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Sample records for lanthanum trichloride scintillators

  1. Characterization of Alpha Contamination in Lanthanum Trichloride Scintillators Using Coincidence Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrath, Brian D.; Runkle, Robert C.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Kaye, William R.; Lepel, Elwood A.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Smith, Leon E.

    2005-08-01

    The commercial availability of LaCl3:Ce scintillators has been much anticipated due to their significantly lower resolution relative to NaI(Tl). Our investigation of these scintillators in regards to the effect of their improved resolution for coincidence gamma-ray measurement applications revealed that the scintillators had a large, internal alpha contamination affecting the gamma-ray energy range from 1700-3000 keV. One passive method of identifying contaminants relies on exploiting coincident signatures. Aided by a coincidence lookup library developed at PNNL, we determined that the parent contaminant is Ac-227 via an alpha-gamma coincidence measurement. In this paper, we characterize the level of contamination and describe our coincidence measurement technique. The Ac-227 concentration was approximately 0.13 ppt. We demonstrate that this coincidence technique measures minimum detectable activities much lower than singles gamma-ray spectroscopy. We also discuss gamma- and beta-contamination in these scintillators.

  2. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF[sub 3] and CeF[sub 3] as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF[sub 3] and the remainder CeF[sub 3] have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography. 2 figures.

  3. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF.sub.3 and CeF.sub.3 as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF.sub.3 and the remainder CeF.sub.3 have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography.

  4. Lanthanum halide nanoparticle scintillators for nuclear radiation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Paul; Guise, Ronald; Yuan, Ding; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; O'Brien, Robert; Lowe, Daniel; Kang, Zhitao; Menkara, Hisham; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated and characterized for their nanocomposite radiation detector properties. This work investigated the properties of several nanostructured radiation scintillators, in order to determine the viability of using scintillators employing nanostructured lanthanum tribromide, lanthanum trifluoride, or cerium tribromide. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with the idea that these materials have an intrinsic response to nuclear radiation that may be correlated to the energy of the incident radiation.

  5. Lanthanum halide nanoparticle scintillators for nuclear radiation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Paul; Guise, Ronald; O'Brien, Robert; Lowe, Daniel; Kang Zhitao; Menkara, Hisham; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2013-02-14

    Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated and characterized for their nanocomposite radiation detector properties. This work investigated the properties of several nanostructured radiation scintillators, in order to determine the viability of using scintillators employing nanostructured lanthanum trifluoride. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with the idea that these materials have an intrinsic response to nuclear radiation that may be correlated to the energy of the incident radiation.

  6. Waveshifting fiber readout of lanthanum halide scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, G. L.; Cherry, M. L.; Stacy, J. G.

    2006-07-01

    Newly developed high-light-yield inorganic scintillators coupled to waveshifting optical fibers provide the capability of efficient X-ray detection and millimeter scale position resolution suitable for high-energy cosmic ray instruments, hard X-ray/gamma ray astronomy telescopes and applications to national security. The CASTER design for NASA's proposed Black Hole Finder Probe mission, in particular, calls for a 6 8 m2 hard X-ray coded aperture imaging telescope operating in the 20 600 keV energy band, putting significant constraints on cost and readout complexity. The development of new inorganic scintillator materials (e.g., cerium-doped LaBr3 and LaCl3) provides improved energy resolution and timing performance that is well suited to the requirements for national security and astrophysics applications. LaBr3 or LaCl3 detector arrays coupled with waveshifting fiber optic readout represent a significant advance in the performance capabilities of scintillator-based gamma cameras and provide the potential for a feasible approach to affordable, large area, extremely sensitive detectors. We describe some of the applications and present laboratory test results demonstrating the expected scintillator performance.

  7. Scintillators with potential to supersede lanthanum bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Steven; Aszatlos, Steve; Hull, Giulia; Kuntz, J.; Niedermayr, Tom; Pimputkar, S.; Roberts, J.; Sanner, R.; Tillotson, T.; van Loef, Edger; Wilson, Cody; Shah, Kanai; Roy, U.; Hawrami, R.; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William

    2009-06-01

    New scintillators for high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy have been identified, grown and characterized. Our development efforts have focused on two classes of high light yield materials: Europium-doped alkaline earth halides and Cerium-doped garnets. Of the halide single crystals we have grown by the Bridgman method - SrI{sub 2}, CaI{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaI{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} - SrI{sub 2} is the most promising. SrI{sub 2}(Eu) emits into the Eu{sup 2+} band, centered at 435 nm, with a decay time of 1.2 {micro}s and a light yield of up to 115,000 photons/MeV. It offers energy resolution better than 3% FWHM at 662 keV, and exhibits excellent light yield proportionality. Transparent ceramics fabrication allows production of Gadolinium- and Terbium-based garnets which are not growable by melt techniques due to phase instabilities. While scintillation light yields of Cerium-doped ceramic garnets are high, light yield non-proportionality and slow decay components appear to limit their prospects for high energy resolution. We are developing an understanding of the mechanisms underlying energy dependent scintillation light yield non-proportionality and how it affects energy resolution. We have also identified aspects of optical design that can be optimized to enhance energy resolution.

  8. Lanthanum

    MedlinePlus

    Lanthanum is used to reduce blood levels of phosphate in patients with kidney disease. High levels of phosphate in the blood can cause bone problems. Lanthanum is in a class of medications called phosphate ...

  9. Lanthanum halide scintillators for time-of-flight 3-D pet

    DOEpatents

    Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2008-06-03

    A Lanthanum Halide scintillator (for example LaCl.sub.3 and LaBr.sub.3) with fast decay time and good timing resolution, as well as high light output and good energy resolution, is used in the design of a PET scanner. The PET scanner includes a cavity for accepting a patient and a plurality of PET detector modules arranged in an approximately cylindrical configuration about the cavity. Each PET detector includes a Lanthanum Halide scintillator having a plurality of Lanthanum Halide crystals, a light guide, and a plurality of photomultiplier tubes arranged respectively peripherally around the cavity. The good timing resolution enables a time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanner to be developed that exhibits a reduction in noise propagation during image reconstruction and a gain in the signal-to-noise ratio. Such a PET scanner includes a time stamp circuit that records the time of receipt of gamma rays by respective PET detectors and provides timing data outputs that are provided to a processor that, in turn, calculates time-of-flight (TOF) of gamma rays through a patient in the cavity and uses the TOF of gamma rays in the reconstruction of images of the patient.

  10. Development of Lanthanum Bromide and Lanthanum Chloride Scintillator Detectors for Hard X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Budden, B. S.; Case, G. L.; Cherry, M. L.; Macri, J. R.; McConnell, M. L.; Ryan, J. M.

    2006-09-01

    Advanced scintillator materials such as LaBr3:Ce and LaCl3:Ce hold great promise for future hard X-ray and gamma-ray astrophysics missions due to their high density, high light output, good linearity, and fast decay times. Of particular importance for future space-based imaging instruments, such as coded-aperture telescopes, are the precise spatial location of individual gamma-ray interactions and the susceptibility of the material to radiation damage. We have investigated the position and energy resolution achievable within LaBr3:Ce and LaCl3:Ce crystals (both monolithic and pixellated) using a variety of readout techniques, including position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes, multi-anode photomultiplier tubes, and orthogonal layers of wavelength-shifting fibers. We have also exposed LaBr3:Ce and LaCl3:Ce detectors to high-energy proton irradiation in order to study any radiation damage and activation. We present the results of these tests and discuss the applicability of such advanced scintillators to future high-energy imaging astrophysics missions.

  11. A comparison of the use of sodium iodide and lanthanum bromide scintillation crystals for airborne surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Derek M.

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Aerial Spectral Environmental Collection Technology (ASPECT) program performs aerial radiological and chemical characterization of geographical regions of interest. Airborne surveys are performed to characterize environmental radionuclide content, for mineral exploration, as well as for emergency scenarios such as major releases or lost sources. Two radiological detection systems are used by the ASPECT team for gamma-ray detection and characterization: lanthanum bromide [LaBr 3(Ce)] and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation systems. An aerial survey of a uranium mine in the western United States was performed using both NaI(Tl) and LaBr3(Ce) detection systems. Analyses of the survey data were performed with RadAssist software and applying International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) airborne gamma ray mapping guidelines. The data for the survey were corrected for cross-over, which is spectral interference from higher energy photons as a result of Compton scattering, height attenuation, cosmic ray contribution to signal, and Radon contribution to signal. Two radiation survey contours were generated from each discrete data set. Based on analysis of the uranium mine survey results, LaBr3(Ce) produced a product comparable to that of NaI(Tl). The LaBr3(Ce) detection system contained 1/16th the scintillating volume and had a total system weight that was 1/4th that of the NaI(Tl) system. LaBr3(Ce) demonstrated a clear advantage over NaI(Tl) detectors in system mobility, and weight factors in airborne gamma ray spectroscopy.

  12. Application of lanthanum halide scintillators and low-resolution dense plastics for modern MC&A needs.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.; Belian, A. P.; McKigney E. A.; Russo, P. A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments in lanthanum halide scintillators and low-resolution dense plastics give breadth to gamma-ray methods of nuclear material detection suitable for modern MC and A needs. Demanding goals for modernization of MC and A cover both portable and continuous on-line measurement applications that are quantitative for inventory/verification, and that serve those quantitative measurement needs plant-wide. Improved performance (sensitivity and reoslution) is important for portable applications in which a single detector must measure many types of materials. Budget is a major issue for continuous inventory measurements with hundreds or even thousands of detectors placed throughout a facility. Experimentally proven resolution of under 4% for 662 keV {sup 137}Cs gamma rays measured with large cerium-doped LaCl{sub 3} (lanthanum chloride) crystals set a new performance standard for versatile, efficient portable applications comparable in price to NaI(Tl), which has been dominant for decades. While the relatively high cost of crystals remains an obstacle for the application of very large numbers of lanthanum halide scintillators as distributed networked detectors, scintillators made from high-density plastic offer a different type of solution for these gamma-ray measurements. Compared to lanthanum halide crystals they are inexpensive and can be larger in size. Despite lower resolution than NaI(Tl), a quantitative interpretation of the photopeak response of the low-cost dense plastic detectors can be tailored to the unique mechanical and spectral properties of different materials at each of hundreds of fixed on-line locations in a plant. This paper describes the properties and presents experimental results for the two new spectrometer types that, together, bracket NaI(Tl) detectors in both performance and cost, fulfilling modern demands for portable and continuous on-line accountability of uranium and plutonium.

  13. Doped Lanthanum Hafnates as Scintillating Materials for High-Energy Photon Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Kareem; Pokhrel, Madhab; Mao, Yuanbing

    Recent years have seen the emergence of nanocrystalline complex oxide scintillators for use in X-ray and gamma-ray detection. In this study, we investigate the structural and optical properties of La2Hf2O7 nanoparticles doped with varying levels of Eu3+ or Ce3+ by use of X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and optical photoluminescence. In addition, scintillation response under X-ray and gamma-ray exposure is reported. The authors thank the support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (Award #HDTRA1-10-1-0114).

  14. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, Jr., Jerry; Avens, Larry R.; Trujillo, Eddie A.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride is provided.

  15. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.; Avens, L.R.; Trujillo, E.A.

    1992-03-24

    A process is described for preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride.

  16. Lanthanum Halide Scintillators and Optical Fiber Readout for X-Ray Astronomy and National Security Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Michael L.; Case, Gary L.; Welch, Christopher E.

    2006-04-01

    The Black Hole Finder Probe (BHFP) mission is intended to survey the local Universe for black holes. One approach to such a survey is a hard X-ray coded aperture imaging telescope operating in the 20 - 600 keV energy band. A sensitive hard X-ray/gamma ray imaging telescope is also well suited to surveillance applications searching for shielded sources of illicit nuclear materials, for example "dirty bomb" materials being smuggled into a harbor or city. The development of new inorganic scintillator materials (e.g., LaBr3 and LaCl3) provides improved energy resolution and timing performance that is well suited to the requirements for these national security and astrophysics applications. LaBr3 or LaCl3 detector arrays coupled with waveshifting fiber optic readout represent a significant advance in the performance capabilities of scintillator-based gamma cameras and provide the potential for a feasible approach to affordable, large area, extremely sensitive detectors. We describe the Coded Aperture Survey Telescope for Energetic Radiation (CASTER), a mission concept for a BHFP, and the High Sensitivity Gamma Ray Imager (HiSGRI), a device intended for surveillance for nuclear materials, and present laboratory test results demonstrating the expected scintillator performance.

  17. Identification of prompt fission γ-rays with lanthanum-chloride scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Billnert, R.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Karlsson, J.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the employment of LaCl3:Ce scintillation detectors for the identification of prompt fission γ-rays from γ-radiation in contrast to other reactions. We present the properties of cylindrical 1.5 in.×1.5 in. detectors in terms of intrinsic activity, energy resolution, intrinsic full peak efficiency and intrinsic timing resolution. In addition, we show results from the measurement of γ-rays emitted in coincidence with the spontaneous fission of 252Cf, which lead us to the conclusion that the properties of the detectors used in this work, in particular the good timing resolution and a reasonably good energy resolution, are more than just sufficient for the assessment of prompt γ-heat in future nuclear reactors as requested by the OECD. Hence, in our opinion, LaCl3:Ce detectors, compared to those made out of LaBr3:Ce crystals, represent an appropriate and quasi low-cost choice for the above mentioned applications.

  18. Fabrication of large-volume, low-cost ceramic lanthanum halide scintillators for gamma ray detection : final report for DHS/DNDO/TRDD project TA-01-SL01.

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ottley, Leigh Anna M.; Yang, Pin; Chen, Ching-Fong; Sanchez, Margaret R.; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2008-10-01

    This project uses advanced ceramic processes to fabricate large, optical-quality, polycrystalline lanthanum halide scintillators to replace small single crystals produced by the conventional Bridgman growth method. The new approach not only removes the size constraint imposed by the growth method, but also offers the potential advantages of both reducing manufacturing cost and increasing production rate. The project goal is to fabricate dense lanthanum halide ceramics with a preferred crystal orientation by applying texture engineering and solid-state conversion to reduce the thermal mechanical stress in the ceramic and minimize scintillation light scattering at grain boundaries. Ultimately, this method could deliver the sought-after high sensitivity and <3% energy resolution at 662 keV of lanthanum halide scintillators and unleash their full potential for advanced gamma ray detection, enabling rapid identification of radioactive materials in a variety of practical applications. This report documents processing details from powder synthesis, seed particle growth, to final densification and texture development of cerium doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup +3}) ceramics. This investigation demonstrated that: (1) A rapid, flexible, cost efficient synthesis method of anhydrous lanthanum halides and their solid solutions was developed. Several batches of ultrafine LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup +3} powder, free of oxyhalide, were produced by a rigorously controlled process. (2) Micron size ({approx} 5 {micro}m), platelet shape LaBr{sub 3} seed particles of high purity can be synthesized by a vapor phase transport process. (3) High aspect-ratio seed particles can be effectively aligned in the shear direction in the ceramic matrix, using a rotational shear-forming process. (4) Small size, highly translucent LaBr{sub 3} (0.25-inch diameter, 0.08-inch thick) samples were successfully fabricated by the equal channel angular consolidation process. (5) Large size, high density

  19. Lanthanum Bromide Detectors for Safeguards Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.

    2011-05-25

    Lanthanum bromide has advantages over other popular inorganic scintillator detectors. Lanthanum bromide offers superior resolution, and good efficiency when compared to sodium iodide and lanthanum chloride. It is a good alternative to high purity germanium detectors for some safeguards applications. This paper offers an initial look at lanthanum bromide detectors. Resolution of lanthanum bromide will be compared lanthanum chloride and sodium-iodide detectors through check source measurements. Relative efficiency and angular dependence will be looked at. Nuclear material spectra, to include plutonium and highly enriched uranium, will be compared between detector types.

  20. Comparison of model fitting and gated integration for pulse shape discrimination and spectral estimation of digitized lanthanum halide scintillator pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, J. E.; Mosquera, C. M.; Faust, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    An analysis of digitized pulse waveforms from experiments with LaBr3(Ce) and LaCl3(Ce) detectors is presented. Pulse waveforms from both scintillator types were captured in the presence of 22Na and 60Co sources and also background alone. Two methods to extract pulse shape discrimination (PSD) parameters and estimate energy spectra were compared. The first involved least squares fitting of the pulse waveforms to a physics-based model of one or two exponentially modified Gaussian functions. The second was the conventional gated integration method. The model fitting method produced better PSD than gated integration for LaCl3(Ce) and higher resolution energy spectra for both scintillator types. A disadvantage to the model fitting approach is that it is more computationally complex and about 5 times slower. LaBr3(Ce) waveforms had a single decay component and showed no ability for alpha/electron PSD. LaCl3(Ce) was observed to have short and long decay components and alpha/electron discrimination was observed.

  1. Assessing soil erosion at landscape level: A step forward in the up-scaling of 137Cs measurements through the use of in-situ lanthanum bromide scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsalves, Basil C.; Darby, Iain G.; Toloza, Arsenio; Mabit, Lionel; Kaiser, Ralf B.; Dercon, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Measuring Fallout Radionuclides (FRN), in particular 137Cs, is a well-established method to estimate soil erosion and deposition in agricultural landscapes. While extremely sensitive, laboratory based gamma-ray spectrometry requires careful handling and preparation of measurement samples with a lengthy measuring time (~1 day), In-situ gamma-ray spectrometry can give near instantaneous results, allowing prompt decisions to be made and identification of critical spots of soil erosion, while the equipment is in the field. The aim of this investigation was to compare the precision of the in-situ FRN measurements, made by a cost-effective lanthanum bromide (LaBr3 (Ce)) scintillation detector of 137Cs against those from conventional (high-purity germanium HPGe detector) but laborious laboratory based gamma-ray spectrometry for assessing soil erosion. As preliminary test, five cores of a gleyic Cambisol - per increments of 5 cm until 1 m depth - were collected at the experimental research station of the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety located in Grabenegg 130 km west of Vienna. Three soil cores were sampled at the study site and, in the vicinity of this experimental site, two additional cores were collected at two different undisturbed reference sites. Laboratory gamma analyses were carried out during 50 000 seconds using a HPGe coaxial detector. The gamma measurements performed at the laboratory confirmed the undisturbed status of the two selected reference sites (i.e. exponential decrease with depth of the 137Cs content). Using the surface area of the sampling tool, the 137Cs areal activities of the cores sampled in the study site have been established at 2134±465 Bq m-2, 1835±356 Bq m-2 and 2553±340 Bq m-2, and, for the two reference sites at 3221±444 Bq m-2 and 3946±527 Bq m-2. At the same location and prior to collect the five soil cores, in-situ measurements using a lanthanum bromide (LaBr3 (Ce)) scintillator were performed. The detector was placed

  2. Method for removal of phosgene from boron trichloride

    DOEpatents

    Freund, Samuel M.

    1983-01-01

    Selective ultraviolet photolysis using an unfiltered mercury arc lamp has been used to substantially reduce the phosgene impurity in a mixture of boron trichloride and phosgene. Infrared spectrophotometric analysis of the sample before and after irradiation shows that is is possible to highly purify commercially available boron trichloride with this method.

  3. Boron trichloride purification with a KrF excimer laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, R.C.; Hartford, A. Jr.; Atencio, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Selective ultraviolet photolysis using a KrF excimer laser has been used to substantially reduce the phosgene impurity in a binary mixture of boron trichloride and phosgene. Infrared spectroscopic analysis of the sample before and after irradiation shows that it is possible to highly purify commercially available boron trichloride with this technique.

  4. Method for removal of phosgene from boron trichloride

    DOEpatents

    Freund, S.M.

    1983-09-20

    Selective ultraviolet photolysis using an unfiltered mercury arc lamp has been used to substantially reduce the phosgene impurity in a mixture of boron trichloride and phosgene. Infrared spectrophotometric analysis of the sample before and after irradiation shows that it is possible to highly purify commercially available boron trichloride with this method. 5 figs.

  5. Synthesis and Structure of Technetium Trichloride

    SciTech Connect

    Poineau, Frederic; Johnstone, Erik V.; Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Forster, Paul M.; Scott, Brian L.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.

    2010-12-07

    Technetium trichloride has been synthesized by reaction of Tc{sub 2}(O{sub 2}CCH{sub 3}){sub 4}Cl{sub 2} with HCl(g) at 300 C. The mechanism of formation mimics the one described earlier in the literature for rhenium. Tc{sub 2}(O{sub 2}CCH{sub 3}){sub 2}Cl{sub 4} [P{sub T}; a = 6.0303(12) {angstrom}, b = 6.5098(13) {angstrom}, c = 8.3072(16) {angstrom}, {alpha} = 112.082(2){sup o}, {beta} = 96.667(3){sup o}, {gamma} = 108.792(3){sup o}; Tc-Tc = 2.150(1) {angstrom}] is formed as an intermediate in the reaction at 100 C. Technetium trichloride is formed above 250 C and is isostructural with its rhenium homologue. The structure consists of Tc{sub 3}Cl{sub 9} clusters [R{sub 3}m; a = b = 10.1035(19) {angstrom}, c = 20.120(8) {angstrom}], and the Tc-Tc separation is 2.444(1) {angstrom}. Calculations on TcX{sub 3} (X = Cl, Br) have confirmed the stability of TcCl{sub 3} and suggest the existence of a polymorph of TcBr{sub 3} with the ReBr{sub 3} structure.

  6. 15. SOUTH PLANT PIPELINES AND RAIL LINES FROM ARSENIC TRICHLORIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. SOUTH PLANT PIPELINES AND RAIL LINES FROM ARSENIC TRICHLORIDE DRY STORAGE TANKS. VIEW TO EAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  7. 41. SOUTH PLANT NORTHCENTER RAILROAD SPUR, WITH ARSENIC TRICHLORIDE MANUFACTURING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. SOUTH PLANT NORTH-CENTER RAILROAD SPUR, WITH ARSENIC TRICHLORIDE MANUFACTURING BUILDING (BUILDING 523) AT LEFT FOREGROUND AND PROCESS PIPING AT CENTER. VIEW TO EAST - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  8. Synthesis of Uranium Trichloride for the Pyrometallurgical Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    B.R. Westphal; J.C. Price; R.D. Mariani

    2011-11-01

    The pyroprocessing of used nuclear fuel via electrorefining requires the continued addition of uranium trichloride to sustain operations. Uranium trichloride is utilized as an oxidant in the system to allow separation of uranium metal from the minor actinides and fission products. The inventory of uranium trichloride had diminished to a point that production was necessary to continue electrorefiner operations. Following initial experimentation, cupric chloride was chosen as a reactant with uranium metal to synthesize uranium trichloride. Despite the variability in equipment and charge characteristics, uranium trichloride was produced in sufficient quantities to maintain operations in the electrorefiner. The results and conclusions from several experiments are presented along with a set of optimized operating conditions for the synthesis of uranium trichloride.

  9. Lanthanum fluoride nanoparticles for radiosensitization of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, Konstantin; Bekah, Devesh; Cooper, Daniel; Shastry, Sathvik; Hill, Colin; Bradforth, Stephen; Nadeau, Jay

    2016-03-01

    Dense inorganic nanoparticles have recently been identified as promising radiosensitizers. In addition to dose enhancement through increased attenuation of ionizing radiation relative to biological tissue, scintillating nanoparticles can transfer energy to coupled photosensitizers to amplify production of reactive oxygen species, as well as provide UVvisible emission for optical imaging. Lanthanum fluoride is a transparent material that is easily prepared as nanocrystals, and which can provide radioluminescence at a number of wavelengths through simple substitution of lanthanum ions with other luminescent lanthanides. We have prepared lanthanum fluoride nanoparticles doped with cerium, terbium, or both, that have good spectral overlap with chlorine6 or Rose Bengal photosensitizer molecules. We have also developed a strategy for stable conjugation of the photosensitizers to the nanoparticle surface, allowing for high energy transfer efficiencies on a per molecule basis. Additionally, we have succeeded in making our conjugates colloidally stable under physiological conditions. Here we present our latest results, using nanoparticles and nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates to demonstrate radiation dose enhancement in B16 melanoma cells. The effects of nanoparticle treatment prior to 250 kVp x-ray irradiation were investigated through clonogenic survival assays and cell cycle analysis. Using a custom apparatus, we have also observed scintillation of the nanoparticles and conjugates under the same conditions that the cell samples are irradiated.

  10. Method for removal of phosgene from boron trichloride. [DOE patent application; mercury arc lamp

    DOEpatents

    Freund, S.M.

    1981-09-03

    Selective ultraviolet photolysis using an unfiltered mercury arc lamp has been used to substantially reduce the phosgene impurity in a mixture of boron trichloride and phosgene. Infrared spectrophotometric analysis of the sample before and after irradiation shows that it is possible to highly purify commercially available boron trichloride with this method.

  11. Metals fact sheet - lanthanum

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Mosander was the first to extract the elusive rare earth, lanthanum, from unrefined cerium nitrate in 1839. The name was derived from the Greek word lanthanein, meaning {open_quotes}to escape notice.{close_quotes} Lanthanum is the lightest rare earth and a very malleable metal-soft enough to be cut with a knife. Used primarily as an additive in steels and non-ferrous metals, lanthanum is the lightest rare earth element and one of four rare earths from which mischmetal is made. Additional applications include advanced batteries, optical fibers, and phosphors.

  12. Stabilized Lanthanum Sulphur Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, George H. (Inventor); Elsner, Norbert B. (Inventor); Shearer, Clyde H. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Lanthanum sulfide is maintained in the stable cubic phase form over a temperature range of from 500 C to 1500 C by adding to it small amounts of calcium, barium. or strontium. This novel compound is an excellent thermoelectric material.

  13. Lanthanum-Induced Gastrointestinal Histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Hiwot; Longacre, Teri A.; Pasricha, Pankaj J.

    2015-01-01

    A patient with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis presented with fever, anorexia, and nausea shortly after starting oral lanthanum carbonate for phosphate control. Gastric and duodenal biopsies demonstrated diffuse histiocytosis with intracellular aggregates of basophilic foreign material. Transmission electron microscopy, an underutilized diagnostic test, revealed the nature of the aggregates as heavy metal particles, consistent with lanthanum. Symptoms and histiocytosis improved after discontinuation of lanthanum. Lanthanum may be an underdiagnosed cause of gastrointestinal histiocytosis. PMID:26157959

  14. Syntheses of neptunium trichloride and measurements of its melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Hirokazu; Takano, Masahide; Kurata, Masaki; Minato, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Neptunium trichloride (NpCl3) of high purity was synthesized by the solid state reaction of neptunium nitride with cadmium chloride. Lattice parameters of hexagonal NpCl3 were determined from the powder X-ray diffraction pattern to be a = 0.7428 ± 0.0001 nm and c = 0.4262 ± 0.0003 nm, which fairly agree with the reported values. The melting temperature of NpCl3 was measured on a sample of about 1 mg, hermetically encapsulated in a gold crucible with a differential thermal analyzer. The value determined was 1070 ± 3 K which is close to the recommended value (1075 ± 30 K) derived from the mean value of the melting temperature of UCl3 and of PuCl3.

  15. Development of scintillation materials for PET scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzhik, Mikhail; Fedorov, Andrei; Annenkov, Alexander; Borissevitch, Andrei; Dossovitski, Alexei; Missevitch, Oleg; Lecoq, Paul

    2007-02-01

    The growing demand on PET methodology for a variety of applications ranging from clinical use to fundamental studies triggers research and development of PET scanners providing better spatial resolution and sensitivity. These efforts are primarily focused on the development of advanced PET detector solutions and on the developments of new scintillation materials as well. However Lu containing scintillation materials introduced in the last century such as LSO, LYSO, LuAP, LuYAP crystals still remain the best PET species in spite of the recent developments of bright, fast but relatively low density lanthanum bromide scintillators. At the same time Lu based materials have several drawbacks which are high temperature of crystallization and relatively high cost compared to alkali-halide scintillation materials. Here we describe recent results in the development of new scintillation materials for PET application.

  16. [Radiographic disappearance of lanthanum].

    PubMed

    Pastori, Giordano

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, Cerny and Kunzendorf in the New England Journal of Medicine Images in clinical medicine, showed the radiographic appearance of lanthanum for the first time. After many years we noticed the inverse phenomenon. In a peritoneal dialysis patient treated with lanthanum carbonate, we had two radiography of the abdomen for monitoring the peritoneal catheter. In the first radiography contrast material was seen in colon. In the most recent radiography contrast material disappeared. The patient was always taking the same dose of lanthanum carbonate (1000 mg bid), although at the time of the first radiography he took the chewable tablets, for the last radiography he took the new powder formulation. We found a report in literature highlighting this phenomenon meanwhile indicating a greater chelating effect for the powder. Our hypothesis is that despite the same lanthanum dose, powder provides a greater surface area of binding and a more dispersed bowel distribution to explain a masked radio-opacity. Considering the wide availability of the powder, this must be taken into account especially in evaluating therapeutic compliance. PMID:25774580

  17. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  18. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  19. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  20. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  1. Metallic behavior of lanthanum disilicide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Robert G.; Bost, M. C.; Mahan, John E.

    1988-01-01

    Polycrystalline thin films of LaSi2 were prepared by reaction of sputter-deposited lanthanum layers with silicon wafers. Samples of the low-temperature tetragonal and the high-temperature orthorhombic phases were separately obtained. The room-temperature intrinsic resistivities were 24 and 57 microohm cm for the low- and high-temperature structures, respectively. Although lanthanum disilicide had been previously reported to be a semiconductor, classical metallic behavior was found for both phases.

  2. [Lanthanum carbonate in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Torregrosa Prats, V

    2008-01-01

    Lanthanum is an element belonging to the group called rare earths. Due to its low solubility, lanthanum carbonate has been widely studied as an intestinal phosphate binder. The results of different clinical trials show that it is an effective and well-tolerated phosphate binder used in monotherapy. Serum phosphate levels are controlled in approximately 70% of patients at 5 years without causing hypercalcemia. The only significant adverse effects observed are a low percentage of gastrointestinal disturbances (6%). Lanthanum carbonate does not alter serum values of liposoluble vitamins or affect the pharmacokinetics of digoxin, warfarin, furosemide, phenytoin, ACE inhibitors or beta-blockers. However, it does alter the pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin (quinolones in general), tetracyclines and doxycycline. Lanthanum carbonate (Fosrenol) is available in Spain as 500 mg, 750 mg, and 1,000 mg chewable tablets, which should not be swallowed without chewing to avoid loss of efficacy. The initial dose recommended by the WHO is 2,250 mg/day, which is equivalent to one 750 mg at each meal. Lanthanum carbonate or lanthanum phosphate can be clearly visualized on a plain x-ray of the abdomen in patients who have recently ingested it. In summary, lanthanum carbonate is a widely studied potent phosphate binder, which offers the possibility of improving control of serum phosphate in patients with chronic kidney disease, without significant side effects. The fact that it is available as chewable tablets and that the number of daily tablets required has been significantly reduced will probably facilitate better patient compliance. PMID:18847414

  3. The kinetics of electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride in different solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Rehana; Nadeem, Syed Muhammad Saqib

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride was investigated in different solvents by spectrophotometry at different temperatures. The the reaction rate was determined by monitoring the absorbance as a function of time at λmax 655 nm. The reaction is pseudo-first order, dependent only on the concentration of titanium trichloride at a fixed concentration of methylene green. The effect of an aqueous alcoholic solvent was studied in the acidic range of pH from 4 to 7. It was observed that the reaction rate increased with an increase in polarity of the reaction medium. The the reaction rate was high in acidic conditions and decreased with a further increase in acidity. The increase in temperature increased the rate of the electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride. The activation energy ( E a) was calculated by the Arrhenius relation. The absence of any reaction intermediate was confirmed by spectroscopic and kinetic investigations. A plausible mechanism for the reaction in line with outer-sphere reaction pathway has been proposed. Thermodynamic parameters such as the activation energy ( E a), enthalpy change (Δ H), free energy change (Δ G), and entropy change (Δ S) were also evaluated

  4. Chlorination of lanthanum oxide.

    PubMed

    Gaviría, Juan P; Navarro, Lucas G; Bohé, Ana E

    2012-03-01

    The reactive system La(2)O(3)(s)-Cl(2)(g) was studied in the temperature range 260-950 °C. The reaction course was followed by thermogravimetry, and the solids involved were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results showed that the reaction leads to the formation of solid LaOCl, and for temperatures above 850 °C, the lanthanum oxychloride is chlorinated, producing LaCl(3)(l). The formation of the oxychloride progresses through a nucleation and growth mechanism, and the kinetic analysis showed that at temperatures below 325 °C the system is under chemical control. The influence of diffusive processes on the kinetics of production of LaOCl was evaluated by studying the effect of the reactive gas flow rate, the mass of the sample, and the chlorine diffusion through the boundary layer surrounding the solid sample. The conversion curves were analyzed and fitted according to the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami description, and the reaction order with respect to the chlorine partial pressure was obtained by varying this partial pressure between 10 and 70 kPa. The rate equation was obtained, which includes the influence of the temperature, chlorine partial pressure, and reaction degree. PMID:22280490

  5. Preparation of porous lanthanum phosphate with templates

    SciTech Connect

    Onoda, Hiroaki; Ishima, Yuya; Takenaka, Atsushi; Tanaka, Isao

    2009-08-05

    Malonic acid, propionic acid, glycine, n-butylamine, and urea were added to the preparation of lanthanum phosphate from lanthanum nitrate and phosphoric acid solutions. All additives were taken into lanthanum phosphate particles. The additives that have a basic site were easy to contain in precipitates. The addition of templates improved the specific surface area of lanthanum phosphate. The amount of pore, with radius smaller than 4 nm, increased with the addition of templates. The remained additives had influence on the acidic properties of lanthanum phosphate.

  6. Ames Lab 101: Lanthanum Decanting

    SciTech Connect

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory scientist Trevor Riedemann explains the process that allows Ames Laboratory to produce some of the purest lanthanum in the world. This and other high-purity rare-earth elements are used to create alloys used in various research projects and play a crucial role in the Planck satellite mission.

  7. Ames Lab 101: Lanthanum Decanting

    ScienceCinema

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2012-08-29

    Ames Laboratory scientist Trevor Riedemann explains the process that allows Ames Laboratory to produce some of the purest lanthanum in the world. This and other high-purity rare-earth elements are used to create alloys used in various research projects and play a crucial role in the Planck satellite mission.

  8. Contamination in LaCl3:Ce Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrath, Brian D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Runkle, Robert C.; Smith, Leon E.

    2005-12-01

    The gamma-, beta-, and x-ray-contamination in LaCl3:Ce scintillators due to the presence of the naturally occurring radioisotope La-138 is discussed. As the size of lanthanum halide crystals grows towards commercially useful sizes, and the effects of alpha-contamination due to Ac-227 has been substantially reduced, the effects of La-138 in background and low-count spectra become more problematic. The crystal's performance in high neutron fluxes is also examined.

  9. METHOD FOR OBTAINING PLUTONIUM METAL AND ALLOYS OF PLUTONIUM FROM PLUTONIUM TRICHLORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Reavis, J.G.; Leary, J.A.; Maraman, W.J.

    1962-11-13

    A process is given for both reducing plutonium trichloride to plutonium metal using cerium as the reductant and simultaneously alloying such plutonium metal with an excess of cerium or cerium and cobalt sufficient to yield the desired nuclear reactor fuel composition. The process is conducted at a temperature from about 550 to 775 deg C, at atmospheric pressure, without the use of booster reactants, and a substantial decontamination is effected in the product alloy of any rare earths which may be associated with the source of the plutonium. (AEC)

  10. SCINTILLATION SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Francis, J.E.

    1960-06-21

    A portable scintillation spectrometer is described which is especially useful in radio-biological studies for determining the uptake and distribution of gamma -emitting substances in tissue. The spectrometer includes a collimator having a plurality of apertures that are hexagonal in cross section. Two crystals are provided: one is activated to respond to incident rays from the collimator; the other is not activated and shields the first from external radiation.

  11. Plastic scintillation dosimetry: Optimal selection of scintillating fibers and scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, Louis; Arsenault, Jean; Gingras, Luc; Sam Beddar, A.; Roy, Rene; Beaulieu, Luc

    2005-07-15

    Scintillation dosimetry is a promising avenue for evaluating dose patterns delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or for the small fields involved in stereotactic radiosurgery. However, the increase in signal has been the goal for many authors. In this paper, a comparison is made between plastic scintillating fibers and plastic scintillator. The collection of scintillation light was measured experimentally for four commercial models of scintillating fibers (BCF-12, BCF-60, SCSF-78, SCSF-3HF) and two models of plastic scintillators (BC-400, BC-408). The emission spectra of all six scintillators were obtained by using an optical spectrum analyzer and they were compared with theoretical behavior. For scintillation in the blue region, the signal intensity of a singly clad scintillating fiber (BCF-12) was 120% of that of the plastic scintillator (BC-400). For the multiclad fiber (SCSF-78), the signal reached 144% of that of the plastic scintillator. The intensity of the green scintillating fibers was lower than that of the plastic scintillator: 47% for the singly clad fiber (BCF-60) and 77% for the multiclad fiber (SCSF-3HF). The collected light was studied as a function of the scintillator length and radius for a cylindrical probe. We found that symmetric detectors with nearly the same spatial resolution in each direction (2 mm in diameter by 3 mm in length) could be made with a signal equivalent to those of the more commonly used asymmetric scintillators. With augmentation of the signal-to-noise ratio in consideration, this paper presents a series of comparisons that should provide insight into selection of a scintillator type and volume for development of a medical dosimeter.

  12. Rapid Synthesis of Nonstoichiometric Lanthanum Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuda, S.; Shapiro, E.; Danielson, L.; Hardister, H.

    1987-01-01

    New process relatively fast and simple. Improved method of synthesizing nonstoichiometric lanthanum sulfide faster and simpler. Product purer because some of prior sources of contamination eliminated.

  13. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  14. Thermoelectric Properties of Lanthanum Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Lockwood, R.; Parker, J. B.; Zoltan, A.; Zoltan, L. D.; Danielson, L.; Raag, V.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes measurement of Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and Hall effect in gamma-phase lanthanum sulfide with composition of La3-x S4. Results of study, part of search for high-temperature thermoelectric energy-conversion materials, indicate this sulfide behaves like extrinsic semiconductor over temperature range of 300 to 1,400 K, with degenerate carrier concentration controlled by stoichiometric ratio of La to S.

  15. Timing resolution measurements of a 3 in. lanthanum bromide detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, L.; De Gerone, M.; Dussoni, S.; Nicolò, D.; Papa, A.; Tenchini, F.; Signorelli, G.

    2013-08-01

    Cerium-doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) is a scintillator that presents very good energy and timing resolutions and it is a perfect candidate for photon detector in future experiments to search for lepton flavor violation as in μ → eγ or μ → e conversion. While energy resolution was thoroughly investigated, timing resolution at several MeV presents some experimental challenge. We measured the timing resolution of a 3 in.×3 in. cylindrical LaBr3(Ce) crystal versus few reference detectors by means of a nuclear reaction from a Cockcroft-Walton accelerator that produces coincident γ-rays in the 4.4-11.6 MeV range. Preliminary results allow us to extrapolate the properties of a segmented γ-ray detector in the 50-100 MeV range.

  16. Multifunctionality of nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Atma; Thakur, Awalendra K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite has been synthesized by adopting modified Pechini route. No evidence of impurity or secondary phase has been detected up to the detection of error limit of X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction pattern reveals orthorhombic crystal system with space group Pnma (62).Crystallite size and lattice strain was found to be ˜42.8nm and 0.306% respectively. Optical band gap was found to be 2.109 eV, by UV-Visible diffused reflectance spectrum (DRS). Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area was found to be ˜3.45 m2/g. Magnetization-hysteresis (M-H) loop was recorded at room temperature (300K) reveals weak ferromagnetism in Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite. The weak ferromagnetism in lanthanum ferrite is due to the uncompensated antiferromagnetic spin ordering. Ferroelectric loop hysteresis observed at room temperature at 100Hz depicts the presence of ferroelectric ordering in LaFeO3.Simultanious presence of magnetic and ferroelectric ordering at room temperature makes it suitable candidate of Multiferroic family.

  17. Absolute bioavailability and disposition of lanthanum in healthy human subjects administered lanthanum carbonate.

    PubMed

    Pennick, Michael; Dennis, Kerry; Damment, Stephen J P

    2006-07-01

    Lanthanum carbonate [La2(CO3)3] is a noncalcium, non-aluminum phosphate binder indicated for hyperphosphatemia treatment in end-stage renal disease. A randomized, open-label, parallel-group, phase I study was conducted to determine absolute bioavailability and investigate excretory routes for systemic lanthanum in healthy subjects. Twenty-four male subjects were randomized to a single lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) intravenous infusion (120 microg elemental lanthanum over a 4-hour period), a single 1-g oral dose [chewable La2(CO3)3 tablets; 4 x 250 mg elemental lanthanum], or no treatment (control). Serial blood, urine, and fecal samples were collected for 7 days postdosing. The absolute bioavailability of lanthanum [administered as La2(CO3)3] was extremely low (0.00127% +/- 0.00080%), with individual values in the range of 0.00015% to 0.00224%. Renal clearance was negligible following oral administration (1.36 +/- 1.43 mL/min). Intravenous administration confirmed low renal clearance (0.95 +/- 0.60 mL/min), just 1.7% of total plasma clearance. Fecal lanthanum excretion was not quantifiable after intravenous administration owing to high and variable background fecal lanthanum and constraints on the size of the intravenous dose. These findings demonstrate that lanthanum absorption from the intestinal tract into the systemic circulation is extremely low and that absorbed drug is cleared predominantly by nonrenal mechanisms. PMID:16809799

  18. Iron Trichloride and Air Mediated Guanylation of Acylthioureas. An Ecological Route to Acylguanidines: Scope and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Pape, Simon; Wessig, Pablo; Brunner, Heiko

    2016-06-01

    Recently we introduced iron trichloride as an environmentally benign and cost-efficient reagent for the synthesis of N-benzoylguanidines. This highly attractive synthetic approach grants access to a broad spectrum of N-benzoylguanidines under mild conditions in short reaction times. In this work we present an extended scope of our methodology along with the results obtained from mechanistic studies via in situ IR spectroscopy in combination with LC (liquid chromatography)-MS analyses. On the basis of these new mechanistic insights we were able to optimize the synthetic protocol and to develop an alternative mechanistic proposal. In this context the symbiotic roles of iron trichloride and oxygen in the guanylation process are highlighted. PMID:27181741

  19. Structural Characterization of Methanol Substituted Lanthanum Halides

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ottley, Leigh Anna M.; Alam, Todd M.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Yang, Pin; Mcintyre, Sarah K.

    2010-01-01

    The first study into the alcohol solvation of lanthanum halide [LaX3] derivatives as a means to lower the processing temperature for the production of the LaBr3 scintillators was undertaken using methanol (MeOH). Initially the de-hydration of {[La(µ-Br)(H2O)7](Br)2}2 (1) was investigated through the simple room temperature dissolution of 1 in MeOH. The mixed solvate monomeric [La(H2O)7(MeOH)2](Br)3 (2) compound was isolated where the La metal center retains its original 9-coordination through the binding of two additional MeOH solvents but necessitates the transfer of the innersphere Br to the outersphere. In an attempt to in situ dry the reaction mixture of 1 in MeOH over CaH2, crystals of [Ca(MeOH)6](Br)2 (3) were isolated. Compound 1 dissolved in MeOH at reflux temperatures led to the isolation of an unusual arrangement identified as the salt derivative {[LaBr2.75•5.25(MeOH)]+0.25 [LaBr3.25•4.75(MeOH)]−0.25} (4). The fully substituted species was ultimately isolated through the dissolution of dried LaBr3 in MeOH forming the 8-coordinated [LaBr3(MeOH)5] (5) complex. It was determined that the concentration of the crystallization solution directed the structure isolated (4 concentrated; 5 dilute) The other LaX3 derivatives were isolated as [(MeOH)4(Cl)2La(µ-Cl)]2 (6) and [La(MeOH)9](I)3•MeOH (7). Beryllium Dome XRD analysis indicated that the bulk material for 5 appear to have multiple solvated species, 6 is consistent with the single crystal, and 7 was too broad to elucidate structural aspects. Multinuclear NMR (139La) indicated that these compounds do not retain their structure in MeOD. TGA/DTA data revealed that the de-solvation temperatures of the MeOH derivatives 4 – 6 were slightly higher in comparison to their hydrated counterparts. PMID:20514349

  20. Stabilized lanthanum sulphur compounds. [thermoelectric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, G. H.; Elsner, N. B.; Shearer, C. H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Lanthanum sulfide is maintained in the stable cubic phase form over a temperature range of from 500 C to 1500 C by adding to it small amounts of calcium, barium, or strontium. This compound is an excellent thermoelectric material.

  1. Field free, directly heated lanthanum boride cathode

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Moussa, D.; Wilde, S.B.

    1987-02-02

    A directly heated cylindrical lanthanum boride cathode assembly is disclosed which minimizes generation of magnetic field which would interfere with electron emission from the cathode. The cathode assembly comprises a lanthanum boride cylinder in electrical contact at one end with a central support shaft which functions as one electrode to carry current to the lanthanum boride cylinder and in electrical contact, at its opposite end with a second electrode which is coaxially position around the central support shaft so that magnetic fields generated by heater current flowing in one direction through the central support shaft are cancelled by an opposite magnetic field generated by current flowing through the lanthanum boride cylinder and the coaxial electrode in a direction opposite to the current flow in the central shaft.

  2. Field free, directly heated lanthanum boride cathode

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Moussa, David; Wilde, Stephen B.

    1991-01-01

    A directly heated cylindrical lanthanum boride cathode assembly is disclosed which minimizes generation of magnetic fields which would interfere with electron emission from the cathode. The cathode assembly comprises a lanthanum boride cylinder in electrical contact at one end with a central support shaft which functions as one electrode to carry current to the lanthanum boride cylinder and in electrical contact, at its opposite end with a second electrode which is coaxially position around the central support shaft so that magnetic fields generated by heater current flowing in one direction through the central support shaft are cancelled by an opposite magnetic field generated by current flowing through the lanthanum boride cylinder and the coaxial electrode in a direction opposite to the current flow in the central shaft.

  3. New Scintillator Materials (K2CeBr5) and (Cs2CeBr5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawrami, R.; Volz, M. P.; Batra, A. K.; Aggarwal, M. D.; Roy, U. N.; Groza, M.; Burger, A.; Cherepy, Nerine; Niedermayr, Thomas; Payne, Stephen A.

    2008-01-01

    Cesium cerium bromide (Cs2CeBr5) and potassium cerium bromide (K2CeBr5) are new scintillator materials for X-ray and gamma ray detector applications. Recently halide scintillator materials, such as Ce doped lanthanum bromide has been proved to be very important material for the same purpose. These materials are highly hygroscopic; a search for high light yield non-hygroscopic materials was highly desirable to advance the scintillator technology. In this paper, we are reporting the crystal growth of novel scintillator materials, cesium cerium bromide (Cs2CeBr5) and potassium cerium bromide (K2CeBr5). Crystals were successfully grown from the melt using the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger technique, in a comparison with the high performance LaBr3 or LaCl3 crystals, cerium based alkali halides crystals, (Cs2CeBr5) and (K2CeBr5) have similar scintillation properties, while being much less hygroscopic. Furthermore, cesium based compounds will not suffer from the self-activity present in potassium and lanthanum compounds. However the Cs2CeBr5 crystals did not grow properly probably due to non-congruent melting or to some phase transition during cooling. Keywords." Scintillator materials; Ce3+; Energy resolution; Light yield; K2CeBr5

  4. Lanthanum

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications called phosphate binders. It works by preventing absorption of phosphate from food in the stomach. ... it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away ...

  5. Scintillators and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard T.

    2014-07-15

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  6. Scintillators and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Richard T.

    2015-09-01

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  7. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  8. Scintillator materials for calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    Requirements for fast, dense scintillator materials for calorimetry in high energy physics and approaches to satisfying these requirements are reviewed with respect to possible hosts and luminescent species. Special attention is given to cerium-activated crystals, core-valence luminescence, and glass scintillators. The present state of the art, limitations, and suggestions for possible new scintillator materials are presented.

  9. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-08-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested.

  10. Comparative teratogenicity of di-n-butyltin diacetate with n-butyltin trichloride in rats.

    PubMed

    Noda, T; Yamano, T; Shimizu, M; Saitoh, M; Nakamura, T; Yamada, A; Morita, S

    1992-08-01

    Teratological tests were conducted on di-n-butyltin diacetate (DBTA), and n-butyltin trichloride (MBTC). Pregnant Wistar rats were treated orally with DBTA at doses of 0, 1.7, 5.0, 10.0, and 15.0 mg/kg/day or with MBTC at doses of 0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day during days 7-17 of gestation. Cesarean sections were performed on day 20 of gestation. Thymic atrophy of the pregnant rats was observed in a dose-dependent manner by DBTA treatment. The incidence of dead or resorbed fetuses and total resorption fetuses increased at the highest dose of DBTA. The incidence of fetuses with external malformations, such as cleft mandible, cleft lower lip, ankyloglossia (tongue-tie) and schistoglossia (cleft tongue), increased in a dose-dependent manner by DBTA treatment. The incidence of fetuses with skeletal malformations such as anomaly of mandibular fixation, fused ribs, fused cervical vertebral arches and fused thoracic vertebral arches also increased at 10.0 and 15.0 mg/kg. However, MBTC, one of the main metabolites of di-n-butyltin, failed to show any evidence of tetatogenic activity at any doses tested. The results indicate that DBTA has potent teratogenic effects on rat fetuses, and DBTA is different from MBTC with respect to teratogenic effects. PMID:1514842

  11. Pulmonary response of Fischer 344 rats to acute nose-only inhalation of indium trichloride.

    PubMed

    Blazka, M E; Tepper, J S; Dixon, D; Winsett, D W; O'Connor, R W; Luster, M I

    1994-10-01

    We have previously shown that rats dosed intratracheally with indium trichloride (InCl3) develop severe lung damage and fibrosis. However, it is not clear what pulmonary effects would result following accidental occupational exposure to low concentrations of indium by inhalation. The present study uses a model of acute lung injury based on single 1-hr nose-only exposures to 0.2, 2.0, or 20 mg InCl3/m3. Exposure to 0.2 mg InCl3/m3 was capable of initiating an inflammatory response. Seven days following inhalation of 20 mg InCl3/m3 the total cell number, fibronectin, and TNF alpha levels in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid were 8, 40, and 5 times higher than the control, respectively. Commensurate with the level of lung injury 7 days after exposure, an acute restrictive lung lesion and increased airway responsiveness to acetylcholine were observed. Forty-two days after exposure a compensatory increase in lung volume and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity in the 20 mg InCl3/m3 group suggested recovery from the lung injury. Lung collagen levels were increased in a concentration-dependent manner 42 days postexposure. These data indicate that inhalation of InCl3/m3 causes acute inflammatory changes in the lung. PMID:7925195

  12. Large Scale Testing and Development of Gadolinium Trichloride for Use in Neutron Detection in Large Water

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Vagine

    2007-09-18

    Water Cherenkov detectors have been used for many years as inexpensive, effective detectors for neutrino interactions and nucleon decay searches. While many important measurements have been made with these detectors a major drawback has been their inability to detect the absorption of thermal neutrons. We believe an inexpensive, effective technique could be developed to overcome this situation via the addition to water of a solute with a large neutron cross section and energetic gamma daughters which would make neutrons detectable. Gadolinium seems an excellent candidate especially since in recent years it has become very inexpensive, now less than $8 per kilogram in the form of commercially-available gadolinium trichloride, GdCl{sub 3}. This non-toxic, non-reactive substance is highly soluble in water. Neutron capture on gadolinium yields a gamma cascade which would be easily seen in detectors like Super-Kamiokande. We have begun to investigate the use of GdCl{sub 3} as a possible upgrade for the Super-Kamiokande detector with a view toward improving its performance as a detector for atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, wrong-sign solar neutrinos, reactor neutrinos, proton decay, and also as a target for the coming T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. This large-scale investigation, conducted in the one kiloton water Cherenkov detector built for the K2K long-baseline experiment, follows up on highly promising benchtop-scale work previously carried out with the assistance of a 2003 Advanced Detector Research Program grant.

  13. Selective Filtration of Gadolinium Trichloride for Use in Neutron Detection in Large Water Cherenkov Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vagins, Mark R.

    2013-04-10

    Water Cherenkov detectors have been used for many years as inexpensive, effective detectors for neutrino interactions and nucleon decay searches. While many important measurements have been made with these detectors a major drawback has been their inability to detect the absorption of thermal neutrons. We believe an inexpensive, effective technique could be developed to overcome this situation via the addition to water of a solute with a large neutron cross section and energetic gamma daughters which would make neutrons detectable. Gadolinium seems an excellent candidate especially since in recent years it has become very inexpensive, now less than $8 per kilogram in the form of commercially-available gadolinium trichloride, GdCl{sub 3}. This non-toxic, non-reactive substance is highly soluble in water. Neutron capture on gadolinium yields a gamma cascade which would be easily seen in detectors like Super-Kamiokande. We have been investigating the use of GdCl{sub 3} as a possible upgrade for the Super-Kamiokande detector with a view toward improving its performance as a detector for atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, wrong-sign solar neutrinos, reactor neutrinos, proton decay, and also as a target for the coming T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. This focused study of selective water filtration and GdCl{sub 3} extraction techniques, conducted at UC Irvine, followed up on highly promising benchtop-scale and kiloton-scale work previously carried out with the assistance of 2003 and 2005 Advanced Detector Research Program grants.

  14. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Jae-Chul; Para, Adam

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  15. METHOD FOR DISSOLVING LANTHANUM FLUORIDE CARRIER FOR PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Koshland, D.E. Jr.; Willard, J.E.

    1961-08-01

    A method is described for dissolving lanthanum fluoride precipitates which is applicable to lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitation processes for recovery of plutonium values from aqueous solutions. The lanthanum fluoride precipitate is contacted with an aqueous acidic solution containing dissolved zirconium in the tetravalent oxidation state. The presence of the zirconium increases the lanthanum fluoride dissolved and makes any tetravalent plutonium present more readily oxidizable to the hexavalent state. (AEC)

  16. Nanostructured Lanthanum Halides and CeBr3 for Nuclear Radiation and Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Guss, Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Ron Guise, Ding Yuan

    2010-06-09

    Scintillator materials are used to detect, and in some cases identify, gamma rays. Higher performance scintillators are expensive, hard to manufacture, fragile, and sometimes require liquid nitrogen or cooling engines. But whereas lower-quality scintillators are cheap, easy to manufacture, and more rugged, their performance is lower. At issue: can the desirable qualities of high-and low-performance scintillators be combined to achieve better performance at lower cost? Preliminary experiments show that a LaF{sub 3}:Ce oleic acid-based nanocomposite exhibits a photopeak when exposed to {sup 137}Cs source gamma-radiation. The chemical synthesis of the cerium-doped lanthanum halide nanoparticles are scalable and large quantities of material can be produced at a time, unlike typical crystal growth processes such as the Bridgeman process. Using a polymer composite (Figure 1), produced by LANL, initial measurements of the unloaded and 8% LaF{sub 3}:Ce-loaded sample have been made using {sup 137}Cs sources. Figure 2 shows an energy spectrum acquired for CeF{sub 3}. The lighter plot is the measured polymer-only spectrum and the black plot is the spectrum from the nanocomposite scintillator. As the development of this material continues, the energy resolution is expected to improve and the photopeak-to-Compton ratio will become greater at higher loadings. These measurements show the expected Compton edge in the polymer-only sample, and the Compton edge and photo-peak expected in the nanophosphor composites that LANL has produced. Using a porous VYCORR with CdSe/ZnS core shell quantum dots, Letant has demonstrated that he has obtained signatures of the 241Am photopeak with energy resolution as good at NaI (Figure 3). We begin with the fact that CeBr{sub 3} crystals do not have a self-activity component as strong as the lanthanum halides. The radioactive 0.090% {sup 138}La component of lanthanum leads to significant self-activity, which will be a problem for very large

  17. Recent development in organic scintillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrocks, D. L.; Wirth, H. O.

    1969-01-01

    Discussion on recent developments of organic scintillators includes studies of organic compounds that form glass-like masses which scintillate and are stable at room temperature, correlations between molecular structure of organic scintillators and self-quenching, recently developed fast scintillators, and applications of liquid-scintillation counters.

  18. Development of Lanthanum Ferrite SOFC Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steve P.; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Shelton, Jayne P.; Sprenkle, Vince L.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2003-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted concerning compositional/microstructural modifications of a Sr-doped lanthanum ferrite (LSF) cathode and protective Sm-doped ceria (SDC) layer in an anode supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Emphasis was placed on achieving enhanced low temperature (700-800 degrees C) performance, and long-term cell stability. Investigations involved manipulation of the lanthanum ferrite chemistry, addition of noble metal oxygen reduction catalysts, incorporation of active cathode layer compositions containing Co, Fe and higher Sr contents, and attempts to optimize the ceria barrier layer between the LSF cathode and YSZ electrolyte.

  19. Determination of lanthanum by flame photometric titration.

    PubMed

    Svehla, G; Slevin, P J

    1968-09-01

    The flame emission of lanthanum at 560 mmu decreases linearly with phosphate concentration until a 1:1 molar ratio is reached, and then remains practically constant. Lanthanum can be titrated with phosphate, the equivalence point being detected from the change in emission intensity. Errors due to consumption of solution by the atomizer can be kept low by using short spraying times and low galvanometer damping. The average error is about -1% for 0.1M solutions and less than -5% for 0.01M. The method gives good results in the presence of titanium(III), zirconium, thorium and aluminium but cerium(III) and yttrium seriously interfere. PMID:18960392

  20. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  1. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  2. Extruded plastic scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau, Alan D. Bross and Kerry L. Mellott

    1999-04-16

    As a way to lower the cost of plastic scintillation detectors, commercially available polystyrene pellets have been used in the production of scintillating materials that can be extruded into different profiles. The selection of the raw materials is discussed. Two techniques to add wavelength shifting dopants to polystyrene pellets and to extrude plastic scintillating strips are described. Data on light yield and transmittance measurements are presented.

  3. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-11-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Study of equatorial scintillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomalaza, J.; Woodman, R.; Tisnado, G.; Nakasone, E.

    1972-01-01

    Observations of the amplitude scintillations produced by the F-region in equatorial areas are presented. The equipment used for conducting the observations is described. The use of transmissions from the ATS-1, ATS-3, and ATS-5 for obtaining data is described. The two principal subjects discussed are: (1) correlation between satellite and incoherent radar observations of scintillations and (2) simultaneous observations of scintillations at 136 MHz and 1550 MHz.

  5. Novel method of producing nanoparticles for gadolinium-scintillator-based digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Kyu; Park, Sung Kwang; Shin, Jung Wook; Oh, Kyung Min; Heo, Seung Uk; Cho, Gyu Seok; Kim, Jin Young; Nam, Sang Hee

    2013-10-01

    Radiation image sensor properties affect the dose of radiation that patients are exposed to in a clinical setting. Numerous radiation imaging systems use scintillators as materials that absorb radiation. Rare-earth scintillators produced from elements such as gadolinium, yttrium, lutetium, and lanthanum have been investigated to improve the properties of radiation imaging systems. Although such rare-earth scintillators are manufactured with a bulk structure, they exhibit low resolution and low efficiency when they are used as conversion devices. Nanoscintillators have been proposed and researched as a possible solution to these problems. According to the research, the optical properties and size of fine scintillators are affected by the sintering temperature used to produce nanoscintillators instead of the existing bulk-structured scintillators. Therefore, the main purpose of this research is to develop radiation-imaging sensors based on nanoscintillators in order to evaluate the quantitative properties of various scintillators produced under various conditions such as sintering temperature. This is accomplished by measuring acquired phantom images, and modulation transfer functions (MTFs) for complementary-symmetry metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors under the same X-ray conditions. Low-temperature solution combustion was used to produce fine scintillators consisting of 5 wt% of europium as an activator dopant in a Gd2O3 scintillator host. Variations in the characteristics of the fine scintillators were investigated. The characteristics of fine scintillators produced at various sintering temperatures (i.e., 600, 800, or 1000 degrees C) and with a europium concentration of 0.5 wt% were also analyzed to determine the optimal conditions for synthesizing the fine scintillators. PMID:24245181

  6. Novel scintillators and silicon photomultipliers for nuclear physics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, David

    2015-06-01

    Until comparatively recently, scintillator detectors were seen as an old-fashioned tool of nuclear physics with more attention being given to areas such as gamma-ray tracking using high-purity germanium detectors. Next-generation scintillator detectors, such as lanthanum bromide, which were developed for the demands of space science and gamma- ray telescopes, are found to have strong applicability to low energy nuclear physics. Their excellent timing resolution makes them very suitable for fast timing measurements and their much improved energy resolution compared to conventional scintillators promises to open up new avenues in nuclear physics research which were presently hard to access. Such "medium-resolution" spectroscopy has broad interest across several areas of contemporary interest such as the study of nuclear giant resonances. In addition to the connections to space science, it is striking that the demands of contemporary medical imaging have strong overlap with those of experimental nuclear physics. An example is the interest in PET-MRI combined imaging which requires putting scintillator detectors in a high magnetic field environment. This has led to strong advances in the area of silicon photomultipliers, a solid-state replacement for photomultiplier tubes, which are insensitive to magnetic fields. Broad application to nuclear physics of this technology may be foreseen.

  7. Ca2+-Doped CeBr3 Scintillating Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Paul; Foster, Michael E.; Wong, Bryan M.; Doty, F. Patrick; Shah, Kanai; Squillante, Michael R.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; Hawrami, Rastgo; Tower, Josh; Yuan, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Despite the outstanding scintillation performance characteristics of cerium tribromide (CeBr3) and cerium-activated lanthanum tribromide, their commercial availability and application are limited due to the difficulties of growing large, crack-free single crystals from these fragile materials. This investigation employed aliovalent doping to increase crystal strength while maintaining the optical properties of the crystal. One divalent dopant (Ca2+) was used as a dopant to strengthen CeBr3 without negatively impacting scintillation performance. Ingots containing nominal concentrations of 1.9% of the Ca2+ dopant were grown. Preliminary scintillation measurements are presented for this aliovalently doped scintillator. Ca2+-doped CeBr3 exhibited little or no change in the peak fluorescence emission for 371 nm optical excitation for CeBr3. The structural, electronic, and optical properties of CeBr3 crystals were studied using the density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data. The energy band structures and density of states were obtained. The optical properties of CeBr3, including the dielectric function, were calculated.

  8. Kinetics and mechanisms of the base decomposition of nitrogen trichloride in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, K.; Shinness, R.W.; Margerum, D.W.

    1987-10-21

    The rate expression for the base decomposition of nitrogen trichloride is -d(NCl/sub 3/)dt = 2(k/sub 0/ + k/sub 1/(OH/sup -/) + k/sub HB/(HB)(OH/sup -/) + k/sub 2/(OH/sup -/)/sup 2/)(NCl/sub 3/), based on the stoichiometry 2NCl/sub 3/ + 6OH/sup -/ ..-->.. N/sub 2/ + 3OCl/sup -/ + 3Cl/sup -/ + 3H/sub 2/O. Values of the rate constants (25.0/sup 0/C, ..mu.. = 0.5) are 1.6 x 10/sup -6/ s/sup -1/ for k/sub 0/, 8 M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ for k/sub 1/, and 890 M/sup -2/ for k/sub 2/. The specific-basegeneral-acid-catalyzed path gives k/sub HB/ values (M/sup -2/ s/sup -1/) of 2.1 x 10/sup 3/ for H/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup -/, 7.6 x 10/sup 2/ for B(OH)/sub 3/, 65 for HCO/sub 3//sup -/, and 128 for HPO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. In the proposed mechanism Cl/sub 2/NClOH/sup -/ is a common reactive intermediate that can react with acids (H/sub 3/O/sup +/, HB and H/sub 2/O with a Broensted ..cap alpha.. value of 0.48) to form HNCl/sub 2/ and HOCl or it can react with an additional OH/sup -/ to release OCl/sup -/. The HNCl/sub 2/ so formed reacts rapidly with a second NCl/sub 3/ to give products. Kinetics data allow an equilibrium constant of 1.6 x 10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/ (25.0/sup 0/C, ..mu.. = 0.5) to be calculated for the reaction NHCl/sub 2/ + HOCl reversible NCl/sub 3/ + H/sub 2/O.

  9. Thin film scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Warren; McKinney, George; Tzolov, Marian

    2015-03-01

    Scintillating materials convert energy flux (particles or electromagnetic waves) into light with spectral characteristic matching a subsequent light detector. Commercial scintillators such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) are commonly used. These are inefficient at lower energies due to the conductive coating present on their top surface, which is needed to avoid charging. We hypothesize that nano-structured thin film scintillators will outperform the commercial scintillators at low electron energies. We have developed alternative thin film scintillators, zinc tungstate and zinc oxide, which show promise for higher sensitivity to lower energy electrons since they are inherently conductive. Zinc tungstate films exhibit photoluminescence quantum efficiency of 74%. Cathodoluminescence spectroscopy was applied in transmission and reflection geometries. The comparison between the thin films and the YAG and YAP commercial scintillators shows much higher light output from the zinc tungstate and zinc oxide at electron energies less than 5 keV. Our films were integrated in a backscattered electron detector. This detector delivers better images than an identical detector with commercial YAG scintillator at low electron energies. Dr. Nicholas Barbi from PulseTor LLC, Dr. Anura Goonewardene, NSF Grants: #0806660, #1058829, #0923047.

  10. Sorption of lanthanum ions by natural clinoptilolite tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dampilova, B. V.; Zonkhoeva, E. L.

    2013-08-01

    The equilibrium and kinetics of sorption of lanthanum ions on natural clinoptilolite tuff are studied. It is demonstrated that sorption of lanthanum ions from diluted solutions occurs in micropores of clinoptilolite, and from concentrated solutions in the mesoporous structure of tuff. The main capacity of zeolite tuff is found in the secondary porous structure. The sorption of lanthanum ions is limited by diffusion in tuff grains. Lanthanum ions are regularly distributed in the tuff phase and interact with the Brønsted centers of large clinoptilolite cavities.

  11. Adsorption of lanthanum to goethite in the presence of gluconate

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Laurence C.; Sarah Pepper; Sue Clark

    2005-05-01

    Adsorption of Lanthanum to Goethite in the Presence of Gluconic Acid L. C. HULL,1 S. E. PEPPER2 AND S. B. CLARK2 1Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (hulllc@inel.gov) 2Washington State University, Pullman, WA (spepper@wsu.edu), (s_clark@wsu.edu) Lanthanide and trivalent-actinide elements in radioactive waste can pose risks to humans and ecological systems for many years. Organic complexing agents, from natural organic matter or the degradation of waste package components, can alter the mobility of these elements. We studied the effect of gluconic acid, as an analogue for cellulose degradation products, on the adsorption of lanthanum, representing lanthanide and trivalent-actinide elments, to goethite, representing natural iron minearals and degradation products of waste packages. Batch pH adsorption edge experiments were conducted with lanthanum alone, and with lanthanum and gluconate at a 1:1 mole ratio. Lanthanum concentrations studied were 0.1, 1, and 10 mM, covering a range from 10% to 1000% of the calculated available adsorption sites on goethite. In the absence of gluconate, lanthanum was primarily present in solution as free lanthanum ion. With gluconate present, free lanthanum concentration in solution decreased with increasing pH as step-wise deprotonation of the gluconate molecule increased the fraction lanthanum complexed with gluconate. Adsorption to the goethite surface was represented with the diffuse double-layer model. The number of adsorption sites and the intrinsic binding constants for the surface complexes were estimated from the pH adsorption edge data using the computer code FITEQL 4.0. Two surface reactions were used to fit the adsorption data in the absence of gluconate. A strong binding site with no proton release and a much higher concentration of weak binding sites with release of two protons per lanthanum adsorbed. The adsorption of lanthanum was not measurably affected by the presence of gluconate

  12. Cost Reduction of Lanthanum Chromite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steve P. ); Stevenson, Jeffry W. ); Hardy, John S. ); Chick, Lawrence A. )

    2000-01-01

    Acceptor doped lanthanum chromite (LaCrO3) has long been the interconnect material of choice for high temperature SOFCs, typically operating at 1000?C. However, lanthanum chromite is relatively expensive, and many developers are currently pursuing SOFCs operating at lower temperatures. As the operating temperature is lowered, metal interconnects (e.g., ferritic steels or chromium alloys) become increasingly viable, but they have their own unique problems (including Cr-oxide formation and Cr volatilization), and it is therefore likely that uncoated metals cannot be used at temperatures greater than 700?C. For intermediate operating temperatures (700-800?C), the application of protective oxide coatings may allow the use of metal interconnects (if such coatings can be applied cost-effectively), but lanthanum chromite may offer better long-term performance. While the electrical conductivity of lanthanum chromite does decrease as temperature decreases, the conductivity at 800?C is only about 10% less than the conductivity at 1000?C. In this study, the authors have investigated the viability of replacing pure La in the acceptor doped LaCrO3 with a less expensive mixed lanthanide (Ln) precursor containing La3+ as the principle cation, but also Ce4+, Nd3+ and Pr3+ in significant proportions. Typical compositions investigated were of the formula Ln0.85Sr0.15Cr1-yMyO3, where 0.02?y?0.1 and M= Co, Cu, Ni, and V. Samples were studied with respect to sinterability in air, thermal expansion, conductivity in air and at low pO2, phase stability, and dilation under reducing atmospheres.

  13. 40 CFR 721.10601 - Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10601 Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... titanium zirconium oxide (PMN P-11-273; CAS No. 1227908-26-0) is subject to reporting under this...

  14. Ionospheric Scintillation Explorer (ISX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuliano, J.; Bahcivan, H.

    2015-12-01

    NSF has recently selected Ionospheric Scintillation Explorer (ISX), a 3U Cubesat mission to explore the three-dimensional structure of scintillation-scale ionospheric irregularities associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF). ISX is a collaborative effort between SRI International and Cal Poly. This project addresses the science question: To what distance along a flux tube does an irregularity of certain transverse-scale extend? It has been difficult to measure the magnetic field-alignment of scintillation-scale turbulent structures because of the difficulty of sampling a flux tube at multiple locations within a short time. This measurement is now possible due to the worldwide transition to DTV, which presents unique signals of opportunity for remote sensing of ionospheric irregularities from numerous vantage points. DTV spectra, in various formats, contain phase-stable, narrowband pilot carrier components that are transmitted simultaneously. A 4-channel radar receiver will simultaneously record up to 4 spatially separated transmissions from the ground. Correlations of amplitude and phase scintillation patterns corresponding to multiple points on the same flux tube will be a measure of the spatial extent of the structures along the magnetic field. A subset of geometries where two or more transmitters are aligned with the orbital path will be used to infer the temporal development of the structures. ISX has the following broad impact. Scintillation of space-based radio signals is a space weather problem that is intensively studied. ISX is a step toward a CubeSat constellation to monitor worldwide TEC variations and radio wave distortions on thousands of ionospheric paths. Furthermore, the rapid sampling along spacecraft orbits provides a unique dataset to deterministically reconstruct ionospheric irregularities at scintillation-scale resolution using diffraction radio tomography, a technique that enables prediction of scintillations at other radio frequencies, and

  15. Scintillator Measurements for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptanoglu, Tanner; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    SNO+ is a neutrino detector located 2km underground in the SNOLAB facility with the primary goal of searching for neutrinoless double beta decay. The detector will be filled with a liquid scintillator target primarily composed of linear alkyl benzene (LAB). As charged particles travel through the detector the LAB produces scintillation light which is detected by almost ten thousand PMTs. The LAB is loaded with Te130, an isotope known to undergo double beta decay. Additionally, the LAB is mixed with an additional fluor and wavelength shifter to improve the light output and shift the light to a wavelength regime in which the PMTs are maximally efficient. The precise scintillator optics drastically affect the ultimate sensitivity of SNO+. I will present work being done to measure the optical properties of the SNO+ scintillator cocktail. The measured properties are used as input to a scintillation model that allows us to extrapolate to the SNO+ scale and ultimately predict the sensitivity of the experiment. Additionally, I will present measurements done to characterize the R5912 PMT, a candidate PMT for the second phase of SNO+ that provides better light collection, improved charge resolution, and a narrower spread in timing.

  16. Scintillator plate calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Price, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Calorimetry using scintillator plates or tiles alternated with sheets of (usually heavy) passive absorber has been proven over multiple generations of collider detectors. Recent detectors including UA1, CDF, and ZEUS have shown good results from such calorimeters. The advantages offered by scintillator calorimetry for the SSC environment, in particular, are speed (<10 nsec), excellent energy resolution, low noise, and ease of achieving compensation and hence linearity. On the negative side of the ledger can be placed the historical sensitivity of plastic scintillators to radiation damage, the possibility of nonuniform response because of light attenuation, and the presence of cracks for light collection via wavelength shifting plastic (traditionally in sheet form). This approach to calorimetry is being investigated for SSC use by a collaboration of Ames Laboratory/Iowa State University, Argonne National Laboratory, Bicron Corporation, Florida State University, Louisiana State University, University of Mississippi, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, and University of Wisconsin.

  17. Rare-earth tri-halides methanol-adduct single-crystal scintillators for gamma ray and neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatner, L. A.; Wisniewski, D. J.; Neal, J. S.; Bell, Z. W.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Chakoumakos, B. C.; Custelcean, R.; Wisniewska, M.; Pena, K. E.

    2009-08-01

    Cerium activated rare-earth tri- halides represent a well-known family of high performance inorganic rare-earth scintillators - including the high-light-yield, high-energy-resolution scintillator, cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide. These hygroscopic inorganic rare-earth halides are currently grown as single crystals from the melt - either by the Bridgman or Czochralski techniques - slow and expensive processes that are frequently characterized by severe cracking of the material due to anisotropic thermal stresses and cleavage effects. We have recently discovered a new family of cerium-activated rare-earth metal organic scintillators consisting of tri-halide methanol adducts of cerium and lanthanum - namely CeCl3(CH3OH)4 and LaBr3(CH3OH)4:Ce. These methanol-adduct scintillator materials can be grown near room temperature from a methanol solution, and their high solubility is consistent with the application of the rapid solution growth methods that are currently used to grow very large single crystals of potassium dihydrogen phosphate. The structures of these new rare-earth metal-organic scintillating compounds were determined by single crystal x-ray refinements, and their scintillation response to both gamma rays and neutrons, as presented here, was characterized using different excitation sources. Tri-halide methanol-adduct crystals activated with trivalent cerium apparently represent the initial example of a solution-grown rare-earth metal-organic molecular scintillator that is applicable to gamma ray, x-ray, and fast neutron detection.

  18. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J.K.

    1992-05-05

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  19. SCINTILLATION EXPOSURE RATE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spears, W.G.

    1960-11-01

    A radiation detector for gamma and x rays is described. The detector comprises a scintillation crystal disposed between a tantalum shield and the input of a photomultiplier tube, the crystal and the shield cooperating so that their combined response to a given quantity of radiation at various energy levels is substantially constant.

  20. Boron loaded scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Zane William; Brown, Gilbert Morris; Maya, Leon; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor

    2009-10-20

    A scintillating composition for detecting neutrons and other radiation comprises a phenyl containing silicone rubber with carborane units and at least one phosphor molecule. The carbonate units can either be a carborane molecule dispersed in the rubber with the aid of a compatibilization agent or can be covalently bound to the silicone.

  1. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, James K.

    1992-01-01

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  2. Development of atomistic models to aid the design of new scintillator materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F. Patrick; Yang, Pin; Zhou, Xiao Wang

    2010-03-01

    The development of more reliable scintillator materials can significantly advance the gamma-ray detection technology. Scintillator materials such as lanthanum halides (e.g., LaBr{sub 3}, CsBr{sub 3}), elpasolites (e.g., Cs{sub 2}LiLaBr{sub 6}, Cs{sub 2}NaLaBr{sub 6}, and Cs{sub 2}LiLaI{sub 6}), and alkali halides (e.g., CsI, NaI) are extremely brittle. The fracture of the materials is often a problem causing the failure of the devices. Lanthanum halides typically have a hexagonal crystal structure. These materials have highly anisotropic thermal and mechanical properties, and therefore they are likely to fracture under cyclic thermal and mechanical loading conditions. For example, fracture of lanthanum halides is known to occur in the field. Fracture during synthesis also complicates the growth of large lanthanum halide single crystals needed for sensitive radiation detection, and accounts for the high production cost of these materials. Elpasolites can have both cubic and non-cubic crystal structures depending on the constituent elements and composition of the compounds. This provides an opportunity to design cubic elpasolites with more isotropic properties and therefore improved mechanical performances. However, the design of an optimized cubic elpasolite crystal remains elusive because there is a tremendous number of possible elpasolites and the design criterion for cubic crystals is not clear. Alkali halides have cubic crystal structures. Consequently, large CsI and NaI crystals have been grown and used in devices. However, these materials suffer from an aging problem, i.e., the properties decay rapidly over time especially under harsh environment. Unfortunately, the fundamental mechanisms of this aging have not been understood and the path to improve the alkali halide-based scintillators is not developed. Clearly, improved scintillator materials can be achieved via strengthened/toughened lanthanum halides, optimized cubic elpasolites, or new alkali halide

  3. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder; Paul L.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  4. Scintillator requirements for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    1999-09-01

    Scintillating materials are used in a variety of medical imaging devices. This paper presents a description of four medical imaging modalities that make extensive use of scintillators: planar x-ray imaging, x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT), SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) and PET (positron emission tomography). The discussion concentrates on a description of the underlying physical principles by which the four modalities operate. The scintillator requirements for these systems are enumerated and the compromises that are made in order to maximize imaging performance utilizing existing scintillating materials are discussed, as is the potential for improving imaging performance by improving scintillator properties.

  5. Thermal stability of lanthanum scandate dielectrics on Si(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Sivasubramani, P.; Lee, T. H.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, J.; Gnade, B. E.; Wallace, R. M.; Edge, L. F.; Schlom, D. G.; Stevie, F. A.; Garcia, R.; Zhu, Z.; Griffis, D. P.

    2006-12-11

    The authors have examined the thermal stability of amorphous, molecular beam deposited lanthanum scandate dielectric thin films on top of Si (100) after a 1000 deg. C, 10 s rapid thermal anneal. After the anneal, crystallization of LaScO{sub 3} is observed. Excellent suppression of lanthanum and scandium diffusion into the substrate silicon is indicated by the back-side secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses. In contrast, front-side SIMS and high-resolution electron energy loss analyses of the amorphous Si/LaScO{sub 3}/Si (100) stack indicated the outdiffusion of lanthanum and scandium into the silicon capping layer during the anneal.

  6. Scintillator gamma-ray detectors with silicon photomultiplier readouts for high-energy astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Legere, Jason; Bancroft, Christopher; McConnell, Mark L.; Ryan, James M.; Schwadron, Nathan

    2013-09-01

    Space-based gamma-ray detectors for high-energy astronomy face strict constraints of mass, volume, and power, and must endure harsh operating environments. Scintillator materials have a long history of successful operation under these conditions, and new materials offer greatly improved performance in terms of efficiency, time response, and energy resolution. The use of scintillators in space remains constrained, however, by the mass, volume, and fragility of the associated light readout device, typically a vacuum photomultiplier tube (PMT). Recently developed silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) offer gains and efficiencies similar to those of PMTs, but with greatly reduced mass and volume, high ruggedness, and no high-voltage requirements. We have therefore been investigating the use of SiPM readouts for scintillator gamma-ray detectors, with an emphasis on their suitability for space- and balloonbased instruments for high-energy astronomy. We present our most recent results, including spectroscopy measurements for lanthanum bromide scintillators with SiPM readouts, and pulse-shape discrimination using organic scintillators with SiPM readouts. We also describe potential applications of SiPM readouts to specific highenergy astronomy instrument concepts.

  7. Application of artificial neural network in 3D imaging with lanthanum bromide calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gostojic, A.; Tatischeff, V.; Kiener, J.; Hamadache, C.; Karkour, N.; Linget, D.; Grave, X.; Gibelin, L.; Travers, B.; Blin, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2015-07-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy in the energy range from 0.1 up to 100 MeV holds many understudied questions connected with e.g. stellar nucleosynthesis, the active Sun, neutron stars and black holes. To access the physics behind, a significant improvement in detection sensitivity is needed compared to previous missions, e.g. CGRO and INTEGRAL. One of the promising concepts for a future gamma-ray mission is an Advanced Compton Telescope. Under the project of creating a prototype of such instrument, we study the perspectives of using a novel inorganic scintillator as a calorimeter part. Modern inorganic crystal or ceramics scintillators are constantly improving on qualities such as energy resolution and radiation hardness, and this makes them a smart choice for a new space-borne telescope. At CSNSM Orsay, we have assembled a detection module from a 5 × 5cm2 area and 1 cm thick, cerium-doped lanthanum (III) bromide (LaBr3:Ce) inorganic scintillator coupled to a 64 channel multi-anode photomultiplier. The readout of the PMT signals is carried out with the ASIC MAROC, used previously for the luminometer of the ATLAS detector (CERN). Characterization, thorough measurements with various radioactive sources, as well as, single photoelectron detection have been done. Furthermore, we made a comparison of measurements with a detailed GEANT4-based simulation which includes tracking of the optical photons. Finally, we have studied the 3D reconstruction of the first interaction point of incident gamma rays, utilizing a neural network algorithm. This spatial position resolution plays a crucial part in the future implementations and, together with the other measured properties, it makes our detector module very interesting for the next generation of space telescopes operating in the MeV range.

  8. Analysis of an explosion accident of nitrogen trichloride in a waste liquid containing ammonium ion and platinum black.

    PubMed

    Okada, Ken; Akiyoshi, Miyako; Ishizaki, Keiko; Sato, Hiroyasu; Matsunaga, Takehiro

    2014-08-15

    Five liters of sodium hypochlorite aqueous solution (12 mass%) was poured into 300 L of liquid waste containing ammonium ion of about 1.8 mol/L in a 500 L tank in a plant area; then, two minutes later the solution exploded with a flash on March 30th, 2005. The tank cover, the fluorescent lamp and the air duct were broken by the blast wave. Thus, we have conducted 40 runs of laboratory-scale explosion tests under various conditions (solution concentrations of (NH4)2SO4 and NaClO, temperatures, Pt catalysts, pH, etc.) to investigate the causes for such an explosion. When solutions of ammonium sulfate and sodium hypochlorite are mixed in the presence of platinum black, explosions result. This is ascribable to the formation of explosive nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). In the case where it is necessary to mix these 2 solutions (ammonium sulfate and sodium hypochlorite) in the presence of platinum black, the following conditions would reduce a probability of explosion; the initial concentration of NH4(+) should be less than 3 mol/L and the pH should be higher than 6. The hypochlorite solution (in 1/10 in volume) to be added at room temperature is recommended to be less than 0.6 mol/L. PMID:24953938

  9. Enhanced hole injection in phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes by thermally evaporating a thin indium trichloride layer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chun-Hong; Cai, Shi-Duan; Gu, Wei; Zhou, Dong-Ying; Wang, Zhao-Kui; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2012-10-24

    An ultrathin layer of indium trichloride (InCl(3)) is thermally evaporated on the indium tin oxide (ITO) anode to enhance the hole injection in simplified phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs). Comparing with the device with ultraviolet (UV)-ozone treatment, the device modified by InCl(3) exhibits a maximum current efficiency of 82.2 cd/A measured at about 2000 cd/cm(2) and 36% improvement in power efficiency measured at 20 mA/cm(2). More importantly, more than three times improvement in half lifetime estimated at an initial luminance of 1000 cd/cm(2) is achieved. The investigations using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the bias- and temperature-dependent current density-voltage characteristics in the related hole-dominated devices have revealed that the improved device performance is mainly attributed to the enhanced hole injection resulting from the lowered hole injection barrier height in the InCl(3)-modified devices. PMID:23003119

  10. Iron trichloride as oxidizer in acid slurry for chemical mechanical polishing of Ge2Sb2Te5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei-Xia; Wang, Liang-Yong; Zhang, Ze-Fang; Liu, Wei-Li; Song, Zhi-Tang

    2014-04-01

    The effect of iron trichloride (FeCl3) on chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) film is investigated in this paper. The polishing rate of GST increases from 38 nm/min to 144 nm/min when the FeCl3 concentration changes from 0.01 wt% to 0.15 wt%, which is much faster than 20 nm/min for the 1 wt% H2O2-based slurry. This polishing rate trends are inversely correlated with the contact angle data of FeCl3-based slurry on the GST film surface. Thus, it is hypothesized that the hydrophilicity of the GST film surface is associated with the polishing rate during CMP. Atomic force microscope (AFM) and optical microscope (OM) are used to characterize the surface quality after CMP. The chemical mechanism is studied by potentiodynamic measurements such as Ecorr and Icorr to analyze chemical reaction between FeCl3 and GST surface. Finally, it is verified that slurry with FeCl3 has no influence on the electrical property of the post-CMP GST film by the resistivity-temperature (RT) tests.

  11. The energetics of lanthanum tantalate materials

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, Tori Z.; Nyman, May; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2010-11-15

    Lanthanum tantalates are important refractory materials with application in photocatalysis, solid oxide fuel cells, and phosphors. Soft-chemical synthesis utilizing the Lindqvist ion, [Ta{sub 6}O{sub 19}]{sup 8-}, has yielded a new phase, La{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}. Using the hydrated phase as a starting material, a new lanthanum orthotantalate polymorph was formed by heating to 850 {sup o}C, which converts to a previously reported LaTaO{sub 4} polymorph at 1200 {sup o}C. The stabilities of La{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2} (LaTa-OH), the intermediate LaTaO{sub 4} polymorph (LaTa-850), and the high temperature phase (LaTa-1200) were investigated using high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The enthalpy of formation from the oxides were calculated from the enthalpies of drop solution to be -87.1{+-}9.6, -94.9{+-}8.8, and -93.1{+-}8.7 kJ/mol for LaTa-OH, LaTa-850, and LaTa-1200, respectively. These results indicate that the intermediate phase, LaTa-850, is the most stable. This pattern of energetics may be related to cation-cation repulsion of the tantalate cations. We also investigated possible LnTaO{sub 4} and Ln{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2} analogues of Ln=Pr, Nd to examine the relationship between cation size and the resulting phases. - Graphical abstract: The energetics of three lanthanum tantalates were investigated by the high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The enthalpies of formation from the oxides were calculated from the enthalpies of drop solution to be -87.1{+-}9.6, -94.9{+-}8.8, and -93.1{+-}8.7 kJ/mol for La{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}, LaTaO{sub 4} (850 {sup o}C), and LaTaO{sub 4} (1200 {sup o}C), respectively. These results indicate that the intermediate phase, LaTaO{sub 4} (850 {sup o}C), is the most stable in energy. Display Omitted

  12. Scintillation and Luminescence Properties of Undoped and Cerium-doped LiGdCl4 and NaGdCl4

    SciTech Connect

    Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.; Bizarri, Gregory; Weber, Marvin J.; Derenzo, Stephen E.

    2008-10-05

    We report the scintillation properties of the undoped and cerium-doped variations of LiGdCl4 and NaGdCl4. Powder samples of these materials exhibit significant scintillation under X-rays. The samples were synthesized by solid-state methods from a 1:1 molar ratio of lithium or sodium chloride and gadolinium chloride. Cerium trichloride was used as the dopant. The physical, optical, and scintillation properties of these materials were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, X-ray excited luminescence, and pulsed X-ray luminosity measurements. Increases in light yields are observed as the concentration of cerium increases. The highest light yields occurred at 20 percent cerium doping for both compounds. At larger concentrations neither compound formed, indicating a breakdown of the lattice with the addition of large amounts of cerium cations. At 20 percent cerium, LiGdCl4 and NaGdCl4 display scintillation light 3.6 times and 2.2 times the light yield of the reference material, YAlO3:Ce3+, respectively. Both emit in the ranges of 340 ? 350 nm and 365 - 370 nm and display multiexponential decays with cerium-like decay components at 33 ns (LiGdCl4:Ce) and 26 ns (NaGdCl4:Ce).

  13. Diminiode thermionic energy conversion with lanthanum-hexaboride electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroeger, E. W.; Bair, V. L.; Morris, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Thermionic conversion data obtained from a variable gap cesium diminiode with a hot pressed, sintered lanthanum hexaboride emitter and an arc melted lanthanum hexaboride collector are presented. Performance curves cover a range of temperatures: emitter 1500 to 1700 K, collector 750 to 1000 K, and cesium reservoir 370 to 510 K. Calculated values of emitter and collector work functions and barrier index are also given.

  14. Diminiode thermionic energy conversion with lanthanum-hexaboride electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroeger, E. W.; Bair, V. L.; Morris, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents thermionic-conversion data obtained from a variable-gap cesium diminiode with a hot-pressed, sintered lanthanum-hexaboride emitter and an arc-melted lanthanum-hexaboride collector. Performance curves cover a range of temperatures: emitter 1500 to 1700 K, collector 750 to 1000 K, and cesium reservoir 370 to 510 K. Calculated values of emitter and collector work functions and barrier index are also given.

  15. Laser glazing of lanthanum magnesium hexaaluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Wang, Yaomin; Jarligo, Maria Ophelia; Zhong, Xinghua; Li, Qin; Cao, Xueqiang

    2008-08-01

    Lanthanum magnesium hexaalumminate (LMA) is an important candidate for thermal barrier coatings due to its thermal stability and low thermal conductivity. On the other hand, laser glazing method can potentially make thermal barrier coatings impermeable, resistant to corrosion on the surface and porous at bulk. LMA powder was synthesized at 1600 °C by solid-state reaction, pressed into tablet and laser glazed with a 5-kW continuous wave CO2 laser. Dendritic structures were observed on the surface of the laser-glazed specimen. The thicker the tablet, the easier the sample cracks. Cracking during laser glazing is attributed to the low thermal expansion coefficient and large thickness of the sample.

  16. Sintering aid for lanthanum chromite refractories

    DOEpatents

    Flandermeyer, Brian K.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Dusek, Joseph T.; Anderson, Harlan U.

    1988-01-01

    An electronically conductive interconnect layer for use in a fuel cell or other electrolytic device is formed with sintering additives to permit densification in a monolithic structure with the electrode materials. Additions including an oxide of boron and a eutectic forming composition of Group 2A metal fluorides with Group 3B metal fluorides and Group 2A metal oxides with Group 6B metal oxides lower the required firing temperature of lanthanum chromite to permit densification to in excess of 94% of theoretical density without degradation of electrode material lamina. The monolithic structure is formed by tape casting thin layers of electrode, interconnect and electrolyte materials and sintering the green lamina together under common densification conditions.

  17. Lanthanum sulfides as high temperature thermoelectric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Matsuda, S.; Raag, V.

    1984-01-01

    Thermoelectric property measurements have been made for the nonstoichiometric lanthanum sulfides, LaS(R) with R in the range 1.33-1.50. The Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivities increase with temperature from 200 to 1100 C. Power factors (defined as Seebeck coefficient squared divided by electrical resistivity) generally increase both as the temperature is increased and as the compound composition is varied from LaS(1.48) to LaS(1.35). The power factor values combined with estimates of thermal conductivities for LaS(1.38) and LaS(1.4) yield figures of merit greater than 0.0005 at 1000 C.

  18. Phases in lanthanum-nickel-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    Lanthanum-nickel-aluminum (LANA) alloys will be used to pump, store and separate hydrogen isotopes in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF). The aluminum content (y) of the primary LaNi{sub 5}-phase is controlled to produce the desired pressure-temperature behavior for adsorption and desorption of hydrogen. However, secondary phases cause decreased capacity and some may cause undesirable retention of tritium. Twenty-three alloys purchased from Ergenics, Inc. for development of RTF processes have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) to determine the distributions and compositions of constituent phases. This memorandum reports the results of these characterization studies. Knowledge of the structural characteristics of these alloys is a useful first step in selecting materials for specific process development tests and in interpreting results of those tests. Once this information is coupled with data on hydrogen plateau pressures, retention and capacity, secondary phase limits for RTF alloys can be specified.

  19. Electrical properties of lanthanum doped barium titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Vijatovic Petrovic, M.M.; Bobic, J.D.; Ramoska, T.; Banys, J.; Stojanovic, B.D.

    2011-10-15

    Pure and lanthanum doped barium titanate (BT) ceramics were prepared by sintering pellets at 1300 deg. C for 8 h, obtained from nanopowders synthesized by the polymeric precursor method. XRD results showed formation of a tetragonal structure. The presence of dopants changed the tetragonal structure to pseudo-cubic. The polygonal grain size was reduced up to 300 nm with addition of lanthanum as a donor dopant. Determined dielectric properties revealed that lanthanum modified BT ceramics possessed a diffused ferroelectric character in comparison with pure BT that is a classical ferroelectric material. In doped BT phase transition temperatures were shifted to lower temperatures and dielectric constant values were much higher than in pure BT. A modified Currie Weiss law was used to explore the connection between the doping level and degree of diffuseness of phase transitions. Impedance spectroscopy measurements were carried out at different temperatures in order to investigate electrical resistivity of materials and appearance of a PTCR effect. - Highlights: {yields} Pure and lanthanum doped BaTiO{sub 3} were prepared by polymeric precursors method. {yields} Change of structure from tetragonal to pseudo-cubic. {yields} Lanthanum as a donor dopant influenced on change of ferro-para phase transition. {yields} The diffuseness factor indicated the formation of diffuse ferroelectric material. {yields} Lanthanum affected on PTCR effect appearance in BT ceramics.

  20. Composite scintillator screen

    DOEpatents

    Zeman, Herbert D.

    1994-01-01

    A scintillator screen for an X-ray system includes a substrate of low-Z material and bodies of a high-Z material embedded within the substrate. By preselecting the size of the bodies embedded within the substrate, the spacial separation of the bodies and the thickness of the screen, the sensitivity of the screen to X-rays within a predetermined energy range can be predicted.

  1. SrI2 scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepy, N. J.; Sturm, B. W.; Drury, O. B.; Hurst, T. A.; Sheets, S. A.; Ahle, L. E.; Saw, C. K.; Pearson, M. A.; Payne, S. A.; Burger, A.; Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; van Loef, E. V.; Glodo, J.; Hawrami, R.; Higgins, W. M.; Shah, K. S.; Moses, W. W.

    2009-08-01

    We are working to perfect the growth of divalent Eu-doped strontium iodide single crystals and to optimize the design of SrI2(Eu)-based gamma ray spectrometers. SrI2(Eu) offers a light yield in excess of 100,000 photons/MeV and light yield proportionality surpassing that of Ce-doped lanthanum bromide. Thermal and x-ray diffraction analyses of SrI2 and EuI2 indicate an excellent match in melting and crystallographic parameters, and very modest thermal expansion anisotropy. We have demonstrated energy resolution with SrI2(4-6%Eu) of 2.6% at 662 keV and 7.6% at 60 keV with small crystals, while the resolution degrades somewhat for larger sizes. Our experiments suggest that digital techniques may be useful in improving the energy resolution in large crystals impaired by light-trapping, in which scintillation light is re-absorbed and re-emitted in large and/or highly Eu2+ -doped crystals. The light yield proportionality of SrI2(Eu) is found to be superior to that of other known scintillator materials, such as LaBr3(Ce) and NaI(Tl).

  2. New scintillator and waveshifter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, H.; Baumbaugh, B.; Gerig, A.; Marchant, J.; Reynolds, K.; Ruchti, R.; Warchol, J; Wayne, M. Hurlbut, C. Kauffman, J. Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-11-01

    Experimental applications requiring fast timing and/or high efficiency position and energy measurements typically use scintillation materials. Scintillators utilized for triggering, tracking, and calorimetry in colliding beam detectors are vulnerable to the high radiation fields associated with such experiments. We have begun an investigation of several fluorescent dyes which might lead to fast, efficient, and radiation resistant scintillators. Preliminary results of spectral analysis and efficiency are presented. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Lunar components in Lunping scintillations

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, J.R.; Lue, H.Y.; Wu, Hsi-Shu; Huang, Yinn-Nien

    1993-08-01

    The authors report on an anlysis of a 14 year data set of ionospheric scintillation data for 136 MHz signals transmitted from a Japanese satellite. They use a lunar age superposition method to analyze this data, breaking the data into blocks by seasons of the year. They observe a number of different scintillation types in the record, as well as impacts of lunar tides on the time record. They attempt to provide an origin for the different scintillation types.

  4. Statistical analysis of scintillation data

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, S.; Noonan, J.P.; Basu, S.

    1981-09-01

    The Nakagami-m distribution has traditionally been used successfully to model the probability characteristics of ionospheric scintillations at UHF. This report investigates the distribution properties of scintillation data in the L-band range. Specifically, the appropriateness of the Nakagami-m and lognormal distributions is tested. Briefly the results confirm that the Nakagami-m is appropriate for UHF but not for L-band scintillations. The lognormal provides a better fit to the distribution of L-band scintillations and is an adequate model allowing for an error of + or - 0.1 or smaller in predicted probability with a sample size of 256.

  5. A plastic scintillation counter prototype.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Etsuko; Kawano, Takao

    2015-10-01

    A new prototype device for beta-ray measurement, a plastic scintillation counter, was assembled as an alternative device to liquid scintillation counters. This device uses plastic scintillation sheets (PS sheets) as a sample applicator without the use of a liquid scintillator. The performance was evaluated using tritium labeled compounds, and good linearity was observed between the activity and net count rate. The calculated detection limit of the device was 0.01 Bq mL(-1) after 10 h measurement for 2 mL sample. PMID:26164628

  6. Synergistic efficacy of γ-radiation together with gallium trichloride and/or doxorubicin against Ehrlich carcinoma in female mice.

    PubMed

    Kandil, Eman; Aziz, Nahed Abdel

    2016-02-01

    Combining chemotherapy with radiotherapy represents a key oncology strategy for a more comprehensive attack toward cancers and improves treatment outcome for various solid tumor malignancies. The present study aims to evaluate the synergistic antitumor effect of γ-radiation together with gallium trichloride (GaCl3) and/or doxorubicin (DOX) against solid Ehrlich carcinoma (EC) in female mice. GaCl3 (300 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)) was administered by gavages daily on the seventh day after tumor inoculation, while the cytotoxic drug DOX (4 mg/kg b.w.) was administered intraperitoneally once a week. Whole-body γ-radiation was carried out at a dose 2 Gy once a week. Biochemical analysis showed that solid EC induced a significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) content with a significant decrease in the antioxidant state (glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT) activities) and depleted serum iron concentration compared to normal control. Moreover, a significant increase was observed in calcium level and caspase-3 concentrations in both serum and tumor homogenate respectively associated with a significant alteration in heart, liver, and kidney functions, as compared to control. Treatment of EC-bearing mice with GaCl3and/or DOX combined with γ-radiation exposure significantly reduced tumor volume and displayed a significant improvement in most studied markers which may indicate a synergistic effect of this combination against organ dysfunction and cellular injury. The histopathologically investigation showed that treatment of animals bearing EC with GaCl3and/or DOX with γ-radiation exposure showed shrinkage in tumor lesions and wide zones of apoptotic cells with signs of regenerations. It was concluded that the combination of GaCl3and/or DOX with γ-radiation exposure resulted in super-additive cytotoxic effects on treatment of cancer cells. PMID:26318299

  7. Studies on Ca2+-Doped CeBr3 Scintillating Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, P.; Foster, M. E.; Wong, B. M.; Doty, F. P.; Shah, K.; Squillante, M.; Glodo, J.; Yuan, D.

    2013-07-03

    Despite the outstanding scintillation performance characteristics of cerium tribromide (CeBr3) and cerium-activated lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce), their commercial availability and application is limited due to the difficulties of growing large, crack-free single crystals from these fragile materials. The objective of this investigation was to employ aliovalent doping to increase crystal strength while maintaining the optical properties of the crystal. One divalent dopant (Ca2+) was investigated as a dopant to strengthen CeBr3 without negatively impacting scintillation performance. Ingots containing nominal concentrations of 1.9% of the Ca2+ dopant were grown. Preliminary scintillation measurements are presented for this aliovalently doped scintillator. Ca2+-doped CeBr3 exhibited little or no change in the peak fluorescence emission for 371 nm optical excitation for CeBr3. The structural, electronic, and optical properties of CeBr3 crystals were investigated using the density functional theory within generalized gradient approximation. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data. The energy band structures and density of states were obtained. The optical properties of CeBr3, including the dielectric function, were calculated.

  8. Studies on Ca2+-Doped CeBr3 Scintillating Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, P.; Foster, M. E.; Wong, B. M.; Doty, F. P.; Shah, K.; Squillante, M. R.; Shirwadkar, U.; Hawrami, R.; Tower, J.; Yuan, D.

    2013-09-01

    Despite the outstanding scintillation performance characteristics of cerium tribromide (CeBr3) and cerium-activated lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce), their commercial availability and application is limited due to the difficulties of growing large, crack-free single crystals from these fragile materials. The objective of this investigation was to employ aliovalent doping to increase crystal strength while maintaining the optical properties of the crystal. One divalent dopant (Ca2+) was investigated as a dopant to strengthen CeBr3 without negatively impacting scintillation performance. Ingots containing nominal concentrations of 1.9% of the Ca2+ dopant were grown. Preliminary scintillation measurements are presented for this aliovalently doped scintillator. Ca2+-doped CeBr3 exhibited little or no change in the peak fluorescence emission for 371 nm optical excitation for CeBr3. The structural, electronic, and optical properties of CeBr3 crystals were investigated using the density functional theory within generalized gradient approximation. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data. The energy band structures and density of states were obtained. The optical properties of CeBr3, including the dielectric function, were calculated.

  9. Rare-Earth Tri-Halide Methanol-Adduct Single-Crystal Scintillators for Gamma Ray and Neutron Detection - 8/17/09

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Wisniewski, D.; Neal, John S; Bell, Zane W; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Custelcean, Radu; Wisniewska, Monika; Peña, K. E.

    2009-01-01

    Cerium activated rare-earth tri- halides represent a well-known family of high performance inorganic rare-earth scintillators - including the high-light-yield, high-energy-resolution scintillator, cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide. These hygroscopic inorganic rare-earth halides are currently grown as single crystals from the melt - either by the Bridgman or Czochralski techniques slow and expensive processes that are frequently characterized by severe cracking of the material due to anisotropic thermal stresses and cleavage effects. We have recently discovered a new family of cerium-activated rare-earth metal organic scintillators consisting of tri-halide methanol adducts of cerium and lanthanum namely CeCl3(CH3OH)4 and LaBr3(CH3OH)4:Ce. These methanol-adduct scintillator materials can be grown near room temperature from a methanol solution, and their high solubility is consistent with the application of the rapid solution growth methods that are currently used to grow very large single crystals of potassium dihydrogen phosphate. The structures of these new rare-earth metal-organic scintillating compounds were determined by single crystal x-ray refinements, and their scintillation response to both gamma rays and neutrons, as presented here, was characterized using different excitation sources. Tri-halide methanol-adduct crystals activated with trivalent cerium apparently represent the initial example of a solution-grown rare-earth metal-organic molecular scintillator that is applicable to gamma ray, x-ray, and fast neutron detection.

  10. Lithium-loaded liquid scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Kesanli, Banu; Neal, John S.

    2012-05-15

    The invention is directed to a liquid scintillating composition containing (i) one or more non-polar organic solvents; (ii) (lithium-6)-containing nanoparticles having a size of up to 10 nm and surface-capped by hydrophobic molecules; and (iii) one or more fluorophores. The invention is also directed to a liquid scintillator containing the above composition.

  11. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markley, F.; Davidson, M.; Keller, J.; Foster, G.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Harmon, J.; Biagtan, E.; Schueneman, G.; Senchishin, V.; Gustfason, H.

    1993-11-01

    The authors have demonstrated that the radiation stability of scintillators made from styrene polymer is very much improved by compounding with pentaphenyl trimethyl trisiloxane (DC 705 vacuum pump oil). The resulting scintillators are softer than desired, so they decided to make the scintillators directly from monomer where the base resin could be easily crosslinked to improve the mechanical properties. They can now demonstrate that scintillators made directly from the monomer, using both styrene and 4-methyl styrene, are also much more radiation resistant when modified with DC705 oil. In fact, they retain from 92% to 95% of their original light output after gamma irradiation to 10 Mrads in nitrogen with air annealing. When these scintillators made directly from monomer are compared with scintillators of the same composition made from polymer the latter have much higher light outputs. They commonly reach 83% while those made from monomer give only 50% to 60% relative to the reference, BC408. When oil modified scintillators using both p-terphenyl and tetra phenyl butadiene are compared with identical scintillators except that they use 3 hydroxy-flavone as the only luminophore the radiation stability is the same. However the 3HF system gives only 30% as much light as BC408 instead of 83% when both are measured with a green extended Phillips XP2081B phototube.

  12. Free liquid scintillation counting bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Packard Instrument Company announces the availability of its newly updated Bibliography of Packard Tri-Carb Liquid Scintillation Analyzers. This unique new booklet lists 628 references in which Packard Tri-Carb{reg_sign} liquid scintillation analyzers have been used in life science, environmental, nuclear power and archaeological measurements. All listings are cross-referenced by radionuclide, specific field of study and author.

  13. Development of intrinsic IPT scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.

    1989-07-31

    We report on the development of a new polystyrene based plastic scintillator. Optical absorption, fluorescence and light output measurements are presented. Preliminary results of radiation damage effects are also given and compared to the effects on a commercial plastic scintillator, NE 110. 6 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, F.; Davidson, M.; Keller, J.; Foster, G.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Harmon, J.; Biagtan, E.; Schueneman, G.; Senchishin, V.; Gustfason, H.; Rivard, M.

    1993-11-01

    The authors have demonstrated that the radiation stability of scintillators made from styrene polymer is very much improved by compounding with pentaphenyltrimethyltrisiloxane (DC 705 vacuum pump oil). The resulting scintillators are softer than desired, so they decided to make the scintillators directly from monomer where the base resin could be easily crosslinked to improve the mechanical properties. They can now demonstrate that scintillators made directly from the monomer, using both styrene and 4-methyl styrene, are also much more radiation resistant when modified with DC705 oil. In fact, they retain from 92% to 95% of their original light output after gamma irradiation to 10 Mrads in nitrogen with air annealing. When these scintillators made directly from monomer are compared with scintillators of the same composition made from polymer the latter have much higher light outputs. They commonly reach 83% while those made form monomer give only 50% to 60% relative to the reference, BC408. When oil modified scintillators using both p-terphenyl and tetraphenylbutadiene are compared with identical scintillators except that they use 3 hydroxy-flavone as the only luminophore the radiation stability is the same. However the 3HF system gives only 30% as much light as BC408 instead of 83% when both are measured with a green extended Phillips XP2081B phototube.

  15. Hybrid scintillators for neutron discrimination

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Patrick L; Cordaro, Joseph G; Anstey, Mitchell R; Morales, Alfredo M

    2015-05-12

    A composition capable of producing a unique scintillation response to neutrons and gamma rays, comprising (i) at least one surfactant; (ii) a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent; and (iii) at least one luminophore. A method including combining at least one surfactant, a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent and at least one luminophore in a scintillation cell under vacuum or an inert atmosphere.

  16. Extruding plastic scintillator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau; Alan D. Bross; Victor V. Rykalin

    2003-10-31

    An understanding of the costs involved in the production of plastic scintillators and the development of a less expensive material have become necessary with the prospects of building very large plastic scintillation detectors. Several factors contribute to the high cost of plastic scintillating sheets, but the principal reason is the labor-intensive nature of the manufacturing process. In order to significantly lower the costs, the current casting procedures had to be abandoned. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. This concept was tested and high quality extruded plastic scintillator was produced. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. This paper will discuss the characteristics of extruded plastic scintillator and its raw materials, the different manufacturing techniques and the current R&D program at Fermilab.

  17. 40 CFR 721.10370 - Phosphonic acid, p-octyl-, lanthanum (3+) salt (2:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphonic acid, p-octyl-, lanthanum... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10370 Phosphonic acid, p-octyl-, lanthanum (3+) salt... substance identified as phosphinic acid, p-octyl-, lanthanum (3+) salt (2:1) (PMN P-10-99; CAS No....

  18. 40 CFR 721.10370 - Phosphonic acid, p-octyl-, lanthanum (3+) salt (2:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphonic acid, p-octyl-, lanthanum... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10370 Phosphonic acid, p-octyl-, lanthanum (3+) salt... substance identified as phosphinic acid, p-octyl-, lanthanum (3+) salt (2:1) (PMN P-10-99; CAS No....

  19. 40 CFR 721.10370 - Phosphonic acid, p-octyl-, lanthanum (3+) salt (2:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphonic acid, p-octyl-, lanthanum... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10370 Phosphonic acid, p-octyl-, lanthanum (3+) salt... substance identified as phosphinic acid, p-octyl-, lanthanum (3+) salt (2:1) (PMN P-10-99; CAS No....

  20. Large-area lanthanum hexaboride electron emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, D.M.; Hirooka, Y.; Sketchley, T.A.

    1985-09-01

    A large-area cathode assembly which is capable of continuous, high-current electron emission is described. The cathode utilizes an indirectly heated lanthanum hexaboride (LaB/sub 6/) disk as the thermionic electron emitter. The LaB/sub 6/ cathode emits over 600 A of electrons at an average of 20 A/cm/sup 2/ continuously with no observable lifetime limits to date after about 400 h of operation in a plasma discharge. Proper clasping of the LaB/sub 6/ disk is required to avoid impurity production from chemical reactions with the holder and to provide adequate support if the disk fractures during rapid thermal cycling. Modification of the LaB/sub 6/ surface composition due to preferential sputtering of boron by hydrogen and argon ions in the plasma discharge has been observed. The surface appearance is consistent with the formation of LaB/sub 4/ as a result of boron depletion. The electron emission capability of the cathode is not significantly altered by the surface change. This surface modification by preferential sputtering is not observed in hollow cathodes where the ion energy from the cathode sheath voltage is typically less than 50 V. The electron emission by the cathode has not been affected by exposure to both air and water during operation. Utilizing thick disks of this intermediate temperature cathode material results in reliable, high-current, long-lifetime electron emitter assemblies.

  1. Phosphate adsorption on lanthanum loaded biochar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Dekui; Shen, Fei; Li, Tianyu

    2016-05-01

    To attain a low-cost and high-efficient phosphate adsorbent, lanthanum (La) loaded biochar (La-BC) prepared by a chemical precipitation method was developed. La-BC and its pristine biochar (CK-BC) were comparatively characterized using zeta potential, BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The adsorption ability and the mechanisms during adsorption process for the La-BC samples were also investigated. La loaded on the surface of biochar can be termed as La-composites (such as LaOOH, LaONO3 and La(OH)3), leading to the decrease of negative charge and surface area of biochar. La-BC exhibited the high adsorption capacity to phosphate compared to CK-BC. Adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies showed that the Langmuir isotherm and second order model could well describe the adsorption process of La-BC, indicating that the adsorption was dominated by a homogeneous and chemical process. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity was as high as 46.37 mg g(-1) (computed in P). Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. SEM, XRD, XPS and FT-IR analysis suggested that the multi-adsorption mechanisms including precipitation, ligand exchange and complexation interactions can be evidenced during the phosphate adsorption process by La-composites in La-BC. PMID:26871732

  2. Toward laser cooling of negative lanthanum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Elena; Cerchiari, Giovanni; Erlewein, Stefan; Kellerbauer, Alban; UNIC Team

    2016-05-01

    Anion laser cooling holds the potential to allow the production of ultracold ensembles of any negatively charged species by sympathetic cooling. It is a promising technique for cooling of antiprotons to a few mK and could clear the way for precision measurements on cold antihydrogen. Laser cooling of negative ions has never been achieved, since most species have no bound-bound electric dipole transitions. Negative lanthanum (La-) is one of the few anions with multiple electric dipole transitions. The bound-bound transition from the 3F2e ground state to the 3D1o excited state in La- has been proposed theoretically as a candidate for laser cooling. The potential laser cooling transition was identified using laser photodetachment spectroscopy and its excitation energy was measured. We have studied the aforementioned transition in a beam of La anions by high-resolution laser photodetachment spectroscopy. Seven of the nine expected hyperfine structure transitions have been resolved and the transition cross sections have been estimated from experimental observations. It was found that presently La- is the most promising candidate among the atomic anions. We plan to demonstrate the first direct laser cooling of negative ions in a linear radio frequency trap. We gratefully acknowledge support from the European Research Council (ERC).

  3. Mechanical properties of lanthanum and yttrium chromites

    SciTech Connect

    Paulik, S.W.; Armstrong, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    In an operating high-temperature (1000{degrees}C) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the interconnect separates the fuel (P(O{sub 2}){approx}10{sup -16} atm) and the oxidant (P(O2){approx}10{sup 0.2} atm), while being electrically conductive and connecting the cells in series. Such severe atmospheric and thermal demands greatly reduce the number of viable candidate materials. Only two materials, acceptor substituted lanthanum chromite and yttrium chromite, meet these severe requirements. In acceptor substituted chromites (Sr{sup 2+} or Ca{sup 2+} for La{sup 3+}), charge compensation is primarily electronic in oxidizing conditions (through the formation of Cr{sup 4+}). Under reducing conditions, ionic charge compensation becomes significant as the lattice becomes oxygen deficient. The formation of oxygen vacancies is accompanied by the reduction of Cr{sup 4+} ions to Cr{sup 3+} and a resultant lattice expansion. The lattice expansion observed in large chemical potential gradients is not desirable and has been found to result in greatly reduced mechanical strength.

  4. First Principle Quantum Description of the Energetics Associated with LaBr3, LaC13, and Ce Doped Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Michael E. McIlwain; Nick Thompson; Da Gao

    2008-03-01

    Considerable interest is given to the excellent scintillation properties of cerium doped lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) and lanthanum bromide (LaBr3). The scintillation efficiencies are much greater than other materials, even those containing cerium. This high efficiency is attributed to the high mobility of electrons and holes, unique placement of the cerium 5d states within the band gap, and energy of the band gap. To better understand the scintillation process and better define the nature of the Self Trapped Exciton (STE) within these unique scintillation materials, density functional theory (DFT), and Ab-inito (HF-MP2) calculations are reported. DFT calculations have yielded a qualitative description of the orbital composition and energy distribution of the band structure in the crystalline material. MP2 and single configuration interaction calculations have provided quantitative values for the band gap and provided energies for the possible range of excited states created following hole and electron creation. Based on this theoretical treatment, one possible description of the STE is the combination of Vk center (Br2-1) and LaBr+1 species that recombine to form a distorted geometry LaBr3* (triplet state). Depending on the distance between the LaBr and Br2, the STE emission band can be reproduced.

  5. First Principle Quantum Description of the Energetics Associated with LaBr3, LaCl3, and Ce Doped Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Michael E. McIlwain; Da Gao; Nick Thompson

    2007-12-01

    Considerable interest is given to the excellent scintillation properties of cerium doped lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) and lanthanum bromide (LaBr3). The scintillation efficiencies are much greater than other materials, even those containing cerium. This high efficiency is attributed to the high mobility of electrons and holes, unique placement of the cerium 5d states within the band gap, and energy of the band gap. To better understand the scintillation process and better define the nature of the Self Trapped Exciton (STE) within these unique scintillation materials, density functional theory (DFT), and Ab-inito (HF-MP2) calculations are reported. DFT calculations have yielded a qualitative description of the orbital composition and energy distribution of the band structure in the crystalline material. MP2 and single configuration interaction calculations have provided quantitative values for the band gap and provided energies for the possible range of excited states created following hole and electron creation. Based on this theoretical treatment, one possible description of the STE is the combination of Vk center (Br2-1) and LaBr+1 species that recombine to form a distorted geometry LaBr3* (triplet state). Depending on the distance between the LaBr and Br2, the STE emission band can be reproduced.

  6. Calcium and lanthanum solid base catalysts for transesterification

    DOEpatents

    Ng, K. Y. Simon; Yan, Shuli; Salley, Steven O.

    2015-07-28

    In one aspect, a heterogeneous catalyst comprises calcium hydroxide and lanthanum hydroxide, wherein the catalyst has a specific surface area of more than about 10 m.sup.2/g. In another aspect, a heterogeneous catalyst comprises a calcium compound and a lanthanum compound, wherein the catalyst has a specific surface area of more than about 10 m.sup.2/g, and a total basicity of about 13.6 mmol/g. In further another aspect, a heterogeneous catalyst comprises calcium oxide and lanthanum oxide, wherein the catalyst has a specific surface area of more than about 10 m.sup.2/g. In still another aspect, a process for preparing a catalyst comprises introducing a base precipitant, a neutral precipitant, and an acid precipitant to a solution comprising a first metal ion and a second metal ion to form a precipitate. The process further comprises calcining the precipitate to provide the catalyst.

  7. Thermoelectric properties of non-stoichiometric lanthanum sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, E.; Danielson, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    The lanthanum sulfides are promising candidate materials for high-efficiency thermoelectric applications at temperatures up to 1300 C. The non-stoichiometric lanthanum sulfides (LaS(x), where x is in the range 1.33-1.50) appear to possess the most favorable thermoelectric properties. The Seebeck coefficient and resistivity vary significantly with composition, so that an optimum value of alpha sq/rho (where alpha is the Seebeck coefficient and rho is the resistivity) can be chosen. The thermal conductivity remains approximately constant with stoichiometry, so a material with an optimum value of alpha sq/rho should possess the optimum figure-of-merit. Data for the Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity of non-stoichiometric lanthanum sulfides will be pressed, together with structural properties of these materials.

  8. Lanthanum Carbonate for Hyperphosphatemia in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Michiya; Ohashi, Hiroshige; Oda, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Haruko; Okada, Miho; Nagaya, Mayu; Izumi, Kumiko; Ito, Hitomi; Katoh, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Background: The efficacy of the phosphate binder lanthanum carbonate has been demonstrated for hemodialysis patients, but no studies have focused on patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). We evaluated whether lanthanum carbonate could control phosphate levels in patients on CAPD. ♦ Methods: In this 48-week open-label prospective study, 28 patients on CAPD with a phosphate level of 6 mg/dL or greater were given lanthanum carbonate titrated from 750 mg to 2250 mg daily to achieve a target serum phosphate level of less than 6 mg/dL. The primary efficacy endpoint was reduction of serum phosphate to less than 6 mg/dL. Serum levels of calcium and parathyroid hormone were also evaluated, as were the Ca×P product and adverse effects. ♦ Results: From week 4 to the end of the study at week 48, we observed a significant reduction of serum phosphate to 5.25 ± 0.97 mg/dL from 6.88 ± 1.06 mg/dL at study start (p < 0.01). At the end of the study, 78.6% of participants had achieved the target of less than 6 mg/dL. Because no change of serum calcium occurred, the Ca×P product declined significantly during the study. Intact parathyroid hormone declined gradually over the study period, but the change had not reached significance at the end of the study (p = 0.11). The mean final dose of lanthanum carbonate was 946 mg daily. The only adverse effect reported was mild nausea in 1 patient. ♦ Conclusions: Lanthanum carbonate is an effective phosphate binder that can control serum phosphate and Ca×P product in CAPD patients with hyperphosphatemia. Lanthanum carbonate was well tolerated in our population. PMID:23209037

  9. Phosphinate chemistry in the 21st century: a viable alternative to the use of phosphorus trichloride in organophosphorus synthesis.

    PubMed

    Montchamp, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-21

    Organophosphorus compounds are important in everyday applications ranging from agriculture to medicine and are used in flame retardants and other materials. Although organophosphorus chemistry is known as a mature and specialized area, researchers would like to develop new methods for synthesizing organophosphorus compounds to improve the safety and sustainability of these chemical processes. The vast majority of compounds that contain a phosphorus-carbon bond are manufactured using phosphorus trichloride (PCl3) as an intermediate. However, these reactions require chlorine, and researchers would like to avoid the use of PCl3 and develop safer chemistry that also decreases energy consumption and minimizes waste. Researchers have already proposed and discussed two primary strategies based on elemental phosphorus (P4 or Pred) or on phosphine (PH3) as alternatives to PCl3. However, phosphinates, an important class of phosphorus compounds defined as any compound with a phosphorus atom attached to two oxygens, R(1)R(2)P(O)(OR) (R(1)/R(2) = hydrogen/carbon), offer another option. This Account discusses the previously neglected potential of these phosphinates as replacements of PCl3 for the preparation of organophosphorus compounds. Because of their strong reductive properties, industry currently uses the simplest members of this class of compounds, hypophosphites, for one major application: electroless plating. In comparison with other proposed PCl3 surrogates, hypophosphorous derivatives can offer improved stability, lower toxicity, higher solubility, and increased atom economy. When their reducing power is harnessed to form phosphorus-carbon or phosphorus-oxygen bonds, these compounds are also rich and versatile precursors to organophosphorus compounds. This Account examines the use of transition metal-catalyzed reactions such as cross-coupling and hydrophosphinylation for phosphorus-carbon bond formation. Because the most important industrial organophosphorus compounds

  10. Changes in serum pneumoproteins caused by short-term exposures to nitrogen trichloride in indoor chlorinated swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Carbonnelle, Sylviane; Francaux, Marc; Doyle, Ian; Dumont, Xavier; de Burbure, Claire; Morel, Georges; Michel, Olivier; Bernard, Alfred

    2002-01-01

    Nitrogen trichloride (NCl(3)) is an irritant gas released in the air of indoor pools sanitized with chlorine-based disinfectants. In the present study we investigated the effects of NCl(3) on the pulmonary epithelium of pool attendees by measuring the leakage into serum of three lung-specific proteins (pneumoproteins): the alveolar surfactant-associated proteins A and B (SP-A and SP-B) and the bronchiolar 16 kDa Clara cell protein (CC16). These pneumoproteins were measured in the serum of 29 recreational swimmers (16 children and 13 adults) before and after attending a chlorinated pool with a mean NCl(3) concentration of 490 microg m(-3). Pneumoprotein changes in serum were also studied in 14 trained swimmers performing an intensive 45 min standardized swimming session in a chlorinated pool (mean NCl(3) concentration of 355 microg m(-3)) and for the purposes of comparison in a non-chlorinated pool sanitized by the copper/silver method. Serum CC16 was not increased in recreational swimmers, but in trained swimmers serum levels of this protein peaked immediately after strenuous exercise, both in the copper/silver pool and in the chlorinated pool. This acute increase in airway permeability is probably the consequence of the mechanical stress on the epithelial barrier caused by overinflation and/or hyperventilation during intense exercise. Serum levels of SP-A and SP-B were unaffected by strenuous exercise in the copper/silver pool. The two proteins were, however, significantly increased in a time-dependent manner in recreational and trained swimmers attending the chlorinated pool. The intravascular leakage of SP-A and SP-B was already statistically significant after only 1 h of exposure to pool air without exercising and remained elevated for 12 h after. These changes were not associated with decrements in lung function. The ability of NCl(3) to acutely disrupt the lung epithelium barrier was confirmed in mice using serum CC16 and plasma proteins in bronchoalveolar

  11. Synthesis and characterization of lanthanum doped zinc oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vinod; Sonia, Suman, Kumar, Sacheen; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-05-01

    La doped ZnO (Zn1-xLaxO, x = 0, 3, 6 and 9) were prepared via chemical co-precipitation method using Zinc Acetate, Lanthanum Acetate and Sodium Hydroxide at 50°C. Hydrate nanoparticles were annealed in air at 300°C for 3 hours. The synthesized samples have been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and UV-Visiblespectrophotometer. The XRD measurement revealsthat the prepared nanoparticles have different microstructure without changing a hexagonal wurtzite structure. The result shows the change in nanoparticles size with the increment of lanthanum concentration for lower concentration for x = 0 to 6 and decreases at x = 9.

  12. Enhancement of Superconductivity of Lanthanum and Yttrium Sesquicarbide

    DOEpatents

    Krupka, M. C.; Giorgi, A. L.; Krikorian, N. H.; Szklarz, E. G.

    1972-06-22

    A method of enhancing the superconductivity of body-centered cubic lanthanum and yttrium sesquicarbide through formation of the sesquicarbides from ternary alloys of novel composition (N/sub x/M/sub 1-x/)C/sub z/, where N is yttrium or lanthanum, M is thorium, any of the Group IV and VI transition metals, or gold, germanium or silicon, and z is approximately 1.2 to 1.6. These ternary sesquicarbides have superconducting transition temperatures as high as 17.0/sup 0/K.

  13. Enhancement of superconductivity of lanthanum and yttrium sesquicarbide

    DOEpatents

    Krupka, M.C.; Giorgi, A.L.; Krikorian, N.H.; Szklarz, E.G.

    1971-06-22

    A method of enhancing the superconductivity of body-centered cubic lanthanum and yttrium sesquicarbide through formation of the sesquicarbides from ternary alloys of novel composition (N/sub x/M/sub 1-x/)C/sub z/, where N is yttrium or lanthanum, M is thorium, any of the Group IV and VI transition metals, or gold, germanium or silicon, and z is approximately 1.2 to 1.6. These ternary sesquicarbides have superconducting transition temperatures as high as 17.0/sup 0/K.

  14. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM FROM LANTHANUM BY CHELATION-EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    James, R.A.; Thompson, S.G.

    1958-12-01

    Plutonium can be separated from a mixture of plutonlum and lanthanum in which the lanthanum to plutonium molal ratio ls at least five by adding the ammonium salt of N-nitrosoarylhydroxylamine to an aqueous solution having a pH between about 3 and 0.2 and containing the plutonium in a valence state of at least +3, to form a plutonium chelate compound of N-nitrosoarylhydroxylamine. The plutonium chelate compound may be recovered from the solution by extracting with an immiscible organic solvent such as chloroform.

  15. Effects of lanthanum in cellular systems. A review.

    PubMed

    Das, T; Sharma, A; Talukder, G

    1988-12-01

    Lanthanum belongs to the group of elements known as "lanthanons," which also includes cerium, europium, promethium, and thulium. It is the most electropositive element of the rare earth group, is uniformly trivalent, and is similar in its chemical properties to the alkaline earth elements. The effects of this element and its compounds on cellular systems are of considerable interest because of their increasing use in industry and as a substitute or antagonist for calcium in a variety of cellular reactions. Lanthanum is also being employed extensively in studying anatomical barriers, membrane structure, and subcellular transport systems, particularly the calcium pathway. PMID:2484565

  16. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Seagraves, David T.

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  17. Ionospheric scintillation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rino, C. L.; Freemouw, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The diffracted field of a monochromatic plane wave was characterized by two complex correlation functions. For a Gaussian complex field, these quantities suffice to completely define the statistics of the field. Thus, one can in principle calculate the statistics of any measurable quantity in terms of the model parameters. The best data fits were achieved for intensity statistics derived under the Gaussian statistics hypothesis. The signal structure that achieved the best fit was nearly invariant with scintillation level and irregularity source (ionosphere or solar wind). It was characterized by the fact that more than 80% of the scattered signal power is in phase quadrature with the undeviated or coherent signal component. Thus, the Gaussian-statistics hypothesis is both convenient and accurate for channel modeling work.

  18. Properties of scintillator solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Fluornoy, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    This special report summarizes measurements of the spectroscopic and other properties of the solutes that were used in the preparation of several new liquid scintillators developed at EG and G/Energy Measurements/Santa Barbara Operations (the precursor to Bechtel Nevada/Special Technologies Laboratory) on the radiation-to-light converter program. The data on the individual compounds are presented in a form similar to that used by Prof. Isadore Berlman in his classic handbook of fluorescence spectra. The temporal properties and relative efficiencies of the new scintillators are presented in Table 1, and the efficiencies as a function of wavelength are presented graphically in Figure 1. In addition, there is a descriptive glossary of the abbreviations used herein. Figure 2 illustrates the basic structures of some of the compounds and of the four solvents reported in this summary. The emission spectra generally exhibit more structure than the absorption spectra, with the result that the peak emission wavelength for a given compound may lie several nm away from the wavelength, {lambda}{sub avg}, at the geometric center of the emission spectrum. Therefore, the author has chosen to list absorption peaks, {lambda}{sub max}, and emission {lambda}{sub avg} values in Figures 3--30, as being most illustrative of the differences between the compounds. The compounds, BHTP, BTPB, ADBT, and DPTPB were all developed on this program. P-terphenyl, PBD, and TPB are commercially available blue emitters. C-480 and the other longer-wavelength emitters are laser dyes available commercially from Exciton Corporation. 1 ref., 30 figs.

  19. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  20. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, Tom; Spector, Garry B.

    1994-01-01

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected.

  1. Photon statistics in scintillation crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Vaibhav Joga Singh

    Scintillation based gamma-ray detectors are widely used in medical imaging, high-energy physics, astronomy and national security. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors are eld-tested, relatively inexpensive, and have good detection eciency. Semi-conductor detectors are gaining popularity because of their superior capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. However, they are relatively hard to manufacture and therefore, at this time, not available in as large formats and much more expensive than scintillation gamma-ray detectors. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors consist of: a scintillator, a material that emits optical (scintillation) photons when it interacts with ionization radiation, and an optical detector that detects the emitted scintillation photons and converts them into an electrical signal. Compared to semiconductor gamma-ray detectors, scintillation gamma-ray detectors have relatively poor capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. This is in large part attributed to the "statistical limit" on the number of scintillation photons. The origin of this statistical limit is the assumption that scintillation photons are either Poisson distributed or super-Poisson distributed. This statistical limit is often dened by the Fano factor. The Fano factor of an integer-valued random process is dened as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Therefore, a Poisson process has a Fano factor of one. The classical theory of light limits the Fano factor of the number of photons to a value greater than or equal to one (Poisson case). However, the quantum theory of light allows for Fano factors to be less than one. We used two methods to look at the correlations between two detectors looking at same scintillation pulse to estimate the Fano factor of the scintillation photons. The relationship between the Fano factor and the correlation between the integral of the two signals detected was analytically derived, and the Fano factor was estimated using the measurements for SrI2:Eu, YAP

  2. About NICADD extruded scintillating strips

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Chakraborty, D.; Francis, K.; Kubik, D.; Lima, J.G.; Rykalin, V.; Zutshi, v.; Baldina, E.; Bross, A.; Deering, P.; Nebel, T.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Schellpfeffer, J.; Serritella, C.; Zimmerman, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    The results of control measurements of extruded scintillating strip responses to a radioactive source Sr-90 are provided, and details of strip choice, preparation, and method of measurement are included. About four hundred one meter long extruded scintillating strips were measured at four different points. These results were essential for prototyping a tail catcher and muon tracker for a future international electron positron linear collider detector.

  3. Three-dimensional SPECT imaging with LaBr3:Ce scintillator for characterization of nuclear waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tushar; Ratheesh, Jilju; Sinha, Amar

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of nuclear waste in terms of radioactivity distribution is important not only for their safe disposal but also for nuclear material accounting. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) provides a non-invasive technique for the characterization and activity distribution of the gamma-emitting sources in a matrix. Sodium iodide scintillators, which are most commonly used, suffer from poor energy resolution and do not provide accurate peak discrimination for radioisotopes like 239Pu which have overlapping peaks. Cerium-activated lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillators have better energy resolution and provide better peak discrimination. In this paper, experimental studies using LaBr3:Ce for 3D SPECT imaging of dummy waste drum has been discussed. The reconstruction has been done using the Filtered Backprojection scheme with attenuation compensation based on Novikov's inversion formula.

  4. Discovery of cesium, lanthanum, praseodymium and promethium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    May, E.; Thoennessen, M.

    2012-09-15

    Currently, forty-one cesium, thirty-five lanthanum, thirty-two praseodymium, and thirty-one promethium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  5. Ab initio energetics of lanthanum substitution in ferroelectric bismuth titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, S. H.; Bristowe, P. D.

    2011-04-01

    Using first principles calculations and atomistic thermodynamics the bulk and defect properties of orthorhombic bismuth titanate (Bi4Ti3O12) and bismuth lanthanum titanate (Bi3.25La0.75Ti3O12) have been investigated. Heats of formation, valid chemical conditions for synthesis, lanthanum substitution energies and oxygen and bismuth vacancy formation energies have been computed. The study improves our understanding of how native point defects and substitutional impurities influence the ferroelectric properties of these layered perovskite materials. It is found that lanthanum incorporation could occur on either of the two distinct bismuth sites in the structure and that the effect of substitution is to increase the formation energy of nearby native oxygen vacancies. The results provide direct atomistic evidence over a range of chemical conditions supporting the suggestion that lanthanum incorporation reduces the oxygen vacancy concentration. Oxygen vacancies contribute to ferroelectric fatigue by interacting strongly with domain walls, and therefore a decrease in their concentration is beneficial. The conditions that favor the greatest reduction in oxygen vacancy concentration are described.

  6. Ionospheric Scintillation Effects on GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Smithtro, C.; Groves, K.

    2007-12-01

    . Ionospheric scintillation of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals threatens navigation and military operations by degrading performance or making GPS unavailable. Scintillation is particularly active, although not limited to, a belt encircling the earth within 20 degrees of the geomagnetic equator. As GPS applications and users increases, so does the potential for detrimental impacts from scintillation. We examined amplitude scintillation data spanning seven years from Ascension Island, U.K.; Ancon, Peru; and Antofagasta, Chile in the Atlantic/Americas longitudinal sector at as well as data from Parepare, Indonesia; Marak Parak, Malaysia; Pontianak, Indonesia; Guam; and Diego Garcia, U.K.; in the Pacific longitudinal sector. From these data, we calculate percent probability of occurrence of scintillation at various intensities described by the S4 index. Additionally, we determine Dilution of Precision at one minute resolution. We examine diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle characteristics and make spatial comparisons. In general, activity was greatest during the equinoxes and solar maximum, although scintillation at Antofagasta, Chile was higher during 1998 rather than at solar maximum.

  7. Extruded plastic scintillator including inorganic powders

    DOEpatents

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2006-06-27

    A method for producing a plastic scintillator is disclosed. A plurality of nano-sized particles and one or more dopants can be combined with a plastic material for the formation of a plastic scintillator thereof. The nano-sized particles, the dopant and the plastic material can be combined within the dry inert atmosphere of an extruder to produce a reaction that results in the formation of a plastic scintillator thereof and the deposition of energy within the plastic scintillator, such that the plastic scintillator produces light signifying the detection of a radiative element. The nano-sized particles can be treated with an inert gas prior to processing the nano-sized particles, the dopant and the plastic material utilizing the extruder. The plastic scintillator can be a neutron-sensitive scintillator, x-ray sensitive scintillator and/or a scintillator for the detection of minimum ionizing particles.

  8. Responses in sediment phosphorus and lanthanum concentrations and composition across 10 lakes following applications of lanthanum modified bentonite.

    PubMed

    Dithmer, Line; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Lürling, Miquel; Spears, Bryan M; Yasseri, Said; Lundberg, Daniel; Moore, Alanna; Jensen, Nicholai D; Reitzel, Kasper

    2016-06-15

    A combined field and laboratory scale study of 10 European lakes treated between 2006 and 2013 with a lanthanum (La) modified bentonite (LMB) to control sediment phosphorus (P) release was conducted. The study followed the responses in sediment characteristics including La and P fractions and binding forms, P adsorption capacity of discrete sediment layers, and pore water P concentrations. Lanthanum phosphate mineral phases were confirmed by solid state (31)P MAS NMR and LIII EXAFS spectroscopy. Rhabdophane (LaPO4 · nH2O) was the major phase although indications of monazite (LaPO4) formation were also reported, in the earliest treated lake. Molar ratios between La and P in the sediments were generally above 1, demonstrating excess La relative to P. Lanthanum was vertically mixed in the sediment down to a depth of 10 cm for eight of the ten lakes, and recovery of La in excess of 100% of the theoretical aerial load indicated translocation of the LMB towards the deepest areas of the lakes. Lanthanum was generally recovered from bed sediment samples following sequential chemical extraction from the HCl fraction. Soluble reactive P (SRP) release experiments on intact sediment cores indicated conditions of P retention (with the exception of two lakes) by sediments, indicating effective control of sediment P release, i.e. between two and nine years after treatment. PMID:26971297

  9. Phosphate-binding efficacy of crushed vs. chewed lanthanum carbonate in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    How, Priscilla P; Anattiwong, Prathana; Mason, Darius L; Arruda, Jose A; Lau, Alan H

    2011-01-01

    Lanthanum carbonate, a chewable noncalcium-containing phosphorus (P) binder, is useful for treating secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients who have hypercalcemia and cannot swallow whole tablets. However, some patients cannot chew tablets or prefer to crush and mix them with food. This study was conducted to determine the P-binding efficacy of crushed lanthanum and compare it with chewed lanthanum in hemodialysis (HD) patients. After a 1-week washout period, 11 hemodialysis patients (7 men, 4 women) were randomized to receive, in a crossover fashion, lanthanum 1000 mg 3 times daily chewed with meals and lanthanum 1000 mg 3 times daily crushed into a fine powder, mixed with applesauce and taken with meals, for 4 weeks each. Serum P was measured at the end of each washout (baseline) and weekly during treatment. Changes in serum P from baseline for crushed lanthanum were compared with chewed lanthanum using paired sample t test. Administration of crushed lanthanum resulted in a significant reduction in serum P from baseline (P reduction [mg/dL] for crushed lanthanum in week 1: 2.1 ± 0.4, week 2: 1.7 ± 0.5, week 3: 1.7 ± 0.5, week 4: 1.7 ± 0.4, P<0.05). No statistically significant differences were observed in serum P reduction from baseline and serum P attained during treatment with crushed when compared with chewed lanthanum. Crushed lanthanum is effective in reducing serum P and have similar P-binding efficacy to chewed lanthanum. Crushing lanthanum and mixing it with food can thus be an option for patients who are unable to chew or swallow whole tablets. PMID:21138519

  10. PMT calibration of a scintillation detector using primary scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, E. D. C.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Yahlali, N.; Pérez, J.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Camargo, M.; Cárcel, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, H.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Irastorza, I. G.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopez-March, N.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez, A.; Martínez Lema, G.; Miller, T.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Nebot Guinot, M.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Querol, M.; Renner, J.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; Dos Santos, J. M. F.; Seguí, L.; Serra, L.; Shuman, D.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R.; White, J.; Monteiro, C. M. B.

    2015-02-01

    We have studied the calibration of PMTs in scintillation detectors, inducing single electron response on the PMT from primary scintillation produced by x-ray interaction. The results agree with those obtained by the commonly used single electron response (SER) method, which uses LED light pulses to induce the PMT SER. The use of the primary scintillation for PMT calibration will be convenient in situations where the PMT is already in situ, when it becomes difficult or even impossible to apply the SER method, e.g. in commercial sealed scintillator/PMT devices. Furthermore, we have experimentally investigated the possibility of fitting the high-charge tail of the PMT SER pulse-height distribution to an exponential function, inferring the PMT gain from the inverse of the exponent. The results of the exponential fit method agree with those obtained by the SER method for pulse-height distributions resulting from an average number of around 1.0 photoelectrons reaching the first dynode per light/scintillation pulse. The SER method has higher precision and, therefore, is used in a larger number of applications. Nevertheless, the exponential fit method will be useful in situations where the single photoelectron peak is under the background or noise peak and it may present an alternative, simple way, for relative gain calibration of PMT arrays as well as for monitoring the PMT gain variations.

  11. FNAL-NICADD extruded scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Bross, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Rykalin, V.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2005-09-01

    The possibility to produce a scintillator that satisfies the demands of physicists from different science areas has emerged with the installation of an extrusion line at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The extruder is the product of the fruitful collaboration between FNAL and Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development (NICADD) at Northern Illinois University (NIU). The results from the light output, light attenuation length and mechanical tolerance indicate that FNAL-NICADD scintillator is of high quality. Improvements in the extrusion die will yield better scintillator profiles and decrease the time needed for initial tuning. This paper will present the characteristics of the FNAL-NICADD scintillator based on the measurements performed. They include the response to MIPs from cosmic rays for individual extruded strips and irradiation studies where extruded samples were irradiated up to 1 Mrad. We will also discuss the results achieved with a new die design. The attractive perspective of using the extruded scintillator with MRS (Metal Resistive Semiconductor) photodetector readout will also be shown.

  12. Performance comparison of four compact room-temperature detectors – two cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor detectors, a LaCl3(Ce) scintillator, and an NaI(Tl) scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Hartwell

    2004-10-01

    The performance characteristics of four compact, room-temperature detectors – two scintillators and two semiconductor detectors – have been studied. All are commercially-available detectors. The two scintillators were a Æ13mmX13mm lanthanum chloride [LaCl3(Ce)] detector and a Æ25mmX25mm sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] detector. The two semiconductor detectors were a 10X10X3 mm3 cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector with a coplanar gridded anode and a 5X5X5 mm3 CZT detector with an extended cathode. The efficiency, resolution, and peak shape performance of these devices are compared in this work. Since LaCl3(Ce) is a relatively new commercial scintillator material, additional information on the performance of this detector is presented. Specifically, we discuss the impact of naturally-occurring radioactive 138La on the background spectra measured with this scintillator. Additionally, two of the three LaCl3(Ce) crystals that we obtained commercially were internally contaminated with an alpha particle-emitting radionuclide which we have identified as 227Ac+daughters. This contamination had a profound impact on the usefulness of these two detectors.

  13. Extensive lanthanum deposition in the gastric mucosa: the first histopathological report.

    PubMed

    Makino, Mutsuki; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Shimojo, Hisashi; Nakamura, Hironori; Nagasawa, Masaki; Kodama, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    Lanthanum carbonate is one of the new phosphate binders used for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in patients with chronic kidney disease. It is poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, forms insoluble complexes within the lumen, and prevents the absorption of dietary phosphate. A 63-year-old female with a 7-year history of peritoneal dialysis, who was treated with lanthanum carbonate for four years, underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection for intramucosal gastric cancer. Resected specimens showed massive accumulation of macrophages containing fine, granular, brown material in the lamina propria. This was confirmed as lanthanum deposition by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Although lanthanum may be poorly absorbed, increased tissue accumulation of lanthanum, particularly in the liver and bone, has been reported in animals with chronic kidney disease. This report indicates enhanced gastrointestinal absorption of lanthanum in some patients or conditions, although its clinical significance awaits further studies. PMID:25413959

  14. A simple spectrophotometric assay for micromolar amounts of lanthanum in the presence of calcium and phosphate.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gavarron, F; Brand, J G; Rabinowitz, J L

    1987-10-01

    A sensitive spectrophotometric assay for micromolar amounts of lanthanum in the presence of calcium and phosphate (as hydroxyapatite) was developed utilizing the change in absorption (at 652 nm) when the dye arsenazo III was complexed with lanthanum. Arsenazo III was used at a level of 25 microM and the solution pH was maintained at 3.1 with 0.2 M sodium acetate. Lanthanum concentrations down to 0.5 microM could be reliably assayed. Calcium ion did not complex well with arsenazo III at pH 3.1. With calcium present at 100 microM and lanthanum at 10 microM, the assay was 115 times more sensitive for lanthanum. The assay is simple, rapid, reproducible and, unlike the assay using radioactive lanthanum, can be performed at any time. PMID:3455624

  15. Investigation into Nanostructured Lanthanum Halides and CeBr{sub 3} for Nuclear Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, P., Guise, R., Mukhopadhyay, S., Yuan, D.

    2011-06-22

    This slide-show presents work on radiation detection with nanostructured lanthanum halides and CeBr{sub 3}. The goal is to extend the gamma energy response on both low and high-energy regimes by demonstrating the ability to detect low-energy x-rays and relatively high-energy activation prompt gamma rays simultaneously using the nano-structured lanthanum bromide, lanthanum fluoride, cerium bromide, or other nanocrystal material. Homogeneous and nano structure cases are compared.

  16. Radiopure Metal-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, Richard; Yeh, Minfang

    2015-03-18

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  17. Radiopure metal-loaded liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, Richard; Yeh, Minfang

    2015-08-17

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  18. Fracture-resistant lanthanide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2011-01-04

    Lanthanide halide alloys have recently enabled scintillating gamma ray spectrometers comparable to room temperature semiconductors (<3% FWHM energy resolutions at 662 keV). However brittle fracture of these materials upon cooling hinders the growth of large volume crystals. Efforts to improve the strength through non-lanthanide alloy substitution, while preserving scintillation, have been demonstrated. Isovalent alloys having nominal compositions of comprising Al, Ga, Sc, Y, and In dopants as well as aliovalent alloys comprising Ca, Sr, Zr, Hf, Zn, and Pb dopants were prepared. All of these alloys exhibit bright fluorescence under UV excitation, with varying shifts in the spectral peaks and intensities relative to pure CeBr.sub.3. Further, these alloys scintillate when coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and exposed to .sup.137Cs gamma rays.

  19. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, Stephanie A.; Chiles, Marion M.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations.

  20. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, S.A.; Chiles, M.M.

    1994-05-31

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. 10 figs.

  1. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, F.; Woods, D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Foster, G. ); Blackburn, R. )

    1992-05-01

    Substantial improvements have been made in the radiation hardness of plastic scintillators. Cylinders of scintillating materials 2.2 cm in diameter and 1 cm thick have been exposed to 10 Mrads of gamma rays at a dose rate of 1 Mrad/h in a nitrogen atmosphere. One of the formulations tested showed an immediate decrease in pulse height of only 4% and has remained stable for 12 days while annealing in air. By comparison a commercial PVT scintillator showed an immediate decrease of 58% and after 43 days of annealing in air it improved to a 14% loss. The formulated sample consisted of 70 parts by weight of Dow polystyrene, 30 pbw of pentaphenyltrimethyltrisiloxane (Dow Corning DC 705 oil), 2 pbw of p-terphenyl, 0.2 pbw of tetraphenylbutadiene, and 0.5 pbw of UVASIL299LM from Ferro.

  2. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  3. Nanoscale assembly of lanthanum silica with dense and porous interfacial structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballinger, Benjamin; Motuzas, Julius; Miller, Christopher R.; Smart, Simon; Diniz da Costa, João C.

    2015-02-01

    This work reports on the nanoscale assembly of hybrid lanthanum oxide and silica structures, which form patterns of interfacial dense and porous networks. It was found that increasing the molar ratio of lanthanum nitrate to tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in an acid catalysed sol-gel process alters the expected microporous metal oxide silica structure to a predominantly mesoporous structure above a critical lanthanum concentration. This change manifests itself by the formation of a lanthanum silicate phase, which results from the reaction of lanthanum oxide nanoparticles with the silica matrix. This process converts the microporous silica into the denser silicate phase. Above a lanthanum to silica ratio of 0.15, the combination of growth and microporous silica consumption results in the formation of nanoscale hybrid lanthanum oxides, with the inter-nano-domain spacing forming mesoporous volume. As the size of these nano-domains increases with concentration, so does the mesoporous volume. The absence of lanthanum hydroxide (La(OH)3) suggests the formation of La2O3 surrounded by lanthanum silicate.

  4. Nanoscale assembly of lanthanum silica with dense and porous interfacial structures

    PubMed Central

    Ballinger, Benjamin; Motuzas, Julius; Miller, Christopher R.; Smart, Simon; Diniz da Costa, João C.

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on the nanoscale assembly of hybrid lanthanum oxide and silica structures, which form patterns of interfacial dense and porous networks. It was found that increasing the molar ratio of lanthanum nitrate to tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in an acid catalysed sol-gel process alters the expected microporous metal oxide silica structure to a predominantly mesoporous structure above a critical lanthanum concentration. This change manifests itself by the formation of a lanthanum silicate phase, which results from the reaction of lanthanum oxide nanoparticles with the silica matrix. This process converts the microporous silica into the denser silicate phase. Above a lanthanum to silica ratio of 0.15, the combination of growth and microporous silica consumption results in the formation of nanoscale hybrid lanthanum oxides, with the inter-nano-domain spacing forming mesoporous volume. As the size of these nano-domains increases with concentration, so does the mesoporous volume. The absence of lanthanum hydroxide (La(OH)3) suggests the formation of La2O3 surrounded by lanthanum silicate. PMID:25644988

  5. Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix

    DOEpatents

    McKigney, Edward Allen; Burrell, Anthony Keiran; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cooke, David Wayne; Ott, Kevin Curtis; Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal; Del Sesto, Rico Emilio; Gilbertson, Robert David; Muenchausen, Ross Edward; McCleskey, Thomas Mark

    2010-03-16

    An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  6. Liquid scintillating fiber calorimetry prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Gui, M.; Brookes, D.; David, A.

    1995-08-01

    A full size liquid scintillating fiber spaghetti-hadronic calorimeter has been constructed and tested using cosmic rays at Texas A and M University. The purpose of this research is to find practical solutions for detectors to be used in extremely high radiation environments. The details of design and construction of this module are presented. The advantages of using liquid scintillating materials were investigated. Relevant subjects are addressed. Cosmic ray test results are compared with that of GEANT Monte Carlo simulations. Over all, they agree well with each other. The conclusion is that calorimeters utilizing this technique can be used in high radiation environments such as SSC colliding area.

  7. Magnetic fields and scintillator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.; Ronzhin, A.; Hagopian, V.

    1995-06-01

    Experimental data have shown that the light output of a scintillator depends on the magnitude of the externally applied magnetic fields, and that this variation can affect the calorimeter calibration and possibly resolution. The goal of the measurements presented here is to study the light yield of scintillators in high magnetic fields in conditions that are similar to those anticipated for the LHC CMS detector. Two independent measurements were performed, the first at Fermilab and the second at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Florida State University.

  8. Hygroscopicity Evaluation of Halide Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, M; Stand, L; Wei, H; Hobbs, C. L.; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E; Melcher, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative study of relative hygroscopicity of anhydrous halide scintillators grown at various laboratories is presented. We have developed a technique to evaluate moisture sensitivity of both raw materials and grown crystals, in which the moisture absorption rate is measured using a gravimetric analysis. Degradation of the scintillation performance was investigated by recording gamma-ray spectra and monitoring the photopeak position, count rate and energy resolution. The accompanying physical degradation of the samples exposed to ambient atmosphere was photographically recorded as well. The results were compared with ben

  9. Radiative lifetimes and transition probabilities of neutral lanthanum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Hartog, E. A.; Palmer, A. J.; Lawler, J. E.

    2015-08-01

    The radiative lifetimes of 72 odd-parity levels of neutral lanthanum are measured to ±5% accuracy using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow atomic beam. The levels range in energy from 15031 to 32140 cm-1. Branching fraction measurements using Fourier-transform spectroscopy are attempted and completed for all of the 72 levels. The branching fractions, when combined with the radiative lifetimes, yield new transition probabilities for 315 lines of the first spectrum of lanthanum (La i ). This study is part of a larger body of work on the radiative properties of rare earth neutral atoms, and is motivated by research needs in lighting science and astrophysics.

  10. High temperature stability of lanthanum silicate dielectric on Si (001)

    SciTech Connect

    Jur, J. S.; Lichtenwalner, D. J.; Kingon, A. I.

    2007-03-05

    Integration of a high-{kappa} dielectric into complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices requires thermal stability of the amorphous dielectric phase and chemical compatibility with silicon. The stability of amorphous lanthanum silicate on Si (001) is investigated by means of metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor measurements, back side secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profiling, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) after a 1000 deg. C, 10 s anneal in nitrogen ambient. Back side SIMS depth profiling of the TaN/LaSiO{sub x}/Si gate stack reveals no detectable lanthanum in the silicon substrate, and HRTEM shows stability of the amorphous LaSiO{sub x}. An effective work function near 4.0 eV is obtained for these gate stacks, making the stack design ideal for n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor device fabrication.

  11. Composite scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Stephan, Andrew Curtis [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Suree S [Knoxville, TN; Wallace, Steven A [Knoxville, TN; Rondinone, Adam J [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-28

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator having enhanced transparency for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a material having optical transparency wherein said material comprises nano-sized objects having a size in at least one dimension that is less than the wavelength of light emitted by the composite scintillator wherein the composite scintillator is designed to have selected properties suitable for a particular application.

  12. Characteristics of High Latitude Ionosphere Scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.

    2012-12-01

    As we enter a new solar maximum period, global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers, especially the ones operating in high latitude and equatorial regions, are facing an increasing threat from ionosphere scintillations. The increased solar activities, however, also offer a great opportunity to collect scintillation data to characterize scintillation signal parameters and ionosphere irregularities. While there are numerous GPS receivers deployed around the globe to monitor ionosphere scintillations, most of them are commercial receivers whose signal processing mechanisms are not designed to operate under ionosphere scintillation. As a result, they may distort scintillation signal parameters or lose lock of satellite signals under strong scintillations. Since 2008, we have established and continuously improved a unique GNSS receiver array at HAARP, Alaska. The array contains high ends commercial receivers and custom RF front ends which can be automatically triggered to collect high quality GPS and GLONASS satellite signals during controlled heating experiments and natural scintillation events. Custom designed receiver signal tracking algorithms aim to preserve true scintillation signatures are used to process the raw RF samples. Signal strength, carrier phase, and relative TEC measurements generated by the receiver array since its inception have been analyzed to characterize high latitude scintillation phenomena. Daily, seasonal, and solar events dependency of scintillation occurrence, spectral contents of scintillation activities, and plasma drifts derived from these measurements will be presented. These interesting results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our experimental data collection system in providing insightful details of ionosphere responses to active perturbations and natural disturbances.

  13. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  14. Lanthanum(III) catalysts for highly efficient and chemoselective transesterification.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Manabu; Ishihara, Kazuaki

    2013-03-11

    A facile, atom-economical, and chemoselective esterification is crucial in modern organic synthesis, particularly in the areas of pharmaceutical, polymer, and material science. However, a truly practical catalytic transesterification of carboxylic esters with various alcohols has not yet been well established, since, with many conventional catalysts, the substrates are limited to 1°- and cyclic 2°-alcohols. In sharp contrast, if we take advantage of the high catalytic activities of La(Oi-Pr)(3), La(OTf)(3), and La(NO(3))(3) as ligand-free catalysts, ligand-assisted or additive-enhanced lanthanum(III) catalysts can be highly effective acid-base combined catalysts in transesterification. A highly active dinuclear La(III) catalyst, which is prepared in situ from lanthanum(III) isopropoxide and 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethanol, is effective for the practical transesterification of methyl carboxylates, ethyl acetate, weakly reactive dimethyl carbonate, and much less-reactive methyl carbamates with 1°-, 2°-, and 3°-alcohols. As the second generation, nearly neutral "lanthanum(III) nitrate alkoxide", namely La(OR)(m)(NO(3))(3-m), has been developed. This catalyst is prepared in situ from inexpensive, stable, low-toxic lanthanum(III) nitrate hydrate and methyltrioctylphosphonium methyl carbonate, and is highly useful in the non-epimerized transesterification of α-substituted chiral carboxylic esters, even under azeotropic reflux conditions. In these practical La(III)-catalyzed transesterifications, colorless esters can be obtained in small- to large-scale synthesis without the need for inconvenient work-up or careful purification procedures. PMID:23325290

  15. Synthesis of plastic scintillation microspheres: Evaluation of scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, L. M.; Bagán, H.; Tarancón, A.; Garcia, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    The use of plastic scintillation microspheres (PSm) appear to be an alternative to liquid scintillation for the quantification of alpha and beta emitters because it does not generate mixed wastes after the measurement (organic and radioactive). In addition to routine radionuclide determinations, PSm can be used for further applications, e.g. for usage in a continuous monitoring equipment, for measurements of samples with a high salt concentration and for an extractive scintillation support which permits the separation, pre-concentration and measurement of the radionuclides without additional steps of elution and sample preparation. However, only a few manufacturers provide PSm, and the low number of regular suppliers reduces its availability and restricts the compositions and sizes available. In this article, a synthesis method based on the extraction/evaporation methodology has been developed and successfully used for the synthesis of plastic scintillation microspheres. Seven different compositions of plastic scintillation microspheres have been synthesised; PSm1 with polystyrene, PSm2 with 2,5-Diphenyloxazol(PPO), PSm3 with p-terphenyl (pT), PSm4 with PPO and 1,4-bis(5-phenyloxazol-2-yl) (POPOP), PSm5 pT and (1,4-bis [2-methylstyryl] benzene) (Bis-MSB), PSm6 with PPO, POPOP and naphthalene and PSm7 with pT, Bis-MSB and naphthalene. The synthesised plastic scintillation microspheres have been characterised in terms of their morphology, detection capabilities and alpha/beta separation capacity. The microspheres had a median diameter of approximately 130 μm. Maximum detection efficiency values were obtained for the PSm4 composition as follows 1.18% for 3H, 51.2% for 14C, 180.6% for 90Sr/90Y and 76.7% for 241Am. Values of the SQP(E) parameter were approximately 790 for PSm4 and PSm5. These values show that the synthesised PSm exhibit good scintillation properties and that the spectra are at channel numbers higher than in commercial PSm. Finally, the addition of

  16. Magnetoresistance of lanthanum manganites with activation-type conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkin, M. I. Neifeld, E. A.; Korolev, A. V.; Ugryumova, N. A.; Gudin, S. A.; Gapontseva, N. N.

    2013-05-15

    The temperature dependence of the resistivity and magnetic moment of La{sub 0.85}Ba{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.85}Sr{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} manganite single crystals in magnetic fields up to 90 kOe is investigated. Analysis of the experimental results shows that the magnetoresistance of lanthanum manganites far from the Curie temperature T{sub C} can be described quantitatively by the s-d model normally used for ferromagnets and taking into account only the exchange interaction between the spins of charge carriers and magnetic moments. These data also show that the features of lanthanum manganites responsible for colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) are manifested in a narrow temperature interval {delta}T Almost-Equal-To 20 K near T{sub C}. Our results suggest a CMR mechanism analogous to the mechanism of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) observed in Fe/Cr-type multilayers with nanometer layer thickness. The nanostratification observed in lanthanum manganites and required for GMR can be described taking into account the spread in T{sub C} in the CMR range {delta}T.

  17. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.

    2011-04-01

    We describe the R&D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O2, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed "natural" radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  18. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.; Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.

    2011-04-27

    We describe the R and D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O{sub 2}, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed ''natural'' radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  19. Boron Doped Plastic Scintillator Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahl, Adam; Chouinard-Dussault, Pascale; Pecinovsky, Cory; Potter, Andrew; Remedes, Tyler; Dorgan, John; Greife, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    This talk will describe the progress made in an interdisciplinary development project aimed at cost-effective, neutron sensitive, plastic scintillator. Colorado School of Mines researchers with backgrounds in Physics, Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering have worked on the incorporation of ^10B in plastics through extrusion. First results on transparent samples using fluorescent spectroscopy and beta excitation will be presented.

  20. Scintillating fiber ribbon --- tungsten calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.; Crisler, M.; Kross, B.; Wrbanek, J.

    1989-07-14

    We describe an ultra-high density scintillating fiber and tungsten calorimeter used as an active beam-dump for electrons. Data showing the calorimeter response to electrons with momenta between 50 and 350 GeV/c are presented. 9 figs.

  1. Scintillating lustre induced by radial fins.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kohske; Fukuda, Haruaki; Watanabe, Katsumi; Ueda, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Radial lines of Ehrenstein patterns induce illusory scintillating lustre in gray disks inserted into the central gaps (scintillating-lustre effect). We report a novel variant of this illusion by replacing the radial lines with white and black radial fins. Both white and gray disks inserted into the central gaps were perceived as scintillating, if the ratio of the black/white fin width were balanced (ie, close to 1.0). Thus, the grayness of the central disk is not a prerequisite for the scintillation. However, the scintillation was drastically reduced when the ratio was imbalanced. Furthermore, the optimal ratio depended on the color of the center disks. PMID:23145270

  2. Method of making a scintillator waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder, Paul L.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  3. Extruded plastic scintillator for MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Bross, Alan D.; Rykalin, Victor V.; Wood, Brian M.; /NICADD, DeKalb

    2005-11-01

    An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. A new experiment at Fermilab is pursuing the use of extruded plastic scintillator. A new plastic scintillator strip is being tested and its properties characterized. The initial results are presented here.

  4. Scintillators for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Like most applications that utilize scintillators for gamma detection, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) desires materials with high light output, short decay time, and excellent stopping power that are also inexpensive, mechanically rugged, and chemically inert. Realizing that this ``ultimate`` scintillator may not exist, this paper evaluates the relative importance of these qualities and describes their impact on the imaging performance of PET. The most important PET scintillator quality is the ability to absorb 511 keV photons in a small volume, which affects the spatial resolution of the camera. The dominant factor is a short attenuation length ({le} 1.5 cm is required), although a high photoelectric fraction is also important (> 30% is desired). The next most important quality is a short decay time, which affects both the dead time and the coincidence timing resolution. Detection rates for single 511 keV photons can be extremely high, so decay times {le} 500 ns are essential to avoid dead time losses. In addition, positron annihilations are identified by time coincidence so {le}5 ns fwhm coincidence pair timing resolution is required to identify events with narrow coincidence windows, reducing contamination due to accidental coincidences. Current trends in PET cameras are toward septaless, ``fully-3D`` cameras, which have significantly higher count rates than conventional 2-D cameras and so place higher demands on scintillator decay time. Light output affects energy resolution, and thus the ability of the camera to identify and reject events where the initial 511 keV photon has undergone Compton scatter in the patient. The scatter to true event fraction is much higher in fully-3D cameras than in 2-D cameras, so future PET cameras would benefit from scintillators with a 511 keV energy resolution < 10--12% fwhm.

  5. Room-temperature scintillation properties of cerium-doped REOX (RE=Y, La, Gd, and Lu; X=F, Cl, Br, and I)

    SciTech Connect

    Eagleman, Yetta; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen

    2010-12-10

    The scintillation properties of cerium-doped oxyhalides following the general formula REOX (RE=Y, La, Gd, and Lu; X=F, Cl, Br, and I) are reported. These materials were synthesized under dry conditions as microcrystalline powders from conventional solid state reactions. The room temperature X-ray excited emission and scintillation decay curves were measured and analyzed for each material. Additionally, the hygroscopic nature of the oxychlorides and oxybromides was compared to that of their corresponding rare earth halides. The yttrium, lanthanum, and gadolinium oxychlorides, and all of the oxybromides and oxyiodides are found to be activated by Ce{sup 3+}. GdOBr doped with 0.5% Ce{sup 3+} has the highest light output with a relative luminosity of about one-half that of LaBr{sub 3}: Ce{sup 3+}. It displays a single exponential decay of 30 ns.

  6. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  7. Scintillation Monitoring Using Asymmetry Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Muhammad Mubasshir; Mahrous, Ayman; Abdallah, Amr; Notarpietro, Riccardo

    Variation in electron density can have significant effect on GNSS signals in terms of propagation delay. Ionospheric scintillation can be caused by rapid change of such delay, specifically, when they last for a longer period of time. Ionospheric irregularities that account for scintillation may vary significantly in spatial range and drift with the background plasma at speeds of 45 to 130 m/sec. These patchy irregularities may occur several times during night, e.g. in equatorial region, with the patches move through the ray paths of the GNSS satellite signals. These irregularities are often characterized as either ‘large scale’ (which can be as large as several hundred km in East-West direction and many times that in the North-South direction) or ‘small scale’ (which can be as small as 1m). These small scale irregularities are regarded as the main cause of scintillation [1,2]. In normal solar activity conditions, the mid-latitude ionosphere is not much disturbed. However, during severe magnetic storms, the aurora oval extends towards the equator and the equator anomaly region may stretched towards poles extending the scintillation phenomena more typically associated with those regions into mid-latitudes. In such stormy conditions, the predicted TEC may deviate largely from the true value of the TEC both at low and mid-latitudes due to which GNSS applications may be strongly degraded. This work is an attempt to analyze ionospheric scintillation (S4 index) using ionospheric asymmetry index [3]. The asymmetry index is based on trans-ionospheric propagation between GPS and LEO satellites in a radio occultation (RO) scenario, using background ionospheric data provided by MIDAS [4]. We attempted to simulate one of the recent geomagnetic storms (NOAA scale G4) occurred over low/mid-latitudes. The storm started on 26 September 2011 at UT 18:00 and lasted until early hours of 27 September 2011. The scintillation data for the storm was taken from an ionospheric

  8. Silicon photomultipliers for scintillating trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaioli, S.; Berra, A.; Bolognini, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Bosisio, L.; Ciano, S.; Iugovaz, D.; Lietti, D.; Penzo, A.; Prest, M.; Rashevskaya, I.; Reia, S.; Stoppani, L.; Vallazza, E.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been proposed as a new kind of readout device for scintillating detectors in many experiments. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected pixels, which are independent photon counters working in Geiger mode with very high gain (∼106). This contribution presents the use of an array of eight SiPMs (manufactured by FBK-irst) for the readout of a scintillating bar tracker (a small size prototype of the Electron Muon Ranger detector for the MICE experiment). The performances of the SiPMs in terms of signal to noise ratio, efficiency and time resolution will be compared to the ones of a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) connected to the same bars. Both the SiPMs and the MAPMT are interfaced to a VME system through a 64 channel MAROC ASIC.

  9. Detecting scintillations in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, P. R.; McKinsey, D. N.

    2013-09-01

    We review our work in developing a tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB)-based detection system for a measurement of the neutron lifetime using magnetically confined ultracold neutrons (UCN). As part of the development of the detection system for this experiment, we studied the scintillation properties of liquid helium itself, characterized the fluorescent efficiencies of different fluors, and built and tested three detector geometries. We provide an overview of the results from these studies as well as references for additional information.

  10. Multi-PSPMT scintillation camera

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Trotta, G.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.; Vincentis, G. de; Scafe, R.; Pergola, A.

    1999-06-01

    Gamma ray imaging is usually accomplished by the use of a relatively large scintillating crystal coupled to either a number of photomultipliers (PMTs) (Anger Camera) or to a single large Position Sensitive PMT (PSPMT). Recently the development of new diagnostic techniques, such as scintimammography and radio-guided surgery, have highlighted a number of significant limitations of the Anger camera in such imaging procedures. In this paper a dedicated gamma camera is proposed for clinical applications with the aim of improving image quality by utilizing detectors with an appropriate size and shape for the part of the body under examination. This novel scintillation camera is based upon an array of PSPMTs (Hamamatsu R5900-C8). The basic concept of this camera is identical to the Anger Camera with the exception of the substitution of PSPMTs for the PMTs. In this configuration it is possible to use the high resolution of the PSPMTs and still correctly position events lying between PSPMTs. In this work the test configuration is a 2 by 2 array of PSPMTs. Some advantages of this camera are: spatial resolution less than 2 mm FWHM, good linearity, thickness less than 3 cm, light weight, lower cost than equivalent area PSPMT, large detection area when coupled to scintillating arrays, small dead boundary zone (< 3 mm) and flexibility in the shape of the camera.

  11. Phase I. Lanthanum-based Start Materials for Hydride Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, K. A.; Schmidt, F. A.; Frerichs, A. E.; Ament, K. A.

    2013-08-20

    The purpose of Phase I of this work is to focus on developing a La-based start material for making nickel-metal (lanthanum)-hydride batteries based on our carbothermic-silicon process. The goal is to develop a protocol for the manufacture of (La1-xRx)(Ni1-yMy)(Siz), where R is a rare earth metal and M is a non-rare earth metal, to be utilized as the negative electrode in nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries.

  12. METHOD OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM LANTHANUM FLUORIDE CARRIER

    DOEpatents

    Watt, G.W.; Goeckermann, R.H.

    1958-06-10

    An improvement in oxidation-reduction type methods of separating plutoniunn from elements associated with it in a neutron-irradiated uranium solution is described. The method relates to the separating of plutonium from lanthanum ions in an aqueous 0.5 to 2.5 N nitric acid solution by 'treating the solution, at room temperature, with ammonium sulfite in an amount sufficient to reduce the hexavalent plutonium present to a lower valence state, and then treating the solution with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ thereby forming a tetravalent plutonium peroxide precipitate.

  13. Morphology of auroral zone radio wave scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Rino, C.L.; Matthews, S.J.

    1980-08-01

    This paper describes the morphology of midnight sector and morning sector auroral zone scintillation observations made over a two-year period using the Wideband satelite, which is in a sun-synchronous, low-altitude orbit. No definitive seasonal variation was found. The nighttime data showed the highest scintillation ocurrence levels, but significant amounts of morning scintillation were observed. For the most part the scintillation activity followed the general pattern of local magnetic activity. The most prominent feature in the nightime data is a localized amplitude and phase scintillation enhancement at the point where the propagation vector lies within an L shell. A geometrical effect due to a dynamic slab of sheetlike structures in the F region is hypothesized as the source of his enhancement. The data have been sorted by magnetic activity, proximity to local midnight, and season. The general features of the data are in agreement with the accepted morphology of auroral zone scintillation.

  14. Subthreshold Pion Production in the Reaction Lanthanum -139 + LANTHANUM-139 ---> Positive Pion, Negative Pion + Chi.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jack

    We have measured charged pion production in the reaction ^{139}La + ^{139}Latopi ^{+/-} + X at three beam energies (246, 183 and 138 MeV/nucleon) below the nucleon-nucleon threshold. Associated multiplicity for charged participants was obtained using a 110-element scintillator multiplicity array. Data were taken over the angular range of 21 ^circ-67^circ in the laboratory (equivalent to 30^ circ-90^circ in the center of mass). Dependence of the spectra upon pion charge, energy and angle, beam energy, system mass and associated multiplicity was investigated. Based on the isotropic angular distributions and the associated multiplicities for pion production, it apprears that subthreshold pions in the range of our experiment are produced predominantly from a source at rest in the center of mass and involving a large number of nucleons. The general character of the subthreshold pion spectra is comparable to previous results above threshold. However, the scaling of the subthreshold pion yield with system mass deviates from the dependence observed in light systems, to an extent which cannot be explained by a simple nucleon-nucleon model. We also found charge dependent structure in the pion spectra, which we analysed in the framework of both Coulomb distortion and clustering models. We conclude that while we did not clear evidence of collective effects in subthreshold pion production, it would be very worthwhile to conduct a systematic investigation of pion production for all charge states and over a range of angles, system masses and beam energies, below threshold.

  15. Scintillating Fibre Tracking at High Luminosity Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joram, C.; Haefeli, G.; Leverington, B.

    2015-08-01

    The combination of small diameter scintillating plastic fibres with arrays of SiPM photodetectors has led to a new class of SciFi trackers usable at high luminosity collider experiments. After a short review of the main principles and history of the scintillating fibre technology, we describe the challenges and developments of the large area Scintillating Fibre Tracker currently under development for the upgraded LHCb experiment.

  16. Spacecraft Radio Scintillation and Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1993-01-01

    When a wave propagates through a turbulent medium, scattering by the random refractive index inhomogeneities can lead to a wide variety of phenomena that have been the subject of extensive study. The observed scattering effects include amplitude or intensity scintillation, phase scintillation, angular broadening, and spectral broadening, among others. In this paper, I will refer to these scattering effects collectively as scintillation. Although the most familiar example is probably the twinkling of stars (light wave intensity scintillation by turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere), scintillation has been encountered and investigated in such diverse fields as ionospheric physics, oceanography, radio astronomy, and radio and optical communications. Ever since planetary spacecraft began exploring the solar system, scintillation has appeared during the propagation of spacecraft radio signals through planetary atmospheres, planetary ionospheres, and the solar wind. Early studies of these phenomena were motivated by the potential adverse effects on communications and navigation, and on experiments that use the radio link to conduct scientific investigations. Examples of the latter are radio occultation measurements (described below) of planetary atmospheres to deduce temperature profiles, and the search for gravitational waves. However,these concerns soon gave way to the emergence of spacecraft radio scintillation as a new scientific tool for exploring small-scale dynamics in planetary atmospheres and structure in the solar wind, complementing in situ and other remote sensing spacecraft measurements, as well as scintillation measurements using natural (celestial) radio sources. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe and review the solar system spacecraft radio scintillation observations, to summarize the salient features of wave propagation analyses employed in interpreting them, to underscore the unique remote sensing capabilities and scientific relevance of

  17. Recording of relativistic particles in thin scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstukhin, I A.; Somov, Alexander S.; Somov, S. V.; Bolozdynya, A. I.

    2014-11-01

    Results of investigating an assembly of thin scintillators and silicon photomultipliers for registering relativistic particles with the minimum ionization are presented. A high efficiency of registering relativistic particles using an Ej-212 plastic scintillator, BSF-91A wavelength-shifting fiber (Saint-Gobain), and a silicon photomultiplier (Hamamtsu) is shown. The measurement results are used for creating a scintillation hodoscope of the magnetic spectrometer for registering γ quanta in the GlueX experiment.

  18. Waveshifters and Scintillators for Ionizing Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    B.Baumgaugh; J.Bishop; D.Karmgard; J.Marchant; M.McKenna; R.Ruchti; M.Vigneault; L.Hernandez; C.Hurlbut

    2007-12-11

    Scintillation and waveshifter materials have been developed for the detection of ionizing radiation in an STTR program between Ludlum Measurements, Inc. and the University of Notre Dame. Several new waveshifter materials have been developed which are comparable in efficiency and faster in fluorescence decay than the standard material Y11 (K27) used in particle physics for several decades. Additionally, new scintillation materials useful for fiber tracking have been developed which have been compared to 3HF. Lastly, work was done on developing liquid scintillators and paint-on scintillators and waveshifters for high radiation environments.

  19. Radio wave scintillations at equatorial regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poularikas, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Radio waves, passing through the atmosphere, experience amplitude and phase fluctuations know as scintillations. A characterization of equatorial scintillation, which has resulted from studies of data recorded primarily in South America and equatorial Africa, is presented. Equatorial scintillation phenomena are complex because they appear to vary with time of day (pre-and postmidnight), season (equinoxes), and magnetic activity. A wider and more systematic geographical coverage is needed for both scientific and engineering purposes; therefore, it is recommended that more observations should be made at earth stations (at low-geomagnetic latitudes) to record equatorial scintillation phenomena.

  20. Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Sparrow, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

  1. Novel borothermal route for the synthesis of lanthanum cerium hexaborides and their field emission properties

    SciTech Connect

    Menaka; Patra, Rajkumar; Ghosh, Santanu; Ganguli, Ashok K.

    2012-10-15

    The present study describes the development of a simple approach to stabilize polycrystalline lanthanum cerium hexaborides without using any flux and at ambient pressure. The nanostructured lanthanum-cerium borides were synthesized using hydroxide precursors. These precursors (La{sub 1-x}Ce{sub x}(OH){sub 3}, x=0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5) were synthesized via hydrothermal route in the presence of Tergitol (surfactant, nonylphenol ethoxylate) as a capping agent. The precursors on heating with boron at 1300 Degree-Sign C lead to the formation of nanostructures (cubes, rods and pyramids) of lanthanum cerium hexaboride. We have investigated the field emission behaviour of the hexaboride films fabricated by spin coating. It was observed that the pyramidal shaped nanostructures of La{sub 0.5}Ce{sub 0.5}B{sub 6} shows excellent field emission characteristics with high field enhancement factor of 4502. - Graphical abstract: Nanostructured lanthanum cerium hexaboride with efficient field emission have fabricated by low temperature hydroxide precursor mediated route. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New methodology to prepare lanthanum cerium hexaboride at 1300 Degree-Sign C via borothermal route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanostructured lanthanum cerium hexaboride film by spin coating process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanopyramids based lanthanum cerium hexaboride shows excellent field emission.

  2. MOCVD of very thin films of lead lanthanum titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, D.B.; Vallet, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    Films of lead lanthanum titanate were deposited using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) at temperatures between 500 and 550{degrees}C in a hot-wall reactor. The precursors used were Pb(THD){sub 2}, La(THD){sub 3}, and Ti(THD){sub 2}(I-OPr){sub 2} where THD = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate, O{sub 2}C{sub 11}H{sub 19}, and I-OPr = isopropoxide, OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}. The three precursors were delivered to the reactor using a single solution containing all three precursors dissolved in tetraglyme and the precursor solution was volatilized at 225{degrees}C. Films were deposited on Si and Si/Ti/Pt substrates, and characterized using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RPS) and X-ray diffraction(XRD). Films deposited at 550{degrees}C had a composition which was close to that of the precursor solution while films deposited at 500{degrees}C were deficient in lanthanum. Even at 500{degrees}C, the desired perovskite phase showed an increase in the intensity of the X-ray lines, but did not change the width of these lines, implying the grain sizes had remained unchanged.

  3. Lanthanum-hexaboride carbon composition for use in corrosive hydrogen-fluorine environments

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Kovach, Louis; Taylor, Albert J.

    1981-01-01

    The present invention relates to a structural composition useful in corrosive hydrogen-fluorine environments at temperatures in excess of 1400.degree. K. The composition is formed of a isostatically pressed and sintered or a hot-pressed mixture of lanthanum hexaboride particles and about 10-30 vol. % carbon. The lanthanum-hexaboride reacts with the high-temperature fluorine-containing bases to form an adherent layer of corrosion-inhibiting lanthanum trifluoride on exposed surfaces of the composition. The carbon in the composite significantly strengthens the composite, enhances thermal shock resistance, and significantly facilitates the machining of the composition.

  4. Lanthanum-hexaboride carbon composition for use in corrosive hydrogen-fluorine environments

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Kovach, L.; Taylor, A.J.

    1980-01-22

    The present invention relates to a structural composition useful in corrosive hydrogen-fluorine environments at temperatures in excess of 1400/sup 0/K. The composition is formed of a isostatically pressed and sintered or a hot-pressed mixture of lanthanum hexaboride particles and about 10 to 30 vol% carbon. The lanthanum-hexaboride reacts with the high-temperature fluorine-containing gases to form an adherent layer of corrosion-inhibiting lanthanum trifluoride on exposed surfaces of the composition. The carbon in the composite significantly strengthens the composite, enhances thermal shock resistance, and significantly facilitates the machining of the composition.

  5. The Do/ scintillating fiber tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.; Gutierrez, G.; Grunendahl, S.; Lincoln, D.; Ramberg, E.; Ray, R.; Ruchti, R.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Choic, S.

    1998-11-01

    The Do/ detector is being upgraded in preparation for the next collider run at Fermilab. The Central Fiber Tracker discussed in this report is a major component of the Do/ upgrade. The expected Tevatron luminosity of 2{times}10{sup 32} cm{sup {minus}2} sec{sup {minus}1}, the 132ns bunch crossing time, and the Do/ detector constraints of a 2 Tesla solenoid and a 52 cm lever arm, make a scintillating fiber based tracker an optimal choice for the upgrade of the Do/ detector. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Photodetectors for Scintillator Proportionality Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Payne, Steve; Cherepy, Nerine; Valentine, J.D.

    2010-10-18

    We evaluate photodetectors for use in a Compton Coincidence apparatus designed for measuring scintillator proportionality. There are many requirements placed on the photodetector in these systems, including active area, linearity, and the ability to accurately measure low light levels (which implies high quantum efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio). Through a combination of measurement and Monte Carlo simulation, we evaluate a number of potential photodetectors, especially photomultiplier tubes and hybrid photodetectors. Of these, we find that the most promising devices available are photomultiplier tubes with high ({approx}50%) quantum efficiency, although hybrid photodetectors with high quantum efficiency would be preferable.

  7. Scintillation properties of strontium iodide doped with europium for high-energy astrophysical detectors: nonproportionality as a function of temperature and at high gamma-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perea, Rose Schmitt; Parsons, Ann M.; Groza, Mike; Caudel, David; Nowicki, Suzanne F.; Burger, Arnold; Stassun, Keivan G.; Peterson, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    Strontium iodide doped with europium [SrI2(Eu2+)] is a new scintillator material being developed as an alternative to lanthanum bromide doped with cerium [LaBr(Ce)] for use in high-energy astrophysical detectors. As with all scintillators, the issue of nonproportionality is important because it affects the energy resolution of the detector. We investigate how the nonproportionality of SrI2(Eu) changes as a function of temperature from 16 to 60°C by heating the SrI2(Eu) scintillator separate from the photomultiplier tube. In a separate experiment, we also investigate the nonproportionality at high energies (up to 6 MeV) of SrI2(Eu) at a testing facility located at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. We find that the nonproportionality increases nearly monotonically as the temperature of the SrI2(Eu) scintillator is increased, although there is evidence of nonmonotonic behavior near 40°C, perhaps due to electric charge carriers trapping in the material. We also find that within the energy range of 662 keV to 6.1 MeV, the change in the nonproportionality of SrI2(Eu) is ˜1.5 to 2%.

  8. Scintillator handbook with emphasis on cesium iodide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidd, J. L.; Dabbs, J. R.; Levine, N.

    1973-01-01

    This report provides a background of reasonable depth and reference material on scintillators in general. Particular attention is paid to the cesium iodide scintillators as used in the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) experiments. It is intended especially for use by persons such as laboratory test personnel who need to obtain a working knowledge of these materials and their characteristics in a short time.

  9. Binderless composite scintillator for neutron detection

    DOEpatents

    Hodges, Jason P [Knoxville, TN; Crow, Jr; Lowell, M [Oak Ridge, TN; Cooper, Ronald G [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-03-10

    Composite scintillator material consisting of a binderless sintered mixture of a Lithium (Li) compound containing .sup.6Li as the neutron converter and Y.sub.2SiO.sub.5:Ce as the scintillation phosphor, and the use of this material as a method for neutron detection. Other embodiments of the invention include various other Li compounds.

  10. Multilayer scintillation spectrometer for charged pionium detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, V. A.; Karnyushina, L. V.; Kuznetsov, S. N.; Kurepin, A. B.; Livanov, A. N.; Pilyar, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    The design description and characteristics of a 14-layer scintillation spectrometer for meson recording are given. The results from testing the spectrometer, calibrating it with cosmic-ray particles, and using the particle beams at energies reaching 1 GeV are presented. The spectrometer design is based on flat scintillation plates glued with wavelength-shifting optic fibers.

  11. Protective effects of perindopril on d-galactose and aluminum trichloride induced neurotoxicity via the apoptosis of mitochondria-mediated intrinsic pathway in the hippocampus of mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weina; Shi, Lili; Chen, Lianji; Zhang, Bingyi; Ma, Kaige; Liu, Yong; Qian, Yihua

    2014-10-01

    Perindopril, an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, has been reported to improve learning and memory in a mouse or rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) induced by injection of beta-amyloid protein. However, the exact mechanism of perindopril on the cognitive deficits is not fully understood. Our previous data have indicated that perindopril improves learning and memory in a mouse model of AD induced by D-galactose (D-gal) and aluminum trichloride (AlCl₃) via inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity and oxidative stress. Whether perindopril also inhibit apoptosis to prevent cognitive decline remains unknown in mice. Therefore, the present study explored the protective effects of perindopril in the hippocampus of mice further. Perindopril (0.5 mg/kg/day) was administered intragastrically for 60 days after the mice were given a D-gal (150 mg/kg/day) and AlCl₃ (10 mg/kg/day) intraperitoneally for 90 days. Then the expression of Bcl-2, Bax, Fas, FasL, caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9 were analyzed by RT-PCR and western blotting in the hippocampus. Perindopril significantly decreased caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities, and elevated Bcl-2/Bax ratio in the hippocampus. However, the expression of Fas, FasL and caspase-8 did not change in the hippocampus whether treatment with d-gal and AlCl₃ or perindopril. Taken together, the above findings indicated that perindopril inhibited apoptosis in the hippocampus may be another mechanism by which perindopril improves learning and memory functions in d-gal and AlCl₃ treated mice. PMID:25290208

  12. Equitorial scintillations: Advances since ISEA-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.

    1985-01-01

    Since the last equatorial aeronomy meeting in 1980, our understanding of the morphology of equatorial scintillations has advanced greatly due to more intensive observations at the equatorial anomaly locations in the different longitude zones. The unmistakable effect of the sunspot cycle in controlling irregularity belt width and electron concentration responsible for strong scintillation in the GHz range has been demonstrated. The fact that night-time F-region dynamics is an important factor in controlling the magnitude of scintillations has been recognized by interpreting scintillation observations in the light of realistic models of total electron content at various longitudes. A hypothesis based on the alignment of the solar terminator with the geomagnetic flux tubes as an indicator of enhanced scintillation occurrence and another based on the influence of a transequatorial thermospheric neutral wind have been postulated to describe the observed longitudinal variation.

  13. Interstellar scattering of pulsar radiation. 1: Scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backer, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation of the intensity fluctuations of 28 pulsars near 0.4 GHz indicates that scintillation spectra have a Gaussian shape, scintillation indices are near unity, and the scintillation bandwidth depends linearly on dispersion measure. Observations near 2.5 GHz suggest a strong dependence of the frequency at which scintillation indices fall below unity on dispersion measure. Multistation measurements of scintillation provide values or limits for the scale size of the scattering diffraction pattern. The dependences of scattering parameters on dispersion measure is discussed in terms of the current models. It is suggested that any line of sight through the galaxy encounters increasingly rare, increasingly large deviations of thermal electron density on the scale of 10 to the 11th power cm.

  14. Extruded scintillator for the calorimetry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Rykalin, V.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Beznosko, D.; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2006-08-01

    An extrusion line has been installed and successfully operated at FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new Facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Recently progress has been made in producing co-extruded plastic scintillator, thus increasing the potential HEP applications of this Facility. The current R&D work with extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator for a potential ALICE upgrade, the ILC calorimetry program and the MINERvA experiment show the attractiveness of the chosen strategy for future experiments and calorimetry. We extensively discuss extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator in calorimetry in synergy with new Solid State Photomultipliers. The characteristics of extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator will be presented here as well as results with non-traditional photo read-out.

  15. Extruded scintillator for the Calorimetry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Rykalin, V.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Beznosko, D.

    2006-10-27

    An extrusion line has been installed and successfully operated at FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new Facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Recently progress has been made in producing co-extruded plastic scintillator, thus increasing the potential HEP applications of this Facility. The current R and D work with extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator for a potential ALICE upgrade, the ILC calorimetry program and the MINERvA experiment show the attractiveness of the chosen strategy for future experiments and calorimetry. We extensively discuss extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator in calorimetry in synergy with new Solid State Photomultipliers. The characteristics of extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator will be presented here as well as results with non-traditional photo read-out.

  16. Morphology-controlled nonaqueous synthesis of anisotropic lanthanum hydroxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Djerdj, Igor; Garnweitner, Georg; Sheng Su, Dang; Niederberger, Markus

    2007-07-15

    The preparation of lanthanum hydroxide and manganese oxide nanoparticles is presented, based on a nonaqueous sol-gel process involving the reaction of La(OiPr){sub 3} and KMnO{sub 4} with organic solvents such as benzyl alcohol, 2-butanone and a 1:1 vol. mixture thereof. The lanthanum manganese oxide system is highly complex and surprising results with respect to product composition and morphology were obtained. In dependence of the reaction parameters, the La(OH){sub 3} nanoparticles undergo a shape transformation from short nanorods with an average aspect ratio of 2.1 to micron-sized nanofibers (average aspect ratio is more than 59.5). Although not directly involved, KMnO{sub 4} plays a crucial role in determining the particle morphology of La(OH){sub 3}. The reason lies in the fact that KMnO{sub 4} is able to oxidize the benzyl alcohol to benzoic acid, which presumably induces the anisotropic particle growth in [0 0 1] direction upon preferential coordination to the {+-}(1 0 0), {+-}(0 1 0) and {+-}(-110) crystal facets. By adjusting the molar La(OiPr){sub 3}-to-KMnO{sub 4} ratio as well as by using the appropriate solvent mixture it is possible to tailor the morphology, phase purity and microstructure of the La(OH){sub 3} nanoparticles. Postsynthetic thermal treatment of the sample containing La(OH){sub 3} nanofibers and {beta}-MnOOH nanoparticles at the temperature of 800 deg. C for 8 h yielded polyhedral LaMnO{sub 3} and worm-like La{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles as final products. - Graphical abstract: Lanthanum hydroxide nanoparticles are synthesized based on a nonaqueous sol-gel process involving the reaction of La(OiPr){sub 3} and KMnO{sub 4} with organic solvents such as benzyl alcohol, 2-butanone and a 1:1 vol. mixture thereof. In dependence of the reaction parameters, the La(OH){sub 3} nanoparticles undergo a shape transformation from short nanorods to micron-sized nanofibers.

  17. Phase transformation, thermal expansion and electrical conductivity of lanthanum chromite

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sapna; Mahapatra, Manoj K.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Orthorhombic and rhombohedral phases co-exist at ≥260 °C and cubic above 1000 °C. • Polymorphic changes with temperature in air and Ar–3%H{sub 2} are observed. • Lattice volume change in Ar–3%H{sub 2} atmosphere corresponds to Cr{sup 4+} → Cr{sup 3+} transition. • Change in valence state of Cr{sup 4+} to Cr{sup 3+} results in lower electrical conductivity. • Experimental evidence is provided for poor densification of LaCrO{sub 3} in air. - Abstract: This paper addresses discrepancies pertaining to structural, thermal and electrical properties of lanthanum chromite. Experimental evidence is provided to support the hypothesis for poor densification in air as well as reduction in electrical conductivity in reducing atmosphere. Sintering condition for the synthesis of LaCrO{sub 3} was optimized to 1450 °C and 10 h. Thermo-analytical (differential scanning calorimetry – DSC) and high temperature X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD) studies show that orthorhombic lanthanum chromite transforms into rhombohedral structure at ∼260 °C and cubic structure above 1000 °C. Co-existence of the structural phases and the variation in each polymorph with temperature in both air and 3%H{sub 2}–Ar atmosphere is reported. Presence and absence of Cr-rich phase at inter-particle neck are observed in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres respectively. The linear thermal expansion co-efficient was calculated to be 10.8 ± 0.2 × 10{sup −6} °C{sup −1} in the temperature range of RT–1400 °C. Electrical conductivity of lanthanum chromite was found to be 0.11 S/cm in air. A decrease in electrical conductivity (0.02 S/cm at 800 °C) of LaCrO{sub 3}, as observed in reducing atmosphere (3%H{sub 2}–Ar), corresponds to lattice volume change as indicated by peak shift in HT-XRD results.

  18. Scintillation proximity assay using polymeric membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) is typically used to quantify electron emitting isotopes. In LSC, radioactive samples are dissolved in an organic fluor solution (scintillation cocktail) to ensure that the label is close enough to the fluor molecules to be detected. Although efficient, scintillation cocktail is neither specific or selective for samples labeled with the same radioisotope. Scintillation cocktail is flammable posing significant health risks to the user and is expensive to purchase and discard. Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) is a radioanalytical technique where only those radiochemical entities (RCE's) bound to fluor containing matrices are detected. Only bound RCE's are in close enough proximity the entrapped fluor molecules to induce scintillations. Unbound radioligands are too far removed from the fluor molecules to be detected. The research in this dissertation focused on the development and evaluation of fluor-containing membranes (scintillation proximity membranes, SP membranes) to be used for specific radioanalytical techniques without using scintillation cocktail. Polysulfone and PVC SP membranes prepared in our laboratory were investigated for radioimmunossay (RIA) where only bound radioligand is detected, thereby eliminating the separation step impeding the automation of RIA. These SP membranes performed RIA where the results were nearly identical to commercial SP microbeads. SP membranes functionalized with quaternary ammonium hydroxide moieties were able to trap and quantify [sup 14]CO[sub 2] without using liquid scintillation cocktail. RCE's bound in the pore structure of SP membranes are intimate with the entrapped fluor providing the geometry needed for high detection efficiencies. Absorbent SP membranes were used in radiation surveys and were shown to be as effective as conventional survey techniques using filter paper and scintillation cocktail.

  19. Scintillation Effects on Space Shuttle GPS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Kramer, Leonard

    2001-01-01

    Irregularities in ionospheric electron density result in variation in amplitude and phase of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals, or scintillation. GPS receivers tracking scintillated signals may lose carrier phase or frequency lock in the case of phase sc intillation. Amplitude scintillation can cause "enhancement" or "fading" of GPS signals and result in loss of lock. Scintillation can occur over the equatorial and polar regions and is a function of location, time of day, season, and solar and geomagnetic activity. Mid latitude regions are affected only very rarely, resulting from highly disturbed auroral events. In the spring of 1998, due to increasing concern about scintillation of GPS signals during the upcoming solar maximum, the Space Shuttle Program began to assess the impact of scintillation on Collins Miniaturized Airborne GPS Receiver (MAGR) units that are to replace Tactical Air Control and Navigation (TACAN) units on the Space Shuttle orbiters. The Shuttle Program must determine if scintillation effects pose a threat to safety of flight and mission success or require procedural and flight rule changes. Flight controllers in Mission Control must understand scintillation effects on GPS to properly diagnose "off nominal" GPS receiver performance. GPS data from recent Space Shuttle missions indicate that the signals tracked by the Shuttle MAGR manifest scintillation. Scintillation is observed as anomalous noise in velocity measurements lasting for up to 20 minutes on Shuttle orbit passes and are not accounted for in the error budget of the MAGR accuracy parameters. These events are typically coincident with latitude and local time occurrence of previously identified equatorial spread F within about 20 degrees of the magnetic equator. The geographic and seasonal history of these events from ground-based observations and a simple theoretical model, which have potential for predicting events for operational purposes, are reviewed.

  20. The improved scintillation crystal lead tungstate scintillation for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Youbao; WU, Rurong; Xiao, Linrong; Zhang, Jianxin; Yang, Peizhi; Yan, Hui

    2009-07-01

    As a valuable material for the detecting of γ-ray, PbWO4 and BaF2:PbWO4 crystals were grown by a novel multi-crucible temperature gradient system developed by ourselves. Utilizing a topical partial heating method, this system can form a topical partial high temperature in its hearth. Thus this system could melt raw materials in step by step as requirement. The advantage of this method is that there would be solid obstruct left on the melt in the procedure of the crystal growing up. The left obstruct could prevent the volatilization of the component in the melt. Hence it is helpful for the composition homogenization in the crystal. The system also offers a sustaining device for multi-crucibles and thus it can grow many crystals simultaneity. The optical properties and scintillation properties of the crystals were studied. The results reveal that the ions doping improves the scintillation properties of the crystal. The transmittance spectra show that the transmittance of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals are better than that of PbWO4 crystals. For the PbWO4 crystals, their absorption edge is at 325nm, and their maximum transmittance is 68%. For the BaF2:PbWO4 crystals, their absorption edge is at 325nm and their maximum transmittance is upto76%. The X-ray excited luminescence spectra shows that the luminescence peak is at 420nm for the samples of PbWO4 crystal while the peak is at 430nm for the samples of BaF2:PbWO4 crystal respectively. The luminescence intensity of the samples of BaF2:PbWO4 crystal is about two times than that of PbWO4 crystal. And their peak shape is different for the two kind of crystal. The light yield of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals is about 2.9 times than that of PbWO4 crystal Analyzing these scintillation properties, we find that the VPb 3+ and VO- defects do harm for the optical properties of the crystal. Ions doping method could reduce the defect concentration and improving its illumination performance of the crystal. Specially, the doped F- ions in O2- site can

  1. Effect of Adsorbed Nitrogen on the Thermionic Emission from Lanthanum Hexaboride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Arlen F.; Wood, George P.

    1959-01-01

    The emission properties of lanthanum hexaboride in an atmosphere of nitrogen were investigated. The emitter was not poisoned by adsorbed nitrogen. This result should have application to magnetohydrodynamic devices in which electron flow from channel walls is required.

  2. METAL INTERACTIONS AT SULFIDE MINERAL SURFACES. PART 2. ADSORPTION AND DESORPTION OF LANTHANUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Batch-type adsorption experiments with four sulfide minerals (chalcocite, galena, pyrite, and sphalerite) were used to investigate the adsorption and desorption behavior of lanthanum (III) in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), a model humic substance. Linear ...

  3. Deposition and investigation of lanthanum cerium hexaboride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzanyan, A. S.; Harutyunyan, S. R.; Vardanyan, V. O.; Badalyan, G. R.; Petrosyan, V. A.; Kuzanyan, V. S.; Petrosyan, S. I.; Karapetyan, V. E.; Wood, K. S.; Wu, H.-D.; Gulian, A. M.

    2006-09-01

    Thin films of lanthanum-cerium hexaboride, the promising thermoelectric material for low-temperature applications, are deposited on various substrates by the electron-beam evaporation, pulsed laser deposition and magnetron sputtering. The influence of the deposition conditions on the films X-ray characteristics, composition, microstructure and physical properties, such as the resistivity and Seebeck coefficient, is studied. The preferred (100) orientation of all films is obtained from XRD traces. In the range of 780-800 °C deposition temperature the highest intensity of diffractions peaks and the highest degree of the preferred orientation are observed. The temperature dependence of the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient of films are investigated in the temperature range of 4-300 K. The features appropriate to Kondo effect in the dependences ρ( T) and S( T) are detected at temperatures below 20 K. Interplay between the value of the Seebeck coefficient, metallic parameters and Kondo scattering of investigated films is discussed.

  4. Cobalt doped lanthanum chromite material suitable for high temperature use

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, R.J.

    1986-12-23

    A high temperature, solid electrolyte electrochemical cell, subject to thermal cycling temperatures of between about 25 C and about 1,200 C, capable of electronic interconnection to at least one other electrochemical cell and capable of operating in an environment containing oxygen and a fuel, is made; where the cell has a first and second electrode with solid electrolyte between them, where an improved interconnect material is applied along a portion of a supporting electrode; where the interconnect is made of a chemically modified lanthanum chromite, containing cobalt as the important additive, which interconnect allows for adjustment of the thermal expansion of the interconnect material to more nearly match that of other cell components, such as zirconia electrolyte, and is stable in oxygen containing atmospheres such as air and in fuel environments. 2 figs.

  5. Cobalt doped lanthanum chromite material suitable for high temperature use

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, Roswell J.

    1986-01-01

    A high temperature, solid electrolyte electrochemical cell, subject to thermal cycling temperatures of between about 25.degree. C. and about 1200.degree. C., capable of electronic interconnection to at least one other electrochemical cell and capable of operating in an environment containing oxygen and a fuel, is made; where the cell has a first and second electrode with solid electrolyte between them, where an improved interconnect material is applied along a portion of a supporting electrode; where the interconnect is made of a chemically modified lanthanum chromite, containing cobalt as the important additive, which interconnect allows for adjustment of the thermal expansion of the interconnect material to more nearly match that of other cell components, such as zirconia electrolyte, and is stable in oxygen containing atmospheres such as air and in fuel environments.

  6. Recent advances of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides for catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-21

    There is a need to reduce the use of noble metal elements especially in the field of catalysis, where noble metals are ubiquitously applied. To this end, perovskite oxides, an important class of mixed oxide, have been attracting increasing attention for decades as potential replacements. Benefiting from the extraordinary tunability of their compositions and structures, perovskite oxides can be rationally tailored and equipped with targeted physical and chemical properties e.g. redox behavior, oxygen mobility, and ion conductivity for enhanced catalysis. Recently, the development of highly efficient perovskite oxide catalysts has been extensively studied. This review article summarizes the recent development of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides as advanced catalysts for both energy conversion applications and traditional heterogeneous reactions.

  7. Recent advances of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides for catalysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-21

    There is a need to reduce the use of noble metal elements especially in the field of catalysis, where noble metals are ubiquitously applied. To this end, perovskite oxides, an important class of mixed oxide, have been attracting increasing attention for decades as potential replacements. Benefiting from the extraordinary tunability of their compositions and structures, perovskite oxides can be rationally tailored and equipped with targeted physical and chemical properties e.g. redox behavior, oxygen mobility, and ion conductivity for enhanced catalysis. Recently, the development of highly efficient perovskite oxide catalysts has been extensively studied. This review article summarizes the recent developmentmore » of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides as advanced catalysts for both energy conversion applications and traditional heterogeneous reactions.« less

  8. Synthesis and characterization of strontium-lanthanum apatites

    SciTech Connect

    Boughzala, K.; Salem, E. Ben; Chrifa, A. Ben; Gaudin, E.; Bouzouita, K. . E-mail: khaled.bouzouita@ipeim.rnu.tn

    2007-07-03

    Two series of strontium-lanthanum apatites, Sr{sub 10-x}La {sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6-x}(SiO{sub 4}) {sub x}F{sub 2} and Sr{sub 10-x}La {sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6-x}(SiO{sub 4}) {sub x}O with 0 {<=} x {<=} 6, were synthesized by solid state reaction in the temperature range of 1200-1400 deg. C. The obtained materials were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, infrared absorption spectroscopy and solid {sup 31}P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Pure solid solutions were obtained within a limited range of unsubstituted phosphate and silicate apatites. A variation of the lattice parameters was observed, with an increase of a and a decrease of c parameters, related to the radius of the corresponding substituted ions.

  9. Sputtering studies during lanthanum implantation in stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ager, F. J.; Respaldiza, M. A.; Soares, J. C.; da Silva, M. F.; Odriozola, J. A.

    1997-05-01

    Lanthanum ions of 100 keV have been implanted in AISI304 specimens at different doses. The erosion or sputtering of the surface atoms, either from the steel matrix or already implanted, during the implantation process imposes a limitation on the maximum implantable dose. Hoping to increase this dose, we deposited thin layers of aluminium and alumina (Al 2O 3) on top of steel samples of similar composition and sputtering behaviour (AISI302), as the sputtering effect is much weaker on such species and this layer could also prevent the steel atoms from being removed from the surface. The experimental determination of the sputtering coefficients, total or partial, and its comparison with theoretical values, when possible, is another aim of this work.

  10. Phases in lanthanum-nickel-aluminum alloys. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1992-08-01

    Lanthanum-nickel-aluminum (LANA) alloys will be used to pump, store and separate hydrogen isotopes in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF). The aluminum content (y) of the primary LaNi{sub 5}-phase is controlled to produce the desired pressure-temperature behavior for adsorption and desorption of hydrogen. However, secondary phases cause decreased capacity and some may cause undesirable retention of tritium. Twenty-three alloys purchased from Ergenics, Inc. for development of RTF processes have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) to determine the distributions and compositions of constituent phases. This memorandum reports the results of these characterization studies. Knowledge of the structural characteristics of these alloys is a useful first step in selecting materials for specific process development tests and in interpreting results of those tests. Once this information is coupled with data on hydrogen plateau pressures, retention and capacity, secondary phase limits for RTF alloys can be specified.