive phosphorus-31 NMR experiments. These studies have demonstrated that measurements of the Pi-efflux from plant cells provide a reliable measure of the permeability of the tonoplast. PMID:24247956

  9. Effect of Cyclosporine on Hepatic Energy Status and on Fructose Metabolism after Portacaval Shunt in Dog as Monitored by Phosphorus-31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rossaro, Lorenzo; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Scotti-Foglieni, Carlo L.; Williams, Donald S.; Simplaceanu, Elena; Simplaceanu, Virgil; Francavilla, Antonio; Starzl, Thomas E.; Ho, Chien; Van Thiel, David H.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of cyclosporin A on the hepatic energy status and intracellular pH of the liver and its response to a fructose challenge has been investigated using in vivo phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in dogs. Three experimental groups were studied: (a) control dogs (n = 5), (b) dogs 4 days after the creation of an end-to-side portacaval shunt (n = 5), and (c) dogs 4 days after portacaval shunt and continuous infusion of cyclosporin A (4 mg/kg/day) by way of the left portal vein (portacaval shunt plus cyclosporin A, n = 5). The phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained at 81 MHz using a Bruker BIOSPEC II 4.7-tesla nuclear magnetic resonance system equipped with a 40-cm horizontal bore superconducting solenoid. The phosphomonoesters (p < 0.01), inorganic phosphate and ATP levels (p < 0.05) were decreased significantly in portacaval shunt–treated and in portacaval shunt-plus-cyclosporin A–treated dogs compared with unshunted control dogs. After a fructose challenge (750 mg/kg body wt, intravenously), fructose-1-phosphate metabolism was reduced in portacaval shunt–treated dogs compared with either the normal or portacaval shunt-plus-cyclosporin A–treated dogs (p < 0.05). Both portacaval shunt– and portacaval shunt-plus-cyclosporin A–treated dogs demonstrated a reduced decline in ATP levels after fructose infusion when compared with the controls (p < 0.05). Immediately after the fructose challenge, the intracellular pH decreased from 7.30 ± 0.03 to 7.00 ± 0.05 in all animals (p < 0.01) and then gradually returned to normal over 60 min. These data, obtained in vivo using phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the liver after a portacaval shunt, suggest that: (a) the energy status of the liver is reduced in dogs with a portacaval shunt compared with that of normal controls and (b) cyclosporin A treatment ameliorates the reduction in hepatic metabolism normally observed after a fructose challenge to the liver with a portacaval shunt. PMID:2010174

  10. Lanthanide-induced calcergy.

    PubMed

    Garrett, I R; McClure, J

    1981-12-01

    The subcutaneous injection of solutions of chloride salts of the rare earths is followed by calcification of the dorsal fascia in the mouse. The concentration of salt required to produce a constant, predictable response varies from salt to salt. The macroscopic outline of the reaction is generally irregular and therefore a quantitative radiological method has been developed to allow an accurate assessment of the dose/response relationship. This with the majority of salts is best described as a log regression and with three as a linear regression. PMID:7328447

  11. Protective effect of pretreatment with the calcium antagonist anipamil on the ischemic-reperfused rat myocardium: a phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance study

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkels, J.H.; Ruigrok, T.J.; Van Echteld, C.J.; Meijler, F.L.

    1988-05-01

    To assess whether the prophylactic administration of anipamil, a new calcium antagonist, protects the heart against the effects of ischemia and reperfusion, rats were injected intraperitoneally twice daily for 5 days with 5 mg/kg body weight of this drug. The heart was then isolated and perfused by the Langendorff technique. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to monitor myocardial energy metabolism and intracellular pH during control perfusion and 30 min of total ischemia (37/sup 0/C), followed by 30 min of reperfusion. Pretreatment with anipamil altered neither left ventricular developed pressure under normoxic conditions nor the rate and extent of depletion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and creatine phosphate during ischemia. Intracellular acidification, however, was attenuated. On reperfusion, hearts from anipamil-pretreated animals recovered significantly better than untreated hearts with respect to replenishment of ATP and creatine phosphate stores, restitution of low levels of intracellular inorganic phosphate and recovery of left ventricular function and coronary flow. Intracellular pH recovered rapidly to preischemic levels, whereas in untreated hearts a complex intracellular inorganic phosphate peak indicated the existence of areas of different pH within the myocardium. It is concluded that anipamil pretreatment protects the heart against some of the deleterious effects of ischemia and reperfusion. Because this protection occurred in the absence of a negative inotropic effect during normoxia, it cannot be attributed to an energy-sparing effect during ischemia. Therefore, alternative mechanisms of action are to be considered.

  12. Fluorescence quenching studies of tryptophan by trivalent lanthanide ions in aqueous media. Evidence for a lanthanide-induced intersystem crossing singlet-to-triplet mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaye-Seye, M. D.; Aaron, J. J.

    1999-09-01

    The quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by trivalent lanthanide ions is studied at room temperature in aqueous non buffered (pH 5.8) and in 0.05 M HEPES pH 7.5 and acetate pH 5.8 buffered solutions. Bimolecular quenching rate constants ranged between 0.9× 109 and 24.4×109 M-1s-1 in HEPES buffer, and 1.8×109 and 20.7×109 in acetate buffer and between 2.0×109 and 22×109 M-1s-1 in non buffered aqueous solution, according to the nature of the ions. A mechanism involving a lanthanide-induced intersystem crossing singlet-to-triplet process is proposed. The induced intersystem crossing rate constants (kiscind) range from 2.0×107 to 4.7×107 M-1s-1. In aqueous media, kiscind are correlated with the molecular weight of the lanthanide ions under study. L'effet de l'extinction de la fluorescence du tryptophane par des ions lanthanides trivalents a été étudié à 298 K en milieu aqueux (pH 5.8) et en solutions tampon HEPES 0.05 M pH 7.5 et acétate pH 5.8. Les constantes de vitesse bimoléculaires d'extinction varient suivant la nature des ions lanthanides et sont comprises entre 0.9× 109 et 24.4×109 M-1s-1 en tampon HEPES, et 1.8×109 et 20.7×109 en tampon acétate et entre 2.0×109 et 22×109 M-1s-1 en milieu aqueux non tamponné. Un mécanisme comprenant un processus de croisement intersystème singulet-triplet induit par les ions lanthanides est proposé. Les constantes de vitesse de croisement intersystéme induit (kiscind) varient entre 2.0×107 et 4.7×107 M-1s-1. En milieu aqueux, les valeurs de kiscind se corrèlent bien avec la masse molaire des ions lanthanides étudiés.

  13. Comparison of Phosphorus Forms in Wet and Dried Animal Manures by Solution Phosphorus-31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both enzymatic hydrolysis and solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been used to characterize P compounds in animal manures. However, no comparison of the two methods has been reported in the literature. In this study, we compared P compounds in dairy and poultry manures i...

  14. A phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance study of phosphate uptake and storage in cultured Catharanthus roseus and Daucus carota plant cells.

    PubMed

    Brodelius, P; Vogel, H J

    1985-03-25

    High resolution 31P NMR spectra (103.2 MHz) of oxygenated Catharanthus roseus and Daucus carota cells grown in suspension cultures were obtained using a solenoidal perfusion probe. The spectra showed resonances for various phosphorylated metabolites such as ATP, ADP, NAD(P)(H), nucleoside diphosphoglucose, and sugar phosphates. The relative levels of the phosphorylated metabolites remained constant throughout the growth curve. No resonances for storage compounds such as polyphosphates, pyrophosphate, or phytates were observed. Two resolved resonances for Pi indicated an intracellular pH of 7.3 and 5.7 (or below) for the cytoplasm and vacuoles, respectively. The time course of Pi uptake and storage during growth in fresh culture medium was followed by studying the level of vacuolar Pi with 31P NMR (145.7 MHz). Simultaneously, the level of Pi in the culture medium was followed with radioactive 32P. C. roseus quickly takes up all the Pi from the culture medium (maximum rate 1.7 mumol min-1 g-1 (dry weight of cells]. The Pi is first stored in the vacuoles; subsequently, one part of this pool is used to keep a constant cytoplasmic Pi level while another part is apparently accumulated as an NMR invisible Pi store, probably in another cell organelle. In contrast, D. carota does not accumulate Pi in the vacuoles and consequently it takes up Pi from the medium at a much slower rate (0.05 mumol min-1 g-1 (dry weight of cells]. PMID:3972837

  15. Lanthanide-cyclodextrin complexes as probes for elucidating optical purity by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, T.J.; Bogyo, M.S.; Lebeau, E.L. )

    1994-06-01

    A multidentate ligand is bonded to cyclodextrins by the reaction of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic dianhydride with 6-mono- and 2-mono(ethylenediamine) derivatives of cyclodextrin. Adding Dy(III) to the cyclodextrin derivatives enhances the enantiomeric resolution in the [sup 1]H NMR spectra of carbionoxamine maleate, doxylamine succinate, pheniramine maleate, propranolol hydrochloride, and tryptophan. The enhancement is more pronounced with the secondary derivative. The Dy(III)-induced shifts can be used to elucidate the geometry of cyclodextrin-substrate inclusion complexes. Lanthanide-induced shifts are reported for complexes of aspartame, tryptophan, propranolol, and 1-anilino-8-naphthalenesulfonate with cyclodextrins, and the relative magnitudes of the shifts agree with previously reported structures of the complexes. 37 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Comparative carbon-13, nitrogen-15, and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance study on the flavodoxins from Clostridium MP, Megasphaera elsdenii, and Azotobacter vinelandii

    SciTech Connect

    Vervoort, J.; Mueller, F.; Mayhew, S.G.; van den Berg, W.A.M.; Moonen, C.T.W.; Bacher, A.

    1986-11-04

    The flavodoxins from Megasphaera elsdenii, Clostridium MP, and Azotobacter vinelandii were studied by /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N, and /sup 31/P NMR techniques by using various selectivity enriched oxidized riboflavin 5'-phosphate (FMN) derivatives. It is shown that the ..pi.. electron distribution in protein-bound flavin differs from that of free flavin and depends also on the apoflavoprotein used. In the oxidized state Clostridium MP and M. elsdenii flavodoxins are very similar with respect to specific hydrogen bond interaction between FMN and the apoprotein and the electronic structure of flavin. A vinelandii flavodoxin differs from these flavodoxins in both respects, but it also differs from Desulfovibrio vulgaris flavodoxin. The similarities between A. vinelandii and D. vulgaris flavodoxins are greater than the similarities with the other two flavodoxins. The differences in the ..pi.. electron distribution in the FMN of reduced flavodoxins from A. vinelandii and D. vulgaris are even greater, but the hydrogen bond patterns between the reduced flavins and the apoflavodoxins are very similar. In the reduced state all flavodoxins studied contain an ionized prosthetic group and the isoalloxazine ring is in a planar conformation. The results are compared with existing three-dimensional data and discussed with respect to the various possible mesomeric structures in protein-bound FMN. The results are discussed in light of the proposed hypothesis that specific hydrogen bonding to the protein-bound flavin determines the specific biological activity of a particular flavoprotein.

  17. NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, E.R.

    1983-04-01

    Since hydrogen is the most abundant element in all living organisms, proton NMR lends itself well as a method of investigation in biology and medicine. NMR imaging has some special advantages as a diagnostic tool: no ionizing radiation is used, it is noninvasive; it provides a safer means of imaging than the use of x-rays, gamma rays, positrons, or heavy ions. In contrast with ultrasound, the radiation penetrates the bony structures without attenuation. In additional to morphological information, NMR imaging provides additional diagnostic insights through relaxation parameters, which are not available from other imaging methods. In the decade since the first primitive NMR images were obtained, the quality of images now obtained approaches those from CT x-ray scanners. Prototype instruments are being constructed for clinical evaluation and the first whole-body scanners are beginning to appear on the market at costs comparable to CT scanners. Primary differences in equipment for conventional NMR and NMR imaging are the much larger aperture magnets that are required for the examination of human subjects and the addition of coils to generate field gradients and facilities for manipulating the gradients. Early results from clinical trials in many parts of the world are encouraging, and in a few years, the usefuleness of this modality of medical imaging to the medical profession in diagnosis and treatment of disease will be defined. 10 figures.

  18. Freezing Point Depression of Water in Phospholipid Membranes — A Solid-State NMR Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Kuk; Kwon, ByungSoo; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2009-01-01

    Lipid-water interaction plays an important role in the properties of lipid bilayers, cryoprotectants, and membrane-associated peptides and proteins. The temperature at which water bound to lipid bilayers freezes is lower than that of free water. Here, we report a solid-state NMR investigation on the freezing point depression of water in phospholipid bilayers in the presence and absence of cholesterol. Deuterium NMR spectra at different temperatures ranging from -75 to +10°C were obtained from fully 2H2O-hydrated POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine) multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), prepared with and without cholesterol, to determine the freezing temperature of water and the effect of cholesterol on the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. Our 2H NMR experiments reveal the motional behavior of unfrozen water molecules in POPC bilayers even at temperatures significantly below 0°C and show that the presence of cholesterol further lowered the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. These results suggest that in the presence of cholesterol the fluidity and dynamics of lipid bilayers can be retained even at very low temperatures as exist in the liquid crystalline phase of the lipid. Therefore, bilayer samples prepared with a cryoprotectant like cholesterol should enable the performance of multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments to investigate the structure, dynamics, and topology of membrane proteins at a very low temperature with enhanced sample stability and possibly a better sensitivity. Phosphorus-31 NMR data suggest that lipid bilayers can be aligned at low temperatures, while 15N NMR experiments demonstrate that such aligned samples can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of 15N chemical shift spectra of a 37-residue human antimicrobial peptide, LL-37. PMID:18991419

  19. Single-Crystal (31)P NMR and X-ray Diffraction Study of a Molybdenum Phosphine Complex: (5-Methyldibenzophosphole)pentacarbonylmolybdenum(0).

    PubMed

    Eichele, Klaus; Wasylishen, Roderick E.; Maitra, Kalyani; Nelson, John H.; Britten, James F.

    1997-07-30

    The molecular structure of (5-methyldibenzophosphole)pentacarbonylmolybdenum(0), 1, has been determined by X-ray crystallography. The crystal is monoclinic C2/c, Z = 8, with unit cell dimensions of: a = 31.113(2) Å, b =7.7917(5) Å, c = 17.9522(12) Å, and beta = 122.135(4) degrees. Least-squares refinement converged to R(F) = 0.0245 for 2407 independent reflections. The molecular structure is typical of phosphine-substituted metal carbonyls. It contains an approximate mirror plane which bisects the dibenzophosphole framework. Phosphorus-31 NMR spectra of powder and single-crystal samples of 1 have been obtained with cross-polarization and (1)H high-power decoupling. The (31)P CP/MAS NMR spectra exhibit exceptionally well-resolved satellites due to spin-spin coupling interactions with (95,97)Mo (I = (5)/(2)). Using first-order perturbation theory, the multiplets have been analyzed to yield (1)J((95,97)Mo,(31)P) = 123(2) Hz and estimates of the molybdenum nuclear quadrupolar coupling constants, chi((95)Mo) = -0.87 MHz and chi((97)Mo) = 10.1 MHz. Phosphorus-31 NMR spectra of a large single crystal of 1 have been investigated as a function of orientation about three orthogonal axes in the applied magnetic field. Analysis of the data yields the three principal components of the phosphorus chemical shift tensor, delta(11) = 112 ppm, delta(22) = -23 ppm, and delta(33) = -40 ppm; delta(22) lies close to the Mo-P bond (8 degrees ), while delta(11) lies in the approximate mirror plane. The phosphorus chemical shift tensor determined for 1 is compared with the limited anisotropic phosphorus shift data available in the literature. PMID:11670035

  20. In vivo sup 31 P-NMR spectroscopy of chronically stimulated canine skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, B.J. III; McCully, A.K.; Subramanian, H.V.; Hammond, R.L.; Salmons, S.; Chance, B.; Stephenson, L.W. Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia Univ. of Birmingham )

    1988-02-01

    Chronic stimulation converts skeletal muscle of mixed fiber type to a uniform muscle made up of type I, fatigue-resistant fibers. Here, the bioenergetic correlates of fatigue resistance in conditioned canine latissimus dorsi are assessed with in vivo phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 31}P-NMR) spectroscopy. After chronic electrical stimulation, five dogs underwent {sup 31}P-NMR spectroscopic and isometric tension measurements on conditioned and contralateral control muscle during stimulation for 200, 300, 500, and 800 ms of an 1,100-ms duty cycle. With stimulation, phosphocreatine (PCr) fell proportional to the degree of stimulation in both conditioned and control muscle but fell significantly less in conditioned muscle at all the least intense stimulation period (200 ms). Isometric tension, expressed as a tension time index per gram muscle, was significantly greater in the conditioned muscle at the two longest stimulation periods. The overall small change in PCr and the lack of a plateau in tension observed in the conditioned muscle are similar to that seen in cardiac muscle during increased energy demand. This study indicates that the conditioned muscle's markedly enhanced resistance to fatigue is in part the result of its increased capacity for oxidative phosphorylation.

  1. Solid-state NMR studies of some tin(II) compounds.

    PubMed

    Amornsakchai, Pornsawan; Apperley, David C; Harris, Robin K; Hodgkinson, Paul; Waterfield, Philip C

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution NMR spectra of [Formula: see text] nuclei, particularly (119)Sn and (31)P, in solid tin(II) phosphite, SnHPO(3), and tin(II) phosphate, SnHPO(4), are presented. The results are discussed in relation to the crystal structures. Spinning sideband analysis has been carried out for both nuclei, giving information on the shielding tensors. Satellite peaks allow the indirect Sn,Sn coupling constants to be determined. Surprisingly large values of 2600+/-200Hz and 4150+/-200Hz are reported for SnHPO(3) and SnHPO(4) respectively. The satellite peaks were investigated by using a single Hahn echo for each refocusing time, which showed that the observed splittings result from (119)Sn, (117)Sn coupling. For SnHPO(3), the calculated relative intensities of the satellites for six intra-layer coupling interactions are in agreement with the experiment values, but for SnHPO(4) the coupling appears to be inter-layer in nature. Tin-119 (and in one case phosphorus-31) shielding tensor data derived from MAS NMR are also reported for four other crystalline tin(II) compounds, namely tin diphosphate, tin oxalate, tin sulphate and calcium tin ethylenediamine tetraacetate. PMID:15388180

  2. Analysis of monoglycerides, diglycerides, sterols, and free fatty acids in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) oil by 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dayrit, Fabian M; Buenafe, Olivia Erin M; Chainani, Edward T; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S

    2008-07-23

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( (31)P NMR) was used to differentiate virgin coconut oil (VCO) from refined, bleached, deodorized coconut oil (RCO). Monoglycerides (MGs), diglycerides (DGs), sterols, and free fatty acids (FFAs) in VCO and RCO were converted into dioxaphospholane derivatives and analyzed by (31)P NMR. On the average, 1-MG was found to be higher in VCO (0.027%) than RCO (0.019%). 2-MG was not detected in any of the samples down to a detection limit of 0.014%. On the average, total DGs were lower in VCO (1.55%) than RCO (4.10%). When plotted in terms of the ratio [1,2-DG/total DGs] versus total DGs, VCO and RCO samples grouped separately. Total sterols were higher in VCO (0.096%) compared with RCO (0.032%), and the FFA content was 8 times higher in VCO than RCO (0.127% vs 0.015%). FFA determination by (31)P NMR and titration gave comparable results. Principal components analysis shows that the 1,2-DG, 1,3-DG, and FFAs are the most important parameters for differentiating VCO from RCO. PMID:18576656

  3. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  4. Small NMR biomolecular sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Nan; Liu, Yong; Qin, Ling; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph; Ham, Donhee

    2013-06-01

    By combining the physics of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and silicon radio-frequency (RF) integrated circuits, we recently created progressively smaller NMR systems, which we originally reported in Refs. [1-4]. Our strategy for NMR system miniaturization proved effective, culminating in the smallest prototype [3,4] that weighs 0.1 kg and can be held at the palm of the hand. These small, low-cost NMR systems can be useful as biomolecular sensors in the personalized medicine setting, and we demonstrated their ability to detect proteins, compounds, and human cancer cells. The present paper, which is not a new technical contribution, reviews these developments.

  5. Silver and Gold NMR

    PubMed Central

    Zangger, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    Silver and gold, together with copper, form the transition metal group IB elements in the periodic table and possess very different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic properties. While there is only one gold isotope (197Au), which has a spin of 3/2 and therefore a quadrupole moment, silver occurs in two isotopic forms (109Ag and 109Au), both of which have a spin 1/2 and similar NMR spectroscopic properties. The unfavorable properties of gold have prevented its NMR spectroscopic investigation thus far. On the other hand, there are several reports of silver NMR. However, the low sensitivity of silver, combined with its long relaxation times have rendered the direct detection of silver possible only with concentrations greater than a few tenth molar. Reviewed here are the general limitations of silver NMR and some techniques to partially overcome these limitations, as well as a summary of currently available chemical shift and scalar coupling data on 109Ag. PMID:18475898

  6. NMR logging apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  7. Functional studies using NMR

    SciTech Connect

    McCready, V.R.; Leach, M.; Ell, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is based on a series of lectures delivered at a one-day teaching symposium on functional and metabolic aspects of NMR measurements held at the Middlesex Hospital Medical School on 1st September 1985 as a part of the European Nuclear Medicine Society Congress. Currently the major emphasis in medical NMR in vivo is on its potential to image and display abnormalities in conventional radiological images, providing increased contrast between normal and abnormal tissue, improved definition of vasculature, and possibly an increased potential for differential diagnosis. Although these areas are undeniably of major importance, it is probable that NMR will continue to complement conventional measurement methods. The major potential benefits to be derived from in vivo NMR measurements are likely to arise from its use as an instrument for functional and metabolic studies in both clinical research and in the everyday management of patients. It is to this area that this volume is directed.

  8. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  9. Screening proteins for NMR suitability

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Adelinda A.; Semesi, Anthony; Garcia, Maite; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary NMR spectroscopy is an invaluable tool in structural genomics. Identification of protein samples that are amenable to structure determination by NMR spectroscopy requires efficient screening. Here, we describe how we prepare multiple samples in parallel and screen by NMR. The method described here is applicable to large structural genomics projects but can easily be scaled down for application to small structural biology projects since all the equipments used are those commonly found in any NMR structural biology laboratory. PMID:24590717

  10. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  11. Coherent NMR Stark spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tarasek, Matthew R; Goldfarb, David J; Kempf, James G

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate phase-coherent Stark effects from a radiofrequency E field at twice the NMR frequency (2?(0)) of (69)Ga in GaAs. The 2?(0) phase (?(E)) selects component responses from the nuclear quadrupole Hamiltonian (H(Q)). This is possible by synchronizing few-?s 2?(0) pulses with an NMR line-narrowing sequence, which averages the Stark interaction to dominate spectra on a background with 10(3)× enhanced resolution. Spectra vs ?(E) reveal relative sizes of tensorial factors in H(Q). Comparative modeling and numerical simulations evaluate spectral features unexplained by average Hamiltonian theory, and suggest improvements for quantitative calibration of individual response components. Application of this approach to bulk samples is of value to define Stark responses that may later be used to interrogate the internal electrostatics of structured samples. PMID:22197485

  12. 224} studied by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Y; Fang, X; Kögerler, P

    2014-05-14

    7Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have been performed to investigate magnetic properties and spin dynamics of Mn3+ (S = 2) spins in the giant polyoxometalate molecule {Mn40W224}. The 7Li-NMR line width is proportional to the external magnetic field H as expected in a paramagnetic state above 3 K. Below this temperature the line width shows a sudden increase and is almost independent of H, which indicates freezing of the local Mn3+ spins. The temperature dependence of T1 for both 1H and 7Li reveals slow spin dynamics at low temperatures, consistent with spin freezing. The slow spin dynamics is also evidenced by the observation of a peak of 1/T2 around 3 K, where the fluctuation frequency of spins is of the order of ~200 kHz. An explicit form of the temperature dependence of the fluctuation frequency of Mn3+ spins is derived from the nuclear relaxation data.

  13. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  14. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus peroxidase was essential in confirming the identity of residues participating in the aromatic donor molecule binding site of peroxidases.

  15. NMR imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Rothwell, W.P.

    1988-03-01

    A method for obtaining at least one petrophysical property of a porous material containing therein at least one preselected fluid, is described, comprising: NMR imaging the material to generate signals dependent upon both M(0) and T/sub 1/ and M(0) and T/sub 2/, generating separate M(0), T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ images from the signals, and determining at least one petrophysical property from at least one of the images.

  16. Catalytic mechanism of ?-phosphate attack in dUTPase is revealed by X-ray crystallographic snapshots of distinct intermediates, 31P-NMR spectroscopy and reaction path modelling

    PubMed Central

    Barabás, Orsolya; Németh, Veronika; Bodor, Andrea; Perczel, András; Rosta, Edina; Kele, Zoltán; Zagyva, Imre; Szabadka, Zoltán; Grolmusz, Vince I.; Wilmanns, Matthias; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2013-01-01

    Enzymatic synthesis and hydrolysis of nucleoside phosphate compounds play a key role in various biological pathways, like signal transduction, DNA synthesis and metabolism. Although these processes have been studied extensively, numerous key issues regarding the chemical pathway and atomic movements remain open for many enzymatic reactions. Here, using the Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus dUTPase, we study the dUTPase-catalyzed hydrolysis of dUTP, an incorrect DNA building block, to elaborate the mechanistic details at high resolution. Combining mass spectrometry analysis of the dUTPase-catalyzed reaction carried out in and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulation, we show that the nucleophilic attack occurs at the ?-phosphate site. Phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopy (31P-NMR) analysis confirms the site of attack and shows the capability of dUTPase to cleave the dUTP analogue ?,?-imido-dUTP, containing the imido linkage usually regarded to be non-hydrolyzable. We present numerous X-ray crystal structures of distinct dUTPase and nucleoside phosphate complexes, which report on the progress of the chemical reaction along the reaction coordinate. The presently used combination of diverse structural methods reveals details of the nucleophilic attack and identifies a novel enzyme–product complex structure. PMID:23982515

  17. Bayesian reconstruction of projection reconstruction NMR (PR-NMR).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Won

    2014-11-01

    Projection reconstruction nuclear magnetic resonance (PR-NMR) is a technique for generating multidimensional NMR spectra. A small number of projections from lower-dimensional NMR spectra are used to reconstruct the multidimensional NMR spectra. In our previous work, it was shown that multidimensional NMR spectra are efficiently reconstructed using peak-by-peak based reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithm. We propose an extended and generalized RJMCMC algorithm replacing a simple linear model with a linear mixed model to reconstruct close NMR spectra into true spectra. This statistical method generates samples in a Bayesian scheme. Our proposed algorithm is tested on a set of six projections derived from the three-dimensional 700 MHz HNCO spectrum of a protein HasA. PMID:25218584

  18. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about the connectivity of the pore system. Examples are given for T1-T2 correlation of some soil samples (Haber-Pohlmeier et al. 2010). Third, relaxometric information forms the basis of understanding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. The general difficulty of imaging in soils are the inherent fast T2 relaxation times due to i) the small pore sizes, ii) presence of paramagnetic ions in the solid matrix, and iii) diffusion in internal gradients. The last point is important, since echo times can not set shorter than about 1ms for imaging purposes. The way out is either the usage of low fields for imaging in soils or special ultra-short pulse sequences, which do not create echoes. In this presentation we will give examples on conventional imaging of macropore fluxes in soil cores (Haber-Pohlmeier et al. 2010), and the combination with relaxometric imaging, as well as the advantages and drawbacks of low-field and ultra-fast pulse imaging. Also first results on the imaging of soil columns measured by SIP in Project A3 are given. Haber-Pohlmeier, S., S. Stapf, et al. (2010). "Waterflow Monitored by Tracer Transport in Natural Porous Media Using MRI." Vadose Zone J.: submitted. Haber-Pohlmeier, S., S. Stapf, et al. (2010). "Relaxation in a Natural soil: Comparison of Relaxometric Imaging, T1 - T2 Correlation and Fast-Field Cycling NMR." The Open Magnetic Resonance Journal: in print. Pohlmeier, A., S. Haber-Pohlmeier, et al. (2009). "A Fast Field Cycling NMR Relaxometry Study of Natural Soils." Vadose Zone J. 8: 735-742. Stingaciu, L. R., A. Pohlmeier, et al. (2009). "Characterization of unsaturated porous media by high-field and low-field NMR relaxometry." Water Resources Research 45: W08412

  19. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140–600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  20. Achievement of 1020MHz NMR.

    PubMed

    Hashi, Kenjiro; Ohki, Shinobu; Matsumoto, Shinji; Nishijima, Gen; Goto, Atsushi; Deguchi, Kenzo; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Noguchi, Takashi; Sakai, Shuji; Takahashi, Masato; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Iguchi, Seiya; Yamazaki, Toshio; Maeda, Hideaki; Tanaka, Ryoji; Nemoto, Takahiro; Suematsu, Hiroto; Miki, Takashi; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Shimizu, Tadashi

    2015-07-01

    We have successfully developed a 1020MHz (24.0T) NMR magnet, establishing the world's highest magnetic field in high resolution NMR superconducting magnets. The magnet is a series connection of LTS (low-Tc superconductors NbTi and Nb3Sn) outer coils and an HTS (high-Tc superconductor, Bi-2223) innermost coil, being operated at superfluid liquid helium temperature such as around 1.8K and in a driven-mode by an external DC power supply. The drift of the magnetic field was initially ±0.8ppm/10h without the (2)H lock operation; it was then stabilized to be less than 1ppb/10h by using an NMR internal lock operation. The full-width at half maximum of a (1)H spectrum taken for 1% CHCl3 in acetone-d6 was as low as 0.7Hz (0.7ppb), which was sufficient for solution NMR. On the contrary, the temporal field stability under the external lock operation for solid-state NMR was 170ppb/10h, sufficient for NMR measurements for quadrupolar nuclei such as (17)O; a (17)O NMR measurement for labeled tri-peptide clearly demonstrated the effect of high magnetic field on solid-state NMR spectra. PMID:25978708

  1. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Written for chemists and biochemists who are not NMR spectroscopists, but who wish to use the new techniques of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, this book brings together for the first time much of the practical and experimental data needed. It also serves as information source for industrial, academic, and graduate student researchers who already use NMR spectroscopy, but not yet in two dimensions. The authors describe the use of 2-D NMR in a wide variety of chemical and biochemical fields, among them peptides, steroids, oligo- and poly-saccharides, nucleic acids, natural products (including terpenoids, alkaloids, and coal-derived heterocyclics), and organic synthetic intermediates. They consider throughout the book both the advantages and limitations of using 2-D NMR.

  2. First Satellite NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, A. F.; Conradi, Mark S.; Haase, J.

    1996-03-01

    A new NMR spectroscopic method that detects only the /pm 3/2 to /pm 1/2 transitions (i.e., first satellites) of half-integer quadrupolar spins is presented. The technique is based on a central transition signal enhancement method that makes use of adiabatic radiofrequency sweeps. A plot of the enhanced central transition signal versus the stop frequency of the sweep is an integrated version of the first satellite spectrum. To find the quadrupole parameters one can fit this integrated spectrum directly, or differentiate the data to reveal the traditional spectrum (of the first satellites). We demonstrate the technique for ^27Al in Al_2O3 and ^93Nb in LiNbO_3. The advantages of this new spectroscopy are discussed.

  3. NMR measurement of pore structure

    SciTech Connect

    Earl, W.L.; Kim, Yong-Wah |; Smith, D.M.

    1993-05-31

    An attempt was made to pursue {sup 129}Xe NMR as a pore measurement technique. Samples studied were synthetic imogolite (tubular aluminosilicate with gibbsite structure), sodium Y-zeolite, and an aerogel and a xerogel. Gases used were normal Xe, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}, and {sup 15}N{sub 2}. Although a completely general NMR technique for measuring pore size distributions may not be possible, information about molecular motion and interactions can be obtained, because NMR is sensitive to short range interactions (1 nm or less) and to molecular dynamics in the range 10{sup {minus}2} to 10{sup {minus}6}s.

  4. NMR measurement of pore structure

    SciTech Connect

    Earl, W.L. ); Kim, Yong-Wah New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM . Center for Microengineered Ceramics); Smith, D.M. . Center for Microengineered Ceramics)

    1993-05-31

    An attempt was made to pursue [sup 129]Xe NMR as a pore measurement technique. Samples studied were synthetic imogolite (tubular aluminosilicate with gibbsite structure), sodium Y-zeolite, and an aerogel and a xerogel. Gases used were normal Xe, [sup 13]CO[sub 2], and [sup 15]N[sub 2]. Although a completely general NMR technique for measuring pore size distributions may not be possible, information about molecular motion and interactions can be obtained, because NMR is sensitive to short range interactions (1 nm or less) and to molecular dynamics in the range 10[sup [minus]2] to 10[sup [minus]6]s.

  5. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  6. Essential NMR for Scientists and Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blömich, Bernhard

    ESSENTIAL NMR is a set of lecture notes for scientists and engineers who want to brush up on their knowledge of NMR. This book is also a compendium for graduate and postgraduate students of physics and chemistry as well as for their teachers, covering all fields of NMR, i.e. NMR methodology and hardware, chemical analysis, 2D-spectroscopy, NMR imaging, flow NMR, and quality control NMR. The material, selected and organized for a one-semester course, is presented with pairs of pages addressing particular topics.

  7. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; van Hulsteyn, David B.

    1990-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  8. "Decoupled" Proton NMR Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodley, M.; Freeman, R.

    High-resolution proton NMR spectra are recorded in a new form where all resonances are singlets at the chemical-shift frequencies, with no spin-spin splittings. These "decoupled" proton spectra are derived from two-dimensional J spectra after real Fourier transformation (without frequency discrimination in F1) so that each spin multiplet lies along both the 45° and the 135° diagonal, forming a pattern similar to St. Andrew's cross, with C 4 symmetry. The chemical shifts are located by searching for these centers of symmetry with a postacquisition data-processing algorithm. This is designed to facilitate the separation of overlapping and interpenetrating spin multiplets. The method is illustrated with applications to the 400 MHz high-resolution proton spectra of dehydrotestosterone and 4-androsten-3,17-dione. It is also possible to separate the spectra of components in a mixture and this is illustrated by breaking down the spectrum of an aqueous solution of D-glucose into subspectra from the α and β anomers, in order to follow the time evolution of the mutarotation.

  9. Multispectral Analysis of NMR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterfield, R. L.; Vannier, M. W. And Associates; Jordan, D.

    1985-01-01

    Conference paper discusses initial efforts to adapt multispectral satellite-image analysis to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scans of human body. Flexibility of these techniques makes it possible to present NMR data in variety of formats, including pseudocolor composite images of pathological internal features. Techniques do not have to be greatly modified from form in which used to produce satellite maps of such Earth features as water, rock, or foliage.

  10. NMR characterization of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2010-06-15

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  11. NMR characterization of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2008-11-25

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  12. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping {sup 129}Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the {sup 131}Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  13. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  14. Using solution state NMR spectroscopy to probe NMR invisible gelators.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Matthew; Iggo, Jonathan A; Adams, Dave J

    2015-10-21

    Supramolecular hydrogels are formed via the self-assembly of gelator molecules upon application of a suitable trigger. The exact nature of this self-assembly process has been widely investigated as a practical understanding is vital for the informed design of these materials. Solution-state NMR spectroscopy is an excellent non-invasive tool to follow the self-assembly of supramolecular hydrogels. However, in most cases the self-assembled aggregates are silent by conventional (1)H NMR spectroscopy due to the low mobility of the constituent molecules, limiting NMR spectroscopy to following only the initial assembly step(s). Here, we present a new solution-state NMR spectroscopic method which allows the entire self-assembly process of a dipeptide gelator to be followed. This gelator forms transparent hydrogels by a multi-stage assembly process when the pH of an initially alkaline solution is lowered via the hydrolysis of glucono-?-lactone (GdL). Changes in the charge, hydrophobicity and relative arrangement of the supramolecular aggregates can be followed throughout the assembly process by measuring the residual quadrupolar couplings (RQCs) of various molecular probes (here, (14)NH4(+) and isopropanol-d8), along with the NMR relaxation rates of (23)Na(+). The initially-formed aggregates comprise negatively charged fibrils which gradually lose their charge and become increasingly hydrophobic as the pH falls, eventually resulting in a macroscopic contraction of the hydrogel. We also demonstrate that the in situ measurement of pH by NMR spectroscopy is both convenient and accurate, representing a useful tool for the characterisation of self-assembly processes by NMR. PMID:26313637

  15. jsNMR: an embedded platform-independent NMR spectrum viewer.

    PubMed

    Vosegaard, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    jsNMR is a lightweight NMR spectrum viewer written in JavaScript/HyperText Markup Language (HTML), which provides a cross-platform spectrum visualizer that runs on all computer architectures including mobile devices. Experimental (and simulated) datasets are easily opened in jsNMR by (i) drag and drop on a jsNMR browser window, (ii) by preparing a jsNMR file from the jsNMR web site, or (iii) by mailing the raw data to the jsNMR web portal. jsNMR embeds the original data in the HTML file, so a jsNMR file is a self-transforming dataset that may be exported to various formats, e.g. comma-separated values. The main applications of jsNMR are to provide easy access to NMR data without the need for dedicated software installed and to provide the possibility to visualize NMR spectra on web sites. PMID:25641013

  16. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  17. NMR Imaging: Instrumentation and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingle, Jeremy Mark

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis presents three original contributions to the field of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR): the experimental framework and analysis for the measurement of a new imaging parameter to describe perfusion; the measurement and analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity and a practical correction system for their reduction; a novel system for the synchronous control of NMR experiments based on the microprogrammed concept. The thesis begins with an introduction to the theory of NMR. The application of NMR to imaging is also introduced with emphasis on the techniques which developed into those in common use today. Inaccurate determination of the traditional NMR parameters (T_1 and T_2 and the molecular diffusion coefficient) can be caused by non-diffusive fluid movement within the sample. The experimental basis for determining a new imaging parameter --the Perfusion coefficient--is presented. This provides a measure of forced isotropic fluid motion through an organ or tissue. The instrumentation required for conducting NMR experiments is described in order to introduce the contribution made in this area during this research: A sequence controller. The controller is based on the concept of microprogramming and enables completely synchronous output of 128 bits of data. The software for the generation and storage of control data and the regulation of the data to provide experimental control is microcomputer based. It affords precise and accurate regulation of the magnetic field gradients, the rf synthesizer and the spectrometer for spectroscopic and imaging applications. Fundamental to the science of NMR is the presence of a magnetic field. A detailed study of the analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity in terms of spherical harmonics is presented. The field of a whole body imaging system with poor inhomogeneity was measured and analyzed to determine and describe the components of the inhomogeneity. Finally a description is given of the design and application of practical methods for reducing the dominant inhomogeneities.

  18. A SENSITIVE NMR THERMOMETER FOR MULTINUCLEI FT NMR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pernicious problem in multinuclei FT NMR is accurate measurement of sample temperature. This arises from several factors including widespread use of high-power decoupling, large sample tubes (with potentially large temperature gradients across the sample volume), and lack of su...

  19. Protein-Inhibitor Interaction Studies Using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Solution-state NMR has been widely applied to determine the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. The designs of experiments used in protein NMR differ from those used for small-molecule NMR, primarily because the information available prior to an experiment, such as molecular mass and knowledge of the primary structure, is unique for proteins compared to small molecules. In this review article, protein NMR for structural biology is introduced with comparisons to small-molecule NMR, such as descriptions of labeling strategies and the effects of molecular dynamics on relaxation. Next, applications for protein NMR are reviewed, especially practical aspects for protein-observed ligand-protein interaction studies. Overall, the following topics are described: (1) characteristics of protein NMR, (2) methods to detect protein-ligand interactions by NMR, and (3) practical aspects of carrying out protein-observed inhibitor-protein interaction studies. PMID:26361636

  20. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  1. Push-through Direction Injectin NMR Automation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two major spectroscopic techniques successfully used in metabolomics studies. The non-invasive, quantitative and reproducible characteristics make NMR spectroscopy an excellent technique for detection of endogeno...

  2. NMR investigations of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful experimental approach for characterizing protein conformational dynamics on multiple time scales. The insights obtained from NMR studies are complemented and by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide full atomistic details of protein dynamics. Homologous mesophilic (E. coli) and thermophilic (T. thermophilus) ribonuclease H (RNase H) enzymes serve to illustrate how changes in protein sequence and structure that affect conformational dynamic processes can be monitored and characterized by joint analysis of NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations. A Gly residue inserted within a putative hinge between helices B and C is conserved among thermophilic RNases H, but absent in mesophilic RNases H. Experimental spin relaxation measurements show that the dynamic properties of T. thermophilus RNase H are recapitulated in E. coli RNase H by insertion of a Gly residue between helices B and C. Additional specific intramolecular interactions that modulate backbone and sidechain dynamical properties of the Gly-rich loop and of the conserved Trp residue flanking the Gly insertion site have been identified using MD simulations and subsequently confirmed by NMR spin relaxation measurements. These results emphasize the importance of hydrogen bonds and local steric interactions in restricting conformational fluctuations, and the absence of such interactions in allowing conformational adaptation to substrate binding.

  3. Deuterium Exchange Kinetics by NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment which allows such concepts as kinetics, catalysis, isotope shifts, coupling constants, and the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for quantitative work to be covered in the same exercise. Background information, experimental procedures used, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  4. QUANTITATIVE 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Line intensities in 15N NMR spectra are strongly influenced by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, relaxation mechanisms and experimental conditions. Special care has to be taken in using 15N spectra for quantitative purposes. Quantitative aspects are discussed for the 1...

  5. Computer Simulation of NMR Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a PASCAL computer program which provides interactive analysis and display of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra from spin one-half nuclei using a hard-copy or monitor. Includes general and theoretical program descriptions, program capability, and examples of its use. (Source for program/documentation is included.)…

  6. Petrophysical applications of NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, W.P.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    A system for obtaining high-resolution NMR images of oil field cores is described. Separate proton density and T/sub 2/ relaxation images are obtained to distinguish spatial variations of fluid-filled porosity and the physical nature of the pores. Results are presented for typical sandstones.

  7. Application of 1H and 23Na magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy to define the HRBC up-taking of MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabi, Luisella; Paleari, Lino; Biondi, Luca; Linati, Laura; De Miranda, Mario; Ghelli, Stefano

    2003-09-01

    The up-take of Gd(III) complexes of BOPTA, DTPA, DOTA, EDTP, HPDO3A, and DOTP in HRBC has been evaluated by measuring the lanthanide induced shift (LIS) produced by the corresponding dysprosium complexes (DC) on the MAS-NMR resonances of water protons and free sodium ions. These complexes are important in their use as MRI contrast agents (MRI-CA) in diagnostics. 1H and 23Na MAS-NMR spectra of HRBC suspension, collected at 9.395 T, show only one signal due to extra- and intra-cellular water (or sodium). In MAS spectra, the presence of DC in a cellular compartment produces the LIS of only the nuclei (water proton or sodium) in that cellular compartment and this LIS can be related to the DC concentrations (by the experimental curves of LIS vs. DC concentrations) collected in the physiological solution. To obtain correct results about LIS, the use of MAS technique is mandatory, because it guarantees the only the nuclei staying in the same cellular compartment where the LC is present show the LIS. In all the cases considered, the addition of the DC to HRBC (100% hematocrit) produced a shift of only the extra-cellular water (or sodium) signal and the gradient of concentration ( GC) between extra- and intra-cellular compartments resulted greater than 100:1, when calculated by means of sodium signals. These high values of GC are direct proofs that none of the tested dysprosium complexes crosses the HRBC membrane. Since the DC are iso-structural to the gadolinium complexes the corresponding gadolinium ones (MRI-CA) do not cross the HRBC membrane and, consequently, they are not up-taken in HRBC. The GC values calculated by means of water proton signals resulted much lower than those obtained by sodium signals. This proves that the choice of the isotope is a crucial step in order to use this method in the best way. In fact, GC value depends on the lowest detectable LIS which, in turn, depends on the nature of the LC (lanthanide complex) and the observed isotopes.

  8. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  9. REDOR NMR for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-01-01

    Rotational-Echo DOuble-Resonance (REDOR) NMR is a powerful and versatile solid-state NMR measurement that has been recruited to elucidate drug modes of action and to drive the design of new therapeutics. REDOR has been implemented to examine composition, structure, and dynamics in diverse macromolecular and whole-cell systems, including taxol-bound microtubules, enzyme-cofactor-inhibitor ternary complexes, and antibiotic-whole-cell complexes. The REDOR approach involves the integrated design of specific isotopic labeling strategies and the selection of appropriate REDOR experiments. By way of example, this digest illustrates the versatility of the REDOR approach, with an emphasis on the practical considerations of experimental design and data interpretation. PMID:24035486

  10. Measuring material susceptibility using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SanGiorgio, Paul; Zens, Albert

    2015-06-01

    We report on a method of measuring the high-field susceptibilities of paramagnetic and diamagnetic materials using only a standard NMR system equipped with pulsed field gradients. We demonstrate the accuracy and sensitivity of the technique by measuring a series of 99.9% copper wires with diameters between 0.16 mm and 0.79 mm. We measured the volumetric susceptibility of the copper to be χ = - 9.5 ± 0.2 ·10-6, which agrees with the literature value of pure copper, - 9.6 ·10-6 . In addition to making quantitative measurements, this technique can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of compensation schemes used to produce "zero-susceptibility" materials needed for construction of high-resolution NMR probes.

  11. Measurement of deformations by NMR.

    PubMed

    Bytchenkoff, Dimitri; Rodts, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Two NMR data acquisition protocols together with corresponding data processing algorithms for locating macroscopic objects, measuring distances between them or monitoring their displacements or deformations with microscopic precision are presented and discussed. The performance of the methods is demonstrated by applying them to the measurement of deformations of a freely supported beam under loading. We believe that our methods will find their applications in mechanics, civil engineering and medicine. PMID:26529203

  12. Measurement of deformations by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytchenkoff, Dimitri; Rodts, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Two NMR data acquisition protocols together with corresponding data processing algorithms for locating macroscopic objects, measuring distances between them or monitoring their displacements or deformations with microscopic precision are presented and discussed. The performance of the methods is demonstrated by applying them to the measurement of deformations of a freely supported beam under loading. We believe that our methods will find their applications in mechanics, civil engineering and medicine.

  13. NMR Hyperpolarization Techniques for Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in NMR hyperpolarization have enabled a wide array of new in vivo molecular imaging modalities—ranging from functional imaging of the lungs to metabolic imaging of cancer. This Concept article explores selected advances in methods for the preparation and use of hyperpolarized contrast agents, many of which are already at or near the phase of their clinical validation in patients. PMID:25470566

  14. NMR-Based Milk Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Sundekilde, Ulrik K.; Larsen, Lotte B.; Bertram, Hanne C.

    2013-01-01

    Milk is a key component in infant nutrition worldwide and, in the Western parts of the world, also in adult nutrition. Milk of bovine origin is both consumed fresh and processed into a variety of dairy products including cheese, fermented milk products, and infant formula. The nutritional quality and processing capabilities of bovine milk is closely associated to milk composition. Metabolomics is ideal in the study of the low-molecular-weight compounds in milk, and this review focuses on the recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics trends in milk research, including applications linking the milk metabolite profiling with nutritional aspects, and applications which aim to link the milk metabolite profile to various technological qualities of milk. The metabolite profiling studies encompass the identification of novel metabolites, which potentially can be used as biomarkers or as bioactive compounds. Furthermore, metabolomics applications elucidating how the differential regulated genes affects milk composition are also reported. This review will highlight the recent advances in NMR-based metabolomics on milk, as well as give a brief summary of when NMR spectroscopy can be useful for gaining a better understanding of how milk composition is linked to nutritional or quality traits. PMID:24957988

  15. NMR Measures of Heterogeneity Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiess, Hans W.

    2002-03-01

    Advanced solid state NMR spectroscopy provides a wealth of information about structure and dynamics of complex systems. On a local scale, multidimensional solid state NMR has elucidated the geometry and the time scale of segmental motions at the glass transition. The higher order correlation functions which are provided by this technique led to the notion of dynamic heterogeneities, which have been characterized in detail with respect to their rate memory and length scale. In polymeric and low molar mass glass formers of different fragility, length scales in the range 2 to 4 nm are observed. In polymeric systems, incompatibility of backbone and side groups as in polyalkylmethacrylates leads to heteogeneities on the nm scale, which manifest themselves in unusual chain dynamics at the glass transition involving extended chain conformations. References: K. Schmidt-Rohr and H.W. Spiess, Multidimensional Solid-State NMR and Polymers,Academic Press, London (1994). U. Tracht, M. Wilhelm, A. Heuer, H. Feng, K. Schmidt-Rohr, H.W. Spiess, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2727 (1998). S.A. Reinsberg, X.H. Qiu, M. Wilhelm, M.D. Ediger, H.W. Spiess, J.Chem.Phys. 114, 7299 (2001). S.A. Reinsberg, A. Heuer, B. Doliwa, H. Zimmermann, H.W. Spiess, J. Non-Crystal. Solids, in press (2002)

  16. NMR-Based Milk Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Sundekilde, Ulrik K; Larsen, Lotte B; Bertram, Hanne C

    2013-01-01

    Milk is a key component in infant nutrition worldwide and, in the Western parts of the world, also in adult nutrition. Milk of bovine origin is both consumed fresh and processed into a variety of dairy products including cheese, fermented milk products, and infant formula. The nutritional quality and processing capabilities of bovine milk is closely associated to milk composition. Metabolomics is ideal in the study of the low-molecular-weight compounds in milk, and this review focuses on the recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics trends in milk research, including applications linking the milk metabolite profiling with nutritional aspects, and applications which aim to link the milk metabolite profile to various technological qualities of milk. The metabolite profiling studies encompass the identification of novel metabolites, which potentially can be used as biomarkers or as bioactive compounds. Furthermore, metabolomics applications elucidating how the differential regulated genes affects milk composition are also reported. This review will highlight the recent advances in NMR-based metabolomics on milk, as well as give a brief summary of when NMR spectroscopy can be useful for gaining a better understanding of how milk composition is linked to nutritional or quality traits. PMID:24957988

  17. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented. PMID:21051249

  18. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm2 silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  19. Advanced NMR technology for bioscience and biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Hernandez, G.; Trewhella, J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Boumenthal, D.K.; Kennedy, M.A.; Moore, G.J.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NMR plays critical roles in bioscience and biotechnology in both imaging and structure determination. NMR is limited, however, by the inherent low sensitivity of the NMR experiment and the demands for spectral resolution required to study biomolecules. The authors addressed both of these issues by working on the development of NMR force microscopy for molecular imaging, and high field NMR with isotope labeling to overcome limitations in the size of biomolecules that can be studied using NMR. A novel rf coil design for NMR force microscopy was developed that increases the limits of sensitivity in magnetic resonance detection for imaging, and the authors demonstrated sub-surface spatial imaging capabilities. The authors also made advances in the miniaturization of two critical NMR force microscope components. They completed high field NMR and isotope labeling studies of a muscle protein complex which is responsible for regulating muscle contraction and is too large for study using conventional NMR approaches.

  20. Solid-state distortions of nominally square-planar palladium and platinum (R sub 3 P) sub 2 MX sub 2 complexes as determined by a combination of sup 13 C( sup 1 H) and sup 31 P( sup 31 H) NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rahn, J.A.; Nelson, J.H. ); O'Donnell, D.J.; Pamer, A.R. )

    1989-06-28

    Phosphorus-31 and carbon-13 NMR spectra have been obtained for a series of 20 (R{sub 3}P){sub 2}MX{sub 2} complexes (R{sub 3}P = MePh{sub 2}P and Me{sub 2}PhP; M = Pd, Pt; X = Cl, Br, I, CN, N{sub 3}) in the solid state by cross-polarization and magic-angle-spinning (CP/MAS) techniques. Comparison of these data with spectral data obtained at 300 K in CDCl{sub 3} solutions was made in order to investigate the influence of local symmetry on {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C chemical shifts in the solid state. It was found that most of these compounds, which have regular square-planar geometries in solution, are distorted in the solid state. The solid-state distortions are evidenced by additional {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C resonances in the CP/MAS spectra as compared to the solution spectra. The nature and degree of these distortions are discussed. 25 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Development of LC-13C NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, H. C.; Wang, J. S.; Glass, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    This study involves the development of C-13 nuclear resonance as an on-line detector for liquid chromatography (LC-C-13 NMR) for the chemical characterization of aviation fuels. The initial focus of this study was the development of a high sensitivity flow C-13 NMR probe. Since C-13 NMR sensitivity is of paramount concern, considerable effort during the first year was directed at new NMR probe designs. In particular, various toroid coil designs were examined. In addition, corresponding shim coils for correcting the main magnetic field (B sub 0) homogeneity were examined. Based on these initial probe design studies, an LC-C-13 NMR probe was built and flow C-13 NMR data was obtained for a limited number of samples.

  2. Dynamic balancing in NMR double rotor system.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, A

    2000-12-01

    An exact solution to the problem of dynamic balancing in a NMR double rotor system is presented. This will enable one to perform high speed spinning about two intersecting axes. Double rotation is used in solid state NMR to average away second-order broadening, thus enhancing the resolution of spectra from quadrupolar nuclei in solid state NMR. An exact expression for imbalance due to asymmetric distribution of weights about the rotation axes is provided. PMID:11145339

  3. Dynamic balancing in NMR double rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Animesh

    2000-12-01

    An exact solution to the problem of dynamic balancing in a NMR double rotor system is presented. This will enable one to perform high speed spinning about two intersecting axes. Double rotation is used in solid state NMR to average away second-order broadening, thus enhancing the resolution of spectra from quadrupolar nuclei in solid state NMR. An exact expression for imbalance due to asymmetric distribution of weights about the rotation axes is provided.

  4. Observation of NMR noise from solid samples.

    PubMed

    Schlagnitweit, Judith; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Nausner, Martin; Jerschow, Alexej; Elena-Herrmann, Bénédicte; Müller, Norbert

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate that proton NMR noise signals, i.e. NMR spectra without excitation by radio frequency, can be obtained from solid samples. Experimental results are shown for static and magic-angle spinning conditions. In addition, a tuning procedure based on the probes' NMR noise characteristics and similar to the one described previously for liquids probes can also be used to optimize signal-to-noise ratios in ¹H-MAS experiments. PMID:20850362

  5. Applications of NMR in Dairy Research

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Anthony D.; Rochfort, Simone J.

    2014-01-01

    NMR is a robust analytical technique that has been employed to investigate the properties of many substances of agricultural relevance. NMR was first used to investigate the properties of milk in the 1950s and has since been employed in a wide range of studies; including properties analysis of specific milk proteins to metabolomics techniques used to monitor the health of dairy cows. In this brief review, we highlight the different uses of NMR in the dairy industry. PMID:24958391

  6. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination. Part II: Pulse NMR and NMR Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Uses simple pulse NMR experiments to discuss Fourier transforms. Studies the generation of spin echoes used in the imaging procedure. Shows that pulse NMR experiments give signals that are additions of sinusoids of differing amplitudes, frequencies, and phases. (MVL)

  7. NMR exposure sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ghibelli, L; Cerella, C; Cordisco, S; Clavarino, G; Marazzi, S; De Nicola, M; Nuccitelli, S; D'Alessio, M; Magrini, A; Bergamaschi, A; Guerrisi, V; Porfiri, L M

    2006-03-01

    NMR technology has dramatically contributed to the revolution of image diagnostic. NMR apparatuses use combinations of microwaves over a homogeneous strong (1 Tesla) static magnetic field. We had previously shown that low intensity (0.3-66 mT) static magnetic fields deeply affect apoptosis in a Ca2+ dependent fashion (Fanelli et al., 1999 FASEBJ., 13;95-102). The rationale of the present study is to examine whether exposure to the static magnetic fields of NMR can affect apoptosis induced on reporter tumor cells of haematopoietic origin. The impressive result was the strong increase (1.8-2.5 fold) of damage-induced apoptosis by NMR. This potentiation is due to cytosolic Ca2+ overload consequent to NMR-promoted Ca2+ influx, since it is prevented by intracellular (BAPTA-AM) and extracellular (EGTA) Ca2+ chelation or by inhibition of plasma membrane L-type Ca2+ channels. Three-days follow up of treated cultures shows that NMR decrease long term cell survival, thus increasing the efficiency of cytocidal treatments. Importantly, mononuclear white blood cells are not sensitised to apoptosis by NMR, showing that NMR may increase the differential cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs on tumor vs normal cells. This strong, differential potentiating effect of NMR on tumor cell apoptosis may have important implications, being in fact a possible adjuvant for antitumor therapies. PMID:16528477

  8. Probing surface interactions by combining NMR cryoporometry and NMR relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Stark, S. C.; Strange, J. H.

    2005-06-01

    To further expand on the understanding of surface interactions at the liquid/solid interface on pore walls, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques of cryoporometry and relaxometry have been combined. The combination of these techniques allows variations in NMR relaxation parameters from pore surface to volume ratio changes and from surface interaction changes to be distinguished. By studying a range of sol-gel silicas from two different sources, it was noted that the relaxation time measurements were not consistent with the pore diameters determined by cryoporometry and N2 gas adsorption. Instead distinctly different relaxivity constants were determined for each absorbate in each of the two brands of silica. It was clear that the relaxation times were modified by more than just the pore geometry. Independent experiments on the two brands of silica suggested that the relaxometry results were heavily influenced by the concentration of paramagnetic relaxation centres in the silica gels. The strength of surface interaction, and hence surface affinity, was seen to depend on the liquid in the pores. Using this difference in surface affinities, binary mixtures of alkanes placed in sol-gel silicas were separated via preferential absorption and their components identified using cryoporometry, whereas the components could not be distinguished in the bulk liquid.

  9. Analytical Applications of NMR: Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1982-01-01

    Highlights a symposium on analytical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), discussing pulse Fourier transformation technique, two-dimensional NMR, solid state NMR, and multinuclear NMR. Includes description of ORACLE, an NMR data processing system at Syracuse University using real-time color graphics, and algorithms for…

  10. Analytical Applications of NMR: Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1982-01-01

    Highlights a symposium on analytical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), discussing pulse Fourier transformation technique, two-dimensional NMR, solid state NMR, and multinuclear NMR. Includes description of ORACLE, an NMR data processing system at Syracuse University using real-time color graphics, and algorithms for…

  11. Tantalum-181 solution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehder, Dieter; Basler, Wolf

    The 181Ta NMR spectra of solutions of [Et 4N][TaL 6] (L = Cl -, CO) and K 2[TaF 7] have been obtained. The shift range encompasses 3450 ppm, limited by [TaCl 6] - at the low-field and [Ta(CO) 6] - at the high-field side. The shielding sensitivity of the 181Ta nucleus is about 1.6 times that of 93Nb and 0.6 times that of 183W. Half widths are 4.3 (L = Cl -), 6.7 (L = CO) and 29 kHz ([TaF 7] -).

  12. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which spectral…

  13. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which spectral…

  14. Picoliter H-1 NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R.); Wind, Robert A.)

    2002-02-01

    A RF probe that fits inside the bore of a small gradient coil package is described for routine 1H-NMR microscopy measurements on small samples. The probe operates at 500 MHz and houses a 267-um-diameter solenoid transceiver. When used in three dimensional chemical shift imaging (3D-CSI) experiments, the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is shown to be within 20-30 percent of theoretical limits formulated by only considering the solenoid's resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-um-diameter globule of triacylglycerols ({approx}900mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus Laevis frogs, and water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live cells ({approx}33mM). In chemical shift images generated using a few thousand scans, the choline methyl line is found to have an acceptable SNR in resolved from just 5 picoliters in the Xenopus globule. It is concluded that the probe's sensitivity is sufficient for performing 1H-NMR on picoliter-scale volumes in biological cells and tissues.

  15. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  16. Enzyme Dynamics from NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Biological activities of enzymes, including regulation or coordination of mechanistic stages preceding or following the chemical step, may depend upon kinetic or equilibrium changes in protein conformations. Exchange of more open or flexible conformational states with more closed or constrained states can influence inhibition, allosteric regulation, substrate recognition, formation of the Michaelis complex, side reactions, and product release. NMR spectroscopy has long been applied to the study of conformational dynamic processes in enzymes because these phenomena can be characterized over multiple time scales with atomic site resolution. Laboratory-frame spin-relaxation measurements, sensitive to reorientational motions on picosecond–nanosecond time scales, and rotating-frame relaxation-dispersion measurements, sensitive to chemical exchange processes on microsecond–millisecond time scales, provide information on both conformational distributions and kinetics. This Account reviews NMR spin relaxation studies of the enzymes ribonuclease HI from mesophilic (Escherichia coli) and thermophilic (Thermus thermophilus) bacteria, E. coli AlkB, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae triosephosphate isomerase to illustrate the contributions of conformational flexibility and dynamics to diverse steps in enzyme mechanism. Spin relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the bacterial ribonuclease H enzymes show that the handle region, one of three loop regions that interact with substrates, interconverts between two conformations. Comparison of these conformations with the structure of the complex between Homo sapiens ribonuclease H and a DNA:RNA substrate suggests that the more closed state is inhibitory to binding. The large population of the closed conformation in T. thermophilus ribonuclease H contributes to the increased Michaelis constant compared with the E. coli enzyme. NMR spin relaxation and fluorescence spectroscopy have characterized a conformational transition in AlkB between an open state, in which the side chains of methionine residues in the active site are disordered, and a closed state, in which these residues are ordered. The open state is highly populated in the AlkB/Zn(II) complex, and the closed state is highly populated in the AlkB/Zn(II)/2OG/substrate complex, in which 2OG is the 2-oxoglutarate cosubstrate and the substrate is a methylated DNA oligonucleotide. The equilibrium is shifted to approximately equal populations of the two conformations in the AlkB/Zn(II)/2OG complex. The conformational shift induced by 2OG ensures that 2OG binds to AlkB/Zn(II) prior to the substrate. In addition, the opening rate of the closed conformation limits premature release of substrate, preventing generation of toxic side products by reaction with water. Closure of active site loop 6 in triosephosphate isomerase is critical for forming the Michaelis complex, but reopening of the loop after the reaction is (partially) rate limiting. NMR spin relaxation and MD simulations of triosephosphate isomerase in complex with glycerol 3-phosphate demonstrate that closure of loop 6 is a highly correlated rigid-body motion. The MD simulations also indicate that motions of Gly173 in the most flexible region of loop 6 contribute to opening of the active site loop for product release. Considered together, these three enzyme systems illustrate the power of NMR spin relaxation investigations in providing global insights into the role of conformational dynamic processes in the mechanisms of enzymes from initial activation to final product release. PMID:25574774

  17. Hypothesis driven assessment of an NMR curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossey, Kimberly

    The goal of this project was to develop a battery of assessments to evaluate an undergraduate NMR curriculum at Penn State University. As a chemical education project, we sought to approach the problem of curriculum assessment from a scientific perspective, while remaining grounded in the education research literature and practices. We chose the phrase hypothesis driven assessment to convey this process of relating the scientific method to the study of educational methods, modules, and curricula. We began from a hypothesis, that deeper understanding of one particular analytical technique (NMR) will increase undergraduate students' abilities to solve chemical problems. We designed an experiment to investigate this hypothesis, and data collected were analyzed and interpreted in light of the hypothesis and several related research questions. The expansion of the NMR curriculum at Penn State was funded through the NSF's Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) program, and assessment was required. The goal of this project, as stated in the grant proposal, was to provide NMR content in greater depth by integrating NMR modules throughout the curriculum in physical chemistry, instrumental, and organic chemistry laboratory courses. Hands-on contact with the NMR spectrometer and NMR data and repeated exposure of the analytical technique within different contexts (courses) were unique factors of this curriculum. Therefore, we maintained a focus on these aspects throughout the evaluation process. The most challenging and time-consuming aspect of any assessment is the development of testing instruments and methods to provide useful data. After key variables were defined, testing instruments were designed to measure these variables based on educational literature (Chapter 2). The primary variables measured in this assessment were: depth of understanding of NMR, basic NMR knowledge, problem solving skills (HETCOR problem), confidence for skills used in class (within the hands-on NMR modules), confidence for NMR tasks (not practiced), and confidence for general science tasks. Detailed discussion of the instruments, testing methods and experimental design used in this assessment are provided (Chapter 3). All data were analyzed quantitatively using methods adapted from the educational literature (Chapter 4). Data were analyzed and the descriptive statistics, independent t-tests between the experimental and control groups, and correlation statistics were calculated for each variable. In addition, for those variables included on the pretest, dependent t-tests between pretest and posttest scores were also calculated. The results of study 1 and study 2 were used to draw conclusions based on the hypothesis and research questions proposed in this work (Chapter 4). Data collected in this assessment were used to answer the following research questions: (1) Primary research question: Is depth of understanding of NMR linked to problem solving skills? (2) Are the NMR modules working as intended? Do they promote depth of understanding of NMR? (a) Will students who complete NMR modules have a greater depth of understanding of NMR than students who do not complete the modules? (b) Is depth of understanding increasing over the course of the experiment? (3) Is confidence an intermediary between depth of understanding and problem solving skills? Is it linked to both variables? (4) What levels of confidence are affected by the NMR modules? (a) Will confidence for the NMR class skills used in the modules themselves be greater for those who have completed the modules? (b) Will confidence for NMR tasks not practiced in the course be affected? (c) Will confidence for general science tasks be affected? (d) Are different levels of confidence (class skills, NMR tasks, general science tasks) linked to each other? Results from this NMR curriculum assessment could also have implications outside of the courses studied, and so there is potential to impact the chemical education community (section 5.2.1). In addition to providing reliable testing instrume

  18. Hyperpolarized NMR in Single-File Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, C. R.; Cheng, C.-Y.; Stamatatos, T. C.; Christou, G.

    2011-03-01

    Continuous-flow hyperpolarized xenon-129 NMR is used to characterize gas exchange and diffusion in two types of polycrystalline solids with one-dimensional channels. Expressions for the hyperpolarized NMR selective-saturation recovery signal are derived for normal and single-file diffusion.

  19. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  20. Large NMR signals and polarization asymmetries.

    SciTech Connect

    Penttila, S. I.

    1998-11-25

    A large modulation in the series Q-meter can lead to nonlinear NMR signals and asymmetric polarization values. With a careful circuit analysis the nonlinearity can be estimated and corrections to polarization can be determined as a function of the strength of the modulation. We describe the recent LAMPF polarized proton target experiment, its NMR measurement and corrections to the measured polarizations.

  1. Using Cloud Storage for NMR Data Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soulsby, David

    2012-01-01

    An approach using Google Groups as method for distributing student-acquired NMR data has been implemented. We describe how to configure NMR spectrometer software so that data is uploaded to a laboratory section specific Google Group, thereby removing bottlenecks associated with printing and processing at the spectrometer workstation. Outside of…

  2. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  3. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  4. Using Cloud Storage for NMR Data Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soulsby, David

    2012-01-01

    An approach using Google Groups as method for distributing student-acquired NMR data has been implemented. We describe how to configure NMR spectrometer software so that data is uploaded to a laboratory section specific Google Group, thereby removing bottlenecks associated with printing and processing at the spectrometer workstation. Outside of…

  5. Chromatographic NMR Spectroscopy with Hollow Silica Spheres.

    PubMed

    González-García, Tania; Margola, Tommaso; Silvagni, Adriano; Mancin, Fabrizio; Rastrelli, Federico

    2016-02-01

    The use of micrometric hollow silica spheres is described as a strategy to reduce magnetic field inhomogeneities in the context of NMR chromatography. When employed as a stationary phase, hollow silica microspheres allow the use of common solution-state NMR instruments to measure the diffusion coefficient perturbation induced by the interaction of the analytes with the silica surface. PMID:26809047

  6. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  7. A Guided Inquiry Approach to NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Laura E.; Lisensky, George C.; Spencer, Brock

    1998-04-01

    We present a novel way to introduce NMR spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum as part of a week-long aspirin project in our one-semester introductory course. Aspirin is synthesized by reacting salicylic acid and acetic anhydride. Purity is determined by titration and IR and NMR spectroscopy. Students compare IR and NMR spectra of their aspirin product to a series of reference spectra obtained by the class. Students are able to interpret the IR spectra of their aspirin using IR data from previous experiments. NMR is introduced by having students collect 1H NMR spectra of a series of reference compounds chosen to include some of the structural features of aspirin and compare spectra and structures of the reference compounds to develop a correlation chart for chemical shifts. This process is done in small groups using shared class data and is guided by a series of questions designed to relate the different kinds of hydrogen atoms to number and position of peaks in the NMR spectrum. Students then identify the peaks in the NMR spectrum of their aspirin product and relate percent purity by titration with spectral results and percent yield. This is an enjoyable project that combines the synthesis of a familiar material with a guided inquiry-based introduction to NMR spectroscopy.

  8. Enantioselective outer-sphere complexation of lanthanide(III) tris (pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate) chelates with vitamin B 12 derivatives. An NMR and CD study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Dekkers, Harry P. J. M.

    1999-08-01

    The binding of three corrinoids, cyanocobalarnin (vitamin B 12, CNCbl), aquacobalamin (vitamin B 12a, H 2OCbl +) and dicyanocobinamide ((CN) 2Cbi), collectively denoted by Q, to the ?- and ?-enantiomer of Ln(DPA) 33- complexes (Ln=lanthanide, DPA=2,6-pyridine dicarboxylate) in aqueous solution at room temperature is investigated by NMR and Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Tb(DPA) 33- induces shifts of the 1H-NMR resonances of Q. A formula, describing the dipolar interaction between the proton spin and the paramagnetic moment of the lanthanide complex, is fitted to the lanthanide induced shifts, yielding the position of Tb(DPA) 33- and the orientation of its magnetic axis with respect to the corrinoid. The magnitude of the shifts provide the value of Kavg, an average of the association constants of the two diastereomeric complexes {?-Tb(DPA) 33-Q) and {?-Tb(DPA) 33-Q}. We find Kavg=4±0.5 (B 12) and 0.8±0.2 M -1 ((CN) 2Cbi). The value for H 2OCbl + depends strongly on the solution's ionic strength I: Kavg=(7±1)×10 1, 22±5 and 16±7 M -1 at I=0.007, 0.12 and 0.22 M, respectively. The addition of the corrinoids to a (racemic) solution of Nd(DPA) 33-, induces CD in the electronic Nd(III) transitions in the 700-800 nm region (ICD). This Pfeiffer effect is attributed to an excess of ?-Nd(DPA) 33- in the enantioselective, outer-sphere association with the corrinoids. From the magnitude of the ICD as a function of [Q], in conjunction with the (indirectly) determined CD effect of ?-Nd(DPA) 33-, values are determined for K?- K?. We find K?- K?=-24±2 M -1 for H 2OCbl + at pH 6.7 and I=0.12 M and -12±2 M -1 at I=0.22 M; -4.4±0.5 M -1 for CNCbl and -0.9±0.3 M -1 for (CN) 2Cbi. Adopting the view that in the lanthanide series Ln(DPA) 33- chelates are isostructural, the results of the NMR and CD experiments are combined to estimate the enantioselectivity in the binding Eb, defined as ( K?- K?)/2 Kavg. We find Eb=-0.5±0.2 for H 2OCbl +, -0.7±0.2 for CNCbl and -0.7±0.3 for (CN) 2Cbi. On the basis of the NMR data, a molecular structure is proposed for the two diastereomeric {Ln(DPA) 33-Q} complexes. The bonding involves hydrogen bonds between the amide proton on the a and g side chain of the corrinoid and the carboxylate oxygen of two DPA ligands.

  9. NMR and MRI apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Myers, Whittier; McDermott, Robert; ten Haken, Bernard; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas

    2007-03-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. Additional signal to noise benefits are obtained by use of a low noise polarization coil, comprising litz wire or superconducting materials. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  10. Chiral discrimination in NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, A David

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is the most important form of molecular spectroscopy in chemistry and biochemistry but it is normally blind to chirality. It was predicted in 2004 that precessing nuclear spins in chiral molecules in a liquid in a strong magnetic field induce a rotating electric polarization that is of opposite sign for enantiomers. This polarization arises from the distortion of the electronic structure by the nuclear magnetic moment in the presence of the strong magnetic field and is equivalent to the linear effect of an electric field on the nuclear shielding tensor. The polarization is strongly enhanced in dipolar molecules through the partial orientation of the permanent dipole through the antisymmetric part of the nuclear magnetic shielding tensor. Alternatively, an applied electric field will induce a chirally sensitive magnetization perpendicular to the field and to the nuclear spin. Progress towards the experimental realization of chiral discrimination by NMR is assessed. PMID:26537400

  11. An Introduction to Biological NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  12. An introduction to biological NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  13. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this article will enable instructors to use inversion recovery as a laboratory activity in applied NMR classes and provide research students with a convenient template with which to acquire inversion recovery data on research samples. PMID:21552343

  14. Hyperpolarized xenon in NMR and MRI.

    PubMed

    Oros, Ana-Maria; Shah, N Jon

    2004-10-21

    Hyperpolarized gases have found a steadily increasing range of applications in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and NMR imaging (MRI). They can be regarded as a new class of MR contrast agent or as a way of greatly enhancing the temporal resolution of the measurement of processes relevant to areas as diverse as materials science and biomedicine. We concentrate on the properties and applications of hyperpolarized xenon. This review discusses the physics of producing hyperpolarization, the NMR-relevant properties of 129Xe, specific MRI methods for hyperpolarized gases, applications of xenon to biology and medicine, polarization transfer to other nuclear species and low-field imaging. PMID:15566166

  15. Scalar operators in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Boqin

    1991-11-01

    Selectivity and resolution of solid-state NMR spectra are determined by dispersion of local magnetic fields originating from relaxation effects and orientation-dependent resonant frequencies of spin nuclei. Theoretically, the orientation-dependent resonant frequencies can be represented by a set of irreducible tensors. Among these tensors, only zero rank tensors (scalar operators) are capable of providing high resolution NMR spectra. This thesis presents a series of new developments in high resolution solid-state NMR concerning the reconstruction of various scalar operators motion in solid C{sub 60} is analyzed.

  16. Saturation transfer difference NMR for fragment screening.

    PubMed

    Begley, Darren W; Moen, Spencer O; Pierce, Phillip G; Zartler, Edward R

    2013-01-01

    Fragment screening by saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD-NMR) is a robust method for identifying small molecule binders and is well suited to a broad set of biological targets. STD-NMR is exquisitely sensitive for detecting weakly binding compounds (a common characteristic of fragments), which is a crucial step in finding promising compounds for a fragment-based drug discovery campaign. This protocol describes the development of a library suitable for STD-NMR fragment screening, as well as preparation of protein samples, optimization of experimental conditions, and procedures for data collection and analysis. PMID:24391096

  17. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Wong, G. P.; Hoffmann, D.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Patz, S.; Schwartz, L. M.; Walsworth, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks.

  18. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  19. NMR studies on UPt 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaoka, Y.; Tou, H.; Ishida, K.; Kimura, N.; ?nuki, Y.; Yamamoto, E.; Haga, Y.; Maezawa, K.

    2000-06-01

    A complete set of the 195Pt Knight-shift (KS) data on the superconducting (SC) state in UPt 3 identified the spin structure of the Cooper pair corresponding to the multiple SC phases. UPt 3 was acclaimed as the first odd-parity superconductor including a non-unitary pairing state characterized by the two-component d vector like db+ idc at low T and low H [H. Tou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 1374; 80 (1998) 3129]. We have shed further light on these novel results through a comparison with the singlet even-parity anisotropic superconductors CeCu 2Si 2 and UPd 2Al 3. In the singlet pairing state, the fractional decrease in KS below T c, ?K obs is independent of the crystal direction. We have found that ? ?obs=( NA? B/ Ahf)? Kobs where Ahf is the hyperfine coupling constant, is in good agreement with spin susceptibilities ??el calculated from an enhanced electronic specific heat ?el and ?nmr from the quasiparticle Korringa relation T1TKs2=const. This gives direct evidence that the ?s of heavy quasiparticles in CeCu 2Si 2 and UPd 2Al 3 is rather isotropic and decreases to zero as T?0 due to the Cooper-pair formation. On the other hand in UPt 3, the ? ?obsb, cs along the b- and c-axis in the non-unitary-pairing state (B phase) are two orders of magnitude smaller than ??el and ?nmr. These anomalously small values for ? ?obsb, cs may suggest either that the spin degree of freedom in the B phase is not perfectly locked to the a-axis or that ?s is not enhanced although ?el is. The latter is theoretically pointed out by Ikeda and Miyake [J. Phys. Soc. Japan 66 (1997) 3714] to be possible if 5f electrons in the non-Kramerse singlet ground state for 5f 2 are hybridized with conduction electrons. We need further effort towards coherent understanding of a microscopic mechanism leading to the occurrence of the odd-parity superconductivity in UPt 3.

  20. NMR Analysis of Unknowns: An Introduction to 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David E.; Warren, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    A study combined 1D (one-dimensional) and 2D (two-dimensional) NMR spectroscopy to solve structural organic problems of three unknowns, which include 2-, 3-, and 4-heptanone. Results showed [to the first power]H NMR and [to the thirteenth power]C NMR signal assignments for 2- and 3-heptanone were more challenging than for 4-heptanone owing to the…

  1. Bayesian peak picking for NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yichen; Gao, Xin; Liang, Faming

    2014-02-01

    Protein structure determination is a very important topic in structural genomics, which helps people to understand varieties of biological functions such as protein-protein interactions, protein-DNA interactions and so on. Nowadays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has often been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of protein in vivo. This study aims to automate the peak picking step, the most important and tricky step in NMR structure determination. We propose to model the NMR spectrum by a mixture of bivariate Gaussian densities and use the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm as the computational tool to solve the problem. Under the Bayesian framework, the peak picking problem is casted as a variable selection problem. The proposed method can automatically distinguish true peaks from false ones without preprocessing the data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort in the literature that tackles the peak picking problem for NMR spectrum data using Bayesian method. PMID:24184964

  2. Solvent Signal is a NMR Concentration Reference

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Huaping; Raftery, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We propose that the NMR solvent signal be utilized as a universal concentration reference because most solvents can be observed by NMR, and solvent concentrations can be readily calculated or determined independently. In particular, a highly protonated solvent such as water can serve as a primary concentration standard for its stability, availability and ease of observation. The potential issues of radiation damping associated with a strong NMR signal can be alleviated by small pulse angle excitations. The solvent signal then can be detected by the NMR receiver with the same efficiency as a dilute analyte. We demonstrated that the analyte's proton concentration can be accurately determined from 4 ?M to more than 100 M, referenced by solvent (water) protons of concentrations more than 10 M. The proposed method is robust and indifferent to probe tuning, and does not require any additional concentration standard. PMID:19007190

  3. Sodium NMR/MRI for anisotropic systems.

    PubMed

    Eliav, U; Navon, G

    2016-02-01

    Sodium ((23) Na) plays a central role in many physiological processes, and its high NMR sensitivity makes it an attractive nucleus for biomedical NMR and MRI research. Many biological tissues contain structures such as fibers and membranes that impose anisotropic translational and rotational motions on the sodium ions. Translational motion can be studied by diffusion measurements. Anisotropic rotational motion results in non-vanishing quadrupolar interaction that it is best studied by exploiting multiple quantum coherences for (23) Na NMR spectroscopy and MRI. The current review covers the application of the various NMR techniques to the study of (23) Na in anisotropic compartments in cartilage, tendon, intervertebral discs, red blood cells, nervous system and muscles. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26105084

  4. NMR spectroscopy of biofluids and extracts.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Gwénaëlle

    2015-01-01

    Metabonomics-based proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy is a cross-disciplinary science that overlaps with analytical chemistry, biology, and statistical analysis. Applying (1)H NMR on cell extracts provides a rapid and comprehensive screening of the most abundant metabolites allowing the quantitation of typically 20-70 compounds including amino and organic acids, sugars, amines, nucleosides, phenolic compounds, osmolytes, and lipids produced at sublevel millimolar concentrations. The method is particularly suited for high-throughput analysis (up to 100 samples/24 h), and the powerful structural elucidation of NMR is a great asset for the identification of unknown compounds. This chapter describes procedures for recording metabolite profiles using (1)H NMR, depicts the preprocessing steps leading to data analysis, and presents methods of metabolite identification in spectral profiles of extracts from plants, food, microbes, and mammalian systems. PMID:25677144

  5. Multinuclear NMR spectra of microscopic gaseous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackowski, Karol

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of some nuclei (e.g. 1H, 13C, 19F, 29Si and 31P) gives strong signals which allow one for analytical investigations of gaseous compounds. The other magnetic nuclei have low natural abundance or/and contain electric quadrupole moments and therefore they are less suitable for such NMR applications. In our laboratory we have developed new experimental techniques which permit us to monitor several micrograms of chemical compounds in the gas phase. For the first time we have observed 17O and 33S NMR spectra of gaseous compounds at the natural abundance as a function of density. We have also found density-dependent spin-spin coupling constants in many molecules. We could extend our gas-phase studies on molecules which exhibit strong intermolecular interactions and are liquids at room temperature. All the latter NMR experimental results obtained for gaseous mixtures are reviewed in this paper.

  6. NMR and optical studies of piezoelectric polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, V.H.; Tuthill, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    Progress is reported in several areas dealing with piezoelectric (electroactive) polymers (mostly vinylidene fluoride, trifluoroethylene, copolymers, PVF[sub 2]) and liquid crystals. Optical studies, neutron scattering, NMR, thermal, theory and modeling were done.

  7. NMR Methods to Study Dynamic Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Grutsch, Sarina; Brüschweiler, Sven; Tollinger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a unique toolbox of experimental probes for studying dynamic processes on a wide range of timescales, ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds and beyond. Along with NMR hardware developments, recent methodological advancements have enabled the characterization of allosteric proteins at unprecedented detail, revealing intriguing aspects of allosteric mechanisms and increasing the proportion of the conformational ensemble that can be observed by experiment. Here, we present an overview of NMR spectroscopic methods for characterizing equilibrium fluctuations in free and bound states of allosteric proteins that have been most influential in the field. By combining NMR experimental approaches with molecular simulations, atomistic-level descriptions of the mechanisms by which allosteric phenomena take place are now within reach. PMID:26964042

  8. Interfaces in polymer nanocomposites - An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Ute; Scheler, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is applied for the investigation of polymer nanocomposites. Solid-state NMR is applied to study the modification steps to compatibilize layered double hydroxides with non-polar polymers. 1H relaxation NMR gives insight on the polymer dynamics over a wide range of correlation times. For the polymer chain dynamics the transverse relaxation time T2 is most suited. In this presentation we report on two applications of T2 measurements under external mechanical stress. In a low-field system relaxation NMR studies are performed in-situ under uniaxial stress. High-temperature experiments in a Couette cell permit the investigation of the polymer dynamics in the melt under shear flow.

  9. NMR in the SPINE Structural Proteomics project.

    PubMed

    Ab, E; Atkinson, A R; Banci, L; Bertini, I; Ciofi-Baffoni, S; Brunner, K; Diercks, T; Dötsch, V; Engelke, F; Folkers, G E; Griesinger, C; Gronwald, W; Günther, U; Habeck, M; de Jong, R N; Kalbitzer, H R; Kieffer, B; Leeflang, B R; Loss, S; Luchinat, C; Marquardsen, T; Moskau, D; Neidig, K P; Nilges, M; Piccioli, M; Pierattelli, R; Rieping, W; Schippmann, T; Schwalbe, H; Travé, G; Trenner, J; Wöhnert, J; Zweckstetter, M; Kaptein, R

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the developments, role and contributions of the NMR spectroscopy groups in the Structural Proteomics In Europe (SPINE) consortium. Focusing on the development of high-throughput (HTP) pipelines for NMR structure determinations of proteins, all aspects from sample preparation, data acquisition, data processing, data analysis to structure determination have been improved with respect to sensitivity, automation, speed, robustness and validation. Specific highlights are protonless (13)C-direct detection methods and inferential structure determinations (ISD). In addition to technological improvements, these methods have been applied to deliver over 60 NMR structures of proteins, among which are five that failed to crystallize. The inclusion of NMR spectroscopy in structural proteomics pipelines improves the success rate for protein structure determinations. PMID:17001092

  10. NMR profiling of transgenic peas.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Adrian; Allnutt, Theo; Holmes, Stephen; Chisholm, James; Bean, Samantha; Ellis, Noel; Mullineaux, Phil; Oehlschlager, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    A high throughput proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy method for the metabolite fingerprinting of plants was applied to genetically modified peas (Pisum sativum) to determine whether biochemical changes, so called 'unintended effects', beyond those intended by incorporation of a transgene, were detectable. Multivariate analysis of 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectra obtained from uniformly grown glasshouse plants revealed differences between the transgenic and control group that exceeded the natural variation of the plants. When a larger data set of six related transgenic lines was analysed, including a null segregant in addition to the wild-type control, multivariate analysis showed that the distribution of metabolites in the transgenics was different from that of the null segregant. However, the profile obtained from the wild-type material was diverse in comparison with both the transgenics and the null segregant, suggesting that the primary cause of the observed differences was that the transformation process selects for a subset of individuals able to undergo the transformation and selection procedures, and that their descendants have a restricted variation in metabolite profile, rather than that the presence of the transgene itself generates these differences. PMID:17166140

  11. "Shim pulses" for NMR spectroscopy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Topgaard, Daniel; Martin, Rachel W; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Meriles, Carlos A; Pines, Alexander

    2004-12-21

    A way to use adiabatic radiofrequency pulses and modulated magnetic-field gradient pulses, together constituting a "shim pulse," for NMR spectroscopy and imaging is demonstrated. These pulses capitalize on phase shifts derived from probe gradient coils to compensate for nonlinear intrinsic main magnetic field homogeneity for spectroscopy, as well as for deviations from linear gradients for imaging. This approach opens up the possibility of exploiting cheaper, less-than-perfect magnets and gradient coils for NMR applications. PMID:15591105

  12. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  13. 33S NMR cryogenic probe for taurine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    With the goal of a S33 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe applicable to in vivo NMR on taurine-biological samples, we have developed the S33 NMR cryogenic probe, which is applicable to taurine solutions. The NMR sensitivity gain relative to a conventional broadband probe is as large as 3.5. This work suggests that improvements in the preamplifier could allow NMR measurements on 100 ?M taurine solutions, which is the level of sensitivity necessary for biological samples.

  14. NMR at low and ultralow temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert

    2013-09-17

    Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements at low temperatures have been common in physical sciences for many years and are becoming increasingly important in studies of biomolecular systems. This Account reviews a diverse set of projects from my laboratory, dating back to the early 1990s, that illustrate the motivations for low-temperature solid state NMR, the types of information that are available from the measurements, and likely directions for future research. These projects include NMR studies of both physical and biological systems, performed at low (cooled with nitrogen, down to 77 K) and ultralow (cooled with helium, below 77 K) temperatures, and performed with and without magic-angle spinning (MAS). NMR studies of physical systems often focus on phenomena that occur only at low temperatures. Two examples from my laboratory are studies of molecular rotation and orientational ordering in solid C60 at low temperatures and studies of unusual electronic states, called skyrmions, in two-dimensionally confined electron systems within semiconductor quantum wells. To study quantum wells, we used optical pumping of nuclear spin polarizations to enhance their NMR signals. The optical pumping phenomenon exists only at ultralow temperatures. In studies of biomolecular systems, low-temperature NMR has several motivations. In some cases, low temperatures suppress molecular tumbling, thereby permitting solid state NMR measurements on soluble proteins. Studies of AIDS-related peptide/antibody complexes illustrate this effect. In other cases, low temperatures suppress conformational exchange, thereby permitting quantitation of conformational distributions. Studies of chemically denatured states of the model protein HP35 illustrate this effect. Low temperatures and rapid freeze-quenching can also be used to trap transient intermediate states in a non-equilibrium kinetic process, as shown in studies of a transient intermediate in the rapid folding pathway of HP35. NMR sensitivity generally increases with decreasing sample temperature. Therefore, it can be useful to carry out experiments at the lowest possible temperatures, particularly in studies of biomolecular systems in frozen solutions. However, solid state NMR studies of biomolecular systems generally require rapid MAS. A novel MAS NMR probe design that uses nitrogen gas for sample spinning and cold helium only for sample cooling allows a wide variety of solid state NMR measurements to be performed on biomolecular systems at 20-25 K, where signals are enhanced by factors of 12-15 relative to measurements at room temperature. MAS NMR at ultralow temperatures also facilitates dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), allowing sizeable additional signal enhancements and large absolute NMR signal amplitudes with relatively low microwave powers. Current research in my laboratory seeks to develop and exploit DNP-enhanced MAS NMR at ultralow temperatures, for example, in studies of transient intermediates in protein folding and aggregation processes and studies of peptide/protein complexes that can be prepared only at low concentrations. PMID:23470028

  15. Use of NMR and NMR Prediction Software to Identify Components in Red Bull Energy Drinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andre J.; Shirzadi, Azadeh; Burrow, Timothy E.; Dicks, Andrew P.; Lefebvre, Brent; Corrin, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as part of an upper-level undergraduate analytical chemistry course is described. Students investigate two popular soft drinks (Red Bull Energy Drink and sugar-free Red Bull Energy Drink) by NMR spectroscopy. With assistance of modern NMR prediction software they identify and quantify major components in each…

  16. Use of NMR and NMR Prediction Software to Identify Components in Red Bull Energy Drinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andre J.; Shirzadi, Azadeh; Burrow, Timothy E.; Dicks, Andrew P.; Lefebvre, Brent; Corrin, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as part of an upper-level undergraduate analytical chemistry course is described. Students investigate two popular soft drinks (Red Bull Energy Drink and sugar-free Red Bull Energy Drink) by NMR spectroscopy. With assistance of modern NMR prediction software they identify and quantify major components in each…

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, Eiichi (Los Alamos, NM); Roeder, Stephen B. W. (La Mesa, CA); Assink, Roger A. (Albuquerque, NM); Gibson, Atholl A. V. (Bryan, TX)

    1986-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  18. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and ?XRCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO? storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (?XRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectly predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.

  19. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  20. BOOK REVIEW: NMR Imaging of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of materials is a field of increasing importance. Applications extend from fundamental science like the characterization of fluid transport in porous rock, catalyst pellets and hemodialysers into various fields of engineering for process optimization and product quality control. While the results of MRI imaging are being appreciated by a growing community, the methods of imaging are far more diverse for materials applications than for medical imaging of human beings. Blümich has delivered the first book in this field. It was published in hardback three years ago and is now offered as a paperback for nearly half the price. The text provides an introduction to MRI imaging of materials covering solid-state NMR spectroscopy, imaging methods for liquid and solid samples, and unusual MRI in terms of specialized approaches to spatial resolution such as an MRI surface scanner. The book represents an excellent and thorough treatment which will help to grow research in materials MRI. Blümich developed the treatise over many years for his research students, graduates in chemistry, physics and engineering. But it may also be useful for medical students looking for a less formal discussion of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The structure of this book is easy to perceive. The first three chapters cover an introduction, the fundamentals and methods of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The book starts at the ground level where no previous knowledge about NMR is assumed. Chapter 4 discusses a wide variety of transformations beyond the Fourier transformation. In particular, the Hadamard transformation and the 'wavelet' transformation are missing from most related books. This chapter also includes a description of noise-correlation spectroscopy, which promises the imaging of large objects without the need for extremely powerful radio-frequency transmitters. Chapters 5 and 6 cover basic imaging methods. The following chapter about the use of relaxation and spectroscopic methods to weight or filter the spin signals represents the core of the book. This is a subject where Blümich is deeply involved with substantial contributions. The chapter includes a lot of ideas to provide MR contrast between different regions based on their mobility, diffusion, spin couplings or NMR spectra. After describing NMR imaging methods for solids with broad lines, Blümich spends time on applications in the last two chapters of the book. This part is really fun to read. It underlines the effort to bring NMR into many kinds of manufacturing. Car tyres and high-voltage cables are just two such areas. Elastomeric materials, green-state ceramics and food science represent other interesting fields of applications. This part of the book represents a personal but nevertheless extensive compilation of modern applications. As a matter of course the MOUSE is presented, a portable permanent-magnet based NMR developed by Blümich and his co-workers. Thus the book is not only of interest to NMR spectroscopists but also to people in material science and chemical engineering. The bibliography and indexing are excellent and may serve as an attractive reference source for NMR spectroscopists. The book is the first on the subject and likely to become the standard text for NMR imaging of materials as the books by Abragam, Slicher and Ernst et al are for NMR spectroscopy. The purchase of this beautiful book for people dealing with NMR spectroscopy or medical MRI is highly recommended. Ralf Ludwig

  1. NMR methodologies in the analysis of blueberries.

    PubMed

    Capitani, Donatella; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Delfini, Maurizio; Vista, Silvia; Antiochia, Riccarda; Proietti, Noemi; Bubici, Salvatore; Ferrante, Gianni; Carradori, Simone; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Mannina, Luisa

    2014-06-01

    An NMR analytical protocol based on complementary high and low field measurements is proposed for blueberry characterization. Untargeted NMR metabolite profiling of blueberries aqueous and organic extracts as well as targeted NMR analysis focused on anthocyanins and other phenols are reported. Bligh-Dyer and microwave-assisted extractions were carried out and compared showing a better recovery of lipidic fraction in the case of microwave procedure. Water-soluble metabolites belonging to different classes such as sugars, amino acids, organic acids, and phenolic compounds, as well as metabolites soluble in organic solvent such as triglycerides, sterols, and fatty acids, were identified. Five anthocyanins (malvidin-3-glucoside, malvidin-3-galactoside, delphinidin-3-glucoside, delphinidin-3-galactoside, and petunidin-3-glucoside) and 3-O-?-l-rhamnopyranosyl quercetin were identified in solid phase extract. The water status of fresh and withered blueberries was monitored by portable NMR and fast-field cycling NMR. (1) H depth profiles, T2 transverse relaxation times and dispersion profiles were found to be sensitive to the withering. PMID:24668393

  2. Mobile NMR for Analysis of Polyethylene Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, B.; Casanova, F.; Buda, A.; Kremer, K.; Wegener, T.

    2006-07-01

    NMR relaxometry is a suitable tool to determine the morphology of semi-crystalline polymers by its ability to discriminate between rigid, mostly crystalline and soft, usually amorphous material. The NMR-MOUSE® (nuclear magnetic resonance mobile universal surface explorer) was explored in this work to supply morphological data of poly(ethylene) pipes nondestructively. PE-100 pipes were investigated in the new state, after squeezing them flat, and after annealing well below the glass temperature. Furthermore, the change in morphology induced by a pressure load from the inside and a point load from the outside was investigated as a function of depth, and the morphology change across a welding line was imaged. A shear-band was detected by destructive high-field NMR imaging in an area of severe deformation of a pipe, where an anomalous depths profile was observed by the NMR-MOUSE. These results demonstrate that the NMR-MOUSE is a suitable tool for non-destructive state assessment of polymer pipes on the basis of laboratory reference data.

  3. Theoretical NMR correlations based Structure Discussion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The actual difficulty of the structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. The moment HMBC data is involved in the process or a large number of heteroatoms is present, a possibility of multiple solutions fitting the same data set exists. A structure elucidation software can be used to find such alternative constitutional assignments and help in the discussion in order to find the correct solution. But this is rarely done. This article describes the use of theoretical NMR correlation data in the structure elucidation process with WEBCOCON, not for the initial constitutional assignments, but to define how well a suggested molecule could have been described by NMR correlation data. The results of this analysis can be used to decide on further steps needed to assure the correctness of the structural assignment. As first step the analysis of the deviation of carbon chemical shifts is performed, comparing chemical shifts predicted for each possible solution with the experimental data. The application of this technique to three well known compounds is shown. Using NMR correlation data alone for the description of the constitutions is not always enough, even when including 13C chemical shift prediction. PMID:21797997

  4. Biological NMR FIDs and spectra normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, R.; Canonico, R.; Acernese, F.; Giordano, G.; Barone, F.

    2014-03-01

    There is increasing use of spectroscopic techniques, such as high-resolution NMR spectroscopy, to examine variations in cell metabolism and / or structure in response to numerous physical, chemical, and biological agents. In these types of studies, in order to obtain relative quantitative information, a comparison between signal intensities of control samples and treated or exposed ones is often conducted. The methods thus far developed for this purpose are not directly related to the overall intrinsic properties of the samples, but rather to the addition of external substances of known concentrations or to indirect measurement of internal substances. Another possibility is to estimate, by an opportune algorithm, a normalization constant which takes into consideration all cell metabolites present in the sample. Recently, a new normalization algorithm, based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA), was presented. PCA is a well-known statistical technique for analysis of large, multivariate datasets, which extracts the basic features of the data. The PRICONA (PRincipal COmponent Normalization Algorithm) algorithm use PCA in a new totally different manner: PCA is, in fact, used to normalize spectra in order to obtain quantitative information about the treatment effects. In this paper, a comparison of results obtained in the time domain, that is on NMR FIDs (Free Induction Decay) and in the frequency domain, on NMR spectra, is conducted. The comparison is useful because in NMR spectroscopy analysis in the different domain can have different advantages. The algorithm was tested by Monte Carlo simulations of NMR FIDs.

  5. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  6. Applications of NMR to biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baatz, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    This work describes the application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR) for the study of three biological systems, namely, the pulmonary surfactant-associated protein, SPL(pVal), the myocardial calcium slow channel of the perfused guinea pig heart, and the intracellular buffering system of the Leishmania donovani promastigote. Investigations of structural features of bovine SPL(pVal) were performed using one and two-dimensional {sup 1}H-NMR techniques. Delayed Fourier transform {sup 1}H-NMR has been used to study the effects of bovine SPL(pVal) and temperature upon model membrane structure. A model describing the mechanism by which the SPL(pVal) lowers the membrane surface tension has been proposed. In order to study the dependence of the myocardial calcium slow channel activity on adenosine triphosphate levels and intracellular pH, and in vivo {sup 31}P-NMR probe capable of simultaneously and noninvasively monitoring these three parameters was designed. In vivo {sup 31}P-NMR was also applied for the study of the Leishmania donovani promastigote's ability to maintain a pH gradient across its cellular membrane at low extracellular pH.

  7. A Bioreactor for In Cell Protein NMR

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf, Naima G.; Barnes, Christopher O.; Charlton, Lisa M.; Young, Gregory B.; Pielak, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    The inside of the cell is a complex environment that is difficult to simulate when studying proteins and other molecules in vitro. We have developed a device and system that provides a controlled environment for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments involving living cells. Our device comprises two main parts, an NMR detection region and a circulation system. The flow of medium from the bottom of the device pushes alginate encapsulated cells into the circulation chamber. In the chamber, the exchange of oxygen and nutrients occurs between the media and the encapsulated cells. When the media flow is stopped, the encapsulated cells fall back into the NMR detection region, and spectra can be acquired. We have utilized the bioreactor to study the expression of the natively disordered protein ?-synuclein, inside Escherichia coli cells. PMID:19910228

  8. HPLC-NMR of fatty alcohol ethoxylates.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Wolf; Brüll, Adele; Argyropoulos, Dimitris; Hoffmann, Eberhard; Pasch, Harald

    2005-09-01

    The application of HPLC-NMR for the analysis of a mixture of fatty alcohol ethoxylates (FAEs) is described. The use of the new generation, cryogenically cooled probes is investigated in respect of the sensitivity advantage that they provide. The FAE mixture is separated using liquid chromatography at the critical point of adsorption. The ability of the method to differentiate between the different end groups and the degree of polymerization of the mixture constituents is investigated. Both on-flow and stop-flow HPLC-NMR techniques were used together with two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The results are compared with those obtained by using an evaporative light scattering detector for the HPLC. PMID:16049957

  9. Gas NMR Characterization of Oil Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorte, Eric; Laicher, Gernot; Saam, Brian

    2007-10-01

    Accurate descriptions and simulations of oil reservoirs such as carbonate-rich sedimentary rock are important for the efficient development and conversion of recoverable energy reserves. These descriptions depend on reliable measures of the properties of the formation rock such as absolute and effective porosity, mineralogical composition, permeability, and tortuosity. NMR signal relaxation time (T1 and T2) and measurements of restricted diffusion of gases in porous media can be used to probe multi-pore media, yielding valuable petrophysical information and allowing the characterization of internal topology and pore size distribution. We employ NMR techniques on imbibed fluorinated and hyperpolarized noble gases - gases with the unique properties of being chemically inert and minimally invasive while exhibiting favorable NMR properties - at various pressure and temperatures to characterize the shale heterogeneity. We show current results of our characterizations and explore ideas for future work.

  10. An NMR Study of Microvoids in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattrix, Larry

    1996-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is most crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally not be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active Xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb and Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe-129-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts in Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of Xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A series of spectra were obtained interspersed with applications of vacuum and heating to drive out the adsorbed Xe and determine the role of Xe-Xe interactions in the observed chemical shift.

  11. Hyperpolarized Xenon for NMR and MRI Applications

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Christopher; Kunth, Martin; Döpfert, Jörg; Rossella, Federica; Schröder, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) suffer from intrinsic low sensitivity because even strong external magnetic fields of ~10 T generate only a small detectable net-magnetization of the sample at room temperature 1. Hence, most NMR and MRI applications rely on the detection of molecules at relative high concentration (e.g., water for imaging of biological tissue) or require excessive acquisition times. This limits our ability to exploit the very useful molecular specificity of NMR signals for many biochemical and medical applications. However, novel approaches have emerged in the past few years: Manipulation of the detected spin species prior to detection inside the NMR/MRI magnet can dramatically increase the magnetization and therefore allows detection of molecules at much lower concentration 2. Here, we present a method for polarization of a xenon gas mixture (2-5% Xe, 10% N2, He balance) in a compact setup with a ca. 16000-fold signal enhancement. Modern line-narrowed diode lasers allow efficient polarization 7 and immediate use of gas mixture even if the noble gas is not separated from the other components. The SEOP apparatus is explained and determination of the achieved spin polarization is demonstrated for performance control of the method. The hyperpolarized gas can be used for void space imaging, including gas flow imaging or diffusion studies at the interfaces with other materials 8,9. Moreover, the Xe NMR signal is extremely sensitive to its molecular environment 6. This enables the option to use it as an NMR/MRI contrast agent when dissolved in aqueous solution with functionalized molecular hosts that temporarily trap the gas 10,11. Direct detection and high-sensitivity indirect detection of such constructs is demonstrated in both spectroscopic and imaging mode. PMID:22986346

  12. SEAL by NMR: glyco-based selenium-labeled affinity ligands detected by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hamark, Christoffer; Landström, Jens; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-10-20

    We report a method for the screening of interactions between proteins and selenium-labeled carbohydrate ligands. SEAL by NMR is demonstrated with selenoglycosides binding to lectins where the selenium nucleus serves as an NMR-active handle and reports on binding through (77)Se NMR spectroscopy. In terms of overall sensitivity, this nucleus is comparable to (13)C?NMR, while the NMR spectral width is ten times larger, yielding little overlap in (77)Se NMR spectroscopy, even for similar compounds. The studied ligands are singly selenated bioisosteres of methyl glycosides for which straightforward preparation methods are at hand and libraries can readily be generated. The strength of the approach lies in its simplicity, sensitivity to binding events, the tolerance to additives and the possibility of having several ligands in the assay. This study extends the increasing potential of selenium in structure biology and medicinal chemistry. We anticipate that SEAL by NMR will be a beneficial tool for the development of selenium-based bioactive compounds, such as glycomimetic drug candidates. PMID:25196366

  13. An optical NMR spectrometer for Larmor-beat detection and high-resolution POWER NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, J. G.; Marohn, J. A.; Carson, P. J.; Shykind, D. A.; Hwang, J. Y.; Miller, M. A.; Weitekamp, D. P.

    2008-06-01

    Optical nuclear magnetic resonance (ONMR) is a powerful probe of electronic properties in III-V semiconductors. Larmor-beat detection (LBD) is a sensitivity optimized, time-domain NMR version of optical detection based on the Hanle effect. Combining LBD ONMR with the line-narrowing method of POWER (perturbations observed with enhanced resolution) NMR further enables atomically detailed views of local electronic features in III-Vs. POWER NMR spectra display the distribution of resonance shifts or line splittings introduced by a perturbation, such as optical excitation or application of an electric field, that is synchronized with a NMR multiple-pulse time-suspension sequence. Meanwhile, ONMR provides the requisite sensitivity and spatial selectivity to isolate local signals within macroscopic samples. Optical NMR, LBD, and the POWER method each introduce unique demands on instrumentation. Here, we detail the design and implementation of our system, including cryogenic, optical, and radio-frequency components. The result is a flexible, low-cost system with important applications in semiconductor electronics and spin physics. We also demonstrate the performance of our systems with high-resolution ONMR spectra of an epitaxial AlGaAs /GaAs heterojunction. NMR linewidths down to 4.1Hz full width at half maximum were obtained, a 103-fold resolution enhancement relative any previous optically detected NMR experiment.

  14. Magic Angle Spinning NMR of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Caitlin; Lu, Manman; Suiter, Christopher L.; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Viruses, relatively simple pathogens, are able to replicate in many living organisms and to adapt to various environments. Conventional atomic-resolution structural biology techniques, X-ray crystallography and solution NMR spectroscopy provided abundant information on the structures of individual proteins and nucleic acids comprising viruses; however, viral assemblies are not amenable to analysis by these techniques because of their large size, insolubility, and inherent lack of long-range order. In this article, we review the recent advances in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy that enabled atomic-resolution analysis of structure and dynamics of large viral systems and give examples of several exciting case studies. PMID:25919197

  15. Magic angle spinning NMR of viruses.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Caitlin M; Lu, Manman; Suiter, Christopher L; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    Viruses, relatively simple pathogens, are able to replicate in many living organisms and to adapt to various environments. Conventional atomic-resolution structural biology techniques, X-ray crystallography and solution NMR spectroscopy provided abundant information on the structures of individual proteins and nucleic acids comprising viruses; however, viral assemblies are not amenable to analysis by these techniques because of their large size, insolubility, and inherent lack of long-range order. In this article, we review the recent advances in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy that enabled atomic-resolution analysis of structure and dynamics of large viral systems and give examples of several exciting case studies. PMID:25919197

  16. 13C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    The many advantages of 13C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, 13C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semi-automated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE datasets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures. PMID:25932900

  17. 1 MHz bandwidth true NMR SQUID amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomasson, S. L.; Gould, C. M.

    1995-10-01

    We have developed an integrated dc SQUID magnetometer with additional positive feedback (APF) for low frequency true NMR applications. The APF scheme allows direct coupled read out from the SQUID to room temperature electronics and eliminates the need for the conventional modulation scheme, thereby greatly simplifying the flux-locked loop electronics. We have configured our SQUID system for the specific needs of sensitive NMR measurements which include large bandwidth and high slew rate. We have achieved a bandwidth of 1.2 MHz and a slew rate greater than 105?0/s for frequencies above 10 kHz.

  18. 14 N NMR of tetrapropylammonium based crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, E.; Mineva, T.; Gaveau, P.; Alonso, B.

    2015-07-01

    We have investigated using 14N NMR different types of materials containing tetrapropylammonium cations. We consider the tetrapropylammonium bromide crystal as well as two different microporous materials silicalite-1 and AlPO-5, with MFI and AFI topology respectively, where the tetrapropylammonium cation plays the role of structure directing agent. 14N NMR quadrupolar coupling parameters were determined experimentally for all the crystals. In addition calculations based on Density Functional Theory with empirical dispersion (DFT-D) were performed on the MFI type zeolite. The sensitivity of the 14N quadrupolar coupling parameters to the spatial distribution of the anions in the zeolite's framework is emphasized.

  19. Sensitive detection of NMR for thin films.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soonchil

    2015-10-01

    NMR can provide valuable information about thin films, but its relatively low sensitivity allows data acquisition only from bulk samples. The sensitivity problem is circumvented by detection schemes with higher sensitivity and/or enhanced polarization. In most of these ingenious techniques, electrons play a central role through hyperfine interactions with the nuclei of interest or the conversion of the spin orientation to an electric charge. The state of the art in NMR is the control of a single nuclear spin state, the complete form of which is one of the ultimate goals of nanotechnology. PMID:26549846

  20. NMR investigation of the quantum pigeonhole effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V. S., Anjusha; Hegde, Swathi S.; Mahesh, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    NMR quantum simulators have been used for studying various quantum phenomena. Here, using a four-qubit NMR quantum simulator, we investigate the recently postulated quantum pigeonhole effect. In this phenomenon, a set of three particles in a two-path interferometer often appears to be in such a superposition that no two particles can be assigned a single path, thus exhibiting the nonclassical behavior. In our experiments, quantum pigeons are emulated by three nuclear qubits whose states are probed jointly and noninvasively by an ancillary spin. The experimental results are in good agreement with quantum theoretical predictions.

  1. NMR Stark Spectroscopy: New Methods to Calibrate NMR Sensitivity to Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.

    The influence of electrostatics on NMR parameters is well accepted. Thus, NMR is a promising route to probe electrical features within molecules and materials. However, applications of NMR Stark effects (E-field induced changes in spin energy levels) have been elusive. I have developed new approaches to resolve NMR Stark effects from an applied E field. This calibrates nuclear probes whose spectral response might later be used to evaluate internal E fields that are critical to function, such as those due to local charge distributions or sample structure. I will present two novel experimental approaches for direct calibration of NMR quadrupolar Stark effects (QSEs). In the first, steady-state (few-second) excitation by an E field at twice the NMR frequency (2? 0) is used to saturate spin magnetization. The extent of saturation vs. E-field amplitude calibrates the QSE response rate, while measurements vs sample orientation determine tensorial character. The second method instead synchronizes short (few µs) pulses of the 2?0 E field with a multiple-pulse NMR sequence. This, “POWER” (Perturbations Observed With Enhanced Resolution) approach enables more accurate measure of small QSEs (i.e. few Hz spectral changes). A 2nd key advantage is the ability to define tensorial response without reorienting the sample, but instead varying the phase of the 2?0 field. I will describe these experiments and my home-built NMR “Stark probe”, employed on a conventional wide-bore solid-state NMR system. Results with GaAs demonstrate each method, while extensions to a wider array of molecular and material systems may now be possible using these methods.

  2. Recommendations of the wwPDB NMR Validation Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Montelione, Gaetano T.; Nilges, Michael; Bax, Ad; Güntert, Peter; Herrmann, Torsten; Richardson, Jane S.; Schwieters, Charles; Vranken, Wim F.; Vuister, Geerten W.; Wishart, David S.; Berman, Helen M.; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Markley, John L.

    2013-01-01

    As methods for analysis of biomolecular structure and dynamics using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) continue to advance, the resulting 3D structures, chemical shifts, and other NMR data are broadly impacting biology, chemistry, and medicine. Structure model assessment is a critical area of NMR methods development, and is an essential component of the process of making these structures accessible and useful to the wider scientific community. For these reasons, the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) has convened an NMR Validation Task Force (NMR-VTF) to work with the wwPDB partners in developing metrics and policies for biomolecular NMR data harvesting, structure representation, and structure quality assessment. This paper summarizes the recommendations of the NMR-VTF, and lays the groundwork for future work in developing standards and metrics for biomolecular NMR structure quality assessment. PMID:24010715

  3. NMR Studies of Metallointercalator-DNA Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Damian P.; Collins, J. Grant

    The study of the interaction between inert transition metal complexes and nucleic acids has developed from the early work of Dwyer [1], Lippard [2], Nordén [3] and Barton [4] to the point that it is now a central theme in bio-inorganic chemistry. While there has been considerable interest in metal complexes that bind nucleic acids, the interaction of metallointercalators with DNA and RNA has received the most attention [5, 6]. Square-planar platinum(II) complexes have demonstrated significant anticancer activity [7], and octahedral ruthenium(II) and rhodium(III) complexes have been used as probes of nucleic acid structure and as a means to study electron transfer reactions mediated by the heteroaromatic bases [5, 6]. While a range of techniques is available to study the nucleic acid binding of metal complexes, NMR spectroscopy (particularly 1H NMR) has proven to be the most useful. NMR spectroscopy can provide a detailed, atom level resolution, picture of the metal complex binding, and if the quality of the data is sufficient, a threedimensional structure of the metal complex bound to the oligonucleotide can be determined. The strategies used to assign the 1H NMR spectrum of an oligonucleotide [8-10], the extension of these methods to study the interaction of metal complexes with DNA and the use of molecular modelling will be presented in this chapter.

  4. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa (Naperville, IL); Dieckman, Stephen L. (Elmhurst, IL); Ellingson, William A. (Naperville, IL)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  5. Solid-State NMR for Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria associate with surfaces and one another by elaborating an extracellular matrix to encapsulate cells, creating communities termed biofilms. Biofilms are beneficial in some ecological niches, but also contribute to the pathogenesis of serious and chronic infectious diseases. New approaches and quantitative measurements are needed to define the composition and architecture of bacterial biofilms to help drive the development of strategies to interfere with biofilm assembly. Solid-state NMR is uniquely suited to the examination of insoluble and complex macromolecular and whole-cell systems. This article highlights three examples that implement solid-state NMR to deliver insights into bacterial biofilm composition and changes in cell-wall composition as cells transition to the biofilm lifestyle. Most recently, solid-state NMR measurements provided a total accounting of the protein and polysaccharide components in the extracellular matrix of an E. coli biofilm and transform our qualitative descriptions of matrix composition into chemical parameters that permit quantitative comparisons among samples. We present additional data for whole biofilm samples (cells plus the extracellular matrix) that complement matrix-only analyses. The study of bacterial biofilms by solid-state NMR is an exciting avenue ripe with many opportunities and we close the article by articulating some outstanding questions and future directions in this area. PMID:24976646

  6. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    An accessory for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  7. Solid-State NMR of PEGylated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Enrico; Ciambellotti, Silvia; Cerofolini, Linda; Martelli, Tommaso; Kozyreva, Tatiana; Bernacchioni, Caterina; Giuntini, Stefano; Fragai, Marco; Turano, Paola; Luchinat, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    PEGylated proteins are widely used in biomedicine but, in spite of their importance, no atomic-level information is available since they are generally resistant to structural characterization approaches. PEGylated proteins are shown here to yield highly resolved solid-state NMR spectra, which allows assessment of the structural integrity of proteins when PEGylated for therapeutic or diagnostic use. PMID:26756539

  8. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackowski, K.

    2006-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of some nuclei (e.g. 1H, 13C, 19F, 29Si or 31P, I=1/2) gives strong signals which allow analytical studies of gaseous compounds. The other magnetic nuclei have low natural abundance or/and contain an electric quadrupole moment and their NMR signals are rather weak. In our laboratory we have developed new experimental techniques, which permit us to monitor several micrograms of chemical compounds in gaseous matrices. Applying this approach we have observed magnetic shielding of various nuclei, including 17O and 33S at the natural abundance, in the gas phase as a function of density. Density-dependent spin-spin couplings were also found for many chemical compounds. It has been shown that NMR gas-phase studies can easily be extended on molecules, which exhibit strong intermolecular interactions and are liquids at room temperature. All the latter NMR experimental results obtained for gaseous matrices are reviewed in this paper.

  9. Advanced laboratory NMR spectrometer with applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biscegli, Clovis; Panepucci, Horacio; Farach, Horacio A.; Poole, Charles P.

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of an inexpensive NMR spectrometer that is suitable for use in an advanced laboratory course. The application of this spectrometer to the measurement of the oil content in corn seeds and the role of polymerization are presented.

  10. A Primer of Fourier Transform NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macomber, Roger S.

    1985-01-01

    Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a new spectroscopic technique that is often omitted from undergraduate curricula because of lack of instructional materials. Therefore, information is provided to introduce students to the technique of data collection and transformation into the frequency domain. (JN)

  11. Advanced Laboratory NMR Spectrometer with Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biscegli, Clovis; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of an inexpensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for use in advanced laboratory courses. Applications to the nondestructive analysis of the oil content in corn seeds and in monitoring the crystallization of polymers are presented. (SK)

  12. Visualizing transient dark states by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Anthis, Nicholas J; Clore, G Marius

    2015-02-01

    Myriad biological processes proceed through states that defy characterization by conventional atomic-resolution structural biological methods. The invisibility of these 'dark' states can arise from their transient nature, low equilibrium population, large molecular weight, and/or heterogeneity. Although they are invisible, these dark states underlie a range of processes, acting as encounter complexes between proteins and as intermediates in protein folding and aggregation. New methods have made these states accessible to high-resolution analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, as long as the dark state is in dynamic equilibrium with an NMR-visible species. These methods - paramagnetic NMR, relaxation dispersion, saturation transfer, lifetime line broadening, and hydrogen exchange - allow the exploration of otherwise invisible states in exchange with a visible species over a range of timescales, each taking advantage of some unique property of the dark state to amplify its effect on a particular NMR observable. In this review, we introduce these methods and explore two specific techniques - paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and dark state exchange saturation transfer - in greater detail. PMID:25710841

  13. Gate controlled amplifier for platinum NMR thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinzaki, Y.; Okuda, Y.; Ikushima, A. J.

    A 250 kHz pulsed NMR circuit for measurement of platinum nuclear susceptibility is described. The nuclear free induction decay signal is detected using the single-coil method. Saturation of the amplifier is avoided by gating the rf pulse. This system is used for nuclear thermometry below 30 mK.

  14. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized) molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments. PMID:24441771

  15. SQUID detected NMR in microtesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlachov, Andrei N.; Volegov, Petr L.; Espy, Michelle A.; George, John S.; Kraus, Robert H.

    2004-09-01

    We have built an NMR system that employs a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector and operates in measurement fields of 2-25 μT. The system uses a pre-polarizing field from 4 to 30 mT generated by simple room-temperature wire-wound coils that are turned off during measurements. The instrument has an open geometry with samples located outside the cryostat at room-temperature. This removes constraints on sample size and allows us to obtain signals from living tissue. We have obtained 1H NMR spectra from a variety of samples including water, mineral oil, and a live frog. We also acquired gradient encoded free induction decay (FID) data from a water-plastic phantom in the μT regime, from which simple projection images were reconstructed. NMR signals from samples inside metallic containers have also been acquired. This is possible because the penetration skin depth is much greater at the low operating frequencies of this system than for conventional systems. Advantages to ultra-low field NMR measurements include lower susceptibility artifacts caused by high strength polarizing and measurement fields, and negligible line width broadening due to measurement field inhomogeneity, reducing the burden of producing highly homogeneous fields.

  16. Sample patterning on NMR surface microcoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrmann, K.; Gersbach, M.; Pascoal, P.; Vincent, F.; Massin, C.; Stamou, D.; Besse, P.-A.; Vogel, H.; Popovic, R. S.

    2006-01-01

    Aligned microcontact printing for patterning the sample in areas of homogeneous RF-field on the highly sensitive surface of planar NMR microprobes is presented. We experimentally demonstrate that sample patterning allows drastic improvement of the spin excitation uniformity. The NMR microprobes are designed for cell analysis and characterized using lipid vesicles as cell substitutes. Lipid vesicles are advantageous as composition and concentration of the confined solution are precisely controlled and because of their similarity to living cells. Using aligned microcontact printing, a monolayer of lipid vesicles is immobilized on the surface of the planar NMR microprobe in a patterned way. 1H NMR spectra and CPMG spin echoes of sucrose solution confined within the lipid vesicles are successfully recorded. Nutation curves of the sample structured in different patterns demonstrate the impact of patterning on the spin excitation uniformity. The total detection volumes are between 1 and 2 nL and derived with help of a theoretic model based on 3D finite element simulation. This model predicts the signal-to-noise ratio and the progression of the nutation curves.

  17. NMR analysis of a fluorocarbon copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Smith, C.H.

    1987-10-01

    Vinylidene fluoride (VF/sub 2/) can be copolymerized with chlorotrifluoroethylene (CTFE) in an aqueous emulsion using a peroxide chain initiator. The physical properties of the resulting fluorocarbon polymer depend on the ratio of VF/sub 2/ to CTFE and the randomness of the copolymerization. When CTFE and VF are polymerized in an approximately 3:1 mole ratio, the resulting polymer is soluble in acetone (and other solvents) at room temperature. Using proton and fluorine-19 NMR, the mole ratio of CTFE to VF/sub 2/, the emulsifier (perfluorodecanoate) concentration, and the randomness of copolymerization can be determined. A trifluorotoluene internal standard is added to a d/sub 6/-acetone solution of the fluoropolymer. Proton NMR is used to determine the amount of VF/sub 2/. Fluorine-19 NMR is used to measure the amount of emulsifier and the randomness of copolymerization. Each analysis requires about 5 minutes, and is quite precise, with relative standard deviations from 3 to 10% (10 replicates analyzed). In addition, the results from NMR analyses agree well with wet chemical analyses. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  19. 13C NMR of tunnelling methyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detken, A.

    The dipolar interactions between the protons and the central 13C nucleus of a 13CH3 group are used to study rotational tunnelling and incoherent dynamics of such groups in molecular solids. Single-crystal 13C NMR spectra are derived for arbitrary values of the tunnel frequency upsilon t. Similarities to ESR and 2H NMR are pointed out. The method is applied to three different materials. In the hydroquinone/acetonitrile clathrate, the unique features in the 13C NMR spectra which arise from tunnelling with a tunnel frequency that is much larger than the dipolar coupling between the methyl protons and the 13C nucleus are demonstrated, and the effects of incoherent dynamics are studied. The broadening of the 13C resonances is related to the width of the quasi-elastic line in neutron scattering. Selective magnetization transfer experiments for studying slow incoherent dynamics are proposed. For the strongly hindered methyl groups of L-alanine, an upper limit for upsilon is derived from the 13C NMR spectrum. In aspirinTM (acetylsalicylic acid), incoherent reorientations dominate the spectra down to the lowest temperatures studied; their rate apparently increases with decreasing temperature below 25K.

  20. Increasing the quantitative bandwidth of NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Power, J E; Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Nilsson, M; Coombes, S R; Phillips, A R; Morris, G A

    2016-02-01

    The frequency range of quantitative NMR is increased from tens to hundreds of kHz by a new pulse sequence, CHORUS. It uses chirp pulses to excite uniformly over very large bandwidths, yielding accurate integrals even for nuclei such as (19)F that have very wide spectra. PMID:26789115

  1. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  2. Advances in NMR-based biofluid analysis and metabolite profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shucha; Nagana Gowda, G. A.; Ye, Tao; Raftery, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Significant improvements in NMR technology and methods have propelled NMR studies to play an important role in a rapidly expanding number of applications involving the profiling of metabolites in biofluids. This review discusses recent technical advances in NMR spectroscopy based metabolite profiling methods, data processing and analysis over the last three years. PMID:20379603

  3. Applications of Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy (DOSY-NMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffusion-ordered NMR (DOSY-NMR) is a powerful, but under-utilized, technique for the investigation of mixtures based on translational diffusion rates. DOSY spectra allow for determination by NMR of components that may differ in molecular weight, geometry or complexation. Typical applications coul...

  4. An NMR study of microvoids in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattix, Larry

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb the Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe(129)-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts line Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A single Xe-129 line at 83.003498 Mhz (with protons at 300 Mhz) was observed for the gas. With the xenon charged PMR-15 samples, a second broader line is observed 190 ppm downfield from the gas line (also observed). The width of the NMR line from the Xe-129 absorbed in the polymer is at least partially due to the distribution of microvoid sizes. From the chemical shift (relative to the gas line) and the line width, we estimate the average void sizes to be 2.74 +/- 0.20 angstroms. Since Xe-129 has such a large chemical shift range (approximately 5000 ppm), we expect the chemical shift anisotropy to contribute to the line width (delta upsilon = 2.5 kHz).

  5. Altered phospholipid metabolism in schizophrenia: a phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Weber-Fahr, Wolfgang; Englisch, Susanne; Esser, Andrea; Tunc-Skarka, Nuran; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Ende, Gabriele; Zink, Mathias

    2013-12-30

    Phospholipid (PL) metabolism is investigated by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Inconsistent alterations of phosphocholine (PC), phosphoethanolamine (PE), glycerophosphocholine (GPC) and glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE) have been described in schizophrenia, which might be overcome by specific editing techniques. The selective refocused insensitive nuclei-enhanced polarization transfer (RINEPT) technique was applied in a cross-sectional study involving 11 schizophrenia spectrum disorder patients (SZP) on stable antipsychotic monotherapy and 15 matched control subjects. Metabolite signals were found to be modulated by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) content and gray matter/brain matter ratio. Corrected metabolite concentrations of PC, GPC and PE differed between patients and controls in both subcortical and cortical regions, whereas antipsychotic medication exerted only small effects. Significant correlations were found between the severity of clinical symptoms and the assessed signals. In particular, psychotic symptoms correlated with PC levels in the cerebral cortex, depression with PC levels in the cerebellum and executive functioning with GPC in the insular and temporal cortices. In conclusion, after controlling for age and tissue composition, this investigation revealed alterations of metabolite levels in SZP and correlations with clinical properties. RINEPT 31P MRS should also be applied to at-risk-mental-state patients as well as drug-naïve and chronically treated schizophrenic patients in order to enhance the understanding of longitudinal alterations of PL metabolism in schizophrenia. PMID:24045051

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging volumetric and phosphorus 31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements in schizophrenia.

    PubMed Central

    Hinsberger, A D; Williamson, P C; Carr, T J; Stanley, J A; Drost, D J; Densmore, M; MacFabe, G C; Montemurro, D G

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) parameters and left prefrontal volumes in both patients with schizophrenia and healthy subjects. 31P MRS parameters and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumetric data were collected in the left prefrontal region in 10 patients with schizophrenia and 10 healthy subjects of comparable age, handedness, sex, educational level, and parental educational level. No correlations were found between any MRS parameter and grey matter volumes in the combined subjects. Phosphomonoester (PME) and grey matter volumes, however, were both correlated negatively with age. PMEs were found to be decreased, and calculated intracellular magnesium ([Mg2+]intra) was found to be increased in the patients with schizophrenia compared with healthy subjects after adjusting for left prefrontal grey and white matter, total brain volume, and age. These findings suggest that cortical grey and white manner volumes are not directly related to PME and [Mg2+]intra abnormalities in schizophrenia patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9074305

  7. Phosphorus-31 MRI of cell membranes using quadratic echo line-narrowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Sean; Frey, Merideth; Madri, Joseph; Michaud, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Soft biological tissues have phosphorus concentrated in the membranes, metabolites, RNA and DNA of cells. This leads to a complicated, multi-peak ^31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum (including a broad membrane peak and narrow metabolite peaks), which precludes high-resolution ^31P MRI of soft tissues. This long-standing barrier has been overcome by a novel pulse sequence - the quadratic echo - recently discovered in fundamental quantum computation research. Applying time-dependent gradients in synch with a repeating pulse block enables a new route to high spatial resolution, three-dimensional ^31P MRI of the soft solid components of cells and tissues. This is a functionally different kind of MR image, since conventional ^1H MRI probes the intracellular and extracellular free water, whereas our ^31P MRI signal is dominated by the cell membrane contribution, which in turn depends on the density of mitochondria. The unique aspects of the signal should provide new insights into cellular and tissue function that compliment the information revealed by ^1H MRI. So far, various ex vivo soft tissue samples have been imaged with (sub-mm)^3 voxels. We will describe plans to enhance the spatial resolution in future work, to open a new window into cells.

  8. Phosphorus-31 metabolism of post-menopausal breast cancer studied in vivo by magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Twelves, C. J.; Porter, D. A.; Lowry, M.; Dobbs, N. A.; Graves, P. E.; Smith, M. A.; Rubens, R. D.; Richards, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the metabolism of 31P-containing metabolites of post-menopausal breast cancers in vivo using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and a 5.5 cm surface coil. Spectra were acquired from 23 diameter. The spectra of the 19 previously untreated tumours had significantly higher phosphomonoester (PME) 31P relative peak areas than the normal breasts of eight post-menopausal women (11.7% and 7.7% respectively, P = 0.002). Although an increased PME relative peak area was characteristic of malignancy, PME relative peak area is similarly raised in lactating breast and, therefore, not a specific feature of cancer. An apparently lower nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) relative peak area in tumours than healthy postmenopausal breast was secondary to the differences in PME relative peak area; contamination by signal from chest wall muscle probably accounts for the ostensibly higher phosphocreatine (PCr) relative peak area of the tumours. Spectroscopy was repeated following chemotherapy in six women. An increase in PCr relative peak area was seen in all five patients who responded, but again this may represent increased contamination secondary to changes in tumour size. A fall in PME relative peak area was noted in four responders, but also one non-responder, so this finding may not be sufficiently specific to be of use clinically. Further studies are need to elucidate fully the role of MRS in breast cancer. PMID:8198985

  9. Zur Bestimmung chemischer Verschiebungen der NMR-Frequenzen bei Quadrupolkernen aus den MAS-NMR-Spektren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, D.

    Die allgemeinen Ausdrücke für den NMR-Zentralübergang für Quadrupolkerne mit halbzahligem Spin bei Probenrotation, die von BEHRENS [1, 2] unter Berücksichtigung von Quadrupolwechselwirkungseffekten 2. Ordnung für beliebige Neigungswinkel der Rotationsachse abgeleitet wurden, werden für den praktisch interessierenden Fall der Probenrotation um den magischen Winkel (magic angle spinning, MAS) in einer den Ausgangsformeln für das Ruhespektrum (ohne Probenrotation) analogen Form dargestellt. Am Beispiel der 27Al-NMR-Spektren zweier Aluminate wird die Theorie überprüft und zur exakten Ermittlung der chemischen Verschiebungswerte aus den MAS-Spektren eingesetzt.Translated AbstractDetermination of Chemical Shifts of NMR-Frequencies of Quadrupolar Nuclei from the MAS-NMR SpectraThe general expressions for the NMR central transition of rotating samples with quadrupolar nuclei of half-integer spins, derived by BEHRENS [1, 2] for arbitrary angles of inclination of the spinning axis considering second-order quadrupolar effects, are presented for the practically interesting case of magic angle spinning (MAS) in a form analogous to the expressions for the resting sample. The theory is tested and used for the exact determination of the chemical shift values from the MAS-27Al-NMR spectra of two representative aluminates.

  10. OPENCORE NMR: Open-source core modules for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    A tool kit for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer [K. Takeda, A highly integrated FPGA-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 033103], referred to as the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer, is open to public. The system is composed of an FPGA chip and several peripheral boards for USB communication, direct-digital synthesis (DDS), RF transmission, signal acquisition, etc. Inside the FPGA chip have been implemented a number of digital modules including three pulse programmers, the digital part of DDS, a digital quadrature demodulator, dual digital low-pass filters, and a PC interface. These FPGA core modules are written in VHDL, and their source codes are available on our website. This work aims at providing sufficient information with which one can, given some facility in circuit board manufacturing, reproduce the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer presented here. Also, the users are encouraged to modify the design of spectrometer according to their own specific needs. A home-built NMR spectrometer can serve complementary roles to a sophisticated commercial spectrometer, should one comes across such new ideas that require heavy modification to hardware inside the spectrometer. This work can lower the barrier of building a handmade NMR spectrometer in the laboratory, and promote novel and exciting NMR experiments.

  11. OPENCORE NMR: open-source core modules for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    A tool kit for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer [K. Takeda, A highly integrated FPGA-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 033103], referred to as the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer, is open to public. The system is composed of an FPGA chip and several peripheral boards for USB communication, direct-digital synthesis (DDS), RF transmission, signal acquisition, etc. Inside the FPGA chip have been implemented a number of digital modules including three pulse programmers, the digital part of DDS, a digital quadrature demodulator, dual digital low-pass filters, and a PC interface. These FPGA core modules are written in VHDL, and their source codes are available on our website. This work aims at providing sufficient information with which one can, given some facility in circuit board manufacturing, reproduce the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer presented here. Also, the users are encouraged to modify the design of spectrometer according to their own specific needs. A home-built NMR spectrometer can serve complementary roles to a sophisticated commercial spectrometer, should one comes across such new ideas that require heavy modification to hardware inside the spectrometer. This work can lower the barrier of building a handmade NMR spectrometer in the laboratory, and promote novel and exciting NMR experiments. PMID:18374613

  12. Structural investigations on betacyanin pigments by LC NMR and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stintzing, Florian C; Conrad, Jürgen; Klaiber, Iris; Beifuss, Uwe; Carle, Reinhold

    2004-02-01

    Four betacyanin pigments were analysed by LC NMR and subjected to extensive NMR characterisation after isolation. Previously, low pH values were applied for NMR investigations of betalains resulting in rapid degradation of the purified substances thus preventing extensive NMR studies. Consequently, up to now only one single (13)C NMR spectrum of a betalain pigment, namely that of neobetanin (=14,15-dehydrobetanin), was available. Because of its sufficient stability under highly acidic conditions otherwise detrimental for betacyanins, this pigment remained an exemption. Since betalains are most stable in the pH range of 5-7, a new solvent system has been developed allowing improved data acquisition through improved pigment stability at near neutral pH. Thus, not only (1)H, but for the first time also partial (13)C data of betanin, isobetanin, phyllocactin and hylocerenin isolated from red-purple pitaya [Hylocereus polyrhizus (Weber) Britton & Rose, Cactaceae] could be indirectly obtained by gHSQC- and gHMQC-NMR experiments. PMID:14759534

  13. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); McDermott, Robert F. (Monona, WI); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  14. 33S NMR cryogenic probe for taurine detection.

    PubMed

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    With the goal of a (33)S nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe applicable to in vivo NMR on taurine-biological samples, we have developed the (33)S NMR cryogenic probe, which is applicable to taurine solutions. The NMR sensitivity gain relative to a conventional broadband probe is as large as 3.5. This work suggests that improvements in the preamplifier could allow NMR measurements on 100 microM taurine solutions, which is the level of sensitivity necessary for biological samples. PMID:19334961

  15. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-05-30

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  16. SQUID detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-10-03

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  17. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA); McDermott, Robert (Louisville, CO); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz (CH-8006 Zurich, CH)

    2007-05-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  18. NMR CHARACTERIZATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    C.T. Philip Chang; Changho Choi; Jeromy T. Hollenshead; Rudi Michalak; Jack Phan; Ramon Saavedra; John C. Slattery; Jinsoo Uh; Randi Valestrand; A. Ted Watson; Song Xue

    2005-01-01

    A critical and long-standing need within the petroleum industry is the specification of suitable petrophysical properties for mathematical simulation of fluid flow in petroleum reservoirs (i.e., reservoir characterization). The development of accurate reservoir characterizations is extremely challenging. Property variations may be described on many scales, and the information available from measurements reflect different scales. In fact, experiments on laboratory core samples, well-log data, well-test data, and reservoir-production data all represent information potentially valuable to reservoir characterization, yet they all reflect information about spatial variations of properties at different scales. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) provide enormous potential for developing new descriptions and understandings of heterogeneous media. NMR has the rare capability to probe permeable media non-invasively, with spatial resolution, and it provides unique information about molecular motions and interactions that are sensitive to morphology. NMR well-logging provides the best opportunity ever to resolve permeability distributions within petroleum reservoirs. We develop MRI methods to determine, for the first time, spatially resolved distributions of porosity and permeability within permeable media samples that approach the intrinsic scale: the finest resolution of these macroscopic properties possible. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the permeability is actually resolved at a scale smaller than the sample. In order to do this, we have developed a robust method to determine of relaxation distributions from NMR experiments and a novel implementation and analysis of MRI experiments to determine the amount of fluid corresponding to imaging regions, which are in turn used to determine porosity and saturation distributions. We have developed a novel MRI experiment to determine velocity distributions within flowing experiments, and developed methodology using that data to determine spatially resolved permeability distributions. We investigate the use of intrinsic properties for developing improved correlations for predicting permeability from NMR well-logging data and for obtaining more accurate estimates of multiphase flow properties--the relative permeability and capillary pressure--from displacement experiments. We demonstrate the use of MRI measurements of saturation and relaxation for prediction wetting-phase relative permeability for unstable experiments. Finally, we developed an improved method for determining surface relaxivity with NMR experiments, which can provide better descriptions of permeable media microstructures and improved correlations for permeability predictions.

  19. Multinuclear NMR studies of relaxor ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Donghua

    Multinuclear NMR of 93Nb, 45Sc, and 207Pb has been carried out to study the structure, disorder, and dynamics of a series of important solid solutions: perovskite relaxor ferroelectric materials (1-x) Pb(Mg1/3Nb 2/3)O3-x Pb(Sc1/2Nb1/2)O 3 (PMN-PSN). 93Nb NMR investigations of the local structure and cation order/disorder are presented as a function of PSN concentration, x. The superb fidelity and accuracy of 3QMAS allows us to make clear and consistent assignments of spectral intensities to the 28 possible nearest B-site neighbor (nBn) configurations, (NMg, NSc, NNb), where each number ranges from 0 to 6 and their sum is 6. For most of the 28 possible nBn configurations, isotropic chemical shifts and quadrupole product constants have been extracted from the data. The seven configurations with only larger cations, Mg 2+ and Sc3+ (and no Nb5+) are assigned to the seven observed narrow peaks, whose deconvoluted intensities facilitate quantitative evaluation of, and differentiation between, different models of B-site (chemical) disorder. The "completely random" model is ruled out and the "random site" model is shown to be in qualitative agreement with the NMR experiments. To obtain quantitative agreement with observed NMR intensities, the random site model is slightly modified by including unlike-pair interaction energies. To date, 45Sc studies have not been as fruitful as 93Nb NMR because the resolution is lower in the 45Sc spectra. The lower resolution of 45Sc spectra is due to a smaller span of isotropic chemical shift (40 ppm for 45Sc vs. 82 ppm for 93Nb) and to the lack of a fortuitous mechanism that simplifies the 93Nb spectra; for 93Nb the overlap of the isotropic chemical shifts of 6-Sc and 6-Nb configurations results in the alignment of all the 28 configurations along only seven quadrupole distribution axes. Finally we present variable temperature 207Pb static, MAS, and 2D-PASS NMR studies. Strong linear correlations between isotropic and anisotropic chemical shifts show that Pb-O bonds vary from more ionic to more covalent environments. Distributions of Pb-O bond lengthes are also quantitatively described. Such distributions are used to examine two competing models of Pb displacements; the shell model and the unique direction model. Only the latter model is able to reproduce the observed Pb-O distance distribution.

  20. Sodium ion effect on silk fibroin conformation characterized by solid-state NMR and generalized 2D NMR NMR correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qing-Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated Na + ion effect on the silk fibroin (SF) conformation. Samples are Na +-involved regenerated silk fibroin films. 13C CP-MAS NMR demonstrates that as added [Na +] increases, partial silk fibroin conformation transit from helix-form to ?-form at certain Na + ion concentration which is much higher than that in Bombyx mori silkworm gland. The generalized two-dimensional NMR-NMR correlation analysis reveals that silk fibroin undergoes several intermediate states during its conformation transition process as [Na +] increase. The appearance order of the intermediates is followed as: helix and/or random coil ? helix-like ? ?-sheet-like ? ?-sheet, which is the same as that produced by pH decrease from 6.8 to 4.8 in the resultant regenerated silk fibroin films. The binding sites of Na + to silk fibroin might involve the carbonyl oxygen atom of certain amino acids sequence which could promote the formation of ?-sheet conformation. Since the Na +sbnd O bond is weak, the ability of Na + inducing the secondary structure transition is weaker than those of Ca 2+, Cu 2+ and even K +. It is maybe a reason why the sodium content is much lower than potassium in the silkworm gland.

  1. NMR-based diffusion lattice imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laun, Frederik Bernd; Müller, Lars; Kuder, Tristan Anselm

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion experiments are widely employed as they yield information about structures hindering the diffusion process, e.g., about cell membranes. While it has been shown in recent articles that these experiments can be used to determine the shape of closed pores averaged over a volume of interest, it is still an open question how much information can be gained in open well-connected systems. In this theoretical work, it is shown that the full structure information of connected periodic systems is accessible. To this end, the so-called "SEquential Rephasing by Pulsed field-gradient Encoding N Time intervals" (SERPENT) sequence is used, which employs several diffusion encoding gradient pulses with different amplitudes. Two two-dimensional solid matrices that are surrounded by an NMR-visible medium are considered: a hexagonal lattice of cylinders and a rectangular lattice of isosceles triangles.

  2. NMR with excitation modulated by Frank sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Gong, Qingxia; Byrne, Eimear; Greferath, Marcus

    2009-07-01

    Miniaturized NMR is of growing importance in bio-, chemical, and -material sciences. Other than the magnet, bulky components are the radio-frequency power amplifier and the power supply or battery pack. We show that constant flip-angle excitation with phase modulation following a particular type of polyphase perfect sequences results in low peak excitation power at high response peak power. It has ideal power distribution in both the time domain and the frequency domain. A savings in peak excitation power of six orders of magnitude has been realized compared to conventionally pulsed excitation. Among others, the excitation promises to be of use for button-cell operated miniature NMR devices as well as for complying with specific-absorption-rate regulations in high-field medical imaging.

  3. NMR with excitation modulated by Frank sequences.

    PubMed

    Blümich, Bernhard; Gong, Qingxia; Byrne, Eimear; Greferath, Marcus

    2009-07-01

    Miniaturized NMR is of growing importance in bio-, chemical, and -material sciences. Other than the magnet, bulky components are the radio-frequency power amplifier and the power supply or battery pack. We show that constant flip-angle excitation with phase modulation following a particular type of polyphase perfect sequences results in low peak excitation power at high response peak power. It has ideal power distribution in both the time domain and the frequency domain. A savings in peak excitation power of six orders of magnitude has been realized compared to conventionally pulsed excitation. Among others, the excitation promises to be of use for button-cell operated miniature NMR devices as well as for complying with specific-absorption-rate regulations in high-field medical imaging. PMID:19386525

  4. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner. PMID:24149218

  5. NMR assays for carbohydrate-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher

    2005-08-10

    Antibodies against the cell surface carbohydrates of many microbial pathogens protect against infection. This was initially exploited by the development of purified polysaccharide vaccines, but glycoconjugate vaccines, in which the cell surface carbohydrate of a microbial pathogen is covalently attached to an appropriate carrier protein, are proving the most effective means to generate this protective immunity. Carbohydrate-based vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae Type b, Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (S. Typhi) are already licensed, and many similar products are in various stages of development. For many of these vaccines, biological assays are not available or are inappropriate and NMR spectroscopy is proving a valuable tool for the characterisation and quality control of existing and novel products. This review highlights some of the areas in which NMR spectroscopy is currently used, and where further developments may be expected. PMID:16087046

  6. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  7. NMR Characterizations of Properties of Heterogeneous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A. Ted; Phan, Jack; Uh, Jinsoo; Michalak, Rudi; Xue, Song

    2003-01-28

    The overall goal of this project was to develop reliable methods for resolving macroscopic properties important for describing the flow of one or more fluid phases in reservoirs from formation measurements. Completed the facilities to house our new NMR imager, the equipment has been delivered and installed. New experimental designs will provide for more reliable estimation of permeability distributions were evaluated. Designed and built a new core holder to incorporate one of the new experimental designs.

  8. Highly flexible pulse programmer for NMR applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dart, J.; Burum, D. P.; Rhim, W. K.

    1980-01-01

    A pulse generator for NMR application is described. Eighteen output channels are provided to allow use in single and double resonance experiments. Complex pulse sequences may be generated by loading instructions into a 256-word by 16-bit program memory. Features of the pulse generator include programmable time delays from 0.5 micros to 1000 s, branching and looping instructions, and the ability to be loaded and operated either manually or from a PDP-11/10 computer.

  9. Quantitative calibration of radiofrequency NMR Stark effects.

    PubMed

    Tarasek, Matthew R; Kempf, James G

    2011-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) Stark responses can occur in quadrupolar nuclei for an electric field oscillating at twice the usual NMR frequency (2?(0)). Calibration of responses to an applied E field is needed to establish nuclear spins as probes of native E fields within material and molecular systems. We present an improved approach and apparatus for accurate measurement of quadrupolar Stark effects. Updated values of C(14) (the response parameter in cubic crystals) were obtained for both (69)Ga and (75)As in GaAs. Keys to improvement include a modified implementation of voltage dividers to assess the 2?(0) amplitude, |E|, and the stabilization of divider response by reduction of stray couplings in 2?(0) circuitry. Finally, accuracy was enhanced by filtering sets of |E| through a linear response function that we established for the radiofrequency amplifier. Our approach is verified by two types of spectral results. Steady-state 2?(0) excitation to presaturate NMR spectra yielded C(14) = (2.59 ± 0.06) × 10(12) m(-1) for (69)Ga at room-temperature and 14.1 T. For (75)As, we obtained (3.1 ± 0.1) × 10(12) m(-1). Both values reconcile with earlier results from 77 K and below 1 T, whereas current experiments are at room temperature and 14.1 T. Finally, we present results where few-microsecond pulses of the 2?(0) field induced small (tens of Hz) changes in high-resolution NMR line shapes. There too, spectra collected vs |E| agree with the model for response, further establishing the validity of our protocols to specify |E|. PMID:22047309

  10. Quantitative calibration of radiofrequency NMR Stark effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.; Kempf, James G.

    2011-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) Stark responses can occur in quadrupolar nuclei for an electric field oscillating at twice the usual NMR frequency (2?0). Calibration of responses to an applied E field is needed to establish nuclear spins as probes of native E fields within material and molecular systems. We present an improved approach and apparatus for accurate measurement of quadrupolar Stark effects. Updated values of C14 (the response parameter in cubic crystals) were obtained for both 69Ga and 75As in GaAs. Keys to improvement include a modified implementation of voltage dividers to assess the 2?0 amplitude, |E|, and the stabilization of divider response by reduction of stray couplings in 2?0 circuitry. Finally, accuracy was enhanced by filtering sets of |E| through a linear response function that we established for the radiofrequency amplifier. Our approach is verified by two types of spectral results. Steady-state 2?0 excitation to presaturate NMR spectra yielded C14 = (2.59 ± 0.06) × 1012 m-1 for 69Ga at room-temperature and 14.1 T. For 75As, we obtained (3.1 ± 0.1) × 1012 m-1. Both values reconcile with earlier results from 77 K and below 1 T, whereas current experiments are at room temperature and 14.1 T. Finally, we present results where few-microsecond pulses of the 2?0 field induced small (tens of Hz) changes in high-resolution NMR line shapes. There too, spectra collected vs |E| agree with the model for response, further establishing the validity of our protocols to specify |E|.

  11. NMR characteristics of rat mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Kreider, J.; Taczanowsky, P.

    1984-01-01

    12 rats were injected intradermally with 13762A rat mammary adenocarcinoma (1 x 10/sup 6/ cells). 3 rats died before completion of the study and 2 rat had tumor regression; the first 3 were excluded from data analysis. NMR imaging with a 1.5K gauss resistive magnet at 2, 3, 4, and 5 weeks after injection demonstrated increasing tumor mass. Saturation recovery (SR), inversion recovery (IR), and spin echo (SE) pulse sequence images and T/sub 1/ calculation were done for tumor characterization. (Tumor size was too small to identify at 2 weeks.) 3 rats were sacrificed after the last 3 imaging periods for histological studies, done to distinguish solid tumor mass from necrosis. Planimetry of tumor areas showed that as tumors grew in size, the ratio of necrotic area to area of solid tumor increased (week 3 = .3 +- .11; week 4 = .45 +- .07; week 5 = .51 +- 05); simultaneous calculated T/sub 1/ values also increased (week 3 = .35 +- .15; week 4 = .45 +- .06; week 5 = .42 +- 03). Qualitative NMR image T/sub 1/ values also increased as evidenced by progression of SR and IR tumor image intensity from very bright compared to the rest of the body at week 3 to less intense than other structures at week 5. These findings indicate that change in T/sub 1/ may be secondary to the pathophysiological change in the tumor (the increasing in necrosis, associated with increased free water). Thus, the range of T/sub 1/ values obtained in tumors in this study (and in previous studies) may be due to change in tumor physiology and anatomy. Careful correlation of histological with NMR data may allow ultimate use of NMR relaxation characteristics for determination of the physiological state of tumors.

  12. 45Scandium NMR Investigations in Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haid, E.; Köhnlein, D.; Kössler, G.; Lutz, O.; Messner, W.; Mohn, K. R.; Nothaft, G.; Rickelen, B. van; Schich, W.; Steinhauser, N.

    1983-03-01

    45Sc NMR chemical shifts, linewidths, and longitudinal relaxation rates have been measured in aqueous solutions of scandium chloride and sulphate as a function of the appropriate acid. A common typical behaviour of these parameters without sudden changes has been observed. Also signals in the basic range have been obtained. H2O -D2O solvent isotope effects on Larmor frequency and relaxation rates are presented.

  13. NMR Studies of Dynamic Biomolecular Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Torchia, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR approaches can provide nearly complete sequential signal assignments of isotopically enriched biomolecules. The availability of assignments together with measurements of spin relaxation rates, residual spin interactions, J-couplings and chemical shifts provides information at atomic resolution about internal dynamics on timescales ranging from ps to ms, both in solution and in the solid state. However, due to the complexity of biomolecules, it is not possible to extract a unique atomic-resolution description of biomolecular motions even from extensive NMR data when many conformations are sampled on multiple timescales. For this reason, powerful computational approaches are increasingly applied to large NMR data sets to elucidate conformational ensembles sampled by biomolecules. In the past decade, considerable attention has been directed at an important class of biomolecules that function by binding to a wide variety of target molecules. Questions of current interest are: “Does the free biomolecule sample a conformational ensemble that encompasses the conformations found when it binds to various targets; and if so, on what time scale is the ensemble sampled?” This article reviews recent efforts to answer these questions, with a focus on comparing ensembles obtained for the same biomolecules by different investigators. A detailed comparison of results obtained is provided for three biomolecules: ubiquitin, calmodulin and the HIV-1 trans-activation response RNA. PMID:25669739

  14. Strategies for protein NMR in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guohua; Ye, Yansheng; Liu, Xiaoli; Cao, Shufen; Wu, Qiong; Cheng, Kai; Liu, Maili; Pielak, Gary J; Li, Conggang

    2014-04-01

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy provides insight into protein conformation, dynamics, and function at atomic resolution in living cells. Systematic evaluation of isotopic-labeling strategies is necessary to observe the target protein in the sea of other molecules in the cell. Here, we investigate the detectability, sensitivity, and resolution of in-cell NMR spectra of the globular proteins GB1, ubiquitin, calmodulin, and bcl-xl-cutloop, resulting from uniform (15)N enrichment (with and without deuteration), selective (15)N-Leu enrichment, (13)C-methyl enrichment of isoleucine, leucine, valine, and alanine, fractional (13)C enrichment, and (19)F labeling. Most of the target proteins can be observed by (19)F labeling and (13)C enrichment with direct detection because selectively labeling suppresses background signals and because deuteration improves in-cell spectra. Our results demonstrate that the detectability of proteins is determined by weak interactions with intercellular components and that choosing appropriate labeling strategies is critical for the success of in-cell protein NMR studies. PMID:24597855

  15. NMR Studies of Cartilage Dynamics, Diffusion, Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huster, Daniel; Schiller, Jürgen; Naji, Lama; et al.

    An increasing number of people is suffering from rheumatic diseases, and, therefore, methods of early diagnosis of joint degeneration are urgently required. For their establishment, however, an improved knowledge about the molecular organisation of cartilage would be helpful. Cartilage consists of three main components: Water, collagen and chondroitin sulfate (CS) that is (together with further polysaccharides and proteins) a major constituent of the proteoglycans of cartilage. 1H and 13C MAS (magic-angle spinning) NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) opened new perspectives for the study of the macromolecular components in cartilage. We have primarily studied the mobilities of CS and collagen in bovine nasal and pig articular cartilage (that differ significantly in their collagen/polysaccharide content) by measuring 13C NMR relaxation times as well as the corresponding 13C CP (cross polarisation) MAS NMR spectra. These data clearly indicate that the mobility of cartilage macromolecules is broadly distributed from almost completely rigid (collagen) to highly mobile (polysaccharides), which lends cartilage its mechanical strength and shock-absorbing properties.

  16. Statistical filtering for NMR based structure generation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The difficulty of a structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. Saturated compounds can usually be assigned unambiguously by hand using only COSY and 13C-HMBC data, whereas condensed heterocycles are problematic due to their lack of protons that could show interatomic connectivities. Different computer programs were developed to aid in the structural assignment process, one of them COCON. In the case of unsaturated and substituted molecules structure generators frequently will generate a very large number of possible solutions. This article presents a "statistical filter" for the reduction of the number of results. The filter works by generating 3D conformations using smi23d, a simple MD approach. All molecules for which the generation of constitutional restraints failed were eliminated from the result set. Some structural elements removed by the statistical filter were analyzed and checked against Beilstein. The automatic removal of molecules for which no MD parameter set could be created was included into WEBCOCON. The effect of this filter varies in dependence of the NMR data set used, but in no case the correct constitution was removed from the resulting set. PMID:21835037

  17. NMR quantitation: influence of RF inhomogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Huaping; Harwood, John; Raftery, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The NMR peak integral is ideally linearly dependent on the sine of excitation angle (?), which has provided unsurpassed flexibility in quantitative NMR by allowing the use of a signal of any concentration as the internal concentration reference. Controlling the excitation angle is particularly critical for solvent proton concentration referencing to minimize the negative impact of radiation damping, and to reduce the risk of receiver gain compression. In practice, due to the influence of RF inhomogeneity for any given probe, the observed peak integral is not exactly proportional to sin ?. To evaluate the impact quantitatively, we introduce a RF inhomogeneity factor I(?) as a function of the nominal pulse excitation angle and propose a simple calibration procedure. Alternatively, I(?) can be calculated from the probe’s RF profile, which can be readily obtained as a gradient image of an aqueous sample. Our results show that without consideration of I(?), even for a probe with good RF homogeneity, up to 5% error can be introduced due to different excitation pulse angles used for the analyte and the reference. Hence, a simple calibration of I(?) can eliminate such errors and allow an accurate description of the observed NMR signal’s dependence on the excitation angle in quantitative analysis. PMID:21919056

  18. RHODOPSIN-LIPID INTERACTIONS STUDIED BY NMR

    PubMed Central

    Soubias, Olivier; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the lipid matrix are known to influence function of integral membrane proteins. We report on a sample preparation method for reconstitution of membrane proteins which uses porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) filters with 200 nm-wide pores of high density. The substrate permits formation of tubular, single membranes that line the inner surface of pores. One square centimeter of filter with a thickness of 60 ?m yields on the order of 500 cm2 of solid-supported single bilayer surface, sufficient for NMR studies. The tubular bilayers are free of detergent, fully hydrated and accessible for ligands from one side of the membrane. The use of AAO filters greatly improves reproducibility of the reconstitution process such that the influence of protein on lipid order parameters can be studied with high resolution. As an example, results for the G protein-coupled receptor of class A, bovine rhodopsin, are shown. By 2H NMR order parameter measurements it is detected that rhodopsin insertion elastically deforms membranes near the protein. Furthermore, by 1H saturation-transfer NMR under conditions of magic-angle spinning (MAS), we demonstrate detection of preferences in interactions of rhodopsin with particular lipid species. It is assumed that function of integral membrane proteins depends on both protein-induced elastic deformations of the lipid matrix and preferences for interaction of the protein with particular lipid species in the first layer of lipids surrounding the protein. PMID:23374188

  19. Phosphorus NMR of isolated perfused morris hepatomas

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.A.; Meyer, R.A.; Brown, T.R.; Sauer, L.A.

    1986-03-05

    The authors are developing techniques for the study of perfused solid tumors by NMR. Tissue-isolated solid hepatomas were grown to 1-2 cm diameter as described previously. The arterial supply was isolated and the tumors perfused (0.5 - 1.0 ml/min) in vitro at 25 C with a 15% suspension of red blood cells in Krebs-Henseliet solution. /sup 31/P-NMR spectra were acquired at 162 MHz in a specially-designed NMR probe using a solenoidal coil. Intracellular pH (monitored from the chemical shift of inorganic phosphate) and ATP levels were stable for up to 6 hrs during perfusion. During 30 min of global ischemia, ATP decreased by 75% and pH fell from 7.0 to 6.7. These changes were reversed by 1 hr reperfusion. In addition to ATP and phosphate, the spectra included a large resonance due to phosphomonoesters, as well as peaks consistent with glycerylphosphocholine, glyceryl-phosphoethanolamine, phosphocreatine, NAD, and UDPG. However, the most novel feature of the spectra was the presence of an unidentified peak in the phosphonate region (+ 16.9 ppm). The peak was not present in spectra of muscle, liver, brain, kidney, or fat tissues excised from the same animals. They are presently attempting to identify the compound that gives rise to this peak and to establish its metabolic origin.

  20. NMR structures of polytopic integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2011-09-01

    Membrane proteins represent up to 30% of the proteins in all organisms, they are involved in many biological processes and are the molecular targets for around 50% of validated drugs. Despite this, membrane proteins represent less than 1% of all high-resolution protein structures due to various challenges associated with applying the main biophysical techniques used for protein structure determination. Recent years have seen an explosion in the number of high-resolution structures of membrane proteins determined by NMR spectroscopy, especially for those with multiple transmembrane-spanning segments. This is a review of the structures of polytopic integral membrane proteins determined by NMR spectroscopy up to the end of the year 2010, which includes both ?-barrel and ?-helical proteins from a number of different organisms and with a range in types of function. It also considers the challenges associated with performing structural studies by NMR spectroscopy on membrane proteins and how some of these have been overcome, along with its exciting potential for contributing new knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of membrane proteins, their roles in human disease, and for assisting drug design. PMID:21809901

  1. Automatic maximum entropy spectral reconstruction in NMR.

    PubMed

    Mobli, Mehdi; Maciejewski, Mark W; Gryk, Michael R; Hoch, Jeffrey C

    2007-10-01

    Developments in superconducting magnets, cryogenic probes, isotope labeling strategies, and sophisticated pulse sequences together have enabled the application, in principle, of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to biomolecular systems approaching 1 megadalton. In practice, however, conventional approaches to NMR that utilize the fast Fourier transform, which require data collected at uniform time intervals, result in prohibitively lengthy data collection times in order to achieve the full resolution afforded by high field magnets. A variety of approaches that involve nonuniform sampling have been proposed, each utilizing a non-Fourier method of spectrum analysis. A very general non-Fourier method that is capable of utilizing data collected using any of the proposed nonuniform sampling strategies is maximum entropy reconstruction. A limiting factor in the adoption of maximum entropy reconstruction in NMR has been the need to specify non-intuitive parameters. Here we describe a fully automated system for maximum entropy reconstruction that requires no user-specified parameters. A web-accessible script generator provides the user interface to the system. PMID:17701276

  2. NMR methodologies for studying mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Alves, Tiago C; Jarak, Ivana; Carvalho, Rui A

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a technique with an increasing importance in the study of metabolic diseases. Its initial important role in the determination of chemical structures (1, 2) has been considerably overcome by its potential for the in vivo study of metabolism (3-5). The main characteristic that makes this technique so attractive is its noninvasiveness. Only nuclei capable of transitioning between energy states, in the presence of an intense and constant magnetic field, are studied. This includes abundant nuclei such as proton ((1)H) and phosphorous ((31)P), as well as stable isotopes such as deuterium ((2)H) and carbon 13 ((13)C). This allows a wide range of applications that vary from the determination of water distribution in tissues (as obtained in a magnetic resonance imaging scan) to the calculation of metabolic fluxes under ex vivo and in vivo conditions without the need to use radioactive tracers or tissue biopsies (as in a magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) scan). In this chapter, some technical aspects of the methodology of an NMR/MRS experiment as well as how it can be used to study mitochondrial bioenergetics are overviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of in vivo MRS versus high-resolution NMR using proton high rotation magic angle spinning (HRMAS) of tissue biopsies and tissue extracts are also discussed. PMID:22057574

  3. The NMR blood flowmeter--design.

    PubMed

    Halbach, R E; Battocletti, J H; Salles-Cunha, S X; Sances, A

    1981-01-01

    Two types of crossed-coil nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) blood flowmeter detectors have been developed for the noninvasive measurement of blood flow. The first is a cylindrical coil configuration suitable for limb blood measurement. A cylindrical flowmeter (12.5 cm internal diam) operating at a nuclear resonance frequency of 3.2 MHz has been applied to measurement of flow in the forearm. The second type is the flat crossed-coil detector, which retains many of the operational advantages of the cylindrical detector, but is suitable for blood flow measurement of almost any surface of the body. Three flat crossed-coil detectors are described, operating at NMR frequencies of 9, 21.4, and 75 MHz. Two types of intermediate frequency signal processors have been used in the NMR receivers, a simple diode type, and a synchronous detector. The synchronous detector is preferred for its ease of operation and superior stability. Modular detection systems containing transmitter, receiver, post-detector signal conditioning, and power supply have been designed for all of the flat crossed-coil detectors. A self-contained synchronous detector module is included in the 21.4 and 75 MHz systems. PMID:6459529

  4. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2015-08-01

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD-NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases (15)N-(1)H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD-NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include (1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the discriminating power score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and (2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta. PMID:26081575

  5. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectlymore » predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.« less

  6. Protein Structure Determination Using Protein Threading and Sparse NMR Data

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, O.H.; Einstein, J.R.; Xu, D.; Xu, Y.

    1999-11-14

    It is well known that the NMR method for protein structure determination applies to small proteins and that its effectiveness decreases very rapidly as the molecular weight increases beyond about 30 kD. We have recently developed a method for protein structure determination that can fully utilize partial NMR data as calculation constraints. The core of the method is a threading algorithm that guarantees to find a globally optimal alignment between a query sequence and a template structure, under distance constraints specified by NMR/NOE data. Our preliminary tests have demonstrated that a small number of NMR/NOE distance restraints can significantly improve threading performance in both fold recognition and threading-alignment accuracy, and can possibly extend threading's scope of applicability from structural homologs to structural analogs. An accurate backbone structure generated by NMR-constrained threading can then provide a significant amount of structural information, equivalent to that provided by the NMR method with many NMR/NOE restraints; and hence can greatly reduce the amount of NMR data typically required for accurate structure determination. Our preliminary study suggests that a small number of NMR/NOE restraints may suffice to determine adequately the all-atom structure when those restraints are incorporated in a procedure combining threading, modeling of loops and sidechains, and molecular dynamics simulation. Potentially, this new technique can expand NMR's capability to larger proteins.

  7. NMR spectroscopy of experimentally shocked single crystal quartz: A reexamination of the NMR shock barometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiske, P. S.; Gratz, A. J.; Nellis, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Cygan and others report a broadening of the Si-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) peak for synthetic quartz powders with increasing shock pressure which they propose as a shock wave barometer for natural systems. These results are expanded by studying single crystal quartz shocked to 12 and 33 GPa using the 6.5 m two-stage light-gas gun at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Our NMR results differ substantially from those of Cygan and others and suggest that the proposed shock wave barometer may require refinement. The difference in results between this study and that of Cygan and others is most likely caused by different starting materials (single crystal vs. powder) and different shock loading histories. NMR results from single crystal studies may be more applicable to natural systems.

  8. Multiplexed NMR: An Automated CapNMR Dual-Sample Probe

    PubMed Central

    Norcross, James A.; Milling, Craig T.; Olson, Dean L.; Xu, Duanxiang; Audrieth, Anthony; Albrecht, Robert; Ruan, Ke; Likos, John; Jones, Claude; Peck, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    A new generation of micro-scale, nuclear magnetic resonance (CapNMR™) probe technology employs two independent detection elements to accommodate two samples simultaneously. Each detection element in the Dual-Sample CapNMR Probe (DSP) delivers the same spectral resolution and S/N as in a CapNMR probe configured to accommodate one sample at a time. A high degree of electrical isolation allows the DSP to be used in a variety of data acquisition modes. Both samples are shimmed simultaneously to achieve high spectral resolution for simultaneous data acquisition, or alternatively, a flowcell-specific shim set is readily called via spectrometer subroutines to enable acquisition from one sample while the other is being loaded. An automation system accommodates loading of two samples via dual injection ports on an autosampler and two completely independent flowpaths leading to dedicated flowcells in the DSP probe. PMID:20681560

  9. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use. PMID:24091140

  10. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  11. Universal Quantitative NMR Analysis of Complex Natural Samples

    PubMed Central

    Simmler, Charlotte; Napolitano, José G.; McAlpine, James B.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a universal and quantitative analytical technique. Being a unique structural tool, NMR also competes with metrological techniques for purity determination and reference material analysis. In pharmaceutical research, applications of quantitative NMR (qNMR) cover mostly the identification and quantification of drug and biological metabolites. Offering an unbiased view of the sample composition, and the possibility to simultaneously quantify multiple compounds, qNMR has become the method of choice for metabolomic studies and quality control of complex natural samples such as foods, plants or herbal remedies, and biofluids. In this regard, NMR-based metabolomic studies, dedicated to both the characterization of herbal remedies and clinical diagnosis, have increased considerably. PMID:24484881

  12. In vivo NMR for ¹³C Metabolic Flux Analysis.

    PubMed

    Roscher, Albrecht; Troufflard, Stéphanie; Taghki, Abdelghani Idrissi

    2014-01-01

    The use of in vivo NMR within the framework of Metabolic Flux Analysis in plants is presented. In vivo NMR allows to visualize the active metabolic network, to determine metabolic and isotopic steady state and to measure metabolic fluxes which are not necessarily accessible by isotopic steady state (stationary) Metabolic Flux Analysis. The kinetic data can be used as input for dynamic (nonstationary) Metabolic Flux Analysis. Both 1D and 2D NMR methods are employed. PMID:24222415

  13. Avoiding Problems with Suspensions in NMR Sample Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Saqib; Danish, M.; Mazhar, M.

    1995-07-01

    Many times during the sample preparation for NMR studies solid samples form suspension due to low solubility in duterated solvents. We developed a technique to get rid of this problem easily. Just tighten the lid on the NMR sample tube and seal it with parafilm. Invert the tube and centrifuge it for five minutes. Now the suspension is collected in the lid and the clear sample is ready for NMR analysis in the tube.

  14. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  15. Lithium Polymer Electrolytes and Solid State NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkeley, Emily R.

    2004-01-01

    Research is being done at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) developing new kinds of batteries that do not depend on a solution. Currently, batteries use liquid electrolytes containing lithium. Problems with the liquid electrolyte are (1) solvents used can leak out of the battery, so larger, more restrictive, packages have to be made, inhibiting the diversity of application and decreasing the power density; (2) the liquid is incompatible with the lithium metal anode, so alternative, less efficient, anodes are required. The Materials Department at GRC has been working to synthesize polymer electrolytes that can replace the liquid electrolytes. The advantages are that polymer electrolytes do not have the potential to leak so they can be used for a variety of tasks, small or large, including in the space rover or in space suits. The polymers generated by Dr. Mary Ann Meador's group are in the form of rod -coil structures. The rod aspect gives the polymer structural integrity, while the coil makes it flexible. Lithium ions are used in these polymers because of their high mobility. The coils have repeating units of oxygen which stabilize the positive lithium by donating electron density. This aids in the movement of the lithium within the polymer, which contributes to higher conductivity. In addition to conductivity testing, these polymers are characterized using DSC, TGA, FTIR, and solid state NMR. Solid state NMR is used in classifying materials that are not soluble in solvents, such as polymers. The NMR spins the sample at a magic angle (54.7') allowing the significant peaks to emerge. Although solid state NMR is a helpful technique in determining bonding, the process of preparing the sample and tuning it properly are intricate jobs that require patience; especially since each run takes about six hours. The NMR allows for the advancement of polymer synthesis by showing if the expected results were achieved. Using the NMR, in addition to looking at polymers, allows for participation on a variety of other projects, including aero-gels and carbon graphite mat en als. The goals of the polymer electrolyte research are to improve the physical properties of the polymers. This includes improving conductivity, durability, and expanding the temperature range over which it is effective. Currently, good conductivity is only present at high temperatures. My goals are to experiment with different arrangements of rods and coils to achieve these desirable properties. Some of my experiments include changing the number of repeat units in the polymer, the size of the diamines, and the types of coil. Analysis of these new polymers indicates improvement in some properties, such as lower glass transition temperature; however, they are not as flexible as desired. With further research we hope to produce polymers that encompass all of these properties to a high degree.

  16. Understanding NMR relaxometry of partially water-saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Jorand, R.; Nordlund, C.; Klitzsch, N.

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry measurements are commonly used to characterize the storage and transport properties of water-saturated rocks. Estimations of these properties are based on the direct link of the initial NMR signal amplitude to porosity (water content) and of the NMR relaxation time to pore size. Herein, pore shapes are usually assumed to be spherical or cylindrical. However, the NMR response at partial water saturation for natural sediments and rocks may differ strongly from the responses calculated for spherical or cylindrical pores, because these pore shapes do not account for water menisci remaining in the corners of desaturated angular pores. Therefore, we consider a bundle of pores with triangular cross sections. We introduce analytical solutions of the NMR equations at partial saturation of these pores, which account for water menisci of desaturated pores. After developing equations that describe the water distribution inside the pores, we calculate the NMR response at partial saturation for imbibition and drainage based on the deduced water distributions. For this pore model, the NMR amplitudes and NMR relaxation times at partial water saturation strongly depend on pore shape, i.e., arising from the capillary pressure and pore shape-dependent water distribution in desaturated pores with triangular cross sections. Even so, the NMR relaxation time at full saturation only depends on the surface-to-volume ratio of the pore. Moreover, we show the qualitative agreement of the saturation-dependent relaxation-time distributions of our model with those observed for rocks and soils.

  17. In NMR tube transcription for rapid screening of RNA conformation.

    PubMed

    Okui, Saya; Kawai, Gota

    2015-01-01

    A simple method for rapid structure screening for RNA by NMR is proposed. Target RNA is transcribed in a NMR tube and its spectra are measured without purification. The proposed method, in NMR tube transcription or INTT, was applied for three RNAs for which NMR spectra have been measured by using the conventionally purified samples. By the real-time measuring, increase of imino proton signals and decrease of NTP signals can be observed. It was confirmed that INTT spectra are in general similar to those obtained by the conventional method. INTT can be used for the first-step screening of RNA folding. PMID:25621704

  18. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy in inhomogeneous fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Cai, Shuhui; Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yulan

    2015-11-01

    High-resolution NMR spectroscopy, providing information on chemical shifts, J coupling constants, multiplet patterns, and relative peak areas, is a mainstream tool for analysis of molecular structures, conformations, compositions, and dynamics. Generally, a homogeneous magnetic field is a prerequisite for obtaining high-resolution NMR information. Magnetic field inhomogeneity, whether from non-ideal experimental conditions or from intrinsic magnetic susceptibility discontinuities in samples, represents a hurdle for applications of high-resolution NMR. Numerous techniques have been proposed for measuring high-resolution NMR spectra free from the influence of inhomogeneous magnetic fields. Besides developments and improvements in NMR instrumentation, various types of experimental approaches have been established for recovering NMR information in inhomogeneous magnetic fields. Three main types are systematically described in this review. In addition, other high-resolution NMR approaches or data processing methods are also briefly described. All high-resolution NMR approaches covered in this review have individual advantages and disadvantages in practical applications, and no one technique is applicable to all practical circumstances. Hence, they are complementary for high-resolution NMR applications in inhomogeneous fields. The underlying mechanisms of these approaches are presented, together with analyses of their applicability and efficiency. PMID:26592943

  19. Cation-? versus anion-? interactions: A theoretical NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Khorassani, Mostafa Habibi; Masoodi, Hamid Reza

    2011-03-01

    The influences of cation-? and anion-? interactions on NMR data have been investigated in complexes of cations and anions with 1,3,5-trifluorobenzene (TFB). Cation-? interaction increases 1JC-F, 1JC-H and the chemical shifts of hydrogen and fluorine while it decreases 1JC-C. The changes are in reverse direction in the presence of anion-? interaction. The role of geometry and electronic effects on the NMR data was considered. The distance dependence of NMR parameters has been studied in these complexes. The NMR data have been investigated in isoelectronic complexes.

  20. Lanthanide induced formation of novel luminescent alginate hydrogels and detection features.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qianmin; Wang, Qianming

    2015-11-20

    Responsive photo-luminescent soft matters have led to the design of optical sensors and switches. In this research, two new organic-inorganic type hybrid hydrogels have been fabricated by the self-assembly of sodium alginate and lanthanide elements. The incorporation of europium ions (Eu(3+)) (or terbium ions (Tb(3+))) was required for the gelation of the dissolved alginate and thermally stable gels were formed. It has been found that red/green emissions derived from lanthanide ions were clearly identified in pure aqueous media through the metal coordination interactions with assembled alginate. These supramolecular structures could partially prevent the Eu(3+) (or Tb(3+)) from being attacked by high frequency vibrations. More importantly, the lanthanide luminescence could be switched "off-on" in the presence of the anthrax biomarker sodium dipicolinate (NaDPA). The detection limits (for NaDPA) were determined to be 8.3×10(-8)M and 9.0×10(-8)M based on Eu(III) and Tb(III) gel, respectively. PMID:26344249

  1. Analysis of lanthanide-induced conformational change of the C-terminal domain on centrin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-Qin; Yan, Jun; Song, Li; Feng, Ya-Nan; Liang, Ai-Hua; Yang, Bin-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Centrin, an EF-hand calcium-binding protein with high homology to calmodulin (CaM), is an essential component of microtubule-organizing center (MTOC). Lanthanide (Ln) ions can improve the stability, increase the amount and enhance the orderliness of microtubules, which are components of cytoskeleton. In order to investigate the structural basis of Ln ions on enhancing orderliness of microtubules, we characterized the binding properties of Ln ions with the isolated C-terminal domain of the Euplotes centrin (C-EoCen). Results suggested that Ln ions may occupy the canonical Ca(2+) binding sites on C-EoCen with middle affinity. Near- and far-UV CD spectra of C-EoCen displayed pronounced differences before and after additing Ln ions. The asymmetry of microenvironments of Phe on C-EoCen was changed. Using 2-p-toluidinylnaphthalene-6- sulfonate (TNS) as probe, Ln ions induced C-EoCen to undergo conformational changes from closed state to open state, resulting in exposing hydrophobic patches to external environments. Ln ions have more obvious effect on the conformation of centrin than Ca(2+). The differences found in the interactions of centrin binding with Ln ions/Ca(2+) maybe provide some insights for structural basis of centrin functions in vivo. PMID:21947611

  2. Random phase detection in multidimensional NMR

    PubMed Central

    Maciejewski, Mark W.; Fenwick, Matthew; Schuyler, Adam D.; Stern, Alan S.; Gorbatyuk, Vitaliy; Hoch, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in resolution accompanying the development of high-field superconducting magnets, biomolecular applications of NMR require multiple dimensions in order to resolve individual resonances, and the achievable resolution is typically limited by practical constraints on measuring time. In addition to the need for measuring long evolution times to obtain high resolution, the need to distinguish the sign of the frequency constrains the ability to shorten measuring times. Sign discrimination is typically accomplished by sampling the signal with two different receiver phases or by selecting a reference frequency outside the range of frequencies spanned by the signal and then sampling at a higher rate. In the parametrically sampled (indirect) time dimensions of multidimensional NMR experiments, either method imposes an additional factor of 2 sampling burden for each dimension. We demonstrate that by using a single detector phase at each time sample point, but randomly altering the phase for different points, the sign ambiguity that attends fixed single-phase detection is resolved. Random phase detection enables a reduction in experiment time by a factor of 2 for each indirect dimension, amounting to a factor of 8 for a four-dimensional experiment, albeit at the cost of introducing sampling artifacts. Alternatively, for fixed measuring time, random phase detection can be used to double resolution in each indirect dimension. Random phase detection is complementary to nonuniform sampling methods, and their combination offers the potential for additional benefits. In addition to applications in biomolecular NMR, random phase detection could be useful in magnetic resonance imaging and other signal processing contexts. PMID:21949370

  3. Stroke, evolution of NMR imaging characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, R.L.; Carr, T.; Kertesz, A.; Black, S.; Cooper, P.; Stewart, S.

    1984-01-01

    This study evaluates the NMR imaging characteristics of stroke and temporal evolution of these features. Patients with acute stroke clinically had NMR imaging (prototype 0.15T resistive imager, Technicare, Inc.) acutely (n=37), at approximately 2 weeks (n=31) and 3 months (n=10). Patients with old (> 1 yr.) stroke were also imaged (n=7). Partial saturation sequences were used employing echo time (T/sub E/) of 30, 60 and 120 msec, as well as inversion recovery (TR) sequences. Partial saturation images displayed a homogeneous increase in signal at lesion sites in both bland and hemorrhagic infarcts, reflection prolongation of spin-spin relaxation (T/sub 2/) due to increased tissue water content, blood and edema being indistinguishable. IR images recovered low signal from bland infarcts due to prolongation of spinlattice relaxation (T/sub 1/) by tissue edema, hemorrhagic lesions and short (T/sub 1/) centrally (blood) with moderate or increased IR signal, and low signal peripherally (edema). On follow-up IR imaging, hematomas developed low signal centres, possibly reflection cavitation, with short T/sub 2/ rims, possibly indicating the presence of iron-laden macrophages. In 2 patients with hemorrhagic infarcts an area of increased signal (prolonged T/sub 2/) was seen on initial partial saturation images in the homologous portion of the other hemisphere (normal by CT). This may reflect a local alteration of blood volume or velocity. In 5 patients with old infarcts, a rim of prolonged T/sub 2/ was seen at the periphery of old lesions, possibly reflecting a local chronic increase in extravascular or intravascular water, slowing of blood velocity, or a zone of neuronal dropout. Detailed pathophysiologic correlation is required to understand the basis of these NMR findings.

  4. NMR measurements of intracellular ions in hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veniero, Joseph C.; Gupta, R. K.

    1993-08-01

    The NMR methods for the measurement of intracellular free Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and H+ are introduced. The recent literature is then presented showing applications of these methods to cells and tissues from hypertensive animal model systems, and humans with essential hypertension. The results support the hypothesis of consistent derangement of the intracellular ionic environment in hypertension. The theory that this derangement may be a common link in the disease states of high blood pressure and abnormal insulin and glucose metabolism, which are often associated clinically, is discussed.

  5. MULTIPLE-QUANTUM NMR IN SOLIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Y-S.

    1982-11-01

    Time domain multiple-quantum (MQ) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for spectral simplification and for providing new information on molecular dynamics. In this thesis, applications of MQ NMR are presented and show distinctly the advantages of this method over the conventional single-quantum NMR. Chapter 1 introduces the spin Hamiltonians, the density matrix formalism and some basic concepts of MQ NMR spectroscopy. In chapter 2, {sup 14}N double-quantum coherence is observed with high sensitivity in isotropic solution, using only the magnetization of bound protons. Spin echoes are used to obtain the homogeneous double-quantum spectrum and to suppress a large H{sub 2}O solvent signal. Chapter 3 resolves the main difficulty in observing high MQ transitions in solids. Due to the profusion of spin transitions in a solid, individual lines are unresolved. Excitation and detection of high quantum transitions by normal schemes are thus difficult. To ensure that overlapping lines add constructively and thereby to enhance sensitivity, time-reversal pulse sequences are used to generate all lines in phase. Up to 22-quantum {sup 1}H absorption in solid adamantane is observed. A time dependence study shows an increase in spin correlations as the excitation time increased. In chapter 4, a statistical theory of MQ second moments is developed for coupled spins of spin I = 1/2. The model reveals that the ratio of the average dipolar coupling to the rms value largely determines the dependence of second moments on the number of quanta. The results of this model are checked against computer-calculated and experimental second moments, and show good agreement. A simple scheme is proposed in chapter 5 for sensitivity improvement in a MQ experiment. The scheme involves acquiring all of the signal energy available in the detection period by applying pulsed spinlocking and sampling between pulses. Using this technique on polycrystalline adamantane, a large increase in sensitivity is observed. Correlation of motion of two interacting methyl groups is the subject of chapter 6. This system serves as a model for the study of hindered internal motion. Because the spin system is small and the motions are well-defined, the calculations involved are tractable. Group theory appropriate for nonrigid molecules is used to treat the change in the Hamiltonian as the methyl groups transit from correlated to uncorrelated motion. Results show that the four-quantum order alone is sufficient to distinguish between the two motions.

  6. Analysis of multiple pulse NMR in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W.-K.; Elleman, D. D.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The general problems associated with the removal of the effects of dipolar broadening from solid-state NMR spectra are analyzed. The effects of finite pulse width and H sub 1 inhomogeneity are shown to have limited the resolution of previous pulse cycles, and a new eight-pulse cycle designed to minimize these problems is discussed. Spectra for F-19 in CaF2 taken with this cycle are presented which show residual linewidth near 10 Hz. The feasibility of measuring proton chemical shift tensors is discussed.

  7. Broadband phase shifter suitable for NMR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, R. E. J.

    1984-10-01

    A broadband radio frequency phase shifter has been designed which provides a continuous 360° variation of the phase angle. This phase shifter is suitable for use with the broadband receiver amplifier and phase-sensitive detector combination frequently found in pulsed NMR spectrometers. A phase shifter operating between 3.5 to 76 MHz, which has an almost linear variation of the electrical phase angle with the manually adjusted phase control setting, is described in detail. While this particular phase shifter is useful for resistive magnet spectrometer applications it would be possible to cover higher frequency ranges if necessary.

  8. Biological and medical imaging by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, P.; Pykett, I. L.

    2011-12-01

    Several methods of producing NMR images are discussed and examples of biological application are given. The discussion emphasizes spin density projections as an introduction to the new method of echo-planar imaging, which is fully described. An example showing the first picture produced by this method is presented. The problems of scaling up medical imaging experiments to whole-body size are also discussed and the type of image expected from such experiments is anticipated by constructing cross-sectional water content maps of a human subject.

  9. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular ?-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils. PMID:26453215

  10. Touch NMR: An NMR Data Processing Application for the iPad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Qiyue; Chen, Zhiwei; Yan, Zhiping; Wang, Cheng; Chen, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful technologies to aid research in numerous scientific disciplines. With the development of consumer electronics, mobile devices have played increasingly important roles in our daily life. However, there is currently no application available for mobile devices able to…

  11. Measuring couplings in crowded NMR spectra: pure shift NMR with multiplet analysis.

    PubMed

    Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Kiraly, P; Nilsson, M; Morris, G A

    2015-10-28

    The PSYCHE method for pure shift NMR is exploited to generate 2D J spectra with full decoupling in one dimension and multiplet structure in the other, allowing spin-spin coupling constants to be measured even in very crowded spectra. Significant improvements over existing techniques are demonstrated for the hormones estradiol and androstenedione. PMID:26343867

  12. Touch NMR: An NMR Data Processing Application for the iPad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Qiyue; Chen, Zhiwei; Yan, Zhiping; Wang, Cheng; Chen, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful technologies to aid research in numerous scientific disciplines. With the development of consumer electronics, mobile devices have played increasingly important roles in our daily life. However, there is currently no application available for mobile devices able to…

  13. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  14. NMR assessment on bone simulated under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Q.; Qin, Y.

    Introduction Microgravity-induced bone loss has been suggested to be similar to disuse-osteoporosis on Earth which constitutes a challenging public health problem No current non-destructive method can provide the microstructural changes in bone particularly on cortical bone Recently the authors have applied low field nuclear magnetic resonance NMR spin-spin relaxation technique and computational analysis method to determine the porosity pore size distribution and microdamage of cortical bone 1-3 The studies by the authors have shown that this technology can be used to characterize microstructural changes as well as bone water distribution bound and mobile water changes of weightless treated simulating a microgravity condition turkey and mouse cortical bone We further determinate that the NMR spin-spin relaxation time T 2 spectrum derived parameters can be used as descriptions of bone quality e g matrix water distribution and porosity size distributions and alone or in combination with current techniques bone mineral density measurements more accurately predict bone mechanical properties Methods underline Bone sample preparation Two kinds of animal samples were collected and prepared for designed experiments from SUNY Cortical bones of the mid-diaphyses of the ulnae of 1-year-old male turkeys were dissected from freshly slaughtered animals Eight samples were categorized from normal or control and four samples were 4-week disuse treated by functionally isolated osteotomies disuse A total of 12

  15. NMR measurements in solutions of dialkylimidazolium haloaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Saboungi, M.L.; Klingler, R.J.; Chen, M.J.; Rathke, J.W.

    1992-06-01

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 35}Cl NMR spectra of AlCl{sub 3}-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) melts were measured for initial compositions ranging from 50 to 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} at various temperatures. It was shown by changing the preaquisition delay time (DE value) that the dominant aluminum species are AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in the melt formed by mixing 50 mol % with EMIC and Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 7}{sup {minus}} in the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} melt. In the equimolar mixture, the chemical shift of {sup 27}Al NMR spectrum is 103.28 ppm and the line width is 22.83Hz. In the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixture, the chemical shift is 103.41 ppm and the line width is 2624Hz. A third species observed at 97 ppm in the {sup 27}Al spectra for the 55 and 60 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixtures is identified to be a product of the reaction with residual water. The relaxation rates for each species in the melts were determined.

  16. NMR crystallography: the use of chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robin K.

    2004-10-01

    Measurements of chemical shifts obtained from magic-angle spinning NMR spectra (together with quantum mechanical computations of shielding) can provide valuable information on crystallography. Examples are given of the determination of crystallographic asymmetric units, of molecular symmetry in the solid-state environment, and of crystallographic space group assignment. Measurements of full tensor components for 199Hg have given additional coordination information. The nature of intermolecular hydrogen bonding in cortisone acetate polymorphs and solvates is obtained from chemical shift information, also involving measurement of the full tensor parameters. The resulting data have been used as restraints, built into the computation algorithm, in the analysis of powder diffraction patterns to give full crystal structures. A combination of quantum mechanical computation of shielding and measurement of proton chemical shifts (obtained by high-speed MAS) leads to the determination of the position of a proton in an intermolecular hydrogen bond. A recently-developed computer program specifically based on crystallographic repetition has been shown to give acceptable results. Moreover, NMR chemical shifts can distinguish between static and dynamic disorder in crystalline materials and can be used to determine modes and rates of molecular exchange motion.

  17. Algorithmic cooling and scalable NMR quantum computers

    PubMed Central

    Boykin, P. Oscar; Mor, Tal; Roychowdhury, Vwani; Vatan, Farrokh; Vrijen, Rutger

    2002-01-01

    We present here algorithmic cooling (via polarization heat bath)—a powerful method for obtaining a large number of highly polarized spins in liquid nuclear-spin systems at finite temperature. Given that spin-half states represent (quantum) bits, algorithmic cooling cleans dirty bits beyond the Shannon's bound on data compression, by using a set of rapidly thermal-relaxing bits. Such auxiliary bits could be implemented by using spins that rapidly get into thermal equilibrium with the environment, e.g., electron spins. Interestingly, the interaction with the environment, usually a most undesired interaction, is used here to our benefit, allowing a cooling mechanism. Cooling spins to a very low temperature without cooling the environment could lead to a breakthrough in NMR experiments, and our “spin-refrigerating” method suggests that this is possible. The scaling of NMR ensemble computers is currently one of the main obstacles to building larger-scale quantum computing devices, and our spin-refrigerating method suggests that this problem can be resolved. PMID:11904402

  18. Algorithmic cooling and scalable NMR quantum computers.

    PubMed

    Boykin, P Oscar; Mor, Tal; Roychowdhury, Vwani; Vatan, Farrokh; Vrijen, Rutger

    2002-03-19

    We present here algorithmic cooling (via polarization heat bath)-a powerful method for obtaining a large number of highly polarized spins in liquid nuclear-spin systems at finite temperature. Given that spin-half states represent (quantum) bits, algorithmic cooling cleans dirty bits beyond the Shannon's bound on data compression, by using a set of rapidly thermal-relaxing bits. Such auxiliary bits could be implemented by using spins that rapidly get into thermal equilibrium with the environment, e.g., electron spins. Interestingly, the interaction with the environment, usually a most undesired interaction, is used here to our benefit, allowing a cooling mechanism. Cooling spins to a very low temperature without cooling the environment could lead to a breakthrough in NMR experiments, and our "spin-refrigerating" method suggests that this is possible. The scaling of NMR ensemble computers is currently one of the main obstacles to building larger-scale quantum computing devices, and our spin-refrigerating method suggests that this problem can be resolved. PMID:11904402

  19. Proton NMR Relaxometry of Portland Cement Hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, P. K.; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    2010-03-01

    In situ proton NMR relaxometry measurements on the hydration of Portland cement pastes were carried out to follow the hydration process. The spin-spin (T2) relaxation times are about 3 orders of magnitude smaller than the spin-lattice relaxation times (T1), indicating the presence of high amounts of paramagnetic ions. The hydration time dependence of T2 is still determined by the confined nature of exchangeable water in the micropores. T1 evolution with hydration time is dominated by the enhanced self-diffusion due to fast molecular exchange of confined water molecules. A ``hump'' structure is seen in T1 during the middle stages of hydration and is attributed to the development of transient high concentration of polymeric ions in the solution phase. The present NMR investigations provide convincing evidence that even in the presence of high concentrations of paramagnetic impurities, molecular self-diffusion is the principal mechanism governing the spin-lattice relaxation of fluids confined in porous media.

  20. The D0 solenoid NMR magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sten Uldall Hansen Terry Kiper, Tom Regan, John Lofgren et al.

    2002-11-20

    A field monitoring system for the 2 Tesla Solenoid of the D0 detector is described. It is comprised of a very small NMR probe cabled to a DSP based signal processing board. The design magnetic field range is from 1.0 to 2.2 Tesla, corresponding to an RF frequency range of 42.57 to 93.67 MHz. The desired an accuracy is one part in 10{sup 5}. To minimize material in the interaction region of the D0 detector, the overall thickness of the NMR probe is 4 mm, including its mounting plate, and its width is 10 mm. To minimize cable mass, 4mm diameter IMR-100A cables are used for transmitting the RF signals from a nearby patch panel 25 meters to each of four probes mounted within the bore of the solenoid. RG213U cables 45 meters long are used to send the RF from the movable counting house to the patch panel. With this setup, the detector signal voltage at the moving counting room is in the range of 250-400 mV.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF METABOLITES IN SMALL FISH BIOFLUIDS AND TISSUES BY NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized for assessing ecotoxicity in small fish models by means of metabolomics. Two fundamental challenges of NMR-based metabolomics are the detection limit and characterization of metabolites (or NMR resonance assignments...

  2. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  3. Studying the pore space of cuttings by NMR and ?CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, Wiete

    2014-05-01

    Evaluating the formation quality by deriving porosity, pore size, and permeability from cuttings instead of drill cores is a promising and challenging field of research established in the past decade. Challenges with cuttings are their small and irregular size rendering them unsuitable for e.g. standard permeability measurements. Permeability can be estimated from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. NMR measurements on cuttings are especially challenging 1) because the total NMR signal is very low due to small sample sizes and 2) because the high ratio of outer surface to volume leads to a significant contribution of interstitial water to the NMR signal, which thus distorts the informative NMR signal from within the pore space. The aim of the study is to evaluate the use of NMR in combination with micro-computed tomography (?CT) as a method to determine the pore space characteristics of small drill cuttings from the Bückeberg Formation (German Wealden). After accurate removal of interstitial water and a CT based sorting, it was possible to measure NMR signals representative for the individual pore sizes. The representiveness of the measured values was verified by simulations of the NMR signals in pore spaces determined via ?CT. Porosity, relaxation time distributions, and permeability were calculated for cuttings assemblages with large, medium, small, and very small pores.

  4. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOEpatents

    Pines, A.; Samoson, A.

    1990-02-06

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero. 8 figs.

  5. NMR-Metabolic Methodology in the Study of GM Foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 1H NMR methodology used in the study of genetically modified (GM) foodstuff is discussed. The study of transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv "Luxor") over-expressing the KNAT1 gene from Arabidopsis is presented as a novel study-case. The 1H NMR metabolic profiling was carried out. Twenty-two wat...

  6. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  7. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Applications for chemists and biochemists

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2-D NMR) has become a very powerful class of experiments (in the hands of an adept scientist) with broad adaptability to new situations. It is the product of a happy marriage between modern pulse FT-NMR technology, with its large memory and high-speed computers, and the physicists and chemists who love to manipulate spin systems. Basic 2-D experiments are now a standard capability of modern NMR spectrometers, and this timely book intends to make 2-D NMR users of those who are familiar with normal 1-D NMR. The 2-D NMR goal is correlation of the lines of the observed NMR spectrum with other properties of the system. This book deals with applications to high-resolution spectrum analysis, utilizing either coupling between the NMR-active nuclei or chemical exchange to perform the correlation. The coupling can be scalar (through bonds) or direct through space (within 5 A). The coupling may be homonuclear (between like nuclei) or heteronuclear.

  8. Heteronuclear Multidimensional Protein NMR in a Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Nathan T.

    2016-01-01

    Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR techniques are commonly used to study protein structure, function, and dynamics, yet they are rarely taught at the undergraduate level. Here, we describe a senior undergraduate laboratory where students collect, process, and analyze heteronuclear multidimensional NMR experiments using an unstudied Ig domain (Ig2…

  9. {sup 17}O NMR investigations of oxidative degradation in polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.; Celina, M.; Assink, R.A.; Gillen, K.T.; Clough, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    We have initiated studies using both solution and solid state magic angle spinning {sup 17}O NMR for a series of oxidatively aged polymers. This short note reports the solution {sup 17}O NMR for oxidatively degraded polypropylene, ethylene-propylene-diene, polyisoprene, and nitrile rubber. Enriched O{sub 2} is used during the accelerated aging. 3 figs, 7 refs.

  10. Heteronuclear Multidimensional Protein NMR in a Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Nathan T.

    2016-01-01

    Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR techniques are commonly used to study protein structure, function, and dynamics, yet they are rarely taught at the undergraduate level. Here, we describe a senior undergraduate laboratory where students collect, process, and analyze heteronuclear multidimensional NMR experiments using an unstudied Ig domain (Ig2…

  11. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Samoson, Ago (Tallinn, SU)

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero.

  12. Chemical Equilibrium in Supramolecular Systems as Studied by NMR Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gaitano, Gustavo; Tardajos, Gloria

    2004-01-01

    Undergraduate students are required to study the chemical balance in supramolecular assemblies constituting two or more interacting species, by using proton NMR spectrometry. A good knowledge of physical chemistry, fundamentals of chemical balance, and NMR are pre-requisites for conducting this study.

  13. Structure calculation, refinement and validation using CcpNmr Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Simon P.; Goult, Benjamin T.; Fogh, Rasmus H.; Boucher, Wayne; Stevens, Tim J.; Laue, Ernest D.; Vuister, Geerten W.

    2015-01-01

    CcpNmr Analysis provides a streamlined pipeline for both NMR chemical shift assignment and structure determination of biological macromolecules. In addition, it encompasses tools to analyse the many additional experiments that make NMR such a pivotal technique for research into complex biological questions. This report describes how CcpNmr Analysis can seamlessly link together all of the tasks in the NMR structure-determination process. It details each of the stages from generating NMR restraints [distance, dihedral, hydrogen bonds and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs)], exporting these to and subsequently re-importing them from structure-calculation software (such as the programs CYANA or ARIA) and analysing and validating the results obtained from the structure calculation to, ultimately, the streamlined deposition of the completed assignments and the refined ensemble of structures into the PDBe repository. Until recently, such solution-structure determination by NMR has been quite a laborious task, requiring multiple stages and programs. However, with the new enhancements to CcpNmr Analysis described here, this process is now much more intuitive and efficient and less error-prone. PMID:25615869

  14. Structure calculation, refinement and validation using CcpNmr Analysis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Simon P; Goult, Benjamin T; Fogh, Rasmus H; Boucher, Wayne; Stevens, Tim J; Laue, Ernest D; Vuister, Geerten W

    2015-01-01

    CcpNmr Analysis provides a streamlined pipeline for both NMR chemical shift assignment and structure determination of biological macromolecules. In addition, it encompasses tools to analyse the many additional experiments that make NMR such a pivotal technique for research into complex biological questions. This report describes how CcpNmr Analysis can seamlessly link together all of the tasks in the NMR structure-determination process. It details each of the stages from generating NMR restraints [distance, dihedral, hydrogen bonds and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs)], exporting these to and subsequently re-importing them from structure-calculation software (such as the programs CYANA or ARIA) and analysing and validating the results obtained from the structure calculation to, ultimately, the streamlined deposition of the completed assignments and the refined ensemble of structures into the PDBe repository. Until recently, such solution-structure determination by NMR has been quite a laborious task, requiring multiple stages and programs. However, with the new enhancements to CcpNmr Analysis described here, this process is now much more intuitive and efficient and less error-prone. PMID:25615869

  15. Earth’s field NMR flow meter: Preliminary quantitative measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of Earth’s field NMR (EF NMR) combined with a pre-polarising permanent magnet for measuring fast fluid velocities. This time of flight measurement protocol has a considerable history in the literature; here we demonstrate that it is quantitative when employing the Earth’s magnetic field for signal detection. NMR signal intensities are measured as a function of flow rate (0-1 m/s) and separation distance between the permanent magnet and the EF NMR signal detection. These data are quantitatively described by a flow model, ultimately featuring no free parameters, that accounts for NMR signal modulation due to residence time inside the pre-polarising magnet, between the pre-polarising magnet and the detection RF coil and inside the detection coil respectively. The methodology is subsequently demonstrated with a metallic pipe in the pre-polarising region.

  16. Membrane Protein Structure and Dynamics from NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Mei; Zhang, Yuan; Hu, Fanghao

    2012-05-01

    We review the current state of membrane protein structure determination using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Multidimensional magic-angle-spinning correlation NMR combined with oriented-sample experiments has made it possible to measure a full panel of structural constraints of membrane proteins directly in lipid bilayers. These constraints include torsion angles, interatomic distances, oligomeric structure, protein dynamics, ligand structure and dynamics, and protein orientation and depth of insertion in the lipid bilayer. Using solid-state NMR, researchers have studied potassium channels, proton channels, Ca2+ pumps, G protein-coupled receptors, bacterial outer membrane proteins, and viral fusion proteins to elucidate their mechanisms of action. Many of these membrane proteins have also been investigated in detergent micelles using solution NMR. Comparison of the solid-state and solution NMR structures provides important insights into the effects of the solubilizing environment on membrane protein structure and dynamics.

  17. Multinuclear NMR studies of an actively dividing artificial tumor.

    PubMed

    Shankland, E G; Livesey, J C; Wiseman, R W; Krohn, K A

    2002-01-01

    Growth of the A549 cell line in a perfusion system suitable for use in a magnetic resonance study has been characterized and shown to be stable physiologically and hence appropriate for serial observations. Several methods of monitoring cell growth were compared to assess the behavior of the cells in this system. Comparison between NMR metabolite data and cell growth via cell counting showed that 31P NMR signals accurately reported cell doubling time. In contrast to most NMR cell culture systems, viable cells can be recovered from the perfusion system after the NMR measurements for further biochemical studies. These data further suggest that this system will be useful for studying the physiology and biochemistry of exponentially growing cells for at least two days in NMR tube culture. PMID:12071290

  18. Studies of organic paint binders by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyros, A.; Anglos, D.

    2006-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is applied to the study of aged binding media used in paintings, namely linseed oil, egg tempera and an acrylic medium. High resolution 1D and 2D NMR experiments establish the state of hydrolysis and oxidation of the linseed and egg tempera binders after five years of aging, by determining several markers sensitive to the hydrolytic and oxidative processes of the binder lipid fraction. The composition of the acrylic binder co-polymer is determined by 2D NMR spectroscopy, while the identification of a surfactant, poly(ethylene glycol), found in greater amounts in aged acrylic medium, is reported. The non-destructive nature of the proposed analytical NMR methodology, and minimization of the amount of binder material needed through the use of sophisticated cryoprobes and hyphenated LC-NMR techniques, make NMR attractive for the arts analyst, in view of its rapid nature and experimental simplicity.

  19. Sensitivity enhancement of multidimensional NMR experiments by paramagnetic relaxation effects.

    PubMed

    Cai, Sheng; Seu, Candace; Kovacs, Zoltan; Sherry, A Dean; Chen, Yuan

    2006-10-18

    One of the main goals of NMR method development is to increase the sensitivity of multidimensional NMR experiments or reduce the required acquisition time. In these experiments, more than 80% of the NMR instrument time is spent on the recycle delay, where the instrument idles to wait for the recovery of proton magnetization. In this study, we report a method of using paramagnetic relaxation effects to shorten the recycle delays required in multidimensional NMR experiments of biological macromolecules. This approach significantly reduces the NMR instrument time required. Ni(2+) ion, complexed with the chelating molecule DO2A, is used to decrease the proton T(1) relaxation time of biological macromolecules without the significant line-broadening effects that are associated with most paramagnetic ions. The Ni(DO2A) also significantly decreases the T(1) relaxation time of water, thus providing additional sensitivity gain by eliminating the saturation of labile amide resonances. PMID:17031960

  20. The Virtual NMR Spectrometer: A Computer Program for Efficient Simulation of NMR Experiments Involving Pulsed Field Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, Peter; Fushman, David; Ruchinsky, Vladislav; Cowburn, David

    2000-08-01

    This paper presents a software program, the Virtual NMR Spectrometer, for computer simulation of multichannel, multidimensional NMR experiments on user-defined spin systems. The program is capable of reproducing most features of the modern NMR experiment, including homo- and heteronuclear pulse sequences, phase cycling, pulsed field gradients, and shaped pulses. Two different approaches are implemented to simulate the effect of pulsed field gradients on coherence selection, an explicit calculation of all coherence transfer pathways, and an effective approximate method using integration over multiple positions in the sample. The applications of the Virtual NMR Spectrometer are illustrated using homonuclear COSY and DQF COSY experiments with gradient selection, heteronuclear HSQC, and TROSY. The program uses an intuitive graphical user interface, which resembles the appearance and operation of a real spectrometer. A translator is used to allow the user to design pulse sequences with the same programming language used in the actual experiment on a real spectrometer. The Virtual NMR Spectrometer is designed as a useful tool for developing new NMR experiments and for tuning and adjusting the experimental setup for existing ones prior to running costly NMR experiments, in order to reduce the setup time on a real spectrometer. It will also be a useful aid for learning the general principles of magnetic resonance and contemporary innovations in NMR pulse sequence design.

  1. Introducing the gNMR Program in an Introductory NMR Spectrometry Course to Parallel Its Use by Spectroscopists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummey, Jackie M.; Boyce, Mary C.

    2004-01-01

    An approach that is useful to any introductory nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy course is developed. This approach to teaching NMR spectrometry includes spectral simulation along with the traditional elements of hands-on instrument use and structure elucidation to demonstrate the connection between simulating a spectrum and structure…

  2. Surfactant/Nonionic polymer interaction. A NMR diffusometry and NMR electrophoretic investigation.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Erik; Topgaard, Daniel; Stilbs, Peter; Söderman, Olle

    2004-02-17

    The interaction between the nonionic polymer poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) of molecular weight 20,000 and surfactants of various types [sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide, octyl beta-D-glucoside, and potassium laurate] has been investigated in an aqueous solution at 25 degrees C by 1H NMR pulsed-gradient spin-echo self-diffusion techniques. The SDS/PEO study was further complemented by component-resolved 1H NMR-based studies of the electrophoretic mobility of PEO and the alkyl part of SDS under the same measurement conditions. Through such combined studies, a much more complete picture of the binding and aggregation processes becomes accessible. PMID:15803688

  3. High resolution NMR of rubidium doped fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Zahab, A.; Bernier, P.; Firlej, L.

    1992-12-01

    The authors have used High Resolution {sup 13}C NMR (50.3 MHz) to study the structural and electronic properties of Rubidium doped Fullerenes. An anisotropic Knight shift is generally observed whose extend ({approximately} 40 ppm) and isotropic part value ({approximately} 42 ppm) do not depend on the stoichiometry of the compound. The resonance linewidth drastically increases by a factor of 10 between room temperature and 150 K, showing that the rotational motion of the individual C{sub 60} is severely hindered at low temperature. The relaxational time T{sub 1}({approximately} 70 ms at room temperature) roughly follows a law T{sub 1}T = constant, usual in the case of normal metal. All the results are discussed on the light of existing structural and electronic models for these compounds.

  4. Velocity imaging by ex situ NMR.

    PubMed

    Perlo, J; Casanova, F; Blümich, B

    2005-04-01

    A pulsed field gradient stimulated spin-echo NMR sequence is combined with imaging methods to spatially resolve velocity distributions and to measure 2D velocity maps ex situ. The implementation of these techniques in open sensors provides a powerful non-invasive tool to measure molecular displacement in a large number of applications inaccessible to conventional closed magnets. The method is implemented on an open tomograph that provides 3D spatial localization by combining slice selection in the presence of a uniform static magnetic field gradient along the depth direction with pulsed field gradients along the two lateral directions. Different pipe geometries are used to demonstrate that the sequence performs well even in the extremely inhomogeneous B0 and B1 fields of these sensors. PMID:15780917

  5. NMR Study of Metallic Ferromagnet UGa2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambe, Shinsaku; Sakai, Hironori; Tokunaga, Yo; Haga, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Etsuji

    2014-11-01

    69,71Ga NMR has been measured in the metallic ferromagnet UGa2. The T-dependence of the internal field at the Ga site has been determined and is found to coincide with that of the spontaneous magnetization. The electric field gradient (EFG) and transferred hyperfine coupling constant at the Ga site are found to be modified in the ferromagnetically ordered state, presumably due to a modification of the 5f electronic state caused by the ferromagnetic ordering. The mechanism of formation for the ordered 5f U moment is found to be different from that for a 5f U induced moment by applied magnetic field in the paramagnetic state. The spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 is enhanced due to ferromagnetic fluctuations around Tc. The 5f magnetic moments are considered to be nearly localized in UGa2, in spite of good metallic conduction.

  6. Quasi equilibria in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakellariou, Dimitris; Hodgkinson, Paul; Emsley, Lyndon

    1998-08-01

    We develop the connection between theoretical studies of so-called quasi-equilibrium states in solid-state NMR for isolated spin-systems with the experimental observability of such states. The observability of these states is expected to be dependent on the relative broadenings due to coherent effects (such as dipolar couplings with the lattice) and incoherent effects, i.e. relaxation. Hence, we expect to see evidence of quasi-equilibria in cross polarization experiments, where the relevant relaxation time constant is relatively long. For classic spectral spin-diffusion experiments, however, quasi equilibria are unlikely to be observed. We also generalise the discussion to rotating solids, which is appropriate to magic angle spinning experiments.

  7. Investigation of glycofullerene dynamics by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Engström, Olof; Muñoz, Antonio; Illescas, Beatriz M; Martín, Nazario; Ribeiro-Viana, Renato; Rojo, Javier; Widmalm, Göran

    2015-08-28

    Glycofullerenes, in which carbohydrate molecules are attached via a linker to a [60]fullerene core, facilitate spherical presentation of glyco-based epitopes. We herein investigate the dynamics of two glycofullerenes, having 12 and 36 mannose residues at their periphery, by NMR translational diffusion and quantitative (13)C relaxation studies employing a model-free approach for their interpretation. The sugar residues are shown to be highly flexible entities with S(2) < 0.2 in both compounds. Notably, the larger glycofullerene with longer linkers shows faster internal dynamics and higher flexibility than its smaller counterpart. The dynamics and flexibility as well as the slower translational diffusion of the larger glycofullerene, thereby favoring rebinding to a receptor, may together with its spatial extension explain why it is better than the smaller one at blocking the DC-SIGN receptor and inhibiting the infection by pseudotyped Ebola virus particles. PMID:26186577

  8. NMR Metabolomics Analysis of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shulei; Powers, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is characterized by progressive death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Although mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are linked to PD pathogenesis, its etiology and pathology remain to be elucidated. Metabolomics investigates metabolite changes in biofluids, cell lysates, tissues and tumors in order to correlate these metabolomic changes to a disease state. Thus, the application of metabolomics to investigate PD provides a systematic approach to understand the pathology of PD, to identify disease biomarkers, and to complement genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics studies. This review will examine current research into PD mechanisms with a focus on mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Neurotoxin-based PD animal models and the rationale for metabolomics studies in PD will also be discussed. The review will also explore the potential of NMR metabolomics to address important issues related to PD treatment and diagnosis. PMID:26078917

  9. NMR Measurements of Granular Flow and Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Eiichi

    1998-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can be used to measure statistical distributions of granular flow velocity and fluctuations of velocity, as well as spatial distributions of particulate concentration, flow velocity, its fluctuations, and other parameters that may be derived from these. All measurements have been of protons in liquid-containing particles such as mustard seeds or pharmaceutical pills. Our favorite geometry has been the slowly rotating partially filled rotating drum with granular flow taking place along the free surface of the particles. All the above-mentioned parameters have been studied as well as a spatial distribution of particulate diffusion coefficients, energy dissipation due to collisions, as well as segregation of non-uniform mixtures of granular material. Finally, we describe some motions of granular material under periodic vibrations.

  10. ?-NMR study of boron in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumikawa, T.; Mihara, M.; Matsuta, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ohtsubo, T.; Ohya, S.; Minamisono, T.

    2015-04-01

    A ?-NMR study of 12B implanted in diamond was performed in order to investigate the implantation sites and the defects. The maintained polarization of 12B was measured by use of widely modulated rf around the Larmor frequency ( ? = ? L ± 200 kHz) as a function of temperature from 160 K to 320 K. The observed polarization was found to be almost constant at about 0.9 % in this temperature range. The initial polarization for this system was obtained as about 8.1 %. Therefore about 10 % of the implanted 12B maintained its polarization in this frequency range. Conversely, about 90 % of the implanted 12B was undetected in the present experiment.

  11. High-performance cryogenic pulsed NMR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. M.; Code, R. F.

    1981-03-01

    A pulsed NMR spectrometer for cryogenic use is described. It includes an improved coupling scheme which is suitable for installation in most cryostats. An rf preamplifier has been developed which offers wide bandwidth, high gain, low noise and fast recovery (⩽2 μs). While the spectrometer was designed for a resonance frequency of 27 MHz, extension from 4-100 MHz is discussed. At 27 MHz the bandwidth of the free-induction decay is 1 MHz, and the dead time, after the end of the rf pulse, is 3.6 ms. Techniques are presented for reducing the dead time, the noise, and the amplitude of ground loops as well as extending the signal bandwidth and dynamic range.

  12. NMR studies on natural and synthetic Amavadin.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, E M; Collison, D; Ertok, N; Garner, C D

    2000-10-01

    The stereochemistry of isolated natural product Amavadin, which contains a 1:2 complex of V(IV) with N-hydroxyimino-2,2'-dipropionic acid (HIDPAH(3)), and some synthetic complexes have been investigated. Amavadin was isolated from Amanita muscaria and oxidized with [NH(4)](2)[Ce(NO(3))(6)]. H(2)[Delta-V(S,S-HIDPA)(2)].3H(2)O, H(2)[Delta,Lambda-V(S,S-HIDPA)(2)].3H(2)O and their equivalent oxidized species have been synthesized and characterized spectroscopically. A combination of COSY, NOE, (1)H, (13)C-NMR and CD spectroscopy have been used to prove that the isolated natural product Amavadin consists of an almost equal mixture of the Delta- and Lambda-isomers of [V(S,S-HIDPA)(2)](2-). PMID:18968091

  13. Conformational analysis of morphiceptin by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Castiglione-Morelli, M A; Hartrodt, B; Neubert, K; Temussi, P A; Trivellone, E

    1988-04-29

    Three exorphins, beta-casomorphin-5, morphiceptin and its D-Pro4 analog, were studied in DMSO by means of 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, with the aim of detecting conformational features of potential biological significance for the mu opioid activity since the presence of two Pro residues restricts the accessible conformational space more than in all other peptides. It is found that the conformational mixtures present in solution contain relevant fractions of folded conformers, a feature that assures the observation of four different Tyr OH signals in the 500 MHz spectrum of morphiceptin. The conformer distribution of (very active) (D-Pro4)-morphiceptin is different from those of its (less active) congeners. PMID:3365236

  14. Double Quantum Filtered NMR Spectroscopy and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navon, Gil

    2007-03-01

    As a result of the anisotropic motion of water molecules interacting with ordered biological tissues the proton-proton dipolar interaction and the deuteron quadrupolar interaction do not average to zero leaving some residual splittings. The technique of double quantum filtered (DQF) NMR capitalizes on this phenomenon, opening new possibilities to probe biological processes and to obtain a new kind of contrast in MRI. In the talk new applications of the DQF pulse sequences to the study of nerves, enabling the measurement of intercompartmental water exchange in sciatic and optic nerves, the study of the fiber architecture in cartilage under normal, compressed and diseased conditions and the imaging of tendons, enabling the monitoring their healing process following injury.

  15. Spatially resolved spectroscopy using tapered stripline NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijssen, Koen C. H.; Bart, Jacob; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Janssen, J. W. G. (Hans); Kentgens, Arno P. M.; van Bentum, P. Jan M.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic field B0 gradients are essential in modern Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Although RF/B1 gradients can be used to fulfill a similar role, this is not used in common practice because of practical limitations in the design of B1 gradient coils. Here we present a new method to create B1 gradients using stripline RF coils. The conductor-width of a stripline NMR chip and the strength of its radiofrequency field are correlated, so a stripline chip can be tapered to produce any arbitrary shaped B1 field gradient. Here we show the characterization of this tapered stripline configuration and demonstrate three applications: magnetic resonance imaging on samples with nL-μL volumes, reaction monitoring of fast chemical reactions (10-2-101 s) and the compensation of B0 field gradients to obtain high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  16. Combined chemometric analysis of (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and stable isotope data to differentiate organic and conventional milk.

    PubMed

    Erich, Sarah; Schill, Sandra; Annweiler, Eva; Waiblinger, Hans-Ulrich; Kuballa, Thomas; Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Monakhova, Yulia B

    2015-12-01

    The increased sales of organically produced food create a strong need for analytical methods, which could authenticate organic and conventional products. Combined chemometric analysis of (1)H NMR-, (13)C NMR-spectroscopy data, stable-isotope data (IRMS) and α-linolenic acid content (gas chromatography) was used to differentiate organic and conventional milk. In total 85 raw, pasteurized and ultra-heat treated (UHT) milk samples (52 organic and 33 conventional) were collected between August 2013 and May 2014. The carbon isotope ratios of milk protein and milk fat as well as the α-linolenic acid content of these samples were determined. Additionally, the milk fat was analyzed by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The chemometric analysis of combined data (IRMS, GC, NMR) resulted in more precise authentication of German raw and retail milk with a considerably increased classification rate of 95% compared to 81% for NMR and 90% for IRMS using linear discriminate analysis. PMID:26041156

  17. Improved nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, E.; Roeder, S.B.W.; Assink, R.A.; Gibson, A.A.V.

    1984-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  18. NMR structures reveal how oxidation inactivates thrombomodulin.

    PubMed

    Wood, Matthew J; Becvar, L Amaya; Prieto, Judith Helena; Melacini, Giuseppe; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2003-10-21

    Oxidation of Met 388, one of the three linker residues connecting the fourth and fifth EGF-like domains of thrombomodulin (TM), is deleterious for TM activity. An NMR structure of the smallest active fragment of TM (TMEGF45) and a crystal structure of a larger fragment (TMEGF456) bound to thrombin both show that Met 388 is packed into the fifth domain. Using multidimensional NMR, we have solved the structure of TMEGF45 in which Met 388 is oxidized (TMEGF45ox) and the structure of TMEGF45 in which Met 388 is mutated to Leu (TMEGF45ML). Comparison of the structures shows that the fifth domain has a somewhat different structure depending on the residue at position 388, and several of the thrombin-binding residues are packed into the fifth domain in the oxidized protein while they are exposed and free to interact with thrombin in the native structure and the Met-Leu mutant. This observation is consistent with kinetic measurements showing that the K(m) for TMEGF45ox binding to thrombin is 3.3-fold higher than for the native protein. Most importantly, the connection between the two domains, as indicated by interdomain NOEs, appears to be essential for activity. In the TMEGF45ox structure which has a reduced k(cat) for protein C activation by the thrombin-TMEGF45ox complex, interaction between the two domains is lost. Conversely, a tighter connection is observed between the two domains in TMEGF45ML, which has a higher k(cat) for protein C activation by the thrombin-TMEGF45ML complex. PMID:14556624

  19. Generating NMR Chemical Shift Assignments of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins Using Carbon-Detect NMR Methods

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Debashish; Bastidas, Monique; Showalter, Scott

    2014-01-01

    There is an extraordinary need to describe the structures of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) due to their role in various biological processes involved in signaling and transcription. However, general study of IDPs by NMR spectroscopy is limited by the poor 1H-amide chemical shift dispersion typically observed in their spectra. Recently, 13C direct-detected NMR spectroscopy has been recognized as enabling broad structural study of IDPs. Most notably, multi-dimensional experiments based on the 15N,13C-CON spectrum make complete chemical shift assignment feasible. Here we document a collection of NMR based tools that efficiently lead to chemical shift assignment of IDPs, motivated by a case study of the C-terminal disordered region from the human pancreatic transcription factor Pdx1. Our strategy builds on the combination of two 3D experiments, (HN-flip)N(CA)CON and 3D (HN-flip)N(CA)NCO, that enable daisy-chain connections to be built along the IDP backbone, facilitated by acquisition of amino-acid specific 15N,13C-CON detected experiments. Assignments are completed through carbon-detected, TOCSY based side chain chemical shift measurement. Conducting our study required producing valuable modifications to many previously published pulse sequences, motivating us to announce the creation of a database of our pulse programs, which we make freely available through the web. PMID:24333248

  20. Interactions between cations and peat organic matter monitored with NMR wideline, static and FFC NMR relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaumann, Gabriele E.; Conte, Pellegrino; Jäger, Alexander; Alonzo, Giuseppe; Bertmer, Marko

    2010-05-01

    The molecular size of humic substances is still under debate and is believed to range up to several hundred thousands Dalton, although a number of recent studies suggest much lower molecular weights. Nowadays an increasing number of authors suggest a model of molecular aggregates. One explanation why results on the molecular mass of humic materials are contradictory, may be that individual OM molecules are linked via intermolecular interactions, by bridges of water molecules or by cations bridging cation exchange sites (Schaumann, 2006a, b). Properties of such cross-linked systems can be similar to macromolecular systems revealing covalent cross-links. In this context, multivalent cations play an important ecological role, serving as reversible cross-linking agent. Formation and disruption of such cation bridges may close or open sorption sites in soil organic matter. Although cross-linking by multivalent cations has been proposed in many studies, the cross-linking effect has not yet been demonstrated on the molecular scale. The objective of this study was to investigate the interactions between cations and peat organic matter using NMR wideline techniques as well as static and fast field cycling (FFC) NMR relaxometry. Peat treated with solutions containing either Na+, Ca2+ or Al3+ was investigated in air-dried state for longitudinal relaxation times (T1) and NMR wideline characteristics. T1 distributions were separated into two Gaussian functions which were interpreted to represent two proton populations belonging to two environments of differing mobility. The relaxation rates (R1 = T1-1) in the cation treated samples spread over a range of 87-123 s-1 (R1a: fast component) and 32-42 s-1 (R1b: slow component). The rates in all treatments are significantly different from each other. and decrease in the order conditioned sample > desalinated sample > Na-treated sample. The treatment with multivalent cations affects R1a and R1b in different ways and needs more detailed explanation. Wideline proton NMR spectra can be used to quantify proton containing material, mainly water, based on their mobility. Spectra were decomposed into a Gaussian and Lorentzian line and changes to mobility after heat treatment indicate the water binding strength. In this study, differences in the various NMR parameters on the cation treatments will be presented and discussed with respect to the crosslinking hypothesis.

  1. NMR data visualization, processing, and analysis on mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Cobas, Carlos; Iglesias, Isaac; Seoane, Felipe

    2015-08-01

    Touch-screen computers are emerging as a popular platform for many applications, including those in chemistry and analytical sciences. In this work, we present our implementation of a new NMR 'app' designed for hand-held and portable touch-controlled devices, such as smartphones and tablets. It features a flexible architecture formed by a powerful NMR processing and analysis kernel and an intuitive user interface that makes full use of the smart devices haptic capabilities. Routine 1D and 2D NMR spectra acquired in most NMR instruments can be processed in a fully unattended way. More advanced experiments such as non-uniform sampled NMR spectra are also supported through a very efficient parallelized Modified Iterative Soft Thresholding algorithm. Specific technical development features as well as the overall feasibility of using NMR software apps will also be discussed. All aspects considered the functionalities of the app allowing it to work as a stand-alone tool or as a 'companion' to more advanced desktop applications such as Mnova NMR. PMID:25924947

  2. Performance Assessment in Fingerprinting and Multi Component Quantitative NMR Analyses.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Vito; Intini, Nicola; Mastrorilli, Piero; Latronico, Mario; Scapicchio, Pasquale; Triggiani, Maurizio; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; Fanizzi, Paolo; Acquotti, Domenico; Airoldi, Cristina; Arnesano, Fabio; Assfalg, Michael; Benevelli, Francesca; Bertelli, Davide; Cagliani, Laura R; Casadei, Luca; Cesare Marincola, Flaminia; Colafemmina, Giuseppe; Consonni, Roberto; Cosentino, Cesare; Davalli, Silvia; De Pascali, Sandra A; D'Aiuto, Virginia; Faccini, Andrea; Gobetto, Roberto; Lamanna, Raffaele; Liguori, Francesca; Longobardi, Francesco; Mallamace, Domenico; Mazzei, Pierluigi; Menegazzo, Ileana; Milone, Salvatore; Mucci, Adele; Napoli, Claudia; Pertinhez, Thelma; Rizzuti, Antonino; Rocchigiani, Luca; Schievano, Elisabetta; Sciubba, Fabio; Sobolev, Anatoly; Tenori, Leonardo; Valerio, Mariacristina

    2015-07-01

    An interlaboratory comparison (ILC) was organized with the aim to set up quality control indicators suitable for multicomponent quantitative analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A total of 36 NMR data sets (corresponding to 1260 NMR spectra) were produced by 30 participants using 34 NMR spectrometers. The calibration line method was chosen for the quantification of a five-component model mixture. Results show that quantitative NMR is a robust quantification tool and that 26 out of 36 data sets resulted in statistically equivalent calibration lines for all considered NMR signals. The performance of each laboratory was assessed by means of a new performance index (named Qp-score) which is related to the difference between the experimental and the consensus values of the slope of the calibration lines. Laboratories endowed with a Qp-score falling within the suitable acceptability range are qualified to produce NMR spectra that can be considered statistically equivalent in terms of relative intensities of the signals. In addition, the specific response of nuclei to the experimental excitation/relaxation conditions was addressed by means of the parameter named NR. NR is related to the difference between the theoretical and the consensus slopes of the calibration lines and is specific for each signal produced by a well-defined set of acquisition parameters. PMID:26020452

  3. Web server based complex mixture analysis by NMR.

    PubMed

    Robinette, Steven L; Zhang, Fengli; Brüschweiler-Li, Lei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2008-05-15

    Comprehensive metabolite identification and quantification of complex biological mixtures are central aspects of metabolomics. NMR shows excellent promise for these tasks. An automated fingerprinting strategy is presented, termed COLMAR query, which screens NMR chemical shift lists or raw 1D NMR cross sections taken from covariance total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY) spectra or other multidimensional NMR spectra against an NMR spectral database. Cross peaks are selected using local clustering to avoid ambiguities between chemical shifts and scalar J-coupling effects. With the use of three different algorithms, the corresponding chemical shift list is then screened against chemical shift lists extracted from 1D spectra of a NMR database. The resulting query scores produced by forward assignment, reverse assignment, and bipartite weighted-matching algorithms are combined into a consensus score, which provides a robust means for identifying the correct compound. The approach is demonstrated for a metabolite model mixture that is screened against the metabolomics BioMagResDatabank (BMRB). This NMR-based compound identification approach has been implemented in a public Web server that allows the efficient analysis of a wide range of metabolite mixtures. PMID:18422338

  4. Can NMR solve some significant challenges in metabolomics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagana Gowda, G. A.; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The field of metabolomics continues to witness rapid growth driven by fundamental studies, methods development, and applications in a number of disciplines that include biomedical science, plant and nutrition sciences, drug development, energy and environmental sciences, toxicology, etc. NMR spectroscopy is one of the two most widely used analytical platforms in the metabolomics field, along with mass spectrometry (MS). NMR's excellent reproducibility and quantitative accuracy, its ability to identify structures of unknown metabolites, its capacity to generate metabolite profiles using intact bio-specimens with no need for separation, and its capabilities for tracing metabolic pathways using isotope labeled substrates offer unique strengths for metabolomics applications. However, NMR's limited sensitivity and resolution continue to pose a major challenge and have restricted both the number and the quantitative accuracy of metabolites analyzed by NMR. Further, the analysis of highly complex biological samples has increased the demand for new methods with improved detection, better unknown identification, and more accurate quantitation of larger numbers of metabolites. Recent efforts have contributed significant improvements in these areas, and have thereby enhanced the pool of routinely quantifiable metabolites. Additionally, efforts focused on combining NMR and MS promise opportunities to exploit the combined strength of the two analytical platforms for direct comparison of the metabolite data, unknown identification and reliable biomarker discovery that continue to challenge the metabolomics field. This article presents our perspectives on the emerging trends in NMR-based metabolomics and NMR's continuing role in the field with an emphasis on recent and ongoing research from our laboratory.

  5. Benchmarking NMR experiments: A relational database of protein pulse sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthamarai, Russell R. P.; Kuprov, Ilya; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2010-03-01

    Systematic benchmarking of multi-dimensional protein NMR experiments is a critical prerequisite for optimal allocation of NMR resources for structural analysis of challenging proteins, e.g. large proteins with limited solubility or proteins prone to aggregation. We propose a set of benchmarking parameters for essential protein NMR experiments organized into a lightweight (single XML file) relational database (RDB), which includes all the necessary auxiliaries (waveforms, decoupling sequences, calibration tables, setup algorithms and an RDB management system). The database is interfaced to the Spinach library ( http://spindynamics.org), which enables accurate simulation and benchmarking of NMR experiments on large spin systems. A key feature is the ability to use a single user-specified spin system to simulate the majority of deposited solution state NMR experiments, thus providing the (hitherto unavailable) unified framework for pulse sequence evaluation. This development enables predicting relative sensitivity of deposited implementations of NMR experiments, thus providing a basis for comparison, optimization and, eventually, automation of NMR analysis. The benchmarking is demonstrated with two proteins, of 170 amino acids I domain of αXβ2 Integrin and 440 amino acids NS3 helicase.

  6. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy under the fume hood.

    PubMed

    Küster, Simon K; Danieli, Ernesto; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2011-08-01

    This work reports the possibility to acquire high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra with a fist-sized NMR magnet directly installed under the fume hood. The small NMR sensor based on permanent magnets was used to monitor the trimerization of propionaldehyde catalyzed by indium trichloride in real time by continuously circulating the reaction mixture through the magnet bore in a closed loop with the help of a peristaltic pump. Thanks to the chemical selectivity of NMR spectroscopy the progress of the reaction can be monitored on-line by determining the concentrations of both reactant and product from the area under their respective lines in the NMR spectra as a function of time. This in situ measurement demonstrates that NMR probes can be used in chemistry laboratories, e.g. for reaction optimization, or installed at specific points of interest along industrial process lines. Therefore, it will open the door for the implementation of feedback control based on spectroscopic NMR data. PMID:21698335

  7. High-pressure on-line photolysis with NMR detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yonker, C.R.; Wallen, S.L.

    1996-06-01

    The investigation of the photoreversible fulgide Aberchrome-540 as a function of pressure and temperature with the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection is described. This technique demonstrates the novel combination of high-pressure NMR and laser photolysis with the use of fiber optics for the conversion of the fulgide on-line in the instrument. Investigation of the photolysis of Aberchrome-540 to 2.0 kbar and 120 degrees C is reported. Extension of this technique should allow the investigation of photo-initiated reaction kinetics and equilibria as a function of pressure and temperature with simultaneous structural characterization with NMR. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  8. Expanding the analytical toolbox: pharmaceutical application of quantitative NMR.

    PubMed

    Webster, Gregory K; Kumar, Shailendra

    2014-12-01

    In response to the changing market pressures being applied to the pharmaceutical industry, a greater emphasis is being made to advance new drugs to market with minimal investment in early development stages. The use of quantitative NMR (q-NMR) has been shown to be a single point replacement for routine early development testing which previously combined elements of identity testing, chromatographic assay, moisture analysis, residual solvent analysis, and elemental analysis. This Feature will highlight the applications of q-NMR to early phase drug development testing and its efficient potency, solvent quantification, and relative response factor determinations. PMID:25348289

  9. Exposing the Moving Parts of Proteins with NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for investigating the dynamics of biomolecules since it provides a description of motion that is comprehensive, site-specific, and relatively non-invasive. In particular, the study of protein dynamics has benefited from sustained methodological advances in NMR that have expanded the scope and time scales of accessible motion. Yet, many of these advances may not be well known to the more general physical chemistry community. Accordingly, this Perspective provides a glimpse of some of the more powerful methods in liquid state NMR that are helping reshape our understanding of functional motions of proteins. PMID:22545175

  10. Chiral NMR solvating additives for differentiation of enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Balzano, Federica

    2013-01-01

    This chapter will describe the general features and main categories of chiral solvating agents (CSAs) for NMR spectroscopy, spanning from low-medium sized CSAs to macrocyclic ones. CSAs based on chiral ionic liquids (CILs) will be introduced in view of their increasing popularity, and, finally, a short paragraph will be dedicated to special applications of CSAs in particular experimental conditions. Several valuable works, which are mainly devoted to investigate enantiodifferentiation mechanisms by NMR, will not be discussed. The main objective is to identify the current trend in the research areas dedicated to the development of new CSAs for NMR spectroscopy. PMID:23729185

  11. Synthesis and complete assignment of NMR data of 20 chalcones.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Doseok; Hyun, Jiye; Jo, Geunhyeong; Koh, Dongsoo; Lim, Yoongho

    2011-01-01

    Chalcones, intermediates in flavonoid biosynthesis, can exhibit antibacterial, antiproliferative, and anti-inflammatory properties. Chalcones contain two benzene rings and both hydroxylated and methoxylated analogs are frequently produced by hydroxylases and O-methyltransferases in plant biosynthetic pathways. Assignments of NMR peaks in the spectra of hydroxylated and/or methoxylated chalcones can help in identifying novel chalcone derivatives isolated from natural sources by referencing these data against NMR spectra obtained from known chalcones. We report here the syntheses of 20 chalcones and complete assignments of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra. PMID:21113969

  12. NMR contributions to structural dynamics studies of intrinsically disordered proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Konrat, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are characterized by substantial conformational plasticity. Given their inherent structural flexibility X-ray crystallography is not applicable to study these proteins. In contrast, NMR spectroscopy offers unique opportunities for structural and dynamic studies of IDPs. The past two decades have witnessed significant development of NMR spectroscopy that couples advances in spin physics and chemistry with a broad range of applications. This article will summarize key advances in basic physical-chemistry and NMR methodology, outline their limitations and envision future R&D directions. PMID:24656082

  13. Metabolite analysis of Cannabis sativa L. by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flores-Sanchez, Isvett Josefina; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert

    2012-01-01

    NMR-based metabolomics is an analytical platform, which has been used to classify and analyze Cannabis sativa L. cell suspension cultures and plants. Diverse groups of primary and secondary metabolites were identified by comparing NMR data with reference compounds and/or by structure elucidation using ¹H-NMR, J-resolved, ¹H-¹H COSY, and ¹H-¹³C HMBC spectroscopy. The direct extraction and the extraction by indirect fractionation are two suitable methods for the C. sativa sample preparation. Quantitative analyses could be performed without requiring fractionation or isolation procedures. PMID:22131005

  14. Solid-state 73Ge NMR spectroscopy of simple organogermanes.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Margaret A; Sutrisno, Andre; Terskikh, Victor V; Baines, Kim M; Huang, Yining

    2012-10-22

    Germanium-73 is an extremely challenging nucleus to examine by NMR spectroscopy due to its unfavorable NMR properties. Through the use of an ultrahigh (21.1 T) magnetic field, a systematic study of a series of simple organogermanes was carried out. In those cases for which X-ray structural data were available, correlations were drawn between the NMR parameters and structural metrics. These data were combined with DFT calculations to obtain insight into the structures of several compounds with unknown crystal structures. PMID:23023927

  15. NMR studies of metallic tin confined within porous matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Charnaya, E. V.; Tien, Cheng; Lee, M. K.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2007-04-01

    {sup 119}Sn NMR studies were carried out for metallic tin confined within synthetic opal and porous glass. Tin was embedded into nanoporous matrices in the melted state under pressure. The Knight shift for liquid confined tin was found to decrease with decreasing pore size. Correlations between NMR line shapes, Knight shift, and pore filling were observed. The melting and freezing phase transitions of tin under confinement were studied through temperature dependences of NMR signals upon warming and cooling. Melting of tin within the opal matrix agreed well with the liquid skin model suggested for small isolated particles. The influence of the pore filling on the melting process was shown.

  16. New Views of Functionally Dynamic Proteins by Solution NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kay, Lewis E

    2016-01-29

    In the past several decades solution NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful technique for the study of the structure and dynamics of proteins, providing detailed insights into biomolecular function. Herein, I provide a summary of two important areas of application, focusing on NMR studies of (i) supramolecular systems with aggregate molecular masses in the hundreds of kilodaltons and of (ii) sparsely populated and transiently formed protein states that are thermally accessible from populated ground-state conformers. The critical role of molecular dynamics in function is emphasized, highlighting the utility of the NMR technique in providing such often elusive information. PMID:26707200

  17. An inductively coupled, series-tuned NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decorps, M.; Blondet, P.; Reutenauer, H.; Albrand, J. P.; Remy, C.

    A matching circuit for NMR coils for in vivo experiments is described. This circuit uses an inductive coupling of the NMR coil to the transmitter-receiver. This arrangement produces a nearly perfectly balanced NMR coil with respect to the sample and thus reduces the electric losses in the sample and also the radiative and resistive losses in the ground loops. Moreover, a series capacitor is inserted in the middle of the coil which further reduces the electric losses in the sample. Both inductive coupling and series tuning reduce the frequency shift of the coil resonance frequency upon the introduction of the sample or due to the movements of the animal under studies.

  18. Characterization of a chiral nematic mesoporous organosilica using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Alan; Shopsowitz, Kevin; Giese, Michael; MacLachlan, Mark; Dong, Ronald; Michal, Carl

    2012-10-01

    Using templation with nanocrystalline cellulose, a mesoporous organosilica film with a chiral nematic pore structure has recently been developed. [1] We have used a variety of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques to characterize the pore structure. The pore size distribution has been found by analyzing the freezing point depression of absorbed water via NMR cryoporometry. The effective longitudinal and transverse pore diameters for diffusing water were investigated with Pulsed-Field Gradient (PFG) NMR and compared to a 1-D connected-pore model. Preliminary data on testing imposed chiral ordering in absorbed liquid crystals is also presented. [4pt] [1] K.E. Shopsowitz et al. JACS 134(2), 867 (2012)

  19. Capillary toroid cavity detector for high pressure NMR

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Chen, Michael J.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; ter Horst, Marc

    2007-09-11

    A Toroid Cavity Detector (TCD) is provided for implementing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of chemical reactions under conditions of high pressures and temperatures. A toroid cavity contains an elongated central conductor extending within the toroid cavity. The toroid cavity and central conductor generate an RF magnetic field for NMR analysis. A flow-through capillary sample container is located within the toroid cavity adjacent to the central conductor to subject a sample material flowing through the capillary to a static magnetic field and to enable NMR spectra to be recorded of the material in the capillary under a temperature and high pressure environment.

  20. NMR imaging of components and materials for DOE application

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, B.R.

    1993-12-01

    The suitability for using NMR imaging to characterize liquid, polymeric, and solid materials was reviewed. The most attractive applications for NMR imaging appear to be liquid-filled porous samples, partially cured polymers, adhesives, and potting compounds, and composite polymers/high explosives containing components with widely varying thermal properties. Solid-state NMR line-narrowing and signal-enhancing markedly improve the imaging possibilities of true solid and materials. These techniques provide unique elemental and chemical shift information for highly complex materials and complement images with similar spatial resolution, such as X-ray computed tomography (CT).

  1. NMR studies on polyphosphide Ce6Ni6P17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Yamada, H.; Ueda, K.; Mito, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Nakano, T.; Takeda, N.

    2016-02-01

    We report the result of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies on Ce6Ni6P17. The observed NMR spectra show a Lorentzian-type and an asymmetric shapes, reflecting the local symmetry around each P site in the cubic unit cell. We have identified the observed NMR lines corresponding to three inequivalent P sites and deduced the temperature dependence of the Knight shift for each site. The Knight shifts increase with decreasing temperature down to 1.5 K, indicating a localized spin system of Ce6Ni6P17. Antiferromagnetic correlation between 4f spins is suggested from the negative sign of the Weiss-temperature.

  2. Microfluidic gas-flow profiling using remote-detection NMR

    PubMed Central

    Hilty, Christian; McDonnell, Erin E.; Granwehr, Josef; Pierce, Kimberly L.; Han, Song-I; Pines, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to obtain spatially and temporally resolved profiles of gas flow in microfluidic devices. Remote detection of the NMR signal both overcomes the sensitivity limitation of NMR and enables time-of-flight measurement in addition to spatially resolved imaging. Thus, detailed insight is gained into the effects of flow, diffusion, and mixing in specific geometries. The ability for noninvasive measurement of microfluidic flow, without the introduction of foreign tracer particles, is unique to this approach and is important for the design and operation of microfluidic devices. Although here we demonstrate an application to gas flow, extension to liquids, which have higher density, is implicit. PMID:16214884

  3. NMR Methods, Applications and Trends for Groundwater Evaluation and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, D. O.; Grunewald, E. D.

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements have a tremendous potential for improving groundwater characterization, as they provide direct detection and measurement of groundwater and unique information about pore-scale properties. NMR measurements, commonly used in chemistry and medicine, are utilized in geophysical investigations through non-invasive surface NMR (SNMR) or downhole NMR logging measurements. Our recent and ongoing research has focused on improving the performance and interpretation of NMR field measurements for groundwater characterization. Engineering advancements have addressed several key technical challenges associated with SNMR measurements. Susceptibility of SNMR measurements to environmental noise has been dramatically reduced through the development of multi-channel acquisition hardware and noise-cancellation software. Multi-channel instrumentation (up to 12 channels) has also enabled more efficient 2D and 3D imaging. Previous limitations in measuring NMR signals from water in silt, clay and magnetic geology have been addressed by shortening the instrument dead-time from 40 ms to 4 ms, and increasing the power output. Improved pulse sequences have been developed to more accurately estimate NMR relaxation times and their distributions, which are sensitive to pore size distributions. Cumulatively, these advancements have vastly expanded the range of environments in which SNMR measurements can be obtained, enabling detection of groundwater in smaller pores, in magnetic geology, in the unsaturated zone, and nearby to infrastructure (presented here in case studies). NMR logging can provide high-resolution estimates of bound and mobile water content and pore size distributions. While NMR logging has been utilized in oil and gas applications for decades, its use in groundwater investigations has been limited by the large size and high cost of oilfield NMR logging tools and services. Recently, engineering efforts funded by the US Department of Energy have produced an NMR logging tool that is much smaller and less costly than comparable oilfield NMR logging tools. This system is specifically designed for near surface groundwater investigations, incorporates small diameter probes (as small as 1.67 inches diameter) and man-portable surface stations, and provides NMR data and information content on par with oilfield NMR logging tools. A direct-push variant of this logging tool has also been developed. Key challenges associated with small diameter tools include inherently lower SNR and logging speeds, the desire to extend the sensitive zone as far as possible into unconsolidated formations, and simultaneously maintaining high power and signal fidelity. Our ongoing research in groundwater NMR aims to integrating surface and borehole measurements for regional-scale permeability mapping, and to develop in-place NMR sensors for long term monitoring of contaminant and remediation processes. In addition to groundwater resource characterization, promising new applications of NMR include assessing water content in ice and permafrost, management of groundwater in mining operations, and evaluation and management of groundwater in civil engineering applications.

  4. Solid phase extraction chromatography and NMR spectroscopy (SPEC-NMR) for the rapid identification of drug metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, I D; Nicholson, J K

    1988-01-01

    The use of solid phase extraction onto disposable columns containing a C18 bonded silica gel provides a rapid and simple procedure for the removal of interfering endogenous components from urine samples containing drug metabolites prior to detection and identification by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. In addition, these columns can be used to retain and concentrate the compounds of interest, thus improving the effective sensitivity of the NMR detection method. Using simple step gradients chromatographic separations can be performed, and metabolites may be rapidly fractionated. This approach (solid phase extraction chromatography with NMR or SPEC-NMR) utilises the multiparametric metabolite detection facility of a Fourier transform NMR spectrometer to monitor a chromatographic separation, as such it has some of the beneficial properties of a directly linked liquid chromatography-NMR system without any of the disadvantages. Applications of the SPEC-NMR method in the investigation of drug metabolism are illustrated here by reference to excretion studies on the drugs ibuprofen, paracetamol, aspirin, oxpentifylline and naproxen. PMID:16867428

  5. Biodegradation pathway of mesotrione: complementarities of NMR, LC-NMR and LC-MS for qualitative and quantitative metabolic profiling.

    PubMed

    Durand, Stéphanie; Sancelme, Martine; Besse-Hoggan, Pascale; Combourieu, Bruno

    2010-09-01

    Enhanced knowledge of pesticide transformation products formed in the environment could lead to both accurate estimates of the overall effects of these compounds on environmental ecosystems and human health and improved removal processes. These compounds can present chemical and environmental behaviours completely different from the starting active ingredient. The difficulty lies on their identification or/and their quantification due to the lack of analytical reference standards. In this context, ex situ Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Liquid Chromatography-NMR (LC-NMR) were used as complementary tools to LC-Mass Spectrometry (MS) to define the metabolic pathway of mesotrione, an emergent herbicide, by the bacterial strain Bacillus sp. 3B6. The complementarities of ex situ and LC-NMR allowed us to unambiguously identify six metabolites whereas the structures of only four metabolites were suggested by LC-MS. The presence of a new metabolic pathway was evidenced by NMR. These results demonstrate that NMR and LC-NMR spectroscopy provided unambiguous structural information for xenobiotic metabolic profiling, even at moderate magnetic field and allowed direct absolute quantification despite the lack of commercial or synthetic standards, required for LC-MS techniques. PMID:20692682

  6. Advances in NMR structures of integral membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Choe, Senyon

    2013-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) play a central role in cell communication with the environment. Their structures are essential for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of signaling and for drug design, yet they remain badly underrepresented in the protein structure databank. Solution NMR is, aside from X-ray crystallography, the major tool in structural biology. Here we review recently reported solution NMR structures of polytopic IMPs and discuss the new approaches, which were developed in the course of these studies to overcome barriers in the field. Advances in cell-free protein expression, combinatorial isotope labeling, resonance assignment, and collection of structural data greatly accelerated IMP structure determination by solution NMR. In addition, novel membrane-mimicking media made possible determination of solution NMR structures of IMPs in a native-like lipid environment. PMID:23721747

  7. A Demonstration of Imaging on an NMR Spectrometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a simple demonstration that relates the techniques of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) used in medicine and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Included are materials, procedures, and probable results. (KR)

  8. lac repressor-lac operator interaction: NMR observations.

    PubMed Central

    Nick, H; Arndt, K; Boschelli, F; Jarema, M A; Lillis, M; Sadler, J; Caruthers, M; Lu, P

    1982-01-01

    We show here the changes in the NMR spectra of the Escherichia coli lac repressor when bound to isolated lac operator DNA. The observations focus on the aromatic residues--four tyrosines and a single histidine--in the amino-terminal DNA binding domain of the lac repressor. There is a good correlation between chemical shift changes seen by 19F NMR when compared with 1 H NMR of otherwise identical repressor--DNA complexes. The results suggest that the tyrosines do not intercalate in the DNA. The NMR spectral changes with similarly sized DNA fragments, not containing the lac operator DNA sequence, are different. Thus, the amino-terminal domain of the lac repressor is independently capable of discriminating between lac operator and nonspecific DNA sequences. There can be two amino-terminal fragments per operator in the specific complex. PMID:7043455

  9. Mixing and Matching Detergents for Membrane Protein NMR Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Columbus, Linda; Lipfert, Jan; Jambunathan, Kalyani; Fox, Daniel A.; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Doniach, Sebastian; Lesley, Scott A.

    2009-10-21

    One major obstacle to membrane protein structure determination is the selection of a detergent micelle that mimics the native lipid bilayer. Currently, detergents are selected by exhaustive screening because the effects of protein-detergent interactions on protein structure are poorly understood. In this study, the structure and dynamics of an integral membrane protein in different detergents is investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results suggest that matching of the micelle dimensions to the protein's hydrophobic surface avoids exchange processes that reduce the completeness of the NMR observations. Based on these dimensions, several mixed micelles were designed that improved the completeness of NMR observations. These findings provide a basis for the rational design of mixed micelles that may advance membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

  10. 77Se Enrichment of Proteins Expands the Biological NMR Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Stephanie A.; Dong, Ming; Rubenstein, Renee P.; Wilkie, Wayne A.; Bahnson, Brian J.; Thorpe, Colin; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur, a key contributor to biological reactivity, is not amendable to investigations by biological NMR spectroscopy. To utilize selenium as a surrogate, we have developed a generally applicable 77Se isotopic enrichment method for heterologous proteins expressed in E. coli. We demonstrate 77Se NMR spectroscopy of multiple selenocysteine and selenomethionine residues in the sulfhydryl oxidase augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR). The resonances of the active site residues were assigned by comparing the NMR spectra of ALR bound to oxidized and reduced FAD. An additional resonance appears only in the presence of the reducing agent and disappears readily upon exposure to air and subsequent reoxidation of the flavin. Hence, 77Se NMR spectroscopy can be used to report the local electronic environment of reactive and structural sulfur sites, as well as changes taking place in those locations during catalysis. PMID:23159557

  11. Revisiting Protocols for the NMR Analysis of Bacterial Metabolomes

    PubMed Central

    Halouska, Steven; Zhang, Bo; Gaupp, Rosmarie; Lei, Shulei; Snell, Emily; Fenton, Robert J.; Barletta, Raul G.; Somerville, Greg A.; Powers, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, metabolomics has emerged as an important technique for systems biology. Measuring all the metabolites in a biological system provides an invaluable source of information to explore various cellular processes, and to investigate the impact of environmental factors and genetic modifications. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an important method routinely employed in metabolomics. NMR provides comprehensive structural and quantitative information useful for metabolomics fingerprinting, chemometric analysis, metabolite identification and metabolic pathway construction. A successful metabolomics study relies on proper experimental protocols for the collection, handling, processing and analysis of metabolomics data. Critically, these protocols should eliminate or avoid biologically-irrelevant changes to the metabolome. We provide a comprehensive description of our NMR-based metabolomics procedures optimized for the analysis of bacterial metabolomes. The technical details described within this manuscript should provide a useful guide to reliably apply our NMR-based metabolomics methodology to systems biology studies. PMID:26078915

  12. Nanoparticle size determination by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gomez, M Victoria; Guerra, Javier; Myers, V Sue; Crooks, Richard M; Velders, Aldrik H

    2009-10-21

    High-resolution solution (1)H NMR spectroscopy has been used to characterize the size of Pd dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs). The Pd nanoparticles measured by this technique contain 55, 147, 200, or 250 atoms, and they are encapsulated within sixth-generation, hydroxyl-terminated poly(amidoamine) PAMAM dendrimers (G6-OH). Detailed analysis of the NMR data shows that signals arising from the innermost protons of G6-OH(Pd(n)) decrease significantly as the size of the encapsulated nanoparticles increase. A mathematical correlation between this decrease in the integral value and the theoretical number of Pd atoms in the nanoparticle is extracted. It enables the elucidation of the size of Pd DENs by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. NMR pulse-field gradient spin-echo experiments demonstrate that G6-OH with and without DENs have identical hydrodynamic radii, which excludes the presence of dendrimer/nanoparticle aggregates. PMID:19785420

  13. A Short Set of Carbon 13-NMR Correlation Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a short set of carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tables. These tables not only serve pedagogic purposes but also allow students to do calculations rapidly and with acceptable accuracy for a wide variety of compounds. (JN)

  14. Proton NMR Spectra: Deceptively Simple and Deceptively Complex Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurst, J. E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes relatively simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments that demonstrate unexpected results of the deceptively simple and deceptively complex types. Background information, experimental procedures, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  15. A high-pressure NMR probe for aqueous geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Pautler, Brent G; Colla, Christopher A; Johnson, Rene L; Klavins, Peter; Harley, Stephen J; Ohlin, C André; Sverjensky, Dimitri A; Walton, Jeffrey H; Casey, William H

    2014-09-01

    A non-magnetic piston-cylinder pressure cell is presented for solution-state NMR spectroscopy at geochemical pressures. The probe has been calibrated up to 20?kbar using in?situ ruby fluorescence and allows for the measurement of pressure dependencies of a wide variety of NMR-active nuclei with as little as 10??L of sample in a microcoil. Initial (11)B?NMR spectroscopy of the H3BO3-catechol equilibria reveals a large pressure-driven exchange rate and a negative pressure-dependent activation volume, reflecting increased solvation and electrostriction upon boron-catecholate formation. The inexpensive probe design doubles the current pressure range available for solution NMR spectroscopy and is particularly important to advance the field of aqueous geochemistry. PMID:24989120

  16. NMR measurements on the triumf polarized deuterium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wait, G. D.; Delheij, P. P. J.; Healey, D. C.

    1989-01-01

    The NMR system and the polarization measurements of the TRIUMF polarized deuterium target are described. The NMR tuned circuit is kept resonant at all frequencies to allow for a high gain in the rf amplifiers and to permit the measurement of the real part of the NMR signal. A Starburst (J-11) and an LSI-11 are used to process the NMR signal at a high sample rate. A synthesizer under the control of an 8085 based microprocessor (TRIMAC) provides the rf sweep. Vector polarizations between -0.33 and -0.40 were routinely achieved during a four week run in the TRIUMF M11 pion beamline with a statistical uncertainty of 3.4% and a systematic uncertainty of 5%.

  17. Systematic solution to homo-oligomeric structures determined by NMR.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jeffrey W; Zhou, Pei; Donald, Bruce R

    2015-04-01

    Protein structure determination by NMR has predominantly relied on simulated annealing-based conformational search for a converged fold using primarily distance constraints, including constraints derived from nuclear Overhauser effects, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, and cysteine crosslinkings. Although there is no guarantee that the converged fold represents the global minimum of the conformational space, it is generally accepted that good convergence is synonymous to the global minimum. Here, we show such a criterion breaks down in the presence of large numbers of ambiguous constraints from NMR experiments on homo-oligomeric protein complexes. A systematic evaluation of the conformational solutions that satisfy the NMR constraints of a trimeric membrane protein, DAGK, reveals 9 distinct folds, including the reported NMR and crystal structures. This result highlights the fundamental limitation of global fold determination for homo-oligomeric proteins using ambiguous distance constraints and provides a systematic solution for exhaustive enumeration of all satisfying solutions. PMID:25620116

  18. NMR spectroscopy for thin films by magnetic resonance force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Won, Soonho; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Lee, SangGap; Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Yunseok

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental research tool that is widely used in many fields. Despite its powerful applications, unfortunately the low sensitivity of conventional NMR makes it difficult to study thin film or nano-sized samples. In this work, we report the first NMR spectrum obtained from general thin films by using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). To minimize the amount of imaging information inevitably mixed into the signal when a gradient field is used, we adopted a large magnet with a flat end with a diameter of 336 ?m that generates a homogeneous field on the sample plane and a field gradient in a direction perpendicular to the plane. Cyclic adiabatic inversion was used in conjunction with periodic phase inversion of the frequency shift to maximize the SNR. In this way, we obtained the (19)F NMR spectrum for a 34 nm-thick CaF2 thin film. PMID:24217000

  19. NMR Spectroscopy for Thin Films by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Soonho; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Lee, Sanggap; Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Yunseok

    2013-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental research tool that is widely used in many fields. Despite its powerful applications, unfortunately the low sensitivity of conventional NMR makes it difficult to study thin film or nano-sized samples. In this work, we report the first NMR spectrum obtained from general thin films by using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). To minimize the amount of imaging information inevitably mixed into the signal when a gradient field is used, we adopted a large magnet with a flat end with a diameter of 336 ?m that generates a homogeneous field on the sample plane and a field gradient in a direction perpendicular to the plane. Cyclic adiabatic inversion was used in conjunction with periodic phase inversion of the frequency shift to maximize the SNR. In this way, we obtained the 19F NMR spectrum for a 34 nm-thick CaF2 thin film.

  20. NMR Spectroscopy for Thin Films by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Won, Soonho; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Lee, SangGap; Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Yunseok

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental research tool that is widely used in many fields. Despite its powerful applications, unfortunately the low sensitivity of conventional NMR makes it difficult to study thin film or nano-sized samples. In this work, we report the first NMR spectrum obtained from general thin films by using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). To minimize the amount of imaging information inevitably mixed into the signal when a gradient field is used, we adopted a large magnet with a flat end with a diameter of 336??m that generates a homogeneous field on the sample plane and a field gradient in a direction perpendicular to the plane. Cyclic adiabatic inversion was used in conjunction with periodic phase inversion of the frequency shift to maximize the SNR. In this way, we obtained the 19F NMR spectrum for a 34?nm-thick CaF2 thin film. PMID:24217000

  1. International NMR-based Environmental Metabolomics Intercomparison Exercise

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several fundamental requirements must be met so that NMR-based metabolomics and the related technique of metabonomics can be formally adopted into environmental monitoring and chemical risk assessment. Here we report an intercomparison exercise which has evaluated the effectivene...

  2. Teaching 1H NMR Spectrometry Using Computer Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habata, Yoichi; Akabori, Sadatoshi

    2001-01-01

    Molecular modeling by computer is used to display stereochemistry, molecular orbitals, structure of transition states, and progress of reactions. Describes new ideas for teaching 1H NMR spectroscopy using computer modeling. (Contains 12 references.) (ASK)

  3. Characterization of molecular structure of DAST via NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zi-Bo; Meng, Da-Lei; Xu, Yong-Kuan; Wu, Cong

    2016-02-01

    4-N, N-dimethylamino-4‧-N‧-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) crystal has excellent properties of nonlinear optics and electro-optical effect, and it can be used in the fields of radiation and detection through wave bands from infrared to terahertz. Besides, DAST thin films have exhibited their excellent properties and have expanded application fields of DAST material. CD3OD was chosen as the solvent to conduct 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, 1H-13C HSQC and 1H-13C HMBC characterization of DAST respectively. All peaks in 1H and 13C NMR spectra of DAST were assigned with assistance of 2D NMR correlation peaks.

  4. NMR of high-[Tc] superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Asayama, K.; Kitaoka, Y.; Zheng, G.Q.; Ishida, K.; Magishi, K.; Tokunaga, Y.; Yoshida, K. . Dept. of Material Physics)

    1998-12-20

    Recent NMR measurements on high-[Tc] materials by the authors' group are reviewed. Study of YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7] + Ni has revealed that the attractive force is spin in origin. Analysis of T[sub 1], the Knight shift K and T[sub 2G] in Tl[sub 2]Ba[sub 2]CuO[sub 10] (Tl2223), HgBa[sub 2]Ca[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 8] (Hg1223), HgBa[sub 2]Ca[sub 3]Cu[sub 4]O[sub 10] (Hg1234) and YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 4]O[sub 8] (Y1248) supports the antiferromagnetic spin fluctuation (AFSF)-mediated-superconductivity-model. The temperatures at which a pseudogap starts to open obtained by 1/T[sub 1]T, dK/dT, photoemission, resistivity and STM all agree with each other in Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub 8] (Bi2212). The origin of the pseudogap is discussed.

  5. Broadband population inversion in solid state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, R.; Schneider, E.; Pines, A.

    1984-07-15

    We present theory, simulations and experimental demonstrations of composite ..pi.. pulses for population inversion in coupled spin systems such as occur in solid state NMR. The composite ..pi.. pulses are phase-shifted RF pulse sequences designed to invert spins over a larger range of dipole or quadrupole couplings than a conventional ..pi.. pulse, for a given RF power. We discuss a previously proposed theory for constructing composite pulses, in the specific context of solids. Two particular sequences 45/sub 0/180/sub 90/90/sub 180/180/sub 90/45/sub 0/ and 180/sub 0/180/sub 120/180/sub 0/ are examined in detail. Their performance in coupled spin systems of various sizes is evaluated in simulations. Experiments are performed on two solid compounds, Ba(ClO/sub 3/)/sub 2/xH/sub 2/O and C/sub 4/O/sub 4/H/sub 2/. The results reveal markedly less spectral distortion after composite pulse inversion than after conventional ..pi.. pulse inversion at low RF powers.

  6. Native dynamics from diversity in NMR structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, Heiko; Onuchic, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Protein function relies on the characteristic dynamics that arise in the protein's unique native structure, controlled by the smooth, funneled energy landscape evolved to enable fast and reliable folding. Structure-based models draw on energy landscape theory to build an ideally funneled energy landscape only from a protein's native structure. Simplified interactions of homogeneous strength are used to eliminate energetic frustration. The dynamics of the model are controlled by geometric constraints imposed by the native fold. The energy landscapes of many actual proteins are smooth enough to let such unfrustrated models describe their folding mechanisms. But conflicting functional demands upon the sequence may introduce sufficient frustration into the energetics to affect the dynamics. For such cases heterogeneous interactions can be optimized based on additional data. We use the diversity among the conformations deposited in a set of NMR structures to estimate the extent of fluctuations in the native state to build an improved model of protein S6. Qualitative modifications bring the observed mechanism into agreement with experiment, and matching of the entire fluctuation profile leads to similar contact maps as optimization based on either phi-values of sequence data.

  7. Deuterium incorporation in biomass cell wall components by NMR analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Foston, Marcus B; McGaughey, Joseph; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Evans, Barbara R; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2012-01-01

    A commercially available deuterated kale sample was analyzed for deuterium incorporation by ionic liquid solution 2H and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This protocol was found to effectively measure the percent deuterium incorporation at 33%, comparable to the 31% value determined by combustion. The solution NMR technique also suggested by a qualitative analysis that deuterium is preferentially incorporated into the carbohydrate components of the kale sample.

  8. NMR Line Shape Studies in a Nematic Liquid Crystal Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzamanian, M. A.; Babaei, A. R.

    2000-09-01

    The director distribution function in different configuration of nematic liquid crystals which are confined in a slab is calculated by minimizing the distortion free energy. Using this function and the appropriate frequency distribution function, NMR line shape is determined in different thicknesses of the slab. By increasing the slab thickness, the maximum distortion in the centre of the slab is increased. This effect reveals in the broadening of NMR lines.

  9. A temperature-jump design for conventional NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushmanov, Pavel V.; Furó, István

    2006-07-01

    The design and performance of a simple probe insert for temperature-jump experiments in conventional NMR probes is described. The insert uses the output from conventional NMR amplifiers for heating conductive aqueous samples with a rate of 30-80 K/s for 200 W radiofrequency power. The observed dependence of the heating rate on sample conductivity is explained by the dominance of dielectric heating. Factors governing the temperature gradient within the sample are discussed.

  10. A New Weak Field Double Resonance NMR Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akay, Cengiz; Yalçiner, Aytaç

    1995-03-01

    Weak field NMR and double resonance spectrometers are mostly homemade. In this work, some electronic units of such a spectrometer operating at 1.437 mT were designed and realized by includ­ing new integrated circuits: an audio generator, digital sweep generator, digital additional field and delay unit, Quartz generator, NMR detector(Q-meter), AF-narrowband amplifier, phase shifter and phase sensitive detector.

  11. Quantitative NMR Analysis of Partially Substituted Biodiesel Glycerols

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, M.; Alleman, T. L.; Dyer, T.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphitylation of hydroxyl groups in biodiesel samples with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by 31P-NMR analysis provides a rapid quantitative analytical technique for the determination of substitution patterns on partially esterified glycerols. The unique 31P-NMR chemical shift data was established with a series mono and di-substituted fatty acid esters of glycerol and then utilized to characterize an industrial sample of partially processed biodiesel.

  12. Proton NMR in the Large Compass 14NH3 Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivuniemi, J.; Gautheron, F.; Hess, C.; Kisselev, Y.; Meyer, W.; Radtke, E.; Reicherz, G.; Doshita, N.; Iwata, T.; Kondo, K.; Michigami, T.

    2011-01-01

    In the large COMPASS polarized proton target the 1508 cm3 of irradiated granular ammonia is polarized with the dynamic nuclear polarization method using 4 mm microwaves in 2.5 T field. The nuclear polarization up to 90-93 % is determined with CW NMR. The properties of the observed ammonia proton signals are described and spin thermodynamics in high fields is presented. Also the second moment of the NMR line is estimated.

  13. Flow units from integrated WFT and NMR data

    SciTech Connect

    Kasap, E.; Altunbay, M.; Georgi, D.

    1997-08-01

    Reliable and continuous permeability profiles are vital as both hard and soft data required for delineating reservoir architecture. They can improve the vertical resolution of seismic data, well-to-well stratigraphic correlations, and kriging between the well locations. In conditional simulations, permeability profiles are imposed as the conditioning data. Variograms, covariance functions and other geostatistical indicators are more reliable when based on good quality permeability data. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) logging and Wireline Formation Tests (WFT) separately generate a wealth of information, and their synthesis extends the value of this information further by providing continuous and accurate permeability profiles without increasing the cost. NMR and WFT data present a unique combination because WFTs provide discrete, in situ permeability based on fluid-flow, whilst NMR responds to the fluids in the pore space and yields effective porosity, pore-size distribution, bound and moveable fluid saturations, and permeability. The NMR permeability is derived from the T{sub 2}-distribution data. Several equations have been proposed to transform T{sub 2} data to permeability. Regardless of the transform model used, the NMR-derived permeabilities depend on interpretation parameters that may be rock specific. The objective of this study is to integrate WFT permeabilities with NMR-derived, T{sub 2} distribution-based permeabilities and thereby arrive at core quality, continuously measured permeability profiles. We outlined the procedures to integrate NMR and WFT data and applied the procedure to a field case. Finally, this study advocates the use of hydraulic unit concepts to extend the WFT-NMR derived, core quality permeabilities to uncored intervals or uncored wells.

  14. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

  15. Improvements in Technique of NMR Imaging and NMR Diffusion Measurements in the Presence of Background Gradients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jianyu

    In this work, modification of the cosine current distribution rf coil, PCOS, has been introduced and tested. The coil produces a very homogeneous rf magnetic field, and it is inexpensive to build and easy to tune for multiple resonance frequency. The geometrical parameters of the coil are optimized to produce the most homogeneous rf field over a large volume. To avoid rf field distortion when the coil length is comparable to a quarter wavelength, a parallel PCOS coil is proposed and discussed. For testing rf coils and correcting B _1 in NMR experiments, a simple, rugged and accurate NMR rf field mapping technique has been developed. The method has been tested and used in 1D, 2D, 3D and in vivo rf mapping experiments. The method has been proven to be very useful in the design of rf coils. To preserve the linear relation between rf output applied on an rf coil and modulating input for an rf modulating -amplifying system of NMR imaging spectrometer, a quadrature feedback loop is employed in an rf modulator with two orthogonal rf channels to correct the amplitude and phase non-linearities caused by the rf components in the rf system. The modulator is very linear over a large range and it can generate an arbitrary rf shape. A diffusion imaging sequence has been developed for measuring and imaging diffusion in the presence of background gradients. Cross terms between the diffusion sensitizing gradients and background gradients or imaging gradients can complicate diffusion measurement and make the interpretation of NMR diffusion data ambiguous, but these have been eliminated in this method. Further, the background gradients has been measured and imaged. A dipole random distribution model has been established to study background magnetic fields Delta B and background magnetic gradients G_0 produced by small particles in a sample when it is in a B_0 field. From this model, the minimum distance that a spin can approach a particle can be determined by measuring and <{bf G}_sp{0 }{2}>. From this model, the particle concentration in a sample can be determined by measuring the lineshape of a free induction decay (fid).

  16. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity. PMID:24083462

  17. The development of solid-state NMR of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Most biological functions are carried out in supramolecular assemblies. As a result of their slow reorientation in solution, these assemblies have been resistant to the widely employed solution NMR approaches. The development of solid-state NMR to first of all overcome the correlation time problem and then obtain informative high-resolution spectra of proteins in supramolecular assemblies, such as virus particles and membranes, is described here. High resolution solid-state NMR is deeply intertwined with the history of NMR, and the seminal paper was published in 1948. Although the general principles were understood by the end of the 1950s, it has taken more than fifty years for instrumentation and experimental methods to become equal to the technical problems presented by the biological assemblies of greatest interest. It is now possible to obtain atomic resolution structures of viral coat proteins in virus particles and membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers by oriented sample solid-state NMR methods. The development of this aspect of the field of solid-state NMR is summarized in this review article. PMID:26069880

  18. NMR properties of partially saturated porous silica glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, Eugen; Klitzsch, Norbert; Mohnke, Oliver

    2010-05-01

    The signal responses of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is sensitive to the inner surfaces of the water filled porous media. Therefore this method is well suited to noninvasively determine hydrological relevant parameters such as the pore radii distributions or hydraulic permeability of fully and partially saturated rocks and soils. NMR exploits the relaxation of the magnetization of fluids in the pore space of porous medium. In this work we study the dependence of NMR signals on the inner structure of fully and partially saturated artificial porous silica glasses (VitraPOR). The samples are characterized by an accurately defined pore space with well known pore radii distributions and surface properties. The mean pore sizes of the investigated samples range from 0.6 ?m to 25 ?m. Laboratory NMR saturation recovery (T1) and CPMG (T2) measurements as well as diffusion pulsed gradient mesurements have been carried out using a 3.91 MHz NMR spectrometer. A homogeneous partial saturation down to 5 vol.% has been realized by applying a uniform negative pressure gradient to the samples at each desaturation step. Additionally the corresponding water retention curves have been recorded and evaluated. On the basis of the results from these experiments the numerical simulation of the pore network using the Delaunay tesselation approach with subsequent simulations of NMR relaxation on the pore scale is performed in order to assess structure, state and thus transport properties of fully and partially saturated soils.

  19. NMR analysis on microfluidic devices by remote detection

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, Erin E.; Han, SongI; Hilty, Christian; Pierce,Kimberly; Pines, Alexander

    2005-08-15

    We present a novel approach to perform high-sensitivity NMR imaging and spectroscopic analysis on microfluidic devices. The application of NMR, the most information rich spectroscopic technique, to microfluidic devices remains a challenge because the inherently low sensitivity of NMR is aggravated by small fluid volumes leading to low NMR signal, and geometric constraints resulting in poor efficiency for inductive detection. We address the latter by physically separating signal detection from encoding of information with remote detection. Thereby, we use a commercial imaging probe with sufficiently large diameter to encompass the entire device, enabling encoding of NMR information at any location on the chip. Because large-diameter coils are too insensitive for detection, we store the encoded information as longitudinal magnetization and flow it into the outlet capillary. There, we detect the signal with optimal sensitivity using a solenoidal microcoil, and reconstruct the information encoded in the fluid. We present a generally applicable design for a detection-only microcoil probe that can be inserted into the bore of a commercial imaging probe. Using hyperpolarized 129Xe gas, we show that this probe enables sensitive reconstruction of NMR spectroscopic information encoded by the large imaging probe while keeping the flexibility of a large coil.

  20. Design and applications of an in situ electrochemical NMR cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaocan; Zwanziger, Josef W.

    2011-01-01

    A device using a three-electrode electrochemical cell (referred to as an ECNMR cell) was successfully constructed that could be used in a standard 5 mm NMR probe to acquire high-resolution NMR spectra while the working electrode was held at a constant electrical potential. The working electrode was a 20 nm thick gold film thermally coated on the outside of an inner 3 mm glass tube. An underlayer consisting of (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxy-silane was coated on the glass surface in order to improve its adhesion to gold. Tests showed prolonged life of the gold film. Details of the design and construction of the ECNMR cell are described. The ECNMR cell could be routinely used in a multi-user service high-resolution NMR instrument under oxygen-free conditions in both aqueous and non-aqueous solvents. Different approaches were applied to suppress the noise transmitted between the potentiostat and the NMR spectrometer. These approaches were shown to be effective in reducing background noise in the NMR spectra. The electrochemical and NMR performance of the ECNMR cell is presented. The reduction of 1,4-benzoquinone in both aqueous and non-aqueous solvents was used for testing. The evolution of the in situ ECNMR spectra with time demonstrated that use of the ECNMR cell was feasible. Studies of caffeic acid and 9-chloroanthracene using this ECNMR cell were undertaken to explore its applications, such as monitoring reactions and studying their reaction mechanisms.

  1. NMR-spectroscopic analysis of mixtures: from structure to function

    PubMed Central

    Forseth, Ry R.; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2010-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy as a particularly information-rich method offers unique opportunities for improving the structural and functional characterization of metabolomes, which will be essential for advancing the understanding of many biological processes. Whereas traditionally NMR spectroscopy was mostly relegated to the characterization of pure compounds, the last few years have seen a surge of interest in using NMR spectroscopic techniques for characterizing complex metabolite mixtures. Development of new methods was motivated partly by the realization that using NMR for the analysis of metabolite mixtures can help identify otherwise inaccessible small molecules, for example compounds that are prone to chemical decomposition and thus cannot be isolated. Furthermore, comparative metabolomics and statistical analyses of NMR-spectra have proven highly effective at identifying novel and known metabolites that correlate with changes in genotype or phenotype. In this review, we provide an overview of the range of NMR spectroscopic techniques recently developed for characterizing metabolite mixtures, including methods used in discovery-oriented natural product chemistry, in the study of metabolite biosynthesis and function, or for comparative analyses of entire metabolomes. PMID:21071261

  2. NMR Logging to Estimate Hydraulic Conductivity in Unconsolidated Aquifers.

    PubMed

    Knight, Rosemary; Walsh, David O; Butler, James J; Grunewald, Elliot; Liu, Gaisheng; Parsekian, Andrew D; Reboulet, Edward C; Knobbe, Steve; Barrows, Mercer

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging provides a new means of estimating the hydraulic conductivity (K) of unconsolidated aquifers. The estimation of K from the measured NMR parameters can be performed using the Schlumberger-Doll Research (SDR) equation, which is based on the Kozeny-Carman equation and initially developed for obtaining permeability from NMR logging in petroleum reservoirs. The SDR equation includes empirically determined constants. Decades of research for petroleum applications have resulted in standard values for these constants that can provide accurate estimates of permeability in consolidated formations. The question we asked: Can standard values for the constants be defined for hydrogeologic applications that would yield accurate estimates of K in unconsolidated aquifers? Working at 10 locations at three field sites in Kansas and Washington, USA, we acquired NMR and K data using direct-push methods over a 10- to 20-m depth interval in the shallow subsurface. Analysis of pairs of NMR and K data revealed that we could dramatically improve K estimates by replacing the standard petroleum constants with new constants, optimal for estimating K in the unconsolidated materials at the field sites. Most significant was the finding that there was little change in the SDR constants between sites. This suggests that we can define a new set of constants that can be used to obtain high resolution, cost-effective estimates of K from NMR logging in unconsolidated aquifers. This significant result has the potential to change dramatically the approach to determining K for hydrogeologic applications. PMID:25810149

  3. Solid-state NMR study of halogen-bonded adducts.

    PubMed

    Bryce, David L; Viger-Gravel, Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy offers unique insights into halogen bonds. NMR parameters such as chemical shifts, quadrupolar coupling constants, J coupling constants, and dipolar coupling constants are in principle sensitive to the formation and local structure of a halogen bond. Carrying out NMR experiments on halogen-bonded adducts in the solid state may provide several advantages over solution studies including (1) the absence of solvent which can interact with halogen bond donor sites and complicate spectral interpretation, (2) the lack of a need for single crystals or even long-range crystalline order, and (3) the potential to measure complete NMR interaction tensors rather than simply their isotropic values. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the NMR interactions and experiments which are relevant to the study of nuclei which are often found in halogen bonds (RX···Y) including (13)C, (35/37)Cl, (79/81)Br, (127)I, (77)Se, and (14/15)N. Experimental examples based on iodoperfluorobenzene halides, bis(trimethylammonium)alkane diiodide, and selenocyanate complexes, as well as haloanilinium halides, are discussed. Of particular interest is the sensitivity of the isotropic chemical shifts, the chemical shift tensor spans, and the halide nuclear electric quadrupolar coupling tensors to the halogen bond geometry in such compounds. Technical limitations associated with the NMR spectroscopy of covalently-bonded halogens are underlined. PMID:24760615

  4. Nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging of multiple nuclear species.

    PubMed

    DeVience, Stephen J; Pham, Linh M; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sushkov, Alexander O; Bar-Gill, Nir; Belthangady, Chinmay; Casola, Francesco; Corbett, Madeleine; Zhang, Huiliang; Lukin, Mikhail; Park, Hongkun; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide non-invasive information about multiple nuclear species in bulk matter, with wide-ranging applications from basic physics and chemistry to biomedical imaging. However, the spatial resolution of conventional NMR and MRI is limited to several micrometres even at large magnetic fields (>1?T), which is inadequate for many frontier scientific applications such as single-molecule NMR spectroscopy and in vivo MRI of individual biological cells. A promising approach for nanoscale NMR and MRI exploits optical measurements of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond, which provide a combination of magnetic field sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution unmatched by any existing technology, while operating under ambient conditions in a robust, solid-state system. Recently, single, shallow NV centres were used to demonstrate NMR of nanoscale ensembles of proton spins, consisting of a statistical polarization equivalent to ?100-1,000 spins in uniform samples covering the surface of a bulk diamond chip. Here, we realize nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and MRI of multiple nuclear species ((1)H, (19)F, (31)P) in non-uniform (spatially structured) samples under ambient conditions and at moderate magnetic fields (?20?mT) using two complementary sensor modalities. PMID:25559712

  5. SENSASS NMR: New NMR techniques for enhancing the sensitivity and the spectral resolution of polymer supported chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosa, Nicolò; Scherrmann, Marie-Christine; Merlet, Denis; Farjon, Jonathan

    2013-12-01

    The use of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) as organic polymer soluble supports for synthesis has been receiving growing interest. The main advantages of using PEGs as support are related to their non-toxicity, their commercial availability and their solubility properties allowing easy recovery and analysis of compounds linked to the polymer. The NMR characterization of PEG-branched products could however be difficult due to the presence of huge signals of the polymeric support. In order to overcome this problem, we developed new NMR experiments named SENSitivity increAsed and resolution enhanced by Signal Suppression or SENSASS NMR. These experiments implement either semi-selective pulses or Water Gate sequences for reducing signals of the polymer as well as fast pulsing techniques optimizing the recycling delay for enhancing the sensitivity of signals. They have been successfully implemented in classical NMR characterization experiments namely, COSY, HSQC and HMBC experiments.

  6. Method development in quantitative NMR towards metrologically traceable organic certified reference materials used as (31)P qNMR standards.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Hellriegel, Christine; Rueck, Alexander; Wuethrich, Juerg; Jenks, Peter; Obkircher, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) spectroscopy is employed by an increasing number of analytical and industrial laboratories for the assignment of content and quantitative determination of impurities. Within the last few years, it was demonstrated that (1)H qNMR can be performed with high accuracy leading to measurement uncertainties below 1 % relative. It was even demonstrated that the combination of (1)H qNMR with metrological weighing can lead to measurement uncertainties below 0.1 % when highly pure substances are used. Although qNMR reference standards are already available as certified reference materials (CRM) providing traceability on the basis of (1)H qNMR experiments, there is an increasing demand for purity assays on phosphorylated organic compounds and metabolites requiring CRM for quantification by (31)P qNMR. Unfortunately, the number of available primary phosphorus standards is limited to a few inorganic CRM which only can be used for the analysis of water-soluble analytes but fail when organic solvents must be employed. This paper presents the concept of value assignment by (31)P qNMR measurements for the development of CRM and describes different approaches to establish traceability to primary Standard Reference Material from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST SRM). Phosphonoacetic acid is analyzed as a water-soluble CRM candidate, whereas triphenyl phosphate is a good candidate for the use as qNMR reference material in organic solvents. These substances contain both nuclei, (1)H and (31)P, and the concept is to show that it is possible to indirectly quantify a potential phosphorus standard via its protons using (1)H qNMR. The same standard with its assigned purity can then be used for the quantification of an analyte via its phosphorus using (31)P qNMR. For the validation of the concept, triphenyl phosphate and phosphonoacetic acid have been used as (31)P qNMR standards to determine the purity of the analyte tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate, and the resulting purity values perfectly overlap within their expanded measurement uncertainties. PMID:25416230

  7. Operation of a 500 MHz high temperature superconducting NMR: towards an NMR spectrometer operating beyond 1 GHz.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Y; Nakagome, H; Tennmei, K; Hamada, M; Yoshikawa, M; Otsuka, A; Hosono, M; Kiyoshi, T; Takahashi, M; Yamazaki, T; Maeda, H

    2010-04-01

    We have begun a project to develop an NMR spectrometer that operates at frequencies beyond 1 GHz (magnetic field strength in excess of 23.5 T) using a high temperature superconductor (HTS) innermost coil. As the first step, we developed a 500 MHz NMR with a Bi-2223 HTS innermost coil, which was operated in external current mode. The temporal magnetic field change of the NMR magnet after the coil charge was dominated by (i) the field fluctuation due to a DC power supply and (ii) relaxation in the screening current in the HTS tape conductor; effect (i) was stabilized by the 2H field-frequency lock system, while effect (ii) decreased with time due to relaxation of the screening current induced in the HTS coil and reached 10(-8)(0.01 ppm)/h on the 20th day after the coil charge, which was as small as the persistent current mode of the NMR magnet. The 1D (1)H NMR spectra obtained by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet were nearly equivalent to those obtained by the LTS NMR magnet. The 2D-NOESY, 3D-HNCO and 3D-HNCACB spectra were achieved for ubiquitin by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet; their quality was closely equivalent to that achieved by a conventional LTS NMR. Based on the results of numerical simulation, the effects of screening current-induced magnetic field changes are predicted to be harmless for the 1.03 GHz NMR magnet system. PMID:20149698

  8. Operation of a 500 MHz high temperature superconducting NMR: Towards an NMR spectrometer operating beyond 1 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Y.; Nakagome, H.; Tennmei, K.; Hamada, M.; Yoshikawa, M.; Otsuka, A.; Hosono, M.; Kiyoshi, T.; Takahashi, M.; Yamazaki, T.; Maeda, H.

    2010-04-01

    We have begun a project to develop an NMR spectrometer that operates at frequencies beyond 1 GHz (magnetic field strength in excess of 23.5 T) using a high temperature superconductor (HTS) innermost coil. As the first step, we developed a 500 MHz NMR with a Bi-2223 HTS innermost coil, which was operated in external current mode. The temporal magnetic field change of the NMR magnet after the coil charge was dominated by (i) the field fluctuation due to a DC power supply and (ii) relaxation in the screening current in the HTS tape conductor; effect (i) was stabilized by the 2H field-frequency lock system, while effect (ii) decreased with time due to relaxation of the screening current induced in the HTS coil and reached 10 -8(0.01 ppm)/h on the 20th day after the coil charge, which was as small as the persistent current mode of the NMR magnet. The 1D 1H NMR spectra obtained by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet were nearly equivalent to those obtained by the LTS NMR magnet. The 2D-NOESY, 3D-HNCO and 3D-HNCACB spectra were achieved for ubiquitin by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet; their quality was closely equivalent to that achieved by a conventional LTS NMR. Based on the results of numerical simulation, the effects of screening current-induced magnetic field changes are predicted to be harmless for the 1.03 GHz NMR magnet system.

  9. NMR and HPLC-NMR spectroscopic studies of futile deacetylation in paracetamol metabolites in rat and man.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, A W; Farrant, R D; Shockcor, J P; Unger, S E; Wilson, I D; Lindon, J C; Nicholson, J K

    1997-04-01

    HPLC-NMR spectroscopy has been used to investigate the level of deacetylation followed by reacetylation (futile deacetylation) of metabolites of paracetamol detected in human and rat urine. This has been achieved through the synthesis and administration of paracetamol isotopically labeled at the acetyl group with C2H3, 13CH3 and 13CO-13CH3. Using paracetamol-C2H3 it had been shown that in the rat the sulphate metabolite present in the urine shows 10-13% futile deacetylation depending on the dose, whereas for paracetamol-13CO-13CH3 the corresponding value was about 8%. After solid phase extraction, it was also possible to determine the level of futile deacetylation in the glucuronide metabolite using directly-coupled HPLC-NMR. This approach was facilitated by the use of acetonitrile-d3 as an HPLC eluent and the HPLC-NMR analyses showed that the level of futile deacetylation in the sulphate and glucuronide metabolites were equal at about 9%. The glucuronide of paracetamol-C2H3 was the predominant metabolite in man and following separation using HPLC-NMR, the level of futile deacetylation was shown to be 1% for the glucuronide and 2% for the sulphate, these values being equal within experimental error. This work demonstrates the utility of NMR and HPLC-NMR spectroscopy for isotope exchange studies. PMID:9160256

  10. Whole-core analysis by sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N. ); Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance {sup 13}C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. {sup 13}C NMR can be used in cores where the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good {sup 13}C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while {sup 1}H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60{degrees} API), and alkanes (C{sub 5} through C{sub 16}) with viscosities at 77{degrees}F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} cp. The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The {sup 13}C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled {sup 13}C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, {sup 13}C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the {sup 13}C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon.

  11. Monitoring prion protein stability by NMR.

    PubMed

    Julien, Olivier; Graether, Steffen P; Sykes, Brian D

    2009-01-01

    Prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), are a group of fatal neurological diseases that affect both humans and animals. At the end of the 20th century, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), better known as mad cow disease, was shown to be transmissible to humans. This resulted in considerable concern for public health and a number of questions for scientists. The first question answered was the possible source of the disease, which appears to be the prion protein (PrP). There are two major forms of this protein: the native, noninfectious form (PrP(C)), and the misfolded infectious form (PrP(Sc)). PrP(C) is mainly alpha-helical in structure, whereas PrP(Sc) aggregates into an assembly of beta-sheets, forming amyloid fibrils. Since the first solution structure of the noninfectious form of the mouse prion protein, about 30 structures of the globular portion of PrP(C) have been characterized from different organisms. However, only a few minor differences are observed when comparing one PrP(C) structure to another. The key to understanding prion formation may then be not in the structure of PrP(C), but in the mechanism underlying PrP(C) unfolding and then conversion into a misfolded fibril state. To identify the possible region(s) of PrP(C) responsible for initiating the conversion into the amyloid fibril formation, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was applied to characterize the stability and structure of PrP(C) and intermediate states during the conversion from PrP(C) to PrP(Sc). Subsequently urea was used to induce unfolding, and data analysis revealed region-specific structural stabilities that may bring insights into the mechanisms underlying conversion of protein into an infectious prion. PMID:19697241

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations on PGLa using NMR orientational constraints.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Ulrich; Witter, Raiker

    2015-11-01

    NMR data obtained by solid state NMR from anisotropic samples are used as orientational constraints in molecular dynamics simulations for determining the structure and dynamics of the PGLa peptide within a membrane environment. For the simulation the recently developed molecular dynamics with orientational constraints technique (MDOC) is used. This method introduces orientation dependent pseudo-forces into the COSMOS-NMR force field. Acting during a molecular dynamics simulation these forces drive molecular rotations, re-orientations and folding in such a way that the motional time-averages of the tensorial NMR properties are consistent with the experimentally measured NMR parameters. This MDOC strategy does not depend on the initial choice of atomic coordinates, and is in principle suitable for any flexible and mobile kind of molecule; and it is of course possible to account for flexible parts of peptides or their side-chains. MDOC has been applied to the antimicrobial peptide PGLa and a related dimer model. With these simulations it was possible to reproduce most NMR parameters within the experimental error bounds. The alignment, conformation and order parameters of the membrane-bound molecule and its dimer were directly derived with MDOC from the NMR data. Furthermore, this new approach yielded for the first time the distribution of segmental orientations with respect to the membrane and the order parameter tensors of the dimer systems. It was demonstrated the deuterium splittings measured at the peptide to lipid ratio of 1/50 are consistent with a membrane spanning orientation of the peptide. PMID:26358333

  13. Accurate, Fully-Automated NMR Spectral Profiling for Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Ravanbakhsh, Siamak; Liu, Philip; Bjordahl, Trent C.; Mandal, Rupasri; Grant, Jason R.; Wilson, Michael; Eisner, Roman; Sinelnikov, Igor; Hu, Xiaoyu; Luchinat, Claudio; Greiner, Russell; Wishart, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases cause significant changes to the concentrations of small molecules (a.k.a. metabolites) that appear in a person’s biofluids, which means such diseases can often be readily detected from a person’s “metabolic profile"—i.e., the list of concentrations of those metabolites. This information can be extracted from a biofluids Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrum. However, due to its complexity, NMR spectral profiling has remained manual, resulting in slow, expensive and error-prone procedures that have hindered clinical and industrial adoption of metabolomics via NMR. This paper presents a system, BAYESIL, which can quickly, accurately, and autonomously produce a person’s metabolic profile. Given a 1D 1H NMR spectrum of a complex biofluid (specifically serum or cerebrospinal fluid), BAYESIL can automatically determine the metabolic profile. This requires first performing several spectral processing steps, then matching the resulting spectrum against a reference compound library, which contains the “signatures” of each relevant metabolite. BAYESIL views spectral matching as an inference problem within a probabilistic graphical model that rapidly approximates the most probable metabolic profile. Our extensive studies on a diverse set of complex mixtures including real biological samples (serum and CSF), defined mixtures and realistic computer generated spectra; involving > 50 compounds, show that BAYESIL can autonomously find the concentration of NMR-detectable metabolites accurately (~ 90% correct identification and ~ 10% quantification error), in less than 5 minutes on a single CPU. These results demonstrate that BAYESIL is the first fully-automatic publicly-accessible system that provides quantitative NMR spectral profiling effectively—with an accuracy on these biofluids that meets or exceeds the performance of trained experts. We anticipate this tool will usher in high-throughput metabolomics and enable a wealth of new applications of NMR in clinical settings. BAYESIL is accessible at http://www.bayesil.ca. PMID:26017271

  14. Transient protein-protein interactions visualized by solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhu; Gong, Zhou; Dong, Xu; Tang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Proteins interact with each other to establish their identities in cell. The affinities for the interactions span more than ten orders of magnitude, and KD values in ?M-mM regimen are considered transient and are important in cell signaling. Solution NMR including diamagnetic and paramagnetic techniques has enabled atomic-resolution depictions of transient protein-protein interactions. Diamagnetic NMR allows characterization of protein complexes with KD values up to several mM, whereas ultraweak and fleeting complexes can be modeled with the use of paramagnetic NMR especially paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE). When tackling ever-larger protein complexes, PRE can be particularly useful in providing long-range intermolecular distance restraints. As NMR measurements are averaged over the ensemble of complex structures, structural information for dynamic protein-protein interactions besides the stereospecific one can often be extracted. Herein the protein interaction dynamics are exemplified by encounter complexes, alternative binding modes, and coupled binding/folding of intrinsically disordered proteins. Further integration of NMR with other biophysical techniques should allow better visualization of transient protein-protein interactions. In particular, single-molecule data may facilitate the interpretation of ensemble-averaged NMR data. Though same structures of proteins and protein complexes were found in cell as in diluted solution, we anticipate that the dynamics of transient protein protein-protein interactions be different, which awaits awaits exploration by NMR. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. PMID:25896389

  15. NMR Study of Strontium Binding by a Micaceous Mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, S.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-04-13

    The nature of strontium binding by soil minerals directly affects the transport and sequestration/remediation of radioactive strontium species released from leaking high-level nuclear waste storage tanks. However, the molecular-level structure of strontium binding sites has seldom been explored in phyllosilicate minerals by direct spectroscopic means and is not well-understood. In this work, we use solid-state NMR to analyze strontium directly and indirectly in a fully strontium-exchanged synthetic mica of nominal composition Na4Mg6Al4Si4O20F4. Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and NMR evidence supports that heat treatment at 500 °C for 4 h fully dehydrates the mica, creating a hydrogen-free interlayer. Analysis of the strontium NMR spectrum of the heat-treated mica shows a single strontium environment with a quadrupolar coupling constant of 9.02 MHz and a quadrupolar asymmetry parameter of 1.0. These quadrupolar parameters are consistent with a highly distorted and asymmetric coordination environment that would be produced by strontium cations without water in the coordination sphere bound deep within the ditrigonal holes. Evidence for at least one additional strontium environment, where proton-strontium couplings may occur, was found via a 1H-87Sr transfer of populations by double resonance NMR experiment. We conclude that the strontium cations in the proton-free interlayer are observable by 87Sr NMR and bound through electrostatic interactions as nine coordinate inner-sphere complexes sitting in the ditrigonal holes. Partially hydrated strontium cations invisible to direct 87Sr NMR are also present and located on the external mica surfaces, which are known to hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture. These results demonstrate that modern pulsed NMR techniques and high fields can be used effectively to provide structural details of strontium binding by phyllosilicate minerals.

  16. Solid-state NMR characterization of Mowry Formation shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-04-01

    Solid-state [sup 13]C and [sup 29]Si NMR measurements were carried out on a series of petroleum source rocks from the Mowry Formation of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The objectives of this study wereto use CP/MAS [sup 13]C NMR measurements to monitor changes in the carbon structure of the kerogen that result from depth of burial, and to examine the feasibility of [sup 29]Si NMR for studying the thermal alteration of clay minerals during diagenesis. Carbon and silicon NMR measurements were made on a suite of samples covering a present-day depth interval of 3,000 to 11,500 ft.In general, the NMR results endorsed other geochemical analyses that were performed on the source rocks as part of another study to examine pressure compartmentalization in the Mowry Formation. The carbon aromaticity of the kerogen increased with depth of burial, and at depths greater that approximately 10,000 ft the kerogen showed little capacity to generate additional oil because of the small fraction of residual aliphatic carbon. By combining NMR and Rock-Eval measurements, an estimate of the hydrogen budget was obtained. The calculations indicated that approximately 20% of the kerogen was converted to hydrocarbons, and that sufficient hydrogen was liberated from aromatization and condensation reactions to stabilize the generated products. The [sup 29]Si NMR spectra were characterized by a relatively sharp quartz resonance and a broad resonance from the clay minerals. With increasing depth of burial, the clay resonance became broader and shifted slightly downfield. These changes qualitatively support X-ray analysis that shows progressive alteration of illite to smectite with depth of burial.

  17. Solid-state NMR characterization of Mowry Formation shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-04-01

    Solid-state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si NMR measurements were carried out on a series of petroleum source rocks from the Mowry Formation of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The objectives of this study wereto use CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR measurements to monitor changes in the carbon structure of the kerogen that result from depth of burial, and to examine the feasibility of {sup 29}Si NMR for studying the thermal alteration of clay minerals during diagenesis. Carbon and silicon NMR measurements were made on a suite of samples covering a present-day depth interval of 3,000 to 11,500 ft.In general, the NMR results endorsed other geochemical analyses that were performed on the source rocks as part of another study to examine pressure compartmentalization in the Mowry Formation. The carbon aromaticity of the kerogen increased with depth of burial, and at depths greater that approximately 10,000 ft the kerogen showed little capacity to generate additional oil because of the small fraction of residual aliphatic carbon. By combining NMR and Rock-Eval measurements, an estimate of the hydrogen budget was obtained. The calculations indicated that approximately 20% of the kerogen was converted to hydrocarbons, and that sufficient hydrogen was liberated from aromatization and condensation reactions to stabilize the generated products. The {sup 29}Si NMR spectra were characterized by a relatively sharp quartz resonance and a broad resonance from the clay minerals. With increasing depth of burial, the clay resonance became broader and shifted slightly downfield. These changes qualitatively support X-ray analysis that shows progressive alteration of illite to smectite with depth of burial.

  18. Magic-angle spinning NMR of cold samples.

    PubMed

    Concistrè, Maria; Johannessen, Ole G; Carignani, Elisa; Geppi, Marco; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2013-09-17

    Magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR provides site-resolved structural and chemical information about molecules that complements many other physical techniques. Recent technical advances have made it possible to perform magic-angle-spinning NMR experiments at low temperatures, allowing researchers to trap reaction intermediates and to perform site-resolved studies of low-temperature physical phenomena such as quantum rotations, quantum tunneling, ortho-para conversion between spin isomers, and superconductivity. In examining biological molecules, the improved sensitivity provided by cryogenic NMR facilitates the study of protein assembly or membrane proteins. The combination of low-temperatures with dynamic nuclear polarization has the potential to boost sensitivity even further. Many research groups, including ours, have addressed the technical challenges and developed hardware for magic-angle-spinning of samples cooled down to a few tens of degrees Kelvin. In this Account, we briefly describe these hardware developments and review several recent activities of our group which involve low-temperature magic-angle-spinning NMR. Low-temperature operation allows us to trap intermediates that cannot be studied under ambient conditions by NMR because of their short lifetime. We have used low-temperature NMR to study the electronic structure of bathorhodopsin, the primary photoproduct of the light-sensitive membrane protein, rhodopsin. This project used a custom-built NMR probe that allows low-temperature NMR in the presence of illumination (the image shows the illuminated spinner module). We have also used this technique to study the behavior of molecules within a restricted environment. Small-molecule endofullerenes are interesting molecular systems in which molecular rotors are confined to a well-insulated, well-defined, and highly symmetric environment. We discuss how cryogenic solid state NMR can give information on the dynamics of ortho-water confined in a fullerene cage. Molecular motions are often connected with fundamental chemical properties; therefore, an understanding of molecular dynamics can be important in fields ranging from material science to biochemistry. We present the case of ibuprofen sodium salt which exhibits different degrees of conformational freedom in different parts of the same molecule, leading to a range of line broadening and line narrowing phenomena as a function of temperature. PMID:23488538

  19. Intermediate couplings: NMR at the solids-liquids interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Megan

    2006-03-01

    Anisotropic interactions like dipolar couplings and chemical shift anisotropy have long offered solid-state NMR spectroscopists valuable structural information. Recently, solution-state NMR structural studies have begun to exploit residual dipolar couplings of biological molecules in weakly anisotropic solutions. These residual couplings are about 0.1% of the coupling magnitudes observed in the solid state, allowing simple, high-resolution NMR spectra to be retained. In this work, we examine the membrane-associated opioid, leucine enkephalin (lenk), in which the ordering is ten times larger than that for residual dipolar coupling experiments, requiring a combination of solution-state and solid-state NMR techniques. We adapted conventional solid-state NMR techniques like adiabatic cross- polarization and REDOR for use with such a system, and measured small amide bond dipolar couplings in order to determine the orientation of the amide bonds (and therefore the peptide) with respect to the membrane surface. However, the couplings measured indicate large structural rearrangements on the surface and contradict the published structures obtained by NOESY constraints, a reminder that such methods are of limited use in the presence of large-scale dynamics.

  20. Low Cost CE-NMR with Microcoils for Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, K; Klunder, G; Demas, V; Malba, V; Bernhardt, A; Evan, L; Harvey, C; Maxwell, R; Herberg, J L

    2009-01-08

    Understanding speciation in solids and solutions is important for environmental and toxicological purposes. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a simple rapid separation technique that can be used to identify species in solution. CE is particularly is well suited for rapid separations of metal containing samples. Direct on-capillary measurement of metal compound speciation can be obtained with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The development of a low-cost microcoil CE-NMR system for in situ characterization of samples of interest is discussed. High precision laser lithography is used to produce copper sputtered microcoils that have comparable resistivity and quality factors to that of hand wound microcoils. A portable NMR system coupled with a CE system has the potential to identify chemical species in aqueous solutions. In addition, transient isotachophoresis can separate and pre-concentrate samples of interest to obtain separate chemical peaks for speciation by online NMR analysis. We are developing separation assays to determine the speciation of chemical complexes in solutions with minimal perturbation to the original sample equilibrium. On-line NMR measurements will be made downstream of the UV detector.

  1. Low Cost CE-NMR with Microcoils for Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, K L; Klunder, G; Demas, V; Malba, V; Bernhardt, A; Evan, L; Harvey, C; Maxwell, R; Herberg, J

    2008-07-25

    Understanding speciation in solids and solutions is important for environmental and toxicological purposes. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a simple rapid separation technique that can be used to identify species in solution. CE is particularly is well suited for rapid separations of metal containing samples. Direct on-capillary measurement of metal compound speciation can be obtained with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The development of a low-cost microcoil CE-NMR system for in situ characterization of samples of interest is discussed. High precision laser lithography is used to produce copper sputtered microcoils that have comparable resistivity and quality factors to that of hand wound microcoils. A portable NMR system coupled with a CE system has the potential to identify chemical species in aqueous solutions. In addition, transient isotachophoresis can separate and pre-concentrate samples of interest to obtain separate chemical peaks for speciation by online NMR analysis. We are developing separation assays to determine the speciation of chemical complexes in solutions with minimal perturbation to the original sample equilibrium. On-line NMR measurements will be made downstream of the UV detector.

  2. Mechanisms of amyloid formation revealed by solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Karamanos, Theodoros K.; Kalverda, Arnout P.; Thompson, Gary S.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are proteinaceous elongated aggregates involved in more than fifty human diseases. Recent advances in electron microscopy and solid state NMR have allowed the characterization of fibril structures to different extents of refinement. However, structural details about the mechanism of fibril formation remain relatively poorly defined. This is mainly due to the complex, heterogeneous and transient nature of the species responsible for assembly; properties that make them difficult to detect and characterize in structural detail using biophysical techniques. The ability of solution NMR spectroscopy to investigate exchange between multiple protein states, to characterize transient and low-population species, and to study high molecular weight assemblies, render NMR an invaluable technique for studies of amyloid assembly. In this article we review state-of-the-art solution NMR methods for investigations of: (a) protein dynamics that lead to the formation of aggregation-prone species; (b) amyloidogenic intrinsically disordered proteins; and (c) protein–protein interactions on pathway to fibril formation. Together, these topics highlight the power and potential of NMR to provide atomic level information about the molecular mechanisms of one of the most fascinating problems in structural biology. PMID:26282197

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based drug metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Eva M

    2011-01-01

    The identification of drug metabolites in biofluids such as urine, plasma and bile is an important step in drug discovery and development. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy can provide detailed information regarding the structural transformation of a compound as a consequence of metabolism. However, successful identification of drug metabolites by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy is generally compromised by the presence of endogenous metabolites, which can obscure the signals of the drug metabolites in question. Hence, sample clean-up and separation of the metabolites from the biofluid matrix is crucial. This is generally achieved by extraction of the biofluid, solid-phase extraction (SPE), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or any combination of these. Apart from (1)H, other NMR-active nuclei, such as (19)F, can provide a useful handle for metabolite profiling, provided they are not naturally present in the biofluid. Successful studies have shown that the presence of a fluorine-handle on the drug and its metabolites can provide additional qualitative and quantitative data by (19)F-NMR spectroscopy. This chapter provides guidelines and examples of NMR-based drug metabolite profiling. PMID:21207298

  4. Batch profiling calibration for robust NMR metabonomic data analysis.

    PubMed

    Fages, Anne; Pontoizeau, Clément; Jobard, Elodie; Lévy, Pierre; Bartosch, Birke; Elena-Herrmann, Bénédicte

    2013-11-01

    Metabonomic studies involve the analysis of large numbers of samples to identify significant changes in the metabolic fingerprints of biological systems, possibly with sufficient statistical power for analysis. While procedures related to sample preparation and spectral data acquisition generally include the use of independent sample batches, these might be sources of systematic variation whose effects should be removed to focus on phenotyping the relevant biological variability. In this work, we describe a grouped-batch profile (GBP) calibration strategy to adjust nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomic data-sets for batch effects either introduced during NMR experiments or samples work-up. We show how this method can be applied to data calibration in the context of a large-scale NMR epidemiological study where quality control samples are available. We also illustrate the efficiency of a batch profile correction for NMR metabonomic investigation of cell extracts, where GBP can significantly improve the predictive power of multivariate statistical models for discriminant analysis of the cell infection status. The method is applicable to a broad range of NMR metabolomic/metabonomic cohort studies. PMID:23975089

  5. Development of a superconducting bulk magnet for NMR and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Tamada, Daiki; Yanagi, Yousuke; Itoh, Yoshitaka; Nemoto, Takahiro; Utumi, Hiroaki; Kose, Katsumi

    2015-10-01

    A superconducting bulk magnet composed of six vertically stacked annular single-domain c-axis-oriented Eu-Ba-Cu-O crystals was energized to 4.74 T using a conventional superconducting magnet for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. Shim coils, gradient coils, and radio frequency coils for high resolution NMR and MRI were installed in the 23 mm-diameter room-temperature bore of the bulk magnet. A 6.9 ppm peak-to-peak homogeneous region suitable for MRI was achieved in the central cylindrical region (6.2 mm diameter, 9.1 mm length) of the bulk magnet by using a single layer shim coil. A 21 Hz spectral resolution that can be used for high resolution NMR spectroscopy was obtained in the central cylindrical region (1.3 mm diameter, 4 mm length) of the bulk magnet by using a multichannel shim coil. A clear 3D MR image dataset of a chemically fixed mouse fetus with (50 ?m)3 voxel resolution was obtained in 5.5 h. We therefore concluded that the cryogen-free superconducting bulk magnet developed in this study is useful for high-resolution desktop NMR, MRI and mobile NMR device.

  6. NMR study of the potential composition of Titan's lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2015-05-01

    A large number of hydrocarbon lakes have been discovered in Titan's surface. However, the chemical composition and physical properties of these lakes are not fully understood. We investigate the potential composition of Titan's lakes by NMR. Based upon NMR data, the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the hydrocarbons in Titan's lakes are simulated on a 1 T spectrometer [being developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for future in situ characterization of Titan's lakes]. The study indicates that the dominant composition (all components>1% of the lake composition by mole fraction) in Titan's lakes can be determined and the major soluble organics quantitatively identified from either quantitative 1H or 13C spectra on a 1 T NMR spectrometer. The proton T1 relaxation times are determined for a number of candidate organics in hydrocarbon solution, a necessary determinant for quantitative NMR. The gas solubility of these organics is also investigated to understand the equilibrium of composition between Titan's lakes and atmosphere and the precipitation rates of the molecules at Titan's ground level. Our results are significant for the ongoing discussion regarding the development of in situ, low bias analysis methods and instruments for Titan missions and other outer planet exploration.

  7. MQ NMR dynamics in dipolar ordered state at negative temperature.

    PubMed

    Furman, G B; Goren, S D; Meerovich, V M; Sokolovsky, V L

    2014-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the Multiple Quantum (MQ) NMR dynamics at negative absolute temperatures in systems of nuclear spins 1/2 coupled by the dipole-dipole interactions and with the initial conditions determined by the dipolar ordered state. Two different methods of MQ NMR are used. One of them is based on the measurement of the dipolar energy. The other method uses an additional resonance (?/4)y-pulse after the preparation period of the standard MQ NMR experiment. It is shown that at negative temperatures many-spin clusters and spin correlations are created faster, and the intensities of MQ coherences are higher than in the usual MQ NMR experiments. So, the eighth-order MQ coherence in 10-spin system of the cyclopentane molecule appears to be 1.5 times faster and its intensity is four orders higher than at positive temperatures. The proposed MQ NMR methods at negative absolute temperatures can be used for the investigation of many-spin dynamics of nuclear spins in solids. PMID:24992818

  8. Selective NMR excitation in strongly inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todica, M.; Fechete, R.; Blümich, B.

    2003-10-01

    The NMR-MOUSE is a unilateral and mobile NMR sensor which operates with highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields. To produce a mobile NMR unit, RF excitation is sought, which can be produced with the most simple equipment, in particular nonlinear, low-power amplifiers, and to observe a free induction decay in strongly inhomogeneous fields, the excitation needs to be selective. The possibility to produce selective excitation by sequences of hard low-power radiofrequency pulses in the strongly inhomogeneous magnetic fields of the NMR-MOUSE is explored. The use of the DANTE sequence for selection of magnetization from parts of the sensitive volume was investigated for longitudinal and transverse magnetization by computer simulations and experiments. The spectra of the recorded FIDs and echo signals are in good agreement with those simulated for the excitation, which verifies the concept of the DANTE excitation. The results obtained are an important step towards a low-power operation of the NMR-MOUSE to improve its mobility.

  9. Web server suite for complex mixture analysis by covariance NMR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengli; Robinette, Steven L; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2009-12-01

    Elucidation of the chemical composition of biological samples is a main focus of systems biology and metabolomics. Their comprehensive study requires reliable, efficient, and automatable methods to identify and quantify the underlying metabolites. Because nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a rich source of molecular information, it has a unique potential for this task. Here we present a suite of public web servers (http://spinportal.magnet.fsu.edu), termed COLMAR, which facilitates complex mixture analysis by NMR. The COLMAR web portal presently consists of three servers: COLMAR covariance calculates the covariance NMR spectrum from an NMR input dataset, such as a TOCSY spectrum; COLMAR DemixC method decomposes the 2D covariance TOCSY spectrum into a reduced set of nonredundant 1D cross sections or traces, which belong to individual mixture components; and COLMAR query screens the traces against a NMR spectral database to identify individual compounds. Examples are presented that illustrate the utility of this web server suite for complex mixture analysis. PMID:19634130

  10. Web Server Suite for Complex Mixture Analysis by Covariance NMR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengli; Robinette, Steve; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Elucidation of the chemical composition of biological samples is a main focus of systems biology and metabolomics. Their comprehensive study requires reliable, efficient, and automatable methods to identify and quantify the underlying metabolites. Because nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a rich source of molecular information, it has a unique potential for this task. Here we present a suite of public web servers (http://spinportal.magnet.fsu.edu), termed COLMAR, that facilitates complex mixture analysis by NMR. The COLMAR web portal presently consists of three servers: COLMAR covariance calculates the covariance NMR spectrum from an NMR input dataset, such as a TOCSY spectrum; COLMAR DemixC method decomposes the 2D covariance TOCSY spectrum into a reduced set of non-redundant 1D cross sections or traces, which belong to individual mixture components; COLMAR query screens the traces against a NMR spectral database to identify individual compounds. Examples are presented that illustrate the utility of this web server suite for complex mixture analysis. PMID:19634130

  11. Determination of fat content in NMR images of meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballerini, Lucia

    2000-12-01

    In this paper we present an application to food science of image processing technique. We describe a method for determining fat content in beef meat. The industry of meat faces a permanent need for improved methods for meat quality evaluation. Researchers want improved techniques to deepen their understanding of meat features. Expectations of consumers for meat quality grow constantly, which induces the necessity of quality control. Recent advances in the area of computer and video processing have created new ways to monitor quality in the food industry. We investigate the use of a new technology to control the quality of food: NMR imaging. The inherent advantages of NMR images are many. Chief among these unprecedented contrasts between the various structures present in meat like muscle, fat, and connective tissue. Moreover, the three-dimensional nature of the NMR method allow us to analyze isolated cross-sectional slices of the meat and to measure the volumetric content of fat, not only the fat visible on the surface. We propose a segmentation algorithm for the detection of fat together with a filtering technique to remove intensity inhomogeneities in NMR images caused by non-uniformities of the magnetic field during acquisition. Measurements have been successfully correlated with chemical analysis and digital photography. Results show that the NMR technique is a promising non-invasive method to determine the fat content in meat.

  12. Evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms with NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Evancho, A.; Osbakken, M.; Weidner, W.

    1984-01-01

    Seven patients (5 male and 2 female, age range from 50 to 88) with angiographic proven abdominal aortic aneurysms were evaluated with NMR imaging (1.5 K gauss system) of the abdomen. Images were obtained in transverse, coronal and saggital planes with three radiofrequency pulse sequences (saturation recovery (SR), inversion recovery (IR), and spin echo (SE)). All of the aneurysms were identified as to site and relative size with NMR images. The lumen in which there was flowing blood was always dark (low intensity), whereas the aneurysmal area which contained presumed clot was brighter (high intensity) on SR images. Although the size, location and relationship to other blood vessels was best demonstrated on aortography, NMR images provided similar information in all cases. NMR images correctly demonstrated thrombus in six cases. The authors conclude that NMR imaging provides a clear delineation of the anatomy of abdominal aortic aneurysms. In addition it can provide information concerning tissue type, i.e., it distinguished clot from moving blood. It may be possible in the future to further characterize atherosclerotic and other pathological changes in vessel architecture by using various pulse sequences and timing parameters to provide in vivo histological typing.

  13. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  14. NMR of a Phospholipid: Modules for Advanced Laboratory Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaede, Holly C.; Stark, Ruth E.

    2001-09-01

    A laboratory project is described that builds upon the NMR experience undergraduates receive in organic chemistry with a battery of NMR experiments that investigate egg phosphatidylcholine (egg PC). This material, often labeled in health food stores as lecithin, is a major constituent of mammalian cell membranes. The NMR experiments may be used to make resonance assignments, to study molecular organization in model membranes, to test the effects of instrumental parameters, and to investigate the physics of nuclear spin systems. A suite of modular NMR exercises is described, so that the instructor may tailor the laboratory sessions to biochemistry, instrumental analysis, or physical chemistry. The experiments include solution-state one-dimensional (1D) 1H, 13C, and 31P experiments; two-dimensional (2D) TOtal Correlated SpectroscopY (TOCSY); and the spectral editing technique of Distortionless Enhancement by Polarization Transfer (DEPT). To demonstrate the differences between solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy and instrumentation, a second set of experiments generates 1H, 13C, and 31P spectra of egg PC dispersed in aqueous solution, under both static and magic-angle spinning conditions.

  15. Quantification of taurine in energy drinks using ¹H NMR.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Monika; Felbinger, Christine; Christoph, Norbert; Wachter, Helmut; Wiest, Johannes; Holzgrabe, Ulrike

    2014-05-01

    The consumption of so called energy drinks is increasing, especially among adolescents. These beverages commonly contain considerable amounts of the amino sulfonic acid taurine, which is related to a magnitude of various physiological effects. The customary method to control the legal limit of taurine in energy drinks is LC-UV/vis with postcolumn derivatization using ninhydrin. In this paper we describe the quantification of taurine in energy drinks by (1)H NMR as an alternative to existing methods of quantification. Variation of pH values revealed the separation of a distinct taurine signal in (1)H NMR spectra, which was applied for integration and quantification. Quantification was performed using external calibration (R(2)>0.9999; linearity verified by Mandel's fitting test with a 95% confidence level) and PULCON. Taurine concentrations in 20 different energy drinks were analyzed by both using (1)H NMR and LC-UV/vis. The deviation between (1)H NMR and LC-UV/vis results was always below the expanded measurement uncertainty of 12.2% for the LC-UV/vis method (95% confidence level) and at worst 10.4%. Due to the high accordance to LC-UV/vis data and adequate recovery rates (ranging between 97.1% and 108.2%), (1)H NMR measurement presents a suitable method to quantify taurine in energy drinks. PMID:24094700

  16. NMR imaging and cryoporometry of swelling clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Szutkowski, Kosma; Petrov, Oleg V.; Furó, István.

    2010-05-01

    Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising "self-sealing" buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. In environmental sciences, evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted clay are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. Major goal of present study was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored [1]. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were obtained. Expansion rates for bulk swelling and swelling in narrow slits were compared. For sodium-exchanged montmorillonite in contact with de-ionised water, we observed a remarkable acceleration of expansion as compared to that obtained in the bulk. To characterize the porosity of the clay a cryoporometric study [2] has been performed. Our results have important implications to waste repository designs and for the assessment of its long-term performance. Further research exploring clay-water interaction over a wide variety of clay composition and water ionic strength as well as investigating the effect of the confining geometry and material surface properties seem to be worth to pursue. Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) and the Swedish Research Council VR. References: [1] Dvinskikh S. V., Szutkowski K., Furó I. MRI profiles over a very wide concentration ranges: application to swelling of a bentonite clay. J. Magn. Reson. 198, 146 (2009). [2] Petrov O. V., Furó I. NMR cryoporometry: Principles, applications and potential. Prog. Nucl. Magn. Reson. Spec. 54, 97 (2009).

  17. Detection of thin film NMR spectrum by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saun, Seung-Bo; Kwon, Sungmin; Lee, Soonchil; Won, Soonho

    2014-03-01

    NMR is widely used in many fields due to its powerful advantages such as nondestructive, chemically selective detection, and local probing. However, because of its low sensitivity, it is difficult to investigate thin film samples by conventional NMR. MRFM is the combined technic of NMR and Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM), and it enabled exceptional sensitivity increasement of NMR detection. We succeeded in detecting general thin film NMR spectrum for the first time by modifying the MRFM. CaF2 34nm thin film NMR was detected and we observed 20 Gauss spectrum in proximity to bulk spectrum which is about 10 Gauss.

  18. High-resolution NMR with resistive and hybrid magnets: deconvolution using a field-fluctuation signal.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takahiro; Takegoshi, K; Hashi, Kenjiro; Fujito, Teruaki; Shimizu, Tadashi

    2007-02-01

    A method for compensating effect of field fluctuation is examined to attain high-resolution NMR spectra with resistive and hybrid magnets. In this method, time dependence of electromotive force induced for a pickup coil attached near a sample is measured synchronously with acquisition of NMR. Observed voltage across the pickup coil is converted to field fluctuation data, which is used to deconvolute NMR signals. The feasibility of the method is studied by (79)Br MAS NMR of KBr under a 30T magnetic field of a hybrid magnet. Twenty single-scan NMR signals were accumulated after the manipulation, resulting in a high-resolution NMR spectrum. PMID:17123849

  19. High resolution NMR measurements using a 400MHz NMR with an (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-x high-temperature superconducting inner coil: Towards a compact super-high-field NMR.

    PubMed

    Piao, R; Iguchi, S; Hamada, M; Matsumoto, S; Suematsu, H; Saito, A T; Li, J; Nakagome, H; Takao, T; Takahashi, M; Maeda, H; Yanagisawa, Y

    2016-02-01

    Use of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) inner coils in combination with conventional low-temperature superconducting (LTS) outer coils for an NMR magnet, i.e. a LTS/HTS NMR magnet, is a suitable option to realize a high-resolution NMR spectrometer with operating frequency >1GHz. From the standpoint of creating a compact magnet, (RE: Rare earth) Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO) HTS inner coils which can tolerate a strong hoop stress caused by a Lorentz force are preferred. However, in our previous work on a first-generation 400MHz LTS/REBCO NMR magnet, the NMR resolution and sensitivity were about ten times worse than that of a conventional LTS NMR magnet. The result was caused by a large field inhomogeneity in the REBCO coil itself and the shielding effect of a screening current induced in that coil. In the present paper, we describe the operation of a modified 400MHz LTS/REBCO NMR magnet with an advanced field compensation technology using a combination of novel ferromagnetic shimming and an appropriate procedure for NMR spectrum line shape optimization. We succeeded in obtaining a good NMR line shape and 2D NOESY spectrum for a lysozyme aqueous sample. We believe that this technology is indispensable for the realization of a compact super-high-field high-resolution NMR. PMID:26778351

  20. Single-sided mobile NMR with a Halbach magnet.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Hao; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Hwang, Lian-Pin

    2006-10-01

    A single-sided mobile NMR apparatus with a small Halbach magnet was constructed for the first time. It is lightweight, compact and exhibits good sensitivity. The weight of the device is only 2 kg, and the NMR signal of the pencil eraser block can be detected in one shot using the device. This study describes the characteristics of this instrument, including the profile of static magnetic flux density, B0, the sensitivity in the depth direction and its effectiveness in one-dimensional profiling. Its usefulness in differentiating soft materials and evaluating the extent of damage of a material is demonstrated based on T2 relaxation data. The moisture absorbance also can be observed from the increase of the echo amplitude of the NMR spin echo signal. PMID:16997080

  1. RNA structure determination by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-05-01

    Knowledge of the RNA three-dimensional structure, either in isolation or as part of RNP complexes, is fundamental to understand the mechanism of numerous cellular processes. Because of its flexibility, RNA represents a challenge for crystallization, while the large size of cellular complexes brings solution-state NMR to its limits. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach on the basis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We develop a suite of experiments and RNA labeling schemes and demonstrate for the first time that ssNMR can yield a RNA structure at high-resolution. This methodology allows structural analysis of segmentally labelled RNA stretches in high-molecular weight cellular machines--independent of their ability to crystallize-- and opens the way to mechanistic studies of currently difficult-to-access RNA-protein assemblies.

  2. RNA structure determination by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the RNA three-dimensional structure, either in isolation or as part of RNP complexes, is fundamental to understand the mechanism of numerous cellular processes. Because of its flexibility, RNA represents a challenge for crystallization, while the large size of cellular complexes brings solution-state NMR to its limits. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach on the basis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We develop a suite of experiments and RNA labeling schemes and demonstrate for the first time that ssNMR can yield a RNA structure at high-resolution. This methodology allows structural analysis of segmentally labelled RNA stretches in high-molecular weight cellular machines—independent of their ability to crystallize— and opens the way to mechanistic studies of currently difficult-to-access RNA-protein assemblies. PMID:25960310

  3. Challenges in NMR instrumentation at high fields and low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, William; Reyes, Arneil; Kuhns, Phillip

    2000-03-01

    Advances in resistive magnet and power supply technology have made available high magnetic fields suitable for condensed matter (broad line) NMR experiments. This capability expands available phase space for investigating a variety of material behavior using magnetic resonance. This also presents new challenges in the design and construction of NMR instrumentation. Field strengths and sample space limitations put constraints on RF power, tank circuit tuning range, field homogeneity and stability, and temperature control.. NMR probes incorporating capabilities such as high pressures, high (>350K) and low (<1.5K) temperatures, optical pumping, and sample rotation require creative designs. Unique user facilities at NHMFL are described focusing probe and cryogenic designs that circumvented problems associated with the high field resistive magnets. Instrumentation developed for the new 45T hybrid magnet will also be presented.

  4. Applications of saturation transfer difference NMR in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Bhunia, Anirban; Bhattacharjya, Surajit; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu

    2012-05-01

    The method of saturation transfer difference (STD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an indispensable NMR tool in drug discovery. It identifies binding epitope(s) at the atomic resolution of small molecule ligands (e.g. organic drugs, peptides and oligosaccharides), while interacting with their receptors, such as proteins and/or nucleic acids. The method is widely used to screen active drug molecules, simultaneously ranking them in a qualitative way. STD NMR is highly successful for a variety of high molecular weight systems, such as whole viruses, platelets, intact cells, lipopolysaccharide micelles, membrane proteins, recombinant proteins and dispersion pigments. Modifications of STD pulse programs using (13)C and (15)N nuclei are now used to overcome the signal overlapping that occurs with more complex structures. PMID:22210119

  5. Advances in solid-state NMR of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Foston, Marcus

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a well-established analytical and enabling technology in biofuel research. Over the past few decades, lignocellulosic biomass and its conversion to supplement or displace non-renewable feedstocks has attracted increasing interest. The application of solid-state NMR spectroscopy has long been seen as an important tool in the study of cellulose and lignocellulose structure, biosynthesis, and deconstruction, especially considering the limited number of effective solvent systems and the significance of plant cell wall three-dimensional microstructure and component interaction to conversion yield and rate profiles. This article reviews common and recent applications of solid-state NMR spectroscopy methods that provide insight into the structural and dynamic processes of cellulose that control bulk properties and biofuel conversion. PMID:24590189

  6. NMR imaging of cell phone radiation absorption in brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, David H.; Moeller, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    A method is described for measuring absorbed electromagnetic energy radiated from cell phone antennae into ex vivo brain tissue. NMR images the 3D thermal dynamics inside ex vivo bovine brain tissue and equivalent gel under exposure to power and irradiation time-varying radio frequency (RF) fields. The absorbed RF energy in brain tissue converts into Joule heat and affects the nuclear magnetic shielding and the Larmor precession. The resultant temperature increase is measured by the resonance frequency shift of hydrogen protons in brain tissue. This proposed application of NMR thermometry offers sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to characterize the hot spots from absorbed cell phone radiation in aqueous media and biological tissues. Specific absorption rate measurements averaged over 1 mg and 10 s in the brain tissue cover the total absorption volume. Reference measurements with fiber optic temperature sensors confirm the accuracy of the NMR thermometry. PMID:23248293

  7. Ligand screening by saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, V V

    2005-04-26

    NMR based methods to screen for high-affinity ligands have become an indispensable tool for designing rationalized drugs, as these offer a combination of good experimental design of the screening process and data interpretation methods, which together provide unprecedented information on the complex nature of protein-ligand interactions. These methods rely on measuring direct changes in the spectral parameters, that are often simpler than the complex experimental procedures used to study structure and dynamics of proteins. The goal of this review article is to provide the basic details of NMR based ligand-screening methods, with particular focus on the saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment. In addition, we provide an overview of other NMR experimental methods and a practical guide on how to go about designing and implementing them.

  8. NMR-Metabolic Methodology in the Study of GM Foods

    PubMed Central

    Sobolev, Anatoly P.; Capitani, Donatella; Giannino, Donato; Nicolodi, Chiara; Testone, Giulio; Santoro, Flavio; Frugis, Giovanna; Iannelli, Maria A.; Mattoo, Autar K.; Brosio, Elvino; Gianferri, Raffaella; D’Amico, Irene; Mannina, Luisa

    2010-01-01

    The 1H-NMR methodology used in the study of genetically modified (GM) foods is discussed. Transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv "Luxor") over-expressing the ArabidopsisKNAT1 gene is presented as a case study. Twenty-two water-soluble metabolites (amino acids, organic acids, sugars) present in leaves of conventional and GM lettuce were monitored by NMR and quantified at two developmental stages. The NMR spectra did not reveal any difference in metabolite composition between the GM lettuce and the wild type counterpart. Statistical analyses of metabolite variables highlighted metabolism variation as a function of leaf development as well as the transgene. A main effect of the transgene was in altering sugar metabolism. PMID:22253988

  9. Solid State NMR and Protein-Protein Interactions in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Solid state NMR spectroscopy has evolved rapidly in recent years into an excellent tool for the characterization of membrane proteins and their complexes. In the past few years it has also become clear that the structure of membrane proteins, especially helical membrane proteins is determined, in part, by the membrane environment. Therefore, the modeling of this environment by a liquid crystalline lipid bilayer for solid state NMR has generated a unique tool for the characterization of native conformational states, local and global dynamics, and high resolution structure for these proteins. Protein-protein interactions can also benefit from this solid state NMR capability to characterize membrane proteins in a native-like environment. These complexes take the form of oligomeric structures and hetero-protein interactions both with water soluble proteins and other membrane proteins. PMID:24034903

  10. Solid state NMR and protein-protein interactions in membranes.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A

    2013-12-01

    Solid state NMR spectroscopy has evolved rapidly in recent years into an excellent tool for the characterization of membrane proteins and their complexes. In the past few years it has also become clear that the structure of membrane proteins, especially helical membrane proteins is determined, in part, by the membrane environment. Therefore, the modeling of this environment by a liquid crystalline lipid bilayer for solid state NMR has generated a unique tool for the characterization of native conformational states, local and global dynamics, and high-resolution structure for these proteins. Protein-protein interactions can also benefit from this solid state NMR capability to characterize membrane proteins in a native-like environment. These complexes take the form of oligomeric structures and hetero-protein interactions both with water-soluble proteins and other membrane proteins. PMID:24034903

  11. NMR/MRI with hyperpolarized gas and high Tc SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Schlenga, Klaus (Eggenstein, DE); de Souza, Ricardo E. (Recife, BR); Wong-Foy, Annjoe (Berkeley, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals and production of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from samples combines the use of hyperpolarized inert gases to enhance the NMR signals from target nuclei in a sample and a high critical temperature (Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect the NMR signals. The system operates in static magnetic fields of 3 mT or less (down to 0.1 mT), and at temperatures from liquid nitrogen (77K) to room temperature. Sample size is limited only by the size of the magnetic field coils and not by the detector. The detector is a high Tc SQUID magnetometer designed so that the SQUID detector can be very close to the sample, which can be at room temperature.

  12. Remote NMR/MRI detection of laser polarized gases

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Saxena, Sunil; Moule, Adam; Spence, Megan; Seeley, Juliette A.; Pierce, Kimberly L.; Han, Song-I; Granwehr, Josef

    2006-06-13

    An apparatus and method for remote NMR/MRI spectroscopy having an encoding coil with a sample chamber, a supply of signal carriers, preferably hyperpolarized xenon and a detector allowing the spatial and temporal separation of signal preparation and signal detection steps. This separation allows the physical conditions and methods of the encoding and detection steps to be optimized independently. The encoding of the carrier molecules may take place in a high or a low magnetic field and conventional NMR pulse sequences can be split between encoding and detection steps. In one embodiment, the detector is a high magnetic field NMR apparatus. In another embodiment, the detector is a superconducting quantum interference device. A further embodiment uses optical detection of Rb--Xe spin exchange. Another embodiment uses an optical magnetometer using non-linear Faraday rotation. Concentration of the signal carriers in the detector can greatly improve the signal to noise ratio.

  13. Automated high-resolution NMR with a sample changer

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, C.G.; Johnson, R.D.; Philson, S.B.; Strouse, J.; McEnroe, F.J.

    1989-01-15

    Within the past two years, it has become possible to obtain high-resolution NMR spectra using automated commercial instrumentation. Software control of all spectrometer functions has reduced most of the tedious manual operations to typing a few computer commands or even making selections from a menu. Addition of an automatic sample changer is the next natural step in improving efficiency and sample throughput; it has a significant (and even unexpected) impact on how NMR laboratories are run and how it is taught. Such an instrument makes even sophisticated experiments routine, so that people with no previous exposure to NMR can run these experiments after a training session of an hour or less. This A/C Interface examines the impact of such instrumentation on both the academic and the industrial laboratory.

  14. Development of a new device control system for ?-NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, N.; Ueno, H.; Yoshimi, A.; Ishibashi, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.; Abe, Y.; Asahi, K.; Chikamori, M.; Fujita, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hikota, E.; Nagae, D.; Ohtomo, Y.; Saito, Y.; Shirai, H.; Suzuki, T.; Yang, X. F.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a device-control system of a ?-NMR apparatus for the measurement of nuclear electromagnetic nuclear moments of rare isotopes. In this development, we installed fast relay switches into a high-power tank circuit in order to apply a strong oscillating magnetic field and to sweep its frequency as wide as possible. The system enables to conduct NMR frequency scans with wide frequency windows by dynamically changing the tank-circuit resonant frequency. Furthermore, logical electric-circuit modules of the data taking system were replaced by a programmable logic module. The system performance was evaluated in the ?-NMR experiments conducted at the RIBF facility using 20F and 33Cl radioactive isotopes.

  15. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  16. An on-line NMR technique with a programmable processor

    SciTech Connect

    Razazian, K.; Dieckman, S.L.; Raptis, A.C.

    1995-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is used to determine molecular content of materials, mainly in laboratory measurements. The reduced cost of fast computer processors, together with recent break throughs in digital signal processor technology, has facilitated the on-line use of NMR by allowing modifications of the available technology. This paper describes a system and an algorithm for improving the on-line operations. It is base on the time-domain NMR signal detected by the controller and some prior knowledge of chemical signal patterns. The desired signal can be separated from a composite signal by using an adaptive line enhancer (ALE) filter. This technique would be useful for upgrading process procedures in on-line manufacturing.

  17. Clinical NMR imaging of the brain: 140 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Bydder, G.M.; Steiner, R.E.; Young, I.R.; Hall, A.S.; Thomas, D.J.; Marshall, J.; Pallis, C.A.; Legg, N.J.

    1982-08-01

    Cranial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scans were performed on 13 healthy volunteers and 140 patients with a broad spectrum of neurologic disease and compared with x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. Advantages of NMR imaging include the high level of gray-white matter contrast, lack of bone artifact, variety of possible sequences, transverse, sagittal, and coronal imaging, sensitivity to pathologic change, and lack of known hazard. Disadvantages include lack of bone detail, limited spatial resolution, lack of contrast agents, and cost. Promising directions for future clinical research include developmental neurology, tissue characterization with T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/, assessment of blood flow, and the development of contrast agents. Much more detailed evaluation will be required, but NMR seems to be a potentially important addition to existing techniques of neurologic diagnosis.

  18. Canopy Dynamics in Nanoscale Ionic Materials Probed by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirau, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs) are hybrids prepared from ionically functionalized nanoparticles (NP) neutralized by oligomeric polymer counter-ions. NIMs are designed to behave as liquids under ambient conditions in the absence of solvent and have no volatile organic content, making them useful for a number of applications. We have used NMR relaxation and pulse-field gradient NMR to probe local and collective canopy dynamics in NIMs based on silica nanoparticles (NP), fullerols and proteins in order to understand the relationship between the core and canopy structure and the bulk properties. The NMR studies show that the canopy dynamics depend on the degree of neutralization, the canopy radius of gyration and molecular crowding at the ionically modified NP surface. The viscosity in NIMs can be directly controlled with the addition of ions that enhance the exchange rate for polymers at the NP surface. These results show that NIMs for many applications can be prepared by controlling the dynamics of the NP interface.

  19. An analytical methodology for magnetic field control in unilateral NMR.

    PubMed

    Marble, Andrew E; Mastikhin, Igor V; Colpitts, Bruce G; Balcom, Bruce J

    2005-05-01

    Traditionally, unilateral NMR systems such as the NMR-MOUSE have used the fringe field between two bar magnets joined with a yoke in a 'U' geometry. This allows NMR signals to be acquired from a sensitive volume displaced from the magnets, permitting large samples to be investigated. The drawback of this approach is that the static field (B0) generated in this configuration is inhomogeneous, and has a large, nonlinear, gradient. As a consequence, the sensitive volume of the instrument is both small and ill defined. Empirical redesign of the permanent magnet array producing the B0 field has yielded instruments with magnetic field topologies acceptable for varying applications. The drawback of current approaches is the lack of formalism in the control of B0. Rather than tailoring the magnet geometry to NMR investigations, measurements must be tailored to the available magnet geometry. In this work, we present a design procedure whereby the size, shape, field strength, homogeneity, and gradients in the sensitive spot of a unilateral NMR sensor can be controlled. Our design uses high permeability pole pieces, shaped according to the contours of an analytical expression, to control B0, allowing unilateral NMR instruments to be designed to generate a controlled static field topology. We discuss the approach in the context of previously published design techniques, and explain the advantages inherent in our strategy as compared to other optimization methods. We detail the design, simulation, and construction of a unilateral magnet array using our approach. It is shown that the fabricated array exhibits a B0 topology consistent with the design. The utility of the design is demonstrated in a sample nondestructive testing application. Our design methodology is general, and defines a class of unilateral permanent magnet arrays in which the strength and shape of B0 within the sensitive volume can be controlled. PMID:15809175

  20. Brute-Force Hyperpolarization for NMR and MRI.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Kalechofsky, Neal; Belzer, Avrum; Rosay, Melanie; Kempf, James G

    2015-07-01

    Hyperpolarization (HP) of nuclear spins is critical for ultrasensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We demonstrate an approach for >1500-fold enhancement of key small-molecule metabolites: 1-(13)C-pyruvic acid, 1-(13)C-sodium lactate, and 1-(13)C-acetic acid. The (13)C solution NMR signal of pyruvic acid was enhanced 1600-fold at B = 1 T and 40 °C by pre-polarizing at 14 T and ?2.3 K. This "brute-force" approach uses only field and temperature to generate HP. The noted 1 T observation field is appropriate for benchtop NMR and near the typical 1.5 T of MRI, whereas high-field observation scales enhancement as 1/B. Our brute-force process ejects the frozen, solid sample from the low-T, high-B polarizer, passing it through low field (B < 100 G) to facilitate "thermal mixing". That equilibrates (1)H and (13)C in hundreds of milliseconds, providing (13)C HP from (1)H Boltzmann polarization attained at high B/T. The ejected sample arrives at a room-temperature, permanent magnet array, where rapid dissolution with 40 °C water yields HP solute. Transfer to a 1 T NMR system yields (13)C signals with enhancements at 80% of ideal for noted polarizing conditions. High-resolution NMR of the same product at 9.4 T had consistent enhancement plus resolution of (13)C shifts and J-couplings for pyruvic acid and its hydrate. Comparable HP was achieved with frozen aqueous lactate, plus notable enhancement of acetic acid, demonstrating broader applicability for small-molecule NMR and metabolic MRI. Brute-force avoids co-solvated free-radicals and microwaves that are essential to competing methods. Here, unadulterated samples obviate concerns about downstream purity and also exhibit slow solid-state spin relaxation, favorable for transporting HP samples. PMID:26098752

  1. A community resource of experimental data for NMR / X-ray crystal structure pairs.

    PubMed

    Everett, John K; Tejero, Roberto; Murthy, Sarath B K; Acton, Thomas B; Aramini, James M; Baran, Michael C; Benach, Jordi; Cort, John R; Eletsky, Alexander; Forouhar, Farhad; Guan, Rongjin; Kuzin, Alexandre P; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Liu, Gaohua; Mani, Rajeswari; Mao, Binchen; Mills, Jeffrey L; Montelione, Alexander F; Pederson, Kari; Powers, Robert; Ramelot, Theresa; Rossi, Paolo; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Snyder, David; Swapna, G V T; Vorobiev, Sergey M; Wu, Yibing; Xiao, Rong; Yang, Yunhuang; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Hunt, John F; Kennedy, Michael A; Prestegard, James H; Szyperski, Thomas; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an online NMR / X-ray Structure Pair Data Repository. The NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has provided many valuable reagents, 3D structures, and technologies for structural biology. The Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium was one of several PSI centers. NESG used both X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy for protein structure determination. A key goal of the PSI was to provide experimental structures for at least one representative of each of hundreds of targeted protein domain families. In some cases, structures for identical (or nearly identical) constructs were determined by both NMR and X-ray crystallography. NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction data for 41 of these "NMR / X-ray" structure pairs determined using conventional triple-resonance NMR methods with extensive sidechain resonance assignments have been organized in an online NMR / X-ray Structure Pair Data Repository. In addition, several NMR data sets for perdeuterated, methyl-protonated protein samples are included in this repository. As an example of the utility of this repository, these data were used to revisit questions about the precision and accuracy of protein NMR structures first outlined by Levy and coworkers several years ago (Andrec et al., Proteins 2007;69:449-465). These results demonstrate that the agreement between NMR and X-ray crystal structures is improved using modern methods of protein NMR spectroscopy. The NMR / X-ray Structure Pair Data Repository will provide a valuable resource for new computational NMR methods development. PMID:26293815

  2. Nanoscale NMR and MRI with NV centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Emma; Pham, Linh; Belthangady, Chinmay; Devience, Stephen; Cappellaro, Paola; Lukin, Mikhail; Walsworth, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    We investigate a new technique for detecting nanoscale volumes of nuclear spins using shallow nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond and dark electronic spins at the diamond-air interface. We apply dressed-state schemes to resonantly couple these dark electronic spins with optically accessible NV spins, thus taking advantage of the close proximity of the dark electronic spins to nuclear spins at the diamond surface in order to significantly enhance the sensitivity and reduce the detection volume of diamond-based nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. The improvements in detection afforded by this technique may enable sensing of single nuclear spins and NMR spectroscopy of single molecules.

  3. NMR probe of metallic states in nanoscale topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Koumoulis, Dimitrios; Chasapis, Thomas C; Taylor, Robert E; Lake, Michael P; King, Danny; Jarenwattananon, Nanette N; Fiete, Gregory A; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2013-01-11

    A 125Te NMR study of bismuth telluride nanoparticles as a function of particle size revealed that the spin-lattice relaxation is enhanced below 33 nm, accompanied by a transition of NMR spectra from the single to the bimodal regime. The satellite peak features a negative Knight shift and higher relaxivity, consistent with core polarization from p-band carriers. Whereas nanocrystals follow a Korringa law in the range 140-420 K, micrometer particles do so only below 200 K. The results reveal increased metallicity of these nanoscale topological insulators in the limit of higher surface-to-volume ratios. PMID:23383927

  4. Instrument Control and Data Acquisition for NMR Experiments

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-03-29

    This is a software program which is intended to do some instrument control and data acquisition for NMR experiments. The basic purpose of the program is to allow a user of the NMR system to create a list of instructions which tells the program what steps should be done, the stat the data taking program and let the system run by itself (depending on the type of sample and the type of experiment being run,more » it can take from several minutes to many hours to do a data collection run).« less

  5. Computer compensation for NMR quantitative analysis of trace components

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Fujiwara, Y.

    1981-07-22

    A computer program has been written that determines trace components and separates overlapping components in multicomponent NMR spectra. This program uses the Lorentzian curve as a theoretical curve of NMR spectra. The coefficients of the Lorentzian are determined by the method of least squares. Systematic errors such as baseline/phase distortion are compensated and random errors are smoothed by taking moving averages, so that there processes contribute substantially to decreasing the accumulation time of spectral data. The accuracy of quantitative analysis of trace components has been improved by two significant figures. This program was applied to determining the abundance of 13C and the saponification degree of PVA.

  6. 31P NMR spectroscopy of in vivo tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, T. C.; Evanochko, W. T.; Hiramoto, R. N.; Ghanta, V. K.; Lilly, M. B.; Lawson, A. J.; Corbett, T. H.; Durant, J. R.; Glickson, J. D.

    A probe, suitable for any wide-bore NMR spectrometer, was constructed for monitoring high-resolution spectra of in vivo subcutaneously implanted tumors in mice. Preliminary studies of a variety of murine tumors (MOPC 104E myeloma, Dunn osteosarcoma, colon-26, ovarian M5, and mammary adenocarcinoma as well as human colon, mammary, and lung tumors in athymic mice) indicate that the 31P NMR spectrum is a sensitive monitor of progressive metabolic changes that occur during untreated tumor growth and an early indicator of tumor response to chemotherapy, hyperthermia, and X radiation. Response to each of these therapeutic modalities is accompanied by distinctly different spectral changes.

  7. MVAPACK: A Complete Data Handling Package for NMR Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Data handling in the field of NMR metabolomics has historically been reliant on either in-house mathematical routines or long chains of expensive commercial software. Thus, while the relatively simple biochemical protocols of metabolomics maintain a low barrier to entry, new practitioners of metabolomics experiments are forced to either purchase expensive software packages or craft their own data handling solutions from scratch. This inevitably complicates the standardization and communication of data handling protocols in the field. We report a newly developed open-source platform for complete NMR metabolomics data handling, MVAPACK, and describe its application on an example metabolic fingerprinting data set. PMID:24576144

  8. Filter-exchange PGSE NMR determination of cell membrane permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åslund, Ingrid; Nowacka, Agnieszka; Nilsson, Markus; Topgaard, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    A new PGSE NMR sequence is introduced for measuring diffusive transport across the plasma membrane of living cells. A "diffusion filter" and a variable mixing time precedes a standard PGSE block for diffusion encoding of the NMR signal. The filter is a PGSE block optimized for selectively removing the magnetization of the extracellular water. With increasing mixing time the intra- and extracellular components approach their equilibrium fractional populations. The rate of exchange can be measured using only a few minutes of instrument time. Water exchange over the plasma membrane of starved yeast cells is studied in the temperature range +5 to +32 °C.

  9. Localized double-quantum-filtered 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. A.; Hetherington, H. P.; Meyerhoff, D. J.; Twieg, D. B.

    The image-guided in vivo spectroscopic (ISIS) pulse sequence has been combined with a double-quantum-filter scheme in order to obtain localized and water-suppressed 1H NMR spectra of J-coupled metabolites. The coherence-transfer efficiency associated with the DQ filter for AX and A 3X spin systems is described. Phantom results of carnosine, alanine, and ethanol in aqueous solution are presented. For comparison, the 1H NMR spectrum of alanine in aqueous solution with the binomial (1331, 2662) spin-echo sequence is also shown.

  10. MAS NMR studies of nanoporous matrices filled with sodium nitrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchakov, A. G.; Sedykh, P. S.; Charnaya, E. V.; Baryshnikov, S. V.; Tien, Cheng; Michel, D.

    2009-10-01

    The sodium nitrite NaNO2 incorporated into MCM-41 molecular sieves with pore sizes of 20, 26, and 37 Å has been investigated by 23Na magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. It has been demonstrated that the structure of the crystalline phase of the nitrite in a confined geometry is similar to the structure of bulk nitrite NaNO2. The direct proof of the diffuse melting of sodium nitrite in the pores has been obtained. The NMR signal of the molten sodium nitrite phase has been observed at temperatures close to the completion of the melting.

  11. Solid-State NMR on Polymers under Mechanical Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Ute; Gelfert, Karsten; Scheler, Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    Low-field NMR in a Halbach magnet has been used for the in-situ investigation of polymers under mechanical stress. Low-field NMR at a Larmor frequency of 32 MHz is particularly suited for the investigation of magnetic resonance relaxation and residual dipolar couplings. The method has been demonstrated on an elastomer and has subsequently been applied to a semicrystalline polymer. Under uniaxial load the transverse relaxation T2 becomes faster and residual dipolar couplings are getting stronger. The effect on the elastomer is completely reversible, while in the semicrystalline polymer an irreversible rearrangement is observed.

  12. On the solid-state NMR spectra of naproxen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernek, Ji?í

    2015-01-01

    Two previous measurements of the 13C and 1H NMR isotropic chemical shifts in crystalline naproxen, which is an important pharmaceutical compound, are confronted with the results obtained from several theoretical approaches capable of the proper treatment of solid-phase effects. In the underlying geometrical optimizations, two crystal structures are considered. The agreement between the data sets is quantified, including an evaluation of the similarity between the experimental solid-state NMR spectra. The 13C-1H heteronuclear correlations are analyzed, and their various assignments are discussed employing the statistical treatment of the differences between the measured and theoretical isotropic chemical shifts.

  13. NMR Force Microscopy on Co/Cu interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Yu.; Pelekhov, D. V.; Banerjee, P.; Martindale, J.; Fong, K. C.; Hammel, P. C.

    2008-03-01

    We present our recent NMR Force Microscopy experiments, where we demonstrate the first detection of 63Cu and 65Cu NMR using Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM). The signals were detected at T = 5 K using a commercial Si3N4 cantilever with a spherical NdFeB probe magnet. We demonstrate MRFM detection sensitivity of 1.0e5 nuclear spins. We report measurements of the relaxation time, signal lifetime, and the results of nutation experiments. We also discuss the application of NMRFM for spatially resolved mapping of the local hyperfine field variation in the vicinity of a buried Co/Cu interface arising from the RKKY interaction.

  14. Experimental quantum deletion in an NMR quantum information processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yu; Feng, GuanRu; Pearson, Jasong; Long, GuiLu

    2014-07-01

    We report an NMR experimental realization of a rapid quantum deletion algorithm that deletes marked states in an unsorted database. Unlike classical deletion, where search and deletion are equivalent, quantum deletion can be implemented with only a single query, which achieves exponential speed-up compared to the optimal classical analog. In the experimental realization, the GRAPE algorithm was used to obtain an optimized NMR pulse sequence, and the efficient method of maximum-likelihood has been used to reconstruct the experimental output state.

  15. Maximum Entropy Reconstruction and Nonuniform Sampling in Multidimensional NMR

    PubMed Central

    HOCH, JEFFREY C.; MACIEJEWSKI, MARK W.; MOBLI, MEHDI; SCHUYLER, ADAM D.; STERN, ALAN S.

    2014-01-01

    CONSPECTUS NMR spectroscopy is one of the most powerful and versatile analytic tools available to chemists. The discrete Fourier transform (DFT) played a seminal role in the development of modern NMR, including the multidimensional methods that are essential for complex biomolecules, but it suffers from well-known limitations. Chief among these is the difficulty of obtaining high-resolution spectral estimates from short data records. For multidimensional NMR experiments, this imposes a sampling burden, because the time required to perform an experiment is proportional to the number of data samples. At high magnetic field, where spectral dispersion is greatest, the problem becomes particularly acute. Consequently multidimensional NMR experiments that rely on the DFT either must sacrifice resolution in order to be completed in reasonable time, or they must use inordinate amounts of time to achieve the potential resolution afforded by high-field magnets. Maximum entropy (MaxEnt) reconstruction is a non-Fourier method of spectrum analysis capable of providing high-resolution spectral estimates from short data records. It can also be used with nonuniformly sampled data sets. Since resolution is substantially determined by the largest evolution time sampled, nonuniform sampling enables high resolution while avoiding the need to uniformly sample at large numbers of evolution times. The Nyquist sampling theorem does not apply to nonuniformly sampled data, and artifacts that attend the use of nonuniform sampling can be viewed as frequency-aliased signals. Strategies for suppressing nonuniform sampling artifacts include careful design of the sampling scheme and special methods for computing the spectrum. Time savings of a factor of three for each of the N-1 indirect dimensions of an N-dimensional NMR experiment are now routinely reported, making practical high-resolution 3- and 4-dimensional experiments that were previously prohibitively time consuming. Conversely, tailored sampling in the indirect dimensions has been utilized to improve sensitivity. Improvements in nonuniform sampling strategies appear poised to enable further reductions in sampling requirements for high resolution NMR spectra, and the combination of these strategies with robust non-Fourier methods of spectrum analysis (such as MaxEnt) represent a profound change in the way multidimensional experiments are conducted. The potential benefits will enable more advanced applications of multidimensional NMR spectroscopy to biological macromolecules, metabolomics, natural products, dynamic systems, and other areas where resolution, sensitivity, or experiment time are limiting. Just as the development of multidimensional NMR methods presaged multidimensional methods in other areas of spectroscopy, we anticipate that nonuniform sampling approaches will find application in other forms of spectroscopy. PMID:24400700

  16. The HRMAS-NMR tool in foodstuff characterisation.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Massimiliano; Ritota, Mena; Cafiero, Caterina; Cozzolino, Sara; Leita, Liviana; Sequi, Paolo

    2011-12-01

    High resolution magic angle spinning, that is, HRMAS, is a quite novel tool in NMR spectroscopy; it offers the almost unique opportunity of measuring intact tissues disguised as suspended or swollen in a deuterated solvent. The feasibility of (1)H-HRMAS-NMR in foodstuff characterisation has been exploited, but in spite of this, its applications are still limited. Metabolic profiling and biopolymer composition and aggregation are the topics investigated until now for raw vegetables, meat and processed foodstuff. Almost all known studies are reported in the next pages. PMID:22290702

  17. Quantum Zeno Effect in an Unstable System with NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically propose a scheme for the verification of the quantum Zeno effect (QZE) to suppress a decay process with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Nuclear spins are affected by low-frequency noise, and thus we can naturally observe non exponential decay behavior, which is a prerequisite in observing the QZE. We also show that a key component for verifying the QZE, namely, the measurement of a nuclear spin, can be realized with NMR using the current technology by using a measurement process with a non selective architecture.

  18. Sensitivity Enhancement in Solution NMR: Emerging Ideas and New Frontiers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Ho; Okuno, Yusuke; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Modern NMR spectroscopy has reached an unprecedented level of sophistication in the determination of biomolecular structure and dynamics at atomic resolution in liquids. However, the sensitivity of this technique is still too low to solve a variety of cutting-edge biological problems in solution, especially those that involve viscous samples, very large biomolecules or aggregation-prone systems that need to be kept at low concentration. Despite the challenges, a variety of efforts have been carried out over the years to increase sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy in liquids. This review discusses basic concepts, recent developments and future opportunities in this exciting area of research. PMID:24656077

  19. Identification of organic phosphorus compounds in the Bronx River bed sediments by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyu; Pant, Hari K

    2010-12-01

    Sediment characteristics influence the distribution and bioavailability of phosphorus (P) in rivers and lakes. The objectives of this study were to identify P compounds in sediments collected from 15 sites along the Bronx River to get insights on nutrient transport for management of highly variable and modified ecosystems such as the Bronx River. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectra showed that the dominant P species in Bronx River bed sediments are orthophosphate monoester and lesser phosphate diesters and pyrophosphates (pyro-P). The P compounds were mostly glycerophosphate, nucleoside monophosphates, and polynucleotides. A few sites showed a small amount of dihydroxyacetone phosphate, inosine monophosphate. By allowing a downstream comparison of P compound variations along the Bronx River, this study provides a step toward improving water quality in an urban river system such as New York City and helps to assess the bioavailability of P, in turn, design estuary habitat restoration projects in comparable region of the world. PMID:20013049

  20. COMPREHENSIVE PROGRESS REPORT FOR FOURIER TRANSFORM NMR (NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE) OF METALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SIGNIFICANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interactions of the metals cadmium and selenium with various biologically important substrates were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Cadmium-113 NMR was used for a critical examination of three metalloproteins: concanavalin A, bovine superoxide dismutase ...

  1. Assigning the NMR Spectrum of Glycidol: An Advanced Organic Chemistry Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Eric; Arpaia, Nicholas; Widener, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Various one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments have been found to be extremely useful for assigning the proton and carbon NMR spectra of glycidol. The technique provides extremely valuable information aiding in the complete assignment of the peaks.

  2. Intrauterine fetal brain NMR spectroscopy: 1H and 31P studies in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nakada, T.; Kwee, I.L.; Suzuki, N.; Houkin, K. )

    1989-11-01

    Fetal brain metabolism was investigated in utero noninvasively using multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in rats at two representative prenatal stages: early (17-18 days) and late (20-21 days) stages. Phosphorus-31 (31P) spectroscopy revealed that phosphocreatine is significantly lower in the early stage and increases to the level of early neonates by the late prenatal stage. Intracellular pH at the early stage was found to be strikingly high (7.52 +/- 0.21) and decreased to a level similar to that of neonates by the late stage (7.29 +/- 0.07). Phosphomonoester levels at both stages were similar to the values reported for early neonates. Water-suppressed proton (1H) spectroscopy demonstrated a distinctive in vivo fetal brain spectral pattern characterized by low levels of N-acetyl aspartate and high levels of taurine. High-resolution proton spectroscopy and homonuclear chemical-shift correlate spectroscopy of brain perchloric acid extracts confirmed these in vivo findings. In vitro 31P spectroscopy of acidified chloroform methanol extracts showed the characteristic membrane phospholipid profiles of fetal brain. The phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)-to-phosphatidylcholine (PC) ratio (PE/PC) did not show significant changes between the two stages at 0.40 +/- 0.11, a value similar to that of early neonates.

  3. 3D-printed system optimizing dissolution of hyperpolarized gaseous species for micro-sized NMR.

    PubMed

    Causier, A; Carret, G; Boutin, C; Berthelot, T; Berthault, P

    2015-05-01

    Dissolution of hyperpolarized species in liquids of interest for NMR is often hampered by the presence of bubbles that degrade the field homogeneity. Here a device composed of a bubble pump and a miniaturized NMR cell both fitted inside the narrow bore of an NMR magnet is built by 3D printing. (129)Xe NMR experiments performed with hyperpolarized xenon reveal high and homogeneous dissolution of the gas in water. PMID:25805248

  4. Protein structure determination by combining sparse NMR data with evolutionary couplings.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuefeng; Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Hopf, Thomas A; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2015-08-01

    Accurate determination of protein structure by NMR spectroscopy is challenging for larger proteins, for which experimental data are often incomplete and ambiguous. Evolutionary sequence information together with advances in maximum entropy statistical methods provide a rich complementary source of structural constraints. We have developed a hybrid approach (evolutionary coupling-NMR spectroscopy; EC-NMR) combining sparse NMR data with evolutionary residue-residue couplings and demonstrate accurate structure determination for several proteins 6-41 kDa in size. PMID:26121406

  5. NMR Structures of Membrane Proteins in Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Radoicic, Jasmina; Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins have always presented technical challenges for structural studies because of their requirement for a lipid environment. Multiple approaches exist including X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy that can give significant insights into their structure and function. However, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is unique in that it offers the possibility of determining the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in their native environment of phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. Furthermore, NMR enables the characterization of the structure and dynamics of backbone and side chain sites of the proteins alone and in complexes with both small molecules and other biopolymers. The learning curve has been steep for the field as most initial studies were performed under non-native environments using modified proteins until ultimately progress in both techniques and instrumentation led to the possibility of examining unmodified membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. This review aims to provide an overview of the development and application of NMR to membrane proteins. It highlights some of the most significant structural milestones that have been reached by NMR spectroscopy of membrane proteins; especially those accomplished with the proteins in phospholipid bilayer environments where they function. PMID:25032938

  6. Diffusional Properties of Methanogenic Granular Sludge: 1H NMR Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Lens, Piet N. L.; Gastesi, Rakel; Vergeldt, Frank; van Aelst, Adriaan C.; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Van As, Henk

    2003-01-01

    The diffusive properties of anaerobic methanogenic and sulfidogenic aggregates present in wastewater treatment bioreactors were studied using diffusion analysis by relaxation time-separated pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and NMR imaging. NMR spectroscopy measurements were performed at 22°C with 10 ml of granular sludge at a magnetic field strength of 0.5 T (20 MHz resonance frequency for protons). Self-diffusion coefficients of H2O in the investigated series of mesophilic aggregates were found to be 51 to 78% lower than the self-diffusion coefficient of free water. Interestingly, self-diffusion coefficients of H2O were independent of the aggregate size for the size fractions investigated. Diffusional transport occurred faster in aggregates growing under nutrient-rich conditions (e.g., the bottom of a reactor) or at high (55°C) temperatures than in aggregates cultivated in nutrient-poor conditions or at low (10°C) temperatures. Exposure of aggregates to 2.5% glutaraldehyde or heat (70 or 90°C for 30 min) modified the diffusional transport up to 20%. In contrast, deactivation of aggregates by HgCl2 did not affect the H2O self-diffusion coefficient in aggregates. Analysis of NMR images of a single aggregate shows that methanogenic aggregates possess a spin-spin relaxation time and self-diffusion coefficient distribution, which are due to both physical (porosity) and chemical (metal sulfide precipitates) factors. PMID:14602624

  7. Studies on supramolecular gel formation using DOSY NMR.

    PubMed

    Nonappa; Šaman, David; Kolehmainen, Erkki

    2015-04-01

    Herein, we present the results obtained from our studies on supramolecular self-assembly and molecular mobility of low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWGs) in organic solvents using pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) NMR. A series of concentration-dependent DOSY NMR experiments were performed on selected LMWGs to determine the critical gelation concentration (CGC) as well as to understand the behaviour of the gelator molecules in the gel state. In addition, variable-temperature DOSY NMR experiments were performed to determine the gel-to-sol transition. The PFG NMR experiments performed as a function of gradient strength were further analyzed using monoexponential DOSY processing, and the results were compared with the automated Bayesian DOSY transformation to obtain 2D plots. Our results provide useful information on the stepwise self-assembly of small molecules leading to gelation. We believe that the results obtained from these experiments are applicable in determining the CGC and gel melting temperatures of supramolecular gels. PMID:25631685

  8. NMR of thin layers using a meanderline surface coil

    DOEpatents

    Cowgill, Donald F. (San Ramon, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A miniature meanderline sensor coil which extends the capabilities of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to provide analysis of thin planar samples and surface layer geometries. The sensor coil allows standard NMR techniques to be used to examine thin planar (or curved) layers, extending NMRs utility to many problems of modern interest. This technique can be used to examine contact layers, non-destructively depth profile into films, or image multiple layers in a 3-dimensional sense. It lends itself to high resolution NMR techniques of magic angle spinning and thus can be used to examine the bonding and electronic structure in layered materials or to observe the chemistry associated with aging coatings. Coupling this sensor coil technology with an arrangement of small magnets will produce a penetrator probe for remote in-situ chemical analysis of groundwater or contaminant sediments. Alternatively, the sensor coil can be further miniaturized to provide sub-micron depth resolution within thin films or to orthoscopically examine living tissue. This thin-layer NMR technique using a stationary meanderline coil in a series-resonant circuit has been demonstrated and it has been determined that the flat meanderline geometry has about he same detection sensitivity as a solenoidal coil, but is specifically tailored to examine planar material layers, while avoiding signals from the bulk.

  9. Single bead detection with an NMR microcapillary probe.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoshihiro; Boss, Michael; Russek, Stephen E; Moreland, John

    2012-11-01

    We have developed a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microcapillary probe for the detection of single magnetic microbeads. The geometry of the probe has been optimized so that the signal from the background water has a similar magnitude compared to the signal from the dephased water nearby a single magnetic bead within the probe detector coil. In addition, the RF field of the coil must be uniform within the effective range of the magnetic bead. Three different RF probes were tested in a 7 T (300 MHz) pulsed NMR spectrometer with sample volumes ranging from 5 nL down to 1 nL. The 1 nL probe had a single-shot signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for pure water of 27 and a volume resolution that exhibits a 600-fold improvement over a conventional (5 mm tube) NMR probe with a sample volume of 18 ?L. This allowed for the detection of a 1 ?m magnetite/polystyrene bead (m=2×10(-14)Am(2)) with an estimated experimental SNR of 30. Simulations of the NMR spectra for the different coil geometries and positions of the bead within the coil were developed that include the B(0) shift near a single bead, the inhomogeneity of the coils, the local coil sensitivity, the skin effect of the coil conductor, and quantitated estimates of the proximity effect between coil windings. PMID:23041798

  10. Study of cultured fibroblasts in vivo using NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Karczmar, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to study the compartmentation of phosphorylated glycolytic intermediates in intact Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts (CEFs) using /sup 31/P NMR at 109 MHz. Because glycolysis is regulated differently in normal and virally transformed CEFs, NMR experiments were performed on both types of cells. A technique for maintaining functional cells at high densities in an NMR magnet is described. Signals were detected from cytoplasmic inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), ATP, NAD, NADH, phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine. The effect of external glucose on cytoplasmic pools of phosphates was studied. However, experiments with /sup 32/P labelled P/sub i/ showed that as the concentration of glucose in the medium was increased, the amount of phosphate sequestered in the cells increased. They conclude that there is a pool of P/sub i/ which is not detected by high resolution of NMR and that the size of this pool increases as the rate of glycolysis increases. These effects were found only in cultured cells; the data for transformed and normal cells were similar. Longitudinal relaxation times of intracellular phosphates in normal, transformed, and primary CEFs were measured.

  11. Adiabatic single scan two-dimensional NMR spectrocopy.

    PubMed

    Pelupessy, Philippe

    2003-10-01

    New excitation schemes, based on the use adiabatic pulses, for single scan two-dimensional NMR experiments (Frydman et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 2002, 99, 15 858-15 862) are introduced. The advantages are discussed. Applications in homo- and heteronuclear experiments are presented. PMID:14519020

  12. Cation Hydration Constants by Proton NMR: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studies the polarization effect on water by cations and anions. Describes an experiment to illustrate the polarization effect of sodium, lithium, calcium, and strontium ions on the water molecule in the hydration spheres of the ions. Analysis is performed by proton NMR. (MVL)

  13. Structural NMR of Protein Oligomers using Hybrid Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Liu, Yizhou; Prestegard, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Solving structures of native oligomeric protein complexes using traditional high resolution NMR techniques remains challenging. However, increased utilization of computational platforms, and integration of information from less traditional NMR techniques with data from other complementary biophysical methods, promises to extend the boundary of NMR-applicable targets. This article reviews several of the techniques capable of providing less traditional and complementary structural information. In particular, the use of orientational constraints coming from residual dipolar couplings and residual chemical shift anisotropy offsets are shown to simplify the construction of models for oligomeric complexes, especially in cases of weak homo-dimers. Combining this orientational information with interaction site information supplied by computation, chemical shift perturbation, paramagnetic surface perturbation, cross-saturation and mass spectrometry allows high resolution models of the complexes to be constructed with relative ease. Non-NMR techniques, such as mass spectrometry, EPR and small angle X-ray scattering, are also expected to play increasingly important roles by offering alternative methods of probing the overall shape of the complex. Computational platforms capable of integrating information from multiple sources in the modeling process are also discussed in the article. And finally a new, detailed example on the determination of a chemokine tetramer structure will be used to illustrate how a non-traditional approach to oligomeric structure determination works in practice. PMID:21074622

  14. NMR Shielding in Metals Using the Augmented Plane Wave Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present calculations of solid state NMR magnetic shielding in metals, which includes both the orbital and the complete spin response of the system in a consistent way. The latter contains an induced spin-polarization of the core states and needs an all-electron self-consistent treatment. In particular, for transition metals, the spin hyperfine field originates not only from the polarization of the valence s-electrons, but the induced magnetic moment of the d-electrons polarizes the core s-states in opposite direction. The method is based on DFT and the augmented plane wave approach as implemented in the WIEN2k code. A comparison between calculated and measured NMR shifts indicates that first-principle calculations can obtain converged results and are more reliable than initially concluded based on previous publications. Nevertheless large k-meshes (up to 2 000 000 k-points in the full Brillouin-zone) and some Fermi-broadening are necessary. Our results show that, in general, both spin and orbital components of the NMR shielding must be evaluated in order to reproduce experimental shifts, because the orbital part cancels the shift of the usually highly ionic reference compound only for simple sp-elements but not for transition metals. This development paves the way for routine NMR calculations of metallic systems. PMID:26322148

  15. Quantitative evaluation of porous media wettability using NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Fleury, M; Deflandre, F

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new method to determine wettability indices from NMR relaxometry. The new method uses the sensitivity of low field NMR relaxometry to the fluid distribution in oil-water saturated porous media. The model is based on the existence of a surface relaxivity for both oil and water, allowing the determination of the amount of surface wetted either by oil or by water. The proposed NMR wettability index requires the measurement of relaxation time distribution at four different saturation states. At the irreducible water saturation, we determine the dominant relaxation time of oil in the presence of a small amount of water, and at the oil residual saturation, we determine the dominant relaxation time of water in the presence of a small amount of oil. At 100% water and 100% oil saturation, we determine the surface relaxivity ratio. The interaction of oil with the surface is also evidenced by the comparison of the spin-lattice (T1) and spin-locking (T1rho) relaxation times. The new NMR index agrees with standard wettability measurements based on drainage-imbibition capillary pressure curves (USBM test) in the range [-0.3-1]. PMID:12850740

  16. Profiling formulated monoclonal antibodies by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Poppe, Leszek; Jordan, John B; Lawson, Ken; Jerums, Matthew; Apostol, Izydor; Schnier, Paul D

    2013-10-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is arguably the most direct methodology for characterizing the higher-order structure of proteins in solution. Structural characterization of proteins by NMR typically utilizes heteronuclear experiments. However, for formulated monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics, the use of these approaches is not currently tenable due to the requirements of isotope labeling, the large size of the proteins, and the restraints imposed by various formulations. Here, we present a new strategy to characterize formulated mAbs using (1)H NMR. This method, based on the pulsed field gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) experiment, facilitates the use of (1)H NMR to generate highly resolved spectra of intact mAbs in their formulation buffers. This method of data acquisition, along with postacquisition signal processing, allows the generation of structural and hydrodynamic profiles of antibodies. We demonstrate how variation of the PGSTE pulse sequence parameters allows proton relaxation rates and relative diffusion coefficients to be obtained in a simple fashion. This new methodology can be used as a robust way to compare and characterize mAb therapeutics. PMID:24006877

  17. NMR Studies of Biomass and its Reaction Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biomass refers to biological material derived from living or recently living organisms, such as wood, agricultural products and wastes, and alcohol fuels. An increasingly popular R&D approach is to convert biomass into industrial polymers or chemicals. NMR is an excellent technique for the character...

  18. A Networked NMR Spectrometer: Configuring a Shared Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David; Mutch, G. William; Wong, Peter; Warren, Steven; Barot, Bal; Kosinski, Jan; Sinton, Mark

    2005-01-01

    A model for a shared nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) facility between a private university and two local community colleges is presented. The discussion of the components required for the shared facility, modes of data distribution, and overall effect on the curriculum is presented.

  19. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnun, Jacob J.; Leftin, Avigdor; Brown, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy finds growing application to inorganic and organic materials, biological samples, polymers, proteins, and cellular membranes. However, this technique is often neither included in laboratory curricula nor typically covered in undergraduate courses. On the other hand, spectroscopy and…

  20. Noise figure characterization of preamplifiers at NMR frequencies.

    PubMed

    Nordmeyer-Massner, J A; De Zanche, N; Pruessmann, K P

    2011-05-01

    A method for characterizing the noise figure of preamplifiers at NMR frequencies is presented. The noise figure of preamplifiers as used for NMR and MRI detection varies with source impedance and with the operating frequency. Therefore, to characterize a preamplifier's noise behavior, it is necessary to perform noise measurements at the targeted frequency while varying the source impedance with high accuracy. At high radiofrequencies, such impedance variation is typically achieved with transmission-line tuners, which however are not available for the relatively low range of typical NMR frequencies. To solve this issue, this work describes an alternative approach that relies on lumped-element circuits for impedance manipulation. It is shown that, using a fixed-impedance noise source and suitable ENR correction, this approach permits noise figure characterization for NMR and MRI purposes. The method is demonstrated for two preamplifiers, a generic BF998 MOSFET module and an MRI-dedicated, integrated preamplifier, which were both studied at 128MHz, i.e., at the Larmor frequency of protons at 3 Tesla. Variations in noise figure of 0.01dB or less over repeated measurements reflect high precision even for small noise figures in the order of 0.4dB. For validation, large sets of measured noise figure values are shown to be consistent with the general noise-parameter model of linear two-ports. Finally, the measured noise characteristics of the superior preamplifier are illustrated by SNR measurements in MRI data. PMID:21439871

  1. Using NMR to Determine Protein Structure in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnero, Silvia

    2003-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a marvelous spectroscopic technique that chemists, physicists, and biochemists routinely employ for their research around the world. This year half of the Nobel Prize for chemistry went to Kurt Wüthrich, who was recognized for the development of NMR-based techniques that lead to the structure determination of biomolecules in solution. In addition to implementing novel pulse sequences and software packages, Wüthrich also applied his methods to several biological systems of key importance to human health. These include the prion protein, which is heavily involved in the spongiform encephalopathy (best known as 'mad cow disease'), which recently caused numerous human deaths, particularly in the UK, due to ingestion of contaminated meat. Transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) is the most intriguing new NMR method recently developed by Wüthrich and coworkers. This and other closely related pulse sequences promise to play a pivotal role in the extension of NMR to the conformational analysis of very large (up to the megadalton range) macromolecules and macromolecular complexes. More exciting new developments are expected in the near future.

  2. 103Rh NMR spectroscopy and its application to rhodium chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ernsting, Jan Meine; Gaemers, Sander; Elsevier, Cornelis J

    2004-09-01

    Rhodium is used for a number of large processes that rely on homogeneous rhodium-catalyzed reactions, for instance rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation of alkenes, carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid and hydrodesulfurization of thiophene derivatives (in crude oil). Many laboratory applications in organometallic chemistry and catalysis involve organorhodium chemistry and a wealth of rhodium coordination compounds is known. For these and other areas, 103Rh NMR spectroscopy appears to be a very useful analytical tool. In this review, most of the literature concerning 103Rh NMR spectroscopy published from 1989 up to and including 2003 has been covered. After an introduction to several experimental methods for the detection of the insensitive 103Rh nucleus, a discussion of factors affecting the transition metal chemical shift is given. Computational aspects and calculations of chemical shifts are also briefly addressed. Next, the application of 103Rh NMR in coordination and organometallic chemistry is elaborated in more detail by highlighting recent developments in measurement and interpretation of 103Rh NMR data, in relation to rhodium-assisted reactions and homogeneous catalysis. The dependence of the 103Rh chemical shift on the ligands at rhodium in the first coordination sphere, on the complex geometry, oxidation state, temperature, solvent and concentration is treated. Several classes of compounds and special cases such as chiral rhodium compounds are reviewed. Finally, a section on scalar coupling to rhodium is provided. PMID:15307053

  3. Novel Dodecaarylporphyrins: Synthesis and Variable Temperature NMR Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cancilla, Mark; Lebrilla, Carlito; Ma, Jian-Guo; Medforth, Craig J.; Muzzi, Cinzia M.; Shelnutt, John A.; Smith, Kevin M.; Voss, Lisa

    1999-05-05

    An investigation of the synthesis of novel dodecaarylporphyrins using the Suzuki coupling reaction of arylboronic acids with octabromotetraarylporphyrins is reported. Studies of the dynamic properties of these new porphyrins using variable temperature (VT) 1H NMR spectroscopy and molecular mechanics provide interesting insights into their dynamic properties, including the first determination of {beta} aryl rotation in a porphyrin system.

  4. Relative Configuration of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By comparing calculated with experimental NMR chemical shifts, we were able to determine the relative configurations of three monoterpene diastereomers produced by the walkingstick Anisomorpha buprestoides. The combined RMSDs of both 1H and 13C quantum chemically calculated shifts were able to predi...

  5. Extended hopane derivatives in sediments - Identification by H-1 NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J.; Wardroper, A. M. K.; Maxwell, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Sedimentary C32 hopanoic acid, one of the most abundant in nature and of probable bacterial origin, has been isolated for the first time as a single component and characterized by H-1 NMR. The 17 alpha H, 21 beta H configuration of the C31 alkane has been similarly confirmed.

  6. NMR and NQR study of the thermodynamically stable quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shastri, A.

    1995-02-10

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 61,65}Cu NMR measurements are reported for powder samples of stable AlCuFe and AlCuRu icosahedral quasicrystals and their crystalline approximants, and for a AlPdMn single grain quasicrystal. Furthermore, {sup 27}Al NQR spectra at 4.2 K have been observed in the AlCuFe and AlCuRu samples. From the quadrupole perturbed NMR spectra at different magnetic fields, and from the zero field NQR spectra, a wide distribution of local electric field gradient (EFG) tensor components and principal axis system orientations was found at the Al site. A model EFG calculation based on a 1/1 AlCuFe approximant was successful in explaining the observed NQR spectra. It is concluded that the average local gradient is largely determined by the p-electron wave function at the Al site, while the width of the distribution is due to the lattice contribution to the EFG. Comparison of {sup 63}Cu NMR with {sup 27}Al NMR shows that the EFG distribution at the two sites is similar, but that the electronic contribution to the EFG is considerably smaller at the Cu site, in agreement with a more s-type wave function of the conduction electrons.

  7. NMR at the Picomole Level of a DNA Adduct

    PubMed Central

    Kautz, Roger; Wang, Poguang; Giese, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the limit of detection for obtaining NMR data of a DNA adduct using modern microscale NMR instrumentation, once the adduct has been isolated at the pmol level. Eighty nanograms (130 pmol) of a DNA adduct standard, N-(2?-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene 5?-monophosphate (AAF-dGMP), in 1.5 ?L of D2O with 10% methanol-d4, in a vial, was completely picked up as a droplet suspended in a fluorocarbon liquid, and loaded efficiently into a microcoil probe. This work demonstrates a practical manual method of droplet microfluidic sample loading, previously demonstrated using automated equipment, which provides a several-fold advantage over conventional flow injection. Eliminating dilution during injection and confining the sample into the observed volume realizes the full theoretical mass sensitivity of a microcoil, comparable to a micro-cryo probe. With 80 ng, an NMR spectrum acquired over 40 hr showed all of the resonances seen in a standard spectrum of AAF-dGMP, with a S/N of at least 10, despite broadening due to previously-noted effects of conformational exchange. Also a 2D TOCSY spectrum (total correlation spectroscopy) was acquired on 1.6 ?g in 18 hr. This work helps to define the utility of NMR in combination with other analytical methods for the structural characterization of a small amount of a DNA adduct. PMID:24028148

  8. ECG gated NMR-CT for cardiovascular diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, J.; Ohtake, T.; Machida, K.; Iio, M.; Yoshimoto, N.; Sugimoto, T.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have been applying ECG gated NMR-CT to mainly patients with myocardial infarction (MI), and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Thirteen patients with MI, 8 with HCM and 5 without any heart diseases were studied by ECG gated NMR imaging (spin-echo technique, TR: depends on patient heart rate, TE: 35 and 70 msec.) with 0.35 T superconducting magnet. On NMR images (MRI), the authors examined the wall thickness, wall motion and T/sub 2/ relaxation time in the area of diseased myocardium. The lesions of old MI were depicted as the area of thin wall and T/sub 2/ relaxation time of those lesions were similar to the area of non-infarcted myocardium. The lesions of recent MI (up to 3.5 months from the recent attack) were shown as the same wall thickness as the non-infarcted myocardium and the area of prolonged T/sub 2/ relaxation time compared with that of non-infarcted myocardium. MRI demonstrated diffusely thick myocardium in all patients with HCM. T/sub 2/ relaxation time of the areas of HCM was almost the same as that of normal myocardium, and it's difference among each ventricular wall in patients with HCM was not statistically significant. The authors conclude that ECG gated NMR-CT offers 3-D morphological information of the heart without any contrast material nor radioisotopes. ECG gated MRI provides the useful informations to diagnose MI, especially in the differential diagnosis between old and recent MI.

  9. NMR in rotating magnetic fields: Magic angle field spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Sakellariou, D.; Meriles, C.; Martin, R.; Pines, A.

    2004-09-10

    Magic angle sample spinning has been one of the cornerstones in high-resolution solid state NMR. Spinning frequencies nowadays have increased by at least one order of magnitude over the ones used in the first experiments and the technique has gained tremendous popularity. It is currently a routine procedure in solid-state NMR, high-resolution liquid-state NMR and solid-state MRI. The technique enhances the spectral resolution by averaging away rank 2 anisotropic spin interactions thereby producing isotropic-like spectra with resolved chemical shifts and scalar couplings. Andrew proposed that it should be possible to induce similar effects in a static sample if the direction of the magnetic field is varied, e.g., magic-angle rotation of the B0 field (B0-MAS) and this has been recently demonstrated using electromagnetic field rotation. Here we discuss on the possibilities to perform field rotation using alternative hardware, together with spectroscopic methods to recover isotropic resolution even in cases where the field is not rotating at the magic angle. Extension to higher magnetic fields would be beneficial in situations where the physical manipulation of the sample is inconvenient or impossible. Such situations occur often in materials or biomedical samples where ''ex-situ'' NMR spectroscopy and imaging analysis is needed.

  10. Nondestructive NMR technique for moisture determination in radioactive materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Aumeier, S.; Gerald, R.E. II; Growney, E.; Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.

    1998-12-04

    This progress report focuses on experimental and computational studies used to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting, quantifying, and monitoring hydrogen and other magnetically active nuclei ({sup 3}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu) in Spent nuclear fuels and packaging materials. The detection of moisture by using a toroid cavity NMR imager has been demonstrated in SiO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} systems. The total moisture was quantified by means of {sup 1}H NMR detection of H{sub 2}O with a sensitivity of 100 ppm. In addition, an MRI technique that was used to determine the moisture distribution also enabled investigators to discriminate between bulk and stationary water sorbed on the particles. This imaging feature is unavailable in any other nondestructive assay (NDA) technique. Following the initial success of this program, the NMR detector volume was scaled up from the original design by a factor of 2000. The capacity of this detector exceeds the size specified by DOE-STD-3013-96.

  11. Applications of 1H-NMR to Biodiesel Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel derived from vegetable oils, animal fats, or used cooking oils. It is produced by reacting these materials with an alcohol in the presence of a catalyst to give the corresponding mono-alkyl esters. 1H-NMR is a routine analytical method that has been used for...

  12. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnun, Jacob J.; Leftin, Avigdor; Brown, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy finds growing application to inorganic and organic materials, biological samples, polymers, proteins, and cellular membranes. However, this technique is often neither included in laboratory curricula nor typically covered in undergraduate courses. On the other hand, spectroscopy and…

  13. Choosing membrane mimetics for NMR structural studies of transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Warschawski, Dror E; Arnold, Alexandre A; Beaugrand, Maïwenn; Gravel, Andrée; Chartrand, Étienne; Marcotte, Isabelle

    2011-08-01

    The native environment of membrane proteins is complex and scientists have felt the need to simplify it to reduce the number of varying parameters. However, experimental problems can also arise from oversimplification which contributes to why membrane proteins are under-represented in the protein structure databank and why they were difficult to study by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Technological progress now allows dealing with more complex models and, in the context of NMR studies, an incredibly large number of membrane mimetics options are available. This review provides a guide to the selection of the appropriate model membrane system for membrane protein study by NMR, depending on the protein and on the type of information that is looked for. Beside bilayers (of various shapes, sizes and lamellarity), bicelles (aligned or isotropic) and detergent micelles, this review will also describe the most recent membrane mimetics such as amphipols, nanodiscs and reverse micelles. Solution and solid-state NMR will be covered as well as more exotic techniques such as DNP and MAOSS. PMID:21477581

  14. Numerical simulation of NQR/NMR: Applications in quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Possa, Denimar; Gaudio, Anderson C; Freitas, Jair C C

    2011-04-01

    A numerical simulation program able to simulate nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments is presented, written using the Mathematica package, aiming especially applications in quantum computing. The program makes use of the interaction picture to compute the effect of the relevant nuclear spin interactions, without any assumption about the relative size of each interaction. This makes the program flexible and versatile, being useful in a wide range of experimental situations, going from NQR (at zero or under small applied magnetic field) to high-field NMR experiments. Some conditions specifically required for quantum computing applications are implemented in the program, such as the possibility of use of elliptically polarized radiofrequency and the inclusion of first- and second-order terms in the average Hamiltonian expansion. A number of examples dealing with simple NQR and quadrupole-perturbed NMR experiments are presented, along with the proposal of experiments to create quantum pseudopure states and logic gates using NQR. The program and the various application examples are freely available through the link http://www.profanderson.net/files/nmr_nqr.php. PMID:21324720

  15. NMR method for accurate quantification of polysorbate 80 copolymer composition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Wang, Aifa; Meng, Yang; Ning, Tingting; Yang, Huaxin; Ding, Lixia; Xiao, Xinyue; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-10-01

    (13)C NMR spectroscopic integration employing short relaxation delays and a 30° pulse width was evaluated as a quantitative tool for analyzing the components of polysorbate 80. (13)C NMR analysis revealed that commercial polysorbate 80 formulations are a complex oligomeric mixture of sorbitan polyethoxylate esters and other intermediates, such as isosorbide polyethoxylate esters and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) esters. This novel approach facilitates the quantification of the component ratios. In this study, the ratios of the three major oligomers in polysorbate 80 were measured and the PEG series was found to be the major component of commercial polysorbate 80. The degree of polymerization of -CH2CH2O- groups and the ratio of free to bonded -CH2CH2O- end groups, which correlate with the hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of the polymer, were analyzed, and were suggested to be key factors for assessing the likelihood of adverse biological reactions to polysorbate 80. The (13)C NMR data suggest that the feed ratio of raw materials and reaction conditions in the production of polysorbate 80 are not well controlled. Our results demonstrate that (13)C NMR is a universal, powerful tool for polysorbate analysis. Such analysis is crucial for the synthesis of a high-quality product, and is difficult to obtain by other methods. PMID:26356097

  16. Amplification of Xenon NMR and MRI by remote detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moule, Adam J.; Spence, Megan M.; Han, Song-I.; Seeley, JulietteA.; Pierce, Kimberly L.; Saxena, Sunil; Pines, Alexander

    2003-03-31

    A novel technique is proposed in which a nuclear magneticresonance (NMR) spectrum or magnetic resonance image (MRI) is encoded andstored as spin polarization and is then moved to a different physicallocation to be detected. Remote detection allows the separateoptimization of the encoding and detection steps, permitting theindependent choice of experimental conditions, and excitation anddetection methodologies. In the first experimental demonstration of thistechnique, we show that NMR signal can be amplified by taking diluted129Xe from a porous sample placed inside a large encoding coil, andconcentrating it into a smaller detection coil. In general, the study ofNMR active molecules at low concentration that have low physical fillingfactor is facilitated by remote detection. In the second experiment, MRIinformation encoded in a very low field magnet (4-7mT) is transferred toa high field magnet (4.2 T) in order to be detected under optimizedconditions. Furthermore, remote detection allows the utilization ofultra-sensitive optical or superconducting detection techniques, whichbroadens the horizon of NMR experimentation.

  17. X-ray CT and NMR imaging of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.

    1986-03-01

    In little more than a decade, X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging have become the premier modalities of medical radiology. Both of these imaging techniques also promise to be useful tools in petrophysics and reservoir engineering, because CT and NMR can nondestructively image a host of physical and chemical properties of porous rocks and multiple fluid phases contained within their pores. The images are taken within seconds to minutes, at reservoir temperatures and pressures, with spatial resolution on the millimeter and submillimeter level. The physical properties imaged by the two techniques are complementary. CT images bulk density and effective atomic number. NMR images the nuclide concentration, M/sub 0/, of a variety of nuclei (/sup 1/H, /sup 19/F, /sup 23/Na, /sup 31/P, etc.), their longitudinal and transverse relaxation-time curves (t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/), and their chemical shift spectra. In rocks, CT images both rock matrix and pore fluids, while NMR images only mobile fluids and the interactions of these mobile fluids with the confining surfaces of the pores.

  18. Statistical models and NMR analysis of polymer microstructure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Statistical models can be used in conjunction with NMR spectroscopy to study polymer microstructure and polymerization mechanisms. Thus, Bernoullian, Markovian, and enantiomorphic-site models are well known. Many additional models have been formulated over the years for additional situations. Typica...

  19. NMR metabolomics of thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) resistance in Senecio hybrids.

    PubMed

    Leiss, Kirsten A; Choi, Young H; Abdel-Farid, Ibrahim B; Verpoorte, Robert; Klinkhamer, Peter G L

    2009-02-01

    Western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) has become a key insect pest of agricultural and horticultural crops worldwide. Little is known about host plant resistance to thrips. In this study, we investigated thrips resistance in F (2) hybrids of Senecio jacobaea and Senecio aquaticus. We identified thrips-resistant hybrids applying three different bioassays. Subsequently, we compared the metabolomic profiles of these hybrids applying nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The new developments of NMR facilitate a wide range coverage of the metabolome. This makes NMR especially suitable if there is no a priori knowledge of the compounds related to herbivore resistance and allows a holistic approach analyzing different chemical compounds simultaneously. We show that the metabolomes of thrips-resistant and -susceptible hybrids differed considerably. Thrips-resistant hybrids contained higher amounts of the pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PA), jacobine, and jaconine, especially in younger leaves. Also, a flavanoid, kaempferol glucoside, accumulated in the resistant plants. Both PAs and kaempferol are known for their inhibitory effect on herbivores. In resistant and susceptible F (2) hybrids, young leaves showed less thrips damage than old leaves. Consistent with the optimal plant defense theory, young leaves contained increased levels of primary metabolites such as sucrose, raffinose, and stachyose, but also accumulated jacaranone as a secondary plant defense compound. Our results prove NMR as a promising tool to identify different metabolites involved in herbivore resistance. It constitutes a significant advance in the study of plant-insect relationships, providing key information on the implementation of herbivore resistance breeding strategies in plants. PMID:19169751

  20. Pulsed zero field NMR of solids and liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, A.M.

    1987-02-01

    This work describes the development and applications to solids and liquid crystals of zero field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with pulsed dc magnetic fields. Zero field NMR experiments are one approach for obtaining high resolution spectra of amorphous and polycrystalline materials which normally (in high field) display broad featureless spectra. The behavior of the spin system can be coherently manipulated and probed in zero field with dc magnetic field pulses which are employed in a similar manner to radiofrequency pulses in high field NMR experiments. Nematic phases of liquid crystalline systems are studied in order to observe the effects of the removal of an applied magnetic field on sample alignment and molecular order parameters. In nematic phases with positive and negative magnetic susceptibility anisotropies, a comparison between the forms of the spin interactions in high and low fields is made. High resolution zero field NMR spectra of unaligned smectic samples are also obtained and reflect the symmetry of the liquid crystalline environment. These experiments are a sensitive measure of the motionally induced asymmetry in biaxial phases. Homonuclear and heteronuclear solute spin systems are compared in the nematic and smectic phases. Nonaxially symmetric dipolar couplings are reported for several systems. The effects of residual fields in the presence of a non-zero asymmetry parameter are discussed theoretically and presented experimentally. Computer programs for simulations of these and other experimental results are also reported. 179 refs., 75 figs.