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Sample records for laparoscopic distal gastrectomy

  1. Intraoperative sentinel lymph node mapping guides laparoscopic-assisted distal gastrectomy for distal gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Naiqing; Niu, Zhengchuan; Niu, Wei; Peng, Cheng; Zou, Xueqing; Sun, Shuxiang; Shinichi, Obo; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Sun, Qinli; Jun, Niu

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this retrospective study is to explore the effects of sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping guided laparoscopic-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) for distal gastric cancer. Methods: Two hundred patients were enrolled in this study. One hundred and one patients undergoing SLN guided LADG were designated as the SLN group. Ninety-nine patients having conventional LADG with D1 or D2 lymph node dissection were designated as the control group. Intraoperative and postoperative indicators such as the number of lymph nodes dissected, intraoperative and postoperative conditions, flow cytometry analysis of T lymphocyte subsets and natural killer (NK) cells, survival rates, recurrence rates and postoperative complications were investigated between these two groups. Results: The number of lymph nodes dissected in the SLN group was significantly lesser than that in the control group. Furthermore, in the SLN group, the patients achieved better immunization status, improved intraoperative and postoperative conditions and decreased postoperative complications. There were no significant differences were found in the positive lymph nodes detected, the distance between proximal and distal cutting edge, postoperative survival or recurrence rates. Conclusions: SLN guided LADG for gastric cancer is a safe and effective method and could achieve an equal clinical effect as traditional laparoscopic D1 or D2 radical operation with less operation trauma and better recovery. PMID:26131162

  2. Laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for severe corrosive gastritis: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kanyama, Yasuaki; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Miura, Shinichi; Kasai, Yasushi; Hibi, Kenji; Ito, Katsuki; Akiyama, Seiji; Nakao, Akimasa

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of severe corrosive gastritis caused by alkali ingestion, which was successfully treated by laparoscopic gastrectomy. A 38-year-old Japanese woman attempted suicide by ingesting Drano. She was treated conservatively for 3 months, but severe stenosis of the antrum secondary to scarification resulted in outlet obstruction. A Billroth I distal gastrectomy was performed through a laparoscopy-assisted approach. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and was discharged on the 13th day after her operation. She was subsequently able to tolerate a normal diet, gained weight, and is now emotionally stable. PMID:14669088

  3. Laparoscopic hemicolectomy in a patient with situs inversus totalis after open distal gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sumi, Yasuo; Tomono, Ayako; Suzuki, Satoshi; Kuroda, Daisuke; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Situs inversus totalis (SIT) is a rare anomaly in which the abdominal and thoracic cavity structures are opposite their usual positions. Occasionally, a few patients with a combination of this condition and malignant tumors have been encountered. Recently, several laparoscopic operations have been reported in patients with SIT. We report a case of an 83-year-old man with situs inversus totalis who developed colon cancer after open distal gastrectomy. Laparoscopic hemicolectomy with radical lymphadenectomy in such a patient was successfully performed by careful consideration of the mirror-image anatomy. Techniques themselves was not different from those in ordinary cases. Thus, curative laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer in the presence of situs inversus totalis is feasible and safe. PMID:23515492

  4. Laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for pyloric stenosis caused by heterotopic glands in a young female: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Tanioka, Toshiro; Matsumoto, Satoru; Takahashi, Shusaku; Ueki, Shinya; Takahashi, Masahiro; Ichihara, Shin

    2015-06-01

    A 17-year-old female was referred to our hospital with worsening dietary intake and abdominal bloating. She had epigastric fullness, but no abdominal pain. Gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed food residue and pyloric stenosis. A contrast-enhanced radiograph also showed pyloric stenosis, and gastrografin was not passed well through her pylorus. Computed tomography revealed similar findings. The biopsy results indicated hyperplasia of the gastric glands. The patient was diagnosed with a benign lesion, and underwent endoscopic balloon dilation several times. However, her stenosis worsened and we decided to perform surgery. In consideration of the cosmetic outcome, we performed laparoscopic distal gastrectomy. The postoperative course was good, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 10. The final diagnosis was pyloric stenosis caused by heterotopic glands. No malignant lesions were found. Since gastric stenosis caused by heterotopic glands has not been reported previously, we consider this to be a very rare case. PMID:24986451

  5. A comparison between two methods for tumor localization during totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Min; Park, Sungsoo; Park, Seong-Heum; Jang, You Jin; Kim, Seung-Joo; Mok, Young-Jae; Kim, Chong-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare two methods of tumor localization during totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy (TLDG) in patients with gastric cancer. Methods From March 2014 to November 2014, patients in whom TLDG had been engaged for middle third gastric cancer enrolled in this study. The patients were allocated to either the radiography or endoscopy group based on the type of tumor localization technique. Clinicopathologic outcomes were compared between the 2 groups. Results The accrual was suspended in November 2014 when 39 patients had been enrolled because a failed localization happened in the radiography group. The radiography and endoscopy groups included 17 (43.6 %) and 22 patients (56.4 %), respectively. Mean length of the proximal resection margin did not differ between the radiography and endoscopy groups (4.0 ± 2.6 and 2.8 ± 1.2 cm, respectively; P = 0.077). Mean localization time was longer in the radiography group than in the endoscopy group (22.7 ± 11.4 and 6.9 ± 1.8 minutes, respectively, P < 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in the incidence of severe complications between the 2 groups (5.9% and 4.5%, respectively, P = 0.851). Conclusion As an intraoperative tumor localization for TLDG, radiologic method was unsafe even though other comparable parameters were not different from that of endoscopy group. Moreover, intraoperative endoscopic localization may be advantageous because it is highly accurate and contributes to reducing operation time.

  6. [Inventive Approach during Laparoscopic Distal Gastrectomy for Treatment of Gastric Cancer in Patients with Adachi Type Ⅵ Vascular Anomaly].

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Toru; Komatsu, Shuhei; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Miyamae, Mahito; Hirajima, Shoji; Kawaguchi, Tsutomu; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Hirotaka; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-11-01

    Vascular anomalies, as described by the Adachi classification, are an inevitable issue for gastric cancer surgery. Here, we report a safe technique for laparoscopic lymph node dissection in a patient with Adachi typeⅥ vascular anomaly. The patient is a 72-year-old woman, who presented with a submucosal gastric cancer located on the lesser curvature of the stomach. Preoperative MDCT revealed Adachi type Ⅵ vascular anomaly. At laparoscopic surgery, we first identified the portal vein. Then, dissection of the hepatoduodenal and No. 8a lymph nodes was performed from the location near the portal vein at the superior portion of the hepatoduodenal ligament to that near the splenic vein superior to the pancreas. This avoids the disorientation that may result from anomalous vessels and prevents error that can lead to vascular complications. Subsequently, she underwent D1 plus gastrectomy. Her postoperative course was uneventful. Our surgical technique offers a safe approach for laparoscopic gastrectomy in the patient with Adachi type Ⅵ vascular anomaly. PMID:26805248

  7. Modified hemi-double-stapling technique combined with the temporal abdominal-wall-lift method for performing Billroth I anastomosis after laparoscopically assisted distal gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hidenori; Aotake, Toshiharu; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki; Okuda, Yukihiro; Doi, Koji; Hirose, Yuki; Matsushita, Toshio

    2008-12-01

    The authors have used a modified hemi-double-stapling (HDS) technique for reconstruction after laparoscopically assisted distal gastrectomy. The stomach is resected from the greater curvature side using a linear stapler inserted into the stomach from that side at a position vertical to the line of the greater curvature. Resection of the stomach is performed by extending the resection line to the lesser curvature using laparoscopic coagulating shears. The resected specimen is examined. After placement of a purse-string suture at the duodenal stump, an anvil is inserted into the stump, and an additional suture with 2-0 silk is placed over the purse-string suture. A curved intraluminal stapler (CDH25) is inserted into the stomach through the opening made on the lesser curvature side, and the center rod of the stapler is passed through the gastric wall on the corner of the resection line at the greater curvature. Ligation with 2-0 silk is added to the center rod by suturing the gastric tissue 5-8 mm from the center rod to encircle it. The authors call this the "one-knot setup HDS," and with this method, a large-caliber anastomosis is secured. In many cases, it is difficult to observe the anastomotic site through the small incisional opening. However, under laparoscopy with the temporal abdominal wall-lift method using the Multi Flap Gate, the anastomotic site can be easily and safely observed. One-knot setup HDS combined with the temporal abdominal wall-lift method is considered a safe and simple method for performing Billroth I anastomosis in laparoscopic distal gastrectomy. PMID:18324439

  8. Strategic approach to concurrent aberrant left gastric vein and aberrant left hepatic artery in laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kuwada, Kazuya; Kuroda, Shinji; Kikuchi, Satoru; Hori, Naoto; Kubota, Tetsushi; Nishizaki, Masahiko; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2015-11-01

    An aberrant left gastric vein (ALGV) directly entering the lateral segment of the liver is a rare variation in the portal vein system, whereas an aberrant left hepatic artery (ALHA) arising from the left gastric artery is observed relatively frequently. Here we report a case in which both ALGV and ALHA were encountered before laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with curative lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer. We accurately diagnosed these vessel anomalies preoperatively on abdominal contrast-enhanced CT. During surgery, we divided the ALGV at the point of entry to the liver and preserved the ALHA by dividing the branches toward the stomach, in consideration of curability and safety. The postoperative course was uneventful overall, although temporary mild liver dysfunction was observed. This case highlights the importance of preoperative evaluation and preparation in a rare case of concurrent ALGV and ALHA. PMID:26708584

  9. Iatrogenic oesophageal transection during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Meshikhes, Abdul-Wahed Nasir; Al-Saif, Osama Habib

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy has been hailed as an easy and safe procedure when compared with other bariatric operations. However, it may be associated with well-recognised early complications such as leaks and bleeding, as well as late ones such as stenosis and weight regain. Iatrogenic complete oesophageal transection has never been reported before as a complication. We report a case of complete oesophageal transection during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy that was not recognised intraoperatively. The repair of this iatrogenic injury was staged, with the final stage carried out some 3 months after the initial procedure. This case report highlights the possible occurrence of complete oesophageal transection during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, and suggests steps to avoid and correct such complications. PMID:24591379

  10. Safety and application of laparoscopic gastrectomy for benign gastric disease and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zia, MK; Morris-Stiff, G; Luhmann, A; Jeffries, R; Ehsan, O; Hassn, A

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Laparoscopic gastrectomy is rapidly expanding despite reservations by some surgeons regarding its safety and radicality. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrectomy for both benign and malignant disease with particular emphasis on technical feasibility, safety, effectiveness and complications. PATIENTS AND METHODS Review of prospectively collected data of patients who underwent laparoscopic gastrectomy from May 2005 to September 2009 under the care of one consultant surgeon. RESULTS A total of 61 laparoscopic gastrectomies were performed (35 men and 26 women) with a median age of 68 years (range, 41–90 years). There were 39 distal gastrectomies (19 adenocarcinoma, 6 gastrointestinal stromal tumour [GIST], 4 benign gastric outlet obstruction, 4 high-grade dysplasia in gastric adenomas, 4 non-healing ulcers, 2 gastric antral vascular ectasia [GAVE]); 15 sub-total gastrectomies (13 adenocarcinomas, 2 GIST); and 7 total gastrectomies (5 adenocarcinomas, 1 GIST, 1 carcinoid). Median follow-up was for 48 months (range, 1–72 months). There was one death, two major and six minor complications. All patients with complications made a satisfactory recovery. CONCLUSIONS Laparoscopic gastrectomy is associated with a low mortality (1.75%) and major morbidity (3.50%). Although technically demanding, especially when a D2 lymphadenectomy is performed, our results have shown that tailored laparoscopic resection based on tumour characteristics with either D1 or D2 lymphadenectomy results in good surgical and oncological outcomes. PMID:20810021

  11. Laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer in China: an overview.

    PubMed

    Lan, Huanrong; Zhu, Naibiao; Lan, Yuefu; Jin, Ketao; Teng, Lisong

    2015-01-01

    Since its introduction in China in 2000, laparoscopic gastrectomy has shown classical advantages of minimally invasive surgery over open counterpart. Like all the pioneers of the technique, Chinese gastrointestinal surgeons claim that laparoscopic gastrectomy led to faster recovery, shorter hospital stay and more rapid return to daily activities respect to open gastrectomy while offering the same functional and oncological results. There has been booming interest in laparoscopic gastrectomy since 2006 in China. The last decade has witnessed national growth in the application of laparoscopic gastrectomy and yielded a significant amount of scientific data to support its clinical merits and advantages. However, few prospective randomized controlled trials have investigated the benefits of laparoscopic gastrectomy in China. In this article, we make an overview of the current data and state of the art of laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer in China. PMID:25911902

  12. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy in partial situs inversus

    PubMed Central

    Borude, S; Jadhav, S; Shaikh, T; Nath, SR

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery in a patient with Partial Situs Inversus may pose interesting challenges to the surgeon. Here we report a case of a morbidly obese young female with partial situs inversus who underwent Laparoscopic Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG). The peri-operative challenges very many and these have been enumerated. The mirror image approach is recommended in such cases for a successful surgery which was not employed in this case. Postoperative barium swallow was normal and the patient has been on regular follow up. PMID:24960136

  13. Successful laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection preserving the common hepatic artery branched from the left gastric artery for advanced gastric cancer with an Adachi type VI (group 26) vascular anomaly.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hironobu; Yasuda, Takashi; Oshikiri, Taro; Imanishi, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Hironori; Oyama, Masato; Kakinoki, Keitaro; Ohara, Tadayuki; Sendo, Hiroyoshi; Fujino, Yasuhiro; Tominaga, Masahiro; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    We report a case of successful laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection preserving the common hepatic artery branched from the left gastric artery for advanced gastric cancer with an Adachi type VI (group 26) vascular anomaly. A 76-year-old female patient was admitted with a diagnosis of advanced gastric cancer at the anterior wall to the lesser curvature of the antrum (cT3N0M0 cStage IIA). Dynamic computed tomography showed the ectopia of the common hepatic artery branched from the left gastric artery. We made a diagnosis of an Adachi type VI (group 26) vascular anomaly and performed the abovementioned operation. In this anomaly pattern, scrupulous attention is required to remove the suprapancreatic lymph nodes because the portal vein is located immediately dorsal to those lymph nodes and is at increased risk for the injury in this situation. The common hepatic artery is branched from the left gastric artery, and the hepatic perfusion from the superior mesenteric artery is not present in group 26. Planning to preserve the artery will improve safety when it is possible oncologically. There were no postoperative complications, and the patient was discharged 9 days after the operation. To our knowledge, the present case is the first reported case of a laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection with an Adachi type VI (group 26) vascular anomaly. Preoperative diagnostic imaging is very important to prevent surgical complications because the reliable identification of vascular anomaly during an operation is very difficult. PMID:27259578

  14. Carbon dioxide embolism during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zikry, Amir Abu; DeSousa, Kalindi; Alanezi, Khaled H

    2011-01-01

    Bariatric restrictive and malabsorptive operations are being carried out in most countries laparoscopically. Carbon dioxide or gas embolism has never been reported in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. We report a case of carbon dioxide embolism during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) in a young super obese female patient. Early diagnosis and successful management of this complication are discussed. An 18-year-old super obese female patient with enlarged fatty liver underwent LSG under general anesthesia. During initial intra-peritoneal insufflation with CO2 at high flows through upper left quadrant of the abdomen, she had precipitous fall of end-tidal CO2 and SaO2 % accompanied with tachycardia. Early suspicion led to stoppage of further insufflation. Clinical parameters were stabilized after almost 30 min, while the blood gas analysis was restored to normal levels after 1 h. The area of gas entrainment on the damaged liver was recognized by the surgeon and sealed and the surgery was successfully carried out uneventfully. Like any other laparoscopic surgery, carbon dioxide embolism can occur during bariatric laparoscopic surgery also. Caution should be exercised when Veress needle is inserted through upper left quadrant of the abdomen in patients with enlarged liver. A high degree of suspicion and prompt collaboration between the surgeon and anesthetist can lead to complete recovery from this potentially fatal complication. PMID:21772696

  15. Laparoscopic Proximal Gastrectomy With Gastric Tube Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Norio; Toujigamori, Manabu; Shiroshita, Hidefumi; Etoh, Tsuyoshi; Inomata, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There is no standardized method of reconstruction in laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy (LPG). We present a novel technique of reconstruction with a long, narrow gastric tube in LPG for early gastric cancer (EGC). Methods: During the laparoscopic procedure, the upper part of the stomach is fully mobilized with perigastric and suprapancreatic lymphadenectomy, and then the abdominal esophagus is transected. After a minilaparotomy is created, the entire stomach is pulled outside. A long, narrow gastric tube (20 cm long, 3 cm wide) is created with a linear stapler. The proximal part of the gastric tube is formed into a cobra head shape for esophagogastric tube anastomosis, which is then performed with a 45-mm linear stapler under laparoscopic view. The end of the esophagus is fixed on the gastric tube to prevent postoperative esophageal reflux. Results: Thirteen patients with early proximal gastric cancer underwent the procedure. The mean operative time was 283 min, and median blood loss was 63 ml. There were no conversions to open surgery, and no intraoperative complications. Conclusion: This new technique of reconstruction after LPG is simple and feasible. The procedure has the potential of becoming a standard reconstruction technique after LPG for proximal EGC. PMID:27547027

  16. Complicated Gallstones after Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sioka, Eleni; Zacharoulis, Dimitris; Zachari, Eleni; Katsogridaki, Georgia; Tzovaras, George

    2014-01-01

    Background. The natural history of gallstone formation after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), the incidence of symptomatic gallstones, and timing of cholecystectomy are not well established. Methods. A retrospective review of prospectively collected database of 150 patients that underwent LSG was reviewed. Results. Preoperatively, gallbladder disease was identified in 32 of the patients (23.2%). Postoperatively, eight of 138 patients (5.8%) became symptomatic. Namely, three of 23 patients (13%) who had evident cholelithiasis preoperatively developed complicated cholelithiasis. From the cohort of patients without preoperative cholelithiasis, five of 106 patients (4.7%) experienced complicated gallstones after LSG. Total cumulative incidence of complicated gallstones was 4.7% (95% CI: 1.3–8.1%). The gallbladder disease-free survival rate was 92.2% at 2 years. No patient underwent cholecystectomy earlier than 9 months or later than 23 months indicating the post-LSG effect. Conclusion. A significant proportion of bariatric patients compared to the general population became symptomatic and soon developed complications after LSG, thus early cholecystectomy is warranted. Routine concomitant cholecystectomy could be considered because the proportion of patients who developed complications especially those with potentially significant morbidities is high and the time to develop complications is short and because of the real technical difficulties during subsequent cholecystectomy. PMID:25105023

  17. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Garness, Rachel L; Zarroug, Abdalla E; Kumar, Seema; Swain, James M

    2012-04-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is a novel technique in pediatric bariatric surgery. The patient reported here participated in our pediatric weight management clinic for 2 years. His obesity was complicated by obstructive sleep apnea, acanthosis nigricans, and hypertension. His past medical history included 2 small bowel resections, bilateral nephrectomy and kidney transplantation for multicystic renal dysplasia, and 2 peritoneal dialysis-catheter infections. Gastric banding was contraindicated because of previous foreign body infections and chronic need of immunosuppression and steroids. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass was of higher risk given his previous abdominal operations and the resulting medication absorption issues. He underwent LSG without any complications. Five trocars were utilized and a gastroscope was placed during gastric resection. Presurgical body mass index was 44.8 kg/m. At 18 months follow-up body mass index was 26.5 kg/m. We concur that LSG can be a safe and effective alternative in bariatric surgery in well-selected adolescents. PMID:22487636

  18. Reduced port laparoscopic gastrectomy: a review, techniques, and perspective.

    PubMed

    Inaki, Noriyuki

    2015-02-01

    Reduced port laparoscopic surgery has been used increasingly. It is a concept that has grown out of the various efforts aimed at minimally invasive surgery, with SILS being the ultimate reduced port technique. Reduced port laparoscopic surgery has been used to perform sleeve gastrectomy in bariatric surgery and excision of benign gastric submucosal tumor, applications that generally do not require lymph node dissection or complicated reconstruction. It can be done safely, result in a permanent cure, and offer good cosmetic outcomes. Reduced port laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer has a short history, and its usefulness has not yet been fully established. This review describes the present situation and challenges faced as well as standardized procedures and the future prospects of reduced port laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer, which my team performs almost daily. These aspects of reduced port laparoscopic surgery are presented in light of the literature. PMID:25496345

  19. [LAPAROSCOPIC "SLEEVE" GASTRECTOMY POST HEART TRANSPLANTION].

    PubMed

    Mahler, Ilanit; Ben Gal, Tuvia; Kashtan, Hanoch; Keidar, Andrei

    2016-03-01

    Morbid obesity affects the function of the transplanted heart either directly, by damaging many elements that affect cardiac function or indirectly, by the initial appearance or worsening of co-morbidities that affect the heart. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for a significant and sustained decrease in weight and it leads to the disappearance of co-morbidities such as diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia in high rates. These diseases can damage the blood vessels of the graft and impair its function. We report a case study of a 47-year-old morbidly obese male (BMI 36 kg/m2] who underwent heart transplantation three years previously, developed gradual weight gain and symptoms of aggravating heart failure. Coronary artery disease in the implanted heart was diagnosed. Clinically, he started suffering from shortness of breath and chest pain during minimal effort. In addition, he also suffered from high blood pressure and kidney failure. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy was successfully performed and he was discharged four days later. On follow-up the patient has lost 35 kg. His present weight is 74 kg (BMI 25.7). All symptoms of heart failure improved and oral medications for hypertension and heart failure were withdrawn. Our conclusion is that it is justified to consider bariatric surgery in heart transplant recipients suffering from morbid obesity, as long as the long-term benefit outweighs the surgical risk. The decision to perform bariatric surgery should be made by a multidisciplinary team and the operation should take place at a center with extensive experience in bariatric surgery. PMID:27305748

  20. Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy versus Laparoscopic Banded Sleeve Gastrectomy: First Prospective Pilot Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Ippoliti, Simona; Gaspari, Achille; Gentileschi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The placement of ring or band around the gastric tube might prevent the dilation after Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG). We describe the first randomized study comparing LSG and Laparoscopic Banded Sleeve Gastrectomy (LBSG). Material and Method. Fifty obese patients were enrolled in the study between January 2014 and January 2015. We analysed differences in operative time, complication rate, mortality, and BMI between the two groups over a period of 12 months. Results. Twenty-five patients received LSG (group A) and 25 LBSG (group B). The mean preoperative BMI was 47.3 ± 6.58 kg/m2 and 44.95 ± 5.85 kg/m2, respectively, in the two groups. There was no statistical relevant difference in operative time. No intraoperative complications occurred. Mean BMI registered after 3, 6, and 12 months in groups A and B, respectively, were 37.86 ± 5.72 kg/m2 and 37.58 ± 6.21 kg/m2 (p = 0.869), 33.64 ± 6.08 kg/m2 and 32.03 ± 5.24 kg/m2 (p = 0.325), and 29.72 ± 4.40 kg/m2 and 27.42 ± 4.47 kg/m2 (p = 0.186); no statistical relevant difference was registered between the two groups. Conclusion. LBSG is a safe and feasible procedure. The time required for the device positioning did not influence significantly the surgical time. The results of bodyweight loss did not document any statistically significant differences among the two groups, even though LBSG group showed a mean BMI slightly lower than that of the control group. PMID:27143964

  1. Current status in remnant gastric cancer after distal gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Masaichi; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Kubo, Naoshi; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-02-28

    Remnant gastric cancer (RGC) and gastric stump cancer after distal gastrectomy (DG) are recognized as the same clinical entity. In this review, the current knowledges as well as the non-settled issues of RGC are presented. Duodenogastric reflux and denervation of the gastric mucosa are considered as the two main factors responsible for the development of RGC after benign disease. On the other hand, some precancerous circumstances which already have existed at the time of initial surgery, such as atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia, are the main factors associated with RGC after gastric cancer. Although eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in remnant stomach is promising, it is still uncertain whether it can reduce the risk of carcinogenesis. Periodic endoscopic surveillance after DG was reported useful in detecting RGC at an early stage, which offers a chance to undergo minimally invasive endoscopic treatment or laparoscopic surgery and leads to an improved prognosis in RGC patients. Future challenges may be expected to elucidate the benefit of eradication of H. pylori in the remnant stomach if it could reduce the risk for RGC, to build an optimal endoscopic surveillance strategy after DG by stratifying the risk for development of RGC, and to develop a specific staging system for RGC for the standardization of the treatment by prospecting the prognosis. PMID:26937131

  2. Entirely Laparoscopic Gastrectomy and Colectomy for Remnant Gastric Cancer with Gastric Outlet Obstruction and Transverse Colon Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Il

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that gastrectomy with curative intent is the best way to improve outcomes of patients with remnant gastric cancer. Recently,several investigators reported their experiences with laparoscopic gastrectomy of remnant gastric cancer. We report the case of an 83-year-old female patient who was diagnosed with remnant gastric cancer with obstruction. She underwent an entirely laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with colectomy because of direct invasion of the transverse colon. The operation time was 200 minutes. There were no postoperative complications. The pathologic stage was T4b (transverse colon) N0M0. Our experience suggests that laparoscopic surgerycould be an effective method to improve the surgical outcomes of remnant gastric cancer patients. PMID:26819808

  3. Technique to manage persistent leak from a prepyloric ulcer where a distal gastrectomy is not appropriate

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, Kirk; Balcombe, Alison; Rait, Jaideep; Andrews, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Perforated peptic ulcer disease remains a relatively frequent emergency surgery presentation. Persistent leak is the most common indication for return to theatre. We present a technique to manage patients in whom a more substantial resection is not possible. A 45-year-old woman underwent initial laparoscopic primary closure of a non-malignant perforated gastric ulcer. This subsequently leaked on return to the UK and had a further graham patch formed via a laparotomy. Unfortunately, the patch repair leaked and at reoperation a wedge excision or distal gastrectomy was not possible given the friability of the tissues and instability of the patient, a transgastric drain and perigastric drain were therefore placed. This created a controlled fistula, which was managed eventually as an outpatient. Transgastric drains in the context of the persistent perforated gastric ulcer leak are a safe way to manage the unstable patient with poor tissues where more substantial surgeries such as a distal gastrectomy are not possible. PMID:26265682

  4. Gastric remnant twist in the immediate post-operative period following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Subhas, Gokulakkrishna; Gupta, Anupam; Sabir, Mubashir; Mittal, Vijay K

    2015-01-01

    Twist of stomach remnant post sleeve gastrectomy is a rare entity and difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. We are reporting a case of gastric volvulus post laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, which was managed conservatively. A 38-year-old lady with a body mass index of 54 underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Sleeve gastrectomy was performed over a 32 French bougie using Endo-GIA tri-stapler. On post-operative day 1, patient had nausea and non-bilious vomiting. An upper gastrointestinal gastrografin study on post-operative days 1 and 2 revealed collection of contrast in the fundic area of stomach with poor flow distally, and she vomited gastrograffin immediately post procedure. With the suspicion of a stricture in the mid stomach as the cause, the patient was taken back for a exploratory laparoscopy and intra-operative endoscopy. We found a twist in the gastric tube which was too tight for the endoscope to pass through. This was managed conservatively with a long stent to keep the gastric tube straight and patent. The stent was discontinued in 7 d and the patient did well. In laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy the stomach is converted into a tube and is devoid of its supports. If the staples fired are not aligned appropriately, it can predispose this stomach tube to undergo torsion along its long axis. Such a twist can be avoided by properly aligning the staples and by placing tacking sutures to the omentum and new stomach tube. This twist is a functional obstruction rather than a stricture; thus, it can be managed by endoscopy and stent placement. PMID:26649158

  5. Gastric remnant twist in the immediate post-operative period following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Subhas, Gokulakkrishna; Gupta, Anupam; Sabir, Mubashir; Mittal, Vijay K

    2015-11-27

    Twist of stomach remnant post sleeve gastrectomy is a rare entity and difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. We are reporting a case of gastric volvulus post laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, which was managed conservatively. A 38-year-old lady with a body mass index of 54 underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Sleeve gastrectomy was performed over a 32 French bougie using Endo-GIA tri-stapler. On post-operative day 1, patient had nausea and non-bilious vomiting. An upper gastrointestinal gastrografin study on post-operative days 1 and 2 revealed collection of contrast in the fundic area of stomach with poor flow distally, and she vomited gastrograffin immediately post procedure. With the suspicion of a stricture in the mid stomach as the cause, the patient was taken back for a exploratory laparoscopy and intra-operative endoscopy. We found a twist in the gastric tube which was too tight for the endoscope to pass through. This was managed conservatively with a long stent to keep the gastric tube straight and patent. The stent was discontinued in 7 d and the patient did well. In laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy the stomach is converted into a tube and is devoid of its supports. If the staples fired are not aligned appropriately, it can predispose this stomach tube to undergo torsion along its long axis. Such a twist can be avoided by properly aligning the staples and by placing tacking sutures to the omentum and new stomach tube. This twist is a functional obstruction rather than a stricture; thus, it can be managed by endoscopy and stent placement. PMID:26649158

  6. [Laparoscopic Gastrostomy for a Patient with Wernicke's Encephalopathy after Gastrectomy--A Case Report with a Literature Review].

    PubMed

    Arita, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Shuhei; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Hirotaka; Morimura, Ryo; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Okamoto, Kazuma; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-11-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is usually related to alcoholism, malnutrition, or hyperemesis gravidarum. We report a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy after distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer. A 58-year-old man underwent distal gastrectomy with Billroth Ⅰreconstruction for early gastric cancer. Nine months later, he developed anorexia and vomiting for a few days. Brain MRI showed no significant findings, and he resumed ingestion 5 days after admission. On the 8th day of hospitalization, dysphagia suddenly developed and brain MRI indicated Wernicke's encephalopathy. Vitamin B1 was immediately injected, and neurological symptoms gradually improved. However, dysphagia did not adequately improve, leading to severe aspiration pneumonitis. Laparoscopic gastrostomy was performed for aspiration of the stomach contents and initiation of enteral nutrition. After gastrostomy, the patient made good progress and was transferred to a rehabilitation hospital. We should recognize that gastrectomy can cause Wernicke's encephalopathy. PMID:26805256

  7. Beginner Surgeon's Initial Experience with Distal Subtotal Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer Using a Minimally Invasive Approach

    PubMed Central

    You, Yung Hun; Ahn, Dae Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Minimally invasive gastrectomy (MIG), including laparoscopic distal subtotal gastrectomy (LDG) and robotic distal subtotal gastrectomy (RDG), is performed for gastric cancer, and requires a learning period. However, there are few reports regarding MIG by a beginner surgeon trained in MIG for gastric cancer during surgical residency and fellowship. The aim of this study was to report our initial experience with MIG, LDG, and RDG by a trained beginner surgeon. Materials and Methods Between January 2014 and February 2015, a total of 36 patients (20 LDGs and 16 RDGs) underwent MIG by a beginner surgeon during the learning period, and 13 underwent open distal subtotal gastrectomy (ODG) by an experienced surgeon in Bundang CHA Medical Center. Demographic characteristics, operative findings, and short-term outcomes were evaluated for the groups. Results MIG was safely performed without open conversion in all patients and there was no mortality in either group. There was no significant difference between the groups in demographic factors except for body mass index. There were significant differences in extent of lymph node dissection (LND) (D2 LND: ODG 8.3% vs. MIG 55.6%, P=0.004) and mean operative time (ODG 178.8 minutes vs. MIG 254.7 minutes, P<0.001). The serial changes in postoperative hemoglobin level (P=0.464) and white blood cell count (P=0.644) did not show significant differences between the groups. There were no significant differences in morbidity. Conclusions This study showed that the operative and short-term outcomes of MIG for gastric cancer by a trained beginner surgeon were comparable with those of ODG performed by an experienced surgeon. PMID:26819806

  8. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and gastroesophageal reflux

    PubMed Central

    Stenard, Fabien; Iannelli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the only effective procedure that provides long-term sustained weight loss. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) has emerged over the last few years to be an ideal bariatric procedure because it has several advantages compared to more complex bariatric procedures, including avoiding an intestinal bypass. However, several published follow-up studies report an increased rate of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) after a SG. GERD is described as either de novo or as being caused by aggravation of preexisting symptoms. However, the literature on this topic is ambivalent despite the potentially increased rate of GERDs that may occur after this common bariatric procedure. This article reviews the mechanisms responsible for GERD in obese subjects as well as the results after a SG with respect to GERD. Future directions for clinical research are discussed along with the current surgical options for morbidly obese patients with GERD and undergoing bariatric surgery. PMID:26420961

  9. Lessons Learned from a Comparative Analysis of Surgical Outcomes of and Learning Curves for Laparoscopy-Assisted Distal Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jun-Seok; Park, Man Sik; Kim, Jong-Han; Jang, You-Jin; Park, Sung-Soo; Mok, Young-Jae; Kim, Seung-Joo; Kim, Chong-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Before expanding our indications for laparoscopic gastrectomy to advanced gastric cancer and adopting reduced port laparoscopic gastrectomy, we analyzed and audited the outcomes of laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) for adenocarcinoma; this was done during the adoptive period at our institution through the comparative analysis of short-term surgical outcomes and learning curves (LCs) of two surgeons with different careers. Materials and Methods A detailed comparative analysis of the LCs and surgical outcomes was done for the respective first 95 and 111 LADGs performed by two surgeons between July, 2006 and June, 2011. The LCs were fitted by using the non-linear ordinary least squares estimation method. Results The postoperative morbidity and mortality rates were 14.6% and 0.0%, respectively, and there was no significant difference in the morbidity rates (12.6% vs. 16.2%, P=0.467). More than 25 lymph nodes were retrieved by each surgeon during LADG procedures. The LCs of both surgeons were distinct. In this study, a stable plateau of the LC was not achieved by both surgeons even after performing 90 LADGs. Conclusions Regardless of the experience with gastrectomy or laparoscopic surgery for other organs, or the age of surgeon, the outcome was quite acceptable; the learning process differ according to the surgeon's experience and individual characteristics. PMID:25861520

  10. [Gastric lipoma removed by laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Olguín R, Roberto; Norero M, Enrique; Briceño, Eduardo; Martínez, Cristian; Viñuela, Eduardo; Báez, Sergio; Aguayo, Gloria; Calvo, Alfonso; Mege R, Rose; Díaz, Alfonso

    2013-07-01

    Gastric lipoma is a rare benign gastric tumor. We report a 62-year-old man, who presented with abdominal pain, vomiting and weight loss. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a gastric antral, submucosal tumor. Abdominal ultrasound and computed tomography revealed a large antral lesion with content of high echogenicity and fat density, measuring 11 x 6 cm. The patient was treated with a laparoscopic distal subtotal gastrectomy, and a Roux-en-Y reconstruction. The patient had no postoperative morbidity, was started on a liquid diet on the third postoperative day and was discharged on the third postoperative day. The pathological study revealed a gastric lipoma with clear margins. This laparoscopic procedure represents a good alternative in the treatment of this benign gastric tumor. PMID:24356743

  11. Risk factors for pulmonary complications following laparoscopic gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ntutumu, Redondo; Liu, Hao; Zhen, Li; Hu, Yan-Feng; Mou, Ting-Yu; Lin, Tian; I, Balde A.; Yu, Jiang; Li, Guo-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The risk factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) following laparoscopic gastrectomy have not been well studied. We sought to identify the risk factors for PPCs following gastric cancer surgery. A retrospective analysis was performed on all gastric cancer patients in a prospective database who underwent a laparoscopic gastrectomy from 2004 to 2014. The potential risk factors for PPCs were evaluated. PPCs occurred in 6.8% (83/1205) of patients and included pneumonia in 56 (67.5%) patients, pleural effusion in 26 (31.3%) patients, and pulmonary embolism in 1 (1.2%) patient. The multivariate analysis identified the following significant risk factors for PPCs: advanced age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.043, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.021%, 1.066%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR = 17.788, 95% CI = 2.618%, 120.838%), total gastrectomy (OR = 2.781, 95% CI = 1.726%, 4.480%), time to first diet (OR = 1.175, 95% CI = 1.060%, 1.302%), and postoperative hospital stay (OR = 1.015, 95% CI = 1.002%, 1.028%). The risk factors for pneumonia included advanced age (OR = 1.036, 95% CI = 1.010%, 1.063%), total gastrectomy (OR = 3.420, 95% CI = 1.960%, 5.969%), and time to first diet (OR = 1.207, 95% CI = 1.703%, 1.358%). Only pancreatectomy was a risk factor for pleural effusion (OR = 9.082, 95% CI = 2.412%, 34.206%). The frequency of PPCs in patients with gastric cancer who underwent laparoscopic surgery was relatively high. Patients with cardiac and pulmonary comorbidities and those who undergo total gastrectomy and combined resection should be considered at high risk. PMID:27512884

  12. Laparoscopic and robot-assisted gastrectomy for gastric cancer: Current considerations

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Stefano; Patriti, Alberto; Roviello, Franco; De Franco, Lorenzo; Franceschini, Franco; Coratti, Andrea; Ceccarelli, Graziano

    2016-01-01

    Radical gastrectomy with an adequate lymphadenectomy is the main procedure which makes it possible to cure patients with resectable gastric cancer (GC). A number of randomized controlled trials and meta-analysis provide phase III evidence that laparoscopic gastrectomy is technically safe and that it yields better short-term outcomes than conventional open gastrectomy for early-stage GC. While laparoscopic gastrectomy has become standard therapy for early-stage GC, especially in Asian countries such as Japan and South Korea, the use of minimally invasive techniques is still controversial for the treatment of more advanced tumours, principally due to existing concerns about its oncological adequacy and capacity to carry out an adequately extended lymphadenectomy. Some intrinsic drawbacks of the conventional laparoscopic technique have prevented the worldwide spread of laparoscopic gastrectomy for cancer and, despite technological advances in recent year, it remains a technically challenging procedure. The introduction of robotic surgery over the last ten years has implied a notable mutation of certain minimally invasive procedures, making it possible to overcome some limitations of the traditional laparoscopic technique. Robot-assisted gastric resection with D2 lymph node dissection has been shown to be safe and feasible in prospective and retrospective studies. However, to date there are no high quality comparative studies investigating the advantages of a robotic approach to GC over traditional laparoscopic and open gastrectomy. On the basis of the literature review here presented, robot-assisted surgery seems to fulfill oncologic criteria for D2 dissection and has a comparable oncologic outcome to traditional laparoscopic and open procedure. Robot-assisted gastrectomy was associated with the trend toward a shorter hospital stay with a comparable morbidity of conventional laparoscopic and open gastrectomy, but randomized clinical trials and longer follow-ups are

  13. Laparoscopic and robot-assisted gastrectomy for gastric cancer: Current considerations.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Stefano; Patriti, Alberto; Roviello, Franco; De Franco, Lorenzo; Franceschini, Franco; Coratti, Andrea; Ceccarelli, Graziano

    2016-07-01

    Radical gastrectomy with an adequate lymphadenectomy is the main procedure which makes it possible to cure patients with resectable gastric cancer (GC). A number of randomized controlled trials and meta-analysis provide phase III evidence that laparoscopic gastrectomy is technically safe and that it yields better short-term outcomes than conventional open gastrectomy for early-stage GC. While laparoscopic gastrectomy has become standard therapy for early-stage GC, especially in Asian countries such as Japan and South Korea, the use of minimally invasive techniques is still controversial for the treatment of more advanced tumours, principally due to existing concerns about its oncological adequacy and capacity to carry out an adequately extended lymphadenectomy. Some intrinsic drawbacks of the conventional laparoscopic technique have prevented the worldwide spread of laparoscopic gastrectomy for cancer and, despite technological advances in recent year, it remains a technically challenging procedure. The introduction of robotic surgery over the last ten years has implied a notable mutation of certain minimally invasive procedures, making it possible to overcome some limitations of the traditional laparoscopic technique. Robot-assisted gastric resection with D2 lymph node dissection has been shown to be safe and feasible in prospective and retrospective studies. However, to date there are no high quality comparative studies investigating the advantages of a robotic approach to GC over traditional laparoscopic and open gastrectomy. On the basis of the literature review here presented, robot-assisted surgery seems to fulfill oncologic criteria for D2 dissection and has a comparable oncologic outcome to traditional laparoscopic and open procedure. Robot-assisted gastrectomy was associated with the trend toward a shorter hospital stay with a comparable morbidity of conventional laparoscopic and open gastrectomy, but randomized clinical trials and longer follow-ups are

  14. Laparoscopic Gastrectomy and Transvaginal Specimen Extraction in a Morbidly Obese Patient with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sumer, Fatih; Karagul, Servet

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic gastrectomy for cancer has some significant postoperative benefits over open surgery with similar oncologic outcomes. This procedure is more popular in the Far East countries where obesity is not a serious public health problem. In the Western countries, laparoscopic gastrectomy for cancer is not a common procedure, yet obesity is more common. Herein, we aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of laparoscopic gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer in a morbidly obese patient. Additionally, we used natural orifice specimen extraction as an option to decrease wound-related complications, which are more prevalent in morbidly obese patients. In this case, we performed a fully laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with lymph node dissection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy with the specimen extracted through the vagina. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first report of a natural orifice surgery in a morbidly obese patient with gastric cancer. PMID:27104027

  15. Laparoscopic Gastrectomy and Transvaginal Specimen Extraction in a Morbidly Obese Patient with Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Fatih; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Karagul, Servet

    2016-03-01

    Laparoscopic gastrectomy for cancer has some significant postoperative benefits over open surgery with similar oncologic outcomes. This procedure is more popular in the Far East countries where obesity is not a serious public health problem. In the Western countries, laparoscopic gastrectomy for cancer is not a common procedure, yet obesity is more common. Herein, we aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of laparoscopic gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer in a morbidly obese patient. Additionally, we used natural orifice specimen extraction as an option to decrease wound-related complications, which are more prevalent in morbidly obese patients. In this case, we performed a fully laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with lymph node dissection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy with the specimen extracted through the vagina. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first report of a natural orifice surgery in a morbidly obese patient with gastric cancer. PMID:27104027

  16. Incidental gastric glomus tumor after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Oruç, Mehmet Tahir; Aslaner, Arif; Çekiç, Sema; Sakar, Alkan; Yardimci, Erdem Can

    2016-01-01

    Gastric glomus tumors (GGTs) are unusual benign, subepithelial, mesenchymal neoplasms of modified smooth muscle cells representing a neoplastic counterpart of glomus bodies. A 38-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic presenting morbid obesity. Routine preoperative evaluations, such as laboratory analysis, abdominal ultrasonography, and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, were performed. She underwent a classical laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). The postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged for outpatient control. Her histopathology report revealed a GGT 0.8 cm in diameter. No further treatment was done and she had lost 28 kg at the postoperative sixth month. Here, we present the case of GGT, which was diagnosed incidentally after LSG. PMID:27284541

  17. Does single-port laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy result in improved short-term perioperative outcomes compared to conventional multi-port laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy?

    PubMed

    Lo, Charlene; Latin, Ladoris; Fariñas, Ángel; Cruz Pico, Christian X; Postoev, Angelina; Ibikunle, Christopher; Sanni, Aliu

    2015-10-01

    A best evidence topic in bariatric surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question asked whether single-port laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy produces better short-term perioperative outcomes compared to the conventional multi-port laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy in the treatment of morbid obesity. A Pubmed search generated 82 papers, 6 of which represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. Of the 6, 1 paper was an updated analysis of the same patient cohort. The evidence on this subject is good. Five papers were level III, nonrandomized studies, 2 of which were prospective and 3 were retrospective cohort studies. The sixth paper was a level II, randomized, prospective study. We conclude that single-port laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy results in less use of postoperative analgesia and better cosmetic satisfaction compared to multi-port laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy in the short-term. The two groups showed comparable results in terms of mean operative time, mean hospitalization, and percentage excess weight loss. There was no difference in rate of postoperative complications including trocar site incisional hernia, staple line leaks, and bleeding. PMID:26278664

  18. Total laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with transvaginal specimen extraction is feasible in advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sumer, Fatih; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Ertugrul, Ismail; Yagci, Mehmet Ali; Karagul, Servet

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) is an ever-evolving advanced laparoscopic technique. NOSE minimizes surgical injury, involving a low risk of wound complications, fewer incisional hernias, faster recovery and less postoperative pain. Laparoscopic gastrectomy combined with NOSE is a procedure that can potentiate the advantages of both minimal invasive techniques. We aim to demonstrate the feasibility of laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with transvaginal specimen extraction in advanced gastric cancer. Case A 72-year-old woman with a 2 cm adenocarcinoma in gastric antrum was treated by laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy and lymph node dissection. A totally laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy was constructed. Specimen was extracted through the posterior fornix of vagina without difficulty. Histopathology confirmed pT3pN0 tumor. After a 10-month follow-up the patient was asymptomatic and getting adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Conclusions Transvaginal specimen extraction after laparoscopic gastric resection for advanced gastric cancer is a feasible procedure. It is offered to selected patients and of course only to female patients. Natural orifice surgery may provide faster recovery and decrease the wound related complications which may cause a delay on postoperative adjuvant chemo–radio therapies. We have presented, as far as we know, the first human case of a transvaginal extraction of an advanced gastric cancer after laparoscopic gastrectomy. PMID:26413924

  19. Laparoscopy-Assisted Distal Gastrectomy in a Patient With Situs Inversus Totalis

    PubMed Central

    Maehara, Ritsuko; Matsuda, Yoshiko; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Nakamura, Tetsu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Kuroda, Daisuke; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We report on a patient with situs inversus totalis who underwent laparoscopic-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) involving standard lymph node dissection (LND) for early gastric cancer. Case Description: A 42-y-old man presented at the Department of Internal Medicine in our hospital with the diagnosis of early gastric cancer detected elsewhere by upper endoscopy. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for this early gastric cancer was performed at our hospital. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen yielded the diagnosis of type 0-IIc, T1b1(SM), ly (+), v (−), UL (−), HM0, VM0, R0, according to the Japanese Classification of Gastric Carcinoma. Additional surgery was deemed necessary, and he was referred to our department. Preoperative computed tomography showed no liver or lung metastasis. The preoperative diagnosis was cStage IA (pT1b1, cN0, cH0, cP0, and cM0). Standard LADG with LND (D1+No.7, 8a, 9) was performed successfully. Histological examination disclosed stage IB (pT1b1, pN1, sH0, sP0, and sM0). The patient was discharged on postoperative day 14 after an uneventful postoperative course. Eighteen months after the operation, he is doing well without recurrent gastric cancer. Conclusion: Laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer with SIT should be considered a feasible, safe, and curative procedure. PMID:24960499

  20. "Tornado Roux-en-Y" anastomosis in laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Eiichiro; Honda, Shinobu; Baba, Yoshifumi; Ishikawa, Shinji; Hayashi, Naoko; Miyanari, Nobutomo; Baba, Hideo

    2008-01-01

    The use of laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy has been gradually spreading and it has become one of the standard treatment options for early gastric cancer in Japan. But anastomotic problems are still frequent with this procedure, because of its technical difficulty. We have developed a simple, safe, and speedy Roux-en-Y anastomosis for use in laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy. Here, we describe our technique and the short-term results. PMID:18825313

  1. Should an Aberrant Left Hepatic Artery Arising from the Left Gastric Artery Be Preserved during Laparoscopic Gastrectomy for Early Gastric Cancer Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jieun; Kim, Su Mi; Seo, Jeong Eun; Ha, Man Ho; An, Ji Yeong; Choi, Min Gew; Lee, Jun Ho; Bae, Jae Moon; Kim, Sung; Jeong, Woo Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose During laparoscopic gastrectomy, an aberrant left hepatic artery (ALHA) arising from the left gastric artery (LGA) is occasionally encountered. The aim of this study was to define when an ALHA should be preserved during laparoscopic gastrectomy. Materials and Methods From August 2009 to December 2014, 1,340 patients with early gastric cancer underwent laparoscopic distal gastrectomy. One hundred fifty patients presented with an ALHA; of the ALHA was ligated in 116 patients and preserved in 34 patients. Patient characteristics, postoperative outcomes and perioperative liver function tests were reviewed retrospectively. Correlations between the diameter of the LGA measured on preoperative abdominal computed tomography and postoperative liver enzyme levels were analyzed. Results Pearson's correlation analysis showed a positive correlation between the diameter of the LGA and serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels on postoperative day 1 in the ALHA-ligated group (P=0.039, P=0.026, respectively). Linear regression analysis estimated the diameter of the LGA to be 5.1 mm and 4.9 mm when AST and ALT levels were twice the normal limit on postoperative day 1. Conclusions We suggest preserving the ALHA arising from a large LGA, having diameter greater than 5 mm, during laparoscopic gastrectomy to prevent immediate postoperative hepatic dysfunction. PMID:27433391

  2. Oncologic value of laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aurello, Paolo; Sagnotta, Andrea; Terrenato, Irene; Berardi, Giammauro; Nigri, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Francesco; Ramacciato, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The oncologic validity of laparoscopic-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) remains controversial. This study is a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available evidence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A comprehensive search was performed between 2008 and 2014 to identify comparative studies evaluating morbidity/mortality, oncologic surgery-related outcomes, recurrence and survival rates. Data synthesis and statistical analysis were carried out using RevMan 5.2 software. RESULTS: Eight studies with a total of 1456 patients were included in this analysis. The complication rate was lower in LADG [odds ratio (OR) 0.59; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.42-0.83; P < 0.002]. The in-hospital mortality rate was comparable (OR 1.22; 95% CI = 0.28-5-29, P = 0.79). There was no significant difference in the number of harvested lymph nodes, resection margins, cancer recurrence rate, cancer-related mortality or overall and disease-free survival (OS and DFS, respectively) rates between the laparoscopic and the open groups (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The current study supports the view that LADG for AGC is a feasible, safe and effective procedure in selected patients. Adequate lymphadenectomy, resection margins, recurrence, cancer-related mortality and long-term outcomes appear equivalent to open distal gastrectomy (ODG). PMID:27279389

  3. Institutional Improvement in Weight Loss after Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Mangieri, Christopher W; Strode, Matthew A; Sherman, William E; Pierotti, Matthew L; Faler, Byron J; Choi, Yong U

    2016-05-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is a recent addition to the bariatric surgery armamentarium. It has been demonstrated to be an efficacious stand-alone bariatric procedure in regard to weight loss. This study evaluates the progress of our initial experience with LSG. Retrospective review of prospective data from 2008 to 2010. Compared data between our first operative year of experience with LSG (2008) and our third year of experience (2010). Data compared for up to three years postoperatively. End points were percentage of excess body weight loss (%EWL) and percentage of excess body mass index loss (%EBL). Institutional improvement in %EWL and %EBL rates as our collective experience increased with LSG. Mean increase in %EWL of 14 per cent and mean increase of %EBL of 22 per cent. In our first year performing LSG the institutional weight loss was <50 per cent EWL, which is often cited as a benchmark level for "success" after bariatric surgery. By our third year of experience with LSG we achieved an institutional weight loss >50 per cent EWL. Institutional improvement in weight loss results with LSG as the collective experience increased. Several factors could have contributed to this observation to include a surgical mentorship program and the institution of formal nutritional education. This study demonstrates that institutional experience is a significant factor in weight loss results with LSG. PMID:27215727

  4. Effects of laparoscopic radical gastrectomy and the influence on immune function and inflammatory factors

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhao; Bao, Xuebin; Gu, Junbao

    2016-01-01

    The effects of laparoscopic radical gastrectomy were observed, and changes in immune function and inflammatory factors of gastric cancer patients were examined. In total, 236 cases of laparoscopic radical gastrectomy were selected between March 2014 and October 2015 and divided into the control and experimental groups. The control group was treated using open radical gastrectomy, while laparoscopic radical gastrectomy was used in the experimental group. Treatment effects, immune function and inflammatory factor in the two groups were compared. Compared to the open radical gastrectomy group, surgery time in the laparoscopic radical gastrectomy group was longer, while blood loss during operation, time of exsufflation through anus after operation, duration of acesodyne use, length of stay and incidence of complications were lower, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). As for the amount of lymph node dissection, differences between the two groups were of no statistical significance (P>0.05). CD3+, CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ cell ratios in the two groups 1 and 7 days after surgery were obviously lower than those before surgery (P<0.05) while CD8+ was higher. In addition, compared with the open radical gastrectomy group, CD3+, CD4+, CD4+/CD8+ cell ratios in the laparoscopic radical gastrectomy group increased while CD8 was lower, and differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). Differences of interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and CRP between the two groups 1 day before surgery were of no statistical significance (P>0.05). One day after surgery, IL-6, TNF and CRP in the two groups increased (P<0.05) and the values in the open radical gastrectomy group were higher (P<0.05). Differences in IL-6 between the two groups 7 days after surgery were of no statistical significance (P>0.05). However, for CRP and TNF, the two values gradually decreased and the differences between the groups were of statistical significance (P<0.05). In conclusion

  5. A simplified technique for tumor localization using preoperative endoscopic clipping and radio-opaque markers during totally laparoscopic gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom Su; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Byung Sik; Jung, Hwoon-Yong

    2014-12-01

    Tumor localization during intracorporeal anastomosis after totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy (TLDG) is challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the simplicity and feasibility of locating tumors in the stomach using radio-opaque markers and preoperative endoscopic clipping. The intra- and postoperative findings of 29 patients who underwent TLDG with intracorporeal anastomosis between January 2012 and March 2013 were reviewed. Preoperative endoscopic clips were applied just proximal to the tumor by specialized endoscopists, and surgical gauze with an attached radio-opaque marker (3 mm × 60 mm) was prepared. The marker was fixed to either the anterior or posterior of the stomach, above the predicted site of the tumor, using suture ties. Portable abdominal radiography was used during the laparoscopic surgery, and the stomach was resected using guidance by the radiomarker. The radio-opaque marker and the endoscopic clips were clearly visible by intraoperative abdominal radiography. All patients received curative resection. No complications or deaths were encountered. The mean distance between the endoscopic clips and the radiomarker by portable intraoperative radiography was 21.3 ± 18.3 mm, whereas the actual in situ mean distance was 20.7 ± 17.6 mm. This difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). It is imperative that preoperative endoscopic clips are applied just proximal to the tumor by specialized endoscopists. The use of a radio-opaque marker is a simple and feasible way to locate tumors during totally laparoscopic gastrectomy. PMID:25513928

  6. Outcome Analysis of Early Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy Experience

    PubMed Central

    Antanavicius, Gintaras; Bonanni, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic vertical sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) was initially performed as the first stage of biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch in the superobese population. In the past few years, however, LSG has been performed as a definitive procedure because of its promising early and midterm results. In this study we describe our initial experience and outcomes with LSG as a potential independent bariatric operation. Methods: A prospectively maintained database including all patients between 2008 and 2011 was reviewed. Results: A total of 100 initial consecutive patients (69 women and 31 men) were included, with a mean age of 50 years (range, 19–79 years) and body mass index of 49 kg/m2 (range, 36.6–70.3 kg/m2). The mean operative time was 106 minutes (range, 58–212 minutes) with a 2% conversion rate. Thirty-day perioperative complications included port-site hemorrhage (1.0%) and the inability to tolerate oral intake resulting in dehydration (3%). The reoperation rate was 2%, and the mean length of stay was 3.1 days (range, 2–12 days). In one patient with a prolonged hospital stay, an acute cholecystitis developed, and prosthetic heart valve complications developed in another patient. The mean excess body weight loss was 18%, 31.7%, 45%, 52%, 58.4%, and 64% at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months postoperatively, respectively. No deaths occurred in this series. Conclusions: Satisfactory outcomes and low complication rates were observed after LSG. Our findings suggest that LSG is safe and effective to serve as a definitive bariatric procedure. PMID:24398203

  7. Six month-follow up of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Keleidari, Behrouz; Mahmoudie, Mohsen; Anaraki, Amin Ghanei; Shahraki, Masoud Sayadi; Jamalouee, Samira Dvashi; Gharzi, Mahsa; Mohtashampour, Farnoosh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The rising prevalence of obesity in today populations has led obese individuals to seek medical interventions. Aside from special diets, routine exercise and in some cases, medical treatment, most of the obese patients, favoring those with morbid or super obesity can benefit from bariatric surgery to lose weight. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is relatively new method to limit the compliance of stomach. The consequent quick satiety during each meal results in gradual weight loss in patients. We investigated the efficacy and safety of this method among a group of our patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Isfahan, Iran, from January 2012 to January 2013. Thirty-five cases of obesity that had undergone LSG were enrolled and their baseline data of weight, body mass index (BMI), blood sugar, lipid profile, liver function indexes and blood pressure were collected. The patients were followed up for 6 months. The 6-month results were analyzed. Results: There was significant reduction in BMI, weight, blood sugar, blood pressure, liver enzymes and lipid profile components (P < 0.05), except for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (P = 0.3). The average of excess weight loss percentage after 6 months was 69.2 ± 20.9%. No mortality occurred. Two of the patients had micro anastomotic leaks that were treated with nonoperative management. A case of gross leakage was treated with tube jejunostomy. Conclusion: Our study confirmed the efficacy and safety of LSG as a single surgical intervention for body weight reduction in morbidly and super obese patients. PMID:27110546

  8. Staple Line Reinforcement Methods in Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy: Comparison of Burst Pressures and Leaks

    PubMed Central

    Aras, Orhan; Karip, Bora; Memisoglu, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a technically simple and popular bariatric operation with acceptable results. However, leaks can occur in long staple lines, for which various reinforcement methods are used. We compared nonreinforced stapling in laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy with 3 staple line reinforcement methods: suturing, absorbable buttressing material, and fibrin glue. Methods: From March 1 until September 30, 2014, 118 patients with body mass index >40 kg/m2 underwent sleeve gastrectomy and were enrolled in 4 groups, depending on the type of reinforcement used. The resected stomach specimens were treated with the same methods of reinforcement as used in the surgeries in the corresponding patients and then insufflated until a burst occurred. The burst pressures of the resected stomach specimens and adverse postoperative events were recorded. Results: Five postoperative leaks occurred in the reinforcement groups (fibrin glue, 2; absorbable buttresses, 2; sutures, 1); no leaks were evident in the no-reinforcement group. Suturing afforded the highest burst pressure and took the longest to perform of the methods. There was no correlation between the leaks and burst pressures. All of the leaks occurred in the proximal fundus in the resected stomach specimens and in the affected patients. Discussion: Although most surgeons use additional reinforcement on long staple lines in sleeve gastrectomy, there is no consensus about its necessity. We did not show any benefit of such reinforcement methods over proper stapling technique alone. Conclusion: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy without staple line reinforcement is safe and avoids additional costs for reinforcement materials. PMID:26175554

  9. Aortoenteric fistula at the site of esophagojejunostomy after laparoscopic total gastrectomy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Gunji, Shutaro; Okabe, Hiroshi; Obama, Kazutaka; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2014-11-01

    A fistula between the aorta and the digestive tract is a rare complication of gastrointestinal tract or vascular surgery. There are occasional reports of aortoesophageal fistula as a fatal complication after esophagectomy or esophageal stent implantation and of aortoenteric fistula (AEF) as a complication after aortic or other vascular procedures. However, AEF after gastrointestinal surgery is rare. We report a case of AEF after laparoscopic total gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer, using the so-called overlap method of esophagojejunal anastomosis. The patient was a 77-year-old Japanese woman who underwent laparoscopic total gastrectomy and esophagojejunal anastomosis with Roux-en-Y reconstruction for advanced gastric cancer. Bacterial peritonitis was diagnosed 5 days after the operation, manifesting as partial necrosis and perforation of the small intestine. The patient was treated successfully with laparoscopic partial resection of the small intestine, but ultimately died of massive hematemesis caused by the AEF 30 days after her primary surgery. PMID:24468742

  10. COMPARISON OF LAPAROSCOPIC TOTAL GASTRECTOMY AND LAPAROTOMIC TOTAL GASTRECTOMY FOR GASTRIC CANCER

    PubMed Central

    RAMAGEM, Carlos Alexandre Garção; LINHARES, Marcelo; LACERDA, Croider Franco; BERTULUCCI, Paulo Anderson; WONRATH, Durval; de OLIVEIRA, Antônio Talvane Torres

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of laparoscopy for the treatment of gastric cancer suffered some resistance among surgeons around the world, gaining strength in the past decade. However, its oncological safety and technical feasibility remain controversial. Aim To describe the results from the clinical and anatomopathological point of view in the comparative evaluation between the surgical videolaparoscopic and laparotomic treatments of total gastrectomy with linphadenectomy at D2, resection R0. Method Retrospective analyses and comparison data from patients submitted to total gastrectomy with D2 linphadenectomy at a sole institution. The data of 111 patients showed that 64 (57,7%) have been submitted to laparotomic gastrectomy and 47 (42,3%) to gastrectomy entirely performed through videolaparoscopy. All variables related to the surgery, post-operative follow-up and anatomopathologic findings have been evaluated. Results Among the studied variables, videolaparoscopy has shown a shorter surgical time and a more premature period for the introduction of oral and enteral nourishment than the open surgery. As to the amount of dissected limph nodes, there has been a significant difference towards laparotomy with p=0,014, but the average dissected limph nodes in both groups exceed 25 nodes as recommended by the JAGC. Was not found a significant difference between the studied groups as to age, ASA, type of surgery, need for blood transfusion, stage of the disease, Bormann classification, degree of differentiation, damage of the margins, further complications and death. Conclusions The total gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy performed by laparoscopy presented the same benefits known of laparotomy and with the advantages already established of minimally invasive surgery. It was done with less surgical time, less time for re-introduction of the oral and enteral diets and lower hospitalization time compared to laparotomy, without increasing postoperative complications. PMID:25861074

  11. Simple, Safe, and Cost-Effective Technique for Resected Stomach Extraction in Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Derici, Serhan; Atila, Koray; Bora, Seymen; Yener, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has become a popular operation during the recent years. This procedure requires resection of 80–90% of the stomach. Extraction of gastric specimen is known to be a challenging and costly stage of the operation. In this paper, we report results of a simple and cost-effective specimen extraction technique which was applied to 137 consecutive LSG patients. Methods. Between October 2013 and October 2015, 137 laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy surgeries were performed at Dokuz Eylul University General Surgery Department, Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery Unit. All specimens were extracted through a 15 mm trocar site without using any special device. Results. We noticed one superficial incisional surgical site infection and treated this patient with oral antibiotics. No cases of trocar site hernia were observed. Conclusion. Different techniques have been described for specimen extraction. This simple technique allows extraction of specimen safely in a short time and does not require any special device.

  12. Changes in cerebral oxygen saturation and early postoperative cognitive function after laparoscopic gastrectomy: a comparison with conventional open surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Youn Yi; Kim, Jong Yeop; Lee, Mi Geum; Lee, Seul Gi

    2016-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic gastrectomy requires a reverse-Trendelenburg position and prolonged pneumoperitoneum and it could cause significant changes in cerebral homeostasis and lead to cognitive dysfunction. We compared changes in regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2), early postoperative cognitive function and hemodynamic variables in patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrectomy with those patients that underwent conventional open gastrectomy. Methods Sixty patients were enrolled in this study and the patients were distributed to receive either laparoscopic gastrectomy (laparoscopy group, n = 30) or open conventional gastrectomy (open group, n = 30). rSO2, end-tidal carbon dioxide tension, hemodynamic variables and arterial blood gas analysis were monitored during the operation. The enrolled patients underwent the mini-mental state examination 1 day before and 5 days after surgery for evaluation of early postoperative cognitive function. Results Compared to baseline value, rSO2 and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension increased significantly in the laparoscopy group after pneumoperitoneum, whereas no change was observed in the open group. No patient experienced cerebral oxygen desaturation or postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Changes in mean arterial pressure over time were significantly different between the groups (P < 0.001). Conclusions Both laparoscopic and open gastrectomy did not induce cerebral desaturation or early postoperative cognitive dysfunction in patients under desflurane anesthesia. However, rSO2 values during surgery favoured laparoscopic surgery, which was possibly related to increased cerebral blood flow due to increased carbon dioxide tension and the effect of a reverse Trendelenburg position. PMID:26885301

  13. Impact of surgical approach on postoperative delirium in elderly patients undergoing gastrectomy: laparoscopic versus open approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young-Hee; Jeong, Hee-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative delirium is a frequent complication in elderly patients undergoing major abdominal surgery and is associated with a poor outcome. We compared postoperative delirium in elderly patients following laparoscopic gastrectomy (LG) versus open gastrectomy (OG). Methods In total, 130 patients aged ≥ 65 years with gastric cancer undergoing LG and OG were enrolled prospectively. Postoperative delirium and cognitive status were assessed daily using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), respectively, for 3 days postoperatively. For CAM-positive patients, delirium severity was then assessed using the Delirium Index (DI). Results In total, 123 subjects (LG, n = 60; OG, n = 63) were included in the analysis. In both groups, the overall incidences of postoperative delirium were similar: 31.6% (19/60) in the LG group and 41.2% (26/63) in the OG group. When considering only those with delirium, the severity, expressed as the highest DI score, was similar between the groups. A decline in cognitive function (reduction in MMSE ≥ 2 points from baseline) during 3 days postoperatively was observed in 23 patients in the LG group (38.3%) and 27 patients in the OG group (42.9%) (P = 0.744). In both groups, postoperative cognitive decline was significantly associated with postoperative delirium (P < 0.001). Conclusions We found that, compared with traditional open gastrectomy, laparoscopic gastrectomy did not reduce either postoperative delirium or cognitive decline in elderly patients with gastric cancer. PMID:26257851

  14. Laparoscopic vs open total gastrectomy for gastric cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jun-Jie; Nunes, Quentin M; Huang, Wei; Tan, Chun-Lu; Ke, Neng-Wen; Xie, Si-Ming; Ran, Xun; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong-Hua; Liu, Xu-Bao

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To conduct a meta-analysis comparing laparoscopic total gastrectomy (LTG) with open total gastrectomy (OTG) for the treatment of gastric cancer. METHODS: Major databases such as Medline (PubMed), Embase, Academic Search Premier (EBSCO), Science Citation Index Expanded and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library were searched for studies comparing LTG and OTG from January 1994 to May 2013. Evaluated endpoints were operative, postoperative and oncological outcomes. Operative outcomes included operative time and intraoperative blood loss. Postoperative recovery included time to first flatus, time to first oral intake, hospital stay and analgesics use. Postoperative complications comprised morbidity, anastomotic leakage, anastomotic stenosis, ileus, bleeding, abdominal abscess, wound problems and mortality. Oncological outcomes included positive resection margins, number of retrieved lymph nodes, and proximal and distal resection margins. The pooled effect was calculated using either a fixed effects or a random effects model. RESULTS: Fifteen non-randomized comparative studies with 2022 patients were included (LTG - 811, OTG - 1211). Both groups had similar short-term oncological outcomes, analgesic use (WMD -0.09; 95%CI: -2.39-2.20; P = 0.94) and mortality (OR = 0.74; 95%CI: 0.24-2.31; P = 0.61). However, LTG was associated with a lower intraoperative blood loss (WMD -201.19 mL; 95%CI: -296.50--105.87 mL; P < 0.0001) and overall complication rate (OR = 0.73; 95%CI: 0.57-0.92; P = 0.009); fewer wound-related complications (OR = 0.39; 95%CI: 0.21-0.72; P = 0.002); a quicker recovery of gastrointestinal motility with shorter time to first flatus (WMD -0.82; 95%CI: -1.18--0.45; P < 0.0001) and oral intake (WMD -1.30; 95%CI: -1.84--0.75; P < 0.00001); and a shorter hospital stay (WMD -3.55; 95%CI: -5.13--1.96; P < 0.0001), albeit with a longer operation time (WMD 48.25 min; 95%CI: 31.15-65.35; P < 0.00001), as compared

  15. A comparison of surgical procedures and postoperative cares for minimally invasive laparoscopic gastrectomy and open gastrectomy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hong-Na; Hu, Jun-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive, laparoscopic gastrectomy (LG) has assumed an ever-expanding role in gastric cancer treatment. Accumulating data so far seem to suggest that LG is at least a viable alternative of conventional open gastrectomy (OG) in different contexts. However, even though reviews and meta-analyses have compared the advantages and limitations of each option, it is still controversial whether LG is a better alternative to OG, especially in advanced gastric cancer (AGC). The major goal of this study is to evaluate the readouts of LG, in comparison with OG. A literature search was performed for studies published from 2009 to 2013. Medical records of 20868 gastric cancer patients from 32 independent studies were reviewed and analyzed. All 32 studies concluded that LG is at least comparable with OG. LG is superior to OG in offering less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, and lower risk of complications, although LG is probably inferior in operative time, and not different from OG in mortality. Considering the merits and the potential future technical improvement, it is reasonable to speculate that LG may eventually replace OG in most clinical contexts. PMID:26379823

  16. STEP-BY-STEP ESOPHAGOJEJUNAL ANASTOMOSIS AFTER INTRA-CORPOREAL TOTAL GASTRECTOMY FOR LAPAROSCOPIC GASTRIC CANCER TREATMENT: TECHNIQUE OF "REVERSE ANVIL"

    PubMed Central

    LACERDA, Croider Franco; BERTULUCCI, Paulo Anderson; de OLIVEIRA, Antônio Talvane Torres

    2014-01-01

    Background The laparoscopic gastrectomy is a relatively new procedure due mainly to the difficulties related to lymphadenectomy and reconstruction. Until the moment, technique or device to perform the esophagojejunal anastomosis by laparoscopy is still a challenge. So, a safe, cheap and quickly performing technique is desirable to be developed. Aim To present technique proposed by the authors with its technical details on reconstruction with "reverse anvil". Method After total gastrectomy completed intra-corporeally, the reconstruction starts with the preparation of the intra-abdominal esophagus cross-section next to the esophagogastric transition of 50%. A graduated device is prepared using Levine gastric tubes (nº. 14 and 10), 3 cm length, connected to the anvil of the circular stapler (nº. 25) with a wire thread (2-0 or 3-0) of 10 cm, which is connected to end of this device. The whole device is introduced in reverse esophagus. The esophagus is amputated and the wire is pulled after previous transfixation in the distal esophagus and the anvil positioned. The jejunal loop is sectioned 20-30 cm from duodenojejunal angle, and the anvil put in the jejunal loop and connect previously in the esophagus. Linear stapler (blue 60 mm) is used to close the opening of the jejunal loop. Conclusion The "reverse anvil" technique used by the authors facilitated the transit reestablishment after total gastrectomy, contributing to obviate reconstruction problems after total gastrectomy. PMID:24676304

  17. Dual-incision laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; You, Young Kyoung; Kim, Dong Goo; Lee, Soo Ho; Han, Jae Hyun; Park, Sung Kyun; Na, Gun Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy has been widely performed for benign and borderline malignancy in the body or tail of the pancreas when there are not oncologic indications for splenectomy. As the need for minimally invasive procedures to reduce postoperative morbidity and improve the quality of life is increasing, many surgeons have attempted to reduce the number of trocars and incision size to minimize access trauma and scarring. Single-port laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy is the result of these efforts; however it has many limitations such as technical difficulty and prolonged operation time. In this article, we report the first case of dual-incision laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy, proving that it can be a safe and feasible minimally invasive procedure for benign or borderline malignant tumors in the body or tail of the pancreas. PMID:25741499

  18. Complications associated with laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity: a surgeon’s guide

    PubMed Central

    Sarkhosh, Kourosh; Birch, Daniel W.; Sharma, Arya; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a common disease affecting adults and children. The incidence of obesity in Canada is increasing. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is a relatively new and effective procedure for weight loss. Owing to an increase in the number of bariatric surgical procedures, general surgeons should have an understanding of the complications associated with LSG and an approach for dealing with them. Early postoperative complications following LSG that need to be identified urgently include bleeding, staple line leak and development of an abscess. Delayed complications include strictures, nutritional deficiencies and gastresophageal reflux disease. We discuss the principles involved in the management of each complication. PMID:24067520

  19. Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy in the Postpartum Period: Increased Risk of Bleeding, a Challenging Situation.

    PubMed

    Abouzahr, Omar; Garofalo, Fabio; Garneau, Pierre Y

    2016-06-01

    The female population represents three-fourths of patients undergoing a bariatric procedure and could be scheduled for surgery in their postpartum period. We report a difficult case of a female patient who underwent a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy 6 weeks postpartum. The postpartum period is accompanied by pronounced vasodilatation with transient portal hypertension. Most of the hemodynamic alterations occurring during pregnancy return to baseline within 6-8 weeks after delivery. Bariatric surgery in the postpartum period should be avoided in order for the cardiovascular system to regain its normality. PMID:27034060

  20. [Difficulty in Preoperative Diagnosis of Residual Gastric Cancer after Distal Gastrectomy for Duodenal Ulcer].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masanori; Nakai, Koji; Inoue, Kentaro; Hijikawa, Takeshi; Kitade, Hiroaki; Yoshioka, Kazuhiko; Kon, Masanori

    2015-10-01

    A 67-year-old man underwent distal gastrectomy via the Billroth Ⅱ method (B-Ⅱ) for a duodenal ulcer. He presented with appetite loss and nausea in May 2014. Gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed wall thickness around gastrojejunostomy and the gastric mucosal fold. Biopsy and re-biopsy revealed a group 2 tumor. Laparotomy for diagnosis was performed because of stenosis and tumor progression. Intraoperative frozen section examination revealed adenocarcinoma in the lymph nodes of the jejunum. Residual gastrectomy with reconstruction using the Roux-en-Y method was performed for residual gastric cancer. Histopathological findings revealed pT4a, pN0, pM1 for the tumor in the lymph nodes of the jejunum, pStage Ⅳ. A distorted gastrojejunostomy site and the presence of anastomotic strictures are important for the rapid diagnosis of residual gastric cancer. PMID:26489571

  1. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for adenocarcinoma: safe and reasonable?

    PubMed Central

    Postlewait, Lauren M.

    2015-01-01

    As a result of technological advances during the past two decades, surgeons now use minimally invasive surgery (MIS) approaches to pancreatic resection more frequently, yet the role of these approaches for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma resections remains uncertain, given the aggressive nature of this malignancy. Although there are no controlled trials comparing MIS technique to open surgical technique, laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma is performed with increasing frequency. Data from retrospective studies suggest that perioperative complication profiles between open and laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy are similar, with perhaps lower blood loss and fewer wound infections in the MIS group. Concerning oncologic outcomes, there appear to be no differences in the rate of achieving negative margins or in the number of lymph nodes (LNs) resected when compared to open surgery. There are limited recurrence and survival data on laparoscopic compared to open distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but in the few studies that assess long term outcomes, recurrence rates and survival outcomes appear similar. Recent studies show that though laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy entails a greater operative cost, the associated shorter length of hospital stay leads to decreased overall cost compared to open procedures. Multiple new technologies are emerging to improve resection of pancreatic cancer. Robotic pancreatectomy is feasible, but there are limited data on robotic resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and outcomes appear similar to laparoscopic approaches. Additionally fluorescence-guided surgery represents a new technology on the horizon that could improve oncologic outcomes after resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, though published data thus far are limited to animal models. Overall, MIS distal pancreatectomy appears to be a safe and reasonable approach to treating selected patients with pancreatic ductal

  2. Portomesenteric Vein Thrombosis After Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy: 3 Case Reports and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Muneer, Mohammed; Abdelrahman, Husham; El-Menyar, Ayman; Zarour, Ahmad; Awad, Ahmed; Dhaheri, Mahmood Al; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 27 • Female, 46 • Male, 46 Final Diagnosis: — Symptoms: Vague abdominal pain • severe nausea • vomiting • fever and diffuse abdominal tendernes Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: — Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis (PMVT) is an infrequent but severe surgical complication developing in patients who underwent laparoscopic bariatric surgery (sleeve gastrectomy). Herein, we describe the clinical presentation, management, and outcome of 3 rare cases of PMVT after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), successfully treated at our center. Case Report: All patients developed PMVT post-LSG and presented with diffused abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen confirmed the diagnosis of portal vein thrombosis. Two patients were treated conservatively with anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy and the third patient required operative intervention with bowel resection. Conclusions: PMVT is a rare presentation after LSG, which requires early diagnosis and management. Conservative management through anticoagulants and thrombolytic therapy is quite effective and, if indicated, should always be considered as the primary treatment option. PMID:27068354

  3. Preoperative endoscopy may reduce the need for revisional surgery for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Madhok, B M; Carr, W R J; McCormack, C; Boyle, M; Jennings, N; Schroeder, N; Balupuri, S; Small, P K

    2016-08-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a safe and effective bariatric operation, but postoperative reflux symptoms can sometimes necessitate revisional surgery. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the preferred operation in morbidly obese patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. In 2011, we introduced preoperative endoscopy to assess for hiatus hernia or evidence of oesophagitis in conjunction with an assessment of gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms for all patients undergoing bariatric surgery with a view to avoid sleeve gastrectomy for these patients. A prospectively maintained database was used to identify patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy before and after we changed the unit policy. The need for revisional surgery in patients with troublesome gastro-oesophageal reflux disease was examined. Prior to 2011, 130 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy, and 11 (8.5%) of them required conversion to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for symptomatic reflux disease. Following the policy change, 284 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy, and to date, only five (1.8%) have required revisional surgery (p = 0.001). Baseline demographics were comparable between the groups, and average follow-up period was 47 and 33 months, respectively, for each group. Preoperative endoscopy and a detailed clinical history regarding gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms may improve patient selection for sleeve gastrectomy. Avoiding sleeve gastrectomy in patients with reflux disease and/or hiatus hernia may reduce the incidence of revisional surgery. PMID:27400631

  4. Robot-assisted distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer in a situs inversus totalis patient

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Beom; Lee, Ju Hee; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Kim, Hyung-Ho; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2012-01-01

    A 47-year-old man was referred to Seoul National University Bundang Hospital with an ulcerative lesion in the midbody of the stomach. Computed tomography revealed that he was a situs inversus totalis (SIT) patient. Robot-assisted distal gastrectomy with D1+β lymph node dissection and Billroth II anastomosis were performed. With the aid of robotic surgery, the surgeon didn't need to change his position and could perform the surgery without any confusion resulting from the patient's reversed anatomy. The operation took 300 minutes, with no intraoperative complications. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 8. The final pathologic report was pT3N3a by American Joint Committee on Cancer 7th tumor-node-metastasis staging. We successfully performed robot-assisted distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer in a SIT patient. We believe that this is the first case of robotic surgery reported in a SIT patient with gastric cancer. PMID:22563541

  5. Transumbilical single-incision laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: Short-term results and technical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Mittermair, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) has gained popularity and acceptance among bariatric surgeons, mainly due its low morbidity and mortality. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery has emerged as another modality of carrying out the bariatric procedures. While the single-incision transumbilical (SITU) approach represents an advance, especially for cosmetic reasons, its application in morbid obesity at present is limited. We describe our short-term surgical results and technical considerations with SITU-SG. MATERIALS AND METHODS: SITU-SG was performed in 10 patients between June 2010 and June 2011. SG was performed in a standard fashion and was started 6 cm from the pylorus using a 36 French bougie. RESULTS: They were all females with a mean age of 45 years. Preoperative BMI was 40 kg/m2 (range, 35–45). The mean operative time was 98 min. No peri- or postoperative complications or deaths occurred. All patients were very satisfied with the cosmetic outcomes and excess weight loss. CONCLUSION: True SITU laparoscopic SG is safe and feasible and can be performed without changing the existing principles of the procedure. PMID:24019687

  6. Gastric emptying scan after distal subtotal gastrectomy: Differences between Billroth I and II and predicting the presence of food residue at endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Ari; Ha, Jung-Min; Kim, Sungsoo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether gastric emptying scans (GESs) showed different emptying patterns between patients after different types of laparoscopic distal subtotal gastrectomies. We also investigated whether the presence of food residue via endoscopy can be predicted by GESs. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively enrolled patients who had GESs within postoperative week 1 after a Billroth I or Billroth II operation. Diabetic patients were excluded. GESs were done with a solid test meal. Percent emptying at each scan time was analyzed. The presence of food residue in the stomach and gastrointestinal symptoms at the outpatient clinic were also analyzed. Results: In total, 46 patients were enrolled (Billroth I: Billroth II = 21:25). Sixteen patients underwent a second GES (postoperative 3-6 months). Both groups showed delayed gastric emptying at the postoperative 1 week scan, but group I showed much slower emptying. However, this difference disappeared by the second scan. Based on endoscopies conducted 6 months after the operation, 73.2% of patients had significant amounts of food residue, which hindered an accurate evaluation. The proportion of patients with food residues did not differ between the groups. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed that a cut-off value of ≤ 30% emptying at 100 min and 120 min in postoperative 3-6 month scans was both highly sensitive and specific for predicting the presence of food residue (90.91% and 75% for 100 min and 91.67% and 75% for 120 min, respectively). Conclusions: GESs within a week after distal subtotal gastrectomy show slower emptying of Billroth I than II. At a ≤ 30% emptying threshold, a GES can predict subtotal gastrectomy patients who might have a significant amount of food residue in their stomach even after following typical fasting instructions to prepare endoscopy. PMID:26885000

  7. Portomesenteric venous thrombosis after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: A case report and a call for prevention

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Parveen; John, Suviraj J; Kalhan, Sudhir; Bindal, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative portomesenteric venous thrombosis (PMVT) is being increasingly reported after bariatric surgery. It is variable and often a nonspecific presentation along with its potential for life-threatening and life-altering outcomes makes it imperative that it is prevented, detected early and treated optimally. We report the case of a 50-year-old morbidly obese man undergoing a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy who developed symptomatic PMVT two weeks postsurgery, which was successfully treated by anticoagulant therapy. We provide postulates to the etiopathological mechanism for this thrombotic entity. The growing recognition that obesity and bariatric surgery create a procoagulant state regionally and systemically provides impetus for designing the ideal protocol for PMVT prophylaxis, which could be more common than currently believed. We support the early screening for PMVT in the postbariatric surgical patient with unexplainable or intractable abdominal symptoms. The role of routine surveillance and the ideal duration of post-PMVT anticoagulation is yet to be elucidated. PMID:26622121

  8. Novel oesophago-gastro-duodenal stenting for gastric leaks after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shirley Yuk-Wah; Wong, Simon Kin-Hung; Ng, Enders Kwok-Wai

    2015-01-01

    The management of gastric leak after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) can be complex and challenging. Whilst operative interventions are mostly complicated and reserved for unstable or refractory cases, endoscopic self-expandable metal stenting (SEMS) is increasingly preferred as a safer treatment option. Yet, SEMS carries the problems of frequent stent migration and inconsistent healing as ordinary SEMS is designed mainly for stenotic disease. We hereby present two cases of early and chronic post-LSG leakage that were respectively failed to be treated by surgery and ordinary SEMS but were successfully managed by a dedicated extra-long oesophago-gastro-duodenal stent. In oesophago-gastro-duodenal stenting, the characteristics of extra-long stent length allow total gastric exclusion between the mid-oesophagus and the first part of duodenum to prevent stent migration and to equalise high pressure gradient within the gastric sleeve to promote fistula healing. PMID:25534492

  9. Effect of Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Infusion on Postoperative Bowel Movements in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin Sun; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Lee, Ki-Young; An, Ji Yeong; Bai, Sun Joon; Cho, Ju Yeon; Yoo, Young Chul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sympathetic hyperactivation is one of the causes of postoperative ileus, which occurs frequently after abdominal surgery and adversely influences the patient's prognosis. We aimed to investigate whether dexmedetomidine (DEX) could attenuate postoperative ileus in patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrectomy. Ninety-two patients were randomized to the control (n = 46) or DEX group (n = 46). DEX was administered at a loading dose of 0.5 μg/kg for 10 minutes, followed by an infusion rate of 0.4 μg/kg/h from insufflation of the pneumoperitoneum to the end of surgery. The primary goal was to compare postoperative bowel movements by evaluating the time to first flatus. The balance of the autonomic nervous system, duration of postoperative hospital stay, and pain scores were assessed. The time to first flatus was shorter in the DEX group compared with the control group (67.2 ± 16.8 hours vs 79.9 ± 15.9 hours, P < 0.001). The low-frequency/high-frequency power ratio during pneumoperitoneum increased in the control group, compared with baseline values and the DEX group. The length of postoperative hospital stay was shorter in the DEX group compared with the control group (5.4 ± 0.7 days vs 5.8 ± 1.1 days, P = 0.04). Patients in the DEX group had lower pain scores and required fewer analgesics at 1 hour postoperatively. DEX facilitated bowel movements and reduced the length of hospital stay in patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrectomy. This may be attributed to the sympatholytic and opioid-sparing effects of DEX.

  10. Usefulness of Preoperative Assessment of Perigastric Vascular Anatomy by Dynamic Computed Tomography for Laparoscopic Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Tomohiro; Saito, Hiroaki; Murakami, Yuki; Miyatani, Kozo; Kuroda, Hirohiko; Matsunaga, Tomoyuki; Fukumoto, Youji; Ikeguchi, Masahide

    2015-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic surgery requires a more detailed understanding of local anatomy than does conventional open surgery. The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of dynamic computed tomography (D-CT) for identification of the location of the left gastric vein (LGV) and existence of the aberrant left hepatic artery (ALHA) compared with conventional enhanced computed tomography (E-CT). Methods Sixty-eight patients underwent laparoscopic-assisted gastrectomy (LAG). E-CT and D-CT were performed in 32 and 36 patients, respectively, and three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography (3D-CTA) was performed in addition to D-CT. The location of the LGV and existence of the ALHA were confirmed during LAG, and these results were compared with those determined preoperatively by CT imaging. Results The location of the LGV as detected by preoperative E-CT and D-CT was consistent with that identified during LAG in 28 (87.5%) and 31 (88.9%) patients, respectively, with no statistical differences. The existence of the ALHA as detected by preoperative E-CT and D-CT was consistent with that identified during gastrectomy in 24 (75%) and 36 (100%) patients, respectively, with a statistical difference (P = 0.005). Furthermore, the type of ALHA could be identified in 10 of 12 patients (83.3%) by D-CT. Conclusion D-CT can produce excellent images of the vascular supply, and thus undoubtedly contributes to the preoperative planning of LAG. Preoperative D-CT might be an informative tool with which to help overcome the disadvantages of LAG. PMID:26740734

  11. Effect of Helicobacter pylori Eradication on Long-Term Survival after Distal Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Il; Cho, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Jong Yeul; Kim, Chan Gyoo; Kook, Myeong-Cherl; Ryu, Keun Won; Kim, Young-Woo; Choi, Il Ju

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Negative Helicobacter pylori status has been identified as a poor prognostic factor for survival in gastric cancer (GC) patients who underwent surgery. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of H. pylori eradication on long-term outcomes after distal gastrectomy for GC. Materials and Methods We analyzed the survival of 169 distal GC patients enrolled in a prospective randomized trial evaluating histologic changes of gastric mucosa after H. pylori eradication in the remnant stomach. The outcomes measured were overall survival (OS) and GC recurrence rates. Results The median follow-up duration was 9.4 years. In the modified intention-to-treat analysis including patients who underwent H. pylori treatment (n=87) or placebo (n=82), 5-year OS rates were 98.9% in the treatment group and 91.5% in the placebo group, and Kaplan-Meier analysis showed no significant difference in OS (p=0.957) between groups. In multivariate analysis, no difference in overall mortality was observed between groups (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] for H. pylori treatment, 0.75; p=0.495) or H. pylori-eradicated status (aHR for positive H. pylori status, 1.16; p=0.715), while old age, male sex, and advanced stage ≥ IIIa were independent risk factors. Six patients in the treatment group (6.9%) and seven patients in the placebo group (8.5%) had GC recurrences, and GC recurrence rates were not different according to H. pylori treatment (5-year GC recurrence rates, 4.6% in the treatment group vs. 8.5% in the placebo group; p=0.652). Conclusion H. pylori eradication for GC patients who underwent distal gastrectomy did not compromise long-term survival after surgery.

  12. Does Preoperative Weight Change Predict Postoperative Weight Loss After Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Aaron E.; Mangieri, Christopher W.; Choi, Yong U.; Faler, Byron J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Some institutions and insurance companies mandate a preoperative weight loss regimen prior to bariatric surgery. Previous studies suggest little to no correlation between preoperative and postoperative weight loss for laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RNYGB). This study examined the impact of preoperative weight change for patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on patients undergoing LSG at the authors' institution from 2010 to 2012. Patients were grouped based on preoperative weight gain or loss. The correlation between preoperative BMI change and postoperative BMI change was studied, as well as length of surgery. Results: Of 141 patients with 1-year follow-up, 72 lost, six maintained, and 64 gained weight preoperatively. Percentage of excess BMI loss at 1 year was not statistically different between those who lost weight and those who gained weight. Percent change in BMI from initial visit to surgery does not correlate with change in BMI at 1 year postoperatively or with length of surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative weight loss is not a reliable predictor of postoperative weight loss or shorter operative time after LSG. Potential patients who otherwise meet indications for LSG should not be denied based on inability to lose weight. PMID:26421248

  13. Intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy after totally laparoscopic total gastrectomy: A single-center 7-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke; Pan, Yu; Cai, Jia-Qin; Xu, Xiao-Wu; Wu, Di; Yan, Jia-Fei; Chen, Rong-Gao; He, Yang; Mou, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy in patients undergoing laparoscopic total gastrectomy (LTG) for gastric cancer. METHODS: A retrospective review of 81 consecutive patients who underwent LTG with the same surgical team between November 2007 and July 2014 was performed. Four types of intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy using staplers or hand-sewn suturing were performed after LTG. Data on clinicopatholgoical characteristics, occurrence of complications, postoperative recovery, anastomotic time, and operation time among the surgical groups were obtained through medical records. RESULTS: The average operation time was 288.7 min, the average anastomotic time was 54.3 min, and the average estimated blood loss was 82.7 mL. There were no cases of conversion to open surgery. The first flatus was observed around 3.7 d, while the liquid diet was started, on average, from 4.9 d. The average postoperative hospital stay was 10.1 d. Postoperative complications occurred in 14 patients, nearly 17.3%. However, there were no cases of postoperative death. CONCLUSION: LTG performed with intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy using laparoscopic staplers or hand-sewn suturing is feasible and safe. The surgical results were acceptable from the perspective of minimal invasiveness. PMID:27022225

  14. Successful treatment of refractory gastric antral vascular ectasia by distal gastrectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ting; Fei, Bao-Ying; Zheng, Wei-Hua; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2014-10-14

    Gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) is an uncommon and often neglected cause of gastric hemorrhage. The treatments for GAVE include surgery, endoscopy and medical therapies. Here, we report an unusual case of GAVE. A 72-year-old man with a three-month history of recurrent melena was diagnosed with GAVE. Endoscopy revealed the classical "watermelon stomach" appearance of GAVE and complete pyloric involvement. Melena reoccurred three days after argon plasma coagulation treatment, and the level of hemoglobin dropped to 47 g/L. The patient was then successfully treated with distal gastrectomy with Billroth II anastomosis. We propose that surgery should be considered as an effective option for GAVE patients with extensive and severe lesions upon deterioration of general conditions and hemodynamic instability. PMID:25320549

  15. Laparoscopy-Assisted Distal Gastrectomy for an Early Gastric Cancer Patient With Situs Inversus Totalis

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Hirohito; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Aoyama, Toru; Hayashi, Tsutomu; Cho, Haruhiko; Ogata, Takashi; Shirai, Jyunya; Oshima, Takashi; Yukawa, Norio; Rino, Yasushi; Masuda, Munetaka; Tsuburaya, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Situs inversus totalis (SIT) is a congenital condition in which there is complete right to left reversal of the thoracic and abdominal organs. This report describes laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) for an early gastric cancer patient with SIT. The preoperative diagnosis was c-stage IA (cT1a cN0 cH0 cP0 cM0). LADG with D1+ dissection and Billroth-I reconstruction was successfully performed by standing at the opposite position. The operating time was 234 minutes and blood loss was 5 mL. Although a mechanical obstruction occurred after surgery, the patient recovered after re-operation with Roux-en-Y bypass. PMID:23971782

  16. Laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer with situs inversus totalis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Min-Feng; Tao, Feng; Xu, Guan-Gen; Sun, Ai-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Situs inversus totalis (SIT) is a rare anomaly in which the abdominal and thoracic cavity structures are located opposite to their usual positions. Occasionally, patients with this condition are diagnosed with malignant tumors. We report a case of a 60-year-old woman with gastric cancer and SIT. Laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) with D2 lymph node dissection and Billroth II anastomosis were performed successfully on the patient by careful consideration of the mirror-image anatomy. The operation required 230 min, and no intraoperative complications occurred. The final pathological report was pT4aN0M0, according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer 7th edition staging guidelines. The postoperative course was favorable, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 8. We believe that this is the first case of LADG with D2 lymphadenectomy reported in a SIT patient with advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26401091

  17. Meta-analysis of short-term outcomes after laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hosono, Shunsuke; Arimoto, Yuichi; Ohtani, Hiroshi; Kanamiya, Yoshitetsu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the current status of laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) with regard to its short-term outcomes by comparing it with conventional open distal gastrectomy (CODG). METHODS: Original articles published from January 1991 to August 2006 were searched in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. Clinical appraisal and data extraction were conducted independently by 2 reviewers. A meta-analysis was performed using a random effects model. RESULTS: Outcomes of 1611 procedures from 4 randomized controlled trials and 12 retrospective studies were analyzed. Compared to CODG, LADG was a longer procedure (weighted mean difference [WMD] 54.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] 38.8 to 69.8; P < 0.001), but was associated with a lower associated morbidity (odds ratio [OR] 0.54; 95% CI 0.37 to 0.77; P < 0.001); this was most significant for postoperative ileus (OR 0.27; 95% CI 0.09 to 0.84; P = 0.02). There was no significant difference between the two groups in anastomotic, pulmonary, and wound complications and mortality. Duration from surgery to first passage of flatus was faster (WMD -0.68; 95% CI -0.85 to -0.50; P < 0.001) and the frequency of additional analgesic requirement (WMD -1.36; 95% CI -2.44 to -0.28; P = 0.01), and duration of hospital stay (WMD -5.51; 95% CI -7.61 to -3.42; P < 0.001) were significantly lower after LADG. However, a significantly higher number of lymph nodes were dissected by CODG (WMD -4.35; 95% CI -5.73 to -2.98; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: LADG for early gastric cancer is associated with a lower morbidity, less pain, faster bowel function recovery, and shorter hospital stay. PMID:17171799

  18. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Versus Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy to Treat Morbid Obesity-Related Comorbidities: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfang; Lai, Dandan; Wu, Dongping

    2016-02-01

    Our aim was to compare laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) for treating morbid obesity and its related comorbidities. An electronic literature search was performed from inception to May 2015 and a total of 18,455 patients, enrolled in 62 recent studies, were included in this meta-analysis. Patients receiving LRYGB had a significantly higher percentage of excess weight loss and better resolution of hypertension, dyslipidemia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and arthritis compared with those receiving LSG. LRYGB and LSG showed similar effects on type 2 diabetes mellitus and sleep apnea. PMID:26661105

  19. Three-Dimensional Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy: Improved Patient Safety and Surgeon Convenience

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Ubieto, Fernando; Jiménez-Bernadó, Teresa; Martínez-Ubieto, Javier; Cabrerizo, Antonio; Pascual-Bellosta, Ana; Muñoz-Rodriguez, Luis; Jiménez-Bernadó, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    One of the aims of laparoscopic surgery is to improve upon the results obtained by open surgery. This clearly appears to have been achieved in bariatric surgery. Two-dimensional (2-D) systems have been used to date, though new 3-dimensional (3-D) technologies have been introduced in an attempt to improve surgeon vision and thus increase the safety of the surgical techniques. Sixty obese patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy using a device equipped with 3-D optics allowing surgery to be viewed by the surgeon in 3 dimensions by using a specific monitor and wearing appropriate glasses. The mean patient age was 48.1 years. The mean weight was 114 kg (range, 92–172), with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 44 ± 5.21 kg/m2. All surgeries were performed using the 3-D system, with a mean surgical time of 71 ± 49.6 minutes and a mean hospital stay of 3.0 ± 1.2 days. Only 1 intraoperative complication was recorded: retroperitoneal bleeding on insertion of the optical trocar. Over a mean follow-up period of 12 months, the mean body weight of the patients was 88 kg (range, 71–121), with a BMI of 30.56 ± 3.98 kg/m2 and a percentage excess weight loss of 68.14% ± 7.89%. There was clear improvement of both the blood pressure and glucose levels. Three-dimensional sleeve gastrectomy is safe, viable, and fully reproducible compared with 2-D surgery, improving visualization of the surgical field, safety, and surgeon convenience. Randomized studies involving larger patient samples are needed for the comparison of results. PMID:26414836

  20. Evaluation of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy compared with laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for people with morbid obesity: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Arabi Basharic, Fateme; Olyaee Manesh, Alireza; Ranjbar Ezzat Abadi, Mohammad; Shiryazdi, Seyed Mostafa; Shabahang, Hussein; Jangjoo, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of obesity in the world, in both developed and developing countries, is growing rapidly. Bariatric surgery is now accepted as the treatment for morbid obesity. Objective: This study compares laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy's effectiveness (LSG) with the most common bariatric surgery, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y (LRYGB) gastric bypass. Methods: A systematic review was performed using relevant search data bases, including Cochrane library, PubMed, Magi ran, Iranmedex, SID and Trip database, with no time limit. Data bases were searched until July 2014 for randomized control trials. The studied population included people aged between 18–60 years, with BMI≥35 and at least one obesity-related disease, or people with BMI≥40. BMI change, as the research outcome, was investigated at least in one-year follow-up period. Cochrane criteria were used to assess quality of studies. The results were extracted from the articles. Results: In total, 384 articles were obtained in the search; six RCTs were included in this study. There was no significant difference between the two laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedures in BMI, and both groups were similar in weight loss CI [-.1.31, 0.43], p=0.32. Conclusion: The two procedures of bariatric surgery are effective and reliable treatments. Performing more trial studies with greater sample size and longer follow-up period for making final decision in selecting a certain surgical procedure is essential.

  1. Dry beriberi preceded Wernicke's encephalopathy: Thiamine deficiency after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Debopam

    2015-01-01

    In recent times, pediatric obesity has become widely prevalent. If first-line treatment with lifestyle modification fails, bariatric surgery may be indicated for severely obese patients. Many patients now travel abroad to get these surgeries done. Some of these patients receive inadequate postoperative care. We described a morbidly obese 17-year-old girl who had a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy procedure for weight loss. Due to severe nausea, she stopped her multivitamin supplementation. Within a few weeks, she developed symptoms of dry beriberi was soon followed by classic symptoms of Wernicke's encephalopathy. The prompt diagnosis was made with confirmation from serum thiamine level and brain magnetic resonance imaging. Thiamine supplementation reversed ophthalmological symptoms promptly. However, the patient needed inpatient rehabilitation for neuropathy. This case describes that thiamine deficiency can occur after restrictive bariatric surgery, despite lower risk of malnutrition in the absence of intestinal bypass procedure. This report highlights that in the presence of risk factors: dietary noncompliance, inadequate follow-up, and severe nausea with and without vomiting can precipitate the development of Wernicke's encephalopathy, even after restrictive surgery. Physicians may increasingly encounter thiamine and other nutrient deficiencies in increasing numbers due to increasing prevalence of obesity disorders and availability of bariatric surgeries. This report also emphasized the importance of identifying vague sensory symptoms in thiamine deficiency. PMID:26557183

  2. Dry beriberi preceded Wernicke's encephalopathy: Thiamine deficiency after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Debopam

    2015-01-01

    In recent times, pediatric obesity has become widely prevalent. If first-line treatment with lifestyle modification fails, bariatric surgery may be indicated for severely obese patients. Many patients now travel abroad to get these surgeries done. Some of these patients receive inadequate postoperative care. We described a morbidly obese 17-year-old girl who had a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy procedure for weight loss. Due to severe nausea, she stopped her multivitamin supplementation. Within a few weeks, she developed symptoms of dry beriberi was soon followed by classic symptoms of Wernicke's encephalopathy. The prompt diagnosis was made with confirmation from serum thiamine level and brain magnetic resonance imaging. Thiamine supplementation reversed ophthalmological symptoms promptly. However, the patient needed inpatient rehabilitation for neuropathy. This case describes that thiamine deficiency can occur after restrictive bariatric surgery, despite lower risk of malnutrition in the absence of intestinal bypass procedure. This report highlights that in the presence of risk factors: dietary noncompliance, inadequate follow-up, and severe nausea with and without vomiting can precipitate the development of Wernicke's encephalopathy, even after restrictive surgery. Physicians may increasingly encounter thiamine and other nutrient deficiencies in increasing numbers due to increasing prevalence of obesity disorders and availability of bariatric surgeries. This report also emphasized the importance of identifying vague sensory symptoms in thiamine deficiency. PMID:26557183

  3. The immunomodulatory role of esmolol in patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrectomy due to gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y S; Kang, S-H; Song, K Y; Cho, M-L; Her, Y-M; Huh, J W; Lee, J

    2013-09-01

    Esmolol has a beneficial effect on the T helper 1/T helper 2 balance in patients with heart failure. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunomodulatory role of esmolol during and after surgery. Patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrectomy due to gastric cancer were enrolled. Patients in the esmolol group (n = 15) received esmolol during surgery, and a saline-treated group (n = 14) served as a control. Cytokines were quantified by sandwich enzyme-linked immunoassays before, during and after surgery. The esmolol group was associated with higher ratios of interferon-γ/interleukin-4 (T helper 1/T helper 2 signature cytokines) than the saline group during (2.36 vs 0.57, respectively, p = 0.041) and after (5.79 vs 0.69, respectively, p = 0.033) surgery. The postoperative increase in interleukin-6 was attenuated in the esmolol group, and the C-reactive protein level on postoperative day 1 was significantly lower in the esmolol group than in the saline group (mean (SD) 26.2 (18.3) mmol.l(-1) vs 56.8 (44.3) mmol.l(-1), p = 0.021). Our findings suggest that esmolol played an immunomodulatory role and mitigated the postoperative inflammatory response in patients under surgical and anaesthetic stress. PMID:23710657

  4. Cost comparison analysis of open versus laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rutz, Daniel R; Squires, Malcolm H; Maithel, Shishir K; Sarmiento, Juan M; Etra, Joanna W; Perez, Sebastian D; Knechtle, William; Cardona, Kenneth; Russell, Maria C; Staley, Charles A; Sweeney, John F; Kooby, David A

    2014-01-01

    Background In comparison with open distal pancreatectomy (ODP), laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) is associated with fewer complications and shorter hospital stays, but comparative cost data for the two approaches are limited. Methods Records of all distal pancreatectomies carried out from January 2009 to June 2013 were reviewed and stratified according to operative complexity. Patient factors and outcomes were recorded. Total variable costs (TVCs) were tabulated for each patient, and stratified by category [e.g. ‘floor’, ‘operating room’ (OR), ‘radiology’]. Costs for index admissions and 30-day readmissions were compared between LDP and ODP groups. Results Of 153 procedures, 115 (70 LDP, 45 ODP) were selected for analysis. The TVC of the index admission was US$3420 less per patient in the LDP group (US$10 480 versus US$13 900; P = 0.06). Although OR costs were significantly greater in the LDP cohort (US$5756 versus US$4900; P = 0.02), the shorter average hospitalization in the LDP group (5.2 days versus 7.7 days; P = 0.01) resulted in a lower overall cost. The total cost of index hospitalization combined with readmission was significantly lower in the LDP cohort (US$11 106 versus US$14 803; P = 0.05). Conclusions In appropriately selected patients, LDP is more cost-effective than ODP. The increased OR cost associated with LDP is offset by the shorter hospitalization. These data clarify targets for further cost reductions. PMID:24931314

  5. Pancreaticoduodenectomy With or Without Distal Gastrectomy and Extended Retroperitoneal Lymphadenectomy for Periampullary Adenocarcinoma, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Charles J.; Cameron, John L.; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Sohn, Taylor A.; Campbell, Kurtis A.; Sauter, Patricia K.; Coleman, JoAnn; Abrams, Ross A.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate, in a prospective, randomized single-institution trial, the end points of operative morbidity, operative mortality, and survival in patients undergoing standard versus radical (extended) pancreaticoduodenectomy. Summary Background Data Numerous retrospective reports and a few prospective randomized trials have suggested that the performance of an extended lymphadenectomy in association with a pancreaticoduodenal resection may improve survival for patients with pancreatic and other periampullary adenocarcinomas. Methods Between April 1996 and June 2001, 299 patients with periampullary adenocarcinoma were enrolled in a prospective, randomized single-institution trial. After intraoperative verification (by frozen section) of margin-negative resected periampullary adenocarcinoma, patients were randomized to either a standard pancreaticoduodenectomy (removing only the peripancreatic lymph nodes en bloc with the specimen) or a radical (extended) pancreaticoduodenectomy (standard resection plus distal gastrectomy and retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy). All pathology specimens were reviewed, fully categorized, and staged. The postoperative morbidity, mortality, and survival data were analyzed. Results Of the 299 patients randomized, 5 (1.7%) were subsequently excluded because their final pathology failed to reveal periampullary adenocarcinoma, leaving 294 patients for analysis (146 standard vs. 148 radical). The two groups were statistically similar with regard to age (median 67 years) and gender (54% male). All the patients in the radical group underwent distal gastric resection, while 86% of the patients in the standard group underwent pylorus preservation (P < .0001). The mean operative time in the radical group was 6.4 hours, compared to 5.9 hours in the standard group (P = .002). There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to intraoperative blood loss, transfusion requirements (median zero units), location of primary

  6. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Gastric Neoplasia Occurring in the Remnant Stomach after Distal Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jung Gyu; Noh, Donghyo; Lee, Jun Haeng; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for tumors occurring in the remnant stomach is technically difficult to perform because of limited working space and severe fibrosis and staples present around the suture line. We aimed to elucidate the feasibility and clinical outcomes of performing ESD for tumors in the remnant stomach. Methods: Between December 2007 and January 2013, 18 patients underwent ESD for tumors (six adenomas and 12 differentiated-type early gastric cancers [EGCs]) occurring in the remnant stomach after distal gastrectomy. Clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes after ESD were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Two-thirds of the lesions were located on the body, and half were located on the suture line. En bloc resection, R0 resection, and en bloc with R0 resection rates were 88.9%, 100%, and 88.9%, respectively. Curative resection rate for EGC was 91.7%. Perforation occurred in one patient (5.6%) and was successfully managed by endoscopic closure with metallic clips and conservative management. There was no significant bleeding after ESD. During a median follow-up of 47.5 months, no local, metachronous, or extragastric recurrence was seen for either EGC or adenoma lesions. Conclusions: ESD is a feasible and effective treatment modality and can be considered a primary intervention for early gastric neoplasia occurring in the remnant stomach. PMID:26879552

  7. The survival benefit and safety of No. 12a lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer patients with distal or total gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai; Zhang, Wei-Han; Chen, Xin-Zu; Chen, Xiao-Long; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2016-01-01

    There has still not been a consensus in aspects of survival benefit and safety on No.12a lymph nodes (LNs) dissection for gastric cancer patients. This study was aimed to evaluate this issue for patients with distal or total gastrectomy. Patients were retrospectively divided into 12aD+ group (with No.12a dissection) and 12aD–group (without No.12a dissection). Clinicopathologic characteristics, survival rate, morbidity and mortality were compared. There were 670 patients in 12aD+ group, while 567 in 12aD–group. The baselines between the two groups were comparable. The No.12a LNs metastasis ratio was 11.6% and higher in lower third tumor. The metastasis of No.5 LNs, N stage and M stage were correlated to metastasis of No.12a LNs. There was no difference in morbidity nor mortality between the two groups. The 5-year overall survival rates (5-y OS) were 59.6% and 55.1% in 12aD+ group and 12aD–group respectively (P = 0.075). The 5-y OS of patients with negative and positive No.12a LNs were 62.3% and 24.1%. The survival of stage III patients with No.12a positive was better than that of stage IV patients. The 5-y OS were better in 12aD+ group for patients with ages more than 60, lower third tumor, distal gastrectomy, N3 status, or III stages compared with 12aD–group. No.12a lymphadenectomy was independently better prognostic factors for stage III patients. No.12a LNs metastasis should not be considered as distant metastasis. No.12a lymphadenectomy can be performed safely and should be indicated for potentially curable progressive stage tumors requiring distal gastrectomy and might be reserved in patients with stage I or II, or upper third tumor. PMID:26959745

  8. Optical Coherence Tomography Parameters in Morbidly Obese Patients Who Underwent Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Ugur; Habibi, Mani; Bulbuller, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate changes in optical coherence tomography parameters in morbidly obese patients who had undergone laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Methods. A total of 41 eyes of 41 morbidly obese patients (BMI ≥ 40) who had undergone LSG were included in study. The topographic optic disc parameters, central macular thickness (CMT), total macular volume (TMV), and retinal ganglion cell layer (RGCL) were measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) was measured by enhanced deep imaging-optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT). Results. The mean CMT was 237.4 ± 24.5 μm, 239.3 ± 24.1 μm, and 240.4 ± 24.5 μm preoperatively, 3 months postoperatively, and 6 months postoperatively, respectively (p < 0.01). The mean TMV was 9.88 ± 0.52 mm3, 9.96 ± 0.56 mm3, and 9.99 ± 0.56 mm3 preoperatively, 3 months postoperatively, and 6 months postoperatively, respectively (p < 0.01). The mean RGCL was 81.2 ± 6.5 μm, 82.7 ± 6.6 μm, and 82.9 ± 6.5 μm preoperatively, 3 months postoperatively, and 6 months postoperatively, respectively (p < 0.01). The mean SFCT was 309.8 ± 71.8 μm, 331.0 ± 81.4 μm, and 352.7 ± 81.4 μm preoperatively, 3 months postoperatively, and 6 months postoperatively, respectively (p < 0.01). No statistically significant differences were found between the preoperative values and 3- and 6-month postoperative values in rim area (p = 0.34), disc area (p = 0.64), vertical cup/disc ratio (p = 0.39), cup volume (p = 0.08), or retinal nerve fiber layer (p = 0.90). Conclusions. Morbidly obese patients who undergo LSG experience a statistically significant increase in CMT, TMV, SFCT, and RGCL at 3 months and 6 months after surgery. PMID:27413543

  9. Optical Coherence Tomography Parameters in Morbidly Obese Patients Who Underwent Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Berna; Dogan, Ugur; Erol, Muhammet Kazim; Habibi, Mani; Bulbuller, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate changes in optical coherence tomography parameters in morbidly obese patients who had undergone laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Methods. A total of 41 eyes of 41 morbidly obese patients (BMI ≥ 40) who had undergone LSG were included in study. The topographic optic disc parameters, central macular thickness (CMT), total macular volume (TMV), and retinal ganglion cell layer (RGCL) were measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) was measured by enhanced deep imaging-optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT). Results. The mean CMT was 237.4 ± 24.5 μm, 239.3 ± 24.1 μm, and 240.4 ± 24.5 μm preoperatively, 3 months postoperatively, and 6 months postoperatively, respectively (p < 0.01). The mean TMV was 9.88 ± 0.52 mm(3), 9.96 ± 0.56 mm(3), and 9.99 ± 0.56 mm(3) preoperatively, 3 months postoperatively, and 6 months postoperatively, respectively (p < 0.01). The mean RGCL was 81.2 ± 6.5 μm, 82.7 ± 6.6 μm, and 82.9 ± 6.5 μm preoperatively, 3 months postoperatively, and 6 months postoperatively, respectively (p < 0.01). The mean SFCT was 309.8 ± 71.8 μm, 331.0 ± 81.4 μm, and 352.7 ± 81.4 μm preoperatively, 3 months postoperatively, and 6 months postoperatively, respectively (p < 0.01). No statistically significant differences were found between the preoperative values and 3- and 6-month postoperative values in rim area (p = 0.34), disc area (p = 0.64), vertical cup/disc ratio (p = 0.39), cup volume (p = 0.08), or retinal nerve fiber layer (p = 0.90). Conclusions. Morbidly obese patients who undergo LSG experience a statistically significant increase in CMT, TMV, SFCT, and RGCL at 3 months and 6 months after surgery. PMID:27413543

  10. Long-term clinical outcomes of laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy versus open distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer: A comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized control trials.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Gao, Jian; Yang, Jingyun; Zhang, Yijian; Lv, Wenjie; Mu, Jiasheng; Dong, Ping; Liu, Yingbin

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare long-term surgical outcomes and complications of laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) with open distal gastrectomy (ODG) for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC) based on a review of available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluated using the Cochrane methodology.RCTs comparing LADG and ODG were identified by a systematic literature search in PubMed, Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, and the China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database, for papers published from January 1, 2003 to July 30, 2015. Meta-analyses were performed to compare the long-term clinical outcomes.Our systematic literature search identified 8 eligible RCTs including 732 patients (374 LADGs and 358 ODGs), with low overall risk of bias. Long-term mortality and relapse rate were comparable for both techniques. The long-term complication rate was 8.47% in LADG groups and 13.62% in the ODG group, indicating that LADG was associated with lower risk for long-term complications (RR = 0.63; 95%CI = 0.39-1.00; P = 0.03).In the treatment of EGC, LADG lowered the rate of long- and short-term complications and promoted earlier recovery, with comparable oncological outcomes to ODG. PMID:27399073

  11. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy with duodeno-jejunal bypass for morbid obesity in a patient with situs inversus totalis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Seki, Yosuke; Kasama, Kazunori

    2016-08-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy with duodeno-jejunal bypass (LSG/DJB) has been adopted in our center for the treatment of morbidly obese patients with both severe type 2 diabetes mellitus and existing risks factors for gastric cancer. We have successfully performed over 200 LSG/DJB procedures in our institution. Here we report the techniques used to perform LSG/DJB in a morbidly obese patient with situs inversus totalis. The only significant difference in executing LSG/DJB between normal anatomy and situs inversus totalis is changing the surgeon's position and switching the trocar placements during the intraoperative phase. Consequently, there were no significant difference in operative time between normal anatomy cases and the situs inversus totalis case. PMID:27140835

  12. Fast-track surgery protocol in elderly patients undergoing laparoscopic radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guozheng; Jian, Fengguo; Wang, Xiuqin; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Aim To study the efficacy of the fast-track surgery (FTS) program combined with laparoscopic radical gastrectomy for elderly gastric cancer (GC) patients. Methods Eighty-four elderly patients diagnosed with GC between September 2014 and August 2015 were recruited to participate in this study and were divided into four groups randomly based on the random number table as follows: FTS + laparoscopic group (Group A, n=21), FTS + laparotomy group (Group B, n=21), conventional perioperative care (CC) + laparoscopic group (Group C, n=21), and CC + laparotomy group (Group D, n=21). Observation indicators include intrasurgery indicators, postoperative recovery indicators, nutritional status indicators, and systemic stress response indicators. Results Preoperative and intraoperative baseline characteristics showed no significant differences between patients in each group (P>0.05). There were no significant differences between each group in nausea and vomiting, intestinal obstruction, urinary retention, incision infection, pulmonary infection, and urinary tract infection after operation (P>0.05). Time of first flatus and postoperative hospital stay time of FTS Group A were the shortest, and total medical cost of this group was the lowest. For all groups, serum albumin, prealbumin, and transferrin significantly decreased, while CRP and interleukin 6 were significantly increased postoperative day 1. From postoperative day 4–7, all indicators of the four groups gradually recovered, but compared with other three groups, those of Group A recovered fastest. Conclusion FTS combined with laparoscopic surgery can promote faster postoperative recovery, improve early postoperative nutritional status, and more effectively reduce postoperative stress reaction, and hence is safe and effective for elderly GC patients. PMID:27330314

  13. Successful Management of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity With the Use of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy After Kidney Transplantation-A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chen, J-H; Lee, C-H; Chang, C-M; Yin, W-Y

    2016-04-01

    In kidney transplantation, obesity is associated with poorer graft survival and patient survival. Bariatric surgery may provide benefit for these patients, not only by inducing weight loss, but also via reduction of diabetes. We report a case of morbid obesity, poorly controlled new-onset diabetes mellitus, and gout after kidney transplantation that was treated with laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy 3 years after kidney transplantation. After 1 year of follow-up, 76% excessive body weight loss was attained. No complications were noted. The operation also provided total remission of diabetes and gout as well as good graft survival. Based on our experience, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy may be a feasible treatment for obese patients after renal transplantation to help resolve obesity and control new-onset diabetes. However, the timing of operation and the long-term potential for graft and patient survivals with this operation require further study. PMID:27234772

  14. Laparoscopic Transvesical Resection of an En Bloc Bladder Cuff and Distal Ureter during Nephroureterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulos, Stilianos; Toufas, George; Dimitriadis, Charalampos; Giannopoulos, Stavros; Kalaitzis, Christos; Bantis, Athanasios; Patris, Emmanuel; Touloupidis, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The most appropriate technique for excising the distal ureter and bladder cuff during laparoscopic nephroureterectomy is still debated. We report our experience with a pure laparoscopic transvesical method that duplicates the long-standing open transvesical approach. Materials and Methods. Seven men and three women diagnosed with upper tract transitional cell carcinoma were treated with this procedure. Three intravesical ports were inserted, and pneumovesicum was established at 12 mmHg. Transvesical laparoscopic circumferential detachment of the bladder cuff and en bloc mobilization of the last centimeters of the distal ureter were performed, followed by the closure of the bladder defect. Subsequently, a nephrectomy was performed either laparoscopically or using an open flank approach. Results. The median age was 68.5 years. The procedure was completed uneventfully in all cases. The median operating time for distal ureter excision was 82.5 minutes (range 55–120). No complications directly related to the pneumovesicum method were recorded. The median follow-up period was 31 months (range 12–55). During the follow-up period, two patients (20%) died from the disease, and a bladder tumor developed in three cases (30%). Conclusion. The laparoscopic transvesical resection of the en bloc bladder cuff and distal ureter is a reliable, effective, and oncologically safe technique, at least in the midterm. PMID:23049475

  15. Treatment of gastric remnant cancer post distal gastrectomy by endoscopic submucosal dissection using an insulation-tipped diathermic knife

    PubMed Central

    Hirasaki, Shoji; Kanzaki, Hiromitsu; Matsubara, Minoru; Fujita, Kohei; Matsumura, Shuji; Suzuki, Seiyuu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness of endoscopic submucosal dissection using an insulation-tipped diathermic knife (IT-ESD) for the treatment of patients with gastric remnant cancer. METHODS: Thirty-two patients with early gastric cancer in the remnant stomach, who underwent distal gastrectomy due to gastric carcinoma, were treated with endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) or ESD at Sumitomo Besshi Hospital and Shikoku Cancer Center in the 10-year period from January 1998 to December 2007, including 17 patients treated with IT-ESD. Retrospectively, patient backgrounds, the one-piece resection rate, complete resection (CR) rate, operation time, bleeding rate, and perforation rate were compared between patients treated with conventional EMR and those treated with IT-ESD. RESULTS: The CR rate (40% in the EMR group vs 82% in the IT-ESD group) was significantly higher in the IT-ESD group than in the EMR group; however, the operation time was significantly longer for the IT-ESD group (57.6 ± 31.9 min vs 21.1 ± 12.2 min). No significant differences were found in the rate of underlying cardiopulmonary disease (IT-ESD group, 12% vs EMR group, 13%), one-piece resection rate (100% vs 73%), bleeding rate (18% vs 6.7%), and perforation rate (0% vs 0%) between the two groups. CONCLUSION: IT-ESD appears to be an effective treatment for gastric remnant cancer post distal gastrectomy because of its high CR rate. It is useful for histological confirmation of successful treatment. The long-term outcome needs to be evaluated in the future. PMID:18442204

  16. [A patient with multiple liver metastases of gastric and rectal cancers after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy who responded completely to S-1 therapy followed by open gastrectomy].

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Ichiro; Arai, Isao; Tamura, Chieko; Inoue, Shigeharu; Wakasa, Kenichi

    2012-11-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with multiple liver metastases of gastric and rectal cancers after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, who responded completely to S-1 therapy followed by open gastrectomy. A 72-year-old man with a chief complaint of occult blood in the feces was referred to our hospital and was diagnosed with rectal cancer by colonoscopy. In addition, we found concomitant gastric cancer by gastrointestinal fiberscopy. Abdominal plain computed tomography showed no liver metastasis. In August 2010, we performed laparoscopic resection of the rectal cancer. However, at the time of discharge, abdominal enhanced computed tomography showed multiple liver metastases. Then, we administered 4 courses of S-1 therapy. In December 2010, abdominal enhanced computed tomography showed no liver metastasis. In March 2011, because no other lesion without residual gastric cancer was detected, the patient underwent gastrectomy followed by S-1 therapy. As of January 2012, the patient is alive and disease free. S-1 therapy with laparoscopic resection for rectal cancer and gastrectomy may help prolong the survival of patients with multiple liver metastases of gastric and rectal cancers. PMID:23268031

  17. Laparoscopic Distal Pancreatectomy with or without Preservation of the Spleen for Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomohide; Masui, Toshihiko; Kaido, Toshimi; Ogawa, Kohei; Yasuchika, Kentaro; Yagi, Shintaro; Seo, Satoru; Takaori, Kyoichi; Mizumoto, Masaki; Iida, Taku; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Uemoto, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) is a rare tumor of the pancreas. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (DP) is a feasible and safe procedure, and successful spleen preservation rates are higher using a laparoscopic approach. We hypothesized that certain patients with SPN would be good candidates for laparoscopic surgery; however, few surgeons have reported laparoscopic DP for SPN. We discuss the preoperative assessment and surgical simulation for two SPN cases. A simulation was designed because we consider that a thorough preoperative understanding of the procedure based on three-dimensional image analysis is important for successful laparoscopic DP. We also discuss the details of the actual laparoscopic DP with or without splenic preservation that we performed for our two SPN cases. It is critical to use appropriate instruments at appropriate points in the procedure; surgical instruments are numerous and varied, and surgeons should maximize the use of each instrument. Finally, we discuss the key techniques and surgical pitfalls in laparoscopic DP with or without splenic preservation. We conclude that experience alone is inadequate for successful laparoscopic surgery. PMID:26587305

  18. MEDIUM-TERM FOLLOW-UP RESULTS WITH LAPAROSCOPIC SLEEVE GASTRECTOMY

    PubMed Central

    RAMOS, Almino Cardoso; BASTOS, Eduardo Lemos de Souza; RAMOS, Manoela Galvão; BERTIN, Nestor Tadashi Suguitani; GALVÃO, Thales Delmondes; de LUCENA, Raphael Torres Figueiredo; CAMPOS, Josemberg Marins

    2015-01-01

    Background : The indications for sleeve gastrectomy in the surgical treatment of morbid obesity have increased worldwide. Despite this, several aspects related to results at medium and long term remain in constant research. Aim : To present the experience of sleeve gastrectomy in a center of excellence in bariatric surgery by analyzing clinical outcomes, complications and follow-up in the medium term. Methods : The study included 120 morbidly obese patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy and who were followed for at least 24 months. Aspects related to surgical technique, surgical complications and clinical outcome were analyzed. Results : Seventy-five patients were women (62.5%) and the average age was 36 years. The body mass index preoperatively ranged from 35.5 to 58 kg/m2(average of 40.2 kg/m2). The length of stay ranged from 1 to 4 days (mean 2.1 days). Comorbidities observed were hypertension (19%), type 2 diabetes mellitus (6.6%), dyslipidemia (7.5%), sleep apnea (16.6%), reflux esophagitis (10%) and orthopedic diseases (7.5%). The mean body mass index and total weight loss percentage with 3, 12, 18 and 24 months were 32.2 kg/m2-19,9%; 29.5 kg/m2-26,5%; 28.2 kg/m2-30,3% and 26.9 kg/m2-32,7%, respectively. Remission of diabetes and dyslipidemia occurred in all patients. In relation to hypertension, there was improvement or remission in 86%. There were only two complications (bronchial pneumonia and dehydration), with good response to clinical treatment. There was no evidence digestive fistula and mortality was zero. Eleven patients (9.1%) had regained weighing more than 5 kg. Conclusion : The sleeve gastrectomy is surgical technique that has proven safe and effective in the surgical treatment of obesity and control of their comorbidities in postoperative follow-up for two years. PMID:26537277

  19. Portomesenteric Vein Thrombosis, Bowel Gangrene, and Bilateral Pulmonary Artery Embolism Two Weeks after Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Darcy, David G.; Charafeddine, Ali H.; Choi, Jenny; Camacho, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass surgery are popular and effective options for weight loss surgery. Portomesenteric vein thrombosis (PMVT) is a documented but rare complication of bariatric surgery. Proper surgical technique, careful postoperative prophylaxis, and early mobilization are essential to prevent this event. The diagnosis of PMVT in the postoperative period requires a high index of suspicion and early directed intervention to prevent a possibly fatal outcome. We present a case of PMVT complicated by small bowel ischemia resulting in gangrene that necessitated resection. PMID:26576312

  20. The effects of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy on head, neck, shoulder, low back and knee pain of female patients

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Tuğrul; Oruç, Mehmet Tahir; Aslaner, Arif; Duygun, Fatih; Yardımcı, Erdem Can; Mayir, Burhan; Bülbüller, Nurullah

    2015-01-01

    As the rise on the prevalence of obesity, it is related with physical impairment of joints, especially in the lumbar spine and knee joints. Losing body weight can reduce or eliminate pain of head, neck, shoulder, lumbar spine and knees. By performing a laparoscopic bariatric surgery we demonstrated a significant improvement on the pain by body weight reduction. In this study we aimed to explore the efficacy and safety of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) on the relief of pain on head and neck, shoulder, low back and knee among the severely morbid obese female patients. A total of 39 morbidly obese female patients who underwent LSG for morbid obesity were included in this study. Body weight, height, body mass index (BMI), head and neck, shoulder, low back and knee pain intensity were measured with Visual Analog Scale (VAS) before and after LSG at the 6th month. 39 morbidly obese female patients were enrolled to this study. The mean age of the patients was 37.69 ± 11.33 years. Preoperative and postoperative body weights were 127.3 kg and 91.21 kg, respectively. Mean height was 165.23 ± 5.78 cm. Preoperative and postoperative BMIs were 46.49 kg/m2 and 32.33 kg/m2, respectively. A significant correlation between preoperative and postoperative parameters was found according to BMI. Our data showed that LSG is an efficient and safe procedure on severely obese patients and showed a predictive remission of head and neck, shoulder, low back and knee pain intensity of female patients by analyzing with VAS during the first 6 months. PMID:25932217

  1. Robotic versus Laparoscopic Distal Pancreatectomy: A Meta-Analysis of Short-Term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jia-Yu; Xin, Chang; Mou, Yi-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Wu; Zhang, Miao-Zun; Zhou, Yu-Cheng; Lu, Chao; Chen, Rong-Gao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the safety and efficacy of robotic-assisted distal pancreatectomy (RADP) and laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP). METHODS A literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library database up to June 30, 2015 was performed. The following key words were used: pancreas, distal pancreatectomy, pancreatic, laparoscopic, laparoscopy, robotic, and robotic-assisted. Fixed and random effects models were applied. Study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. RESULTS Seven non-randomized controlled trials involving 568 patients met the inclusion criteria. Compared with LDP, RADP was associated with longer operating time, lower estimated blood loss, a higher spleen-preservation rate, and shorter hospital stay. There was no significant difference in transfusion, conversion to open surgery, R0 resection rate, lymph nodes harvested, overall complications, severe complications, pancreatic fistula, severe pancreatic fistula, ICU stay, total cost, and 30-day mortality between the two groups. CONCLUSION RADP is a safe and feasible alternative to LDP with regard to short-term outcomes. Further studies on the long-term outcomes of these surgical techniques are required. Core tip To date, there is no consensus on whether laparoscopic or robotic-assisted distal pancreatectomy is more beneficial to the patient. This is the first meta-analysis to compare laparoscopic and robotic-assisted distal pancreatectomy. We found that robotic-assisted distal pancreatectomy was associated with longer operating time, lower estimated blood loss, a higher spleen-preservation rate, and shorter hospital stay. There was no significant difference in transfusion, conversion to open surgery, overall complications, severe complications, pancreatic fistula, severe pancreatic fistula, ICU stay, total cost, and 30-day mortality between the two groups. PMID:26974961

  2. Determinants of Weight Loss following Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy: The Role of Psychological Burden, Coping Style, and Motivation to Undergo Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Figura, Andrea; Ahnis, Anne; Stengel, Andreas; Hofmann, Tobias; Elbelt, Ulf; Ordemann, Jürgen; Rose, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Background. The amount of excess weight loss (%EWL) among obese patients after bariatric surgery varies greatly. However, reliable predictors have not been established yet. The present study evaluated the preoperative psychological burden, coping style, and motivation to lose weight as factors determining postoperative treatment success. Methods. The sample included 64 morbidly obese patients with a preoperative BMI of 51 ± 8 kg/m2 who had undergone laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Well-established questionnaires were applied before surgery to assess the psychological burden in terms of “perceived stress” (PSQ-20), “depression” (PHQ-9), “anxiety” (GAD-7), and “mental impairment” (ISR) as well as coping style (Brief COPE) and motivation to lose weight. %EWL as an indicator for treatment success was assessed on average 20 months after surgery. Results. Based on the %EWL distribution, patients were classified into three %EWL groups: low (14–39%), moderate (40–59%), and high (60–115%). LSG patients with high %EWL reported significantly more “active coping” behavior prior to surgery than patients with moderate and low %EWL. Patients' preoperative psychological burden and motivation to lose weight were not associated with %EWL. Conclusion. An “active coping” style might be of predictive value for better weight loss outcomes in patients following LSG intervention. PMID:26649192

  3. Total laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for a benign appearing tumor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Efthimiadis, Christopher; Anthimidis, George; Grigoriou, Marios; Toulis, Evangelos; Levva, Sofia; Prousalidis, Ioannis; Fachantidis, Epaminondas

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Therapeutic laparoscopy of the pancreas is still described as experimental surgery by many surgeons. Many issues remain to be clarified in determining the future of this new method. Case presentation The objective of the present study was to present a case of a patient who underwent totally laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for a benign appearing tumor in the tail of the pancreas and to critically discuss the treatment of the pancreatic remnant and the need to perform splenectomy with or without ligation of the splenic vessels. Conclusion Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy is usually performed en-bloc along with resection of the spleen, for technical reasons, making the operation short and easy. However, it should only be performed in centers with expertise in both pancreatic surgery and advanced laparoscopy. Furthermore, the use of linear stapler to cut the pancreas (4.5-mm staples) seems to prevent fistula formation and ischemia of the pancreatic stump. PMID:19830077

  4. Mid-term results of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in adolescent patients.

    PubMed

    Cozacov, Yaniv; Roy, Mayank; Moon, Savannah; Marin, Pablo; Lo Menzo, Emanuele; Szomstein, Samuel; Rosenthal, Raul

    2014-05-01

    The prevalence and severity of obesity in children and adolescents has been increasing in recent years at an unprecedented rate. Morbidly obese children will almost certainly develop severe comorbidities as they progress to adulthood, and bariatric surgery may provide the only alternative for achieving a healthy weight. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term outcomes and safety of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) as new treatment modalities for morbidly obese adolescents. We conducted a retrospective review of a prospectively collected database of all adolescent patients who underwent LSG and RYGB under IRB protocol at the Bariatric and Metabolic Institute in Cleveland Clinic Florida between 2002 and 2011. Patients were also contacted by phone, adhering to HIPAA regulations, and were asked to answer a survey. Eighteen adolescents had a bariatric procedure performed at this institution. The mean age was 17.5 years, the average weight was 293.1 lbs, and the average BMI was 47.2 kg/m2. The mean follow-up period consisted of 55.2 months. The postoperative weight at 55 months follow-up was 188.4 lbs and average BMI was 30.1 kg/m2. Fifteen of the patients were available for follow-up. Thirteen out of 16 (81%) comorbidities in patients available for follow-up were in remission following rapid weight loss. The long-term follow-up and perioperative morbidity shown in this study suggest that LSG and LRYGB appear to be safe and effective operations in morbidly obese adolescents. PMID:24390732

  5. Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms After Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy for Morbid Obesity. The Importance of Preoperative Evaluation and Selection

    PubMed Central

    Sucandy, Iswanto; Chrestiana, Dewi; Bonanni, Fernando; Antanavicius, Gintaras

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is prevalent in morbidly obese patients, and its severity appears to correlate with body mass index (BMI). Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the status of GERD after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Materials and Methods: A prospectively maintained database of all the patients who underwent LSG from February 2008 to May 2011 was reviewed. Results: A total of 131 patients were included. The mean age and the BMI of the patients were 49.4 years and 48.9 kg/m2, respectively. Prior to LSG, subjective reflux symptoms were reported in 67 (51%) patients. Anatomical presence of hiatal hernia was endoscopically confirmed in 35 (52%) patients who reported reflux symptoms prior to LSG. All these patients underwent simultaneous hiatal hernia repair during their LSG. The overall mean operative time was 106 min (range: 48-212 min). There were no intra- and 30-day postoperative complications. Out of the 67 preoperative reflux patients, 32 (47.7%) reported resolution of their symptoms after the operation, 20 (29.9%) reported clinical improvement, and 12 (22.2%) reported unchanged or persistent symptoms. Three patients developed new-onset reflux symptoms, which were easily controlled with proton pump inhibitors. No patient required conversion to gastric bypass or duodenal switch because of the severe reflux symptoms. At 18 months, the follow-up data were available in 60% of the total patients. Conclusion: LSG results in resolution or improvement of the reflux symptoms in a large number of patients. Proper patient selection, complete preoperative evaluation to identify the presence of hiatal hernia, and good surgical techniques are the keys to achieve optimal outcomes. PMID:26110129

  6. Distal ureterectomy techniques in laparoscopic and robot-assisted nephroureterectomy: Updated review

    PubMed Central

    Stravodimos, Konstantinos G.; Komninos, Christos; Kural, Ali Riza; Constantinides, Constantinos

    2015-01-01

    Controversies exist about the best method for managing the distal ureter during the laparoscopic (LNU) and robot-assisted nephroureterectomy (RANU). Therefore, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science databases were searched in order to identify articles describing the management of distal ureter during LNU or RANU in patients suffering from upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma. Forty seven articles were selected for their relevance to the subject of this review. The approaches that are usually performed regarding the distal ureter management are open excision, transurethral resection of ureteral orifice (Pluck Technique), ureteric intussusception and pure LNU or pure RANU. Pure LNU and RANU with complete laparoscopic dissection and suture reconstruction of ureter and bladder cuff seems to be better tolerated than open nephroureterectomy providing equal efficacy, without deteriorating the oncological outcome, however evidence is poor. Transurethral resection of the ureteric orifice and the bladder cuff after occlusion of the ureter with a balloon catheter seems to be an attractive alternative option for low stage, low grade tumors of the renal pelvis and the proximal ureter, while stapling technique is correlated with the increased risk of positive surgical margins. The open resection of the distal ureter in continuity with the bladder cuff is considered the most reliable approach, preferred in our practice as well, however the existing data are based on retrospective and non-randomized studies. PMID:25657536

  7. Subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Roberto; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Santoro, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Although a steady decline in the incidence and mortality rates of gastric carcinoma has been observed in the last century worldwide, the absolute number of new cases/year is increasing because of the aging of the population. So far, surgical resection with curative intent has been the only treatment providing hope for cure; therefore, gastric cancer surgery has become a specialized field in digestive surgery. Gastrectomy with lymph node (LN) dissection for cancer patients remains a challenging procedure which requires skilled, well-trained surgeons who are very familiar with the fast-evolving oncological principles of gastric cancer surgery. As a matter of fact, the extent of gastric resection and LN dissection depends on the size of the disease and gastric cancer surgery has become a patient and “disease-tailored” surgery, ranging from endoscopic resection to laparoscopic assisted gastrectomy and conventional extended multivisceral resections. LN metastases are the most important prognostic factor in patients that undergo curative resection. LN dissection remains the most challenging part of the operation due to the location of LN stations around major retroperitoneal vessels and adjacent organs, which are not routinely included in the resected specimen and need to be preserved in order to avoid dangerous intra- and postoperative complications. Hence, the surgeon is the most important non-TMN prognostic factor in gastric cancer. Subtotal gastrectomy is the treatment of choice for middle and distal-third gastric cancer as it provides similar survival rates and better functional outcome compared to total gastrectomy, especially in early-stage disease with favorable prognosis. Nonetheless, the resection range for middle-third gastric cancer cases and the extent of LN dissection at early stages remains controversial. Due to the necessity of a more extended procedure at advanced stages and the trend for more conservative treatments in early gastric cancer, the

  8. Urgent laparoscopic mesh splenopexy for torsion of wandering spleen and distal pancreas: A case report.

    PubMed

    Torri, Fabio; Parolini, Filippo; Vanzetti, Enrico; Milianti, Susanna; Cheli, Maurizio; Alberti, Daniele

    2015-08-01

    Wandering spleen is a condition in which an incomplete fusion of the splenic ligaments allows the spleen to move within the abdomen, predisposing it to splenic torsion along its vascular pedicle. Torsion of a wandering spleen is an uncommon occurrence, especially in children, and associated torsion of the distal pancreas is even more unusual, with only four cases having been reported in adults. Non-specific clinical presentation makes radiologic evaluation essential in order to obtain a diagnosis and to send the patient for early surgery before life-threatening complications arise. Here we present a rare case of torsion of wandering spleen together with volvulus of the distal pancreas in a 13-year-old girl. In this case, prompt radiological assessment allowed for an early diagnosis, and the patient was successfully treated with urgent laparoscopic derotation of both the spleen and the distal pancreas as well as mesh splenopexy. To the best of our knowledge, this procedure has never been described in a pediatric setting. PMID:26303736

  9. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy at a new bariatric surgery centre in Canada: 30-day complication rates using the Clavien–Dindo classification

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Vanessa; Twells, Laurie; Gregory, Deborah; Murphy, Raleen; Smith, Chris; Boone, Darrell; Pace, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) has the highest rate of obesity in Canada, prompting the establishment of a bariatric surgery program at the Health Sciences Centre in NL. This retrospective study examined 30-day complication rates in more than 200 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) between May 2011 and February 2014. Methods We performed a chart review and collected data on 30-day postoperative complications. Complications were graded and reported using the Clavien–Dindo classification. Grades I and II were defined as minor and grades III and higher were defined as major complications. Results We reviewed the charts of the first 209 patients to undergo LSG. The mean body mass index was 49.2, 81% were women and the average age was 43 years. Comorbidities included hypertension (55.0%), obstructive sleep apnea (46.4%), dyslipidemia (42.1%), diabetes (37.3%), osteoarthritis (36.4%) and cardiovascular disease with previous cardiac stents (5.3%). Furthermore, 38.3% of patients reported psychiatric diagnoses, such as depression and anxiety. The overall 30-day complication rate was 15.3%. The complication rate for minor complications was 13.4% and for major complications was 1.9% (2 leaks, 1 stricture and 1 fistula). Conclusion Our results support the feasibility of safely performing LSG surgery at bariatric centres completing fewer than 125 procedures annually. PMID:27007089

  10. Strategic Approach to the Splenic Artery in Laparoscopic Spleen-preserving Distal Pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ebihara, Yuma; Sakamoto, Keita; Miyamoto, Noriyuki; Kurashima, Yo; Tamoto, Eiji; Nakamura, Toru; Murakami, Soichi; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Okamura, Keisuke; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Hirano, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy (LSPDP) is an ideal procedure in selected patients with benign or low-grade malignant tumors in the body/tail of the pancreas. We describe our procedure and experience with splenic vessel-preserving LSPDP (SVP-LSPDP) in a retrospective case series. Methods: Six consecutive patients underwent SVP-LSPDP from January 2011 to September 2013. We evaluated the courses of the splenic artery by preoperative computed tomography and applied an individualized approach (the superior approach or inferior approach) to the splenic artery. Results: All of the operations were successful. The median surgical duration was 249 minutes. The median blood loss was 0 mL. Pathologic examination revealed 4 cases of insulinoma, 1 case of solid pseudopapillary tumor, and 1 case of pancreatic metastasis from renal carcinoma. Conclusions: In performing SVP-LSPDP, it is effective to make a strategic choice between 2 different approaches according to the course of splenic artery. PMID:26121549

  11. Laparoscopic management of distal ureteric stones in a bilharzial ureter: Results of a single-centre prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Nour, Hani H.; Elgobashy, Samir E.; Elkholy, Amr; Kamal, Ahmad M.; Roshdy, Mamdouh A.; Elbaz, Ahmad G.; Riad, Essam

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy and safety of the laparoscopic management of an impacted distal ureteric stone in a bilharzial ureter, as bilharzial ureters are complicated by distal stricture caused by the precipitation of bilharzial ova in the distal ureter. These cases are associated with poorly functioning and grossly hydronephrotic kidneys that hinder the endoscopic manipulation of the coexistent distal high burden of, and long-standing, impacted stones. Patients and methods We used laparoscopic ureterolithotomy, with four trocars, to manage 51 bilharzial patients (33 men and 18 women; mean age 40.13 years) with distal ureteric stones. The ureter was opened directly over the stone and the stone was extracted. A JJ stent was inserted into the ureter, which was then closed with a 4–0 polyglactin running suture. Results The mean stone size was 2.73 cm. Conversion to open surgery was required in only one patient. The mean operative duration was 92 min, the postoperative pain score was 20–60, the mean (range) number of analgesic requests after surgery was 1.72 (1–3), comprising once in 21 patients, twice in 23 and thrice in seven. The mean hospital stay was 2.74 days, and the total duration of follow-up was 7–12 months. The stone recurred in four patients and a ureteric stricture was reported in two. All patients were rendered stone-free. Conclusion Laparoscopy is a safe and effective minimally invasive procedure for distal ureteric stones in a bilharzial ureter with hydronephrosis. PMID:26413344

  12. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity with intra-operative endoscopic guidance. Immediate peri-operative and 1-year results after 25 patients.

    PubMed

    Diamantis, T; Alexandrou, A; Pikoulis, E; Diamantis, D; Griniatsos, J; Felekouras, E; Papalambros, E

    2010-08-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) represents a promising alternative option for the surgical treatment of morbid obesity. Its standard technique includes the longitudinal division of the stomach along a bougie of varying diameter. We report in this retrospective study our experience with LSG being performed with the use of intra-operative endoscopy instead of the bougie. Twenty-five consecutive patients (18 women, seven men) with a mean age of 40.2 years and mean body weight of 152.1 kg were submitted to LSG with intra-operative endoscopy in our hospital. The mean preoperative BMI was 53.5 kg/m(2). There were no conversions. Mean operative time was 117.5 min. There was no morbidity or mortality. The mean loss of excess body weight (EBW) at 3 months post-op was 19 +/- 1.8 kg, at 6 months was 28.6 +/- 4.5 kg, and at 1 year post-op was 48.9 +/- 3.7 kg (min 11-max 92). In other words the patients had lost 30 +/- 5%, 45 +/- 7.7%, and 60.8 +/- 4.3% of their EBW, respectively. The mean excess body weight loss at the day of the last visit to our outpatient clinic was 52.3 +/- 4.3 kg which corresponded to 66.4 +/- 4.3% of the total excess weight. LSG with intra-operative endoscopic guidance is a safe and efficient alternative method to treat morbid obesity and is a viable option for surgical units familiar with endoscopic techniques. PMID:20464526

  13. Surgical treatment of morbid obesity: mid-term outcomes of the laparoscopic ileal interposition associated to a sleeve gastrectomy in 120 patients.

    PubMed

    DePaula, Aureo L; Stival, Alessandro R; Halpern, Alfredo; Vencio, Sergio

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mid-term outcomes of the laparoscopic ileal interposition associated to a sleeve gastrectomy (LII-SG) for the treatment of morbid obesity. The procedure was performed in 120 patients: 71 women and 49 men with mean age of 41.4 years. Mean body mass index (BMI) was 43.4 ± 4.2 kg/m². Patients had to meet requirements of the 1991 NIH conference criteria for bariatric operations. Associated comorbidities were observed in all patients, including dyslipidemia in 51.7%, hypertension in 35.8%, type 2 diabetes in 15.8%, degenerative joint disease in 55%, gastroesophageal reflux disease in 36.7%, sleep apnea in 10%, and cardiovascular problems in 5.8%. Mean follow-up was 38.4 ± 10.2 months, range 25.2-61.1. There was no conversion to open surgery nor operative mortality. Early major complications were diagnosed in five patients (4.2%). Postoperatively, 118 patients were evaluated. Late major complications were observed in seven patients (5.9%). Reoperations were performed in six (5.1%). Mean postoperative BMI was 25.7 ± 3.17 kg/m², and 86.4% were no longer obese. Mean %EWL was 84.5 ± 19.5%. Hypertension was resolved in 88.4% of the patients, dyslipidemia in 82.3%, and T2DM in 84.2%. The LII-SG provided an adequate weight loss and resolution of associated diseases during mid-term outcomes evaluation. There was an acceptable morbidity with no operative mortality. It seems that chronic ileal brake activation determined sustained reduced food intake and increased satiety over time. LII-SG could be regularly used as a surgical alternative for the treatment of morbid obesity. PMID:20652440

  14. Intraoperative Gastroscopy for Tumor Localization in Laparoscopic Surgery for Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hur, Hoon; Son, Sang-Yong; Cho, Yong Kwan; Han, Sang-Uk

    2016-01-01

    Determining resection margins for gastric cancer, which are not exposed to the serosal surface of the stomach, is the most important procedure during totally laparoscopic gastrectomy (TLG). The aim of this protocol is to introduce a procedure for intraoperative gastroscopy, in order to directly mark tumors during TLG for gastric cancer in the middle third of the stomach. Patients who were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma in the middle third of the stomach were enrolled in this case series. Before surgery, additional gastroscopy for tumor localization is not performed. Under general anesthesia, laparoscopic mobilization of the stomach is performed first. After the first portion of the duodenum is mobilized from the pancreas and clamped, the surgeon moves to the other side for the gastroscopic procedure. On the insertion of a gastroscope through the oral cavity into the stomach, 2 - 3 cc of indigo carmine is administered via an endoscopic injector into the gastric muscle layer at the proximal margin of the stomach. The location of stained serosa in the laparoscopic view is used to guide distal subtotal gastrectomy, however, total gastrectomy is performed if the tumor is too close to the esophagogastric junction. A specimen is sampled after distal gastrectomy to confirm sufficient length from resection margin to tumor before reconstruction. In our case series, all patients had tumor-free margins and required no additional resection. There was no morbidity related to the gastroscopic procedure, and the time required for the procedure has gradually decreased to about five minutes. Intraoperative gastroscopy for tumor localization is an accurate and tolerated method for gastric cancer patients undergoing totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy. PMID:27584713

  15. LAPAROSCOPIC RESECTION OF GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    LOUREIRO, Marcelo de Paula; de ALMEIDA, Rômulo Augusto Andrade; CLAUS, Christiano Marlo Paggi; BONIN, Eduardo Aimoré; CURY-FILHO,, Antônio Moris; DIMBARRE, Daniellson; da COSTA, Marco Aurélio Raeder; VITAL, Marcílio Lisboa

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal mesenchymal or stromal tumors (GIST) are lesions originated on digestive tract walls, which are treated by surgical resection. Several laparoscopic techniques, from gastrectomies to segmental resections, have been used successfully. Aim Describe a single center experience on laparoscopic GIST resection. Method Charts of 15 operated patients were retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen had gastric lesions, of which ten were sub epithelial, ranging from 2-8 cm; and three were pure exofitic growing lesions. The remaining two patients had small bowel lesions. Surgical laparoscopic treatment consisted of two distal gastrectomies, 11 wedge gastric resections and two segmental enterectomies. Mechanical suture was used in the majority of patients except on six, which underwent resection and closure using manual absorbable sutures. There were no conversions to open technique. Results Mean operative time was 1h 29 min±92 (40-420 min). Average lenght of hospital stay was three days (2-6 days). There were no leaks, postoperative bleeding or need for reintervention. Mean postoperative follow-up was 38±17 months (6-60 months). Three patients underwent adjuvant Imatinib treatment, one for recurrence five months postoperatively and two for tumors with moderate risk for recurrence . Conclusion Laparoscopic GIST resection, not only for small lesions but also for tumors above 5 cm, is safe and acceptable technique. PMID:27120729

  16. Nonsurgical management of multiple splenic abscesses in an obese patient that underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Schiavo, Luigi; Scalera, Giuseppe; De Sena, Gabriele; Ciorra, Francesca R; Pagliano, Pasquale; Barbarisi, Alfonso

    2015-10-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is a surgical weight-loss procedure. Splenic abscess is a rare complication of SG. Four cases of splenic abscess after SG have been reported, all managed by surgical intervention. We report the first documented case of multiple splenic abscesses following SG managed conservatively by an integrated medical treatment. PMID:26509027

  17. Case for sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Corcelles, Ricard; Lacy, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    During the last 10 years, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has progressively increased in popularity as a primary procedure because of its simplicity, safety, and effectiveness to achieve sustained weight loss over time. The efficacy of LSG in the metabolic control of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of various mechanisms not thoroughly elucidated. Thus, excellent short-term outcomes have been published in glycemic control after SG at comparable rates to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Unfortunately, head-to-head comparative studies between SG and RYGB are limited and long-term follow-up data is not abundant. The aim of this manuscript is to describe current evidence on the clinical impact of SG on T2D as well as to provide a critical appraisal of the available published data. PMID:27568474

  18. Intrathoracic Hernia after Total Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yoshihiko; Murakami, Masahiko; Otsuka, Koji; Saito, Kazuhiko; Saito, Akira; Motegi, Kentaro; Date, Hiromi; Yamashita, Takeshi; Ariyoshi, Tomotake; Goto, Satoru; Yamazaki, Kimiyasu; Fujimori, Akira; Watanabe, Makoto; Aoki, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic hernias after total gastrectomy are rare. We report the case of a 78-year-old man who underwent total gastrectomy with antecolic Roux-Y reconstruction for residual gastric cancer. He had alcoholic liver cirrhosis and received radical laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy for gastric cancer 3 years ago. Early gastric cancer in the remnant stomach was found by routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. We initially performed endoscopic submucosal dissection, but the vertical margin was positive in a pathological result. We performed total gastrectomy with antecolic Roux-Y reconstruction by laparotomy. For adhesion of the esophageal hiatus, the left chest was connected with the abdominal cavity. A pleural defect was not repaired. Two days after the operation, the patient was suspected of having intrathoracic hernia by chest X-rays. Computed tomography showed that the transverse colon and Roux limb were incarcerated in the left thoracic cavity. He was diagnosed with intrathoracic hernia, and emergency reduction and repair were performed. Operative findings showed that the Roux limb and transverse colon were incarcerated in the thoracic cavity. After reduction, the orifice of the hernia was closed by suturing the crus of the diaphragm with the ligament of the jejunum and omentum. After the second operation, he experienced anastomotic leakage and left pyothorax. Anastomotic leakage was improved with conservative therapy and he was discharged 76 days after the second operation.

  19. Laparoscopic nephroureterectomy with transvesical single-port distal ureter and bladder cuff dissection: points of technique and initial surgical outcomes with five patients

    PubMed Central

    Markuszewski, Marcin; Kłącz, Jakub; Sieczkowski, Marcin; Połom, Wojciech; Piaskowski, Wojciech; Krajka, Kazimierz; Matuszewski, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Although a variety of techniques have been used to manage the distal ureter during laparoscopic radical nephroureterectomy (LNU), a consensus has not yet been established. Recently, some authors have used a single-port transvesical approach to excise the distal ureter and bladder cuff following LNU. The aim of the study was to present our initial experience in „en bloc” dissection of the distal ureter and bladder cuff during LNU, using a transvesical single-port approach (T-LESS) and standard laparoscopic instruments. From April to October 2012, 5 patients aged 45 to 73 years with upper urinary tract urothelial tumors were subjected to LNU/T-LESS. After a standard LNU was performed, a TriPort+® device was introduced into the bladder and the pneumovesicum was established. A bladder cuff with a distal ureter was dissected and put in the paravesical tissue. The bladder wall defect was closed with the V-loc® 3/0 suture. The LNU was then completed in the flank position. All procedures were completed successfully. No significant blood loss or complications were observed. The mean operative time was 250 min (range: 200–370) for a total procedure and 59 min (range: 42–80) for the T-LESS stage. The postoperative hospital stay was 5.2 days (range: 4–9). Pathologic examination revealed no positive margin in any of the cases. The LNU/T-LESS approach is an efficient and safe procedure. A well-visualized dissection of the distal ureter, closing the defect of the bladder, the use of standard laparoscopic instruments and a good cosmesis are advantages of the method. PMID:25097698

  20. Laparoscopic Low Anterior Resection and Eversion Technique Combined With a Nondog Ear Anastomosis for Mid- and Distal Rectal Neoplasms: A Preliminary and Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Changhua; Liang, Lei; Ying, Mingang; Li, Qingguo; Li, Dawei; Li, Yiwei; Peng, Junjie; Huang, Liyong; Cai, Sanjun; Li, Xinxiang

    2015-12-01

    The transanal eversion and prolapsing technique is a well-established procedure, and can ensure an adequate distal margin for patients with low rectal neoplasms. Potential leakage risks, however, are associated with bilateral dog ear formation, which results from traditional double-stapling anastomosis. The authors determined the feasibility of combining these techniques with a commercial stapling set to achieve a nondog ear (end-to-end) anastomosis for patients with mid- and distal rectal neoplasms. Patients with early-stage (c/ycT1-2N0), mid- to distal rectal neoplasms and good anal sphincter function were included in this study. Laparoscopic low anterior resection was performed with a standard total mesorectal excision technique downward to the pelvic floor as low as possible. The bowel was resected proximal to the lesion with an endoscopic linear stapler. An anvil was inserted extracorporeally into the proximal colon via an extended working pore. The distal rectum coupled with the lesion was prolapsed and everted out of the anus. The neoplasm was resected with a sufficient margin above the dentate line under direct sight. A transrectal anastomosis without dog ears was performed intracorporeally to reconstitute the continuity of the bowel. Eleven cases, 6 male and 5 female patients, were included in this study. The mean operative time was 191 (129-292) minutes. The mean blood loss was 110 (30-300) mL. The median distal margin distance from the lower edge of the lesion to the dentate line was 1.5 (0.5-2.5) cm. All the resection margins were negative. Most patients experienced uneventful postoperative recoveries. No patient had anastomotic leak. Most patients had an acceptable stool frequency after loop ileostomy closure. Our preliminary data demonstrated the safety and feasibility of achieving a sound anastomosis without risking potential anastomotic leakage because of dog ear formation. PMID:26683958

  1. [Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy in treating middle-third early gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jin; Wang, Yunliang; Zhu, Xingguo; Li, Dechun

    2016-02-01

    Compared with distal gastrectomy, pylorus-preserving gastrectomy is less invasive which can decrease incidence of dumping syndrome, diarrhea and body weight lost, cholecystitis and gallstone, reflux gastritis and esophagitis and remnant gastric cancer. Based on new Japanese Gastric Cancer Treatment Guideline and new progression in the world, we give a review mainly basic characteristics, indications, operation details and short- and long-time outcomes after pylorus-preserving gastrectomy. PMID:26831891

  2. Current status of robotic gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Obama, Kazutaka; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-05-01

    Although over 3000 da Vinci Surgical System (DVSS) devices have been installed worldwide, robotic surgery for gastric cancer has not yet become widely spread and is only available in several advanced institutions. This is because, at least in part, the advantages of robotic surgery for gastric cancer remain unclear. The safety and feasibility of robotic gastrectomy have been demonstrated in several retrospective studies. However, no sound evidence has been reported to support the superiority of a robotic approach for gastric cancer treatment. In addition, the long-term clinical outcomes following robotic gastrectomy have yet to be clarified. Nevertheless, a robotic approach can potentially overcome the disadvantages of conventional laparoscopic surgery if the advantageous functions of this technique are optimized, such as the use of wristed instruments, tremor filtering and high-resolution 3-D images. The potential advantages of robotic gastrectomy have been discussed in several retrospective studies, including the ability to achieve sufficient lymphadenectomy in the area of the splenic hilum, reductions in local complication rates and a shorter learning curve for the robotic approach compared to conventional laparoscopic gastrectomy. In this review, we present the current status and discuss issues regarding robotic gastrectomy for gastric cancer. PMID:26019020

  3. [Effect of gastrectomy on release of gut hormones].

    PubMed

    Misumi, A; Harada, K; Mizumoto, S; Yoshinaka, I; Maeda, M; Nakashima, Y; Ogawa, M

    1991-09-01

    We investigated the effect of gastrectomy on the digestive system in 87 postoperative long-term survivors under test meal or egg yolk load. After test meal, gastrin and secretin responses were decreased in each of groups of proximal gastrectomy (PG), distal gastrectomy with Billroth-I (DG-B1), that with Billroth-II (DG-B2), total gastrectomy with interposition (TG-I), and that with Roux-Y (TG-RY). However, sufficient acid-secretors after partial gastrectomy showed secretin responses comparable to controls. Furthermore, cases of total gastrectomy given betain-hydrochloride with test meal increased secretin responses. Serum glucose response was higher in the TG-RY group while insulin response was high in the TG-RY and DG-B2 groups, compared with controls. GLI response was high in all groups compared with controls. Postgastrectomy gallstone occurred in 11.6%. Yolk-induced contraction of the gallbladder was decreased, and CCK release increased, for several years postoperatively. Gallbladder contraction with CCK was reduced for one year postoperatively. The contraction was reduced in persons with gallstone than those without it. This study shows that the digestive function after gastrectomy depends on acidification and duodenal passage of food, and that reduced contraction with CCK plays an important role in hypokinesis of the gallbladder. PMID:1944181

  4. Function-preserving gastrectomy for gastric cancer in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Eiji; Okajima, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    Surgery used to be the only therapy for gastric cancer, and since its ability to cure gastric cancer was the focus of attention, less attention was paid to function-preserving surgery in gastric cancer, though it was studied for gastroduodenal ulcer. Maki et al developed pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for gastric ulcer in 1967. At the same time, the definition of early gastric cancer (EGC) was being considered, histopathological investigations of EGC were carried out, and the validity of modified surgery was sustained. After the development of H2-blockers, the number of operations for gastroduodenal ulcers decreased, and the number of EGC patients increased simultaneously. As a result, the indications for pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for EGC in the middle third of the stomach extended, and various alterations were added. Since then, many kinds of function-preserving gastrectomies have been performed and studied in other fields of gastric cancer, and proximal gastrectomy, jejunal pouch interposition, segmental gastrectomy, and local resection have been performed. On the other hand, from the overall perspective, it can be said that endoscopic resection, which was launched at almost the same time, is the ultimate function-preserving surgery under the current circumstances. The current function-preserving gastrectomies that are often performed and studied are pylorus-preserving gastrectomy and proximal gastrectomy. The reasons for this are that these procedures that can be performed with systemic lymph node dissection, and they include three important elements: (1) reduction of the extent of gastrectomy; (2) preservation of the pylorus; and (3) preservation of the vagal nerve. In addition, these operations are more likely to be performed with a laparoscopic approach as minimally invasive surgery. Of the above-mentioned three elements, reduction of the extent of gastrectomy is the most important in our view. Therefore, we should try to reduce the extent of gastrectomy

  5. Function-preserving gastrectomy for gastric cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Eiji; Okajima, Kunio

    2016-07-14

    Surgery used to be the only therapy for gastric cancer, and since its ability to cure gastric cancer was the focus of attention, less attention was paid to function-preserving surgery in gastric cancer, though it was studied for gastroduodenal ulcer. Maki et al developed pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for gastric ulcer in 1967. At the same time, the definition of early gastric cancer (EGC) was being considered, histopathological investigations of EGC were carried out, and the validity of modified surgery was sustained. After the development of H2-blockers, the number of operations for gastroduodenal ulcers decreased, and the number of EGC patients increased simultaneously. As a result, the indications for pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for EGC in the middle third of the stomach extended, and various alterations were added. Since then, many kinds of function-preserving gastrectomies have been performed and studied in other fields of gastric cancer, and proximal gastrectomy, jejunal pouch interposition, segmental gastrectomy, and local resection have been performed. On the other hand, from the overall perspective, it can be said that endoscopic resection, which was launched at almost the same time, is the ultimate function-preserving surgery under the current circumstances. The current function-preserving gastrectomies that are often performed and studied are pylorus-preserving gastrectomy and proximal gastrectomy. The reasons for this are that these procedures that can be performed with systemic lymph node dissection, and they include three important elements: (1) reduction of the extent of gastrectomy; (2) preservation of the pylorus; and (3) preservation of the vagal nerve. In addition, these operations are more likely to be performed with a laparoscopic approach as minimally invasive surgery. Of the above-mentioned three elements, reduction of the extent of gastrectomy is the most important in our view. Therefore, we should try to reduce the extent of gastrectomy

  6. Early gastric stump cancer following distal gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, K; Kondo, H; Saito, D; Shirao, K; Yamaguchi, H; Yokota, T; Yamao, G; Sano, T; Sasako, M; Yoshida, S

    1998-01-01

    Background—Gastric stump cancer (GSC) is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage, and consequently the prognosis is poor. 
Aims—To investigate the clinicopathological characteristics of GSC at an early stage to assist in its identification, and thereby improve its prognosis. 
Methods—Forty three patients with resected early GSC were compared with 156 patients with resected primary early cancer in the upper third of the stomach. 
Results—Sixty five per cent (28/43) of the early GSC patients showed the elevated type endoscopically, although the frequency of the depressed type in GSC has tended to increase in the past five years. This occurred in less than 26% (40/156) of the primary early cancers. Half of the early GSCs were located on the lesser curvature (47%), and revealed differentiated adenocarcinoma (81%) histologically. The male:female ratio of early GSC cases was about 6:1, which was much higher than that in patients with primary early cancer. The five year survival rates of patients with early GSCs and early primary cancers were 84% and 95%, respectively. GSC had a favourable prognosis, if it was detected at an early stage. 
Conclusion—To detect early GSC, our results suggest that special attention should be given to elevated as well as depressed lesions on the lesser curvature of the stomach, particularly in men, during endoscopic examinations. 

 Keywords: gastric stump cancer; early gastric cancer; prognosis; endoscopy PMID:9863478

  7. Hiatal Hernia as a Total Gastrectomy Complication

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Bruna do Nascimento; de Oliveira, Marcos Belotto; Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino

    2016-01-01

    Introduction According to the Brazilian National Institute of Cancer, gastric cancer is the third leading cause of death among men and the fifth among women in Brazil. Surgical resection is the only potentially curative treatment. The most serious complications associated with surgery are fistulas and dehiscence of the jejunal-esophageal anastomosis. Hiatal hernia refers to herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm, though this occurrence is rarely reported as a complication in gastrectomy. Case Report A 76-year-old man was diagnosed with intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. He underwent a total laparoscopic-assisted gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy on May 19, 2015. The pathology revealed a pT4pN3 gastric adenocarcinoma. The patient became clinically stable and was discharged 10 days after surgery. He was subsequently started on adjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy; however, 9 days after the second cycle, he was brought to the emergency room with nausea and severe epigastric pain. A CT scan revealed a hiatal hernia with signs of strangulation. The patient underwent emergent repair of the hernia and suffered no postoperative complications. He was discharged from the hospital 9 days after surgery. Conclusion Hiatal hernia is not well documented, and its occurrence in the context of gastrectomy is an infrequent complication.

  8. Non-Randomized Confirmatory Trial of Laparoscopy-Assisted Total Gastrectomy and Proximal Gastrectomy with Nodal Dissection for Clinical Stage I Gastric Cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG1401.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Kozo; Katai, Hitoshi; Mizusawa, Junki; Katayama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kenichi; Morita, Shinji; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Ito, Seiji; Kinoshita, Takahiro; Fukagawa, Takeo; Sasako, Mitsuru

    2016-06-01

    Several prospective studies on laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer have been initiated, but no prospective study evaluating laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy or laparoscopy-assisted proximal gastrectomy has been completed to date. A non-randomized confirmatory trial was commenced in April 2015 to evaluate the safety of laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy and laparoscopy-assisted proximal gastrectomy for clinical stage I gastric cancer. A total of 245 patients will be accrued from 42 Japanese institutions over 3 years. The primary endpoint is the proportion of patients with anastomotic leakage. The secondary endpoints are overall survival, relapse-free survival, proportion of patients with completed laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy or laparoscopy-assisted proximal gastrectomy, proportion of patients with conversion to open surgery, adverse events, and short-term clinical outcomes. The UMIN Clinical Trials Registry number is UMIN000017155. PMID:27433394

  9. Non-Randomized Confirmatory Trial of Laparoscopy-Assisted Total Gastrectomy and Proximal Gastrectomy with Nodal Dissection for Clinical Stage I Gastric Cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG1401

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kozo; Mizusawa, Junki; Katayama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kenichi; Morita, Shinji; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Ito, Seiji; Kinoshita, Takahiro; Fukagawa, Takeo; Sasako, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Several prospective studies on laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer have been initiated, but no prospective study evaluating laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy or laparoscopy-assisted proximal gastrectomy has been completed to date. A non-randomized confirmatory trial was commenced in April 2015 to evaluate the safety of laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy and laparoscopy-assisted proximal gastrectomy for clinical stage I gastric cancer. A total of 245 patients will be accrued from 42 Japanese institutions over 3 years. The primary endpoint is the proportion of patients with anastomotic leakage. The secondary endpoints are overall survival, relapse-free survival, proportion of patients with completed laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy or laparoscopy-assisted proximal gastrectomy, proportion of patients with conversion to open surgery, adverse events, and short-term clinical outcomes. The UMIN Clinical Trials Registry number is UMIN000017155. PMID:27433394

  10. Pylorus-Preserving Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seung-Young; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG) is a function-preserving surgery for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC), aiming to decrease the complication rate and improve postoperative quality of life. According to the Japanese gastric cancer treatment guidelines, PPG can be performed for cT1N0M0 gastric cancer located in the middle-third of the stomach, at least 4.0 cm away from the pylorus. Although the length of the antral cuff gradually increased, from 1.5 cm during the initial use of the procedure to 3.0 cm currently, its optimal length still remains unclear. Standard procedures for the preservation of pyloric function, infra-pyloric vessels, and hepatic branch of the vagus nerve, make PPG technically more difficult and raise concerns about incomplete lymph node dissection. The short- and long-term oncological and survival outcomes of PPG were comparable to those for distal gastrectomy, but with several advantages such as a lower incidence of dumping syndrome, bile reflux, and gallstone formation, and improved nutritional status. Gastric stasis, a typical complication of PPG, can be effectively treated by balloon dilatation and stent insertion. Robot-assisted pylorus-preserving gastrectomy is feasible for EGC in the middle-third of the stomach in terms of the short-term clinical outcome. However, any benefits over laparoscopy-assisted PPG (LAPPG) from the patient's perspective have not yet been proven. An ongoing Korean multicenter randomized controlled trial (KLASS-04), which compares LAPPG and laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for EGC in the middle-third of the stomach, may provide more clear evidence about the advantages and oncologic safety of PPG. PMID:27433390

  11. Pylorus-Preserving Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung-Young; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2016-06-01

    Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG) is a function-preserving surgery for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC), aiming to decrease the complication rate and improve postoperative quality of life. According to the Japanese gastric cancer treatment guidelines, PPG can be performed for cT1N0M0 gastric cancer located in the middle-third of the stomach, at least 4.0 cm away from the pylorus. Although the length of the antral cuff gradually increased, from 1.5 cm during the initial use of the procedure to 3.0 cm currently, its optimal length still remains unclear. Standard procedures for the preservation of pyloric function, infra-pyloric vessels, and hepatic branch of the vagus nerve, make PPG technically more difficult and raise concerns about incomplete lymph node dissection. The short- and long-term oncological and survival outcomes of PPG were comparable to those for distal gastrectomy, but with several advantages such as a lower incidence of dumping syndrome, bile reflux, and gallstone formation, and improved nutritional status. Gastric stasis, a typical complication of PPG, can be effectively treated by balloon dilatation and stent insertion. Robot-assisted pylorus-preserving gastrectomy is feasible for EGC in the middle-third of the stomach in terms of the short-term clinical outcome. However, any benefits over laparoscopy-assisted PPG (LAPPG) from the patient's perspective have not yet been proven. An ongoing Korean multicenter randomized controlled trial (KLASS-04), which compares LAPPG and laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for EGC in the middle-third of the stomach, may provide more clear evidence about the advantages and oncologic safety of PPG. PMID:27433390

  12. Enhancing effect of partial gastrectomy on pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Watanapa, P.; Flaks, B.; Oztas, H.; Deprez, P. H.; Calam, J.; Williamson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    The controversial issue of enhanced pancreatic carcinogenesis following partial gastrectomy has been explored in male Wistar rats (n = 40) weighing 250-300 g. Animals were randomised to receive either 60% distal gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction or gastrotomy and resuture (control). Immediately after operation each group was further divided into two subgroups, receiving i.p. injections of either saline or azaserine (30 mg kg-1 wk-1 for 3 weeks). At 15 months blood was obtained at 0, 5, 15 and 30 min after a fatty meal for cholecystokinin (CCK) assay; rats were then killed. Pancreatic wet weight was measured, and histological sections were examined for atypical acinar cell foci (AACF), the putative precursor lesion of carcinoma. There were no significant differences in body weight or pancreatic weight between controls and rats with gastrectomy. Only azaserine-treated rats had acidophilic AACF. Partial gastrectomy substantially increased the number of acidophilic AACF per pancreas (median 26.05 vs 2.09; P less than 0.005), with a 9-fold increase in their volume (P less than 0.005). Basal and postprandial plasma CCK concentrations were higher after gastrectomy than in controls (P less than 0.05). Partial gastrectomy has an enhancing effect on azaserine-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis, probably by means of increased CCK release. PMID:1558791

  13. Role of endogenous somatostatin in postprandial hypersecretion of neurotensin in patients after gastrectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, T; Miyata, M; Izukura, M; Tanaka, Y; Iwase, K; Imabun, S; Matsuda, H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this report is to elucidate the mechanism of the hypersecretion of neurotensin (NT) after gastrectomy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: NT secretion induced by fat ingestion is increased after pancreatoduodenectomy or distal gastrectomy. The hypersecretion of NT in the patients undergoing resection of the upper gastrointestinal tract is suppressed by an exogenous somatostatin (SST) analog. METHODS: We observed simultaneously the secretion of NT and SST in the same patients before and after gastrectomy (n = 7). We also observed the secretion of these hormones induced by intraduodenal (ID) fat infusion in the normal volunteers (n = 6). RESULTS: The response of plasma NT to fat ingestion was significantly increased after gastrectomy compared with that before gastrectomy. The response of plasma SST after gastrectomy was significantly suppressed. The response of plasma NT and SST after ID fat infusion in the normal volunteers was similar to the gastrectomized state. CONCLUSION: Diminution of SST secretion, probably caused by the lack of SST cells in the distal part of the stomach, may play a role in augmenting NT secretion after gastrectomy. PMID:9114796

  14. Prosthetic Bioabsorbable Mesh for Hiatal Hernia Repair During Sleeve Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy has become a valuable primary bariatric operation. It has an acceptable complication profile and amount of weight loss. However, one of the most distressing complications to the patient is reflux postoperatively. There is thought to be a relationship between a hiatal hernia and postoperative reflux. There is disagreement on how to address a hiatal hernia intraoperatively, and the use of mesh is controversial. Our objectives were to examine the use of a prosthetic bioabsorbable mesh for repair of a large hiatal hernia during a sleeve gastrectomy and to examine the incidence of reflux and mesh-related complications in the near term. Methods: This is a case series of patients with hiatal hernia undergoing a primary sleeve gastrectomy. None of the patients had a previous hiatal hernia repair. Three patients with large hiatal hernias diagnosed preoperatively or intraoperatively were included. The hiatus of the diaphragm was repaired with a posterior crural closure, and a piece of prosthetic bioabsorbable mesh was placed posteriorly to reinforce the repair. Results: There were 3 patients. The mean follow-up period was 12 months. There were no mesh-related complications. One of the patients needed to resume proton pump inhibitors to control reflux. Conclusion: The use of a prosthetic bioabsorbable mesh to repair a hiatal hernia simultaneously with a sleeve gastrectomy is safe. There were no mesh-related complications at 1 year. PMID:24398209

  15. Laparoscopic resection of synchronous gastric cancer and primary small intestinal lymphoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ding-Wei; Pan, Yu; Yan, Jia-Fei; Mou, Yi-Ping

    2014-05-28

    Synchronous gastric cancer and primary small intestinal lymphoma are extremely rare. A 49-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with a history of upper abdominal pain for two weeks and was diagnosed with synchronous cancer. During hospitalization, the patient underwent laparoscopic distal gastrectomy + resection of bilateral ovaries + partial resection of both small intestine and descending colon. Pathological examination revealed a synchronous cancer consisting of early gastric cancer with poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma located in mucosa, with lymph node metastasis (3+/29) (T1N1M0, stage IB); and diffuse large B cell lymphoma of small intestine involving descending colon and bilateral ovaries, with lymph node metastasis (2+/5) (Ann Arbor IIE). The patient recovered well, without any obvious complications and was discharged on post-operative day 7. The patient received six cycles of chemotherapy after operation. She has been doing well with no evidence of recurrence for 13 mo. PMID:24876758

  16. De novo gastric adenocarcinoma 1 year after sleeve gastrectomy in a transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Masrur, M.; Elli, E.; Gonzalez-Ciccarelli, L.F.; Giulianotti, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It has been reported in the literature that upper gastrointestinal malignancies after bariatric surgery are mostly gastro-esophageal, although it is not clear whether bariatric surgery represents a risk factor for the development of esophageal and/or gastric cancer. We report a case of a de novo gastric adenocarcinoma occurring in a transplant patient 1 year after a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Presentation of case A 44 year-old woman with a BMI of 38 kg/m2, hypertension, type 1 diabetes mellitus, multiple malignancies and a pancreas transplant underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. The patient presented with intense dysphagias during the follow up. Studies were performed and the diagnoses of grade 2/3 adenocarcinoma were made. The patient underwent a robotic assisted total gastrectomy with a roux-en-y intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy. The procedure resulted in multiple metastasic lymph nodes, focal and transmural invasions to multiple organs with a tumor free margin resection. The patient presented with a postoperative pleural effusion, with no further complications. Discussion The diagnosis of gastroesophageal cancer after bariatric surgery is usually late since these patients have common upper gastrointestinal symptoms related to the procedure that could delay the diagnosis. De novo gastric cancer after sleeve gastrectomy has only been reported in one instance, in contrast with other bariatric surgery procedures. Conclusions No direct relation has been established between sleeve gastrectomy and the development of gastric cancer. Robotic procedures allow for complex multiorgan resections, while preserving the benefits of minimally invasive surgery. PMID:26774417

  17. Pure single-incision laparoscopic D2 lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer: a novel approach to 11p lymph node dissection (midpancreas mobilization).

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Jung, Do Hyun; Son, Sang-Yong; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung-Ho

    2014-11-01

    We developed a novel approach to perform a perfect 11p lymph node dissection (LND), the so-called 'midpancreas mobilization' (MPM) method. Briefly, in pure single-incision laparoscopic distal gastrectomy (SIDG), after the completion of 7, 8a/12a, and 9 LND in the suprapancreatic portion, we started 11p LND after midpancreas mobilization. After mobilization of the entire midpancreas from the white line of Toldt, two gauzes were inserted behind the pancreas. This maneuver facilitated exposure of the splenic vein and complete detachment of soft tissue, including 11p lymph nodes, from the white line of Toldt, which was possible because of the tilting of the pancreas. The dissection plane along the splenic artery and vein for 11p LND could be visualized just through control of the operator's grasper without the need of an assistant. Fourteen patients underwent the procedure without intraoperative events, conversion to conventional laparoscopy, or surgery-related complications, including postoperative pancreatic fistula. All patients underwent D2 LND by exposure of the splenic vein. The mean numbers of retrieved lymph node and 11p lymph node were 61.3 ± 9.0 (range, 49-70), and 4.00 ± 3.38 (range, 1-10). Thus, we concluded that MPM for 11p LND in pure SIDG appears feasible and embryologically ideal; this method can be used in conventional laparoscopic gastrectomy. PMID:25368856

  18. Laparoscopic gastric cancer surgery: Current evidence and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Son, Taeil; Hyung, Woo Jin

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic gastrectomy has been widely accepted as a standard alternative for the treatment of early-stage gastric adenocarcinoma because of its favorable short-term outcomes. Although controversies exist, such as establishing clear indications, proper preoperative staging, and oncologic safety, experienced surgeons and institutions have applied this approach, along with various types of function-preserving surgery, for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer. With technical advancement and the advent of state-of-the-art instruments, indications for laparoscopic gastrectomy are expected to expand as far as locally advanced gastric cancer. Laparoscopic gastrectomy appears to be promising; however, scientific evidence necessary to generalize this approach to a standard treatment for all relevant patients and care providers remains to be gathered. Several multicenter, prospective randomized trials in high-incidence countries are ongoing, and results from these trials will highlight the short- and long-term outcomes of the approach. In this review, we describe up-to-date findings and critical issues regarding laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer. PMID:26811620

  19. Pancreatic insulinomas: Laparoscopic management

    PubMed Central

    Antonakis, Pantelis T; Ashrafian, Hutan; Martinez-Isla, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Insulinomas are rare pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors that are most commonly benign, solitary, and intrapancreatic. Uncontrolled insulin overproduction from the tumor produces neurological and adrenergic symptoms of hypoglycemia. Biochemical diagnosis is confirmed by the presence of Whipple’s triad, along with corroborating measurements of blood glucose, insulin, proinsulin, C-peptide, β-hydroxybutyrate, and negative tests for hypoglycemic agents during a supervised fasting period. This is accompanied by accurate preoperative localization using both invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities. Following this, careful preoperative planning is required, with the ensuing procedure being preferably carried out laparoscopically. An integral part of the laparoscopic approach is the application of laparoscopic intraoperative ultrasound, which is indispensable for accurate intraoperative localization of the lesion in the pancreatic region. The extent of laparoscopic resection is dependent on preoperative and intraoperative findings, but most commonly involves tumor enucleation or distal pancreatectomy. When performed in an experienced surgical unit, laparoscopic resection is associated with minimal mortality and excellent long-term cure rates. Furthermore, this approach confers equivalent safety and efficacy rates to open resection, while improving cosmesis and reducing hospital stay. As such, laparoscopic resection should be considered in all cases of benign insulinoma where adequate surgical expertise is available. PMID:26566426

  20. Post-gastrectomy Syndrome Successfully Treated With Kampo Medicine: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ohgishi, Miwako; Horiba, Yuko; Watanabe, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related gastrectomy can cause post-gastrectomy syndrome, which includes weight loss, dumping syndrome, and reflux esophagitis and negatively affects the quality of life. Comprehensive and individualized patient management is required; however, there is a limit to Western medicine's ability to treat these symptoms. Kampo, a traditional Japanese medicine, adapts treatments to each individual's symptoms and constitution. We treated a 68-year-old male patient with post-gastrectomy syndrome using senpukukataishasekito, a Kampo medicine. He was diagnosed with Stage II-A gastric cancer at age 66 years and underwent a laparoscopic, pylorus-preserving gastrectomy followed by chemotherapy for 13 months. He visited our clinic for chemotherapy-related fatigue, postsurgical weight loss, and limb numbness. He was prescribed both hachimijiogan and hochuekkito. At the second visit, he complained of stomach discomfort, so we prescribed senpukukataishasekito. As his stomach function improved, his body weight increased and his fatigue decreased. We suggest that senpukukataishasekito may be an effective treatment for post-gastrectomy syndrome. PMID:26937322

  1. Post-gastrectomy Syndrome Successfully Treated With Kampo Medicine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ohgishi, Miwako; Horiba, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related gastrectomy can cause post-gastrectomy syndrome, which includes weight loss, dumping syndrome, and reflux esophagitis and negatively affects the quality of life. Comprehensive and individualized patient management is required; however, there is a limit to Western medicine's ability to treat these symptoms. Kampo, a traditional Japanese medicine, adapts treatments to each individual's symptoms and constitution. We treated a 68-year-old male patient with post-gastrectomy syndrome using senpukukataishasekito, a Kampo medicine. He was diagnosed with Stage II-A gastric cancer at age 66 years and underwent a laparoscopic, pylorus-preserving gastrectomy followed by chemotherapy for 13 months. He visited our clinic for chemotherapy-related fatigue, postsurgical weight loss, and limb numbness. He was prescribed both hachimijiogan and hochuekkito. At the second visit, he complained of stomach discomfort, so we prescribed senpukukataishasekito. As his stomach function improved, his body weight increased and his fatigue decreased. We suggest that senpukukataishasekito may be an effective treatment for post-gastrectomy syndrome. PMID:26937322

  2. Hysterectomy - laparoscopic - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Supracervical hysterectomy - discharge; Removal of the uterus - discharge; Laparoscopic hysterectomy - discharge; Total laparoscopic hysterectomy - discharge; TLH - discharge; Laparoscopic supracervical ...

  3. Sleeve gastrectomy with anti-reflux procedures

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Sergio; Lacombe, Arnaldo; de Aquino, Caio Gustavo Gaspar; Malzoni, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Sleeve gastrectomy is the fastest growing surgical procedure to treat obesity in the world but it may cause or worsen gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article originally aimed to describe the addition of anti-reflux procedures (removal of periesophageal fats pads, hiatoplasty, a small plication and fixation of the gastric remnant in position) to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and to report early and late results. Methods Eighty-eight obese patients that also presented symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease were submitted to sleeve gastrectomy with anti-reflux procedures. Fifty of them were also submitted to a transit bipartition. The weight loss of these patients was compared to consecutive 360 patients previously submitted to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and to 1,140 submitted to sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms were specifically inquired in all anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy patients and compared to the results of the same questionnaire applied to 50 sleeve gastrectomy patients and 60 sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition patients that also presented preoperative symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Results In terms of weight loss, excess of body mass index loss percentage after anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy is not inferior to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition is not inferior to sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition. Anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy did not add morbidity but significantly diminished gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and the use of proton pump inhibitors to treat this condition. Conclusion The addition of anti-reflux procedures, such as hiatoplasty and cardioplication, to the usual sleeve gastrectomy did not add morbidity neither worsened the weight loss but significantly reduced the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms as well as the use of proton pump inhibitors. PMID:25295447

  4. Laparoscopic pancreatic resection.

    PubMed

    Harrell, K N; Kooby, D A

    2015-10-01

    Though initially slow to gain acceptance, the minimally invasive approach to pancreatic resection grew during the last decade and pancreatic operations such as the distal pancreatectomy and pancreatic enucleation are frequently performed laparoscopically. More complex operations such as the pancreaticoduodenectomy may also confer benefits with a minimally invasive approach but are less widely utilized. Though most research to date comparing open and laparoscopic pancreatectomy is retrospective, the current data suggest that compared with open, a laparoscopic procedure may afford postoperative benefits such as less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, and fewer wound complications. Regarding oncologic considerations, despite initial concerns, laparoscopic resection appears to be non-inferior to an open procedure in terms of lymph node retrieval, negative margin rates, and long-term survival. New technologies, such as robotics, are also gaining acceptance. Data show that while the laparoscopic approach incurs higher cost in the operating room, the resulting shorter hospital stay appears to be associated with an equivalent or lower overall cost. The minimally invasive approach to pancreatic resection can be safe and appropriate with significant patient benefits and oncologic non-inferiority based on existing data. PMID:26199025

  5. Robotic gastrectomy with transvaginal specimen extraction for female gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Gang; Feng, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Jiang; Zhao, Jian; Li, Jie-Shou

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe the application of complete robotic gastrectomy with transvaginal specimen extraction (TVSE) for gastric cancer patients. METHODS: Between July and November 2014, eight female patients who were diagnosed with gastric adenocarcinoma underwent a TVSE following a full robot-sewn gastrectomy. According to the tumor location, the patients were allocated to two different groups; two patients received robotic total gastrectomy with TVSE and the other six received robotic distal gastrectomy with TVSE. RESULTS: Surgical procedures were successfully performed in all eight cases without conversion. The mean age was 55.3 (range, 42-69) years, and the mean body mass index was 23.2 (range, 21.6-26.0) kg/m2. The mean total operative time and blood loss were 224 (range, 200-298) min and 62.5 (range, 50-150) mL, respectively. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 3.6 (range, 3-5) d. The mean number of lymph nodes resected was 23.6 (range, 17-27). None was readmitted within 30 d of postoperation. During the follow-up, no stricture developed nor was any anastomotic leakage detected. CONCLUSION: It is possible to perform a TVSE following a full robot-sewn gastrectomy with standard D2 lymph node resection for female gastric cancer patients. PMID:26715817

  6. Full robot-assisted gastrectomy with intracorporeal robot-sewn anastomosis produces satisfying outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin-Xin; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Yan; Pan, Hua-Feng; Li, Jie-Shou

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of full robot-assisted gastrectomy with intracorporeal robot hand-sewn anastomosis in the treatment of gastric cancer. METHODS: From September 2011 to March 2013, 110 consecutive patients with gastric cancer at the authors’ institution were enrolled for robotic gastrectomies. According to tumor location, total gastrectomy, distal or proximal subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy was fully performed by the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System. All construction, including Roux-en-Y jejunal limb, esophagojejunal, gastroduodenal and gastrojejunal anastomoses were fully carried out by the intracorporeal robot-sewn method. At the end of surgery, the specimen was removed through a 3-4 cm incision at the umbilicus trocar point. The details of the surgical technique are well illustrated. The benefits in terms of surgical and oncologic outcomes are well documented, as well as the failure rate and postoperative complications. RESULTS: From a total of 110 enrolled patients, radical gastrectomy could not be performed in 2 patients due to late stage disease; 1 patient was converted to laparotomy because of uncontrollable hemorrhage, and 1 obese patient was converted due to difficult exposure; 2 patients underwent extra-corporeal anastomosis by minilaparotomy to ensure adequate tumor margin. Robot-sewn anastomoses were successfully performed for 12 proximal, 38 distal and 54 total gastrectomies. The average surgical time was 272.52 ± 53.91 min and the average amount of bleeding was 80.78 ± 32.37 mL. The average number of harvested lymph nodes was 23.1 ± 5.3. All specimens showed adequate surgical margin. With regard to tumor staging, 26, 32 and 46 patients were staged as I, II and III, respectively. The average hospitalization time after surgery was 6.2 d. One patient experienced a duodenal stump anastomotic leak, which was mild and treated conservatively. One patient was readmitted for intra-abdominal infection and was

  7. Robotic distal pancreatectomy: a valid option?

    PubMed

    Jung, M K; Buchs, N C; Azagury, D E; Hagen, M E; Morel, P

    2013-10-01

    Although reported in the literature, conventional laparoscopic approach for distal pancreatectomy is still lacking widespread acceptance. This might be due to two-dimensional vision and decreased range of motion to reach and safely dissect this highly vascularized retroperitoneal organ by laparoscopy. However, interest in minimally invasive access is growing ever since and the robotic system could certainly help overcome limitations of the laparoscopic approach in the challenging domain of pancreatic resection, notably in distal pancreatectomy. Robotic distal pancreatectomy with and without spleen preservation has been reported with encouraging outcomes for benign and borderline malignant disease. As a result of upgraded endowristed manipulation and three-dimensional visualization, improved outcome might be expected with the launch of the robotic system in the procedure of distal pancreatectomy. Our aim was thus to extensively review the current literature of robot-assisted surgery for distal pancreatectomy and to evaluate advantages and possible limitations of the robotic approach. PMID:24101006

  8. CT-Guided Percutaneous Drainage of Infected Collections Due to Gastric Leak After Sleeve Gastrectomy for Morbid Obesity: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kelogrigoris, M. Sotiropoulou, E.; Stathopoulos, K.; Georgiadou, V.; Philippousis, P.; Thanos, L.

    2011-06-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of computed tomography (CT)-guided drainage in treating infected collections due to gastric leak after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity. From January 2007 to June 2009, 21 patients (9 men and 12 women; mean age, 39.2 (range, 26-52) years) with infected collections due to gastric leak after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity underwent image-guided percutaneous drainage. All procedures were performed using CT guidance and 8- to 12-Fr pigtail drainage catheters. Immediate technical success was achieved in all 21 infected collections. In 18 of 21 collections, we obtained progressive shrinkage of the collection with consequent clinical success (success rate 86%). In three cases, the abdominal fluid collection was not resolved, and the patients were reoperated. Among the 18 patients who avoided surgery, 2 needed replacement of the catheter due to obstruction. No major complications occurred during the procedure. The results of our study support that CT-guided percutaneous drainage is an effective and safe method to treat infected abdominal fluid collections due to gastric leak in patients who had previously underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity. It may be considered both as a preparatory step for surgery and a valuable alternative to open surgery. Failure of the procedure does not, however, preclude a subsequent surgical operation.

  9. Total versus subtotal gastrectomy: surgical morbidity and mortality rates in a multicenter Italian randomized trial. The Italian Gastrointestinal Tumor Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Bozzetti, F; Marubini, E; Bonfanti, G; Miceli, R; Piano, C; Crose, N; Gennari, L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to analyze postoperative morbidity and mortality of patients included in a randomized trial comparing total versus subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: There is controversy as to whether the optimal surgery for gastric cancer in the distal half of the stomach is subtotal or total gastrectomy. Although only a randomized trial can resolve this oncologic dilemma, the first step is to demonstrate whether the two procedures are penalized by different postoperative morbidity and mortality rates. METHODS: A total of 624 patients with cancer in the distal half of the stomach were randomized to subtotal gastrectomy (320) or total gastrectomy (304), both associated with a second-level lymphadenectomy, in a multicenter trial aimed at assessing the oncologic outcome after the two procedures. The end points considered were the occurrence of a postoperative event, complication, or death and length of postoperative stay. RESULTS: Nonfatal complications and death occurred in 9% and 1% of subtotal gastrectomy patients and in 13% and 2% of total gastrectomy patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis of postoperative events showed that splenectomy or resection of adjacent organs was associated with a twofold risk of postoperative complications. Random surgery and extension of surgery influenced the length of stay. The mean length of stay, adjusted for extension of surgery, was 13.8 days for subtotal gastrectomy and 15.4 days for total gastrectomy. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that subtotal and total gastrectomies, with second-level lymphadenectomy, performed as an elective procedure have a similar postoperative complication rate and surgical outcome. A conclusive long-term evaluation of the two operations and an accurate estimate of the oncologic impact of surgery on long-term survival, not penalized by excess surgical risk of one of the two operations, are consequently feasible. PMID:9389395

  10. A comparative study of gastrectomy without vagotomy with either Roux-en-Y or Billroth II anastomosis in peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Rieu, P M; Joosten, H J; Jansen, J B; Lamers, C B

    1994-06-01

    Since recent small uncontrolled studies have suggested that surgery for peptic ulcer comprising partial gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y anastomosis without vagotomy effectively prevents postoperative enterogastric reflux without increasing ulcer recurrence rate, we have compared mortality, ulcer recurrence rate, and complaints in ulcer patients who had undergone partial gastrectomy with either Roux-en-Y (n = 47) or Billroth II anastomosis (n = 47). The groups were comparable with regard to age, sex, ulcer localisation, indication for surgery and number of emergency procedures. During postoperative follow-up, seven patients with Roux-en-Y have died, compared with nine patients with Billroth II gastrectomy. In two of the seven patients who died after Roux-en-Y gastrectomy, but in none of the nine who died after Billroth II resection, death was unequivocally related to postoperative ulcer recurrences. At 1, 2, 3 and 4 years postoperatively, 90 vs. 100% (not significant), 78 vs. 98% (p < 0.01), 72 vs. 95% (p < 0.01) and 72 vs. 95% (p < 0.01) of the patients were in remission after Roux-en-Y and Billroth II gastrectomy, respectively. All ulcers were localized at or just distal to the anastomosis, and were diagnosed within the first 3 postoperative years. We conclude that in peptic ulcer patients the ulcer recurrence rate after Roux-en-Y gastrectomy without vagotomy is considerably higher than after Billroth II resection. Thus, gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y anastomosis without vagotomy cannot be recommended as the primary procedure in patients undergoing partial gastrectomy for peptic ulcer disease. PMID:7959558

  11. Comparative Study on the Difference in Functional Outcomes at Discharge between Proximal and Total Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, Kazuaki; Matsuda, Shinya; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Ishikawa, Koichi B.; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Fujimori, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have regarded proximal gastrectomy (PG) as optimal compared to total gastrectomy (TG) for upper stomach cancer. In addition to the traditional outcomes of complication and mortality, change in functional status should be considered as another relevant outcome in aging generations. However, there has been no community-based appraisal of functional outcomes between PG and TG. Using an administrative database, we compared functional outcomes between PG and TG. Among 12,508 patients who survived for ≥15 years and underwent open gastrectomy between 2008 and 2010, we examined patient characteristics, comorbidities, functional status estimated by the Barthel index (BI) at admission and discharge, complications, ICU care, ventilation administration, blood transfusion, operating room time, resumption of oral intake, length of stay and total charges. With reference to distal gastrectomy (DG), we performed multivariate analyses to assess the impacts of PG and TG on complications and BI deterioration. A total of 434 PGs and 4,941 TGs were observed in 148 and 295 hospitals, respectively. Patient characteristics, care process, resumption of oral intake, operating room time, length of stay and total charges were also significantly different among the three gastrectomy types. PG, TG and DG were not associated with complications or functional deterioration. Patient characteristics, preoperative blood transfusion and longer operating room time were significantly associated with more complications and BI deterioration. Since patient case mix and longer operating room time were associated with poor outcomes, physicians should recognize the role of PG and might optimally challenge and complete gastrectomies within the appropriate indications. PMID:22933986

  12. DISTAL MYOPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Over a century ago, Gowers described two young patients in whom distal muscles weakness involved the hand, foot, sternocleidomastoid, and facial muscles in the other case the shoulder and distal leg musculature. Soon after, , similar distal myopathy cases were reported whereby the absence of sensory symptoms and of pathologic changes in the peripheral nerves and spinal cord at postmortem examination allowed differentiation from Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In 1951, Welander described autosomal dominant (AD) distal arm myopathy in a large Scandanavian cohort. Since then the number of well-characterized distal myopathies has continued to grow such that the distal myopathies have formed a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Affected kindred commonly manifest weakness that is limited to foot and toe muscles even in advanced stages of the disease, with variable mild proximal leg, distal arm, neck and laryngeal muscle involvement in selected individuals. An interesting consequence of the molecular characterization of the distal myopathies has been the recognition that mutation in a single gene can lead to more than one clinical disorder. For example, Myoshi myopathy (MM) and limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2B are allelic disorders due to defects in the gene that encodes dysferlin. The six well described distal myopathy syndromes are shown in Table 1. Table 2 lists advances in our understanding of the myofibrillar myopathy group and Table 3 includes more recently delineated and less common distal myopathies. In the same manner, the first section of this review pertains to the more traditional six distal myopathies followed by discussion of the myofibrillar myopathies. In the third section, we review other clinically and genetically distinctive distal myopathy syndromes usually based upon single or smaller family cohorts. The fourth section considers other neuromuscular disorders that are important to recognize as they display prominent

  13. Comparing Laparoscopic to Endoscopic Resections for Early Gastric Cancer in a High Volume North American Center.

    PubMed

    Najmeh, Sara; Cools-Lartigue, Jonathan; Mueller, Carmen; Ferri, Lorenzo E

    2016-09-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection as an organ sparing option for early gastric cancer is becoming increasingly accepted as an alternative to laparoscopic gastrectomy. Given the very limited North American data, we sought to compare outcomes between endoscopic and laparoscopic resection of gastric malignant and premalignant tumors. Patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrectomy or endoscopic submucosal dissection from 2007 to 2014 for adenocarcinoma or dysplasia at the McGill University Health Center were identified from a prospectively collected database and dichotomized according to the surgical approach. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, stage, oncologic outcome, length of stay, and postoperative complications were recorded. Of 155 patients with gastric cancer identified, 67 were treated by laparoscopic gastrectomy (n = 37) or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) (n = 30). There were significantly more invasive lesions in the laparoscopic group and patients subject to ESD harbored more T1 lesions. No significant difference in the rate of R0 resection or overall complications was observed between the groups. Accordingly, length of stay was significantly shorter in the ESD group. There were no significant differences in terms of overall and disease-free survival. In selected patients, ESD is associated with improved short-term outcomes and provides an appropriate oncologic resection option in a North American patient cohort. PMID:27282756

  14. Paraesophageal Hernia Repair With Partial Longitudinal Gastrectomy in Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, John; El-Hayek, Kevin; Brethauer, Stacy; Schauer, Philip; Zelisko, Andrea; Chand, Bipan; O'Rourke, Colin; Kroh, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with hiatal hernia in obese patients has proven difficult, as studies demonstrate poor symptom control and high failure rates in this patient population. Recent data have shown that incorporating weight loss procedures into the treatment of reflux may improve overall outcomes. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 28 obese and morbidly obese patients who presented from December 2007 through July 2013 with large or recurrent type 3 or 4 paraesophageal hernia. All of the patients underwent combined paraesophageal hernia repair and partial longitudinal gastrectomy. Charts were retrospectively reviewed, and the patients were contacted to determine symptomatic relief. Results: Mean preoperative body mass index was 38.1 ± 4.9 kg/m2. Anatomic failure of prior fundoplication occurred in 7 patients (25%). The remaining 21 had primary paraesophageal hernia, 3 of which were type 4. Postoperative complications included pulmonary embolism (n = 1), pulmonary decompensation (n = 2), and wound infection (n = 1). Mean hospital stay was 5 ± 3 days. Upper gastrointestinal esophagogram was performed in 21 patients with no immediate recurrence or staple line dehiscence. Mean excess weight loss was 44 ± 25%. All of the patients surveyed experienced near to total resolution of their preoperative symptoms within the first month. At 1 year, symptom scores decreased significantly. At 27 months, however, there was a mild increase in the scores. Return of severe symptoms occurred in 2 patients, both of whom underwent conversion to gastric bypass. Conclusions: Combined laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair with longitudinal partial gastrectomy offers a safe, feasible approach to the management of large or recurrent paraesophageal hernia in well-selected obese and morbidly obese patients. Short-term results were promising; however, intermediate results showed increasing rates of reflux symptoms that required

  15. Carbon dioxide pneumothorax occurring during laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy due to a congenital diaphragmatic defect: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Jin; Kim, Duk-Kyung; Yang, Mi-Kyung; Seo, Jeong-Eun; Kwon, Ji-Hye

    2016-02-01

    During laparoscopic surgery, carbon dioxide (CO2) pneumothorax can develop due to a congenital defect in the diaphragm. We present a case of a spontaneous massive left-sided pneumothorax that occurred during laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy, because of an escape of intraperitoneal CO2 gas, under pressure, into the pleural cavity through a congenital defect in the esophageal hiatus of the left diaphragm. This was confirmed on intraoperative chest radiography and laparoscopic inspection. This CO2 pneumothorax caused tolerable hemodynamic and respiratory consequences, and was rapidly reversible after release of the pneumoperitoneum. Thus, a conservative approach was adopted, and the remainder of the surgery was completed, laparoscopically. Due to the high solubility of CO2 gas and the extra-pulmonary mechanism, CO2 pneumothorax with otherwise hemodynamically stable conditions can be managed by conservative modalities, avoiding unnecessary chest tube insertion or conversion to an open procedure. PMID:26885310

  16. Carbon dioxide pneumothorax occurring during laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy due to a congenital diaphragmatic defect: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye-Jin

    2016-01-01

    During laparoscopic surgery, carbon dioxide (CO2) pneumothorax can develop due to a congenital defect in the diaphragm. We present a case of a spontaneous massive left-sided pneumothorax that occurred during laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy, because of an escape of intraperitoneal CO2 gas, under pressure, into the pleural cavity through a congenital defect in the esophageal hiatus of the left diaphragm. This was confirmed on intraoperative chest radiography and laparoscopic inspection. This CO2 pneumothorax caused tolerable hemodynamic and respiratory consequences, and was rapidly reversible after release of the pneumoperitoneum. Thus, a conservative approach was adopted, and the remainder of the surgery was completed, laparoscopically. Due to the high solubility of CO2 gas and the extra-pulmonary mechanism, CO2 pneumothorax with otherwise hemodynamically stable conditions can be managed by conservative modalities, avoiding unnecessary chest tube insertion or conversion to an open procedure. PMID:26885310

  17. [Laparoscopic myomectomy].

    PubMed

    Kolmorgen, K

    1995-01-01

    This retrospective study reviews the indications, surgical techniques and complications in 212 laparoscopic myomectomies performed on 150 patients. The indications for laparoscopic myomectomy include myoma with symptoms, irregular menstruation, rapid growth or sterility and pediculate myoma or identified secondary changes without symptoms. Laparoscopy is contraindicated in patients with fibroids larger than 10 cm and extreme localizations such as prevesicular, parametrial and deep intramural myoma in patients desirous of children. Pediculate myomas were resectioned after coagulation or ligation (22.6%), whereas other myomas were enucleated by various other techniques (77.4%). The small intestine of one patient was damaged by alligator forceps. The lesion was noticed the next day as intestinal contents emerged from the Robinson drain. In three other patients, the laparoscopic operation was completed by laparotomy. Laparoscopic myomectomy, the main advantage of which lies in the avoidance of hysterectomy, is recommended, provided the various surgical suturing and morcellation skills are available and the indications and contraindications are observed. PMID:8585361

  18. Comparison of laparoscopy-assisted and open radical gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yingxue; Yu, Peiwu; Qian, Feng; Zhao, Yongliang; Shi, Yan; Tang, Bo; Zeng, Dongzhu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG) has gained international acceptance for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC). However, the use of laparoscopic surgery in the management of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) has not attained widespread acceptance. This retrospective large-scale patient study in a single center for minimally invasive surgery assessed the feasibility and safety of LAG for T2 and T3 stage AGC. A total of 628 patients underwent LAG and 579 patients underwent open gastrectomy (OG) from Jan 2004 to Dec 2011. All cases underwent radical lymph node (LN) dissection from D1 to D2+. This study compared short- and long-term results between the 2 groups after stratifying by pTNM stages, including the mean operation time, volume of blood loss, number of harvested LNs, average days of postoperative hospital stay, mean gastrointestinal function recovery time, intra- and post-operative complications, recurrence rate, recurrence site, and 5-year survival curve. Thirty-five patients (5.57%) converted to open procedures in the LAG group. There were no significant differences in retrieved LN number (30.4 ± 13.4 vs 28.1 ± 17.2, P = 0.43), proximal resection margin (PRM) (6.15 ± 1.63 vs 6.09 ± 1.91, P = 0.56), or distal resection margin (DRM) (5.46 ± 1.74 vs 5.40 ± 1.95, P = 0.57) between the LAG and OG groups, respectively. The mean volume of blood loss (154.5 ± 102.6 vs 311.2 ± 118.9 mL, P < 0.001), mean postoperative hospital stay (7.6 ± 2.5 vs 10.7 ± 3.6 days, P < 0.001), mean time for gastrointestinal function recovery (3.3 ± 1.4 vs 3.9 ± 1.5 days, P < 0.001), and postoperative complications rate (6.4% vs 10.5%, P = 0.01) were clearly lower in the LAG group compared to the OG group. However, the recurrence pattern and site were not different between the 2 groups, even they were stratified by the TNM stage. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 85.38%, 79

  19. Is Sleeve Gastrectomy Always an Absolute Contraindication in Patients with Barrett's?

    PubMed

    Gagner, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma is not rising at the same rate as severe obesity, and incidence-based mortality is marginally going down since 2000. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is now the preferred operation for weight loss in several countries including the USA. Recent objective studies of reflux before and 2 years after LSG show improvement by GERD Symptom Assessment Scale score, DeMeester score, total acid exposure, as well as unchanged lower esophageal sphincter pressure measurements. Therefore, sleeve gastrectomy improves symptoms and reduces reflux in most morbidly obese patients with preoperative reflux. At the last LSG consensus conference, 94.5 % of experts mentioned Barrett's esophagus to be a major contraindication for the performance of LSG, a change from 2011 (81 %). But the actual incidence of Barrett's is only 1 % in the severely obese. Therefore, 99 % of patients should be able to get a LSG. Further, after 25 years of duodenal switch operations (which includes a sleeve gastrectomy, there are still no reports of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Hence, LSG is not a contraindication in GERD patients without Barrett's. PMID:26612694

  20. Unusual complication of multiple splenic abscesses arising from a feeding jejunostomy tube subsequent to total gastrectomy: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    AN, SHUCHANG; LI, BING; CUI, RONG; YAN, FENG; YANG, GUOSHAN; ZHAO, LI; ZHANG, ZHENYA; WANG, RUIQIN

    2015-01-01

    Splenic abscess is a rare clinical entity. The present study reports a case of a patient that suffered from splenic abscess secondary to septicemia resulting from Klebsiella pneumoniae infection following the removal of the feeding jejunostomy tube that was utilized subsequent to the patient undergoing total gastrectomy as part of the treatment regimen for gastric adenocarcinoma. The early clinical presentation was nonspecific and multiple splenic abscesses were subsequently identified. To reduce the risks of an additional surgical procedure in this particular patient, laparoscopic assisted splenotomy and catheter drainage were performed. Due to the severe complications that occurred in the present patient, no adjuvant chemotherapy was administered. Therefore, the unusual complication of splenic abscess subsequent to total gastrectomy should be noted, and the routine feeding jejunostomy tube placement at the time of total gastrectomy should be discussed and re-assessed. PMID:26137078

  1. Melanocortin-4 receptor signaling is not required for short-term weight loss after sleeve gastrectomy in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Jelin, E B; Daggag, H; Speer, A L; Hameed, N; Lessan, N; Barakat, M; Nadler, E P

    2016-03-01

    Homozygous or compound heterozygous melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) mutations are rare with fewer than 10 patients described in current literature. Here we report the short- and long-term outcomes for four children ages 4.5-14 who are homozygous for loss-of-function mutations in the MC4R and underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. All four patients experienced significant weight loss and improvement in, or resolution of, their comorbidities in the short term. One patient, however, has had significant weight regain in the long term. We conclude that MC4R signaling is not required for short-term weight loss after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy in children. Behavior modification may be more important for long-term weight maintenance, but patients with homozygous MC4R deficiency should not be excluded from consideration for sleeve gastrectomy. However, as at least one copy of functional MC4R is necessary and sufficient to induce long-term postoperative weight loss benefits, patients with complete loss of MC4R functionality might be less likely to exhibit the same benefits resulting from bariatric surgery. PMID:26538186

  2. Gastrectomy and D2 Lymphadenectomy for Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis Comparing the Harmonic Scalpel to Conventional Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hang; Hsiao, Chia-Wen; Clymer, Jeffrey W.; Schwiers, Michael L.; Tibensky, Bryanna N.; Patel, Leena; Ferko, Nicole C.; Chekan, Edward

    2015-01-01

    The ultrasonic Harmonic scalpel has demonstrated clinical and surgical benefits in dissection and coagulation. To evaluate its use in gastrectomy, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the Harmonic scalpel to conventional techniques in gastrectomy for patients with gastric cancer. International databases were searched without language restrictions for comparisons in open or laparoscopic gastrectomy and lymphadenectomy. The meta-analysis used a random-effects model for all outcomes; continuous variables were analyzed for mean differences and dichotomous variables were analyzed for risk ratios. Sensitivity analyses were conducted for study quality, type of conventional technique, and imputation of study results. Ten studies (N = 935) met the inclusion criteria. Compared with conventional hemostatic techniques, the Harmonic scalpel demonstrated significant reductions in operating time (−27.5 min; P < 0.001), intraoperative blood loss (−93.2 mL; P < 0.001), and drainage volume (−138.8 mL; P < 0.001). Results were numerically higher for conventional techniques for hospital length of stay, complication risk, and transfusions but did not reach statistical significance. Results remained robust to sensitivity analyses. This meta-analysis demonstrates the clear advantages of using the Harmonic scalpel compared to conventional techniques, with improvements demonstrated across several outcome measures for patients undergoing gastrectomy and lymphadenectomy. PMID:26075090

  3. When Eastern Surgeons Meet Western Patients: A Pilot Study of Gastrectomy with Lymphadenectomy in Caucasian Patients at a Single Korean Institute.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masatoshi; Choi, Yoon Young; An, Ji Yeong; Seo, Sang Hyuk; Shin, Hyun Beak; Bang, Hui Jae; Li, Shuangxi; Kim, Hyung Il; Cheong, Jae Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2016-09-01

    East Asian surgeons generally report lower morbidity and mortality rates for gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy than do surgeons in Western countries; however, the disparity remains unexplained. The aim of this article was to determine the feasibility and safety regarding cases in which East Asian surgeons perform such procedures in Caucasian patients (CPs). Twelve CPs underwent gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer at Yonsei University Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea between June 2011 and April 2014. Procedures performed included total gastrectomy (7 of 12, 58%), distal gastrectomy (4 of 12, 33%), and completion total gastrectomy (1 of 12, 8%). Nine patients (75%) underwent D2 lymphadenectomy, and D1+ lymphadenectomy was performed in three others (25%). In four patients (33%), combined resections were carried out. The median values of surgical parameters were as follows: operative time, 266.5 min (range, 120-586 min); estimated blood loss, 90 mL (range, 37-350 mL); retrieved lymph node count, 37.5 (range, 22-63); and postoperative hospital stay, 13.7 days (range, 5-63 days). No mortality was encountered, although two patients (17%) experienced complications (both Clavien-Dindo classification grade IIIa anastomotic leakages), which were successfully managed by conservative treatment. In the hands of East Asian surgeons, mortality and short-term morbidity appears to be acceptably low in CPs subjected to gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer. PMID:27401666

  4. Risk factors for tuberculosis after gastrectomy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Won Jai; Park, Young Mok; Song, Joo Han; Chung, Kyung Soo; Kim, Song Yee; Kim, Eun Young; Jung, Ji Ye; Park, Moo Suk; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon; Noh, Sung Hoon; An, Ji Yeong; Kang, Young Ae

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in gastrectomy patients and investigate the risk factors for developing TB after gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of gastrectomy patients with gastric cancer was performed at a university-affiliated hospital in Seoul, South Korea between January 2007 and December 2009. We reviewed patient medical records and collected data associated with the risk of TB, surgery, and gastric cancer. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of TB were calculated to compare the incidence of TB in gastrectomy patients with that in the general Korean population, and risk factors for TB after gastrectomies were analyzed. RESULTS: Among the 1776 gastrectomy patients, 0.9% (16/1776) developed post-gastrectomy TB, with an incidence of 223.7 cases per 100000 patients per year. The overall incidence of TB in gastrectomy patients, adjusted by sex and age, was significantly higher than that in the general population (SIR = 2.22, 95%CI: 1.27-3.60). Previous TB infection [odds ratio (OR) = 7.1, P < 0.001], lower body mass index (BMI) (kg/m2; OR = 1.21, P = 0.043) and gastrectomy extent (total gastrectomy vs subtotal gastrectomy) (OR = 3.48, P = 0.017) were significant risk factors for TB after gastrectomy in a multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: TB incidence after gastrectomy is higher than that in the general population. Previous TB infection, lower BMI, and total gastrectomy are risk factors for TB after gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:26937146

  5. Laparoscopic appendectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Kent F.; Christensen, Brent J.

    1991-07-01

    The accurate and timely diagnosis of acute appendicitis remains a difficult clinical dilemma. Misdiagnosis rates of up to 40% are not unusual. Laparoscopic appendectomy provides a definitive diagnosis and an excellent method for routine removal of the appendix with very low morbidity and patient discomfort.

  6. Automated branching pattern report generation for laparoscopic surgery assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Tetsuro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a method for generating branching pattern reports of abdominal blood vessels for laparoscopic gastrectomy. In gastrectomy, it is very important to understand branching structure of abdominal arteries and veins, which feed and drain specific abdominal organs including the stomach, the liver and the pancreas. In the real clinical stage, a surgeon creates a diagnostic report of the patient anatomy. This report summarizes the branching patterns of the blood vessels related to the stomach. The surgeon decides actual operative procedure. This paper shows an automated method to generate a branching pattern report for abdominal blood vessels based on automated anatomical labeling. The report contains 3D rendering showing important blood vessels and descriptions of branching patterns of each vessel. We have applied this method for fifty cases of 3D abdominal CT scans and confirmed the proposed method can automatically generate branching pattern reports of abdominal arteries.

  7. [Laparoscopic rectopexy].

    PubMed

    Herold, A; Bruch, H P

    1997-01-01

    Within 4 years 66 laparoscopic rectopexies were performed. The indications were: rectal prolapse, morphologic outlet-constipation and a combination of both. Using a modified suture rectopexy (according to Sudeck), we did not take any foreign material and resected the sigmoid in 35 patients. Conversion rate was 2%, complications that needed reoperation occurred in 9%. In the follow up period of 24.1 months in the mean (max. 50) no recurrent prolapse occurred. Incontinence was abolished or improved in 64%, outlet-constipation was improved in 85%. Especially in rectopexy the laparoscopic technique seems to be of benefit for the patient: quicker convalescence, less pain, small scars, a.o. But all these potential advantages have to be proven in prospective-if possible randomised-studies. PMID:9340966

  8. Laparoscopic resection of splenic flexure tumors.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Massimo; Spoletini, Domenico; Castaldi, Fabio; Giovannini, Cristiano; Passaro, Umberto

    2016-03-01

    In this paper a single institution experience in laparoscopic treatment of splenic flexure tumors (SFT) is reported. Low incidence of these tumors and complexity of the procedure make the laparoscopic resection not diffuse and not well standardized. Since 2004, in a specific database, we prospectively record clinicopathological features and outcome of all patients submitted to laparoscopic colorectal resection. From January 2004 to October 2015, out of 567 cases of minimally invasive colorectal procedures, we performed 20 laparoscopic resection of SFT, 11 with extracorporeal anastomosis and 9 totally laparoscopic. Twelve patients had an advanced disease. Conversion rate was null. The mean operative time was 105' (range 70'-135'). Comparing extracorporeal and intracorporeal anastomoses, we did not find any significant difference in mean duration of surgery. Mean distal margin was 9.4 ± 3.1 cm (mean ± DS), mean proximal margin 8.9 ± 2.7 cm. The mean number of harvested lymph nodes was 17.8 ± 5.6. Evaluating surgical short-term and oncological mid-term outcomes, laparoscopic resection of splenic flexure for tumors, even if challenging, resulted technically feasible and oncologically safe and it seems to be advisable. PMID:27040272

  9. A Fatal Case of Wernicke's Encephalopathy after Sleeve Gastrectomy for Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Manatakis, Dimitrios K.; Georgopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute neuropsychiatric disorder, due to thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. It is traditionally described in chronic alcohol abusers; however obesity surgery is an emerging cause, as the number of bariatric procedures increases. A high index of clinical suspicion is required, since initial symptoms may be nonspecific and the classic triad of ophthalmoplegia, gait and stance disorders, and mental confusion is present only in one-third of patients. Laboratory tests can be within normal range and typical MRI brain lesions are found only in 50% of cases. Aggressive supplementation with intravenous thiamine should not be delayed until confirmation of diagnosis, as it may fully reverse symptoms, but almost half the patients will still display permanent neurological deficit. We present our experience with a fatal case of Wernicke's encephalopathy, following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity. PMID:25276464

  10. [Treatment of bone disease caused by gastrectomy].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Gastrectomy is undergone mainly in patients with gastric cancer. Bone diseases(osteoporosis and osteomalacia)caused by gastractomy are associated with weight loss, calcium and vitamin D inadequancy, and malnutrition. Most patients after gastrectomy have multile risk factors of bone diseases and subsequently are at a higher risk for fractures. In particular, sex hormone deficiency and aging enhance the risk for fractures. The management of bone diseases caused by gastraectomy include adequet intake of calcium, vitamin D and protein, sunlight exposure, and regular weight-bearing exercise, as well as non-smoking and avoiding excess alcohol drinking. The patients at a high risk for fractures shoud be treated with bisphosphonates. PMID:26503874

  11. Laparoscopic Ureterolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Aras, Bekir; Ekşi, Mithat; Şener, Nevzat Can; Tugču, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: The present study retrospectively analyzed the data of 213 patients who underwent laparoscopic ureterolithotomy. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the data of 213 patients, in whom we performed conventional laparoscopic ureterolithotomy from April 2006 and January 2015 based on the diagnosis of an upper or middle ureteral stone. Patients with large ureteral stones (>15 mm) or a history of failed shock-wave lithotripsy or ureteroscopy were included in the study. Although the retroperitoneal approach was preferred for 170 patients, the transperitoneal approach was used in the remaining 43 patients. Results: The mean patient age was 39.3 ± 12.0 years (range, 18–73). The study population was composed of 78 (26.7%) female and 135 (63.3%) male patients. The mean stone size was 19.7 ± 2.5 mm. The mean operative time was 80.9 ± 10.9 minutes, and the mean blood loss was 63.3 ± 12.7 mL. Intraoperative insertion of a double-J catheter was performed in 76 patients. The overall stone-free rate was 99%. No major complication was observed in any patient. However, conversion to open surgery was necessary in 1 patient. Conclusion: With high success and low complication rates, laparoscopic ureterolithotomy is an effective and reliable method that ensures quick recovery and may be the first treatment option for patients with large, impacted ureteral stones, as well as for those with a history of failed primary treatment. PMID:27019576

  12. [Sleeve gastrectomy as a revision procedure for failed gastric banding].

    PubMed

    Utech, M; Shaheen, H; Halter, J; Riege, R; Knapp, A; Wolf, E; Büsing, M

    2014-02-01

    The number of bariatric surgical procedures is still increasing in Germany and also worldwide. According to the German quality assurance study of surgical treatment of obesity, the laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) was the most common bariatric operation with a total of 678 cases between 2004 and 2006 in Germany. In the meantime a high rate of LAGB treatment failures has been reported, so that a high rate of revisional bariatric operations is required. But still the question is open which bariatric procedure can be recommended. The aim of this study is to report the results and follow-up of conversion of failed LAGB to laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Between 8/2008 and 4/2012 39 patients (31♀/8♂) with a mean age of 43.7 ± 7.8 (26-61) years and a BMI of 47.1 ± 9.1 (30.4 to 67.4) kg/m² had revisional surgery for converting a failed LAGB to LSG. The indications for conversion were dysphagia (38.5 %), weight regain (33.3 %), band slippage (17.9 %), band erosion (5.1 %), band defect (2.6 %) as well as band sepsis (2.6 %). 19 procedures were performed as a one-stage operation and 20 procedures as a two-stage operation. The average operating time was 129 ± 49 (50-312) min. The complication rate was 7.7 %. There were one proximal leak, one gastric sleeve stenosis and one pronounced wound infection. The percent excess weight loss was 23 %, 39 %, 51 %, 52 %, 60 % and 46 % after 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months follow- up, respectively. Converting a failed LAGB into a LSG is a revision procedure with low complication rate and promising results, which can be performed as a two-stage as well as a one-stage procedure. PMID:23907841

  13. The laparoscopic approach toward hyperinsulinism in children.

    PubMed

    Bax, Klaas N M A; van der Zee, D C

    2007-11-01

    Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (HH) in children requiring surgery is rare. Early HH can be the result of focal or diffuse pancreatic pathology. A number of genetic abnormalities in early HH have been identified, but in the majority of patients no abnormality is found. The sporadic focal and diffuse forms as well the autosomal recessive form are particularly therapy-resistant and demand for early surgery. Preoperative discrimination between focal and diffuse disease in early HH is difficult. 18 F DOPA PET in combination with CT is promising as is laparoscopic exploration of the pancreas. Frozen section biopsy analysis has not been uniformly beneficial. If macroscopically no focal lesion is found, limited laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy provides tissue for definitive pathologic examination. Subsequent near total laparoscopic spleen-saving pancreatectomy surgery is not particularly difficult. Later HH may occur in the context of the MEN-1 syndrome and is then multifocal in nature. In MEN-1 patients, a distal spleen-saving pancreatectomy with enucleation of lesions in the head seems justified. Insulin-producing lesions in non-MEN-1 patients should be enucleated. There should always be a suspicion of malignancy. Also, in older children, surgery for hyperinsulinism should be performed laparoscopically. PMID:17933666

  14. Prophylactic gastrectomy in a 16-year-old.

    PubMed

    Wickremeratne, Tehara; Lee, Cheng Hiang; Kirk, Judy; Charlton, Amanda; Thomas, Gordon; Gaskin, Kevin J

    2014-03-01

    We performed a total gastrectomy in a 16-year-old asymptomatic CDH1 gene mutation carrier in whom two prior gastroscopies with biopsies were normal. The patient's mother died aged 39 years and her aunt died aged 21 years of gastric cancer. A germline CDH1 mutation (associated with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer) was initially identified in her mother at diagnosis and was later identified by predictive testing in this patient. Our patient is the youngest CDH1 carrier to date to have a prophylactic gastrectomy, and is several years below the age at which existing guidelines recommend consideration of gastrectomy. Multiple foci of early-stage carcinoma were found in her gastrectomy specimen. Given the family history of advanced gastric cancer in the late second decade, the unpredictable time course to development of advanced gastric cancer, and the futility of gastroscopic surveillance, we recommend consideration of prophylactic gastrectomy in adolescent asymptomatic CDH1 mutation carriers on an individual basis. PMID:24240619

  15. Incidence of Port-Site Incisional Hernia After Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rainville, Harvey; Ikedilo, Ojinika; Vemulapali, Pratibha

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is gaining popularity among minimally invasive surgeons and is now being applied to a broad number of surgical procedures. Although this technique uses only 1 port, the diameter of the incision is larger than in standard laparoscopic surgery. The long-term incidence of port-site hernias after single-incision laparoscopic surgery has yet to be determined. Methods: All patients who underwent a single-incision laparoscopic surgical procedure from May 2008 through May 2009 were included in the study. Single-incision laparoscopic surgical operations were performed either by a multiport technique or with a 3-trocar single-incision laparoscopic surgery port. The patients were seen at 30 to 36 months' follow-up, at which time they were examined for any evidence of port-site incisional hernia. Patients found to have hernias on clinical examination underwent repairs with mesh. Results: A total of 211 patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The types of operations included were cholecystectomy, appendectomy, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric banding, Nissen fundoplication, colectomy, and gastrojejunostomy. We found a port-site hernia rate of 2.9% at 30 to 36 months' follow-up. Conclusion: Port-site incisional hernia after single-incision laparoscopic surgical procedures remains a major setback for patients. The true incidence remains largely unknown because most patients are asymptomatic and therefore do not seek surgical aid. PMID:24960483

  16. Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some hernia repairs are performed using a small telescope known as a laparoscope. If your surgeon has ... in the abdominal wall (muscle) using small incisions, telescopes and a patch (mesh). Laparoscopic repair offers a ...

  17. Gallbladder removal - laparoscopic

    MedlinePlus

    Laparoscopic gallbladder removal is surgery to remove the gallbladder using a medical device called a laparoscope. ... lets the doctor see inside your belly. Gallbladder removal surgery is done while you are under general ...

  18. [Survival after gastrectomy for cancer. 209 cases].

    PubMed

    Le Treut, Y P; Capobianco, C; Botti, G; Christophe, M; Lebreuil, G; Bricot, R

    1992-09-26

    The long-term results of 209 gastrectomies performed for adenocarcinoma, including 117 which were prospectively collected, are presented. Resection was curative in 154 cases (73.6 percent). The TNM distribution of the tumours was: stage I (TxNOMO) 75 cases, stage II (TxN1MO) 46 cases, stage III (TxN2MO) 33 cases and stage IV (TxNxM1) 55 cases. Lymph node involvement was more frequent in the prospective than in the retrospective study. With a more than 5 years' follow-up of 80 percent of the patients operated upon, the actuarial survival rate at 5 years (operative mortality included) was 38 percent for all lesions, 52 percent for curative resection and 2 percent for palliative resection. Following curative resection, the survival rates for tumours of the upper, middle and lower thirds of the stomach were 40, 60 and 55 percent respectively. These rates were 60 percent for stage I tumours, 54 percent for stage II tumours and 25 percent for stage III tumours. The results obtained in this series, where most of the curative gastrectomies included excision of N1 and N2 lymph nodes, show that lymph node involvement has no significant importance for the prognosis when it is proximal (N1) and is not incompatible with prolonged survival when it is pedicular (N2). PMID:1465364

  19. Gastric microbiota and predicted gene functions are altered after subtotal gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ching-Hung; Lin, Jaw-Town; Ho, Hsiu J; Lai, Zi-Lun; Wang, Chang-Bi; Tang, Sen-Lin; Wu, Chun-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Subtotal gastrectomy (i.e., partial removal of the stomach), a surgical treatment for early-stage distal gastric cancer, is usually accompanied by highly selective vagotomy and Billroth II reconstruction, leading to dramatic changes in the gastric environment. Based on accumulating evidence of a strong link between human gut microbiota and host health, a 2-year follow-up study was conducted to characterize the effects of subtotal gastrectomy. Gastric microbiota and predicted gene functions inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequencing were analyzed before and after surgery. The results demonstrated that gastric microbiota is significantly more diverse after surgery. Ralstonia and Helicobacter were the top two genera of discriminant abundance in the cancerous stomach before surgery, while Streptococcus and Prevotella were the two most abundant genera after tumor excision. Furthermore, N-nitrosation genes were prevalent before surgery, whereas bile salt hydrolase, NO and N2O reductase were prevalent afterward. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document changes in gastric microbiota before and after surgical treatment of stomach cancer. PMID:26860194

  20. Gastric microbiota and predicted gene functions are altered after subtotal gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ching-Hung; Lin, Jaw-Town; Ho, Hsiu J.; Lai, Zi-Lun; Wang, Chang-Bi; Tang, Sen-Lin; Wu, Chun-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Subtotal gastrectomy (i.e., partial removal of the stomach), a surgical treatment for early-stage distal gastric cancer, is usually accompanied by highly selective vagotomy and Billroth II reconstruction, leading to dramatic changes in the gastric environment. Based on accumulating evidence of a strong link between human gut microbiota and host health, a 2-year follow-up study was conducted to characterize the effects of subtotal gastrectomy. Gastric microbiota and predicted gene functions inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequencing were analyzed before and after surgery. The results demonstrated that gastric microbiota is significantly more diverse after surgery. Ralstonia and Helicobacter were the top two genera of discriminant abundance in the cancerous stomach before surgery, while Streptococcus and Prevotella were the two most abundant genera after tumor excision. Furthermore, N-nitrosation genes were prevalent before surgery, whereas bile salt hydrolase, NO and N2O reductase were prevalent afterward. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document changes in gastric microbiota before and after surgical treatment of stomach cancer. PMID:26860194

  1. Retrograde jejunal intussusception after total gastrectomy: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Huang, G S; Jin, Y

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde jejunal intussusception is a rare disease. A 60-year-old female patient was hospitalized due to vomiting for 2 days, with a history of radical gastrectomy plus esophagus jejunum Rouxs-en-Y. On examination, there was a palpable wax-like mass on the left-hand side underneath the umbilicus. Computerized tomography scan showed a proximal jejunal intussusception. During surgery, the distal jejunum was found set into the proximal jejunum for a length of 30 cm, and bowel necrosis was also observed. The necrotic tube was resected and anastomosis was performed. Four days after the surgery, gastrointestinal function resumed. After a 10-month follow-up, the patient had no discomfort. PMID:27022810

  2. Comparison of laparoscopy-assisted and open radical gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer: A retrospective study in a single minimally invasive surgery center.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yingxue; Yu, Peiwu; Qian, Feng; Zhao, Yongliang; Shi, Yan; Tang, Bo; Zeng, Dongzhu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG) has gained international acceptance for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC). However, the use of laparoscopic surgery in the management of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) has not attained widespread acceptance. This retrospective large-scale patient study in a single center for minimally invasive surgery assessed the feasibility and safety of LAG for T2 and T3 stage AGC. A total of 628 patients underwent LAG and 579 patients underwent open gastrectomy (OG) from Jan 2004 to Dec 2011. All cases underwent radical lymph node (LN) dissection from D1 to D2+. This study compared short- and long-term results between the 2 groups after stratifying by pTNM stages, including the mean operation time, volume of blood loss, number of harvested LNs, average days of postoperative hospital stay, mean gastrointestinal function recovery time, intra- and post-operative complications, recurrence rate, recurrence site, and 5-year survival curve. Thirty-five patients (5.57%) converted to open procedures in the LAG group. There were no significant differences in retrieved LN number (30.4 ± 13.4 vs 28.1 ± 17.2, P = 0.43), proximal resection margin (PRM) (6.15 ± 1.63 vs 6.09 ± 1.91, P = 0.56), or distal resection margin (DRM) (5.46 ± 1.74 vs 5.40 ± 1.95, P = 0.57) between the LAG and OG groups, respectively. The mean volume of blood loss (154.5 ± 102.6 vs 311.2 ± 118.9 mL, P < 0.001), mean postoperative hospital stay (7.6 ± 2.5 vs 10.7 ± 3.6 days, P < 0.001), mean time for gastrointestinal function recovery (3.3 ± 1.4 vs 3.9 ± 1.5 days, P < 0.001), and postoperative complications rate (6.4% vs 10.5%, P = 0.01) were clearly lower in the LAG group compared to the OG group. However, the recurrence pattern and site were not different between the 2 groups, even they were stratified by the TNM stage. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 85.38%, 79.70%, 57

  3. Intraoperative assessment of tissue oxygen saturation of the remnant stomach by near-infrared spectroscopy in two cases of pancreatectomy following gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Akabane, Shintaro; Ohira, Masahiro; Ishiyama, Kohei; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Ide, Kentaro; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Shintaro; Tanimine, Naoki; Shimizu, Seiichi; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Objective and quantitative intraoperative methods of bowel viability assessment could decrease the risk of postoperative ischemic complications in gastrointestinal surgery. Because the remnant stomach and the pancreas share an arterial blood supply, it is often unclear whether the remnant stomach can be safely preserved when performing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) or distal pancreatectomy (DP) post gastrectomy. We herein report two cases in which the remnant stomach was safely preserved using near-infrared spectroscopy to assess the regional saturation of oxygen (rSO2) in the remnant stomach during operation. Presentation of case The first patient, a 68-year-old man, was diagnosed with cancer of the pancreatic head and underwent PD a year after proximal gastrectomy for gastric cancer. The remnant stomach was safely preserved by evaluation of the rSO2 before and after reconstruction of the arteries. The second patient, an 82-year-old woman with a history of distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer 40 years previously, was diagnosed with a main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreatic body, requiring DP. As in the previous case, we could safely preserve the remnant stomach through assessing the intraoperative rSO2 of the remnant stomach. Discussion Through comparing changes in the rSO2 during surgery, near-infrared spectroscopy provides objective and quantitative assessments of intestinal viability to predict ischemic complications. Conclusion This method may be a viable option to evaluate the blood supply to the alimentary tract. PMID:27061481

  4. Laparoscopic pancreatic surgery for benign and malignant disease.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, Thijs; Klompmaker, Sjors; Abu Hilal, Mohammad; Kendrick, Michael L; Busch, Olivier R; Besselink, Marc G

    2016-04-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for benign and malignant pancreatic lesions has slowly been gaining acceptance over the past decade and is being introduced in many centres. Some studies suggest that this approach is equivalent to or better than open surgery, but randomized data are needed to assess outcomes. In this Review, we aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in laparoscopic pancreatic surgery by aggregating high-quality published evidence. Various aspects, including the benefits, limitations, oncological efficacy, learning curve and latest innovations, are discussed. The focus is on laparoscopic Whipple procedure and laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for both benign and malignant disease, but robot-assisted surgery is also addressed. Surgical and oncological outcomes are discussed as well as quality of life parameters and the cost efficiency of laparoscopic pancreatic surgery. We have also included decision-aid algorithms based on the literature and our own expertise; these algorithms can assist in the decision to perform a laparoscopic or open procedure. PMID:26882881

  5. Distal splenorenal shunt

    MedlinePlus

    ... shunt procedure; Renal - splenic venous shunt; Warren shunt; Cirrhosis - distal splenorenal; Liver failure - distal splenorenal ... hepatitis Blood clots Certain congenital disorders Primary biliary cirrhosis When blood cannot flow normally through the portal ...

  6. Distal Convoluted Tubule

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The distal convoluted tubule is the nephron segment that lies immediately downstream of the macula densa. Although short in length, the distal convoluted tubule plays a critical role in sodium, potassium, and divalent cation homeostasis. Recent genetic and physiologic studies have greatly expanded our understanding of how the distal convoluted tubule regulates these processes at the molecular level. This article provides an update on the distal convoluted tubule, highlighting concepts and pathophysiology relevant to clinical practice. PMID:24855283

  7. Laparoscopic long sleeve pancreaticogastrostomy (LPG): a novel pancreatic anastomosis following central pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Tamara M. H.; Sodergren, Mikael H.; Fan, Ruifang

    2016-01-01

    Background Central pancreatectomy (CP) is preferred to distal pancreatectomy (DP) for the excision of benign tumours at the neck or body of the pancreas, in order to preserve pancreatic function and the spleen. However, the pancreaticoenterostomy is technically difficult to perform laparoscopically and the postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) rate is high. Methods A novel laparoscopic reconstruction of the pancreatic stump during CP is described, the laparoscopic long sleeve pancreaticogastrostomy (LPG). Results Two males and two females with a median age of 49 years had a laparoscopic CP with LPG. After a median follow-up of 27.5 months, there was no mortality. One patient had a grade A POPF, managed conservatively. Conclusions The LPG is a safe and technically less demanding method to reconstruct pancreatic drainage laparoscopically. PMID:27275466

  8. Sleeve Gastrectomy and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: a Systematic Review of Long-Term Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Switzer, Noah J; Prasad, Shalvin; Debru, Estifanos; Church, Neal; Mitchell, Philip; Gill, Richdeep S

    2016-07-01

    Long-term T2DM resolution rates are not well established following the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). The aim of this paper was to systematically review the evidence on the efficacy of the LSG on long-term T2DM resolution. A comprehensive electronic literature search was conducted. Included studies reported 5-year follow-up of T2DM outcomes following the LSG. Eleven studies (n = 1354) were included in the systematic review. T2DM patients (n = 402) encompassed 29.7 % of patients. Diabetes prevalence decreased post-operatively to 20.5 % at 5 years, with diabetes resolution occurring in 60.8 % of patients. Mean plasma glucose levels and haemoglobin A1c values fell from 170.3 to 112.0 mg/dL and 8.3 to 6.7 % respectively at the 5-year mark. The LSG is an effective long-term metabolic surgery for patients with T2DM. PMID:27103028

  9. The first laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, W

    2001-01-01

    Prof Dr Med Erich Mühe of Böblingen, Germany, performed the first laparoscopic cholecystectomy on September 12, 1985. The German Surgical Society rejected Mühe in 1986 after he reported that he had performed the first laparoscopic cholecystectomy, yet in 1992 he received their highest award, the German Surgical Society Anniversary Award. In 1990 in Atlanta, at the Society of American Gastrointestinal Surgeons (SAGES) Convention, Perissat, Berci, Cuschieri, Dubois, and Mouret were recognized by SAGES for performing early laparoscopic cholecystectomies, but Mühe was not. However, in 1999 he was recognized by SAGES for having performed the first laparoscopic cholecystectomy-SAGES invited Mühe to present the Storz Lecture. In Mühe's presentation, titled "The First Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy," which he gave in March 1999 in San Antonio, Texas, he described the first procedure. Finally, Mühe had received the worldwide acclaim that he deserved for his pioneering work. One purpose of this article is to trace the development of the basic instruments used in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The other purpose is to give Mühe the recognition he deserves for being the developer of the laparoscopic cholecystectomy procedure. PMID:11304004

  10. Complete laparoscopic nephroureterectomy with intravesical lockable clip

    PubMed Central

    Eret, Viktor; Ürge, Tomáš; Klečka, Jiří; Trávníček, Ivan; Hes, Ondřej; Petersson, Fredrik; Stránský, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We present a cohort of patients with low-stage pelviureteric neoplastic disease who underwent complete laparoscopic nephroureterectomy (CLNUE) with intravesical lockable clip (IVLC). Due to the absence of a standard technique of NUE, the study was not randomized. Materials From 1/2010 to 1/2012, 21 patients were subjected to CLNUE-IVLC. The first step was transurethral excision of the ureterovesical junction with Collin's knife deep into the paravesical adipose tissue. The ureter was grasped with biopsy forceps and the distal end of the ureter was occluded with lockable clip. The applicator was introduced through a 5 mm port inserted as an epicystostomy. The patients were rotated to flank position and CLNUE followed. The endoscopically introduced clip on the distal ureter is proof of completion of the total ureterectomy. Results The mean operation time was 161 (115-200) min. In four (19.0%), the application of the clip failed and CLNUE was completed with non-occluded ureter. In three cases, subsequent laparoscopic nephrectomy was converted to open surgery. In two cases, the distal ureterectomy was completed with pluck technique through a lower abdominal incision that was also used for extraction of the specimen. There were four complications (Clavien II 2x, IIIb, V). Follow-up was available for all – mean 10.6 (range: 0-25) months. One died of disease generalization within 11 months. Conclusion CLNUE-IVLC is fast and safe. If needed, the endoscopic phase can be switched to open NUE. Disadvantages include: the need to change the position of the patient, the risk of inability to apply the clip on the distal ureter, and the risk of an unclosed defect of the urinary bladder. PMID:24578933

  11. Sigmoid volvulus after laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Sadatomo, Ai; Miyakura, Yasuyuki; Zuiki, Toru; Koinuma, Koji; Horie, Hisanaga; Lefor, Alan T; Yasuda, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-01

    We report the first case of sigmoid volvulus after laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid colon cancer. The patient is a 75-year-old man who presented with the sudden onset of severe abdominal pain. He had undergone laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for cancer 2 years before presentation. CT scan showed a distended sigmoid colon with a mesenteric twist, or "whirl sign." Colonoscopy showed a mucosal spiral and luminal stenosis with dilated sigmoid colon distally and ischemic mucosa. The diagnosis of ischemic colonic necrosis due to sigmoid volvulus was established. Resection of the necrotic sigmoid colon was performed and a descending colon stoma was created. A long remnant sigmoid colon and chronic constipation may contribute to the development of sigmoid volvulus after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy. Prompt diagnosis is essential for adequate treatment, and colonoscopy aids in the diagnosis of ischemic changes in patients without definitive findings of a gangrenous colon. PMID:23879414

  12. Laparoscopic duodenoduodenostomy for duodenal atresia.

    PubMed

    Bax, N M; Ure, B M; van der Zee, D C; van Tuijl, I

    2001-02-01

    A 3,220-g newborn baby with trisomy 21 presented with duodenal atresia. No other congenital malformations were diagnosed. Informed consent for a laparoscopic approach was obtained. The child was placed in a supine, head-up position slightly rotated to the left at the end of a shortened operating table. The surgeon stood at the bottom end with the cameraperson to his left and the scrub nurse to his right. The screen was at the right upper end. Open insertion of a cannula for a 5-mm 30 degrees telescope through the inferior umbilical fold was performed. A carbon dioxide (CO2) pneumoperitoneum with a pressure of 8 mmHg and a flow of 2l/min was established. Two 3.3-mm working cannulas were inserted; one in the left hypogastrium and one pararectally on the right at the umbilical level. Two more such cannulas were inserted; one under the xyphoid for a liver elevator and one in the right hypogastrium for a sucker. Mobilization of the dilated upper and collapsed lower duodenum was easy. After transverse enterotomy of the upper duodenum and longitudinal enterotomy of the distal duodenum, a diamond-shaped anastomosis with interrupted 5 zero Vicryl sutures were performed. The absence of air in the bowel beyond the atresia increased the working space and greatly facilitated the procedure. The technique proved to be easy, and the child did very well. Laparoscopic bowel anastomosis in newborn babies had not been described previously. Recently, a diamond-shaped duodenoduodenostomy for duodenal atresia was performed. The technique proved to be simple and is described in detail. The child did very well. PMID:12200660

  13. Hand-Assisted Laparoscopic Surgery (HALS) With the HandPort System

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, Demetrius E. M.; Darzi, Ara; Jakimowicz, Jacek; Kelly, John J.; Arvidsson, Dag; Hansen, Paul; Callery, Mark P.; Denis, Ronald; Fowler, Dennis L.; Medich, David S.; O’Reilly, Michael J.; Atlas, Henry; Himpens, Jacques M.; Swanstrom, Lee L.; Arous, Elias J.; Pattyn, Piet; Yood, Steven M.; Ricciardi, Rocco; Sandor, Andras; Meyers, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and potential benefits of hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery with the HandPort System, a new device. Summary Background Data In hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery, the surgeon inserts a hand into the abdomen while pneumoperitoneum is maintained. The hand assists laparoscopic instruments and is helpful in complex laparoscopic cases. Methods A prospective nonrandomized study was initiated with the participation of 10 laparoscopic surgical centers. Surgeons were free to test the device in any situation where they expected a potential advantage over conventional laparoscopy. Results Sixty-eight patients were entered in the study. Operations included colorectal procedures (sigmoidectomy, right colectomy, resection rectopexy), splenectomy for splenomegaly, living-related donor nephrectomy, gastric banding for morbid obesity, partial gastrectomy, and various other procedures. Mean incision size for the HandPort was 7.4 cm. Most surgeons (78%) preferred to insert their nondominant hand into the abdomen. Pneumoperitoneum was generally maintained at 14 mmHg, and only one patient required conversion to open surgery as a result of an unmanageable air leak. Hand fatigue during surgery was noted in 20.6%. Conclusions The hand-assisted technique appeared to be useful in minimally invasive colorectal surgery, splenectomy for splenomegaly, living-related donor nephrectomy, and procedures considered too complex for a laparoscopic approach. This approach provides excellent means to explore, to retract safely, and to apply immediate hemostasis when needed. Although the data presented here reflect the authors’ initial experience, they compare favorably with series of similar procedures performed purely laparoscopically. PMID:10767793

  14. Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... the likelihood of a hernia including persistent coughing, difficulty with bowel movements or urination, or frequent need for straining. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair? Keep reading... Page 1 of 2 1 2 » Brought to ...

  15. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... adrenal tumors that appear malignant. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal? In the past, ... of procedure and the patients overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain Shorter hospital stay Quicker ...

  16. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... to pressure on the nerve. Are There Other Advantages to the Anterior Approach? Inter-vertebral disc height ( ... require removal of any bone. What are the Advantages of the Laparoscopic (Minimally Invasive) Approach? Keep reading... ...

  17. Laparoscopic Colon Resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... inches to complete the procedure. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Colon Resection? Results may vary depending ... type of procedure and patient’s overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain May shorten hospital stay ...

  18. Hysterectomy - laparoscopic - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... called a hysterectomy. The surgeon made 3 to 5 small cuts in your belly. A laparoscope (a thin tube with a small camera on it) and other small surgical tools were inserted through those incisions. Part or all ...

  19. Laparoscopic Spleen Removal (Splenectomy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Login Laparoscopic Spleen Removal (Splenectomy) Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Version Find a SAGES Surgeon What ... 2017 Meeting Information Healthy Sooner: Patient Information Contact SAGES Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons 11300 ...

  20. Laparoscopic intersphincteric resection: indications and results.

    PubMed

    Scala, Dario; Niglio, Antonello; Pace, Ugo; Ruffolo, Fulvio; Rega, Daniela; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    Surgical treatment of distal rectal cancer has long been based only on abdominoperineal excision, resulting in a permanent stoma and not always offering a definitive local control. Sphincter saving surgery has emerged in the last 20 years and can be offered also to patients with low lying tumours, provided that the external sphincter is not involved by the disease. An intersphincteric resection (ISR) is based on the resection of the rectum with a distal dissection proceeding into the space between the internal and the external anal sphincter. Originally described as an open procedure, it has also been developed with the laparoscopic approach, and also this technically demanding procedure is inscribed among those offered to the patient by a minimally invasive surgery. Indications have to be strict and patient selection is crucial to obtain both oncological and functional optimal results. The level of distal dissection and the extent of internal sphincter resected are chosen according to the distal margin of the tumour and is based on MRI findings: accurate imaging is therefore mandatory to better define the surgical approach. We here present our actual indications for ISR, results in terms of operative time, median hospital stay for ISR in our experience and review the updated literature. PMID:27022927

  1. [Sacrocolpopexy - pro laparoscopic].

    PubMed

    Hatzinger, M; Sohn, M

    2012-05-01

    Innovative techniques have a really magical attraction for physicians as well as for patients. The number of robotic-assisted procedures worldwide has almost tripled from 80,000 procedures in the year 2007 to 205,000 procedures in 2010. In the same time the total number of Da Vinci surgery systems sold climbed from 800 to 1,400. Advantages, such as three-dimensional visualization, a tremor-filter, an excellent instrument handling with 6 degrees of freedom and better ergonomics, together with aggressive marketing led to a veritable flood of new Da Vinci acquisitions in the whole world. Many just took the opportunity to introduce a new instrument to save a long learning curve and start immediately in the surgical master class.If Da Vinci sacrocolpopexy is compared with the conventional laparoscopic approach, robotic-assisted sacrocolpopexy shows a significantly longer duration of the procedure, a higher need for postoperative analgesics, much higher costs and an identical functional outcome without any advantage over the conventional laparoscopic approach. Although the use of robotic-assisted systems shows a significantly lower learning curve for laparoscopic beginners, it only shows minimal advantages for the experienced laparoscopic surgeon. Therefore it remains uncertain whether robotic-assisted surgery shows a significant advantage compared to the conventional laparoscopic surgery, especially with small reconstructive laparoscopic procedures such as sacrocolpopexy. PMID:22526178

  2. Distal Myopathies: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Shaibani, Aziz

    2016-08-01

    About 15% of myopathies present with distal weakness. Lack of sensory deficit, and preservation of sensory responses and deep tendon reflexes, favors a myopathic cause for distal weakness. Electromyogram confirms this diagnosis. Profuse spontaneous discharges are common in inflammatory, metabolic, and myofibrillar myopathy (MFM). If the clinical picture indicates a specific disease such as facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), genetic testing provides the quickest diagnosis. Otherwise, muscle biopsy can distinguish specific features. The common causes of myopathic distal weakness are FSHD, myotonic dystrophy, and inclusion body myositis. Other causes include MFM, distal muscular dystrophies, metabolic myopathies, and congenital myopathies. PMID:27445241

  3. Reconstruction with Jejunal Pouch after Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Tsutomu; Munekage, Eri; Munekage, Masaya; Maeda, Hiromichi; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Michiya; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The construction of a gastric substitute pouch after gastrectomy for gastric cancer has been proposed to help ameliorate postprandial symptoms and nutritional performance. Adequate reconstruction after gastrectomy is an important issue, because postoperative patient quality of life (QOL) primarily depends on the reconstruction method. To this end, jejunal pouch (JP) reconstructions were developed to improve the patient's eating capacity and QOL by creating large reservoirs with improved reflux barriers to prevent esophagitis and residual gastritis. It is important that such reconstructions also preserve blood and extrinsic neural integrity for maintaining pouch function, because JP motility is associated directly with QOL. Some problems remain to be resolved with the JP reconstructions method including gastrointestinal motility, which plays a major role in food transfer, digestion, and absorption of nutrients. Further studies including basic research and larger prospective randomized control trials are also needed to obtain definitive results. With persistent innovations in surgical techniques, JP after gastrectomy could become a safe and preferable reconstructive modality to improve patient QOL after gastrectomy. PMID:27305882

  4. Coil Embolization of Arterioportal Fistula That Developed After Partial Gastrectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Ishigami, Kousei; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Honda, Hiroshi; Kuroiwa, Toshiro; Irie, Hiroyuki; Aibe, Hitoshi; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Makoto; Masuda, Kouji

    1999-07-15

    A 51-year-old man suffered from bleeding esophageal varices. He had undergone partial gastrectomy for gastric cancer 1 year before. An extrahepatic arterioportal fistula and resultant portal hypertension were found. We successfully performed transarterial embolization of the fistula using stainless steel coils. Portal hypertension improved dramatically. RID='''' ID='''' Correspondence to: K. Ishigami, M.D.

  5. Laparoscopic Repair of Left Lumbar Hernia After Laparoscopic Left Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Milone, Luca; Gumbs, Andrew; Turner, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Lumbar hernias, rarely seen in clinical practice, can be acquired after open or laparoscopic flank surgery. We describe a successful laparoscopic preperitoneal mesh repair of multiple trocar-site hernias after extraperitoneal nephrectomy. All the key steps including creating a peritoneal flap, reducing the hernia contents, and fixation of the mesh are described. A review of the literature on this infrequent operation is presented. Laparoscopic repair of lumbar hernias has all the advantages of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. PMID:21333197

  6. A Case Study of Severe Esophageal Dysmotility following Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Daniel C.; Gill, Richdeep

    2016-01-01

    Following bariatric surgery, a proportion of patients have been observed to experience reflux, dysphagia, and/or odynophagia. The etiology of this constellation of symptoms has not been systematically studied to date. This case describes a 36-year-old female with severe esophageal dysmotility following LSG. Many treatments had been used over a course of 3 years, and while calcium channel blockers reversed the esophageal dysmotility seen on manometry, significant symptoms of dysphagia persisted. Subsequently, the patient underwent a gastric bypass, which seemed to partially relieve her symptoms. Her dysphagia was no longer considered to be associated with a structural cause but attributed to a “sleeve dysmotility syndrome.” Considering the difficulties with managing sleeve dysmotility syndrome, it is reasonable to consider the need for preoperative testing. The question is whether motility studies should be required for all patients planning to undergo a LSG to rule out preexisting esophageal dysmotility and whether conversion to gastric bypass is the preferred method for managing esophageal dysmotility after LSG. PMID:27413570

  7. Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy in a Morbidly Obese Patient with Myasthenia Gravis: A Review of the Management

    PubMed Central

    Ballal, Megana; Straker, Tracey

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis, a disorder of neuromuscular transmission, presents a unique challenge to the perioperative anesthetic management of morbidly obese patients. This report describes the case of a 27-year-old morbidly obese woman with a past medical history significant for myasthenia gravis and fatty liver disease undergoing bariatric surgery. Anesthesia was induced with intravenous agents and maintained with an inhalational and balanced intravenous technique. The nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocker Cisatracurium was chosen so that no reversal agents were given. Neostigmine was not used to antagonize the effects of Cisatracurium. The goal of this approach was to reduce the risk of complications such as postoperative mechanical ventilation. The anesthetic and surgical techniques used resulted in an uneventful hospital course. Therefore, we can minimize perioperative risks and complications by adjusting the anesthetic plan based on the patient's physiology and comorbidities as well as the pharmacology of the drugs. PMID:26294914

  8. A Case Study of Severe Esophageal Dysmotility following Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Caroline E; Sadowski, Daniel C; Gill, Richdeep; Birch, Daniel W

    2016-01-01

    Following bariatric surgery, a proportion of patients have been observed to experience reflux, dysphagia, and/or odynophagia. The etiology of this constellation of symptoms has not been systematically studied to date. This case describes a 36-year-old female with severe esophageal dysmotility following LSG. Many treatments had been used over a course of 3 years, and while calcium channel blockers reversed the esophageal dysmotility seen on manometry, significant symptoms of dysphagia persisted. Subsequently, the patient underwent a gastric bypass, which seemed to partially relieve her symptoms. Her dysphagia was no longer considered to be associated with a structural cause but attributed to a "sleeve dysmotility syndrome." Considering the difficulties with managing sleeve dysmotility syndrome, it is reasonable to consider the need for preoperative testing. The question is whether motility studies should be required for all patients planning to undergo a LSG to rule out preexisting esophageal dysmotility and whether conversion to gastric bypass is the preferred method for managing esophageal dysmotility after LSG. PMID:27413570

  9. Effects of sleeve gastrectomy on insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    CĂTOI, ADRIANA FLORINELA; PÂRVU, ALINA; MIRONIUC, AUREL; GALEA, ROMEO FLORIN; MUREŞAN, ADRIANA; BIDIAN, CRISTINA; POP, IOANA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Obesity is a major risk factor for the onset of insulin resistance (IR), hyperinsulinemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) Evidence data has proven that beyond important weight loss bariatric surgery especially Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and bilio-pancreatic diversion (BPD) leads to significant early reduction of insulinemia and of IR calculated through the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR), independently of fat mass decrease. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is now used as a sole weight loss operation with good results. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the early changes of fasting blood glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR in a group of morbidly obese (MO) patients i.e. at 7, 30 and 90 days after SG. Methods The study included 20 MO patients (7 male and 13 female) submitted to SG. Anthropometrical (weight, body mass index –BMI, percent excess BMI loss -%EBMIL) and biochemical (plasma glucose, insulin and calculated HOMA-IR ) evaluation were performed before and at 7, 30 and 90 days after SG. In addition, a second group of 10 normal weight healthy subjects with a BMI ranging form 19 kg/m2 to 23.14 kg/m2, matched for age and gender was investigated. Results Plasma glucose (p=0.018), insulin (p=0.004) and HOMA-IR (p=0.006) values were statistically different between the studied groups. After surgery, at every follow-up point, there were statistically different weight and BMI mean values relative to the operation day (p<0.003). BMI, decreased at 7 days (estimated reduction=2.79; 95% CI:[2.12;3.45]), at 30 days (estimated reduction=5.65; 95% CI:[3.57;7.73]) and at 90 days (estimated reduction=10.88; 95% CI:[7.35;14.41]) respectively after SG. We noted a tendency toward statistical significant change of mean insulin values at 7 days after surgery (corrected p=0.075), no statistical change at 30 days (corrected p=0.327) and a significant change at 90 days (corrected p=0.027) after SG as compared to baseline. There was a

  10. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by D2 gastrectomy in locally advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Sun; Lim, Joon Seok; Hyung, Woo Jin; Lee, Yong Chan; Rha, Sun Young; Keum, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) for resectability of locally advanced gastric cancer (LAGC). METHODS: Between November 2007 and January 2014, 29 patients with LAGC (clinically T3 with distal esophagus invasion/T4 or bulky regional node metastasis) that were treated with NACRT followed by D2 gastrectomy were included in this study. Resectability was evaluated with radiologic and endoscopic exams before and after NACRT. Using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, patients received 45 Gy, with a daily dose of 1.8 Gy. The entire tumor extent and the regional metastatic lymph nodes were included in the gross tumor volume. Patients presenting with a resectable tumor after NACRT received a total or subtotal gastrectomy with D2 dissection. The pathologic tumor response was evaluated using Japanese Gastric Cancer Association histologic evaluation criteria. Postoperative morbidity was evaluated using the National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were estimated using a Kaplan-Meier analysis and compared using the log-rank test. RESULTS: All patients were assessed as unresectable cases. Twenty-four patients (24/29; 82.8%) showed LAGC on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced CT, whereas four patients (4/29; 13.8%) with vague invasion or abutment to an adjacent organ underwent diagnostic laparoscopy. One patient (1/29; 3.4%), initially assessed as a resectable case, underwent an “open and closure” after the tumor was found to be unresectable. Abutment to an adjacent organ (34.5%) was the most common reason for NACRT. The clinical response rate one month after NACRT was 44.8%. After NACRT, 69% (20/29) of patients had a resectable tumor. Of the 20 patients with a resectable tumor, 18 patients (62.1%) underwent a D2 gastrectomy. The R0 resection rate was 94.4% and two patients (2/18; 11

  11. Retroperitoneal laparoscopic bilateral lumbar sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Segers, B; Himpens, J; Barroy, J P

    2007-06-01

    The first retroperitoneal lumbar sympathectomy was performed in 1924 by Julio Diez. The classic procedure for sympathectomy is open surgery. We report a unilateral laparoscopic retroperitoneal approach to perform bilateral lumbar sympathectomy. This approach was performed for a 43-year-old man with distal arterial occlusive disease and no indication for direct revascularization. His predominant symptoms were intermittent claudication at 100 metres and cold legs. The patient was placed in a left lateral decubitus position. The optical system was placed first in an intra-abdominal position to check that the trocars were well positioned in the retroperitoneal space. The dissection of retroperitoneum was performed by CO2 insufflation. The inferior vena cava was reclined and the right sympathetic chain was individualized. Two ganglia (L3-L4) were removed by bipolar electro-coagulation. The aorta was isolated on a vessel loop and careful anterior traction allowed a retro-aortic pre-vertebral approach between the lumbar vessels. The left sympathetic chain was dissected. Two ganglia (L3-L4) were removed by bipolar electro-coagulation. PMID:17685269

  12. Laparoscopic surgery in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Jennings, R.; Johnston, S. 3rd

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Performing a surgical procedure in weightlessness has been shown not to be any more difficult than in a 1g environment if the requirements for the restraint of the patient, operator, and surgical hardware are observed. The feasibility of performing a laparoscopic surgical procedure in weightlessness, however, has been questionable. Concerns have included the impaired visualization from the lack of gravitational retraction of the bowel and from floating debris such as blood. METHODS: In this project, laparoscopic surgery was performed on a porcine animal model in the weightlessness of parabolic flight. RESULTS: Visualization was unaffected due to the tethering of the bowel by the elastic mesentery and the strong tendency for debris and blood to adhere to the abdominal wall due to surface tension forces. CONCLUSIONS: There are advantages to performing a laparoscopic instead of an open surgical procedure in a weightless environment. These will become important as the laparoscopic support hardware is miniaturized from its present form, as laparoscopic technology becomes more advanced, and as more surgically capable crew medical officers are present in future long-duration space-exploration missions.

  13. Simulation in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    León Ferrufino, Felipe; Varas Cohen, Julián; Buckel Schaffner, Erwin; Crovari Eulufi, Fernando; Pimentel Müller, Fernando; Martínez Castillo, Jorge; Jarufe Cassis, Nicolás; Boza Wilson, Camilo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays surgical trainees are faced with a more reduced surgical practice, due to legal limitations and work hourly constraints. Also, currently surgeons are expected to dominate more complex techniques such as laparoscopy. Simulation emerges as a complementary learning tool in laparoscopic surgery, by training in a safe, controlled and standardized environment, without jeopardizing patient' safety. Simulation' objective is that the skills acquired should be transferred to the operating room, allowing reduction of learning curves. The use of simulation has increased worldwide, becoming an important tool in different surgical residency programs and laparoscopic training courses. For several countries, the approval of these training courses are a prerequisite for the acquisition of surgeon title certifications. This article reviews the most important aspects of simulation in laparoscopic surgery, including the most used simulators and training programs, as well as the learning methodologies and the different key ways to assess learning in simulation. PMID:25039039

  14. [Patients with gastric cancer submitted to gastrectomy: an integrative review].

    PubMed

    Mello, Bruna Schroeder; Lucena, Amália de Fátima; Echer, Isabel Cristina; Luzia, Melissa de Freitas

    2010-12-01

    This study aims to analyze the scientific production about patients with gastric cancer submitted to gastrectomy and describe important aspects of nursing guidelines for these patients. An integrative review was carried out using Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) and Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) databases; twenty two articles were analyzed. Retrospective cross-sectional studies were the most frequent. The scientific production of nursing is numerically small in relation to the medical area. The results show that approaches related to pre and post-operative in gastrectomy for gastric cancer resection subsidize the knowledge of issues essential for nurses to promote efficient intervention for the recovery of such patients. There is still the need for further research on the practice of nursing in the guidelines of this kind of surgery. PMID:21805893

  15. Anaemia after partial gastrectomy: a neglected curable condition.

    PubMed

    Tovey, F I; Clark, C G

    1980-05-01

    Anaemia is a well recognised complication of partial gastrectomy, the incidence increasing with the postoperative interval. Many surveys show a similar incidence of untreated anaemia, which implies that the need for regular follow-up is recognised but not put into practice. Much information is available on the aetiology of postgastrectomy anaemia, and a single course of therapy is known to be effective. Since the difficulty semms to lie in early detection, prophylaxis may be a solution. Our study of a group of patients treated by gastrectomy attending a follow-up clinic during the past ten years has provided information on the frequency of anaemia and the outcome of different treatments. PMID:6103303

  16. Transphyseal Distal Humerus Fracture.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua; Ho, Christine Ann; Ritzman, Todd F; Brighton, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Transphyseal distal humerus fractures typically occur in children younger than 3 years secondary to birth trauma, nonaccidental trauma, or a fall from a small height. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture is crucial for a successful outcome. Recognizing that the forearm is not aligned with the humerus on plain radiographs may aid in the diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture. Surgical management is most commonly performed with the aid of an arthrogram. Closed reduction and percutaneous pinning techniques similar to those used for supracondylar humerus fractures are employed. Cubitus varus caused by a malunion, osteonecrosis of the medial condyle, or growth arrest is the most common complication encountered in the treatment of transphyseal distal humerus fractures. A corrective lateral closing wedge osteotomy can be performed to restore a nearly normal carrying angle. PMID:27049206

  17. Giant distal humeral geode.

    PubMed

    Maher, M M; Kennedy, J; Hynes, D; Murray, J G; O'Connell, D

    2000-03-01

    We describe the imaging features of a giant geode of the distal humerus in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, which presented initially as a pathological fracture. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in establishing this diagnosis is emphasized. PMID:10794554

  18. Preventing staple-line leak in sleeve gastrectomy: reinforcement with bovine pericardium vs. oversewing.

    PubMed

    Al Hajj, Georges Nabih; Haddad, Johnny

    2013-11-01

    One of the most serious, potentially life-threatening complications of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is staple-line leakage. Oversewing the LSG staple line vs buttressing it with bovine pericardial strips (BPS) to reduce perioperative bleeding and postoperative gastric leak was evaluated. From 2006 through 2011, 160 patients underwent LSG with suturing as the only staple-line reinforcement (Group A). From March 2010 through August 2012, 84 LSG patients had BPS incorporated into their last two stapler firings (Group B). Staple lines were evaluated perioperatively for bleeding, and patients were monitored for indications of staple-line leaks (peritonitis, abnormal output from the drain). In preoperative Group A and B, there were 117 (73.1%) vs. 56 (66.7%) females; mean age, 35.2 years (18.0-68.0) vs. 33.8 years (15.0-64.0); mean body mass index (BMI, kilograms per square meter), 42.5 (27.0-76.0) vs. 42.0 (30.0-58.0). Three months after surgery, mean BMI for Group A was 37.3 (-5.9); Group B, 35.2 (-7.3); at 6 months, 32.7 (-10.8) and 31.5 (-11.3; p < 0.001). Although there was no significant difference in perioperative blood loss, oversewn staple lines in Group A often required electrocautery to stanch bleeding; this was not required for Group B. In Group A, 15 patients (9.4%) developed complications; in Group B, five (6.0%; p = 0.46). Gastric fistula, verified by barium swallow, occurred in eight Group A patients (5.0%); in Group B, one (1.2%; p = 0.17). Relative to oversewing, staple-line buttressing with bovine pericardium was readily accomplished, safe, and associated with a lower staple-line leak rate. PMID:23975327

  19. Absorption of biliary cobalamin in baboons following total gastrectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Green, R.; Jacobsen, D.W.; Van Tonder, S.V.; Kew, M.C.; Metz, J.

    1982-11-01

    Absorption of radiolabeled cobalamin in baboons was assessed by whole body counting. Retention of biliary cobalamin and an aqueous solution of cyanocobalamin was measured in normal baboons and in baboons after total gastrectomy by using /sup 57/Co-labeled biliary cobalamin and /sup 58/C0-cyanocobalamin, with and without baboon gastric juice containing intrinsic factor. Radiolabeled biliary cobalamin was obtained by intravenous injection of /sup 57/Co-cyanocobalamin in baboons and collection of bile through a cannula placed in the common bile duct. Cobalamin absorption was not completely abolished by gastrectomy and biliary cobalamin was better retained than cyanocobalamin; intrinsic factor enhanced absorption of both forms. After gastrectomy there was steady depletion of liver and serum cobalamin levels, which ceased after a new equilibrium was reached between a progressively diminishing cobalamin loss and the impaired but significant residual level of absorption. These studies in the nonhuman primate provide further information concerning the enterohepatic circulation of cobalamin and suggest that the form of cobalamin in bile may be more readily absorbed than is cyanocobalamin or that bile itself may have an enhancing effect on cobalamin absorption. The data also suggest that physiologically significant amounts of cobalamin may be absorbed in the absence of a gastric source of intrinsic factor.

  20. Biliopancreatic Diversion with Gastrectomy as Surgical Treatment of Morbid Obesity.

    PubMed

    Marceau; Biron; St Georges R; Duclos; Potvin; Bourque

    1991-12-01

    The best procedure for the treatment of morbid obesity has not yet been defined. Biliopancreatic diversion is one of the techniques available, but its results have not been sufficiently documented and the addition of a subtotal gastrectomy to the diversion so as to avoid leaving a blind non-functioning stomach, is still questionable. The purpose of this paper is to report our experience with our first 149 consecutive patients who were treated by biliopancreatic diversion with subtotal gastrectomy for morbid obesity. Operative mortality was 3% and morbidity 12%. The weight loss was marked during the first 6 months and decreased during the following 12 months. The weight stabilized at 2 years and there was subsequently a small increase. In only two out of 48 cases was the weight loss less than 25% of the initial weight at 2 years. The undesirable side-effects were diarrhea in 6%, vomiting in 9% and dyspepsia in 4%. The intervention leads to a malabsorption of carotene, iron, albumin and calcium. Except for carotene the deficiencies were corrected by oral supplement. In two patients, with resistant deficiencies, the diversion was reversed. Eighty-eight percent of the patients are satisfied with this intervention. At 2 years, 70% have reached their weight loss objective without any major side-effects or nutritional deficiencies, but in 14% the outcome of the procedure must be considered unsatisfactory. Biliopancreatic diversion with subtotal gastrectomy is a major operation, but it gives encouraging results so far. PMID:10775939

  1. Severe Insulin Resistance Improves Immediately After Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Hassan, Chandra; Chaiban, Joumana T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Obese individuals exhibit insulin resistance often leading to adverse health outcomes. When compared with intensive medical therapy, bariatric surgery has shown better outcomes mainly in terms of insulin resistance and glycemic control. Using the Homeostasis Model Assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), we report herein a case illustrating a drastic improvement in severe insulin resistance after sleeve gastrectomy in the immediate postoperative period. Case Report. A patient with long-standing history of morbid obesity, type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, and severe insulin resistance (requiring approximately 2 units of insulin per kg per day) was enrolled in the medical weight management program for 6 months during which he lost 40 lbs and his insulin requirements decreased. He then underwent a sleeve gastrectomy and did not require insulin therapy as of postoperative day 1. His HOMA-IR improved by about 76% between day 1 and day 14 postoperatively. Conclusion. Sleeve gastrectomy leads to a drastic improvement in severe insulin resistance as early as the first postoperative day. PMID:26788532

  2. Recent advances in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Jei; Chan, Chien-Pin; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2013-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has been widely adopted and new technical innovation, procedures and evidence based knowledge are persistently emerging. This review documents recent major advancements in laparoscopic surgery. A PubMed search was made in order to identify recent advances in this field. We reviewed the recent data on randomized trials in this field as well as papers of systematic review. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the most frequently performed procedure, followed by laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Although bile duct injuries are relatively uncommon (0.15%-0.6%), intraoperative cholangiography still plays a role in reducing the cost of litigation. Laparoscopic bariatric surgery is the most commonly performed laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery in the USA, and laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the treatment of choice for intractable gastroesophageal reflux disease. Recent randomized trials have demonstrated that laparoscopic gastric and colorectal cancer resection are safe and oncologically correct procedures. Laparoscopic surgery has also been widely developed in hepatic, pancreatic, gynecological and urological surgery. Recently, SILS and robotic surgery have penetrated all specialties of abdominal surgery. However, evidence-based medicine has failed to show major advantages in SILS, and the disadvantage of robotic surgery is the high costs related to purchase and maintenance of technology. Laparoscopic surgery has become well developed in recent decades and is the choice of treatment in abdominal surgery. Recently developed SILS techniques and robotic surgery are promising but their benefits remain to be determined. PMID:23126424

  3. Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Rosario; MacFadyen, Bruce V

    2002-04-01

    In recent years, laparoscopic common bile duct exploration has become the procedure of choice in the management of choledocholithiasis in several laparoscopic centers. The increasing interest for this laparoscopic approach is due to the development of instrumentation and technique, allowing the procedure to be performed safely, and it is also the result of the revised role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, which has been questioned because of its cost, risk of complications and effectiveness. Many surgeons, however, are still not familiar with this technique. In this article we discuss the technique and results of laparoscopic common bile duct exploration. Both the laparoscopic transcystic approach and choledochotomy are discussed, together with the results given in the literature. When one considers the costs, morbidity, mortality and the time required before the patient can return to work, it would appear that laparoscopic cholecystectomy with common bile duct exploration is more favorable than open surgery or laparoscopic cholecystectomy with preoperative or postoperative endoscopic sphincterotomy. However, the technique requires advanced laparoscopic skills, including suturing, knot tying, the use of a choledochoscope, guidewire, dilators and balloon stone extractor. Although laparoscopic common bile duct exploration appears to be the most cost-effective method to treat common bile duct stones, it should be emphasized that this procedure is very challenging, and it should be performed by well-trained laparoscopic surgeons with experience in biliary surgery. PMID:11981684

  4. Laparoscopic bypass pyeloureterostomy.

    PubMed

    Noh, Paul H; Shah, Anish K

    2013-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been increasingly applied in paediatric urology, including the treatment of ureteropelvic junction obstruction. To the best of our knowledge, we describe the first laparoscopic bypass pyeloureterostomy in a 3-month-old male infant, with giant hydronephrosis and high insertion of the ureter into the renal pelvis. PMID:22889709

  5. Laparoscopic gastrostomy in children.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, G M; Najmaldin, A

    1997-09-01

    During a 30-month period, 28 children aged 6 months-15 years underwent fashioning of a laparoscopic gastrostomy. Indications for operation included: feeding difficulties and failure to thrive in neurologically impaired children (13); chronic renal failure (9); and others (6). There were 17 conventional tube and 11 button gastrostomies. Twelve children had insertion of a gastrostomy alone; the others underwent a concomitant laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (NFP). The average operation time for gastrostomy alone was 65 min (range 35-104) and for gastrostomy plus NFP 155 min (range 130-246). There were no specific laparoscopic complications. Two patients who required large volumes of eternal drugs and peritoneal dialysis from the 1st post-operative day developed minor external leaks from their stomas. It appears that laparoscopy provides for safe and precise positioning of any standard balloon or button gastrostomy. It is a particularly attractive technique for use in patients already undergoing a laparoscopic fundoplication and those in whom other minimally invasive techniques are contraindicated or fail. PMID:9238116

  6. Laparoscopic simple prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Blew, Brian D M; Fazio, Luke M; Pace, Kenneth; D'A Honey, R John

    2005-12-01

    Classically, surgical options for very large prostate glands, not amenable to transurethral resection, include suprapubic or retropubic simple prostatectomy and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP). We present a case managed with a laparoscopic simple prostatectomy. Technical considerations are discussed as well as possible advantages of this approach including decreased blood loss, faster patient recovery and improved visualization. PMID:16401375

  7. Short-Term Analysis of Food Tolerance and Quality of Life after Laparoscopic Greater Curvature Plication

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Bin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare short-term outcomes [food tolerance scores (FTS) and quality of life] after three types of restrictive bariatric surgery: laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), laparoscopic greater curvature plication (LGCP), and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Materials and Methods From January 2012 to December 2013, all patients that underwent primary surgery were included in one of the LAGB, LGCP, or LSG groups. These three groups were then compared with respect to FTS, gastrointestinal quality of life indices (GIQLI), and the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire. Questionnaires were sent to all patients both pre- and post-operatively. Results A total of 85 patients (LAGB=45, LGCP=22, and LSG=18) returned the questionnaires in full, and these patients constituted the study cohort. The cohort was predominately female (n=73, 85.9%). Mean percentage excess weight loss (%EWL) values after LAGB, LGCP, and LSG were 65.4±27.0%, 65.6±25.2%, and 82.7±21.7%, respectively (p=0.044). Mean postoperative FTSs and improvements in total GIQLIs after LAGB, LGCP, and LSG were 15.96, 20.95, and 21.33 and -3.40, 6.68, and 18.78, respectively (p<0.05). All procedures produced improvements in the three SF-36 domain scores. Subgroup analysis revealed significant differences between the three procedures in terms of improvements in general health and emotional well-being. Conclusion LGCP is safe and effective at achieving significant weight loss. In terms of food tolerance and GI quality of life, LGCP was found to be comparable to gastric banding and sleeve gastrectomy. PMID:26847297

  8. Hepatic Artery Angiography and Embolization for Hemobilia Following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, Tony; Travis, Simon; Ettles, Duncan; Dyet, John; Sedman, Peter; Wedgewood, Kevin; Royston, Christopher

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: The effectiveness of angiography and embolization in diagnosis and treatment were assessed in a cohort of patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods: Over a 6-year period 1513 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were carried out in our region. Nine of these patients (0.6%) developed significant upper gastrointestinal bleeding, 5-43 days after surgery. All underwent emergency celiac and selective right hepatic artery angiography. All were treated by coil embolization of the right hepatic artery proximal and distal to the bleeding point. Results: Pseudoaneurysms of the hepatic artery adjacent to cholecystectomy clips were demonstrated in all nine patients at selective right hepatic angiography. In three patients celiac axis angiography alone failed to demonstrate the pseudoaneurysm. Embolization controlled hemorrhage in all patients with no further bleeding and no further intervention. One patient developed a candidal liver abscess in the post-procedure period. All patients are alive and well at follow-up. Conclusion: Selective right hepatic angiography is vital in the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Embolization offers the advantage of minimally invasive treatment in unstable patients, does not disrupt recent biliary reconstruction, allows distal as well as proximal control of the hepatic artery, and is an effective treatment for this potentially life-threatening complication.

  9. Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Resection for Mid and Low Rectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Bulent; Yuksel, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The current study was conducted to determine whether robotic low anterior resection (RLAR) has real benefit over laparoscopic low anterior resection (LLAR) in terms of surgical and early oncologic outcomes. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 35 RLARs and 28 LLARs, performed for mid and low rectal cancers, from January 2013 through June 2015. Results: A total of 63 patients were included in the study. All surgeries were performed successfully. The clinicopathologic characteristics were similar between the 2 groups. Compared with the laparoscopic group, the robotic group had less intraoperative blood loss (165 vs. 120 mL; P < .05) and higher mean operative time (252 vs. 208 min; P < .05). No significant differences were observed in the time to flatus passage, length of hospital stay, and postoperative morbidity. Pathological examination of total mesorectal excision (TME) specimens showed that both circumferential resection margin and transverse (proximal and distal) margins were negative in the RLAR group. However, 1 patient each had positive circumferential resection margin and positive distal transverse margin in the LLAR group. The mean number of harvested lymph nodes was 27 in the RLAR group and 23 in the LLAR group. Conclusions: In our study, short-term outcomes of robotic surgery for mid and low rectal cancers were similar to those of laparoscopic surgery. The quality of TME specimens was better in the patients who underwent robotic surgery. However, the longer operative time was a limitation of robotic surgery. PMID:27081292

  10. Laparoscopic resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: dream or reality?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Blaire; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2014-10-21

    Laparoscopic pancreatic surgery is in its infancy despite initial procedures reported two decades ago. Both laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) and laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy (LPD) can be performed competently; however when minimally invasive surgical (MIS) approaches are implemented the indication is often benign or low-grade malignant pathologies. Nonetheless, LDP and LPD afford improved perioperative outcomes, similar to those observed when MIS is utilized for other purposes. This includes decreased blood loss, shorter length of hospital stay, reduced post-operative pain, and expedited time to functional recovery. What then is its role for resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma? The biology of this aggressive cancer and the inherent challenge of pancreatic surgery have slowed MIS progress in this field. In general, the overall quality of evidence is low with a lack of randomized control trials, a preponderance of uncontrolled series, short follow-up intervals, and small sample sizes in the studies available. Available evidence compiles heterogeneous pathologic diagnoses and is limited by case-by-case follow-up, which makes extrapolation of results difficult. Nonetheless, short-term surrogate markers of oncologic success, such as margin status and lymph node harvest, are comparable to open procedures. Unfortunately disease recurrence and long-term survival data are lacking. In this review we explore the evidence available regarding laparoscopic resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, a promising approach for future widespread application. PMID:25339812

  11. Spleen-Preserving Versus Spleen-Sacrificing Distal Pancreatectomy in Laparoscopy and Open Method-Perioperative Outcome Analysis-14 Years Experience.

    PubMed

    Panda, Nilanjan; Bansal, Nitin Kumar; Narsimhan, Mohan; Ardhanari, Ramesh; Bronson, Joseph Raja B

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed perioperative outcome of distal pancreatectomies with or without splenic preservation both in laparoscopic and open method to determine best approach. Retrospective data was collected from 1999 to 2013. We divided all distal pancreatectomies into four groups. Group 1-laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy (LSPDP). Group 2-laparoscopic splenectomy + distal pancreatectomy (LSDP). Group 3-open spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy. Group 4-open splenectomy + distal pancreatectomy. We recorded demographic data, intra and post operative complications, operative time, estimated blood loss, length of stay, pancreatic leak rate, and final pathology result. A total of 38 distal pancreatectomies were included. In group 1, patients were significantly younger (mean 29 vs 47 to 50 in other groups, p = 0.014). Tumor size (average 2.5 vs 5 to 9.5 cm in other groups, p = 0.023) and operative time (average 98 min vs 125 to 141 in other groups, p = 0.004) and hospital stay (average 6 vs 8 to 19 days in other groups, p = 0.009) in LSPDP were all significantly less than other groups taken together. However, intra-operative blood loss was equivalent. We further analyzed that between LSPDP and LSDP, age and tumor size were significantly less in LSPDP. Further we analyzed between spleen-preserving (groups 1 + 3) vs spleen-sacrificing (groups 2 + 4) distal pancreatectomies and between overall laparoscopic (groups 1 + 2) vs open (groups 3 + 4). Laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy has all the advantages of minimal access surgery especially in small lesions and low-grade malignancy. PMID:27303115

  12. Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kanellos, D; Pramateftakis, M G; Vrakas, G; Mantzoros, I; Tsachalis, T; Hatzigianni, P; Kanellos, I

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to report our experience with laparoscopic sigmoidectomy due to cancer. Between 2007 and 2009, laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for cancer was performed in 3 patients. The average operative time was 176 min. The average hospital stay was 10.2 days. There was one anastomotic leak. The patient was subjected to laparotomy and a Hartmann's procedure and drainage of the peritoneal cavity was performed. In conclusion, laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for cancer is a safe and efficient procedure. PMID:20694496

  13. Simulation System for Training in Laparoscopic Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basdogan, Cagatay; Ho, Chih-Hao

    2003-01-01

    A computer-based simulation system creates a visual and haptic virtual environment for training a medical practitioner in laparoscopic surgery. Heretofore, it has been common practice to perform training in partial laparoscopic surgical procedures by use of a laparoscopic training box that encloses a pair of laparoscopic tools, objects to be manipulated by the tools, and an endoscopic video camera. However, the surgical procedures simulated by use of a training box are usually poor imitations of the actual ones. The present computer-based system improves training by presenting a more realistic simulated environment to the trainee. The system includes a computer monitor that displays a real-time image of the affected interior region of the patient, showing laparoscopic instruments interacting with organs and tissues, as would be viewed by use of an endoscopic video camera and displayed to a surgeon during a laparoscopic operation. The system also includes laparoscopic tools that the trainee manipulates while observing the image on the computer monitor (see figure). The instrumentation on the tools consists of (1) position and orientation sensors that provide input data for the simulation and (2) actuators that provide force feedback to simulate the contact forces between the tools and tissues. The simulation software includes components that model the geometries of surgical tools, components that model the geometries and physical behaviors of soft tissues, and components that detect collisions between them. Using the measured positions and orientations of the tools, the software detects whether they are in contact with tissues. In the event of contact, the deformations of the tissues and contact forces are computed by use of the geometric and physical models. The image on the computer screen shows tissues deformed accordingly, while the actuators apply the corresponding forces to the distal ends of the tools. For the purpose of demonstration, the system has been set

  14. Virtual reality in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, Selman; Yanik, Mustafa; Bretthauer, Georg

    2004-01-01

    Although the many advantages of laparoscopic surgery have made it an established technique, training in laparoscopic surgery posed problems not encountered in conventional surgical training. Virtual reality simulators open up new perspectives for training in laparoscopic surgery. Under realistic conditions in real time, trainees can tailor their sessions with the VR simulator to suit their needs and goals, and can repeat exercises as often as they wish. VR simulators reduce the number of experimental animals needed for training purposes and are suited to the pursuit of research in laparoscopic surgery. PMID:15747974

  15. Use of Barbed Sutures in Laparoscopic Gastrointestinal Single-Layer Sutures

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Masahide; Kinoshita, Jun; Shimizu, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic anastomotic methods are not commonly used because of the cumbersome laparoscopic intracorporeal sutures and tying involved. The barbed suture is one of the various devices developed to simplify the placement of intracorporeal sutures. However, barbed sutures are not commonly used during reconstruction after radical gastrectomy in cancer patients or for single-layer entire-thickness running suturing for intestinal anastomoses. We describe the procedure for using barbed sutures and report on the short-term surgical outcomes. Methods: Between August 2012 and March 2014, 15-cm-long barbed sutures (V-Loc 180; Covidien, Mansfield, MA, USA) were used for laparoscopic intestinal anastomoses, including intestinal hole closure for esophagojejunal and gastrojejunal anastomoses after mechanical anastomoses and gastric wall closure after partial resection. Results: In total, 38 patients underwent 40 laparoscopic anastomoses (esophagojejunostomies, 26; gastrojejunostomies, 7; and simple closure of gastric defect, 7); no cases required conversion to open surgery. Two cases exhibited positive air leak test results during surgery (1 case of esophagojejunostomy and 1 case of simple closure of gastric defect). Two cases of intestinal obstruction were noted; of those, one patient with postoperative intestinal paresis (grade II) was managed conservatively, and the other underwent repeat laparoscopic surgery (grade IIIb) for internal herniation unrelated to V-Loc use. No postoperative complications at the anastomosis site and no surgery-related deaths were noted. Conclusion: Single-layer entire-thickness running suturing with the V-Loc 180 barbed suture after stapled side-to-side intestinal anastomosis was found to be safe and feasible in the reported cases. PMID:27493467

  16. Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Nephroureterectomy and Bladder Cuff Excision

    PubMed Central

    Ozdemir, A. T.; Asil, E.; Balbay, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Our aim was to show that bladder cuff excision and distal ureterectomy can be safely performed by using the LigaSure device during robotic-assisted laparoscopic nephroureterectomy. Methods: A 60-year-old man presented with gross hematuria. He was diagnosed with upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) on the left side and was scheduled for robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery. Without changing the patient's position, sealing with the LigaSure atlas for bladder cuff excision and distal ureterectomy was performed. Results: The operating time was 140 minutes from the initial incision to skin closure of all incisions. The estimated blood loss during the surgery was 120mL. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The Foley drain was removed on day 3 after normal cystographic findings, and the patient was discharged from the hospital on the fourth postoperative day. Conclusion: Robot-assisted nephroureterectomy with distal ureterectomy in the same position using a LigaSure device is a safe alternative for upper tract transitional cell carcinoma. PMID:23477188

  17. Appraisal of laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Graves, H A; Ballinger, J F; Anderson, W J

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports the experience of three general surgeons performing 304 laparoscopic cholecystectomies in three private hospitals between October 1989 and November 1990. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy boasts two major advantages over the conventional procedure: the remarkable reduction in postoperative pain and economic benefit, largely due to the patient's early return to work. Revealing a complication rate of 2% and no deaths, this study has shown that this procedure can offer patients these advantages with a medical risk no greater than that accompanying conventional cholecystectomy. Patient safety must be paramount, and it is the responsibility of the surgical community to ensure that all surgeons receive the highest quality training and that the technique is applied appropriately. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1828140

  18. [Laparoscopic rectal resection technique].

    PubMed

    Anthuber, M; Kriening, B; Schrempf, M; Geißler, B; Märkl, B; Rüth, S

    2016-07-01

    The quality of radical oncological operations for patients with rectal cancer determines the rate of local recurrence and long-term survival. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced tumors, a standardized surgical procedure for rectal tumors less than 12 cm from the anus with total mesorectal excision (TME) and preservation of the autonomous nerve system for sexual and bladder function have significantly improved the oncological results and quality of life of patients. The TME procedure for rectal resection has been performed laparoscopically in Germany for almost 20 years; however, no reliable data are available on the frequency of laparoscopic procedures in rectal cancer patients in Germany. The rate of minimally invasive procedures is estimated to be less than 20 %. A prerequisite for using the laparoscopic approach is implicit adherence to the described standards of open surgery. Available data from prospective randomized trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses indicate that in the early postoperative phase the generally well-known positive effects of the minimally invasive approach to the benefit of patients can be realized without any long-term negative impact on the oncological results; however, the results of many of these studies are difficult to interpret because it could not be confirmed whether the hospitals and surgeons involved had successfully completed the learning curve. In this article we would like to present our technique, which we have developed over the past 17 years in more than 1000 patients. Based on our experiences the laparoscopic approach can be highly recommended as a suitable alternative to the open procedure. PMID:27277556

  19. Laparoscopic total and partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin R

    2002-01-01

    Laparoscopic radical nephrectomy has established its role as a standard of care for the management of renal neoplasms. Long term follow-up has demonstrated laparoscopic radical nephrectomy has shorter patient hospitalization and effective cancer control, with no significant difference in survival compared with open radical nephrectomy. For renal masses less than 4cm, partial nephrectomy is indicated for patients with a solitary kidney or who demonstrate impairment of contralateral renal function. The major technical issue for success of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is bleeding control and several techniques have been developed to achieve better hemostatic control. Development of new laparoscopic techniques for partial nephrectomy can be divided into 2 categories: hilar control and warm ischemia vs. no hilar control. Development of a laparoscopic Satinsky clamp has achieved en bloc control of the renal hilum in order to allow cold knife excision of the mass, with laparoscopic repair of the collecting system, if needed. Combination of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy with ablative techniques has achieved successful excision of renal masses with adequate hemostasis without hilar clamping. Other techniques without hilar control have been investigated and included the use of a microwave tissue coagulator. In conclusion, laparoscopic radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma has clearly demonstrated low morbidity and equivalent cancer control. The rates for local recurrences and metastatic spread are low and actuarial survival high. Furthermore, laparoscopic partial nephrectomy has demonstrated to be technically feasible, with low morbidity. With short term outcomes demonstrating laparoscopic partial nephrectomy as an efficacious procedure, the role of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy should continue to increase. PMID:15748397

  20. Distal median nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Neuropathy - distal median nerve Images Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system References Jarvik JG, Comstock BA, Kliot M, et al. Surgery versus non-surgical therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized ... D. Disorders of peripheral nerves. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, ...

  1. Comparison of weight loss outcomes 1 year after sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in patients aged above 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Praveenraj, Palanivelu; Gomes, Rachel M; Kumar, Saravana; Perumal, Sivalingam; Senthilnathan, Palanisamy; Parthasarathi, Ramakrishnan; Rajapandian, Subbiah; Palanivelu, Chinnusamy

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Safe, effective weight loss with resolution of comorbidities has been convincingly demonstrated with bariatric surgery in the aged obese. They, however, lose less weight than younger individuals. It is not known if degree of weight loss is influenced by the choice of bariatric procedure. The aim of this study was to compare the degree of weight loss between laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) in patients above the age of 50 years at 1 year after surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed of all patients more than 50 years of age who underwent LSG or LRYGB between February 2012 and July 2013 with at least 1 year of follow-up. Data evaluated at 1 year included age, sex, weight, body mass index (BMI), mean operative time, percentage of weight loss and excess weight loss, resolution/remission of diabetes, morbidity and mortality. RESULTS: Of a total of 86 patients, 54 underwent LSG and 32 underwent LRYGB. The mean percentage of excess weight loss at the end of 1 year was 60.19 ± 17.45 % after LSG and 82.76 ± 34.26 % after LRYGB (P = 0.021). One patient developed a sleeve leak after LSG, and 2 developed iron deficiency anaemia after LRYGB. The remission/improvement in diabetes mellitus and biochemistry was similar. CONCLUSION: LRYGB may offer better results than LSG in terms of weight loss in patients over 50 years of age. PMID:27279392

  2. Laparoscopic radical cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fergany, Amr

    2012-01-01

    Objective Laparoscopic radical cystectomy (LRC) has emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to open radical cystectomy (ORC). This review focuses on patient selection criteria, technical aspects and postoperative outcomes of LRC. Methods Material for the review was obtained by a PubMed search over the last 10 years, using the keywords ‘laparoscopic radical cystectomy’ and ‘laparoscopic bladder cancer’ in human subjects. Results Twenty-two publications selected for relevance and content were used for this review from the total search yield. The level of evidence was IIb and III. LRC results in comparable short- and intermediate-range oncological outcomes to ORC, with generally longer operative times but decreased blood loss, postoperative pain and hospital stay. Overall operative and postoperative morbidity are equivalent. Conclusion In experienced hands, LRC is an acceptable minimally invasive alternative to ORC in selected patients, with the main advantage of decreased blood loss and postoperative pain, as well as a shorter hospital stay and recovery. PMID:26558003

  3. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic wedge resection of a gastric leiomyoma with intraoperative ultrasound localization.

    PubMed

    Abdel Khalek, Mohamed; Joshi, Virendra; Kandil, Emad

    2011-12-01

    Gastric leiomyoma is a rare gastric neoplasm that traditionally has been resected for negative margins using an open approach. The laparoscopic approach may also treat various gastric tumors without opening the gastric cavity. Robotic surgery was developed in response to the limitations and drawbacks of laparoscopic surgery. Herein, we describe a case of robotic-assisted laparoscopic wedge resection of a gastric leiomyoma. A 63-year-old male complaining of abdominal pain was found to have an incidental 3 cm antral mass on an abdominal CT. Endoscopy with endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) confirmed a submucosal mass. Biopsy of the lesion was consistent with a leiomyoma. The DaVinci robotic system was used for partial gastrectomy and reconstruction, with the addition of intraoperative ultrasound to localize the lesion intraoperatively. Pathological examination of the resected mass confirmed a diagnosis of leiomyoma with negative margins. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The patient was discharged home on the second postoperative day. Intraoperative endoscopic ultrasound is a safe technique that may improve the success rate of surgery by confirming the location of the lesion. Robotic assistance in gastric resection offers an easy minimally invasive approach to such tumors. This approach can achieve adequate surgical margins and lead to short hospital stays. PMID:21919811

  4. Benefits of xiphoidectomy in total gastrectomy: Technical note

    PubMed Central

    Mihmanlı, Mehmet; Köksal, Hakan Mustafa; Demir, Uygar; Işıl, Rıza Gürhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The esophago-gastric junction may be challenging during total gastrectomy due to gastric cancer. This situation may compromise the security of both the dissection and anastomosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of xiphoidectomy to overcome this issue. Material and Methods: The files of patients who underwent total gastrectomy + D2 lymph node dissection due to proximal gastric cancer or cardia cancer between April 2002–December 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. We assessed the outcome in patients with xiphoidectomy in addition to the midline incision in terms of xiphoidectomy technique, xiphoidectomy time, and operative and postoperative complications. Results: Thirty cases were identified to undergo xiphoidectomy. Nineteen patients were male and 11 were female, with a mean age of 51 (21–80) years. The time required for xiphoidectomy was 7–15 minutes (mean 8.7 minutes). The mean additional time required for the closure of the incision in cases with xiphoidectomy was 2 minutes. There was minimal arterial bleeding from the diaphragmatic surface in one patient, which was controlled by electrocautery. Only two patients developed wound infection. Conclusion: Performing xiphoidectomy is quite easy, after a certain learning phase. The operative time was 7–15 minutes longer due to excision of xiphoid and closure of the related defect. Minor hemorrhage was a problem during surgery. There were no early or late post-operative complications. We suggest that the procedure is beneficial in selected cases with requirement of a wider operative field or better exposure of the esophago-gastric junction during total gastrectomy for gastric cancer, and recommend removal of the xiphoid bone PMID:26985158

  5. Lithium Toxicity Following Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Alam, Abdulkader; Raouf, Sherief; Recio, Fernando O

    2016-08-31

    We are presenting the first documented case of lithium toxicity after vertical sleeve gastrectomy surgery in an 18 year-old female with psychiatric history of bipolar disorder who was treated with lithium. This case illustrates the need for closer monitoring of lithium levels following bariatric surgery. Both psychiatrists and surgeons should be aware of the potential risk of lithium toxicity following bariatric surgery, as well as the need to judiciously monitor lithium level and possibly adjust the dose of some medications. PMID:27489390

  6. Lithium Toxicity Following Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Abdulkader; Raouf, Sherief; Recio, Fernando O.

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting the first documented case of lithium toxicity after vertical sleeve gastrectomy surgery in an 18 year-old female with psychiatric history of bipolar disorder who was treated with lithium. This case illustrates the need for closer monitoring of lithium levels following bariatric surgery. Both psychiatrists and surgeons should be aware of the potential risk of lithium toxicity following bariatric surgery, as well as the need to judiciously monitor lithium level and possibly adjust the dose of some medications. PMID:27489390

  7. Laparoscopic colonic resection for rectosigmoid colonic tumours: a retrospective analysis and comparison with open resection.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Kurumboor; Varma, Deepak; Rajan, Mahendra; Kamlesh, Naduthottam Palanisamy; Zacharias, Prakash; Ganesh Narayanan, Ramesh; Philip, Mathew

    2010-08-01

    Laparoscopic approach for treatment of colorectal malignancy is gaining acceptance gradually; however the benefits of laparoscopic surgery in colonic and rectal tumours is still open to debate. This study aims at a retrospective analysis of operative and short term outcome of patients with rectosigmoid tumours. A retrospective analysis of operative, postoperative and short-term outcome of 62 patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal resection for cancer of rectosigmoid region were compared with a same number of parameters-matched patients who underwent open colorectal resection. Blood transfusion requirement was significantly more in the open group compared to the laparoscopy group (38.7% versus 6.4%, p = 0.001). ICU stay was less in the laparoscopy group (p = <0.05) and they were started on oral liquid diet earlier (p = 0.013). The number of the lymph nodes retrieved, positive distal margin and radial involvement were similar in both groups. The hospital stay was significantly shorter in laparoscopy group (8.4 versus 13.8 days, p < 0.05). Radical operation for rectosigmoid tumors is technically feasible with laparoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic approach is associated with less blood loss, transfusion and significantly less ICU stay. Laparoscopic group recovers early and needs less hospital stay. PMID:21938195

  8. How I Do It: Hybrid Laparoscopic and Robotic Pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, R Matthew; Chalikonda, Sricharan

    2016-09-01

    Minimally invasive pancreatic resections remain technically challenging. Distal pancreatectomy has been embraced at multiple centers as an acceptable minimally invasive technique in selected patients. In contrast, minimally invasive pancreaticoduodenectomy has not achieved broad acceptance, partly due to technical challenges. We detail a minimally invasive technique that utilizes both laparoscopic and robotic approaches which capitalizes on the advantages of each. Our early results have encouraged the continued development of this minimally invasive pancreatic surgery program. This hybrid technique may be an approach that is useful for surgeons striving to adopt the advantages of minimally invasive surgery for their patients. PMID:27271540

  9. Distal radioulnar joint injuries.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Binu P; Sreekanth, Raveendran

    2012-09-01

    Distal radioulnar joint is a trochoid joint relatively new in evolution. Along with proximal radioulnar joint, forearm bones and interosseous membrane, it allows pronosupination and load transmission across the wrist. Injuries around distal radioulnar joint are not uncommon, and are usually associated with distal radius fractures,fractures of the ulnar styloid and with the eponymous Galeazzi or Essex_Lopresti fractures. The injury can be purely involving the soft tissue especially the triangular fibrocartilage or the radioulnar ligaments. The patients usually present with ulnar sided wrist pain, features of instability, or restriction of rotation. Difficulty in carrying loads in the hand is a major constraint for these patients. Thorough clinical examination to localize point of tenderness and appropriate provocative tests help in diagnosis. Radiology and MRI are extremely useful, while arthroscopy is the gold standard for evaluation. The treatment protocols are continuously evolving and range from conservative, arthroscopic to open surgical methods. Isolated dislocation are uncommon. Basal fractures of the ulnar styloid tend to make the joint unstable and may require operative intervention. Chronic instability requires reconstruction of the stabilizing ligaments to avoid onset of arthritis. Prosthetic replacement in arthritis is gaining acceptance in the management of arthritis. PMID:23162140

  10. Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy and Laparoscopic-Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    King, Cara R; Giles, Dobie

    2016-09-01

    Vaginal hysterectomy has been shown to have the lowest complication rate, better cosmesis, and decreased cost compared with alternate routes of hysterectomy. However, there are times when a vaginal hysterectomy is not feasible and an open abdominal hysterectomy should be avoided. Minimally invasive surgery has evolved over the last several decades; with the improvement in optics and surgical instruments, laparoscopic hysterectomy is becoming increasingly common. A total laparoscopic hysterectomy is possible with proper training, including sound technique in laparoscopic suturing for closure of the vaginal cuff. PMID:27521879