Science.gov

Sample records for large aperture optical

  1. A large aperture electro-optic deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosco, A.; Boogert, S. T.; Boorman, G. E.; Blair, G. A.

    2009-05-01

    An electro-optic laser beam deflector with a clear optical aperture of 8.6 mm has been designed, realized, and tested. The electro-optic material used to implement the device was a MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. The exceptionally large aperture makes the device suitable for applications where fast scanning of high power laser beams is needed. The measured deflection angle was 120 μrad/kV for a total length of electro-optic material of 90 mm. A mode quality analysis of the laser beam revealed that the M2 of the laser is affected by less than 4% during scan operation when maximum driving voltage is applied.

  2. Development of large aperture composite adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmetik, Viliam; Vitovec, Bohumil; Jiran, Lukas; Nemcova, Sarka; Zicha, Josef; Inneman, Adolf; Mikulickova, Lenka; Pavlica, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Large aperture composite adaptive optics for laser applications is investigated in cooperation of Institute of Plasma Physic, Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering FME CTU and 5M Ltd. We are exploring opportunity of a large-size high-power-laser deformable-mirror production using a lightweight bimorph actuated structure with a composite core. In order to produce a sufficiently large operational free aperture we are developing new technologies for production of flexible core, bimorph actuator and deformable mirror reflector. Full simulation of a deformable-mirrors structure was prepared and validated by complex testing. A deformable mirror actuation and a response of a complicated structure are investigated for an accurate control of the adaptive optics. An original adaptive optics control system and a bimorph deformable mirror driver were developed. Tests of material samples, components and sub-assemblies were completed. A subscale 120 mm bimorph deformable mirror prototype was designed, fabricated and thoroughly tested. A large-size 300 mm composite-core bimorph deformable mirror was simulated and optimized, fabrication of a prototype is carried on. A measurement and testing facility is modified to accommodate large sizes optics.

  3. Large aperture adaptive optics for intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneuville, François; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-05-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed a range of large aperture electro-mechanical deformable mirrors (DM) suitable for ultra short pulsed intense lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations thanks to electromechanical actuators driven by stepper motors. DM design and assembly method have been adapted to large aperture beams and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm at 45° angle of incidence. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Simulations were correlated with measurements on optical bench and the design has been validated by calculation for very large aperture (up to Ø550mm). Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for actual MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The MD-AME mirrors can be adapted to circular, square or elliptical beams and they are compatible with all dielectric or metallic coatings.

  4. Study on test metrology of large aperture optical system wavefront

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiying; Fu, Yuegang; Gao, Tianyuan; Wang, Zhijian

    2009-05-01

    Large aperture optical system test has been a key problem for a long time. It could be solved by sub-aperture stitching method after the sub-apertures are tested. Sub-aperture stitching technology is a feasible method for testing large diameter optical system with small diameter interferometer sub-aperture stitching. Auto-collimating component will be needed with interferometer stitching method. Auto-collimating component is defined that the image could be kept stable when the optical component rotates about any axis in space. And the beam could be back along original optical path. By this means, auto collimation could be realized. The auto-collimating component is smaller than the test system. The whole wavefront of large aperture system could be tested through the method that the auto-collimating component moves along the guide rail and rotates about optical axis. A right angle roof prism is chosen as the auto-collimating component due to its character of easier manufacture. The active matrix, characteristic orientation and extreme axial is deduced with dynamic optics. The sub-aperture stitching testing process is simulated by ZEMAX in detail. The test result by stitching method is compared with that by directive test method for large aperture optical system. It is shown that the relative test error is less than 4.3λ 0/00. The sub -aperture stitching test method is verified.

  5. Large aperture ac interferometer for optical testing.

    PubMed

    Moore, D T; Murray, R; Neves, F B

    1978-12-15

    A 20-cm clear aperture modified Twyman-Green interferometer is described. The system measures phase with an AC technique called phase-lock interferometry while scanning the aperture with a dual galvanometer scanning system. Position information and phase are stored in a minicomputer with disk storage. This information is manipulated with associated software, and the wavefront deformation due to a test component is graphically displayed in perspective and contour on a CRT terminal. PMID:20208642

  6. Testing the large aperture optical components by the sub-aperture stitching interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yong; Wang, Zhao-xuan; Wang, Qing; Ji, Bo

    2008-03-01

    Nowadays many large aperture optical components are widely used in the high-tech area, how to test them become more and more important. Here describes a new method to test the large aperture optical components using the small aperture interferometer, deduce how to get the aperture number and the concrete process of the stitching parameter in a systematic way, finally get the best plan to choose the sub-aperture of the square and circular optical plane. To specify the stability of the method we operate an experiment, the result shows that the stitching accuracy can reach λ/10, it meet the need of the inertia constraint fusion etc, that is good enough to be used in the high-tech area.

  7. Fabrication and applications of large aperture diffractive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, S; Britten, J B; Hyde, R; Rushford, M; Summers, L; Toeppen, J

    2002-02-19

    Large aperture diffractive optics are needed in high power laser applications to protect against laser damage during operation and in space applications to increase the light gathering power and consequently the signal to noise. We describe the facilities we have built for fabricating meter scale diffractive optics and discuss several examples of these.

  8. Low-Cost Large Aperture Telescopes for Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid

    2006-01-01

    Low-cost, 0.5-1 meter ground apertures are required for near-Earth laser communications. Low-cost ground apertures with equivalent diameters greater than 10 meters are desired for deep-space communications. This presentation focuses on identifying schemes to lower the cost of constructing networks of large apertures while continuing to meet the requirements for laser communications. The primary emphasis here is on the primary mirror. A slumped glass spherical mirror, along with passive secondary mirror corrector and active adaptive optic corrector show promise as a low-cost alternative to large diameter monolithic apertures. To verify the technical performance and cost estimate, development of a 1.5-meter telescope equipped with gimbal and dome is underway.

  9. Large Aperture Multiplexed Diffractive Lidar Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rallison, Richard D.; Schwemmer, Geary K. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We have delivered only 2 or 3 UV Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs) thus far and have fallen short of the intended goal in size and in dual wavelength function. Looking back, it has been fortuitous that we even made anything work in the UV region. It was our good fortune to discover that the material we work with daily was adequate for use at 355 nm, if well rinsed during processing. If we had stuck to our original plan of etching in small pieces of fused silica, we would still be trying to make the first small section in our ion mill, which is not yet operational. The original plan was far too ambitious and would take another 2 years to complete beginning where we left off this time. In order to make a HOE for the IR as well as the UV we will likely have to learn to sensitize some film to the 1064 line and we have obtained sensitizer that is reported to work in that region already. That work would also take an additional year to complete.

  10. Large-aperture, high-damage-threshold optics for beamlet

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.; Atherton, L.J.; DeYoreo, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    Beamlet serves as a test bed for the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser design and components. Therefore, its optics are similar in size and quality to those proposed for the NIF. In general, the optics in the main laser cavity and transport section of Beamlet are larger and have higher damage thresholds than the optics manufactured for any of the previous laser systems. In addition, the quality of the Beamlet optical materials is higher, leading to better wavefront quality, higher optical transmission, and lower-intensity modulation of the output laser beam than, for example, that typically achieved on Nova. In this article, the authors discuss the properties and characteristics of the large-aperture optics used on Beamlet.

  11. Optical system design for lens with large relative aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaisheng; Zhang, Zhi; Zhang, Zhaohui; Wang, Zefeng; Yan, Aqi; Fei, Jiaqi; Mei, Chao; Zhang, Gaopeng

    2015-10-01

    As the space remote sensing technology progresses, the developing trend of telescope is larger and larger aperture, higher and higher resolution. An Optical system with the relative aperture of 1:2 is introduced. The primary optical properties are: focal length of 120mm, F number of 2, field angle of 7.4°. It has the advantages of large high resolution, small size and excellent image quality. Several kinds of aberration curves and the MTF curve are given. Its imaging quality is nearly diffraction limited so that the spatial frequency is greater than 70lp/mm when its modulated transfer function (MTF) value of the optical system is equal to 0.8,and the optical system distortion is less than 1%. At last, the stray light is analyzed and the baffle of the telescope is designed. The solid model of the Optical system was constructed in Tracepro software, the point sources transmittance (PST) cure was given at different off-axis angle between 7.4°~80° the analysis result indicates that the PST values are less than 10-6 when off-axis angle are larger than soar critical angle. So the system is suitable for observation or photography of deep sky objects.

  12. Optical simulation of large aperture spatial heterodyne imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qisheng; Xiangli, Bin; Fang, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Large aperture spatial heterodyne imaging spectrometer (LASHIS) is a new pushbroom Fourier transform ultraspectral imager with no moving parts. It is based on a Sagnac interferometer combined with a pair of gratings. In this paper, the basic principle of LASHIS is reviewed and an optical LASHIS model is set up in ZEMAX. Three interference images are presented, one is calculated according to the basic theory, one is simulated using the optical model in ZEMAX, and the other is generated by the experimental device set up in our laboratory. These three interference images show a good agreement with each other that demonstrate the correctness of the optical model. Using this model, we can simulate the interference image quickly. This image gives a visualized evaluation of the system performance, and it will be more convenient for system design or tolerance analysis of LASHIS.

  13. Advances in optical materials for large aperture lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Stokowski, S.E.; Lowdermilk, W.H.; Marchi, F.T.; Swain, J.E.; Wallerstein, E.P.; Wirtenson, G.R.

    1981-12-15

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is using large aperture Nd: glass lasers to investigate the feasibility of inertial confinement fusion. In our experiments high power laser light is focussed onto a small (100 to 500 micron) target containing a deuterium-tritium fuel mixture. During the short (1 to 5 ns) laser pulse the fuel is compressed and heated, resulting in fusion reactions. The generation and control of the powerful laser pulses for these experiments is a challenging scientific and engineering task, which requires the development of new optical materials, fabrication techniques, and coatings. LLNL with the considerable cooperation and support from the optical industry, where most of the research and development and almost all the manufacturing is done, has successfully applied several new developments in these areas.

  14. Optical system of large relative aperture and wide field using aspheric corrector for detecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Ming; Wang, Jianli; Zhang, Jingxu

    2009-05-01

    The magnitude requirement of space target detecting determines that the image of detecting telescope should have several performances: small spots, small 80% encircled energy diameter and good MTF(Modulation transfer function). So the aperture and field of view of optical system have some demands accordingly. The larger aperture, the more energy that telescope collects and higher magnitude the telescope detects; the wider field of view, the more extensive range which the telescope searches. Now most of ground telescopes whose apertures are from 500mm to 1000mm is on-axis optical system, so wide field of view becomes the most importance problem. To obtain large relative aperture and wide field of view, the paper introduces a catadioptric telescope with small aperture aspheric refractive corrector, whose conic surface will be used to remove the aberrations due to large relative aperture and wide field of view. As to the optical system, there is only one aspheric refractive corrector, and it is relatively easy for manufacturing because of its concave figure and normal material. The paper gives the example, and optimizes this optical system with ZEMAX program. And then the paper provides a specific analysis program for testing the aspheric refractive corrector. The aperture of this optical system is 750mm, and its relative aperture is 0.82, and the field of view is 3.6° diameter(diagonal). Its structure is simple and the image quality is also very good.

  15. A Large Aperture, High Energy Laser System for Optics and Optical Component Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Nostrand, M C; Weiland, T L; Luthi, R L; Vickers, J L; Sell, W D; Stanley, J A; Honig, J; Auerbach, J; Hackel, R P; Wegner, P J

    2003-11-01

    A large aperture, kJ-class, multi-wavelength Nd-glass laser system has been constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Lab which has unique capabilities for studying a wide variety of optical phenomena. The master-oscillator, power-amplifier (MOPA) configuration of this ''Optical Sciences Laser'' (OSL) produces 1053 nm radiation with shaped pulse lengths which are variable from 0.1-100 ns. The output can be frequency doubled or tripled with high conversion efficiency with a resultant 100 cm{sup 2} high quality output beam. This facility can accommodate prototype hardware for large-scale inertial confinement fusion lasers allowing for investigation of integrated system issues such as optical lifetime at high fluence, optics contamination, compatibility of non-optical materials, and laser diagnostics.

  16. Eyeglass Large Aperture, Lightweight Space Optics FY2000 - FY2002 LDRD Strategic Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R

    2003-02-10

    A series of studies by the Air Force, the National Reconnaissance Office and NASA have identified the critical role played by large optics in fulfilling many of the space related missions of these agencies. Whether it is the Next Generation Space Telescope for NASA, high resolution imaging systems for NRO, or beam weaponry for the Air Force, the diameter of the primary optic is central to achieving high resolution (imaging) or a small spot size on target (lethality). While the detailed requirements differ for each application (high resolution imaging over the visible and near-infrared for earth observation, high damage threshold but single-wavelength operation for directed energy), the challenges of a large, lightweight primary optic which is space compatible and operates with high efficiency are the same. The advantage of such large optics to national surveillance applications is that it permits these observations to be carried-out with much greater effectiveness than with smaller optics. For laser weapons, the advantage is that it permits more tightly focused beams which can be leveraged into either greater effective range, reduced laser power, and/or smaller on-target spot-sizes; weapon systems can be made either much more effective or much less expensive. This application requires only single-wavelength capability, but places an emphasis upon robust, rapidly targetable optics. The advantages of large aperture optics to astronomy are that it increases the sensitivity and resolution with which we can view the universe. This can be utilized either for general purpose astronomy, allowing us to examine greater numbers of objects in more detail and at greater range, or it can enable the direct detection and detailed examination of extra-solar planets. This application requires large apertures (for both light-gathering and resolution reasons), with broad-band spectral capability, but does not emphasize either large fields-of-view or pointing agility. Despite

  17. Large Aperture Scanning Lidar Based on Holographic Optical Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Miller, David O.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Andrus, Ionio; Guerra, David V.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Lidar remote sensing instruments can make a significant contribution to satisfying many of the required measurements of atmospheric and surface parameters for future spaceborne platforms, including topographic altimeters, atmospheric profiles of, wind, humidity, temperature, trace molecules, aerosols, and clouds. It is highly desirable to have wide measurement swaths for rapid coverage rather than just the narrow ribbon of data that is obtained with a nadir only observation. For most applications global coverage is required, and for wind measurements scanning or pointing is required in order to retrieve the full 3-D wind vector from multiple line-of-sight Doppler measurements. Conventional lidar receivers make up a substantial portion of the instrument's size and weight. Wide angle scanning typically requires a large scanning mirror in front of the receiver telescope, or pointing the entire telescope and aft optics assembly, Either of these methods entails the use of large bearings, motors, gearing and their associated electronics. Spaceborne instruments also need reaction wheels to counter the torque applied to the spacecraft by these motions. NASA has developed simplified conical scanning telescopes using Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs) to reduce the size, mass, angular momentum, and cost of scanning lidar systems. NASA has developed two operating lidar systems based on 40 cm diameter HOEs. The first such system, named Prototype Holographic Atmospheric Scanner for Environmental Remote Sensing (PHASERS) was a joint development between NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the University of Maryland College Park. PHASERS is based on a reflection HOE for use at the doubled Nd:YAG laser wavelength of 532 nm and has recently undergone a number of design changes in a collaborative effort between GSFC and Saint Anselm College in New Hampshire. The next step was to develop IR transmission HOEs for use with the Nd:YAG fundamental in the Holographic Airborne

  18. Large Aperture Scanning Lidar Based on Holographic Optical Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Miller, David O.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Andrus, Ionio; Guerra, David V.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Lidar remote sensing instruments can make a significant contribution to satisfying many of the required measurements of atmospheric and surface parameters for future spaceborne platforms, including topographic altimeters, atmospheric profiles of, wind, humidity, temperature, trace molecules, aerosols, and clouds. It is highly desirable to have wide measurement swaths for rapid coverage rather than just the narrow ribbon of data that is obtained with a nadir only observation. For most applications global coverage is required, and for wind measurements scanning or pointing is required in order to retrieve the full 3-D wind vector from multiple line-of-sight Doppler measurements. Conventional lidar receivers make up a substantial portion of the instrument's size and weight. Wide angle scanning typically requires a large scanning mirror in front of the receiver telescope, or pointing the entire telescope and aft optics assembly, Either of these methods entails the use of large bearings, motors, gearing and their associated electronics. Spaceborne instruments also need reaction wheels to counter the torque applied to the spacecraft by these motions. NASA has developed simplified conical scanning telescopes using Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs) to reduce the size, mass, angular momentum, and cost of scanning lidar systems. NASA has developed two operating lidar systems based on 40 cm diameter HOEs. The first such system, named Prototype Holographic Atmospheric Scanner for Environmental Remote Sensing (PHASERS) was a joint development between NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the University of Maryland College Park. PHASERS is based on a reflection HOE for use at the doubled Nd:YAG laser wavelength of 532 nm and has recently undergone a number of design changes in a collaborative effort between GSFC and Saint Anselm College in New Hampshire. The next step was to develop IR transmission HOEs for use with the Nd:YAG fundamental in the Holographic Airborne

  19. Simulation analysis of on-orbit adjustment and compensation for large aperture optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianfeng; Li, Bo; Sun, Dewei; Ruan, Ningjuan; Zhou, Feng

    2014-09-01

    With the uprating requirements of space remote sensing, the aperture of the optical remote sensor is getting larger and larger. The influences of both the support of optical elements and gravity deformation on the optical system are difficult to conquer. Therefore, it is necessary to compensate the descending optical performance which is caused by the surface error of primary mirror by means of adjusting the position parameters of the optical elements on-orbit. A large aperture coaxial three-mirror optical system is introduced in the paper. Matlab and MetroPro are used to simulate the surface error of the primary mirror. The surface error of the primary mirror is compensated by adjusting the position freedoms of the secondary mirror. The results show that the adjustment of the position freedoms of the secondary mirror can compensate both the coma and some astigmatism of the primary mirror, but not the spherical aberration.

  20. Optical slicing of large scenes by synthetic aperture integral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Héctor; Saavedra, Genaro; Molina, Ainhoa; Martínez-Corral, Manuel; Martínez-Cuenca, Raúl; Javidi, Bahram

    2010-04-01

    Integral imaging (InI) technology was created with the aim of providing the binocular observers of monitors, or matrix display devices, with auto-stereoscopic images of 3D scenes. However, along the last few years the inventiveness of researches has allowed to find many other interesting applications of integral imaging. Examples of this are the application of InI in object recognition, the mapping of 3D polarization distributions, or the elimination of occluding signals. One of the most interesting applications of integral imaging is the production of views focused at different depths of the 3D scene. This application is the natural result of the ability of InI to create focal stacks from a single input image. In this contribution we present new algorithm for this optical slicing application, and show that it is possible the 3D reconstruction with improved lateral resolution.

  1. Large Aperture "Photon Bucket" Optical Receiver Performance in High Background Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor A.; Hoppe, D.

    2011-01-01

    The potential development of large aperture groundbased "photon bucket" optical receivers for deep space communications, with acceptable performance even when pointing close to the sun, is receiving considerable attention. Sunlight scattered by the atmosphere becomes significant at micron wavelengths when pointing to a few degrees from the sun, even with the narrowest bandwidth optical filters. In addition, high quality optical apertures in the 10-30 meter range are costly and difficult to build with accurate surfaces to ensure narrow fields-of-view (FOV). One approach currently under consideration is to polish the aluminum reflector panels of large 34-meter microwave antennas to high reflectance, and accept the relatively large FOV generated by state-of-the-art polished aluminum panels with rms surface accuracies on the order of a few microns, corresponding to several-hundred micro-radian FOV, hence generating centimeter-diameter focused spots at the Cassegrain focus of 34-meter antennas. Assuming pulse-position modulation (PPM) and Poisson-distributed photon-counting detection, a "polished panel" photon-bucket receiver with large FOV will collect hundreds of background photons per PPM slot, along with comparable signal photons due to its large aperture. It is demonstrated that communications performance in terms of PPM symbol-error probability in high-background high-signal environments depends more strongly on signal than on background photons, implying that large increases in background energy can be compensated by a disproportionally small increase in signal energy. This surprising result suggests that large optical apertures with relatively poor surface quality may nevertheless provide acceptable performance for deep-space optical communications, potentially enabling the construction of cost-effective hybrid RF/optical receivers in the future.

  2. Initial Technology Assessment for the Large-Aperture UV-Optical-Infrared (LUVOIR) Mission Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Feinberg, Lee; France, Kevin; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Redding, David; Schiminovich, David

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Division's 30-Year Roadmap prioritized a future large-aperture space telescope operating in the ultra-violet/optical/infrared wavelength regime. The Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy envisioned a similar observatory, the High Definition Space Telescope. And a multi-institution group also studied the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope. In all three cases, a broad science case is outlined, combining general astrophysics with the search for biosignatures via direct-imaging and spectroscopic characterization of habitable exoplanets. We present an initial technology assessment that enables such an observatory that is currently being studied for the 2020 Decadal Survey by the Large UV/Optical/Infrared (LUVOIR) surveyor Science and Technology Definition Team. We present here the technology prioritization for the 2016 technology cycle and define the required technology capabilities and current state-of-the-art performance. Current, planned, and recommended technology development efforts are also reported.

  3. Research on 2x1 plasma electrode electro-optical switch with large aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiong Jun; Zheng, Kui Xing; Feng, B.; Wu, D. S.; Lu, J. P.; Tian, X. L.; Jin, F.; Sui, Zhan; Wei, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xiaomin

    2005-01-01

    In conceptual design of the prototype for SG-III facility, a full aperture electro-optical switch was placed between the cavity mirror and the main amplifier to isolate the reflected beams. The beam on the cavity mirror is 240mm×240mm square. Pockells cells of conversional design with coaxial ring electrodes can not scale to such large square aperture. In the 1980s, a plasma electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) concept was invented at LLNL. It uses transparent plasma electrode formed through gas discharge as the electrodes to apply the voltage across switching crystal to rotate the polarization of a transmitted laser beam. And it can be scaled to large aperture with thin crystal. So the switch which would be used in SG-III is based on this technology. The technical integration line as a prototype of SG-III laser is actually a 4×2 beam bundle. And the full aperture optical switch is mechanically designed four apertures as a removable unit, and electrically two 2×1 PEPC putting together. So we built a 2×1 PEPC to develop the technology first. The 2×1 PEPC is a sandwich structure made of an insulating mid plane between a pair of plasma chambers. The frame of both plasma chambers are machining in duralumin. Each chamber is installed with a planar magnetic cathode and four segments spherical anodes made from stainless steel. The cathode and anode are insulated from the housing with a special shell made from plastic, and plasma is insulated from the housing by an 80-μm-thick anodic coating on the duralumin. The two plasma chambers are separated by a mid plane of glass frame with two square holes. The two holes are filled by two electro-optical crystals with a 240-mm square aperture. With the optimized operating pressure and the electrical parameters, a very good homogeneity and low resistivity plasma electrode is obtained. Finally we tested its switching performance to simulate the case that it will be used in the SG-III prototype facility. It works with a quarter wave

  4. Electro-optic harmonic conversion switch for large-aperture multipass laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Henesian, M.A.; Goldhar, J.; Haas, R.A.

    1984-08-01

    The authors have demonstrated electro-optically tuned second-harmonic generation using Type I KDP inside a plasma-electrode discharge cell. An axial voltage of +/- 52 kV is required to switch a 1.064-..mu..m beam by conversion to 0.53 ..mu..m, in agreement with theory. Electro-optically tuned harmonic generation may be combined with a recently developed transparent plasma electrode to produce a large-aperture switch for multipass laser systems. 7 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  5. Development of large-aperture electro-optical switch for high power laser at CAEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiongjun; Wu, Dengsheng; Zhang, Jun; Lin, Donghui; Zheng, Jiangang; Zheng, Kuixing

    2015-02-01

    Large-aperture electro-optical switch based on plasma Pockels cell (PPC) is one of important components for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) laser facility. We have demonstrated a single-pulse driven 4×1 PPC with 400mm×400mm aperture for SGIII laser facility. And four 2×1 PPCs modules with 350mm×350mm aperture have been operated in SGII update laser facility. It is different to the PPC of NIF and LMJ for its simple operation to perform Pockels effect. With optimized operation parameters, the PPCs meet the SGII-U laser requirement of four-pass amplification control. Only driven by one high voltage pulser, the simplified PPC system would be provided with less associated diagnostics, and higher reliability. To farther reduce the insert loss of the PPC, research on the large-aperture PPC based on DKDP crystal driven by one pulse is developed. And several single-pulse driven PPCs with 80mm×80mm DKDP crystal have been manufactured and operated in laser facilities.

  6. Fast inspection of bulk and surface defects of large aperture optics in high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan'an; Hu, Guohang; Liu, Shijie; Yi, Kui; Shao, Jianda

    2015-05-01

    Laser induced damage for nanosecond pulse duration is attributed to the existence of defects. The growth and polishing, as well as coating deposition, may induce versatile kinds of defects, including dig, scratch and inclusion. It is special important to get the information of the defects, such as size and location, which is the basis to know the origin of the defects and figures out effective techniques to eliminate it. It is quite easy to get the information of the defects with micron-level resolution, but it is time-consuming and is not suitable for fast inspection of the large aperture (hundreds of millimeters). In this work, on-the-fly image capture technique was employed to realize fast inspection of large aperture optics. A continuous green laser was employed as illumination source to enhance and enlarge the image of bulk defects. So it could detect the submicron-scale defects. A transmission microscopy with white light illumination was employed to detect the surface defect. Its field of view was about 2.8mm×1.6mm. The sample was raster scanned driving by a stepper motor through the stationary illumination laser and digital camera, and the speed to scan the sample was about 10mm/s. The results of large aperture optics proved the functions of this fast inspection technique.

  7. Pulse power requirements for large aperture optical switches based on plasma electrode Pockels cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Taylor, J.

    1992-06-01

    We discuss very large-aperture optical switches (greater than 30 [times] 30 cm) as an enabling technology for inertial confinement fusion drivers based on multipass laser amplifiers. Large-scale laser fusion drivers such as the Nova laser have been based on single-pass amplifier designs in part because of the unavailability of a suitable large-aperture switch. We are developing an optical switch based on a Pockels cell employing plasma-electrodes. A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) is a longitudinal-mode Pockels cell in which a plasma discharge is formed on each side of an electro-optic crystal (typically KDP or deuterated KDP, often designated KD*P). The plasmas formed on either side of the crystal act as transparent electrodes for a switching-pulse and are intended to allow uniform charging of the entire crystal. The switching-pulse is a nominally rectangular high-voltage pulse equal to the half-wave voltage V[sub x] ( 8 kV for KD*P or 17 kV for KDP) and is applied across the crystal via the plasma-electrodes. When the crystal is charged to V[sub x], the polarization of an incoming, linearly polarized, laser beam is rotated by 90[degree]. When used in conjunction with an appropriate, passive polarizer, an optical switch is thus realized. A switch with a clear aperture of 37 [times] 37 cm is now in construction for the Beamlet laser which will serve as a test bed for this switch as well as other technologies required for an advanced NOVA laser design. In this paper, we discuss the unique power electronics requirements of PEPC optical switches.

  8. Pulse power requirements for large aperture optical switches based on plasma electrode Pockels cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Taylor, J.

    1992-06-01

    We discuss very large-aperture optical switches (greater than 30 {times} 30 cm) as an enabling technology for inertial confinement fusion drivers based on multipass laser amplifiers. Large-scale laser fusion drivers such as the Nova laser have been based on single-pass amplifier designs in part because of the unavailability of a suitable large-aperture switch. We are developing an optical switch based on a Pockels cell employing plasma-electrodes. A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) is a longitudinal-mode Pockels cell in which a plasma discharge is formed on each side of an electro-optic crystal (typically KDP or deuterated KDP, often designated KD*P). The plasmas formed on either side of the crystal act as transparent electrodes for a switching-pulse and are intended to allow uniform charging of the entire crystal. The switching-pulse is a nominally rectangular high-voltage pulse equal to the half-wave voltage V{sub x} ( 8 kV for KD*P or 17 kV for KDP) and is applied across the crystal via the plasma-electrodes. When the crystal is charged to V{sub x}, the polarization of an incoming, linearly polarized, laser beam is rotated by 90{degree}. When used in conjunction with an appropriate, passive polarizer, an optical switch is thus realized. A switch with a clear aperture of 37 {times} 37 cm is now in construction for the Beamlet laser which will serve as a test bed for this switch as well as other technologies required for an advanced NOVA laser design. In this paper, we discuss the unique power electronics requirements of PEPC optical switches.

  9. End-to-End Assessment of a Large Aperture Segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Rioux, Norman; Bolcar, Matthew; Liu, Alice; Guyon, Oliver; Stark, Chris; Arenberg, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Key challenges of a future large aperture, segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope capable of performing a spectroscopic survey of hundreds of Exoplanets will be sufficient stability to achieve 10^-10 contrast measurements and sufficient throughput and sensitivity for high yield Exo-Earth spectroscopic detection. Our team has collectively assessed an optimized end to end architecture including a high throughput coronagraph capable of working with a segmented telescope, a cost-effective and heritage based stable segmented telescope, a control architecture that minimizes the amount of new technologies, and an Exo-Earth yield assessment to evaluate potential performance. These efforts are combined through integrated modeling, coronagraph evaluations, and Exo-Earth yield calculations to assess the potential performance of the selected architecture. In addition, we discusses the scalability of this architecture to larger apertures and the technological tall poles to enabling it.

  10. End-to-End Assessment of a Large Aperture Segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Bolcar, Matt; Liu, Alice; Guyon, Olivier; Stark,Chris; Arenberg, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Key challenges of a future large aperture, segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope capable of performing a spectroscopic survey of hundreds of Exoplanets will be sufficient stability to achieve 10-10 contrast measurements and sufficient throughput and sensitivity for high yield Exo-Earth spectroscopic detection. Our team has collectively assessed an optimized end to end architecture including a high throughput coronagraph capable of working with a segmented telescope, a cost-effective and heritage based stable segmented telescope, a control architecture that minimizes the amount of new technologies, and an Exo-Earth yield assessment to evaluate potential performance.

  11. Simple mathematical model for designing laser diode focusing optics with a large numerical aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiyin

    2014-10-01

    A simple mathematical model is derived for conveniently designing laser diode focusing optics with a large numerical aperture. The astigmatism of laser diode beams and the lens truncation effects are considered in the model. The linearly polarized nature of laser diode beams is also included. Two design examples using this model are presented. Design results show that the lens truncation will increase the size of the focused spot and the value of the M2 factor, and the lens truncation caused a focal shift, which is not enough to correct laser diode beam astigmatism.

  12. In-situ monitoring of surface post-processing in large aperture fused silica optics with Optical Coherence Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, G M; Bass, I l; Hackel, R P; Mailhiot, C; Demos, S G

    2008-02-08

    Optical Coherence Tomography is explored as a method to image laser-damage sites located on the surface of large aperture fused silica optics during post-processing via CO{sub 2} laser ablation. The signal analysis for image acquisition was adapted to meet the sensitivity requirements for this application. A long-working distance geometry was employed to allow imaging through the opposite surface of the 5-cm thick optic. The experimental results demonstrate the potential of OCT for remote monitoring of transparent material processing applications.

  13. Intracavity Herriott-cell testbed for large-aperture femtosecond optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rácz, Péter; Nagy, Benedek J.; Ferencz, Kárpát; Dombi, Péter

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate a versatile test method of large-aperture femtosecond mirrors inside a long-cavity Ti:sapphire laser oscillator. The Herriott-cell inside the cavity is utilized for the purpose of carrying out full-aperture testing. The method is highly sensitive to the homogeneity of mirror reflectivity and group delay dispersion over the whole mirror surface and it is suitable for testing both high reflector and chirped mirrors starting from 2” size up to arbitrarily large apertures.

  14. Horizon: A Proposal for Large Aperture, Active Optics in Geosynchronous Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, Dennis; Jenstrom, Del

    2000-01-01

    In 1999, NASA's New Millennium Program called for proposals to validate new technology in high-earth orbit for the Earth Observing-3 (NMP EO3) mission to fly in 2003. In response, we proposed to test a large aperture, active optics telescope in geosynchronous orbit. This would flight-qualify new technologies for both Earth and Space science: 1) a future instrument with LANDSAT image resolution and radiometric quality watching continuously from geosynchronous station, and 2) the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) for deep space imaging. Six enabling technologies were to be flight-qualified: 1) a 3-meter, lightweight segmented primary mirror, 2) mirror actuators and mechanisms, 3) a deformable mirror, 4) coarse phasing techniques, 5) phase retrieval for wavefront control during stellar viewing, and 6) phase diversity for wavefront control during Earth viewing. Three enhancing technologies were to be flight- validated: 1) mirror deployment and latching mechanisms, 2) an advanced microcontroller, and 3) GPS at GEO. In particular, two wavefront sensing algorithms, phase retrieval by JPL and phase diversity by ERIM International, were to sense optical system alignment and focus errors, and to correct them using high-precision mirror mechanisms. Active corrections based on Earth scenes are challenging because phase diversity images must be collected from extended, dynamically changing scenes. In addition, an Earth-facing telescope in GEO orbit is subject to a powerful diurnal thermal and radiometric cycle not experienced by deep-space astronomy. The Horizon proposal was a bare-bones design for a lightweight large-aperture, active optical system that is a practical blend of science requirements, emerging technologies, budget constraints, launch vehicle considerations, orbital mechanics, optical hardware, phase-determination algorithms, communication strategy, computational burdens, and first-rate cooperation among earth and space scientists, engineers and managers

  15. [Modeling and simulation of effect of optical distortion on the large aperture static imaging spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Lü, Qun-bo; Xiangli, Bin; Yao, Tao; Jing, Juan-juan; Wang, Zhong-hou

    2010-01-01

    As a new type Fourier transform imaging spectrometry, large aperture static imaging spectrometry (LASIS) has come forth in recent years, which has many advantages such as simple principle, high stability and so on. However, the requirement for the optical system design of LASIS was very harsh. As one of the optical aberrations, optical distortion degrades the data quality acquired by LASIS, consequently limits its applications. According to the analysis of the data acquisition principle of LASIS, the data model with the effect of optical distortion was presented, which could be used for LASIS performance pre-evaluation. Finally, the computer simlulation of the data model was achieved with supposed parameters. The simulation results indicated that the relative error more than 5% was induced in the recovery spectrum, and approximate 8 nm spectral line deviation was occurred at the long wavelength region. The results show that the 4% optical distortion was inapplicable for LASIS although it is acceptant for common optical imaging system. PMID:20302101

  16. Performance of large-aperture optical switches for high-energy inertial-confinement fusion lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Woods, B.; DeYoreo, J.J.; Roberts, D.; Atherton, L.J.

    1995-08-20

    We describe the design and performance of large-aperture ({lt}30 cm {times} 30 cm) optical switches that have demonstrated, for the first time to our knowledge, active switching of a high-energy ({lt}5 kJ) optical pulse in an inertial-confinement fusion laser. These optical switches, which consist of a plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) and a passive polarizer, permit the design of efficient, multipass laser amplifiers. In a PEPC, plasma discharges on the faces of a thin (1-cm) electro-optic crystal (KDP or KD{bold |}P) act as highly conductive and transparent electrodes. These plasma electrodes facilitate rapid ({lt}100 ns) and uniform charging of the crystal to the half-wave voltage and discharging back to 0 V. We discuss the operating principles, design, optical performance, and technical issues of a 32 cm {times} 32 cm prototype PEPC with both KDP and KD{bold |}P crystals, and a 37 cm {times} 37 cm PEPC with a KDP crystal for the Beamlet laser. This PEPC recently switched a 6-kJ, 3-ns pulse in a four-pass cavity.

  17. Large aperture diffractive space telescope

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Roderick A.

    2001-01-01

    A large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary objective lens functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass "aiming" at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The objective lens includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the objective lens, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets which may be either earth bound or celestial.

  18. The measurement and analysis of wavefront structure from large aperture ICF optics

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, C.R.; Lawson, J.K.

    1995-05-30

    This paper discusses the techniques, developed over the past year, for high spatial resolution measurement and analysis of the transmitted and/or reflected wavefront of large aperture ICF optical components. Parts up to 400 mm {times} 750 mm have been measured and include: laser slabs, windows, KDP crystals and lenses. The measurements were performed using state-of-the-art commercial phase shifting interferometers at a wavelength of 633 {mu}m. Both 1 and 2-D Fourier analysis have been used to characterize the wavefront; specifically the Power Spectral Density, (PSD), function was calculated. The PSDs of several precision optical components will be shown. The PSD(V) is proportional to the (amplitude){sup 2} of components of the Fourier frequency spectrum. The PSD describes the scattered intensity and direction as a function of scattering angle in the wavefront. The capability of commercial software is limited to 1-D Fourier analysis only. We are developing our own 2-D analysis capability in support of work to revise specifications for NIF optics. 2-D analysis uses the entire wavefront phase map to construct 2D PSD functions. We have been able to increase the signal-to-noise relative to 1-D and can observe very subtle wavefront structure.

  19. Structural Feasibility Analysis of a Robotically Assembled Very Large Aperture Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, William Keats; Williams, R. Brett; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilcox, Brian H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a feasibility study of robotically constructing a very large aperture optical space telescope on-orbit. Since the largest engineering challenges are likely to reside in the design and assembly of the 150-m diameter primary reflector, this preliminary study focuses on this component. The same technology developed for construction of the primary would then be readily used for the smaller optical structures (secondary, tertiary, etc.). A reasonable set of ground and on-orbit loading scenarios are compiled from the literature and used to define the structural performance requirements and size the primary reflector. A surface precision analysis shows that active adjustment of the primary structure is required in order to meet stringent optical surface requirements. Two potential actuation strategies are discussed along with potential actuation devices at the current state of the art. The finding of this research effort indicate that successful technology development combined with further analysis will likely enable such a telescope to be built in the future.

  20. Improving 351-nm Damage Performance of Large-Aperture Fused Silica and DKDP Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A K; Hackel, L; Wegner, P; Parham, T; Hrubesh, L; Penetrante, B; Whitman, P; Demos, S; Menapace, J; Runkel, M; Fluss, M; Feit, M; Key, M; Biesiada, T

    2002-01-07

    A program to identify and eliminate the causes of UV laser-induced damage and growth in fused silica and DKDP has developed methods to extend optics lifetimes for large-aperture, high-peak-power, UV lasers such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Issues included polish-related surface damage initiation and growth on fused silica and DKDP, bulk inclusions in fused silica, pinpoint bulk damage in DKDP, and UV-induced surface degradation in fused silica and DKDP in a vacuum. Approaches included an understanding of the mechanism of the damage, incremental improvements to existing fabrication technology, and feasibility studies of non-traditional fabrication technologies. Status and success of these various approaches are reviewed. Improvements were made in reducing surface damage initiation and eliminating growth for fused silica by improved polishing and post-processing steps, and improved analytical techniques are providing insights into mechanisms of DKDP damage. The NIF final optics hardware has been designed to enable easy retrieval, surface-damage mitigation, and recycling of optics.

  1. Large aperture scanning airborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J.; Bindschadler, R.; Boers, R.; Bufton, J. L.; Clem, D.; Garvin, J.; Melfi, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    A large aperture scanning airborne lidar facility is being developed to provide important new capabilities for airborne lidar sensor systems. The proposed scanning mechanism allows for a large aperture telescope (25 in. diameter) in front of an elliptical flat (25 x 36 in.) turning mirror positioned at a 45 degree angle with respect to the telescope optical axis. The lidar scanning capability will provide opportunities for acquiring new data sets for atmospheric, earth resources, and oceans communities. This completed facility will also make available the opportunity to acquire simulated EOS lidar data on a near global basis. The design and construction of this unique scanning mechanism presents exciting technological challenges of maintaining the turning mirror optical flatness during scanning while exposed to extreme temperatures, ambient pressures, aircraft vibrations, etc.

  2. Developing Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) Technology for the Manufacture of Large-Aperture Optics in Megajoule Class Laser Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A

    2010-10-27

    Over the last eight years we have been developing advanced MRF tools and techniques to manufacture meter-scale optics for use in Megajoule class laser systems. These systems call for optics having unique characteristics that can complicate their fabrication using conventional polishing methods. First, exposure to the high-power nanosecond and sub-nanosecond pulsed laser environment in the infrared (>27 J/cm{sup 2} at 1053 nm), visible (>18 J/cm{sup 2} at 527 nm), and ultraviolet (>10 J/cm{sup 2} at 351 nm) demands ultra-precise control of optical figure and finish to avoid intensity modulation and scatter that can result in damage to the optics chain or system hardware. Second, the optics must be super-polished and virtually free of surface and subsurface flaws that can limit optic lifetime through laser-induced damage initiation and growth at the flaw sites, particularly at 351 nm. Lastly, ultra-precise optics for beam conditioning are required to control laser beam quality. These optics contain customized surface topographical structures that cannot be made using traditional fabrication processes. In this review, we will present the development and implementation of large-aperture MRF tools and techniques specifically designed to meet the demanding optical performance challenges required in large-aperture high-power laser systems. In particular, we will discuss the advances made by using MRF technology to expose and remove surface and subsurface flaws in optics during final polishing to yield optics with improve laser damage resistance, the novel application of MRF deterministic polishing to imprint complex topographical information and wavefront correction patterns onto optical surfaces, and our efforts to advance the technology to manufacture large-aperture damage resistant optics.

  3. Optical sparse aperture imaging.

    PubMed

    Miller, Nicholas J; Dierking, Matthew P; Duncan, Bradley D

    2007-08-10

    The resolution of a conventional diffraction-limited imaging system is proportional to its pupil diameter. A primary goal of sparse aperture imaging is to enhance resolution while minimizing the total light collection area; the latter being desirable, in part, because of the cost of large, monolithic apertures. Performance metrics are defined and used to evaluate several sparse aperture arrays constructed from multiple, identical, circular subapertures. Subaperture piston and/or tilt effects on image quality are also considered. We selected arrays with compact nonredundant autocorrelations first described by Golay. We vary both the number of subapertures and their relative spacings to arrive at an optimized array. We report the results of an experiment in which we synthesized an image from multiple subaperture pupil fields by masking a large lens with a Golay array. For this experiment we imaged a slant edge feature of an ISO12233 resolution target in order to measure the modulation transfer function. We note the contrast reduction inherent in images formed through sparse aperture arrays and demonstrate the use of a Wiener-Helstrom filter to restore contrast in our experimental images. Finally, we describe a method to synthesize images from multiple subaperture focal plane intensity images using a phase retrieval algorithm to obtain estimates of subaperture pupil fields. Experimental results from synthesizing an image of a point object from multiple subaperture images are presented, and weaknesses of the phase retrieval method for this application are discussed. PMID:17694146

  4. Optical Design for the Optimum Solid Immersion Lens with High Numerical Aperture and Large Tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Narak; Shim, Seongbo; Milster, Tom D.; Kim, Jaisoon

    2007-06-01

    Super hemispherical solid immersion lens system becomes a matter of interest due to its high numerical aperture (NA) gain. However, because of the instability of the aplanatic condition, even small amount of alignment error can easily lower the optical performance. To overcome the instability while maintaining high NA gain, we suggest an optimum solid immersion lens (opti-SIL) system which combines the advantages of both super hemispherical SIL (hyper-SIL) and hemispherical SIL (hemi-SIL). Exemplary designs and simulation results of the tolerance analysis show that opti-SIL system has much higher tolerances to various performance-lowering factors than hyper-SIL, even with relatively small NA resignation.

  5. Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Roderick Allen

    1998-04-20

    A very large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass ''aiming'' at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The magnifying glass includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the magnifying glass, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets.

  6. Large aperture Fresnel telescopes/011

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R.A., LLNL

    1998-07-16

    At Livermore we`ve spent the last two years examining an alternative approach towards very large aperture (VLA) telescopes, one based upon transmissive Fresnel lenses rather than on mirrors. Fresnel lenses are attractive for VLA telescopes because they are launchable (lightweight, packagable, and deployable) and because they virtually eliminate the traditional, very tight, surface shape requirements faced by reflecting telescopes. Their (potentially severe) optical drawback, a very narrow spectral bandwidth, can be eliminated by use of a second (much smaller) chromatically-correcting Fresnel element. This enables Fresnel VLA telescopes to provide either single band ({Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 0.1), multiple band, or continuous spectral coverage. Building and fielding such large Fresnel lenses will present a significant challenge, but one which appears, with effort, to be solvable.

  7. Eyeglass. 1. Very large aperture diffractive telescopes.

    PubMed

    Hyde, R A

    1999-07-01

    The Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100-m) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope s large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently launchable (lightweight, packagable, and deployable) it and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope s eyepiece; the Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band (Deltalambda/lambda approximately 0.1), multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. PMID:18323902

  8. Differential Optical Synthetic Aperture Radar

    DOEpatents

    Stappaerts, Eddy A.

    2005-04-12

    A new differential technique for forming optical images using a synthetic aperture is introduced. This differential technique utilizes a single aperture to obtain unique (N) phases that can be processed to produce a synthetic aperture image at points along a trajectory. This is accomplished by dividing the aperture into two equal "subapertures", each having a width that is less than the actual aperture, along the direction of flight. As the platform flies along a given trajectory, a source illuminates objects and the two subapertures are configured to collect return signals. The techniques of the invention is designed to cancel common-mode errors, trajectory deviations from a straight line, and laser phase noise to provide the set of resultant (N) phases that can produce an image having a spatial resolution corresponding to a synthetic aperture.

  9. Performance Evaluation of Large Aperture 'Polished Panel' Optical Receivers Based on Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Recent interest in hybrid RF/Optical communications has led to the development and installation of a "polished-panel" optical receiver evaluation assembly on the 34-meter research antenna at Deep-Space Station 13 (DSS-13) at NASA's Goldstone Communications Complex. The test setup consists of a custom aluminum panel polished to optical smoothness, and a large-sensor CCD camera designed to image the point-spread function (PSF) generated by the polished aluminum panel. Extensive data has been obtained via realtime tracking and imaging of planets and stars at DSS-13. Both "on-source" and "off-source" data were recorded at various elevations, enabling the development of realistic simulations and analytic models to help determine the performance of future deep-space communications systems operating with on-off keying (OOK) or pulse-position-modulated (PPM) signaling formats with photon-counting detection, and compared with the ultimate quantum bound on detection performance for these modulations. Experimentally determined PSFs were scaled to provide realistic signal-distributions across a photon-counting detector array when a pulse is received, and uncoded as well as block-coded performance analyzed and evaluated for a well-known class of block codes.

  10. A conceptual design for a Cassegrain-mounted high-resolution optical spectrograph for large-aperture telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steven; Burgh, Eric; Beasley, Matthew; Scowen, Paul; Veach, Todd; Jordan, Steven; Ebbets, Dennis; Lieber, Michael; deCino, James; Castilho, Bruno Vaz; Gneiding, Clemens; César de Oliveira, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    We present a conceptual design for a high-resolution optical spectrograph appropriate for mounting at Cassegrain on a large aperture telescope. The design is based on our work for the Gemini High Resolution Optical Spectrograph (CUGHOS) project. Our design places the spectrograph at Cassegrain focus to maximize throughput and blue wavelength coverage, delivering R=40,000 resolving power over a continuous 320-1050 nm waveband with throughputs twice those of current instruments. The optical design uses a two-arm, cross-dispersed echelle format with each arm optimized to maximize efficiency. A fixed image slicer is used to minimize optics sizes. The principal challenge for the instrument design is to minimize flexure and degradation of the optical image. To ensure image stability, our opto-mechanical design combines a cost-effective, passively stable bench employing a honeycomb aluminum structure with active flexure control. The active flexure compensation consists of hexapod mounts for each focal plane with full 6-axis range of motion capability to correct for focus and beam displacement. We verified instrument performance using an integrated model that couples the optical and mechanical design to image performance. The full end-to-end modeling of the system under gravitational, thermal, and vibrational perturbations shows that deflections of the optical beam at the focal plane are <29 μm per exposure under the worst case scenario (<10 μm for most orientations), with final correction to 5 μm or better using open-loop active control to meet the stability requirement. The design elements and high fidelity modeling process are generally applicable to instruments requiring high stability under a varying gravity vector.

  11. Large-aperture continuous-phase diffractive optical element for beam transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qiaofeng; Yan, Yingbai; Jin, Guofan; Wu, Minxian

    1999-11-01

    Beam transform, such as to obtain uniform focal spot with flat top, steep edge, low side lobes and high light efficiency, can be realized well by diffractive optical element (DOE). The DOE has many advantages, such as high light efficiency and strong phase distribution design flexibility. To increase the light efficiency and decrease large-angle scattering, continuous phase DOE should be used. The phase design is competed by a kind of multi-resolution hybrid algorithm based on hill-climbing and simulated annealing, which exploits sufficiently strong convergence ability of the hill climbing and global optimization potential of the simulated annealing. A kind of phase distribution with good geometrical structure and diameter 80 mm is obtained by choosing disturbance function, receipt and refused probability and so on. The simulated results show that the light efficiency is more than 95 percent, and the non-uniformity is less than 5 percent. Because the etching depth is direct proportion to the exposure time, to obtain continuous phase DOE, a kind of hollowed-out mask, namely gray-scale mask is used to control exposure time of each are. The mask is manufactured by linear cutting machine. The continuous phase DOE with diameter 80mm is fabricated by ion-etching with the mask. Finally, the tolerance of manufacturing error including depth error and alignment error are analyzed.

  12. Measurement of wavefront structure from large aperture optical components by phase shifting interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, C.R.; Lawson, J.K.; Kellam, M.; Maney, R.T.; Demiris, A.

    1995-05-12

    This paper discusses the results of high spatial resolution measurement of the transmitted or reflected wavefront of optical components using phase shifting interferometry with a wavelength of 6328 {angstrom}. The optical components studied range in size from approximately 50 mm {times} 100 mm to 400 mm {times} 750 mm. Wavefront data, in the form of 3-D phase maps, have been obtained for three regimes of scale length: ``micro roughness``, ``mid-spatial scale``, and ``optical figure/curvature.`` Repetitive wavefront structure has been observed with scale lengths from 10 mm to 100 mm. The amplitude of this structure is typically {lambda}/100 to {lambda}/20. Previously unobserved structure has been detected in optical materials and on the surfaces of components. We are using this data to assist in optimizing laser system design, to qualify optical components and fabrication processes under study in our component development program.

  13. Thermo-optical simulation and experiment for the assessment of single, hollow, and large aperture retroreflector for lunar laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Hiroshi; Kashima, Shingo; Noda, Hirotomo; Kunimori, Hiroo; Chiba, Kouta; Mashiko, Hitomi; Kato, Hiromasa; Otsubo, Toshimichi; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki; Tsuruta, Seiitsu; Asari, Kazuyoshi; Hanada, Hideo; Yasuda, Susumu; Utsunomiya, Shin; Takino, Hideo

    2016-06-01

    A single aperture and hollow retroreflector [corner-cube mirror (CCM)] that in principle has no internal optical path difference is a key instrument for achieving lunar laser ranging one order or more accurate than the current level (~2 cm). We are developing CCM whose aperture is 20 cm with optimized dihedral angles. The 20-cm CCM yields two times peak height for returned laser pulse compared with Apollo 15's retroreflector. Two investigations were conducted to confirm the feasibility of the 20-cm aperture CCM. The first is thermo-optical simulation and evaluation of the 20-cm CCM in the lunar thermal environment. Through this simulation, it has turned out for the first time that 20-cm aperture CCM made of single-crystal Si or "ultra-low expansion glass-ceramics" such as CCZ-EX® (OHARA Inc.) can be used for CCM with no thermal control, if the perfectly fixed point of CCM is limited to one. The second is annealing and shear loading experiments of single-crystal silicon (Si) samples. Through these experiments, high-temperature annealing from 100 to 1000 °C is confirmed to be effective for the enhancement of the adhesive strength between optically contacted surfaces with no optical damage in roughness and accuracy, indicating that this annealing process would enhance the rigidity of CCM fabricated by the optically contacted plates.

  14. Technology development for the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) as a candidate large UV-Optical-Infrared (LUVOIR) surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Clampin, Mark; Crooke, Julie; Feinberg, Lee; Postman, Marc; Quijada, Manuel; Rauscher, Bernard; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Shaklan, Stuart; Stahl, H. Philip; Stahle, Carl; Thronson, Harley

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) team has identified five key technologies to enable candidate architectures for the future large-aperture ultraviolet/optical/infrared (LUVOIR) space observatory envisioned by the NASA Astrophysics 30-year roadmap, Enduring Quests, Daring Visions. The science goals of ATLAST address a broad range of astrophysical questions from early galaxy and star formation to the processes that contributed to the formation of life on Earth, combining general astrophysics with direct-imaging and spectroscopy of habitable exoplanets. The key technologies are: internal coronagraphs, starshades (or external occulters), ultra-stable large-aperture telescopes, detectors, and mirror coatings. Selected technology performance goals include: 1x10-10 raw contrast at an inner working angle of 35 milli-arcseconds, wavefront error stability on the order of 10 pm RMS per wavefront control step, autonomous on-board sensing and control, and zero-read-noise single-photon detectors spanning the exoplanet science bandpass between 400 nm and 1.8 μm. Development of these technologies will provide significant advances over current and planned observatories in terms of sensitivity, angular resolution, stability, and high-contrast imaging. The science goals of ATLAST are presented and flowed down to top-level telescope and instrument performance requirements in the context of a reference architecture: a 10-meter-class, segmented aperture telescope operating at room temperature (~290 K) at the sun-Earth Lagrange-2 point. For each technology area, we define best estimates of required capabilities, current state-of-the-art performance, and current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) - thus identifying the current technology gap. We report on current, planned, or recommended efforts to develop each technology to TRL 5.

  15. Technology Development for the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) as a Candidate Large UV-Optical-Infrared (LUVOIR) Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatha; Clampin, Mark; Crooke, Julie; Feinberg, Lee; Postman, Marc; Quijada, Manuel; Rauscher, Bernard; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Shaklan, Stuart; Stahl, H. Philip; Stahle, Carl; Thronson, Harley

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) team has identified five key technologies to enable candidate architectures for the future large-aperture ultraviolet/optical/infrared (LUVOIR) space observatory envisioned by the NASA Astrophysics 30-year roadmap, Enduring Quests, Daring Visions. The science goals of ATLAST address a broad range of astrophysical questions from early galaxy and star formation to the processes that contributed to the formation of life on Earth, combining general astrophysics with direct-imaging and spectroscopy of habitable exoplanets. The key technologies are: internal coronagraphs, starshades (or external occulters), ultra-stable large-aperture telescopes, detectors, and mirror coatings. Selected technology performance goals include: 1x10?10 raw contrast at an inner working angle of 35 milli-arcseconds, wavefront error stability on the order of 10 pm RMS per wavefront control step, autonomous on-board sensing & control, and zero-read-noise single-photon detectors spanning the exoplanet science bandpass between 400 nm and 1.8 µm. Development of these technologies will provide significant advances over current and planned observatories in terms of sensitivity, angular resolution, stability, and high-contrast imaging. The science goals of ATLAST are presented and flowed down to top-level telescope and instrument performance requirements in the context of a reference architecture: a 10-meter-class, segmented aperture telescope operating at room temperature (290 K) at the sun-Earth Lagrange-2 point. For each technology area, we define best estimates of required capabilities, current state-of-the-art performance, and current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) - thus identifying the current technology gap. We report on current, planned, or recommended efforts to develop each technology to TRL 5.

  16. Distributed Bragg reflector ring oscillators: A large aperture source of high single-mode optical power

    SciTech Connect

    Dzurko, K.M.; Hardy, A.; Scifres, D.R.; Welch, D.F.; Waarts, R.G.; Lang, R.J. )

    1993-06-01

    Distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) ring oscillators are the first monolithic semiconductor lasers containing broad-area active regions which operate in a single mode to several times their threshold current. Orthogonally oriented diffraction gratings surrounding an unpatterned active region select a single spatial and temporal mode of oscillation. This paper presents both analytic and experimental verification of single mode operation for active dimensions up to 368 [times] 1000 [mu]m. Threshold current densities under 200 A/cm[sup 2] and total differential efficiencies greater than 60% have been measured. DBR ring oscillators have demonstrated over 1 W of single frequency output power, 460 mW of spatially coherent, single frequency output power, and nearly circular diffraction limited output to 4 [times] I[sub th]. The performance potential of these devices is enormous, considering that the output apertures are nearly two orders of magnitude wider than conventional single mode sources which generate up to 0.2 W of coherent output.

  17. Affordable Options for Ground-Based, Large-Aperture Optical Space Surveillance Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Beason, J. D.; Kiziah, R.; Spillar, E.; Vestrand, W. T.; Cox, D.; McGraw, J.; Zimmer, P.; Holland, C.

    2013-09-01

    The Space Surveillance Telescope (SST) developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) - has demonstrated significant capability improvements over legacy ground-based optical space surveillance systems. To fulfill better the current and future space situational awareness (SSA) requirements, the Air Force would benefit from a global network of such telescopes, but the high cost to replicate the SST makes such an acquisition decision difficult, particularly in an era of fiscal austerity. Ideally, the Air Force needs the capabilities provided by the SST, but at a more affordable price. To address this issue, an informal study considered a total of 67 alternative optical designs, with each being evaluated for cost, complexity and SSA performance. One promising approach identified in the study uses a single mirror at prime focus with a small number of corrective lenses. This approach results in telescopes that are less complex and estimated to be less expensive than replicated SSTs. They should also be acquirable on shorter time scales. Another approach would use a modest network of smaller telescopes for space surveillance. This approach provides significant cost advantages but faces some challenges with very dim objects. In this paper, we examine the cost and SSA utility for each of the 67 designs considered.

  18. the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Bertou, Xavier

    2009-04-30

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) aims at the detection of high energy photons from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) using the single particle technique (SPT) in ground based water Cherenkov detectors (WCD). To reach a reasonable sensitivity, high altitude mountain sites have been selected in Mexico (Sierra Negra, 4550 m a.s.l.), Bolivia (Chacaltaya, 5300 m a.s.l.) and Venezuela (Merida, 4765 m a.s.l.). We report on the project progresses and the first operation at high altitude, search for bursts in 6 months of preliminary data, as well as search for signal at ground level when satellites report a burst.

  19. Manufacture of Large-Aperture Diffractive Optics and Ultrathin Optics for High-Power Laser and Space Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J A

    2002-01-18

    We have developed equipment and technology for fabricating submicron pitch, high-efficiency diffraction gratings over meter-scale apertures that are used for pulse compression in ultrafast systems around the world. We have also developed wet-etch figuring (WEF) to generate arbitrary continuous contours on ultrathin glass substrates in a closed loop process. The current and future states of these technologies will be discussed.

  20. Diffraction smoothing aperture for an optical beam

    DOEpatents

    Judd, O'Dean P.; Suydam, Bergen R.

    1976-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an aperture for an optical beam having an irregular periphery or having perturbations imposed upon the periphery to decrease the diffraction effect caused by the beam passing through the aperture. Such apertures are particularly useful with high power solid state laser systems in that they minimize the problem of self-focusing which frequently destroys expensive components in such systems.

  1. Optical Transmission Properties of Dielectric Aperture Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao

    Optical detection devices such as optical biosensors and optical spectrometers are widely used in many applications for the functions of measurements, inspections and analysis. Due to the large dimension of prisms and gratings, the traditional optical devices normally occupy a large space with complicated components. Since cheaper and smaller optical devices are always in demand, miniaturization has been kept going for years. Thanks to recent fabrication advances, nanophotonic devices such as semiconductor laser chips have been growing in number and diversity. However, the optical biosensor chips and the optical spectrometer chips are seldom reported in the literature. For the reason of improving system integration, the study of ultra-compact, low-cost, high-performance and easy-alignment optical biosensors and optical spectrometers are imperative. This thesis is an endeavor in these two subjects and will present our research work on studying the optical transmission properties of dielectric aperture arrays and developing new optical biosensors and optical spectrometers. The first half of the thesis demonstrates that the optical phase shift associated with the surface plasmon (SP) assisted extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) in nano-hole arrays fabricated in a metal film has a strong dependence on the material refractive index value in close proximity to the holes. A novel refractive index sensor based on detecting the EOT phase shift is proposed by building a model. This device readily provides a 2-D biosensor array platform for non-labeled real-time detection of a variety of organic and biological molecules in a sensor chip format, which leads to a high packing density, minimal analyte volumes, and a large number of parallel channels while facilitating high resolution imaging and supporting a large space-bandwidth product (SBP). Simulation (FDTD Solutions, Lumerical Solutions Inc) results indicate an achievable sensitivity limit of 4.37x10-9 refractive index

  2. Eyeglass: A Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R; Dixit, S; Weisberg, A; Rushford, M

    2002-07-29

    Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100 meter) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope's large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently fieldable (lightweight and flat, hence packagable and deployable) and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight, surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope's eyepiece. The Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band, multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. Broadband diffractive telescopes have been built at LLNL and have demonstrated diffraction-limited performance over a 40% spectral bandwidth (0.48-0.72 {micro}m). As one approach to package a large aperture for launch, a foldable lens has been built and demonstrated. A 75 cm aperture diffractive lens was constructed from 6 panels of 1 m thick silica; it achieved diffraction-limited performance both before and after folding. This multiple panel, folding lens, approach is currently being scaled-up at LLNL. We are building a 5 meter aperture foldable lens, involving 72 panels of 700 {micro}m thick glass sheets, diffractively patterned to operate as coherent f/50 lens.

  3. Experimental and numerical investigation of ADP square crystal with large aperture in the new Final Optics Assembly under the non-critical phase matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fuzhong; Zhang, Peng; Bai, Qingshun; Lu, Lihua; Xiang, Yong

    2016-04-01

    This paper presented a new Final Optics Assembly (FOA) of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) square crystal with large aperture under the non-critical phase matching (NCPM), which controlled by the constant temperature water, and the temperature distribution was analyzed by simulation and experiment. Firstly, thermal analysis was carried out, as well as the temperature distribution of the cavity only heated under different velocities was analyzed. Then, the temperature distributions of ADP square crystal in the cavity were achieved using the Finite Volume Method (FVM), and this prediction was validated by the experiment results when the velocity is 0.1 m/s and 0.5 m/s. Finally, the optimal FHG conversion efficiency was obtained and the comparison of different heating methods was also highlighted.

  4. Large Aperture Electrostatic Dust Detector

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner, R. Hensley, and A.L Roquemore

    2007-10-09

    Diagnosis and management of dust inventories generated in next-step magnetic fusion devices is necessary for their safe operation. A novel electrostatic dust detector, based on a fine grid of interlocking circuit traces biased to 30 or 50 ν has been developed for the detection of dust particles on remote surfaces in air and vacuum environments. Impinging dust particles create a temporary short circuit and the resulting current pulse is recorded by counting electronics. Up to 90% of the particles are ejected from the grid or vaporized suggesting the device may be useful for controlling dust inventories. We report measurements of the sensitivity of a large area (5x5 cm) detector to microgram quantities of dust particles and review its applications to contemporary tokamaks and ITER.

  5. OpTIIX: An ISS-Based Testbed Paving the Roadmap Toward a Next Generation Large Aperture UV/Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Etemad, Shar; Seery, Bernard D.; Thronson, Harley; Burdick, Gary M.; Coulter, Dan; Goullioud, Renaud; Green, Joseph J.; Liu, Fengchuan; Ess, Kim; Postman, Marc; Sparks, Williams

    2012-01-01

    The next generation large aperture UV/Optical space telescope will need a diameter substantially larger than even that of JWST in order to address some of the most compelling unanswered scientific quests. These quests include understanding the earliest phases of the Universe and detecting life on exo-planets by studying spectra of their atmospheres. Such 8-16 meter telescopes face severe challenges in terms of cost and complexity and are unlikely to be affordable unless a new paradigm is adopted for their design and construction. The conventional approach is to use monolithic or preassembled segmented mirrors requiring complicated and risky deployments and relying on future heavy-lift vehicles, large fairings and complex geometry. The new paradigm is to launch component modules on relatively small vehicles and then perform in-orbit robotic assembly of those modules. The Optical Testbed and Integration on ISS eXperiment (OpTIIX) is designed to demonstrate, at low cost by leveraging the infrastructure provided by ISS, telescope assembly technologies and end-to-end optical system technologies. The use of ISS as a testbed permits the concentration of resources on reducing the technical risks associated with robotically integrating the components. These include laser metrology and wavefront sensing and control (WFS&C) systems, an imaging instrument, lightweight, low-cost deformable primary mirror segments and the secondary mirror. These elements are then aligned to a diffraction-limited optical system in space. The capability to assemble the optical system and remove and replace components via the existing ISS robotic systems like the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM), or by the ISS flight crew, allows for future experimentation, as well as repair.

  6. Design of large aperture focal plane shutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jia-wen; Ma, Wen-li; Huang, Jin-long

    2012-09-01

    To satisfy the requirement of large telescope, a large aperture focal plane shutter with aperture size of φ200mm was researched and designed to realize, which could be started and stopped in a relative short time with precise position, and also the blades could open and close at the same time at any orientation. Timing-belts and stepper motors were adopted as the drive mechanism. Velocity and position of the stepper motors were controlled by the PWM pulse generated by DSP. Exponential curve is applied to control the velocity of the stepper motors to make the shutter start and stop in a short time. The closing/open time of shutter is 0.2s, which meets the performance requirements of large telescope properly.

  7. Large-aperture multiple quantum well modulating retroreflector for free-space optical data transfer on unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbreath, G. Charmaine; Rabinovich, William S.; Meehan, Timothy J.; Vilcheck, Michael J.; Mahon, Rita; Burris, Ray; Ferraro, Mina; Sokolsky, Ilene; Vasquez, John A.; Bovais, Chris S.; Cochrell, Kerry; Goins, Kim C.; Barbehenn, Robin; Katzer, D. Scott; Ikossi-Anastasiou, Kiki; Montes, Marcos J.

    2001-07-01

    We describe progress in the development of a multiple quantum well modulating retroreflector, including a description of recent demonstrations of an infrared data link between a small rotary-wing unmanned airborne vehicle and a ground-based laser interrogator using the device designed and fabricated at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Modulating retroreflector systems couple an optical retroreflector, such as a corner cube, and an electro-optic shutter to allow two-way optical communications using a laser, telescope, and pointer-tracker on only one platform. The NRL modulating retroreflector uses a semiconductor-based multiple quantum well shutter capable of modulation rates greater than 10 Mbps, depending on link characteristics. The technology enables the use of near-infrared frequencies, which is well known to provide covert communications immune to frequency allocation problems. This specific device has the added advantage of being compact, lightweight, covert, and requires very low paper. Up to an order of magnitude in onboard power can be saved using a small array of these devices instead of the radio frequency equivalent. In the described demonstration, a Mbps optical link to an unmanned aerial vehicle in flight at a range of 100 to 200 feet is shown. Near real-time compressed video was also demonstrated at the Mbps level and is described.

  8. Self-Referencing Hartmann Test for Large-Aperture Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korechoff, Robert P.; Oseas, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    A method is proposed for end-to-end, full aperture testing of large-aperture telescopes using an innovative variation of a Hartmann mask. This technique is practical for telescopes with primary mirrors tens of meters in diameter and of any design. Furthermore, it is applicable to the entire optical band (near IR, visible, ultraviolet), relatively insensitive to environmental perturbations, and is suitable for ambient laboratory as well as thermal-vacuum environments. The only restriction is that the telescope optical axis must be parallel to the local gravity vector during testing. The standard Hartmann test utilizes an array of pencil beams that are cut out of a well-corrected wavefront using a mask. The pencil beam array is expanded to fill the full aperture of the telescope. The detector plane of the telescope is translated back and forth along the optical axis in the vicinity of the nominal focal plane, and the centroid of each pencil beam image is recorded. Standard analytical techniques are then used to reconstruct the telescope wavefront from the centroid data. The expansion of the array of pencil beams is usually accomplished by double passing the beams through the telescope under test. However, this requires a well-corrected, autocollimation flat, the diameter or which is approximately equal to that of the telescope aperture. Thus, the standard Hartmann method does not scale well because of the difficulty and expense of building and mounting a well-corrected, large aperture flat. The innovation in the testing method proposed here is to replace the large aperture, well-corrected, monolithic autocollimation flat with an array of small-aperture mirrors. In addition to eliminating the need for a large optic, the surface figure requirement for the small mirrors is relaxed compared to that required of the large autocollimation flat. The key point that allows this method to work is that the small mirrors need to operate as a monolithic flat only with regard to

  9. Single-pulse driven, large-aperture 2×1 array plasma-electrodes optical switch for SG-II upgrading facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Wu, Dengsheng; Zheng, Jiangang; Zheng, Kuixing; Zhu, Qihua; Zhang, Xiongjun

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate the design and performance of an optical switch that has been constructed for the SG-II upgrading facility. The device is a longitudinal, potassium di-hydrogen phosphate (KDP), 360 mm×360 mm aperture, and 2×1 array electro-optical switch driven by a 20 kV output switching-voltage pulse generator through two plasma electrodes produced at the rise edge of the switching-voltage pulse. The results show that the temporal responses and the spatial performance of the optical switch fulfill the operation requirements of the SG-II upgrading facility.

  10. Large-aperture broadband sapphire windows for common aperture, target acquisition, tracking, and surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askinazi, Joel

    1997-06-01

    State of the art optical sensing systems performing target acquisition/tracking and surveillance functions are being designed to incorporate a number of sensors into one package. These include visual and MWIR cameras, FLIRs, and laser range finders. These combined systems are being configured to view through a common aperture window. Typical window diameters are to eleven inches, but some surveillance applications have windows approaching twenty inches in diameter. These sensor windows typically operate in hostile environments including very high pressure differentials, large thermal gradients, and severe rain and sand abrasion. EMI/EMC protection and de-icing capabilities are also commonly required. For airborne applications and to minimize thermal gradients, thinner, lightweight, high strength windows are also necessary. Sapphire is an ideal window material to satisfy these requirements due to its high strength, UV-MWIR bandpass, minimal optical scatter, excellent index of refraction homogeneity and very high scratch/impact resistance. Associated optical fabrication, grid lithography and optical coating processes have been developed at Hughes Danbury for sapphire windows. This paper addresses the development of a family of large aperture, broadband sapphire windows which also provide EMI/EMC protection and de-icing capabilities. The resulting design configuration and performance characteristics are also addressed. Future technology development requirements are also discussed.

  11. Large-aperture interferometer using local reference beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    A large-aperture interferometer was devised by adding a local-reference-beam-generating optical system to a schlieren system. Two versions of the interferometer are demonstrated, one employing 12.7 cm (5 in.) diameter schlieren optics, the other employing 30.48 cm (12 in.) diameter parabolic mirrors in an off-axis system. In the latter configuration a cylindrical lens is introduced near the light source to correct for astigmatism. A zone plate is a satisfactory decollimating element in the reference-beam arm of the interferometer. Attempts to increase the flux and uniformity of irradiance in the reference beam by using a diffuser are discussed.

  12. Temperature characteristic of 808nm VCSELs with large aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yuan; Feng, Dawei; Hao, Yongqin; Wang, Yong; Yan, Changling; Lu, Peng; Li, Yang

    2015-03-01

    In order to study the output characteristics of 808nm vertical cavity surface emitting laser(VCSEL) with large aperture at different temperature, 808nm VCSEL with 500μm emitting diameter are fabricated with Reticular Electrode Structure(RES). Lasing wavelength, optical power and the threshold current are measured by changing the temperature of heat sink. And an output power of 0.42W is achieved at 1.3A at room temperature under continuous wave operation. The central wavelength is 803.32nm, and the full width at half maximum is 0.16nm, the temperature shift is 0.06nm/°, the thermal resistance is 0.098°/mW. The testing results show that 808nm VCSEL with large aperture is good temperature characteristic.

  13. Aperture-synthesis interferometry at optical wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Bernard F.

    1987-01-01

    The prospects for applying aperture-synthesis interferometry to the optical domain are reviewed. The radio examples such as the VLA provide a model, since the concepts are equally valid for radio and optical wavelengths. If scientific problems at the milliarc-second resolution level (or better) are to be addressed, a space-based optical array seems to be the only practical alternative, for the same reasons that dictated array development at radio wavelengths. One concept is examined, and speculations are offered concerning the prospects for developing real systems. Phase-coherence is strongly desired for a practical array, although self-calibration and phase-closure techniques allow one to relax the restriction on absolute phase stability. The design of an array must be guided by the scientific problems to be addressed.

  14. KAOS: kilo-aperture optical spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Samuel C.; Dey, Arjun; Boyle, Brian; Glazebrook, Karl

    2004-09-01

    A design is described for a potential new facility capable of taking detailed spectroscopy of millions of objects in the Universe to explore the complexity of the Universe and to answer fundamental questions relating to the equation of state of dark energy and to how the Milky Way galaxy formed. The specific design described is envisioned for implementation on the Gemini 8-meter telescopes. It utilizes a 1.5° field of view and samples that field with up to ~5000 apertures. This Kilo-Aperture Optical Spectrograph (KAOS) is mounted at prime focus with a 4-element corrector, atmospheric dispersion compensator (ADC), and an Echidna-style fiber optic positioner. The ADC doubles as a wobble plate, allowing fast guiding that cancels out the wind buffeting of the telescope. The fibers, which can be reconfigured in less than 10 minutes, feed to an array of 12 spectrographs located in the pier of the telescope. The spectrographs are capable of provided spectral resolving powers of a few thousand up to about 40,000.

  15. Optical aperture synthesis with electronically connected telescopes.

    PubMed

    Dravins, Dainis; Lagadec, Tiphaine; Nuñez, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Highest resolution imaging in astronomy is achieved by interferometry, connecting telescopes over increasingly longer distances and at successively shorter wavelengths. Here, we present the first diffraction-limited images in visual light, produced by an array of independent optical telescopes, connected electronically only, with no optical links between them. With an array of small telescopes, second-order optical coherence of the sources is measured through intensity interferometry over 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, and two-dimensional images reconstructed. The technique aims at diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometre-long baselines to reach resolutions showing details on stellar surfaces and perhaps even the silhouettes of transiting exoplanets. Intensity interferometry circumvents problems of atmospheric turbulence that constrain ordinary interferometry. Since the electronic signal can be copied, many baselines can be built up between dispersed telescopes, and over long distances. Using arrays of air Cherenkov telescopes, this should enable the optical equivalent of interferometric arrays currently operating at radio wavelengths. PMID:25880705

  16. Optical aperture synthesis with electronically connected telescopes

    PubMed Central

    Dravins, Dainis; Lagadec, Tiphaine; Nuñez, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Highest resolution imaging in astronomy is achieved by interferometry, connecting telescopes over increasingly longer distances and at successively shorter wavelengths. Here, we present the first diffraction-limited images in visual light, produced by an array of independent optical telescopes, connected electronically only, with no optical links between them. With an array of small telescopes, second-order optical coherence of the sources is measured through intensity interferometry over 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, and two-dimensional images reconstructed. The technique aims at diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometre-long baselines to reach resolutions showing details on stellar surfaces and perhaps even the silhouettes of transiting exoplanets. Intensity interferometry circumvents problems of atmospheric turbulence that constrain ordinary interferometry. Since the electronic signal can be copied, many baselines can be built up between dispersed telescopes, and over long distances. Using arrays of air Cherenkov telescopes, this should enable the optical equivalent of interferometric arrays currently operating at radio wavelengths. PMID:25880705

  17. Phase retrieval in situ measurement for large aperture parabolic mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lingyan; Wu, Yulie; Li, Shengyi; Liao, Yang; Shu, Yong

    2010-10-01

    Phase retrieval is a promising method for in-situ metrology and has been applied to spherical mirror surface metrology successfully. To meet the requirement of in-situ measurement in manufacturing large aperture parabolic mirror, a new method using phase retrieval technology is developed. In this method, an approximately parallel beam is used to illuminate the large parabolic mirror. The beam is produced by a point light source far away from the tested mirror. Then, intensity of diffraction patterns near the focus is measured by CCD. The experiment of testing a parabolic mirror with aperture 400mm and radius of curvature at vertex 2789.7mm is described. And some advices of improving the setup are presented. Errors brought by the approximately parallel beam are compensated by an algorithm derived from GS iterative algorithm. Phase retrieval result is consistent with that measured by interferometer sub-aperture stitching in error distribution, PV value and RMS value. The experiment shows that this method features simple optical path, good anti-vibration ability and acceptable accuracy.

  18. Fresnel Lenses for Wide-Aperture Optical Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid

    2004-01-01

    Wide-aperture receivers for freespace optical communication systems would utilize Fresnel lenses instead of conventional telescope lenses, according to a proposal. Fresnel lenses weigh and cost much less than conventional lenses having equal aperture widths. Plastic Fresnel lenses are commercially available in diameters up to 5 m large enough to satisfy requirements for aperture widths of the order of meters for collecting sufficient light in typical long-distance free-space optical communication systems. Fresnel lenses are not yet suitable for high-quality diffraction-limited imaging, especially in polychromatic light. However, optical communication systems utilize monochromatic light, and there is no requirement for high-quality imaging; instead, the basic requirement for an optical receiver is to collect the incoming monochromatic light over a wide aperture and concentrate the light onto a photodetector. Because of lens aberrations and diffraction, the light passing through any lens is focused to a blur circle rather than to a point. Calculations for some representative cases of wide-aperture non-diffraction-limited Fresnel lenses have shown that it should be possible to attain blur-circle diameters of less than 2 mm. Preferably, the blur-circle diameter should match the width of the photodetector. For most high-bandwidth communication applications, the required photodetector diameters would be about 1 mm. In a less-preferable case in which the blur circle was wider than a single photodetector, it would be possible to occupy the blur circle with an array of photodetectors. As an alternative to using a single large Fresnel lens, one could use an array of somewhat smaller lenses to synthesize the equivalent aperture area. Such a configuration might be preferable in a case in which a single Fresnel lens of the requisite large size would be impractical to manufacture, and the blur circle could not be made small enough. For example one could construct a square array

  19. U-turn alternative to the large aperture switch

    SciTech Connect

    Vann, C.S.

    1994-03-09

    The primary alternative laser architecture is the U-turn design. The U-turn has significantly different cost and performance risks than the full-aperture switch, which makes it a highly desirable alternative. The U-turn was conceived at LLNL in 1992. A similar concept, the L-turn had already been discovered by the French at CEL-V. Both concepts are based on the multipass glass amplifier design, but the full-aperture Pockels cell and polarizer are replaced with smaller and less expensive optics. Eliminating the large switch and polarizer not only reduces component costs, it also provides options for shortening the laser which, in turn, could reduce the size and cost of the laser building. Efficient use of the amplifier aperture (small vignetting allowance) requires that the U-turn have a long transport spatial filter; however, this is not a disadvantage if a long spatial filter is already required for image relaying to the frequency converter. Given a long spatial filter, the U-turn is potentially more efficient because losses in the switch and polarizer are avoided.

  20. MOIRE: ground demonstration of a large aperture diffractive transmissive telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atcheson, Paul; Domber, Jeanette; Whiteaker, Kevin; Britten, Jerald A.; Dixit, Shamasundar N.; Farmer, Brandon

    2014-08-01

    The desire to field space-based telescopes with apertures in excess of 10 meter diameter is forcing the development of extreme lightweighted large optomechanical structures. Sparse apertures, shell optics, and membrane optics are a few of the approaches that have been investigated and demonstrated. Membrane optics in particular have been investigated for many years. The MOIRE approach in which the membrane is used as a transmissive diffractive optical element (DOE) offers a significant relaxation in the control requirements on the membrane surface figure, supports extreme lightweighting of the primary collecting optic, and provides a path for rapid low cost production of the primary optical elements. Successful development of a powered meter-scale transmissive membrane DOE was reported in 2012. This paper presents initial imaging results from integrating meter-scale transmissive DOEs into the primary element of a 5- meter diameter telescope architecture. The brassboard telescope successfully demonstrates the ability to collect polychromatic high resolution imagery over a representative object using the transmissive DOE technology. The telescope includes multiple segments of a 5-meter diameter telescope primary with an overall length of 27 meters. The object scene used for the demonstration represents a 1.5 km square complex ground scene. Imaging is accomplished in a standard laboratory environment using a 40 nm spectral bandwidth centered on 650 nm. Theoretical imaging quality for the tested configuration is NIIRS 2.8, with the demonstration achieving NIIRS 2.3 under laboratory seeing conditions. Design characteristics, hardware implementation, laboratory environmental impacts on imagery, image quality metrics, and ongoing developments will be presented.

  1. Optimal strategy for fabrication of large aperture aspheric surfaces.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yunpeng; Cheng, Haobo; Wang, Tan; Dong, Zhichao; Tam, Hon-Yuen

    2014-01-01

    Aspheric surfaces are widely used because of their desirable characteristics. Such a surface can obtain nearly perfect imaging quality with fewer optical elements and reduce the size and mass of optical systems. Various machine systems have been developed based on modern deterministic polishing technologies for large aperture aspheric surfaces. Several factors affect the final precision of large aperture aspheric surfaces, such as the velocity limit of the machine and the path design. Excess velocity, which will be truncated automatically by the computer numerical control system, may cause the dwell time to deviate from the desired time. When a path designed on a two-dimensional surface map with equidistant pitch is projected onto an aspheric surface, the pitch changes as a result of the varied curvature of the aspheric surface. This may affect the removal map and cause some ripple errors. A multiregion distribution strategy, which includes velocity checking, is proposed in this study to avoid exceeding the velocity limits. The strategy can be used to modify local errors and edge effects. A three-dimensional spiral path generation method is also presented using an iterative method to ensure uniformity in the space length of the adjacent circle of the spiral path. This process can reduce the ripple error caused by the overlapping of tool paths. A polishing experiment was conducted, and the results proved the validity of the proposed strategies. PMID:24514001

  2. Measurement of the surface form error of large aperture plane optical surfaces with a polarization phase-shifting liquid reference reflection Fizeau interferometer.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sanjib; Kumar, Y Pavan; Singh, Rishipal; Singh, Sarvendra

    2016-01-10

    A polarization phase-shifting liquid reference reflection Fizeau interferometer has been proposed. A polarization cyclic path optical configuration along with a concave telescope mirror is used to produce a pair of expanded, collimated p and s polarized beams with a small angular separation between them. The collimated beams are deflected along a vertical direction toward a Fizeau interferometer cavity formed between a liquid surface that acts as a reference surface and a plane test surface. Either the p or s polarized beam is allowed to strike the liquid surface normally and the orientation of the test surface is adjusted to reflect the other beam, having orthogonal linear polarization, in the direction of the normally reflected reference beam from the liquid surface. A combination of a quarter-wave plate and linear polarizer is used to apply polarization phase shift between the test and reference beams, and quantitative surface form error is measured by applying phase-shifting interferometry. A method for elimination of the residual system aberration is discussed. Results obtained for an optically polished BK-7 disk of clear aperture diameter ≈160  mm are presented. PMID:26835767

  3. Sub-aperture stitching with scanning pentaprism testing optical wave-front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihua; Yang, Wei; Li, Lei; Wu, Shibin; Lin, Zhaohen

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes a pentaprism scanning combined with sub-aperture stitching interference method to test large aperture optical system wave-front. This method uses pentaprism scanning and interferometer testing sub-aperture optical system wave-front, after testing all the sub-aperture wave-front and then using average error stitching algorithm to reconstruction full-aperture optical system wave-front. It makes use of the pentaprism easily to adjust and interferometer's high-precision characteristic. Analyzed the mechanical precision of turntable and electric guide, when the turntable sway angle is less than 8', location accuracy is less than 1.194' and the electric guide linearity is less than 8'location accuracy is less than 83.3μm, can meet the testing requirements. We used 40mm sub-aperture testing 312mm full aperture wave-front PV is 0.2197λ and RMS is 0.0536λ. Compared the stitching results with Zygo interferometer directly full aperture testing verified the accuracy of the method and provides a new idea for testing a large aperture optical wave-front.

  4. High numerical aperture hybrid optics for two-photon polymerization.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, Frank; Zeitner, Uwe D; Nolte, Stefan; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2012-03-26

    We report on an immersion hybrid optics specially designed for focusing ultrashort laser pulses into a polymer for direct laser writing via two-photon polymerization. The hybrid optics allows for well-corrected focusing over a large working distance range of 577 μm with a numerical aperture (NA) of 1.33 and low internal dispersion. We combine the concepts of an aplanatic solid immersion lens (ASIL) for achieving a high NA with a diffractive optical element (DOE) for correction of aberrations. To demonstrate the improvements for volume structuring of the polymer, we compare the achievable structure sizes of our optics with a commercially available oil-immersion objective (100x, NA=1.4). PMID:22453471

  5. Large-aperture interferometer with local reference beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    A large-aperture interferometer was devised by adding a local-reference-beam-generating optical system to a schlieren system. Two versions of the interferometer are demonstrated, one employing 12.7 cm (5 in.) diameter schlieren optics, the other employing 30.48 cm (12 in.) diameter parabolic mirrors in an off-axis system. In the latter configuration a cylindrical lens is introduced near the light source to correct for astigmatism. A zone plate is a satisfactory decollimating element in the reference-beam arm of the interferometer. Attempts to increase the flux and uniformity of irradiance in the reference beam by using a diffuser are discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N83-13979

  6. Cavity-excited Huygens' metasurface antennas for near-unity aperture illumination efficiency from arbitrarily large apertures.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Ariel; Wong, Joseph P S; Eleftheriades, George V

    2016-01-01

    One of the long-standing problems in antenna engineering is the realization of highly directive beams using low-profile devices. In this paper, we provide a solution to this problem by means of Huygens' metasurfaces (HMSs), based on the equivalence principle. This principle states that a given excitation can be transformed to a desirable aperture field by inducing suitable electric and (equivalent) magnetic surface currents. Building on this concept, we propose and demonstrate cavity-excited HMS antennas, where the single-source-fed cavity is designed to optimize aperture illumination, while the HMS facilitates the current distribution that ensures phase purity of aperture fields. The HMS breaks the coupling between the excitation and radiation spectra typical to standard partially reflecting surfaces, allowing tailoring of the aperture properties to produce a desirable radiation pattern, without incurring edge-taper losses. The proposed low-profile design yields near-unity aperture illumination efficiencies from arbitrarily large apertures, offering new capabilities for microwave, terahertz and optical radiators. PMID:26790605

  7. Cavity-excited Huygens' metasurface antennas for near-unity aperture illumination efficiency from arbitrarily large apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Ariel; Wong, Joseph P. S.; Eleftheriades, George V.

    2016-01-01

    One of the long-standing problems in antenna engineering is the realization of highly directive beams using low-profile devices. In this paper, we provide a solution to this problem by means of Huygens' metasurfaces (HMSs), based on the equivalence principle. This principle states that a given excitation can be transformed to a desirable aperture field by inducing suitable electric and (equivalent) magnetic surface currents. Building on this concept, we propose and demonstrate cavity-excited HMS antennas, where the single-source-fed cavity is designed to optimize aperture illumination, while the HMS facilitates the current distribution that ensures phase purity of aperture fields. The HMS breaks the coupling between the excitation and radiation spectra typical to standard partially reflecting surfaces, allowing tailoring of the aperture properties to produce a desirable radiation pattern, without incurring edge-taper losses. The proposed low-profile design yields near-unity aperture illumination efficiencies from arbitrarily large apertures, offering new capabilities for microwave, terahertz and optical radiators.

  8. Cavity-excited Huygens' metasurface antennas for near-unity aperture illumination efficiency from arbitrarily large apertures

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Ariel; Wong, Joseph P. S.; Eleftheriades, George V.

    2016-01-01

    One of the long-standing problems in antenna engineering is the realization of highly directive beams using low-profile devices. In this paper, we provide a solution to this problem by means of Huygens' metasurfaces (HMSs), based on the equivalence principle. This principle states that a given excitation can be transformed to a desirable aperture field by inducing suitable electric and (equivalent) magnetic surface currents. Building on this concept, we propose and demonstrate cavity-excited HMS antennas, where the single-source-fed cavity is designed to optimize aperture illumination, while the HMS facilitates the current distribution that ensures phase purity of aperture fields. The HMS breaks the coupling between the excitation and radiation spectra typical to standard partially reflecting surfaces, allowing tailoring of the aperture properties to produce a desirable radiation pattern, without incurring edge-taper losses. The proposed low-profile design yields near-unity aperture illumination efficiencies from arbitrarily large apertures, offering new capabilities for microwave, terahertz and optical radiators. PMID:26790605

  9. Multi-aperture digital coherent combining for free-space optical communication receivers.

    PubMed

    Geisler, David J; Yarnall, Timothy M; Stevens, Mark L; Schieler, Curt M; Robinson, Bryan S; Hamilton, Scott A

    2016-06-13

    Space-to-ground optical communication systems can benefit from reducing the size, weight, and power profiles of space terminals. One way of reducing the required power-aperture product on a space platform is to implement effective, but costly, single-aperture ground terminals with large collection areas. In contrast, we present a ground terminal receiver architecture in which many small less-expensive apertures are efficiently combined to create a large effective aperture while maintaining excellent receiver sensitivity. This is accomplished via coherent detection behind each aperture followed by digitization. The digitized signals are then combined in a digital signal processing chain. Experimental results demonstrate lossless coherent combining of four lasercom signals, at power levels below 0.1 photons/bit/aperture. PMID:27410287

  10. A Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory: Study Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postman, Marc; Thronson, Harley A.; Feinberg, Lee; Redding, David; Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    The scientific drivers for very high angular resolution coupled with very high sensitivity and wavefront stability in the UV and optical wavelength regime have been well established. These include characterization of exoplanets in the habitable zones of solar type stars, probing the physical properties of the circumgalactic medium around z < 2 galaxies, and resolving stellar populations across a broad range of galactic environments. The 2010 NRC Decadal Survey and the 2013 NASA Science Mission Directorate 30-Year Roadmap identified a large-aperture UVOIR observatory as a priority future space mission. Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI team has extended several earlier studies of the technology and engineering requirements needed to design and build a single filled aperture 10-meter class space-based telescope that can enable these ambitious scientific observations. We present here an overview of our new technical work including a brief summary of the reference science drivers as well as in-depth investigations of the viable telescope architectures, the requirements on thermal control and active wavefront control systems, and the range of possible launch configurations.

  11. A review of large aperture Schlieren photography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Song-bo; Xie, Yong-jun; Chen, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Schlieren photography is a visual process to display the flow of fluids of varying density. It is widely used in wind tunnel tests to photograph the flow of air around objects. To achieve schlieren images with high sensitivity and high resolution, and satisfy the requirements of the large-scale wind tunnel tests, it is urgent to develop schlieren photographers with large aperture primary mirrors. However, the application of large aperture primary mirrors may bring many challenges in the design of the schlieren system. First, the surface figure of large aperture primary mirrors is difficult to control so that the support structure may need more strategical design. Second, because the schlieren system works under some severe environments of the wind tunnel test including the air disturbance, wind-induced ground vibration and high ambient pressure, it has to withstand serious instability risks to ensure a good schlieren image quality. In this work, the current status of the development in the large aperture schlieren systems is reviewed. Several advanced methods, for example, active damping control technique, focal spot monitoring technique, 18-points whilffletree support technique, etc.., are introduced to deal with the challenges of the large aperture schlieren system. This work aims at improving the technical development of large aperture schlieren photographer, which may contribute to the acquisition of the high sensitive and high resolution schlieren images and the improvement of the testing capability in wind tunnel experiments.

  12. Analytical model and optical design of distributed aperture optical system for millimeter-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Caihua; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Martin, Richard D.; Samluk, Jesse; Stein, E. Lee, Jr.; MacKrides, Daniel G.; Mirotznik, Mark; Prather, Dennis W.

    2008-10-01

    Millimeter-wave imaging is very interesting due to its unique transmission properties through a broad range of atmospheric obscurants such as cloud, dust, fog, sandstorms, and smoke, which thereby enables all-weather passive imaging. Unfortunately, the usefulness of millimeter-wave imagers is often limited by the large aperture sizes required to obtain images of sufficient resolution, as governed by the diffraction limit. To this end, we previously proposed a distributed aperture system for direct non-scan millimeter-wave imaging using an optical upconversion technique. In this proposed approach, an antenna array is employed to sample image signals in the millimeter-wave domain. The sampled millimeter-wave signals are then upconverted to the optical domain using electro-optic modulation techniques. These optical signals are mapped into a similar array on the entrance pupil of the following optical system for direct imaging. Although distributed aperture imaging is not new in both radio astronomy and conventional optical inteferometric imaging, the proposed approach is different in that it physically samples image in the millimeter-wave domain and directly forms the image in the optical domain. Therefore, specific analysis and evaluation techniques are required for the design and optimization of the proposed system. In this paper, we will address these issues, develop techniques to evaluate and enhance the system imaging performance and present methods to optimize the geometric configuration.

  13. Zinc selenide-based large aperture photo-controlled deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Quintavalla, Martino; Bonora, Stefano; Natali, Dario; Bianco, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Realization of large aperture deformable mirrors with a large density of actuators is important in many applications, and photo-controlled deformable mirrors (PCDMs) represent an innovation. Herein we show that PCDMs are scalable realizing a 2-inch aperture device based on a polycrystalline zinc selenide (ZnSe) as the photoconductive substrate and a thin polymeric reflective membrane. ZnSe is electrically characterized and analyzed through a model that we previously introduced. The PCDM is then optically tested, demonstrating its capabilities in adaptive optics. PMID:27244417

  14. Realization of a video-rate distributed aperture millimeter-wave imaging system using optical upconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Christopher; Martin, Richard; Dillon, Thomas; Yao, Peng; Mackrides, Daniel; Harrity, Charles; Zablocki, Alicia; Shreve, Kevin; Bonnett, James; Curt, Petersen; Prather, Dennis

    2013-05-01

    Passive imaging using millimeter waves (mmWs) has many advantages and applications in the defense and security markets. All terrestrial bodies emit mmW radiation and these wavelengths are able to penetrate smoke, fog/clouds/marine layers, and even clothing. One primary obstacle to imaging in this spectrum is that longer wavelengths require larger apertures to achieve the resolutions desired for many applications. Accordingly, lens-based focal plane systems and scanning systems tend to require large aperture optics, which increase the achievable size and weight of such systems to beyond what can be supported by many applications. To overcome this limitation, a distributed aperture detection scheme is used in which the effective aperture size can be increased without the associated volumetric increase in imager size. This distributed aperture system is realized through conversion of the received mmW energy into sidebands on an optical carrier. This conversion serves, in essence, to scale the mmW sparse aperture array signals onto a complementary optical array. The side bands are subsequently stripped from the optical carrier and recombined to provide a real time snapshot of the mmW signal. Using this technique, we have constructed a real-time, video-rate imager operating at 75 GHz. A distributed aperture consisting of 220 upconversion channels is used to realize 2.5k pixels with passive sensitivity. Details of the construction and operation of this imager as well as field testing results will be presented herein.

  15. NST: Thermal Modeling for a Large Aperture Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulter, Roy

    2011-05-01

    Late in the 1990s the Dutch Open Telescope demonstrated that internal seeing in open, large aperture solar telescopes can be controlled by flushing air across the primary mirror and other telescope structures exposed to sunlight. In that system natural wind provides a uniform air temperature throughout the imaging volume, while efficiently sweeping heated air away from the optics and mechanical structure. Big Bear Solar Observatory's New Solar Telescope (NST) was designed to realize that same performance in an enclosed system by using both natural wind through the dome and forced air circulation around the primary mirror to provide the uniform air temperatures required within the telescope volume. The NST is housed in a conventional, ventilated dome with a circular opening, in place of the standard dome slit, that allows sunlight to fall only on an aperture stop and the primary mirror. The primary mirror is housed deep inside a cylindrical cell with only minimal openings in the side at the level of the mirror. To date, the forced air and cooling systems designed for the NST primary mirror have not been implemented, yet the telescope regularly produces solar images indicative of the absence of mirror seeing. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of the NST primary mirror system along with measurements of air flows within the dome, around the telescope structure, and internal to the mirror cell are used to explain the origin of this seemingly incongruent result. The CFD analysis is also extended to hypothetical systems of various scales. We will discuss the results of these investigations.

  16. Teaching and Research in Astronomy using Small Aperture Optical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, S. K.

    2006-08-01

    Small aperture (<1m, typically 20-50cm) optical telescopes with adequate back-end instrumentation (photometer, CCD camera and CCD spectrograph etc) can be used for spreading the joy and excitement of observational astronomy among postgraduate and research students in Colleges/. On the basis of over a decade's experience in observing with small optical telescopes it has been amply demonstrated that such a facility, which any University department can hope to procure and maintain, can be effectively used for teaching as well quality research. The Physics Department of Pt Ravishankar Shukla University at Raipur, India offers Astronomy & Astrophysics (A&A) as one of the specialization as a part of M Sc program in Physics. A set of observational exercises has been incorporated with a view to provide training in observations, analysis and interpretation of the astronomical data to the students. Observing facilities available in the department include 8"-14" aperture telescopes (CGE series from Celestron) equipped with the new-state-of-the-art backend instrumentation like Photometer, CCD Camera and also a CCD spectrograph. Observing facility of this kind is ideally suited for continuous monitoring of a variety of variable stars, and thus can provide valuable data for understanding the physics of stellar variability. This is especially true for a class of variable stars known as chromospherically active stars. The stars belonging to this class have variable light curves, and the most puzzling feature is that their light curves change year after year in a rather queerer way. A large fraction of these active stars are bright ones and, hence, the importance of small aperture telescope for collecting the much needed photometric data. For over a decade the research activity using 14" optical telescope is focused on photometric monitoring of well known as well suspected active stars. This together with spectroscopic data using observing facility at Indian Observatories has led

  17. Three-Dimensional Optical Trapping of a Plasmonic Nanoparticle using Low Numerical Aperture Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Šiler, Martin; Trojek, Jan; Chvátal, Lukáš; Karásek, Vítězslav; Paták, Aleš; Pokorná, Zuzana; Mika, Filip; Zemánek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    It was previously believed that larger metal nanoparticles behave as tiny mirrors that are pushed by the light beam radiative force along the direction of beam propagation, without a chance to be confined. However, several groups have recently reported successful optical trapping of gold and silver particles as large as 250 nm. We offer a possible explanation based on the fact that metal nanoparticles naturally occur in various non-spherical shapes and their optical properties differ significantly due to changes in localized plasmon excitation. We demonstrate experimentally and support theoretically three-dimensional confinement of large gold nanoparticles in an optical trap based on very low numerical aperture optics. We showed theoretically that the unique properties of gold nanoprisms allow an increase of trapping force by an order of magnitude at certain aspect ratios. These results pave the way to spatial manipulation of plasmonic nanoparticles using an optical fibre, with interesting applications in biology and medicine. PMID:25630432

  18. Large Aperture, Scanning, L-Band SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Bach, Vinh; Grando, Maurio; Quijano, Ubaldo; Smith, Phil; Zawadzki, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We have developed the first L-band membrane-based active phased array. The antenna is a 16x16 element patch array with dimensions of 2.3mx2.6m. The array uses membrane-compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the antenna design, the fabrication of this large array, the T/R module development, the signal distribution approach and the measured results of the array.

  19. New LGS for large aperture telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vladimir; Bolbasova, Lidia

    2007-10-01

    The image quality is analyzed of an extraterrestrial object formed by astronomical optical system through the turbulent atmosphere. Relative increase the Strehl parameter is calculated under adaptive correction based on the laser guide star technique. The efficiency of adaptive correction of distortions for different type of the guide sources is compared. A special wave front sensor is applied, which operates using the broad laser beam as a reference wave. The calculations are performed for different models of the vertical variations of the structural parameter of the refractive index of the turbulent atmosphere. The wave front sensor was used, which enables to reconstruct the continuous phase of the reference wave. As the estimates show, the parameters of the formed field are quite close to that plane wave. So the higher correction and big increase of the Strehl parameter are obtained, that is indirect evidence of the good correction of the higher mode components, which are badly corrected using the traditional techniques for formation of LGS by means of a focused laser beam. As comparative calculations for different models of vertical variations of the structural parameter of the refractive index have shown, there are serious differences in the behaviors of the correlation radii for the plane and spherical waves.

  20. Design and performance of a distributed aperture millimeter-wave imaging system using optical upconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Richard; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Dillon, Thomas E.; Chen, Caihua; Samluk, Jesse; Stein, E. Lee, Jr.; Mirotznik, Mark; Prather, Dennis W.

    2009-05-01

    Passive imaging using millimeter waves (mmWs) has many advantages and applications in the defense and security markets. All terrestrial bodies emit mmW radiation and these wavelengths are able to penetrate smoke, blowing dust or sand, fog/clouds/marine layers, and even clothing. One primary obstacle to imaging in this spectrum is that longer wavelengths require larger apertures to achieve the resolutions typically desired in surveillance applications. As a result, lens-based focal plane systems tend to require large aperture optics, which severely limit the minimum achievable volume and weight of such systems. To overcome this limitation, a distributed aperture detection scheme is used in which the effective aperture size can be increased without the associated volumetric increase in imager size. However, such systems typically require high frequency (~ 30 - 300 GHz) signal routing and down conversion as well as large correlator banks. Herein, we describe an alternate approach to distributed aperture mmW imaging using optical upconversion of the mmW signal onto an optical carrier. This conversion serves, in essence, to scale the mmW sparse aperture array signals onto a complementary optical array. The optical side bands are subsequently stripped from the optical carrier and optically recombined to provide a real-time snapshot of the mmW signal. In this paper, the design tradeoffs of resolution, bandwidth, number of elements, and field of view inherent in this type of system will be discussed. We also will present the performance of a 30 element distributed aperture proof of concept imaging system operating at 35 GHz.

  1. Off-axis multipass amplifier as a large aperture driver stage for fusion lasers.

    PubMed

    Murray, J E; Downs, D C; Hunt, J T; Hermes, G L; Warren, W E

    1981-03-01

    A multipass amplifier configuration is described which has potential as a large aperture, high gain driver stage for fusion laser systems. We avoid the present limitations of large aperture switches by using an off-angle geometry that does not require an optical switch. The saturated gain characteristics of this multipass amplifier are optimized numerically. Three potential problems are investigated experimentally, self-lasing, output beam quality, and amplified spontaneous emission output. The results indicate comparable cost for comparable performance to a linear chain, with some operational advantage for the multipass driver stage. PMID:20309212

  2. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope: BLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascale, E.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Chapin, E. L.; Chung, J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S.; Griffin, M.; Gundersen, J. O.; Halpern, M.; Hargrave, P. C.; Hughes, D. H.; Klein, J.; MacTavish, C. J.; Marsden, G.; Martin, P. G.; Martin, T. G.; Mauskopf, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Olmi, L.; Patanchon, G.; Rex, M.; Scott, D.; Semisch, C.; Thomas, N.; Truch, M. D. P.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, G. S.; Viero, M. P.; Wiebe, D. V.

    2008-07-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) is a suborbital surveying experiment designed to study the evolutionary history and processes of star formation in local galaxies (including the Milky Way) and galaxies at cosmological distances. The BLAST continuum camera, which consists of 270 detectors distributed between three arrays, observes simultaneously in broadband (30%) spectral windows at 250, 350, and 500 μm. The optical design is based on a 2 m diameter telescope, providing a diffraction-limited resolution of 30'' at 250 μm. The gondola pointing system enables raster mapping of arbitrary geometry, with a repeatable positional accuracy of ~30''; postflight pointing reconstruction to lesssim5'' rms is achieved. The onboard telescope control software permits autonomous execution of a preselected set of maps, with the option of manual override. In this paper we describe the primary characteristics and measured in-flight performance of BLAST. BLAST performed a test flight in 2003 and has since made two scientifically productive long-duration balloon flights: a 100 hr flight from ESRANGE (Kiruna), Sweden to Victoria Island, northern Canada in 2005 June; and a 250 hr, circumpolar flight from McMurdo Station, Antarctica, in 2006 December.

  3. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope: BLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semisch, Christopher; BLAST Collaboration

    2007-12-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) is a sub-orbital survey-experiment designed to study the evolutionary history and processes of star formation in local galaxies (including the Milky Way) and galaxies at cosmological distances. The BLAST continuum camera, which consists of 270 detectors distributed between 3 arrays, observes simultaneously in broad-band (30%) spectral-windows at 250µm, 350µm, and 500µm. The optical design is based on a 2m diameter Cassegrain telescope, providing a diffraction-limited resolution of 30" at 250µm. The gondola pointing system enables raster-like maps of arbitrary geometry, with a repeatable positional accuracy of 30"; post-flight pointing reconstruction to < 5" rms is also achieved. The on-board telescope control software permits autonomous execution of a pre-selected set of maps, with the option of manual intervention. Since a test-flight in 2003, BLAST has made two scientifically productive long-duration balloon flights: a 100-hour flight from ESRANGE (Kiruna), Sweden to Victoria Island, northern Canada in June 2005, and a 250-hour, circumpolar-flight from McMurdo Station, Antarctica, in December 2006.

  4. Enhancing efficiency of single, large-aperture antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M.; Grimes, D. E.; Littlepage, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    Numerical analysis method provides means of describing energy distribution in focal plane of parabolic surface in terms of phase and wavelength. Two approaches for enhancing antenna efficiency include single, large reflector focused to feeding element, and array of smaller apertures whose individual outputs are summed.

  5. Operational aspects of the Main Injector large aperture quadrupole (WQB)

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Bartelson, L.; Brown, B.; Capista, D.; Crisp, J.; DiMarco, J.; Fitzgerald, J.; Glass, H.; Harding, D.; Johnson, D.; Kashikhin, V.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    A two-year Large Aperture Quadrupole (WQB) Project was completed in the summer of 2006 at Fermilab. [1] Nine WQBs were designed, fabricated and bench-tested by the Technical Division. Seven of them were installed in the Main Injector and the other two for spares. They perform well. The aperture increase meets the design goal and the perturbation to the lattice is minimal. The machine acceptance in the injection and extraction regions is increased from 40{pi} to 60{pi} mm-mrad. This paper gives a brief report of the operation and performance of these magnets. Details can be found in Ref [2].

  6. Imaging with Concave Large-Aperture Therapeutic Ultrasound Arrays Using Conventional Synthetic-Aperture Beamforming

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yayun; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2009-01-01

    Several dual-mode ultrasound array (DMUA) systems are being investigated for potential use in image-guided surgery. In therapeutic mode, DMUAs generate pulsed or continuous-wave (CW) high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) beams capable of generating localized therapeutic effects within the focal volume. In imaging mode, pulse-echo data can be collected from the DMUA elements to obtain B-mode images or other forms of feedback on the state of the target tissue before, during, and after the application of the therapeutic HIFU beam. Therapeutic and technological constraints give rise to special characteristics of therapeutic arrays. Specifically, DMUAs have concave apertures with low f-number values and are typically coarsely sampled using directive elements. These characteristics necessitate pre- and post-beamforming signal processing of echo data to improve the spatial and contrast resolution and maximize the image uniformity within the imaging field of view (IxFOV). We have recently developed and experimentally validated beamforming algorithms for concave large-aperture DMUAs with directive elements. Experimental validation was performed using a 1 MHz, 64-element, concave spherical aperture with 100 mm radius of curvature. The aperture was sampled in the lateral direction using elongated elements 1−λ×33.3‒ with 1.333‒−λ center-to-center spacing (λ is the wavelength). This resulted in f-number values of 0.8 and 2 in the azimuth and elevation directions, respectively. In this paper, we present a new DMUA design approach based on different sampling of the shared concave aperture to improve image quality while maintaining therapeutic performance. A pulse-wave (PW) simulation model using a modified version of the Field II program is used in this study. The model is used in generating pulse-echo data for synthetic-aperture (SA) beamforming for forming images of a variety of targets, e.g., wire arrays and speckle-generating cyst phantoms. To provide

  7. Inter-aperture correlation in MIMO free space optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özbilgin, Tuğba; Koca, Mutlu

    2015-10-01

    We present a unified framework for determining the inter-aperture separations in multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) free space optical (FSO) systems such that the transmitter-receiver paths are resolvable. The analysis framework is also useful in determining the amount of spatial correlation for a given set of system configuration parameters and aperture separations. It is applicable to both point apertures and also apertures with larger diameters and can be used at both transmit and receive arrays. We show that the results obtained via theoretical derivations are in good agreement with those in the literature obtained via measurements or simulations. The theoretical calculations reveal that even under strong turbulence conditions and very long link distances, aperture separations at the order of a few tens of centimeters are sufficient to have resolvable paths with independent fading gains. Furthermore, the channel correlations increase relatively slowly with decreasing inter-aperture separations which are below these values. We also provide design guidelines to obtain resolvable paths for several commonly used system configurations.

  8. Optical design of a synthetic aperture ladar antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Changqing; Zeng, Xiaodong; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Liu, Huanhuan; Man, Xiangkun

    2008-03-01

    The spatial resolution of a conventional imaging LADAR system is constrained by the diffraction limit of the telescope aperture. The purpose of this work is to investigate Synthetic Aperture Imaging LADAR (SAIL), which employs aperture synthesis with coherent laser radar to overcome the diffraction limit and achieve fine-resolution, long range, two-dimensional imaging with modest aperture diameters. According to the demands of the Synthetic Aperture LADAR (SAL), the key techniques are analyzed briefly. The preliminary design of the optical antenna is also introduced in this paper. We investigate the design method and relevant problems of efficient optical antenna that are required in SAL. The design is pursued on the basis of the same method as is used at microwave frequency. The method is based on numerical analysis and the error values obtained by present manufacturing technology. According to the requirement to SAL with the trial of little size, light mass, low cost and high image quality, the result by ZEMAX will result.

  9. Engineering Specification for Large-aperture UVO Space Telescopes Derived from Science Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Arnold, William; Bevan, Ryan M.; Smith, W. Scott.; Kirk, Charles S.; Postman, Mark

    2013-01-01

    An advanced large aperture UV/optical UVO space telescope is required for the next generation of astrophysics and exoplanet science. The science requirements of proposed exoplanet and astrophysics missions were used to determine the encircled energy, point spread function stability and thermal environment requirements. These requirements then determine the optical wavefront specification for potential telescope assemblies which can fit inside current and planned launch vehicles. The optical wavefront specification becomes the top level of the error budget that is split into various sources that control the structural, thermal and optical design.

  10. Performance characteristics of phased array and thinned aperture optical telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, James E.; Rockwell, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    While phased telescope arrays for general-purpose broadband imaging applications suffer severe sensitivity losses and field-of-view limitations, thinned-aperture telescopes consisting of a dilute, segmented primary mirror with a common secondary mirror are viable second-generation space telescope configurational possibilities yielding resolution and sensitivity an order of magnitude greater than those of the Hubble Space Telescope. Attention is given to thinned-aperture optical systems' image quality characterization problems; the 'practical resolution limit' image quality criterion proposed is defined as the reciprocal of the spatial frequency within which no zeros occur in the modulation transfer function.

  11. Central obscuration effects on optical synthetic aperture imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue-wen; Luo, Xiao; Zheng, Li-gong; Zhang, Xue-jun

    2014-02-01

    Due to the central obscuration problem exists in most optical synthetic aperture systems, it is necessary to analyze its effects on their image performance. Based on the incoherent diffraction limited imaging theory, a Golay-3 type synthetic aperture system was used to study the central obscuration effects on the point spread function (PSF) and the modulation transfer function (MTF). It was found that the central obscuration does not affect the width of the central peak of the PSF and the cutoff spatial frequency of the MTF, but attenuate the first sidelobe of the PSF and the midfrequency of the MTF. The imaging simulation of a Golay-3 type synthetic aperture system with central obscuration proved this conclusion. At last, a Wiener Filter restoration algorithm was used to restore the image of this system, the images were obviously better.

  12. Mission definition for a large-aperture microwave radiometer spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An Earth-observation measurements mission is defined for a large-aperture microwave radiometer spacecraft. This mission is defined without regard to any particular spacecraft design concept. Space data application needs, the measurement selection rationale, and broad spacecraft design requirements and constraints are described. The effects of orbital parameters and image quality requirements on the spacecraft and mission performance are discussed. Over the land the primary measurand is soil moisture; over the coastal zones and the oceans important measurands are salinity, surface temperature, surface winds, oil spill dimensions and ice boundaries; and specific measurement requirements have been selected for each. Near-all-weather operation and good spatial resolution are assured by operating at low microwave frequencies using an extremely large aperture antenna in a low-Earth-orbit contiguous mapping mode.

  13. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope: BLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truch, Matthew D. P.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Chapin, E. L.; Chung, J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S.; Griffin, M.; Gundersen, J. O.; Halpern, M.; Hargrave, P. C.; Hughes, D. H.; Klein, J.; MacTavish, C. J.; Marsden, G.; Martin, P. G.; Martin, T. G.; Mauskopf, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Olmi, L.; Pascale, E.; Patanchon, G.; Rex, M.; Scott, D.; Semisch, C.; Thomas, N. E.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, G. S.; Viero, M. P.; Wiebe, D. V.

    2009-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) is a suborbital surveying experiment designed to study the evolutionary history and processes of star formation in local galaxies (including the Milky Way) and galaxies at cosmological distances. The BLAST continuum camera, which consists of 270 detectors distributed between three arrays, observes simultaneously in broadband (30%) spectral windows at 250, 350, and 500 microns. The optical design is based on a 2 m diameter telescope, providing a diffraction-limited resolution of 30" at 250 microns. The gondola pointing system enables raster mapping of arbitrary geometry, with a repeatable positional accuracy of 30"; postflight pointing reconstruction to <5" rms is achieved. The onboard telescope control software permits autonomous execution of a preselected set of maps, with the option of manual override. On this poster, we describe the primary characteristics and measured in-flight performance of BLAST. BLAST performed a test flight in 2003 and has since made two scientifically productive long-duration balloon flights: a 100 hour flight from ESRANGE (Kiruna), Sweden to Victoria Island, northern Canada in 2005 June; and a 250 hour, circumpolar flight from McMurdo Station, Antarctica in 2006 December. The BLAST collaboration acknowledges the support of NASA through grants NAG5-12785, NAG5-13301, and NNGO-6GI11G, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Canada's Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Ontario Innovation Trust, the Puerto Rico Space Grant Consortium, the Fondo Institucional para la Investigacion of the University of Puerto Rico, and the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs.

  14. Obtaining Crosswind from Single-Aperture Optical Scintillometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dinther, D.; Hartogensis, O. K.

    2010-09-01

    A scintillometer is a device that consist of a transmitter and receiver. The receiver records intensity fluctuations of the electromagnetic beam emitted at optical or microwave wavelengths by the transmitter. These fluctuations are caused by refraction of the beam upon its passage through the turbulent surface layer. An increasingly popular application of scintillometry is to estimate the area-averaged surface fluxes from these raw measurements following scintillometer theory (Tatarskii, 1961) relating the raw intensity measurements to the structure parameter of the refractive index, Cn2 and Monin-Obukhov similarity theory that relates structure parameters to surface fluxes (Meijninger et al., 2002). A less known application of scintillometry is the estimation of the crosswind, i.e. the wind perpendicular to the scintillometer path. Past research on this issue focused on multiple aperture scintillometers that use the time delay between the turbulence signals of the displaced apertures to estimate the crosswind (Andreas, 2000, Poggio et al., 2000 and Furger et al., 2001,). The goal of this study is to explore a method to obtain the crosswind from single aperture scintillometers through spectral analysis of the raw scintillometer signal. In theory the scintillometer spectrum shows an inflection at the transition of the refractive and absorption part of the spectrum. The transition frequency (fC2) is related to the ratio of the crosswind and the diameter of the receiver and transmitter (Nieveen et al., 1998) via fc2 = -u-- 1.25D where u is the crosswind speed and D the diameter of the scintillometer. Limitation of the method is that it only works properly when the crosswind is constant, i.e. with a horizontal scintillometer path, no time variation and no spatial variations of the crosswind. The prescribed method to obtain the crosswind is examined with LITFASS-2009 (Germany) and Haarweg (The Netherlands) datasets. At LITFASS-2009 different optical and microwave

  15. Annular sub-aperture stitching interferometry for testing of large aspherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-kun; Wang, Li-hui; Zheng, Li-gong; Deng, Wei-jie; Zhang, Xue-jun

    2008-03-01

    Annular subaperture stitching interferometric technology can test large-aperture, high numerical aperture aspheric surfaces with high resolution, low cost and high efficiency without auxiliary null optics. In this paper, the basic principle and theory of the stitching method are introduced, the reasonable mathematical model and effective splicing algorithm are established based on simultaneous least-squares method and Zernike polynomial fitting. The translation errors are eliminated from each subaperture through the synthetical optimization stitching mode, it keeps the error from transmitting and accumulating. The numerical simulations have been carried on by this method. As results, the surface map of the full aperture after stitching is consistent to the input surface map, the difference of PV error and RMS error between them is -0.0074 λ and -0.00052 λ (λ is 632.8nm), respectively; the relative error of PV and RMS is -0.53% and -0.31%; and the PV and RMS of residual error of the full aperture phase distribution is 0.027 λ and 0.0023 λ, respectively. The results conclude that this splicing model and algorithm are accurate and feasible. So it provides another quantitive measurement for test aspheric surfaces especially for large aperture aspheres besides null-compensation.

  16. A Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory: Reference Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley; Rioux, Norman; Feinberg, Lee; Stahl, H. Philip; Redding, Dave; Jones, Andrew; Sturm, James; Collins, Christine; Liu, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. We describe the feasibility assessment of system thermal and dynamic stability for supporting coronagraphy. The observatory is in a Sun-Earth L2 orbit providing a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Reference designs include a 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of reference designs including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  17. A future large-aperture UVOIR space observatory: reference designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Norman; Thronson, Harley; Feinberg, Lee; Stahl, H. Philip; Redding, Dave; Jones, Andrew; Sturm, James; Collins, Christine; Liu, Alice

    2015-09-01

    Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. We describe the feasibility assessment of system thermal and dynamic stability for supporting coronagraphy. The observatory is in a Sun-Earth L2 orbit providing a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Reference designs include a 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of reference designs including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  18. Advanced optical and thermal technologies for aperture control

    SciTech Connect

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Lampert, C.M.; Rubin, M.

    1982-09-01

    Control of heat transfer and radiant energy flow through building apertures is essential for maximizing thermal and daylighting benefits and minimizing undesired heating and cooling loads. Architectural solutions based on current technology generally add devices such as louvers, shutters, shades, or blinds to the glazing system. The objectives and initial accomplishments of a research program the goal of which is to identify and evaluate advanced optical and thermal technologies for controlling aperture energy flows, thus reducing building energy requirements are outlined. Activities are described in four program areas: (1) low-conductance, high-transmittance glazing materials (e.g., heat mirrors, aerogels); (2) optical switching materials (e.g., electrochromic, photochromic); (3) selective transmitters; and (4) daylight enhancement techniques.

  19. Advanced optical and thermal technologies for aperture control

    SciTech Connect

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Lampert, C.M.; Rubin, M.

    1983-11-01

    Control of heat transfer and radiant energy flow through building apertures is essential for maximizing thermal and daylighting benefits and minimizing undesired heating and cooling loads. Architectural solutions based on current technology generally add devices such as louvers, shutters, shades, or blinds to the glazing system. The objectives and initial accomplishments of a research program are outlined, the goal of which is to identify and evaluate advanced optical and thermal technologies for controlling aperture energy flows, thus reducing building energy requirements. Activities in four program areas are described: (1) low-conductance, high-transmittance glazing materials (e.g., heat mirrors, aerogels) (2) optical switching materials (e.g., electrochromic, photochromic) (3) selective transmitters and (4) daylight enhancement techniques.

  20. Performance results for Beamlet: A large aperture multipass Nd glass laser

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.; Barker, C.E.; VanWonterghem, B.M.; Speck, D.R.; Behrendt, W.C.; Murray, J.R.; Caird, J.A.; Decker, D.E.; Smith, I.C.

    1995-04-11

    The Beamlet laser is a large aperture, flashlamp pumped Nd: glass laser that is a scientific prototype of an advanced Inertial Fusion laser. Beamlet has achieved third harmonic, conversion efficiency of near 80% with its nominal 35cm {times} 35cm square beam at mean 3{omega} fluences in excess of 8 J/cm{sup 2}(3-ns). Beamlet uses an adaptive optics system to correct for aberrations and achieve less than 2 {times} diffraction limited far field spot size.

  1. Optical metrology for very large convex aspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burge, J. H.; Su, P.; Zhao, C.

    2008-07-01

    Telescopes with very large diameter or with wide fields require convex secondary mirrors that may be many meters in diameter. The optical surfaces for these mirrors can be manufactured to the accuracy limited by the surface metrology. We have developed metrology systems that are specifically optimized for measuring very large convex aspheric surfaces. Large aperture vibration insensitive sub-aperture Fizeau interferometer combined with stitching software give high resolution surface measurements. The global shape is corroborated with a coordinate measuring machine based on the swing arm profilometer.

  2. Silicon Powder Filters for Large-Aperture Cryogenic Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Fletcher; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Bennett, C. L.; Marriage, T.; Xu, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Upcoming experiments probing for the existence of B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) will require large arrays of background-limited detectors. This will necessitate the use of cryogenic receivers with large-aperture vacuum windows and correspondingly large low-pass infrared-blocking filters to minimize thermal load. Large-diameter filters composed of absorptive dielectrics are difficult to conductively cool adequately, and thus tend to heat up and re-radiate towards the focal plane. Reflective metal-mesh filters are challenging to manufacture at such large apertures and with feature sizes small enough to effectively block 300K thermal radiation. In order to overcome these difficulties, we have developed a novel type of thermal filter that scatters, rather than reflects or absorbs, unwanted infrared radiation. Comprised of ultra-pure silicon powder distributed within a polymethylpentene (PMP) substrate, these filters are not absorptive in the infrared while being transparent to microwaves, and are comparatively straightforward to produce. By adjusting the size of the silicon particles, the frequency cut-off of these low-pass filters is fully tunable. Small scale (70mm diameter, 3mm thickness) prototypes have exhibited <10% transmission throughout the infrared spectrum and <1% transmission at the peak of the 300K blackbody spectrum, while maintaining an estimated 97% transmission in the microwave regime.

  3. Multi-aperture optics as a universal platform for computational imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanida, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Computational imaging is a novel imaging framework based on optical encoding and computational decoding. To avoid a heuristic design that depends on the particular problem to be solved, multi-aperture optics is useful as a universal platform for optical encoding. In this paper, the fundamental properties of multi-aperture optics are summarized. Then some examples of interesting functions implemented by multi-aperture optics are explained, together with some effective applications.

  4. Extracting spatial information from large aperture exposures of diffuse sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, J. T.; Moos, H. W.

    1981-01-01

    The spatial properties of large aperture exposures of diffuse emission can be used both to investigate spatial variations in the emission and to filter out camera noise in exposures of weak emission sources. Spatial imaging can be accomplished both parallel and perpendicular to dispersion with a resolution of 5-6 arc sec, and a narrow median filter running perpendicular to dispersion across a diffuse image selectively filters out point source features, such as reseaux marks and fast particle hits. Spatial information derived from observations of solar system objects is presented.

  5. Large aperture spatial heterodyne imaging spectrometer: Principle and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiangli, Bin; Cai, Qisheng; Du, Shusong

    2015-12-01

    A large aperture spatial heterodyne imaging spectrometer (LASHIS) is proposed. It is a kind of pushbroom Fourier transform ultraspectral imager with no moving parts. This imaging spectrometer, based on a Sagnac lateral shearing interferometer combined with a pair of gratings, has the advantages of high spectral resolution, high throughput and robustness. The principle of LASHIS and its spectral retrieval method are introduced. The processing chain to convert raw images to ultraspectral datacube is also described. Experimental results demonstrate the high resolving power of LASHIS with the emission spectrum of a low pressure sodium lamp.

  6. The COronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO) Large Aperture Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, Steve; Gallagher, Dennis; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Haiying; Nelson, Pete; Burkepile, Joan; Kolinksi, Don; Sutherland, Lee

    2013-04-01

    The COSMO is a facility dedicated to observing coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields. It will be located on a mountaintop in the Hawaiian Islands and will replace the current Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO). COSMO will provide unique observations of the global coronal magnetic fields and its environment to enhance the value of data collected by other observatories on the ground (e.g. SOLIS, BBO NST, Gregor, ATST, EST, Chinese Giant Solar Telescope, NLST, FASR) and in space (e.g. SDO, Hinode, SOHO, GOES, STEREO, Solar-C, Solar Probe+, Solar Orbiter). COSMO will employ a fleet of instruments to cover many aspects of measuring magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere. The dynamics and energy flow in the corona are dominated by magnetic fields. To understand the formation of CMEs, their relation to other forms of solar activity, and their progression out into the solar wind requires measurements of coronal magnetic fields. The large aperture coronagraph, the Chromospheric and Prominence Magnetometer and the K-Coronagraph form the COSMO instrument suite to measure magnetic fields and the polarization brightness of the low corona used to infer electron density. The large aperture coronagraph will employ a 1.5 meter fuse silica singlet lens, birefringent filters, and a spectropolarimeter to cover fields of view of up to 1 degree. It will observe the corona over a wide range of emission lines from 530.3 nm through 1083.0 nm allowing for magnetic field measurements over a wide range of coronal temperatures (e.g. FeXIV at 530.3 nm, Fe X at 637.4 nm, Fe XIII at 1074.7 and 1079.8 nm. These lines are faint and require the very large aperture. NCAR and NSF have provided funding to bring the large aperture coronagraph to a preliminary design review state by the end of 2013. As with all data from Mauna Loa, the data products from COSMO will be available to the community via the Mauna Loa website: http://mlso.hao.ucar.edu

  7. The development of large-aperture test system of infrared camera and visible CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingwen; Geng, Anbing; Wang, Bo; Wang, Haitao; Wu, Yanying

    2015-10-01

    Infrared camera and CCD camera dual-band imaging system is used in many equipment and application widely. If it is tested using the traditional infrared camera test system and visible CCD test system, 2 times of installation and alignment are needed in the test procedure. The large-aperture test system of infrared camera and visible CCD camera uses the common large-aperture reflection collimator, target wheel, frame-grabber, computer which reduces the cost and the time of installation and alignment. Multiple-frame averaging algorithm is used to reduce the influence of random noise. Athermal optical design is adopted to reduce the change of focal length location change of collimator when the environmental temperature is changing, and the image quality of the collimator of large field of view and test accuracy are also improved. Its performance is the same as that of the exotic congener and is much cheaper. It will have a good market.

  8. Development of Large-Aperture, Light-Weight Fresnel Lenses for Gossamer Space Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, D; Hyde, R; Weisberg, A; Early, J; Rushford, M; Britten, J

    2002-04-29

    In order to examine more distant astronomical objects, with higher resolution, future space telescopes require objectives with significantly larger aperture than presently available. NASA has identified a progression in size from the 2.4m aperture objective currently used in the HUBBLE space telescope[l,2], to 25m and greater in order to observe, e.g., extra-solar planets. Since weight is a crucial factor for any object sent into space, the relative weight of large optics over a given area must be reduced[3]. The areal mass density of the primary mirror for the Hubble space telescope is {approx}200 kg/m{sup 2}. This is expected to be reduced to around 15 kg/m{sup 2} for the successor to Hubble--the next generation space telescope (NGST)[4]. For future very large aperture telescopes needed for extra-solar planet detection, the areal mass density must be reduced even further. For example, the areal mass density goal for the Gossamer space telescopes is < 1 kg/m{sup 2}. The production of lightweight focusing optics at >10m size is also an enabling technology for many other applications such as Earth observation, power beaming, and optical communications.

  9. Research on the support structure of the primary mirror of large-aperture telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Jingxu

    2007-12-01

    Large-aperture telescope can be used in surveying battlefield, researching landform, searching object, real-time monitoring, imaging, detecting and identifying spatial targets and so on. A large-aperture telescope for achieving high resolution power is designed to monitor spatial target and image in real time. Real-time monitoring plays an important role in military conflicts. The orbit parameter of object, quantity, geometrical shape parameter and so on can be obtained by detect spatial target. With the development of optical technology, people require larger aperture in optics-electronic (O-E) system. By increasing optical aperture, the ability of collecting light and resolution power in the system can be enhanced. But the support structure of the primary mirror of large-aperture telescope will be a very difficult problem. With the increase of primary mirror aperture, the weight of the primary mirror will become larger than before. The root mean square (rms) of the primary mirror is affected by many factors, such as deadweight, deformation of heat, environment and so on. Due to the primary mirror of telescope is an important component of telescope system. By reducing the weight of primary mirror, precision of the system is ensured. During the designing phase, one can consider the supporting project of the primary mirror synthetically and analyze it roundly according to technical requirement of optical system and the effect factors. The final structural design can be reasonable. In an astronomical telescope, the surface of reflector is an important part for collecting dark radiation of celestial bodies. Its surface shape will have an effect on collecting efficiency of telescope radiant energy directly. So the rms must be very high. Optical system of large aperture, small wavelength and small focus can receive maximal light intensity. For ground-based optical astronomical telescope, the design proposed in the paper can satisfy the requirement of the possible

  10. Large-aperture MOEMS Fabry-Perot interferometer for miniaturized spectral imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissanen, Anna; Langner, Andreas; Viherkanto, Kai; Mannila, Rami

    2015-02-01

    VTT's optical MEMS Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs) are tunable optical filters, which enable miniaturization of spectral imagers into small, mass producible hand-held sensors with versatile optical measurement capabilities. FPI technology has also created a basis for various hyperspectral imaging instruments, ranging from nanosatellites, environmental sensing and precision agriculture with UAVs to instruments for skin cancer detection. Until now, these application demonstrations have been mostly realized with piezo-actuated FPIs fabricated by non-monolithical assembly method, suitable for achieving very large optical apertures and with capacity to small-to-medium volumes; however large-volume production of MEMS manufacturing supports the potential for emerging spectral imaging applications also in large-volume applications, such as in consumer/mobile products. Previously reported optical apertures of MEMS FPIs in the visible range have been up to 2 mm in size; this paper presents the design, successful fabrication and characterization of MEMS FPIs for central wavelengths of λ = 500 nm and λ = 650 nm with optical apertures up to 4 mm in diameter. The mirror membranes of the FPI structures consist of ALD (atomic layer deposited) TiO2-Al2O3 λ/4- thin film Bragg reflectors, with the air gap formed by sacrificial polymer etching in O2 plasma. The entire fabrication process is conducted below 150 °C, which makes it possible to monolithically integrate the filter structures on other ICdevices such as detectors. The realized MEMS devices are aimed for nanosatellite space application as breadboard hyperspectral imager demonstrators.

  11. Design of large aperture, low mass vacuum windows

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, W.J.; Mapes, M.

    1993-01-01

    Large vacuum vessels are employed downstream of fixed targets in High Energy Physics experiments to provide a long path for particles to traverse without interacting with air molecules. These vessels generally have a large aperture opening known as a vacuum window which employs a thin membrane to preserve the vacuum environment yet allows the particles to pass through with a minimal effect on them. Several large windows have been built using a composite of Kevlar/Mylar including circular windows to a diameter of 96.5 cm and rectangular windows up to 193 cm x 86 cm. This paper describes the design, fabrication, testing and operating experience with these windows and relates the actual performance to theoretical predictions.

  12. Design of large aperture, low mass vacuum windows

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, W.J.; Mapes, M.

    1993-07-01

    Large vacuum vessels are employed downstream of fixed targets in High Energy Physics experiments to provide a long path for particles to traverse without interacting with air molecules. These vessels generally have a large aperture opening known as a vacuum window which employs a thin membrane to preserve the vacuum environment yet allows the particles to pass through with a minimal effect on them. Several large windows have been built using a composite of Kevlar/Mylar including circular windows to a diameter of 96.5 cm and rectangular windows up to 193 cm x 86 cm. This paper describes the design, fabrication, testing and operating experience with these windows and relates the actual performance to theoretical predictions.

  13. Simulating aperture masking at the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stürmer, Julian; Quirrenbach, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Preliminary investigations for an Aperture Masking Experiment at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) and its application to stellar surface imaging are presented. An algorithm is implemented which generates non redundant aperture masks for the LBT. These masks are adapted to the special geometrical conditions at the LBT. At the same time, they are optimized to provide a uniform UV-coverage. It is also possible to favor certain baselines to adapt the UV-coverage to observational requirements. The optimization is done by selecting appropriate masks among a large number (order 109) of randomized realizations of non-redundant (NR) masks. Using results of numerical simulations of the surface of red supergiants, interferometric data is generated as it would be available with these masks at the LBT while observing Betelgeuse. An image reconstruction algorithm is used to reconstruct images from Squared Visibility and Closure Phase data. It is shown that a number of about 15 holes per mask is sufficient to retrieve detailed images. Additionally, noise is added to the data in order to simulate the influence of measurement errors e.g. photon noise. Both the position and the shape of surface structures are hardly influenced by this noise. However, the flux of these details changes significantly.

  14. Compact large-aperture Fabry-Perot interferometer modules for gas spectroscopy at mid-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantojärvi, Uula; Varpula, Aapo; Antila, Tapani; Holmlund, Christer; Mäkynen, Jussi; Näsilä, Antti; Mannila, Rami; Rissanen, Anna; Antila, Jarkko; Disch, Rolf J.; Waldmann, Torsten A.

    2014-03-01

    VTT has developed Fabry-Pérot Interferometers (FPI) for visible and infrared wavelengths since 90's. Here we present two new platforms for mid-infrared gas spectroscopy having a large optical aperture to provide high optical throughput but still enabling miniaturized instrument size. First platform is a tunable filter that replaces a traditional filter wheel, which operates between wavelengths of 4-5 um. Second platform is for correlation spectroscopy where the interferometer provides a comb-like transmission pattern mimicking absorption of diatomic molecules at the wavelength range of 4.7-4.8 um. The Bragg mirrors have 2-4 thin layers of polysilicon and silicon oxide.

  15. Optical imaging process based on two-dimensional Fourier transform for synthetic aperture imaging ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiwei; Zhi, Ya'nan; Liu, Liren; Sun, Jianfeng; Zhou, Yu; Hou, Peipei

    2013-09-01

    The synthetic aperture imaging ladar (SAIL) systems typically generate large amounts of data difficult to compress with digital method. This paper presents an optical SAIL processor based on compensation of quadratic phase of echo in azimuth direction and two dimensional Fourier transform. The optical processor mainly consists of one phase-only liquid crystal spatial modulator(LCSLM) to load the phase data of target echo and one cylindrical lens to compensate the quadratic phase and one spherical lens to fulfill the task of two dimensional Fourier transform. We show the imaging processing result of practical target echo obtained by a synthetic aperture imaging ladar demonstrator. The optical processor is compact and lightweight and could provide inherent parallel and the speed-of-light computing capability, it has a promising application future especially in onboard and satellite borne SAIL systems.

  16. The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Science Drivers and Technology Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Phillip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers and the resulting performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsecond angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 m to 2.4 m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We also discuss the priorities for technology development needed to enable the construction of ATLAST for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions. Keywords: Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST); ultraviolet/optical space telescopes; astrophysics; astrobiology; technology development.

  17. Synthetic Aperture Interferometry: In-Process Measurement of Aspheric Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, Richard; Coupland, Jeremy M.; Petzing, Jon

    2003-02-01

    A scanning probe consisting of a source and receive fiber pair is used to measure the phase difference between wave fronts scattered from the front and rear surfaces of an aspheric optic. This system can be thought of as a classical interferometer with an aperture synthesized from the data collected along the path of the probe. If the form of either surface is known, the other can be deduced. In contrast with classical interferometers, the method does not need test or null plates and has the potential to be integrated into the manufacturing process.

  18. Large-Aperture Membrane Active Phased-Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris; McGrath, William; Leduc, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Large-aperture phased-array microwave antennas supported by membranes are being developed for use in spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar systems. There may also be terrestrial uses for such antennas supported on stationary membranes, large balloons, and blimps. These antennas are expected to have areal mass densities of about 2 kg/sq m, satisfying a need for lightweight alternatives to conventional rigid phased-array antennas, which have typical areal mass densities between 8 and 15 kg/sq m. The differences in areal mass densities translate to substantial differences in total mass in contemplated applications involving aperture areas as large as 400 sq m. A membrane phased-array antenna includes patch antenna elements in a repeating pattern. All previously reported membrane antennas were passive antennas; this is the first active membrane antenna that includes transmitting/receiving (T/R) electronic circuits as integral parts. Other integral parts of the antenna include a network of radio-frequency (RF) feed lines (more specifically, a corporate feed network) and of bias and control lines, all in the form of flexible copper strip conductors on flexible polymeric membranes. Each unit cell of a prototype antenna (see Figure 1) contains a patch antenna element and a compact T/R module that is compatible with flexible membrane circuitry. There are two membrane layers separated by a 12.7-mm air gap. Each membrane layer is made from a commercially available flexible circuit material that, as supplied, comprises a 127-micron-thick polyimide dielectric layer clad on both sides with 17.5-micron-thick copper layers. The copper layers are patterned into RF, bias, and control conductors. The T/R module is located on the back side of the ground plane and is RF-coupled to the patch element via a slot. The T/R module is a hybrid multilayer module assembled and packaged independently and attached to the membrane array. At the time of reporting the information for

  19. Factors affecting the performance of large-aperture microphone arrays.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Harvey F; Patterson, William R; Sachar, Joshua

    2002-05-01

    Large arrays of microphones have been proposed and studied as a possible means of acquiring data in offices, conference rooms, and auditoria without requiring close-talking microphones. When such an array essentially surrounds all possible sources, it is said to have a large aperture. Large-aperture arrays have attractive properties of spatial resolution and signal-to-noise enhancement. This paper presents a careful comparison of theoretical and measured performance for an array of 256 microphones using simple delay-and-sum beamforming. This is the largest currently functional, all digital-signal-processing array that we know of. The array is wall-mounted in the moderately adverse environment of a general-purpose laboratory (8 m x 8 m x 3 m). The room has a T60 reverberation time of 550 ms. Reverberation effects in this room severely impact the array's performance. However, the width of the main lobe remains comparable to that of a simplified prediction. Broadband spatial resolution shows a single central peak with 10 dB gain about 0.4 m in diameter at the -3 dB level. Away from that peak, the response is approximately flat over most of the room. Optimal weighting for signal-to-noise enhancement degrades the spatial resolution minimally. Experimentally, we verify that signal-to-noise gain is less than proportional to the square root of the number of microphones probably due to the partial correlation of the noise between channels, to variation of signal intensity with polar angle about the source, and to imperfect correlation of the signal over the array caused by reverberations. We show measurements of the relative importance of each effect in our environment. PMID:12051434

  20. Factors affecting the performance of large-aperture microphone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Harvey F.; Patterson, William R.; Sachar, Joshua

    2002-05-01

    Large arrays of microphones have been proposed and studied as a possible means of acquiring data in offices, conference rooms, and auditoria without requiring close-talking microphones. When such an array essentially surrounds all possible sources, it is said to have a large aperture. Large-aperture arrays have attractive properties of spatial resolution and signal-to-noise enhancement. This paper presents a careful comparison of theoretical and measured performance for an array of 256 microphones using simple delay-and-sum beamforming. This is the largest currently functional, all digital-signal-processing array that we know of. The array is wall-mounted in the moderately adverse environment of a general-purpose laboratory (8 m×8 m×3 m). The room has a T60 reverberation time of 550 ms. Reverberation effects in this room severely impact the array's performance. However, the width of the main lobe remains comparable to that of a simplified prediction. Broadband spatial resolution shows a single central peak with 10 dB gain about 0.4 m in diameter at the -3 dB level. Away from that peak, the response is approximately flat over most of the room. Optimal weighting for signal-to-noise enhancement degrades the spatial resolution minimally. Experimentally, we verify that signal-to-noise gain is less than proportional to the square root of the number of microphones probably due to the partial correlation of the noise between channels, to variation of signal intensity with polar angle about the source, and to imperfect correlation of the signal over the array caused by reverberations. We show measurements of the relative importance of each effect in our environment.

  1. Partial feedback unstable resonator on small scale supersonic large aperture chemical laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Rui; Li, Lei

    2015-05-01

    There is always a challenge on large aperture medium power laser's resonator design, stable resonator would supports significant higher order transverse modes, folded and telescope stable resonator are too complex and not preferred by engineers, unstable resonator need rather large round trip gain to compensate its high geometric out-coupling, which is difficult for this kind of laser since its gain length is limited due to the power level and large aperture. Partial feedback unstable resonator had been proposed to tackle this difficulty since the early days of laser development, however, the debates of its effect never stopped even with those distinguished optical resonator scientists such as Siegman, Anan'ev, and Weber. Recently integrated partial feedback unstable resonator design had been successfully demonstrated on a medium size chemical oxygen iodine laser. In this paper, we carry this resonator configuration on a small scale discharge driven supersonic nozzle array Hydrogen Fluoride chemical laser, a typical large aperture short gain length device. With magnification equals 4/3, we successfully get ten Watts level ring beam output.

  2. Active polishing technology for large aperture aspherical mirror and ultra thin mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xaingqun; Gao, Bilie; Li, Xinnan

    2006-02-01

    Some results on active polishing technology for large aperture aspherical mirrors and ultra thin mirrors, which have been developed in recent years in Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology, CAS, are presented in this paper. There are two polishing methods developed for the large aperture ultra thin mirrors with two different trial mirrors respectively. One is a hexagonal mirror with diagonal size of 1100mm, and thickness of 25mm by no-separate support method specially for polish the sub-mirror of Schmidt corrector of LAMOST, which is a national large scientific project of China. Another is a circular mirror with 1035mm in diameter and 26mm in thickness by active support method. The active stressed polishing technology developed for large aperture aspherical mirror with fast f ratio, and a paraboloidal mirror with a diameter of 910mm and an f ratio 2 as was successfully polished. The computer controlled polishing is also different from the normal way in the system. Some complicated aspects were added. The results showed the final surface accuracy of all these trial mirrors is better than expected requirements for normal application in astronomical telescopes.

  3. Experimental instrumentation system for the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boykin, William H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive optics are used in telescopes for both viewing objects with minimum distortion and for transmitting laser beams with minimum beam divergence and dance. In order to test concepts on a smaller scale, NASA MSFC is in the process of setting up an adaptive optics test facility with precision (fraction of wavelengths) measurement equipment. The initial system under test is the adaptive optical telescope called PAMELA (Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture). Goals of this test are: assessment of test hardware specifications for PAMELA application and the determination of the sensitivities of instruments for measuring PAMELA (and other adaptive optical telescopes) imperfections; evaluation of the PAMELA system integration effort and test progress and recommended actions to enhance these activities; and development of concepts and prototypes of experimental apparatuses for PAMELA.

  4. BLAST: The Balloon-Borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devlin, Mark; Ade, Peter; Bock, Jamie; Dicker, Simon; Griffin, Matt; Gunderson, Josh; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter; Hughes, David; Klein, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    BLAST is the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Sub-millimeter Telescope. It will fly from a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) platform from Antarctica. The telescope design incorporates a 2 m primary mirror with large-format bolometer arrays operating at 250, 350 and 500 microns. By providing the first sensitive large-area (10 sq. deg.) sub-mm surveys at these wavelengths, BLAST will address some of the most important galactic and cosmological questions regarding the formation and evolution of stars, galaxies and clusters. Galactic and extragalactic BLAST surveys will: (1) identify large numbers of high-redshift galaxies; (2) measure photometric redshifts, rest-frame FIR luminosities and star formation rates thereby constraining the evolutionary history of the galaxies that produce the FIR and sub-mm background; (3) measure cold pre-stellar sources associated with the earliest stages of star and planet formation; (4) make high-resolution maps of diffuse galactic emission over a wide range of galactic latitudes. In addition to achieving the above scientific goals, the exciting legacy of the BLAST LDB experiment will be a catalogue of 3000-5000 extragalactic sub-mm sources and a 100 sq. deg. sub-mm galactic plane survey. Multi-frequency follow-up observations from SIRTF, ASTRO-F, and Herschel, together with spectroscopic observations and sub-arcsecond imaging from ALMA are essential to understand the physical nature of the BLAST sources.

  5. ATLAST-9.2m: a Large-Aperture Deployable Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oergerle, William; Feinberg, Lee D.; Purves, Lloyd R.; Hyde, T. Tupper; Thronson, Harley A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Postman, Marc; Bolear, Matthew R.; Budinoff, Jason G.; Dean, Bruce H.; Clampin, Mark C.; Ebbets, Dennis C.; Gong, Qian; Gull, Theodore R.; Howard, Joseph M.; Jones, Andrew L.; Lyon, Richard G.; Pasquale, Bert A.; Perrygo, Charles; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Thompson, Patrick L.; Woodgate, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    We present results of a study of a deployable version of the Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST), designed to operate in a Sun-Earth L2 orbit. The primary mirror of the segmented 9.2-meter aperture has 36 hexagonal 1.315 m (flat to flat) glass mirrors. The architecture and folding of the telescope is similar to JWST, allowing it to fit into the 6.5 m fairing of a modest upgrade to the Delta-IV Heavy version of the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV). We discuss the overall observatory design, optical design, instruments, stray light, wavefront sensing and control, pointing and thermal control, and in-space servicing options.

  6. Nonparaxial vector-field modeling of optical coherence tomography and interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brynmor J; Schlachter, Simon C; Marks, Daniel L; Ralston, Tyler S; Boppart, Stephen A; Carney, P Scott

    2007-09-01

    A large-aperture, electromagnetic model for coherent microscopy is presented and the inverse scattering problem is solved. Approximations to the model are developed for near-focus and far-from-focus operations. These approximations result in an image-reconstruction algorithm consistent with interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM): this validates ISAM processing of optical-coherence-tomography and optical-coherence-microscopy data in a vectorial setting. Numerical simulations confirm that diffraction-limited resolution can be achieved outside the focal plane and that depth of focus is limited only by measurement noise and/or detector dynamic range. Furthermore, the model presented is suitable for the quantitative study of polarimetric coherent microscopy systems operating within the first Born approximation. PMID:17767224

  7. APPLICATION OF LARGE APERTURE EMATS TO WELD INSPECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maclauchlan, D. T.; Clark, S. P.; Hancock, J. W.

    2008-02-28

    One of the most significant developments in EMAT operation is the incorporation of phased array techniques. Phased array EMATs enable electronic beam steering and focusing while operating with temporally short pulses for good range resolution. Using phased array EMAT operation, multiple high powered pulsers are combined in the generation of the ultrasonic wave and multiple elements are combined in the reception of the ultrasonic wave, for improved sensitivity. EMATs make it practical to operate with shear horizontal (SH) waves and scan over a metal part's surface. An EMAT generated line force at the surface launches shear horizontal waves with uniform amplitude for beam angles from -90 deg. to 90 deg. Shear horizontal waves also reflect without mode conversion from surfaces that are parallel to the polarization of the shear wave displacements. The combination of these advantages makes phased array EMATs well suited for weld inspection. Recently, BWXT Services has developed a 32 active channel EMAT phased array system for operation up to 5 MHz. In addition, each element can be constructed with several sub-elements, alternating in polarity, to effectively multiply the number of active elements for a restricted range of beam angles. For example by using elements comprised of 4 sub elements, a 128 active element aperture designed for operation with a nominal 60 deg. beam angle provides good beam steering and focusing performance for 45 deg. to 70 deg. beam angles. The large active apertures allow the use of highly focused beams for good defect detection and high resolution imaging of weld defects. Application of this system to weld inspections has verified that good defect detection and imaging is possible. In addition, operation with SH waves has proven to provide improved detection of lack of fusion at the cap and root of the weld for certain weld geometries. The system has also been used to demonstrate the inspection of submerged metal arc welds while welding.

  8. Design considerations for a large aperture high field superconducting dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Harfoush, F.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Harrison, M.; Kerby, J.; Koepke, K.; Mantsch, P.; Nicol, T.; Riddiford, A.; Theilacker, J.

    1989-03-01

    The final phase of the Fermilab upgrade proposal calls for a new ring of superconducting magnets to be placed in the existing Main Accelerator tunnel. The goal of this design study is to specify a high field dipole (HFD) that is capable of supporting fixed target operation (ramping, resonant extraction) at a field of 6.6T (1.5 Tev) and colliding beam physics at 8.0T (1.8 Tev). The magnetic field quality at high field is set by the large amplitude orbits associated with resonant extraction. The field quality must therefore be at least as good as the existing Tevatron magnets which fulfill these criteria. The high fields and large aperture of this magnet result in large forces on the coil and collar assemblies. Therefore, the cold mass design must be able to sustain these forces while providing sufficient cooling to the coils during 4.2 K fixed target operation, and a minimum heat load during 1.8 K collider operation. The design work is still in progress but a cosine-theta, cold-iron dipole with a 70mm inner diameter coil has been tentatively adopted. This report presents details on the conductor and cable parameters, coil cross-section, projected manufacturing tolerances, iron yoke design, and cold mass assembly. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. High-resolution fracture aperture mapping using optical profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameli, Pasha; Elkhoury, Jean E.; Detwiler, Russell L.

    2013-10-01

    Fractures play an important role in the Earth's crust, often controlling both mechanical and transport processes. Developing a mechanistic understanding of these processes requires quantifying the roughness of fracture surfaces and the contacts and void spaces between fracture surfaces at high spatial resolution (10s of microns) over a broad range of scales (centimeters to meters). Here we present a scalable method for measuring fracture surfaces and reconstructing fracture aperture fields using an optical profilometer. We evaluate the method by measuring two fractured limestone cores; one is a tensile fracture with strong cross correlation between the surfaces and the other is a saw-cut, sand-blasted fracture with negligible cross correlation between the surfaces. Results of repeated measurements of these two fractures suggest that well-correlated surfaces, where the correlation between the surfaces can aid reconstruction, can be reproduced with local uncertainties with median standard deviation of 8 μm . Poorly correlated surfaces, where reconstruction relies solely upon the precision of the placement of the halves of the core on the profilometer stage, can be reproduced with local uncertainties with median standard deviation of 20 μm . Additionally, we quantified the accuracy of the technique by comparing calculated aperture profiles of a fractured concrete core to thin sections cut from the core after impregnating it with epoxy. The median deviation between the two measurements, which includes errors due to residual misalignment of the profiles, was 29 μm supporting the accuracy of the method. Our results emphasize the potential for using noncontact surface measurement techniques to accurately and precisely reconstruct fracture apertures over a wide range of length scales.

  10. Subarray partitions of large aperture planar towed arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jennifer A.; Baggeroer, Arthur B.; Zurk, Lisa M.; Tracey, Brian H.

    2002-05-01

    The current focus of passive detection and localization is in littoral regions where acoustic propagation becomes complicated by severe bottom interaction. The resultant high-transmission loss motivates the need for high-array gain for effective performance over long ranges. Large planar seismic arrays, with aperture dimensions upwards of 3 km×0.5 km, have potential to achieve high gain and good resolution when using matched field processing. In realistic environments, however, large arrays are suceptible to signal gain degradation mechanisms, particularly due to spatial decorrelation of the signal and non-stationary environments. One approach to overcoming this is partitioning the array. Subarray processing reduces stationarity requirements and extracts optimum coherent gain, thus achieving higher gain than that of smaller arrays. This work examines criteria for partitioning planar arrays to perform localization using MFP. Trade-offs between spatial resolution, array gain, and resilience to motion will be quantified and discussed. Performance of different subarray geometries will be presented using adaptive and conventional MFP. [Work sponsored by DARPA under Air Force Contract No. F1962800-00-C-0002. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions, and recommendations are those of the authors and are not necessarily endorsed by the Department of Defense. AB's work was supported by ONR through the SECNAV CNO Chair.

  11. Recent Enhancements of the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) Telescope Testbed at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John; Montgomery, Edward E.; Lindner, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    Recent incremental upgrades to the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) telescope testbed have enabled the demonstration of phasing (with a monochromatic source) of clusters of primary mirror segments down to the diffraction limit. PAMELA upgrades include an improved Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, passive viscoelastic damping treatments for the voice-coil actuators, mechanical improvement of mirror surface figures, and optical bench baffling. This report summarizes the recent PAMELA upgrades, discusses the lessons learned, and presents a status of this unique testbed for wavefront sensing and control. The Marshall Space Flight Center acquired the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) telescope in 1993 after Kaman Aerospace was unable to complete integration and testing under the limited SDIO and DARPA funding. The PAMELA is a 36-segment, half-meter aperture, adaptive telescope which utilizes a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, inductive coil edge sensors, voice coil actuators, imaging CCD cameras and interferometry for figure alignment, wavefront sensing and control. MSFC originally obtained the PAMELA to supplement its research in the interactions of control systems with flexible structures. In August 1994, complete tip, tilt and piston control was successfully demonstrated using the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and the inductive edge sensors.

  12. Recent Enhancements of the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) Telescope Testbed at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent incremental upgrades to the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) telescope testbed have enabled the demonstration of phasing (with a monochromatic source) of clusters of primary mirror segments down to the diffraction limit. PAMELA upgrades include in improved Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, passive viscoelastic damping treatments for the voice-coil actuators, mechanical improvement of mirror surface figures, and optical bench baffling. This report summarizes the recent PAMELA upgrades, discusses the lessons learned, and presents a status of this unique testbed for wavefront sensing and control. The Marshall Space Flight Center acquired the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) telescope in 1993 after Kaman Aerospace was unable to complete integration and testing under the limited SDIO and DARPA funding. The PAMELA is a 36-segment, half-meter aperture, adaptive telescope which utilizes a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, inductive coil edge sensors, voice coil actuators, imaging CCD cameras and interferometry for figure alignment, wavefront sensing and control. MSFC originally obtained the PAMELA to supplement its research in the interactions of control systems with flexible structures. In August 1994, complete tip, tilt and piston control was successfully demonstrated using the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and the inductive edge sensors.

  13. Improvements in large window and optics production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallock, Bob; Messner, Bill; Hall, Chris; Supranowitz, Chris

    2007-04-01

    Fabrication of large optics has been a topic of discussion for decades. As early as the late 1980s, computer-controlled equipment has been used to semi-deterministically correct the figure error of large optics over a number of process iterations. Magnetorheological Finishing, MRF®, was developed and commercialized in the late 1990's to predictably and reliably allow the user to achieve deterministic results on a variety of optical glasses, ceramics and other common optical materials. Large and small optics such as primary mirrors, conformal optics and off-axis components are efficiently fabricated using this approach. More recently, specific processes, MR Fluids and equipment have been developed and implemented to enhance results when finishing large aperture sapphire windows. MRF, by virtue of its unique removal process, overcomes many of the drawbacks of a conventional polishing process. For example, lightweighted optics often exhibit a quilted pattern coincident with their pocket cell structure following conventional pad-based polishing. MRF does not induce mid-frequency errors and is capable of removing existing quilt patterns. Further, odd aperture shapes and part geometries which can represent significant challenges to conventional polish processing are simply and easily corrected with MRF tools. Similarly, aspheric optics which can often present multiple obstacles-particularly when lightweighted and off-axis-typically have a departure from best-fit sphere that is not well matched with to static pad-based polishing tools resulting in pad misfit and associated variations in removal. The conformal subaperture polishing tool inherent to the QED process works as well on typical circular apertures as it does on irregular shapes such as rectangles, petals and trapezoids for example and matches the surface perfectly at all points. Flats, spheres, aspheres and off-axis sections are easily corrected. The schedule uncertainties driven by edge roll and edge control

  14. Multidirectional curved integral imaging with large depth by additional use of a large-aperture lens.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Hak; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2006-10-01

    We propose a curved integral imaging system with large depth achieved by the additional use of a large-aperture lens in a conventional large-depth integral imaging system. The additional large-aperture lens provides a multidirectional curvature effect and improves the viewing angle. The proposed system has a simple structure due to the use of well-fabricated, unmodified flat devices. To calculate the proper elemental images for the proposed system, we explain a modified computer-generated pickup technique based on an ABCD matrix and analyze an effective viewing zone in the proposed system. From experiments, we show that the proposed system has an improved viewing angle of more than 7 degrees compared with conventional integral imaging. PMID:16983427

  15. High throughput optical lithography by scanning a massive array of bowtie aperture antennas at near-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, X.; Datta, A.; Traverso, L. M.; Pan, L.; Xu, X.; Moon, E. E.

    2015-11-01

    Optical lithography, the enabling process for defining features, has been widely used in semiconductor industry and many other nanotechnology applications. Advances of nanotechnology require developments of high-throughput optical lithography capabilities to overcome the optical diffraction limit and meet the ever-decreasing device dimensions. We report our recent experimental advancements to scale up diffraction unlimited optical lithography in a massive scale using the near field nanolithography capabilities of bowtie apertures. A record number of near-field optical elements, an array of 1,024 bowtie antenna apertures, are simultaneously employed to generate a large number of patterns by carefully controlling their working distances over the entire array using an optical gap metrology system. Our experimental results reiterated the ability of using massively-parallel near-field devices to achieve high-throughput optical nanolithography, which can be promising for many important nanotechnology applications such as computation, data storage, communication, and energy.

  16. High throughput optical lithography by scanning a massive array of bowtie aperture antennas at near-field

    PubMed Central

    Wen, X.; Datta, A.; Traverso, L. M.; Pan, L.; Xu, X.; Moon, E. E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical lithography, the enabling process for defining features, has been widely used in semiconductor industry and many other nanotechnology applications. Advances of nanotechnology require developments of high-throughput optical lithography capabilities to overcome the optical diffraction limit and meet the ever-decreasing device dimensions. We report our recent experimental advancements to scale up diffraction unlimited optical lithography in a massive scale using the near field nanolithography capabilities of bowtie apertures. A record number of near-field optical elements, an array of 1,024 bowtie antenna apertures, are simultaneously employed to generate a large number of patterns by carefully controlling their working distances over the entire array using an optical gap metrology system. Our experimental results reiterated the ability of using massively-parallel near-field devices to achieve high-throughput optical nanolithography, which can be promising for many important nanotechnology applications such as computation, data storage, communication, and energy. PMID:26525906

  17. Correction on the effect of numerical aperture in optical scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiqi; Liu, Shiyuan; Zhang, Chuanwei; Chen, Xiuguo; Gu, Honggang

    2013-10-01

    Optical scatterometry, also referred to as optical critical dimension (OCD) metrology, has been introduced for critical dimension (CD) monitoring and overlay metrology with great success in recent years. Forward modeling to calculate the optical signature from the measured diffractive structure is one of the most important issues in OCD metrology. To simplify the forward modeling approach, such as rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA), the incidence and azimuthal angles are usually assumed to be constant. However, since some focusing elements, such as focusing lens or parabolic mirrors with finite numerical aperture (NA), are always used to gain a sufficient small spot size onto the sample, this assumption is not true in the whole exit pupil of the focusing elements, leading to a modeling error in forward modeling, and finally leading to a fitting error in OCD metrology. In this paper, we propose a correction method with consideration of the effect of NA to decrease the modeling error in the forward modeling. The correction method is an average integral method based on Gaussian quadrature in two dimensions inside a circle, and is performed on forward modeling with varied incidence and azimuthal angles over the exit pupil. Experiments performed on silicon gratings with a Mueller matrix polarimeter have demonstrated that the proposed correction method achieves a higher accuracy in OCD metrology.

  18. Error analysis of large aperture static interference imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fan; Zhang, Guo

    2015-12-01

    Large Aperture Static Interference Imaging Spectrometer is a new type of spectrometer with light structure, high spectral linearity, high luminous flux and wide spectral range, etc ,which overcomes the contradiction between high flux and high stability so that enables important values in science studies and applications. However, there're different error laws in imaging process of LASIS due to its different imaging style from traditional imaging spectrometers, correspondingly, its data processing is complicated. In order to improve accuracy of spectrum detection and serve for quantitative analysis and monitoring of topographical surface feature, the error law of LASIS imaging is supposed to be learned. In this paper, the LASIS errors are classified as interferogram error, radiometric correction error and spectral inversion error, and each type of error is analyzed and studied. Finally, a case study of Yaogan-14 is proposed, in which the interferogram error of LASIS by time and space combined modulation is mainly experimented and analyzed, as well as the errors from process of radiometric correction and spectral inversion.

  19. Large aperture tunable-focus liquid lens using shape memory alloy spring.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Nazmul; Kim, Hanseup; Mastrangelo, Carlos H

    2016-06-13

    A tunable-focus large aperture liquid lens is constructed using shape memory alloy (SMA) springs as actuators. The lens mainly consists of a shallow liquid-filled cylindrical cavity bound by a thin compressible annular rim and encapsulated by a flexible circular membrane on the top of the rim and a rigid circular plate at the rim bottom. The lens optical power is adjusted by a controlled compression of the annular rim via actuation of the three shape-memory alloy (SMA) springs. Since the volume of the cavity liquid is constant, the rim compression bulges the flexible membrane outward thus reducing its radius of curvature and the lens focal length. The fabricated tunable lens demonstrated an optical power range of 0-4 diopters utilizing a driving voltage less than 3V. Lens optical wavefront profiling was done using a Shack-Hartmann sensor displaying a RMS wave front error of 0.77 µm and 1.68 µm at 0 D and + 4 D. The aperture diameter and thickness of the fabricated lens are 34 mm and 9 mm, respectively, while weighing 16.7 g. PMID:27410350

  20. Large-pitch steerable synthetic transmit aperture imaging (LPSSTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Kolios, Michael C.; Xu, Yuan

    2016-04-01

    A linear ultrasound array system usually has a larger pitch and is less costly than a phased array system, but loses the ability to fully steer the ultrasound beam. In this paper, we propose a system whose hardware is similar to a large-pitch linear array system, but whose ability to steer the beam is similar to a phased array system. The motivation is to reduce the total number of measurement channels M (the product of the number of transmissions, nT, and the number of the receive channels in each transmission, nR), while maintaining reasonable image quality. We combined adjacent elements (with proper delays introduced) into groups that would be used in both the transmit and receive processes of synthetic transmit aperture imaging. After the M channels of RF data were acquired, a pseudo-inversion was applied to estimate the equivalent signal in traditional STA to reconstruct a STA image. Even with the similar M, different choices of nT and nR will produce different image quality. The images produced with M=N2/15 in the selected regions of interest (ROI) were demonstrated to be comparable with a full phased array, where N is the number of the array elements. The disadvantage of the proposed system is that its field of view in one delay-configuration is smaller than a standard full phased array. However, by adjusting the delay for each element within each group, the beam can be steered to cover the same field of view as the standard fully-filled phased array. The LPSSTA system might be useful for 3D ultrasound imaging.

  1. Numerical aperture characteristics of angle-ended plastic optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Cheng; Farrell, Gerard

    2003-03-01

    With the increasing information rates demanded in consumer, automotive and aeronautical applications, a low cost and high performance physical transmission medium is required. Compared with Silica Optical Fiber, Plastic Optical Fiber (POF) offers an economic solution for a range of high-capacity, short-haul applications in industrial and military environments. Recently, a new type of POF, the perfluorinated graded-index plastic optical fiber (PF GI-POF), has been introduced that has low losses and high bandwidth at the communication wavelengths 850 nm and 1300nm. POF is normally terminated perpendicular to the fiber axis. We propose an angle-ended POF, which is terminated at non-perpendicular angles to the fiber axis. The aim of the research is to investigate the numerical aperture (NA) characteristics of angle-ended POF along the major axis of the elliptical endface. A theoretical model indicates that the NA of the angle-ended POF will increase nonlinearly with tilt-angle and the acceptance cone will be deflected with the angle of the deflection increasing nonlinearly with tilt-angle. We present results for the measured NA and the measured deflection angle using the far-field radiation method. Results are presented for 13 angle-ended SI-POF tilt-angles. We also present results for theoretical value of NA and deflection angle as a function of tilt-angle. The agreement between the measured and theoretical value is good up to tilt-angles of about 15 degrees, beyond which deviation occurs.

  2. Grating-flanked plasmonic coaxial apertures for efficient fiber optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Amr A E; Sheikhoelislami, Sassan; Gastelum, Steven; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2016-09-01

    Subwavelength plasmonic apertures have been foundational for direct optical manipulation of nanoscale specimens including sub-100 nm polymeric beads, metallic nanoparticles and proteins. While most plasmonic traps result in two-dimensional localization, three-dimensional manipulation has been demonstrated by integrating a plasmonic aperture on an optical fiber tip. However, such 3D traps are usually inefficient since the optical mode of the fiber and the subwavelength aperture only weakly couple. In this paper we design more efficient optical-fiber-based plasmonic tweezers combining a coaxial plasmonic aperture with a plasmonic grating coupler at the fiber tip facet. Using full-field finite difference time domain analysis, we optimize the grating design for both gold and silver fiber-based coaxial tweezers such that the optical transmission through the apertures is maximized. With the optimized grating, we show that the maximum transmission efficiency increases from 2.5% to 19.6% and from 1.48% to 16.7% for the gold and silver structures respectively. To evaluate their performance as optical tweezers, we calculate the optical forces and the corresponding trapping potential on dielectric particles interacting with the apertures. We demonstrate that the enahncement in the transmission translates into an equivalent increase in the optical forces. Consequently, the optical power required to achieve stable optical trapping is significantly reduced allowing for efficient localization and 3D manipulation of sub-30 nm dielectric particles. PMID:27607663

  3. Large optics for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, P.

    2015-01-12

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser with its 192 independent laser beams is not only the world’s largest laser, it is also the largest optical system ever built. With its 192 independent laser beams, the NIF requires a total of 7648 large-aperture (meter-sized) optics. One of the many challenges in designing and building NIF has been to carry out the research and development on optical materials, optics design, and optics manufacturing and metrology technologies needed to achieve NIF’s high output energies and precision beam quality. This paper describes the multiyear, multi-supplier, development effort that was undertaken to develop the advanced optical materials, coatings, fabrication technologies, and associated process improvements necessary to manufacture the wide range of NIF optics. The optics include neodymium-doped phosphate glass laser amplifiers; fused silica lenses, windows, and phase plates; mirrors and polarizers with multi-layer, high-reflectivity dielectric coatings deposited on BK7 substrates; and potassium di-hydrogen phosphate crystal optics for fast optical switches, frequency conversion, and polarization rotation. Also included is a discussion of optical specifications and custom metrology and quality-assurance tools designed, built, and fielded at supplier sites to verify compliance with the stringent NIF specifications. In addition, a brief description of the ongoing program to improve the operational lifetime (i.e., damage resistance) of optics exposed to high fluence in the 351-nm (3ω) is provided.

  4. Intense THz Pulses with large ponderomotive potential generated from large aperture photoconductive antennas.

    PubMed

    Ropagnol, X; Khorasaninejad, M; Raeiszadeh, M; Safavi-Naeini, S; Bouvier, M; Côté, C Y; Laramée, A; Reid, M; Gauthier, M A; Ozaki, T

    2016-05-30

    We report the generation of free space terahertz (THz) pulses with energy up to 8.3 ± 0.2 µJ from an encapsulated interdigitated ZnSe Large Aperture Photo-Conductive Antenna (LAPCA). An aperture of 12.2 cm2 is illuminated using a 400 nm pump laser with multi-mJ energies at 10 Hz repetition rate. The calculated THz peak electric field is 331 ± 4 kV/cm with a spectrum characterized by a median frequency of 0.28 THz. Given its relatively low frequency, this THz field will accelerate charged particles efficiently having very large ponderomotive energy of 15 ± 1 eV for electrons in vacuum. The scaling of the emission is studied with respect to the dimensions of the antenna, and it is observed that the capacitance of the LAPCA leads to a severe decrease in and distortion of the biasing voltage pulse, fundamentally limiting the maximum applied bias field and consequently the maximum energy of the radiated THz pulses. In order to demonstrate the advantages of this source in the strong field regime, an open-aperture Z-scan experiment was performed on n-doped InGaAs, which showed significant absorption bleaching. PMID:27410061

  5. Optical aperture area determination for accurate illuminance and luminous efficacy measurements of LED lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dönsberg, Timo; Mäntynen, Henrik; Ikonen, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    The measurement uncertainty of illuminance and, consequently, luminous flux and luminous efficacy of LED lamps can be reduced with a recently introduced method based on the predictable quantum efficient detector (PQED). One of the most critical factors affecting the measurement uncertainty with the PQED method is the determination of the aperture area. This paper describes an upgrade to an optical method for direct determination of aperture area where superposition of equally spaced Gaussian laser beams is used to form a uniform irradiance distribution. In practice, this is accomplished by scanning the aperture in front of an intensity-stabilized laser beam. In the upgraded method, the aperture is attached to the PQED and the whole package is transversely scanned relative to the laser beam. This has the benefit of having identical geometry in the laser scanning of the aperture area and in the actual photometric measurement. Further, the aperture and detector assembly does not have to be dismantled for the aperture calibration. However, due to small acceptance angle of the PQED, differences between the diffraction effects of an overfilling plane wave and of a combination of Gaussian laser beams at the circular aperture need to be taken into account. A numerical calculation method for studying these effects is discussed in this paper. The calculation utilizes the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral, which is applied to the geometry of the PQED and the aperture. Calculation results for various aperture diameters and two different aperture-to-detector distances are presented.

  6. Topology optimization-based lightweight primary mirror design of a large-aperture space telescope.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shutian; Hu, Rui; Li, Quhao; Zhou, Ping; Dong, Zhigang; Kang, Renke

    2014-12-10

    For the large-aperture space telescope, the lightweight primary mirror design with a high-quality optical surface is a critical and challenging issue. This work presents a topology optimization-based design procedure for a lightweight primary mirror and a new mirror configuration of a large-aperture space telescope is obtained through the presented design procedure. Inspired by the topology optimization method considering cast constraints, an optimization model for the configuration design of the mirror back is proposed, through which the distribution and the heights of the stiffeners on the mirror back can be optimized simultaneously. For the purpose of minimizing the optical surface deviation due to self-weight and polishing pressure loadings, the objective function is selected as to maximize the mirror structural stiffness, which can be achieved by minimizing the structural compliance. The total mass of the primary mirror is assigned as the constraint. In the application example, results of the optimized design topology for two kinds of mass constraints are presented. Executing the design procedure for specific requirements and postprocessing the topology obtained of the structure, a new mirror configuration with tree-like stiffeners and a multiple-arch back in double directions is proposed. A verification model is constructed to evaluate the design results and the finite element method is used to calculate the displacement of the mirror surface. Then the RMS deviation can be obtained after fitting the deformed surface by Zernike polynomials. The proposed mirror is compared with two classical mirrors in the optical performance, and the comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the new mirror configuration. PMID:25608076

  7. Designs for a large-aperture telescope to map the CMB 10× faster.

    PubMed

    Niemack, Michael D

    2016-03-01

    Current large-aperture cosmic microwave background (CMB) telescopes have nearly maximized the number of detectors that can be illuminated while maintaining diffraction-limited image quality. The polarization-sensitive detector arrays being deployed in these telescopes in the next few years will have roughly 10⁴ detectors. Increasing the mapping speed of future instruments by at least an order of magnitude is important to enable precise probes of the inflationary paradigm in the first fraction of a second after the big bang and provide strong constraints on cosmological parameters. The CMB community has begun planning a next generation "Stage IV" CMB project that will be comprised of multiple telescopes with between 10⁵-10⁶ detectors to pursue these goals. This paper introduces the new crossed Dragone telescope and receiver optics designs that increase the usable diffraction-limited field-of-view, and therefore the mapping speed, by an order of magnitude compared to the upcoming generation of large-aperture instruments. Polarization systematics and engineering considerations are presented, including a preliminary receiver model to demonstrate that these designs will enable high efficiency illumination of >10⁵ detectors in a next generation CMB telescope. PMID:26974631

  8. Optimization analysis of primary mirror in large aperture telescope based on workbench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhengsen; Wang, Guomin

    2015-10-01

    With the diameter increasing for large aperture telescope primary mirror, the gravity caused by the increased of surface size will directly affect the quality of optical imaging, the adjustment of large aperture primary mirror will be frequent according to the requirement of observation. As the angle and the azimuth's transformation of primary mirror influences the surface shape accuracy immediately, the rational design of the primary mirror supporting structure is of crucial importance. Now the general method is to use ANSYS APDL programming, which is inconvenient and complex to fit for the different components, the calculation require much time and the analysis is lack of efficient. Taking the diameter of 1.12 m telescope primary mirror as the research objection, the paper combine the actual design parameters of SONG telescope, respectively using ANSYS WORKBENCH to employ the primary mirror axial and lateral support model in finite element method, the optimal solution is obtained by optimization design and the change rule of mirror surface deformation under inclined condition is studied. The optimization results according with the requirements of the primary mirror comprehensive error proves that the optimization analysis method is available and applicable.

  9. Optical synthetic-aperture radar processor archietecture with quadratic phase-error correction

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, F.M.; Mason, J.J. )

    1990-10-15

    Uncompensated phase errors limit the image quality of synthetic-aperture radar. We present an acousto-optic synthetic-aperture radar processor architecture capable of measuring the quadratic phase error. This architecture allows for the error signal to be fed back to the processor to generate the corrected image.

  10. Optical configuration of an upconverted millimeter-wave distributed aperture imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Thomas E.; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Martin, Richard D.; Stein, E. Lee, Jr.; Samluk, Jesse P.; Mackrides, Daniel G.; Mirotznik, Mark S.; Prather, Dennis W.

    2009-09-01

    Millimeter-wave (mmW) imaging is presently a subject of considerable interest due to the ability of mmW radiation to penetrate obscurants while concurrently exhibiting low atmospheric absorption loss in particular segments of the spectrum, including near 35 and 94 GHz. As a result, mmW imaging affords an opportunity to see through certain levels of fog, rain, cloud cover, dust, and blowing sand, providing for situational awareness where visible and infrared detectors are unable to perform. On the other hand, due to the relatively long wavelength of the radiation, achieving sufficient resolution entails large aperture sizes, which furthermore leads to volumetric scaling of the imaging platform when using conventional refractive optics. Alternatively, distributed aperture imaging can achieve comparable resolution in an essentially two-dimensional form factor by use of a number of smaller subapertures through which the image is interferometrically synthesized. The novelty of our approach lies in the optical upconversion of the mmW radiation as sidebands on carrier laser beams using electro-optic modulators. These sidebands are subsequently stripped from the carrier using narrow passband optical filters and a spatial Fourier transform is performed by means of a simple lens to synthesize the image, which is then viewed using a standard near-infrared focal plane array (FPA). Consequently, the optical configuration of the back-end processor represents a major design concern for the imaging system. As such, in this paper we discuss the optical configuration along with some of the design challenges and present preliminary imaging data validating the system performance.

  11. Large field distributed aperture laser semiactive angle measurement system design with imaging fiber bundles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunyun; Cheng, Haobo; Feng, Yunpeng; Jing, Xiaoli

    2016-09-01

    A type of laser semiactive angle measurement system is designed for target detecting and tracking. Only one detector is used to detect target location from four distributed aperture optical systems through a 4×1 imaging fiber bundle. A telecentric optical system in image space is designed to increase the efficiency of imaging fiber bundles. According to the working principle of a four-quadrant (4Q) detector, fiber diamond alignment is adopted between an optical system and a 4Q detector. The structure of the laser semiactive angle measurement system is, we believe, novel. Tolerance analysis is carried out to determine tolerance limits of manufacture and installation errors of the optical system. The performance of the proposed method is identified by computer simulations and experiments. It is demonstrated that the linear region of the system is ±12°, with measurement error of better than 0.2°. In general, this new system can be used with large field of view and high accuracy, providing an efficient, stable, and fast method for angle measurement in practical situations. PMID:27607276

  12. Study on the method to test large-aperture hyperboloid convex mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaohui; Dong, Huiwen; Guo, Wen; Wang, Huijun

    2014-08-01

    There are numerous reflecting optical system designs that call for large-aperture convex surfaces, such as secondary mirror in on-axis three mirror anastigmatic (TMA). Several methods to test high accuracy hyperboloid convex surfaces are introduced separately in this paper. A kind of arrangement is chosen to test a surface with diameter of 420mm, radius of 1371mm, and conic K -2.1229. The CGH compensator for testing is designed, which is made up of illumination lens and hologram test plate with designed residual wavefront aberration less than 0.001λ (RMS). The second transmitted method that is equipped with a technical flat surface coating by Ag film in the bottom of surface mirror under test, which form an auto-collimation optical system to eliminate the aberration. The Hindle-Simpson test that requires a larger meniscus lens to compensate the optical aberration, and the designed result of optical test system is less than 0.0016λ. Contrasting the CGH compensator and the second transmitted method, the Hindle-Simpson testing method has the advantage of it is easily to manufacture and adjust; meanwhile the test result is stable and has been less affected by the environment. It has been found that the method is rational and reliable, and it can fulfill the requirement of manufacturing and testing process for hyperboloid convex mirrors.

  13. Large-aperture wide-bandwidth antireflection-coated silicon lenses for millimeter wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Datta, R; Munson, C D; Niemack, M D; McMahon, J J; Britton, J; Wollack, E J; Beall, J; Devlin, M J; Fowler, J; Gallardo, P; Hubmayr, J; Irwin, K; Newburgh, L; Nibarger, J P; Page, L; Quijada, M A; Schmitt, B L; Staggs, S T; Thornton, R; Zhang, L

    2013-12-20

    The increasing scale of cryogenic detector arrays for submillimeter and millimeter wavelength astrophysics has led to the need for large aperture, high index of refraction, low loss, cryogenic refracting optics. Silicon with n=3.4, low loss, and high thermal conductivity is a nearly optimal material for these purposes but requires an antireflection (AR) coating with broad bandwidth, low loss, low reflectance, and a matched coefficient of thermal expansion. We present an AR coating for curved silicon optics comprised of subwavelength features cut into the lens surface with a custom three-axis silicon dicing saw. These features constitute a metamaterial that behaves as a simple dielectric coating. We have fabricated silicon lenses as large as 33.4 cm in diameter with micromachined layers optimized for use between 125 and 165 GHz. Our design reduces average reflections to a few tenths of a percent for angles of incidence up to 30° with low cross polarization. We describe the design, tolerance, manufacture, and measurements of these coatings and present measurements of the optical properties of silicon at millimeter wavelengths at cryogenic and room temperatures. This coating and lens fabrication approach is applicable from centimeter to submillimeter wavelengths and can be used to fabricate coatings with greater than octave bandwidth. PMID:24513939

  14. Large-Aperture Wide-Bandwidth Anti-Reflection-Coated Silicon Lenses for Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, R.; Munson, C. D.; Niemack, M. D.; McMahon, J. J.; Britton, J.; Wollack, E. J.; Beall, J.; Devlin, M. J.; Fowler, J.; Gallardo, P.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K.; Newburgh, L.; Nibarger, J. P.; Page, L.; Quijada, M. A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Staggs, S. T.; Thornton, R.; Zhang, L.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing scale of cryogenic detector arrays for sub-millimeter and millimeter wavelength astrophysics has led to the need for large aperture, high index of refraction, low loss, cryogenic refracting optics. Silicon with n = 3.4, low loss, and relatively high thermal conductivity is a nearly optimal material for these purposes, but requires an antireflection (AR) coating with broad bandwidth, low loss, low reflectance, and a matched coffecient of thermal expansion. We present an AR coating for curved silicon optics comprised of subwavelength features cut into the lens surface with a custom three axis silicon dicing saw. These features constitute a metamaterial that behaves as a simple dielectric coating. We have fabricated and coated silicon lenses as large as 33.4 cm in diameter with coatings optimized for use between 125-165 GHz. Our design reduces average reflections to a few tenths of a percent for angles of incidence up to 30 deg. with low cross-polarization. We describe the design, tolerance, manufacture, and measurements of these coatings and present measurements of the optical properties of silicon at millimeter wavelengths at cryogenic and room temperatures. This coating and lens fabrication approach is applicable from centimeter to sub-millimeter wavelengths and can be used to fabricate coatings with greater than octave bandwidth.

  15. Large-aperture Wide-bandwidth Antireflection-coated Silicon Lenses for Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, R.; Munson, C. D.; Niemack, M. D.; McMahon, J. J.; Britton, J.; Wollack, Edward J.; Beall, J.; Devlin, M. J.; Fowler, J.; Gallardo, P.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K.; Newburgh, L.; Nibarger, J. P.; Page, L.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Staggs, S. T.; Thornton, R.; Zhang, L.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing scale of cryogenic detector arrays for submillimeter and millimeter wavelength astrophysics has led to the need for large aperture, high index of refraction, low loss, cryogenic refracting optics. Silicon with n 3.4, low loss, and high thermal conductivity is a nearly optimal material for these purposes but requires an antireflection (AR) coating with broad bandwidth, low loss, low reflectance, and a matched coefficient of thermal expansion. We present an AR coating for curved silicon optics comprised of subwavelength features cut into the lens surface with a custom three-axis silicon dicing saw. These features constitute a metamaterial that behaves as a simple dielectric coating.We have fabricated silicon lenses as large as 33.4 cm in diameter with micromachined layers optimized for use between 125 and 165 GHz. Our design reduces average reflections to a few tenths of a percent for angles of incidence up to 30deg with low cross polarization.We describe the design, tolerance, manufacture, and measurements of these coatings and present measurements of the optical properties of silicon at millimeter wavelengths at cryogenic and room temperatures. This coating and lens fabrication approach is applicable from centimeter to submillimeter wavelengths and can be used to fabricate coatings with greater than octave bandwidth.

  16. Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope: Science Drivers and Technology Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Glavallsco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8- to 16-m ultraviolet optical near Infrared space observatory for launch in the 2025 to 2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including: Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy? We present a range of science drivers and the resulting performance requirements for ATLAST (8- to 16-marcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 micron wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 sq m, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 to 2.4 micron, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We also discuss the priorities for technology development needed to enable the construction of ATLAST for a cost that is comparable to that of current generation observatory-class space missions.

  17. Characterisation of a large aperture steep concave parabolic mirror using SASI based on auto-collimation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bingcai; Li, Bing; Tian, Ailing; Yang, Haoyu; Gao, Fen; Chen, Lei

    2015-01-01

    To characterise a large aperture steep concave parabolic mirror, a new sub-aperture stitching interferometry measurement technology (SASI) based on auto-collimation is proposed. The principle of the stitching process is analysed, and the sub-aperture partitioning for a full aperture of a paraboloid is discussed. Next, the overlapped sampled points between sub-apertures are rectified through sampled points realigned in mesh grids. Finally, two experiments, the SASI based on auto-collimation and the full aperture test, were implemented for a parabolic mirror. The stitching result exhibits good agreement with the full-aperture result.

  18. The scaling relationship between telescope cost and aperture size for very large telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van Belle, Gerard T.; Meinel, Aden Baker; Meinel, Marjorie Pettit

    2004-01-01

    Cost data for ground-based telescopes of the last century are analyzed for trends in the relationship between aperture size and cost. We find that for apertures built prior to 1980, costs scaled as aperture size to the 2.8 power, which is consistent with the precious finding of Meinel (1978). After 1980, 'traditional' monolithic mirror telescope costs have scaled as aperture to the 2.5 power. The large multiple mirror telescopes built or in construction during this time period (Keck, LBT, GTC) appear to deviate from this relationship with significant cost savings as a result, although it is unclear what power law such structures follow. We discuss the implications of the current cost-aperture size data on the proposed large telescope projects of the next ten to twenty years. Structures that naturally tend towards the 2.0 power in the cost-aperture relationship will be the favorable choice for future extremely large apertures; out expectation is that space-based structures will ultimately gain economic advantage over ground-based ones.

  19. Large-aperture, tapered fiber-coupled, 10-kHz particle-image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Paul S; Roy, Sukesh; Jiang, Naibo; Gord, James R

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate the design and implementation of a fiber-optic beam-delivery system using a large-aperture, tapered step-index fiber for high-speed particle-image velocimetry (PIV) in turbulent combustion flows. The tapered fiber in conjunction with a diffractive-optical-element (DOE) fiber-optic coupler significantly increases the damage threshold of the fiber, enabling fiber-optic beam delivery of sufficient nanosecond, 532-nm, laser pulse energy for high-speed PIV measurements. The fiber successfully transmits 1-kHz and 10-kHz laser pulses with energies of 5.3 mJ and 2 mJ, respectively, for more than 25 min without any indication of damage. It is experimentally demonstrated that the tapered fiber possesses the high coupling efficiency (~80%) and moderate beam quality for PIV. Additionally, the nearly uniform output-beam profile exiting the fiber is ideal for PIV applications. Comparative PIV measurements are made using a conventionally (bulk-optic) delivered light sheet, and a similar order of measurement accuracy is obtained with and without fiber coupling. Effective use of fiber-coupled, 10-kHz PIV is demonstrated for instantaneous 2D velocity-field measurements in turbulent reacting flows. Proof-of-concept measurements show significant promise for the performance of fiber-coupled, high-speed PIV using a tapered optical fiber in harsh laser-diagnostic environments such as those encountered in gas-turbine test beds and the cylinder of a combustion engine. PMID:23481818

  20. Three-dimensional digital holographic aperture synthesis for rapid and highly-accurate large-volume metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, Stephen; Kaylor, Brant M.; Barber, Zeb W.; Reibel, Randy R.

    2015-09-01

    Currently large volume, high accuracy three-dimensional (3D) metrology is dominated by laser trackers, which typically utilize a laser scanner and cooperative reflector to estimate points on a given surface. The dependency upon the placement of cooperative targets dramatically inhibits the speed at which metrology can be conducted. To increase speed, laser scanners or structured illumination systems can be used directly on the surface of interest. Both approaches are restricted in their axial and lateral resolution at longer stand-off distances due to the diffraction limit of the optics used. Holographic aperture ladar (HAL) and synthetic aperture ladar (SAL) can enhance the lateral resolution of an imaging system by synthesizing much larger apertures by digitally combining measurements from multiple smaller apertures. Both of these approaches only produce two-dimensional imagery and are therefore not suitable for large volume 3D metrology. We combined the SAL and HAL approaches to create a swept frequency digital holographic 3D imaging system that provides rapid measurement speed for surface coverage with unprecedented axial and lateral resolution at longer standoff ranges. The technique yields a "data cube" of Fourier domain data, which can be processed with a 3D Fourier transform to reveal a 3D estimate of the surface. In this paper, we provide the theoretical background for the technique and show experimental results based on an ultra-wideband frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) chirped heterodyne ranging system showing ~100 micron lateral and axial precisions at >2 m standoff distances.

  1. Reflective Schmidt-Cassegrain system for large-aperture telescopes.

    PubMed

    Brychikhin, M N; Chkhalo, N I; Eikhorn, Ya O; Malyshev, I V; Pestov, A E; Plastinin, Yu A; Polkovnikov, V N; Rizvanov, A A; Salashchenko, N N; Strulya, I L; Toropov, M N

    2016-06-01

    A reflective modification of the Schmidt-Cassegrain system was built and tested. Ultraviolet (UV) and soft x-ray applications are discussed. The system consists of a planoid mirror with an aspheric profile and prime concave and secondary convex spherical mirrors. Spherical aberration in a wide field of view and astigmatism are compensated by the aspheric profile of the planoid. The main parameters of the scheme are as follows: an entrance aperture of 180 mm, a focal ratio F/3.2, an angular resolution better than 3'' (corresponding to a pixel size of a back-side illuminated CCD), a field of view of ±1.5° (2ω=3°) and a flat image field with a diameter of 30.4 mm. Due to the absence of chromatic aberrations and wide field of view, the scheme is of considerable interest for hyperspectral instruments. In particular, the operating range of the instruments can be expanded into vacuum UV and UV regions. PMID:27411199

  2. Automated interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy and computational adaptive optics for improved optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Boppart, Stephen A; Carney, P Scott

    2016-03-10

    In this paper, we introduce an algorithm framework for the automation of interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM). Under this framework, common processing steps such as dispersion correction, Fourier domain resampling, and computational adaptive optics aberration correction are carried out as metrics-assisted parameter search problems. We further present the results of this algorithm applied to phantom and biological tissue samples and compare with manually adjusted results. With the automated algorithm, near-optimal ISAM reconstruction can be achieved without manual adjustment. At the same time, the technical barrier for the nonexpert using ISAM imaging is also significantly lowered. PMID:26974799

  3. Experimentally supported investigations into the optical performance of multi-aperture window concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, L. C.; Kalin, D. A.; Banish, M. R.

    1992-05-01

    An experimental and analytic investigation was undertaken to examine the optical performance of a multiaperture window concept for use in hypersonic, endoatmospheric vehicles. The window was simulated using a simple two-dimensional flat plate with multiple circular apertures. Analyses were performed to examine transmission, thermal emission, and aero-optic effects (image blur, jitter, and Strehl reduction). A series of imaging tests was conducted in both the short wave infrared (SWIR) and midwave infrared (MWIR) wavebands through the multi-aperture window and a monolithic (baseline) window. The images recorded through both window schemes were analyzed and compared to investigate the effects of multi-aperture windows on aero-optic performance. The results from these experiments could be used in a concept definition or trade study for potential optically guided vehicle systems.

  4. A high-resolution detecting system based on machine vision for defects on large aperture and super-smooth surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongying; Zhao, Limin; Wang, Shitong; Cao, Pin; Liu, Dong; Li, Lu; Yan, Lu; Li, Chen; Xie, Shibing; Li, Yang; Chen, Yangjie

    2015-02-01

    The high-resolution detecting system based on machine vision for defects on large aperture and super-smooth surface uses a novel ring telecentric lighting optical system detecting the defects on the sample all round and without blind spots. The scattering light induced by surface defects enters the adaptive and highly zoom microscopic scattering dark-field imaging system for defect detecting and then forms digital images. Sub-aperture microscopic scanning sampling and fast stitching on the surface is realized by using precise multi-axis shifting guided scanning system and a standard comparison board based upon binary optics is used to implement fast calibration of micron-dimension defects detected actually. The pattern recognition technology of digital image processing which can automatically output digitalized surface defects statements after scaling is established to comprehensively evaluate defects. This system which can reach micron-dimension defect resolution can achieve detections of large aperture components of 850 mm × 500 mm, solve the durable problem of subjective uncertainty brought in by human visual detection of defects and achieve quantitative detection of defects with machine vision.

  5. LCLS X-ray mirror measurements using a large aperture visible light interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    McCarville, T; Soufli, R; Pivovaroff, M

    2011-03-02

    Synchrotron or FEL X-ray mirrors are required to deliver an X-ray beam from its source to an experiment location, without contributing significantly to wave front distortion. Accurate mirror figure measurements are required prior to installation to meet this intent. This paper describes how a 300 mm aperture phasing interferometer was calibrated to <1 nm absolute accuracy and used to mount and measure 450 mm long flats for the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Measuring focus mirrors with an interferometer requires additional calibration, because high fringe density introduces systematic errors from the interferometer's imaging optics. This paper describes how these errors can be measured and corrected. The calibration approaches described here apply equally well to interferometers larger than 300 mm aperture, which are becoming more common in optics laboratories. The objective of this effort was to install LCLS flats with < 10 nm of spherical curvature, and < 2 nm rms a-sphere. The objective was met by measuring the mirrors after fabrication, coating and mounting, using a 300 mm aperture phasing interferometer calibrated to an accuracy < 1 nm. The key to calibrating the interferometer accurately was to sample the error using independent geometries that are available. The results of those measurements helped identify and reduce calibration error sources. The approach used to measure flats applies equally well to focus mirrors, provided an additional calibration is performed to measure the error introduced by fringe density. This calibration has been performed on the 300 mm aperture interferometer, and the measurement correction was evaluated for a typical focus mirror. The 300 mm aperture limitation requires stitching figure measurements together for many X-ray mirrors of interest, introducing another possible error source. Stitching is eliminated by applying the calibrations described above to larger aperture instruments

  6. 8 Meter Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST-8m)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    ATLAST-8m (Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope) is a proposed 8-meter monolithic UV/optical/NIR space observatory (wavelength range 110 to 2500 nm) to be placed in orbit at Sun-Earth L2 by NASA's planned Ares V heavy lift vehicle. Given its very high angular resolution (15 mas @ 500 nm), sensitivity and performance stability, ATLAST-8m is capable of achieving breakthroughs in a broad range of astrophysics including: Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy? An 8-meter UVOIR observatory has the performance required to detect habitability (H2O, atmospheric column density) and biosignatures (O2, O3, CH4) in terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres, to reveal the underlying physics that drives star formation, and to trace the complex interactions between dark matter, galaxies, and intergalactic medium. The ATLAST Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study developed a detailed point design for an 8-m monolithic observatory including optical design; structural design/analysis including primary mirror support structure, sun shade and secondary mirror support structure; thermal analysis; spacecraft including structure, propulsion, GN&C, avionics, power systems and reaction wheels; mass and power budgets; and system cost. The results of which were submitted by invitation to NRC's 2010 Astronomy & Astrophysics Decadal Survey.

  7. Thermal Analysis of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) 8 Meter Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornsby, Linda; Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) preliminary design concept consists of an 8 meter diameter monolithic primary mirror enclosed in an insulated, optical tube with stray light baffles and a sunshade. ATLAST will be placed in orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 and will experience constant exposure to the sun. The insulation on the optical tube and sunshade serve to cold bias the telescope which helps to minimize thermal gradients. The primary mirror will be maintained at 280K with an active thermal control system. The geometric model of the primary mirror, optical tube, sun baffles, and sunshade was developed using Thermal Desktop(R) SINDA/FLUINT(R) was used for the thermal analysis and the radiation environment was analyzed using RADCAD(R). A XX node model was executed in order to characterize the static performance and thermal stability of the mirror during maneuvers. This is important because long exposure observations, such as extra-solar terrestrial planet finding and characterization, require a very stable observatory wave front. Steady state thermal analyses served to predict mirror temperatures for several different sun angles. Transient analyses were performed in order to predict thermal time constant of the primary mirror for a 20 degree slew or 30 degree roll maneuver. This paper describes the thermal model and provides details of the geometry, thermo-optical properties, and the environment which influences the thermal performance. All assumptions that were used in the analysis are also documented. Parametric analyses are summarized for design parameters including primary mirror coatings and sunshade configuration. Estimates of mirror heater power requirements are reported. The thermal model demonstrates results for the primary mirror heated from the back side and edges using a heater system with multiple independently controlled zones.

  8. Large-Aperture, Three Mirror Telescopes for Near-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; McGraw, J.

    In this era when Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is a national priority and optical-infrared telescopic sensor development is underway, cost-benefit analyses of competing approaches are necessary and appropriate. The DOD is presently investing in a new three-mirror telescope for SSA. At the same time, the Air Force, various universities and private research organizations are either studying or building wide-field telescopes with similar capabilities, but in most cases, at a significantly lower cost. Much of the expense for the DOD system appears driven by certain design choices which were advertised as necessary to fulfill the mission. Design details which would allow an independent analysis have not been published and no public comparison with other approaches is known to exist. Most telescope designs however, can be closely approximated from their optical configuration and imaging performance specifications. An optical designer will tell you that field curvature is one of the five monochromatic aberrations which they try to eliminate. The fact that one DOD development effort considers field curvature a design feature immediately draws attention to the project. This coupled with the paucity of published information and the very high development cost makes this program irresistible for comparison with competing approaches. This paper examines the likely design and performance of a proxy telescope intended to find NEOs, compares and contrasts that telescope with similar, but lower cost on-going projects, and examines the predictable impacts of reproducing such a telescope and placing multiple copies around the globe. The study primarily concentrates on performance measured in terms of search rate in square degrees per hour vs. object visual magnitude. Other considerations such as cost, transportability, availability of replacement components and ease of installation are also considered.

  9. Large aperture deformable mirror with a transferred single-crystal silicon membrane actuated using large-stroke PZT Unimorph Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hishinumat, Yoshikazu; Yang, Eui - Hyeok (EH)

    2005-01-01

    We have demonstrated a large aperture (50 mm x 50 mm) continuous membrane deformable mirror (DM) with a large-stroke piezoelectric unimorph actuator array. The DM consists of a continuous, large aperture, silicon membrane 'transferred' in its entirety onto a 20 x 20 piezoelectric unimorph actuator array. A PZT unimorph actuator, 2.5 mm in diameter with optimized PZT/Si thickness and design showed a deflection of 5.7 [m at 20V. An assembled DM showed an operating frequency bandwidth of 30 kHz and influence function of approximately 30%.

  10. Synthesis of a large communications aperture using small antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, George M.; Cwik, T. W.; Jamnejad, V.; Logan, R. T.; Miller, R. B.; Rogstad, Dave H.

    1994-01-01

    In this report we compare the cost of an array of small antennas to that of a single large antenna assuming both the array and single large antenna have equal performance and availability. The single large antenna is taken to be one of the 70-m antennas of the Deep Space Network. The cost of the array is estimated as a function of the array element diameter for three different values of system noise temperature corresponding to three different packaging schemes for the first amplifier. Array elements are taken to be fully steerable paraboloids and their cost estimates were obtained from commercial vendors. Array loss mechanisms and calibration problems are discussed. For array elements in the range 3 - 35 m there is no minimum in the cost versus diameter curve for the three system temperatures that were studied.

  11. NIF Large Optics Metrology Software: Description and Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W H

    2002-10-15

    Several software packages have been developed for use by NIF large optics vendors during production of NIF optics. These packages allow specific comparison of the interferometer measurements done on optics against the wavefront requirements for those optics, as given on relevant drawings. This document outlines the various packages, and their specific applications, and describes in some detail the calculational algorithms used. It is intended as the primary reference document for the codes (aside from the source codes themselves). In order to ensure good laser beam quality, NIF requires that all large optics be measured with an interferometer to monitor how that optic will affect beam wavefront quality and focusability. Various specifications for transmitted wavefront (TWF) and reflected wavefront (RWF) for the full-aperture parts, and for various sub-apertures, are given on the large optics drawings. For reference, a summary of the various specifications for the NIF large optics is given in Figure 1. Each large optic in production will be measured against some of these specifications. Other specifications will be monitored in a 'process validation' fashion by measuring a representative sample of parts to assure the process is yielding parts which pass specification. This document will focus on the specifications requiring measurements on every part. This document will not go into detail concerning the procedures and limitations of the measurements themselves.

  12. A Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory: Key Technologies and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew Ryan; Stahle, Carl M.; Balasubramaniam, Kunjithapatham; Clampin, Mark; Feinberg, Lee D.; Mosier, Gary E.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Redding, David C.; Rioux, Norman M.; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Stahl, H. Philip; Thronson, Harley A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the key technologies and capabilities that will enable a future, large-aperture ultravioletopticalinfrared (UVOIR) space observatory. These include starlight suppression systems, vibration isolation and control systems, lightweight mirror segments, detector systems, and mirror coatings. These capabilities will provide major advances over current and near-future observatories for sensitivity, angular resolution, and starlight suppression. The goals adopted in our study for the starlight suppression system are 10-10 contrast with an inner working angle of 20 milliarcsec and broad bandpass. We estimate that a vibration and isolation control system that achieves a total system vibration isolation of 140 dB for a vibration-isolated mass of 5000 kg is required to achieve the high wavefront error stability needed for exoplanet coronagraphy. Technology challenges for lightweight mirror segments include diffraction-limited optical quality and high wavefront error stability as well as low cost, low mass, and rapid fabrication. Key challenges for the detector systems include visible-blind, high quantum efficiency UV arrays, photon counting visible and NIR arrays for coronagraphic spectroscopy and starlight wavefront sensing and control, and detectors with deep full wells with low persistence and radiation tolerance to enable transit imaging and spectroscopy at all wavelengths. Finally, mirror coatings with high reflectivity ( 90), high uniformity ( 1) and low polarization ( 1) that are scalable to large diameter mirror substrates will be essential for ensuring that both high throughput UV observations and high contrast observations can be performed by the same observatory.

  13. Electro-Mechanical Simulation of a Large Aperture MOEMS Fabry-Perot Tunable Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Jonathan L.; Barclay, Richard B.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Mott, D. Brent; Satyapal, Shobita; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We are developing a micro-machined electrostatically actuated Fabry-Perot tunable filter with a large clear aperture for application in high through-put wide-field imaging spectroscopy and lidar systems. In the first phase of this effort, we are developing key components based on coupled electro-mechanical simulations. In particular, the movable etalon plate design leverages high coating stresses to yield a flat surface in drum-head tension over a large diameter (12.5 mm). In this approach, the cylindrical silicon movable plate is back etched, resulting in an optically coated membrane that is suspended from a thick silicon support ring. Understanding the interaction between the support ring, suspended membrane, and coating is critical to developing surfaces that are flat to within stringent etalon requirements. In this work, we present the simulations used to develop the movable plate, spring suspension system, and electrostatic actuation mechanism. We also present results from tests of fabricated proof of concept components.

  14. The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) Technology Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahle, Carl; Balasubramanian, K.; Bolcar, M.; Clampin, M.; Feinberg, L.; Hartman, K.; Mosier, C.; Quijada, M.; Rauscher, B.; Redding, D.; Shaklan, S.; Stahl, P.; Thronson, H.

    2014-01-01

    We present the key technologies and capabilities that will enable a future, large-aperture ultravioletopticalinfrared (UVOIR) space observatory. These include starlight suppression systems, vibration isolation and control systems, lightweight mirror segments, detector systems, and mirror coatings. These capabilities will provide major advances over current and near-future observatories for sensitivity, angular resolution, and starlight suppression. The goals adopted in our study for the starlight suppression system are 10-10 contrast with an inner working angle of 40 milliarcsec and broad bandpass. We estimate that a vibration and isolation control system that achieves a total system vibration isolation of 140 dB for a vibration-isolated mass of 5000 kg is required to achieve the high wavefront error stability needed for exoplanet coronagraphy. Technology challenges for lightweight mirror segments include diffraction-limited optical quality and high wavefront error stability as well as low cost, low mass, and rapid fabrication. Key challenges for the detector systems include visible-blind, high quantum efficiency UV arrays, photon counting visible and NIR arrays for coronagraphic spectroscopy and starlight wavefront sensing and control, and detectors with deep full wells with low persistence and radiation tolerance to enable transit imaging and spectroscopy at all wavelengths. Finally, mirror coatings with high reflectivity ( 90), high uniformity ( 1) and low polarization ( 1) that are scalable to large diameter mirror substrates will be essential for ensuring that both high throughput UV observations and high contrast observations can be performed by the same observatory.

  15. RF/optical shared aperture for high availability wideband communication RF/FSO links

    DOEpatents

    Ruggiero, Anthony J; Pao, Hsueh-yuan; Sargis, Paul

    2015-03-24

    An RF/Optical shared aperture is capable of transmitting and receiving optical signals and RF signals simultaneously. This technology enables compact wide bandwidth communications systems with 100% availability in clear air turbulence, rain and fog. The functions of an optical telescope and an RF reflector antenna are combined into a single compact package by installing an RF feed at either of the focal points of a modified Gregorian telescope.

  16. RF/optical shared aperture for high availability wideband communication RF/FSO links

    DOEpatents

    Ruggiero, Anthony J; Pao, Hsueh-yuan; Sargis, Paul

    2014-04-29

    An RF/Optical shared aperture is capable of transmitting and receiving optical signals and RF signals simultaneously. This technology enables compact wide bandwidth communications systems with 100% availability in clear air turbulence, rain and fog. The functions of an optical telescope and an RF reflector antenna are combined into a single compact package by installing an RF feed at either of the focal points of a modified Gregorian telescope.

  17. The research of filtering on images with noises of the three-mirror aperture optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Wu, Quanying; Fan, Junliu; Wang, Youqing

    2014-11-01

    In order to eliminate the noise in images acquired by the sparse aperture system, the modeling and filtering of electrical and optical noise are analyzed by the case of three-mirror aperture optical system. The study shows that the median filter can be applied to remove Gauss and salt & pepper noise, meanwhile high-pass filter with Gauss function can eliminate the influence of non-uniform illuminating on imaging. The Lucy-Richardson algorithm is used to restore the image, by which the resolution is heightened.

  18. Sparse aperture detection and imaging of millimeter sources via optical image-plane interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Indraneil; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Martin, Richard D.; Prather, Dennis W.; Mirotznik, Mark S.

    2007-10-01

    We attempt to perform real time detection and direct high resolution imaging of millimeter blackbody sources using sparse aperture interferometry. We reject heterodyne technology for a multitude of factors including bulky equipment, cryogenic cooling, long integration times, and indirect imaging. An alternative method is to convert the incoming millimeter waves into optical and perform optical image-plane interferometry in real time. This method is suitable for snapshot-imaging of short-lived phenomena, often encountered in defense and security applications. The approach presented in this work utilizes a millimeter wave antenna array coupled to an optical interferometer which images directly on a detector array for image read-out, processing, and storage. To minimize the maximum sidelobes of the point spread function, we choose an antenna array composed of two concentric hexagonal rings, such that the outer ring is ~3 times the inner ring. This design ensures more or less uniform and isotropic spatial frequency coverage, eliminating difficulties associated with resolving out structures whose spatial frequencies are in between that of the single aperture diameter and those of the baselines. The Fourier coverage of this array is the sum of the Fourier coverage of the outer ring plus that of the inner ring added to that of the baselines between the inner and outer rings. The need for delay lines is done away with by mounting all the apertures on the same plane. The incoming millimeter signals are fed through electro-optical modulators for upconversion onto an optical carrier, which can be readily captured, routed, and processed using optical techniques. The optical waves are fed via a fiber optic array onto a microlens array which is a scaled down version of the antenna array configuration. Then homodyne interferometry is performed. We reject pupil-plane (Michelson) interferometry based on a multitude of factors. The main drawback is that pupil-plane interferometers

  19. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields generated from a transmitter with a large aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Fan, Tingbo; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong

    2014-03-01

    Prediction and measurement of the acoustic field emitted from a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is essential for the accurate ultrasonic treatment. In this study, the acoustic field generated from a strongly focused HIFU transmitter was characterized by a combined experiment and simulation method. The spheroidal beam equation (SBE) was utilized to describe the nonlinear sound propagation. The curve of the source pressure amplitude versus voltage excitation was determined by fitting the measured ratio of the second harmonic to the fundamental component of the focal waveform to the simulation result; finally, the acoustic pressure field generated by the strongly focused HIFU transmitter was predicted by using the SBE model. A commercial fiber optic probe hydrophone was utilized to measure the acoustic pressure field generated from a 1.1 MHz HIFU transmitter with a large half aperture angle of 30°. The maximum measured peak-to-peak pressure was up to 72 MPa. The validity of this combined approach was confirmed by the comparison between the measured results and the calculated ones. The results indicate that the current approach might be useful to describe the HIFU field. The results also suggest that this method is not valid for low excitations owing to low sensitivity of the second harmonic.

  20. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields generated from a transmitter with a large aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tao; Fan, Tingbo; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Tu, Juan E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn

    2014-03-21

    Prediction and measurement of the acoustic field emitted from a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is essential for the accurate ultrasonic treatment. In this study, the acoustic field generated from a strongly focused HIFU transmitter was characterized by a combined experiment and simulation method. The spheroidal beam equation (SBE) was utilized to describe the nonlinear sound propagation. The curve of the source pressure amplitude versus voltage excitation was determined by fitting the measured ratio of the second harmonic to the fundamental component of the focal waveform to the simulation result; finally, the acoustic pressure field generated by the strongly focused HIFU transmitter was predicted by using the SBE model. A commercial fiber optic probe hydrophone was utilized to measure the acoustic pressure field generated from a 1.1 MHz HIFU transmitter with a large half aperture angle of 30°. The maximum measured peak-to-peak pressure was up to 72 MPa. The validity of this combined approach was confirmed by the comparison between the measured results and the calculated ones. The results indicate that the current approach might be useful to describe the HIFU field. The results also suggest that this method is not valid for low excitations owing to low sensitivity of the second harmonic.

  1. Statistical measurement of mid-spatial frequency defects of large optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiancheng; Wang, Feizhou; Shi, Qikai; Deng, Yan

    2012-06-01

    A statistical method is proposed to measure the power-spectral density (PSD) of the mid-spatial frequency defects of large optics. The method measures the geometrical defects of large optics by a large-aperture low-resolution interferometer, and then measures the mid-spatial frequency defects of every subregion in large optics by a small-aperture high-resolution interferometer. Statistical theory shows that the PSD of mid-spatial frequency defects in large optics approximately equals the weighted average of that in every subregion. Simulation and experiment demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed method. The proposed statistical method is not sensitive to the translation stage's error and thus is more appropriate for measurement of the mid-spatial frequency defects of large optics than the traditional sub-aperture stitching interferometry.

  2. π/K/p identification with a large-aperture ring-imaging cherenkov counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M.; Bastin, A.; Coutrakon, G.; Glass, H.; Jaffe, D.; Kirz, J.; McCarthy, R.; Hubbard, J. R.; Mangeot, Ph.; Mullie, J.; Peisert, A.; Tichit, J.; Bouclier, R.; Charpak, G.; Santiard, J. C.; Sauli, F.; Crittenden, J.; Hsiung, Y.; Kaplan, D.; Brown, C.; Childress, S.; Finley, D.; Ito, A.; Jonckheere, A.; Jöstlein, H.; Lederman, L.; Orava, R.; Smith, S.; Sugano, K.; Ueno, K.; Maki, A.; Hemmi, Y.; Miyake, K.; Nakamura, T.; Sasao, N.; Sakai, Y.; Gray, R.; Plaag, R.; Rothberg, J.; Rutherfoord, J.; Young, K.

    1983-11-01

    The operating large aperture ring-imaging Cherenkov detector from the FNAL experiment E605 is described. Cherenkov ultraviolet photons are detected with a multi-step avalanche chamber using a He/TEA gas mixture and π/K/p separation is obtained from 50 to 200 GeV/ c.

  3. Propagation equation of Hermite-Gauss beams through a complex optical system with apertures and its application to focal shift.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sun; Jin, Guo; Tingfeng, Wang

    2013-07-01

    Based on the generalized Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral (Collins' formula), the propagation equation of Hermite-Gauss beams through a complex optical system with a limiting aperture is derived. The elements of the optical system may be all those characterized by an ABCD ray-transfer matrix, as well as any kind of apertures represented by complex transmittance functions. To obtain the analytical expression, we expand the aperture transmittance function into a finite sum of complex Gaussian functions. Thus the limiting aperture is expressed as a superposition of a series of Gaussian-shaped limiting apertures. The advantage of this treatment is that we can treat almost all kinds of apertures in theory. As application, we define the width of the beam and the focal plane using an encircled-energy criterion and calculate the intensity distribution of Hermite-Gauss beams at the actual focus of an aperture lens. PMID:24323153

  4. Large aperture vibrating wire monitor with two mechanically coupled wires for beam halo measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Arutunian, S. G.; Avetisyan, A. E.; Davtyan, M. M.; Harutyunyan, G. S.; Vasiniuk, I. E.; Chung, M.; Scarpine, V.

    2014-03-01

    Development of a new type of Vibrating Wire Monitor (VWM), which has two mechanically coupled wires (vibrating and target), is presented. The new monitor has a much larger aperture size than the previous model of the VWM, and thus allows us to measure transverse beam halos more effectively. A prototype of such a large aperture VWM with a target wire length of 60 mm was designed, manufactured, and bench-tested. Initial beam measurements have been performed at the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) facility, and key results are presented.

  5. A systematic investigation of large-scale diffractive coded aperture designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottesman, Stephen R.; Shrekenhamer, Abraham; Isser, Abraham; Gigioli, George

    2012-10-01

    One obstacle to optimizing performance of large-scale coded aperture systems operating in the diffractive regime has been the lack of a robust, rapid, and efficient method for generating diffraction patterns that are projected by the system onto the focal plane. We report on the use of the 'Shrekenhamer Transform' for a systematic investigation of various types of coded aperture designs operating in the diffractive mode. Each design is evaluated in terms of its autocorrelation function for potential use in future imaging applications. The motivation of our study is to gain insight into more efficient optimization methods of image reconstruction algorithms.

  6. Dynamic optical aberration correction with adaptive coded apertures techniques in conformal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hu, Bin; Zhang, Pengbin; Zhang, Binglong

    2015-02-01

    Conformal imaging systems are confronted with dynamic aberration in optical design processing. In classical optical designs, for combination high requirements of field of view, optical speed, environmental adaption and imaging quality, further enhancements can be achieved only by the introduction of increased complexity of aberration corrector. In recent years of computational imaging, the adaptive coded apertures techniques which has several potential advantages over more traditional optical systems is particularly suitable for military infrared imaging systems. The merits of this new concept include low mass, volume and moments of inertia, potentially lower costs, graceful failure modes, steerable fields of regard with no macroscopic moving parts. Example application for conformal imaging system design where the elements of a set of binary coded aperture masks are applied are optimization designed is presented in this paper, simulation results show that the optical performance is closely related to the mask design and the reconstruction algorithm optimization. As a dynamic aberration corrector, a binary-amplitude mask located at the aperture stop is optimized to mitigate dynamic optical aberrations when the field of regard changes and allow sufficient information to be recorded by the detector for the recovery of a sharp image using digital image restoration in conformal optical system.

  7. Optical design through optimization using freeform orthogonal polynomials for rectangular apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolic, Milena; Benítez, P.; Miñano, Juan C.; Grabovickic, D.; Liu, Jiayao; Narasimhan, B.; Buljan, M.

    2015-09-01

    With the increasing interest in using freeform surfaces in optical systems due to the novel application opportunities and manufacturing techniques, new challenges are constantly emerging. Optical systems have traditionally been using circular apertures, but new types of freeform systems call for different aperture shapes. First non-circular aperture shape that one can be interested in due to tessellation or various folds systems is the rectangular one. This paper covers the comparative analysis of a simple local optimization of one design example using different orthogonalized representations of our freeform surface for the rectangular aperture. A very simple single surface off-axis mirror is chosen as a starting system. The surface is fitted to the desired polynomial representation, and the whole system is then optimized with the only constraint being the effective focal length. The process is repeated for different surface representations, amongst which there are some defined inside a circle, like Forbes freeform polynomials, and others that can be defined inside a rectangle like a new calculated Legendre type polynomials orthogonal in the gradient. It can be observed that with this new calculated polynomial type there is a faster convergence to a deeper minimum compared to "defined inside a circle" polynomials. The average MTF values across 17 field points also show clear benefits in using the polynomials that adapted more accurately to the aperture used in the system.

  8. Tethered Formation Configurations: Meeting the Scientific Objectives of Large Aperture and Interferometric Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Rodger E.; Quinn, David A.; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    With the success of the Hubble Space Telescope, it has become apparent that new frontiers of science and discovery are made every time an improvement in imaging resolution is made. For the HST working primarily in the visible and near-visible spectrum, this meant designing, building, and launching a primary mirror approximately three meters in diameter. Conventional thinking tells us that accomplishing a comparable improvement in resolution at longer wavelengths for Earth and Space Science applications requires a corresponding increase in the size of the primary mirror. For wavelengths in the sub-millimeter range, a very large telescope with an effective aperture in excess of one kilometer in diameter would be needed to obtain high quality angular resolution. Realistically a single aperture this large is practically impossible. Fortunately such large apertures can be constructed synthetically. Possibly as few as three 34 meter diameter mirrors flying in precision formation could be used to collect light at these longer wavelengths permitting not only very large virtual aperture science to be carried out, but high-resolution interferometry as well. To ensure the longest possible mission duration, a system of tethered spacecraft will be needed to mitigate the need for a great deal of propellant. A spin-stabilized, tethered formation will likely meet these requirements. Several configurations have been proposed which possibly meet the needs of the Space Science community. This paper discusses two of them, weighing the relative pros and cons of each concept. The ultimate goal being to settle on a configuration which combines the best features of structure, tethers, and formation flying to meet the ambitious requirements necessary to make future large synthetic aperture and interferometric science missions successful.

  9. Tethered Formation Configurations: Meeting the Scientific Objectives of Large Aperture and Interferometric Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Rodger E.; Quinn, David A.

    2004-01-01

    With the success of the Hubble Space Telescope, it has become apparent that new frontiers of science and discovery are made every time an improvement in imaging resolution is made. For the HST working primarily in the visible and near-visible spectrum, this meant designing, building and launching a primary mirror approximately three meters in diameter. Conventional thinking tells us that accomplishing a comparable improvement in resolution at longer wavelengths for Earth and Space Science applications requires a corresponding increase in the size of the primary mirror. For wavelengths in the sub-millimeter range, a very large telescope with an effective aperture in excess of one kilometer in diameter would be needed to obtain high quality angular resolution. Realistically a single aperture this large is practically impossible. Fortunately such large apertures can be constructed synthetically. Possibly as few as three 3 - 4 meter diameter mirrors flying in precision formation could be used to collect light at these longer wavelengths permitting not only very large virtual aperture science to be carried out, but high-resolution interferometry as well. To ensure the longest possible mission duration, a system of tethered spacecraft will be needed to mitigate the need for a great deal of propellant. A spin-stabilized, tethered formation will likely meet these requirements. Several configurations have been proposed which possibly meet the needs of the Space Science community. This paper discusses two of them, weighing the relative pros and cons of each concept. The ultimate goal being to settle on a configuration which combines the best features of structure, tethers and formation flying to meet the ambitious requirements necessary to make future large synthetic aperture and interferometric science missions successful.

  10. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOEpatents

    Ayers, Marion Jay; Ayers, Shannon Lee

    2012-10-09

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  11. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOEpatents

    Ayers, Marion Jay; Ayers, Shannon Lee

    2010-08-24

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  12. X-ray refractive large aperture rolled prism lenses as condensers for x-ray tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, H.; Simon, M.; Last, A.; Marschall, F.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Eisenhower, R.; Mettendorf, K. U.

    2011-10-01

    At the Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), refractive X-ray optics are developed. These optics are proposed to be used as condenser optics in X-Ray spectroscopy and microscopy applications with an X-ray tube as a source. To produce the lenses, a thin structured foil with equidistant fins in triangular form is casted from a structured silicon wafer. The foil is then wound around a glass fibre core. Due to this fabrication method, it is possible to produce large-aperture lenses with low absorption in comparison to other types of refractive X-Ray optics, like X-ray lenses with continuous parabolic shape or prism lenses. The first are limited due to their absorption while the latter are limited due to their mechanical stability of the prism columns. The optimisation of the so called X-Ray rolled prism lenses (RXPL) is underway at the institute and involves several parameters. One important property of the lenses is the correct form of the wound foil layers. This determines the number of necessary refractive elements at a given radius, which in turn determines the refracted slope and focal position of the transmitted beam. The spatial extent of the x-ray source is also being accounted for in the lens design. Another important point is the diameter of the winding core, which should be as small as possible due to the fact that the winding core reduces the active area of the lens. The rolling process itself is also revised to produce lenses with the above-mentioned small diameter winding cores and bend foil layers while sustaining a tight- fitting foil bundle. The lenses are studied at different energies and types of X-Ray tubes, as well as synchrotron sources, to gain additional information of the internal structure of the lens after the winding process. In this paper the current status of the lens development and results at X-Ray tube sources for use in diffractometers is presented.

  13. Measurement of radius of curvature of spherical optical surfaces with small curvature and aperture by optical profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shuang; Yi, Shengzhen; Chen, Shenghao; Wang, Zhanshan

    2014-11-01

    Monochromatic energy multilayer Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope is one of key diagnostic tools for researches on inertial confinement fusion. It is composed by two orthogonal concave spherical mirrors with small curvature and aperture, and produce the image of an object by collecting X-rays in each orthogonal direction, independently. Accurate measurement of radius of curvature of concave spherical mirrors is very important to achieve its design optical properties including imaging quality, optical throughput and energy resolution. However, it is difficult to measure the radius of curvature of spherical optical surfaces with small curvature and aperture by conventional methods, for the produced reflective intensity of glass is too low to correctly test. In this paper, we propose an improved measuring method of optical profiler to accomplish accurate measurement of radius of curvature of spherical optical surfaces with small curvature and aperture used in the monochromatic energy multilayer Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope. Firstly, we use a standard super-smooth optical flat to calibrate reference mirror before each experiment. Following, deviation of central position between measurement area and interference pattern is corrected by the theory of Newton's rings, and the zero-order fringe position is derived from the principle of interference in which surface roughness has minimum values in the position of zero light path difference. Measured results by optical profiler show the low relative errors and high repeatability. Eventually, an imaging experiment of monochromatic energy multilayer Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope determines the measurement accuracy of radius of curvature.

  14. Large area damage testing of optics

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, L.; Kozlowski, M.; Stolz, C.

    1996-04-26

    The damage threshold specifications for the National Ignition Facility will include a mixture of standard small-area tests and new large-area tests. During our studies of laser damage and conditioning processes of various materials we have found that some damage morphologies are fairly small and this damage does not grow with further illumination. This type of damage might not be detrimental to the laser performance. We should therefore assume that some damage can be allowed on the optics, but decide on a maximum damage allowance of damage. A new specification of damage threshold termed {open_quotes}functional damage threshold{close_quotes} was derived. Further correlation of damage size and type to system performance must be determined in order to use this measurement, but it is clear that it will be a large factor in the optics performance specifications. Large-area tests have verified that small-area testing is not always sufficient when the optic in question has defect-initiated damage. This was evident for example on sputtered polarizer and mirror coatings where the defect density was low enough that the features could be missed by standard small- area testing. For some materials, the scale-length at which damage non-uniformities occur will effect the comparison of small-area and large-area tests. An example of this was the sub-aperture tests on KD*P crystals on the Beamlet test station. The tests verified the large-area damage threshold to be similar to that found when testing a small-area. Implying that for this KD*P material, the dominate damage mechanism is of sufficiently small scale-length that small-area testing is capable of determining the threshold. The Beamlet test station experiments also demonstrated the use of on-line laser conditioning to increase the crystals damage threshold.

  15. Two-dimensional synthetic aperture laser optical feedback imaging using galvanometric scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witomski, Arnaud; Lacot, Eric; Hugon, Olivier; Jacquin, Olivier

    2008-02-01

    We have improved the resolution of our laser optical feedback imaging (LOFI) setup by using a synthetic aperture (SA) process. We report a two-dimensional (2D) SA LOFI experiment where the unprocessed image (i.e., the classical LOFI image) is obtained point by point, line after line using full 2D galvanometric scanning. The 2D superresolved image is then obtained by successively computing two angular SA operations while a one-dimensional angular synthesis is preceded by a frequency synthesis to obtain a 2D superresolved image conventionally in the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) method and their corresponding laser method called synthetic aperture ladar. The numerical and experimental results are compared.

  16. Determination of Electron Optical Properties for Aperture Zoom Lenses Using an Artificial Neural Network Method.

    PubMed

    Isik, Nimet

    2016-04-01

    Multi-element electrostatic aperture lens systems are widely used to control electron or charged particle beams in many scientific instruments. By means of applied voltages, these lens systems can be operated for different purposes. In this context, numerous methods have been performed to calculate focal properties of these lenses. In this study, an artificial neural network (ANN) classification method is utilized to determine the focused/unfocused charged particle beam in the image point as a function of lens voltages for multi-element electrostatic aperture lenses. A data set for training and testing of ANN is taken from the SIMION 8.1 simulation program, which is a well known and proven accuracy program in charged particle optics. Mean squared error results of this study indicate that the ANN classification method provides notable performance characteristics for electrostatic aperture zoom lenses. PMID:26879447

  17. CAMERA: a compact, automated, laser adaptive optics system for small aperture telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, Matthew; Velur, Viswa; Law, Nick; Choi, Philip; Penprase, Bryan E.

    2008-07-01

    CAMERA is an autonomous laser guide star adaptive optics system designed for small aperture telescopes. This system is intended to be mounted permanently on such a telescope to provide large amounts of flexibly scheduled observing time, delivering high angular resolution imagery in the visible and near infrared. The design employs a Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor, a 12x12 actuator MEMS device for high order wavefront compensation, and a solid state 355nm ND:YAG laser to generate a guide star. Commercial CCD and InGaAs detectors provide coverage in the visible and near infrared. CAMERA operates by selecting targets from a queue populated by users and executing these observations autonomously. This robotic system is targeted towards applications that are diffcult to address using classical observing strategies: surveys of very large target lists, recurrently scheduled observations, and rapid response followup of transient objects. This system has been designed and costed, and a lab testbed has been developed to evaluate key components and validate autonomous operations.

  18. Large-aperture prism-array lens for high-energy X-ray focusing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Jing; Chang, Guangcai; Shi, Zhan; Li, Ming; Ren, Yuqi; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yi, Futing; Liu, Peng; Sheng, Weifan

    2016-09-01

    A new prism-array lens for high-energy X-ray focusing has been constructed using an array of different prisms obtained from different parabolic structures by removal of passive parts of material leading to a multiple of 2π phase variation. Under the thin-lens approximation the phase changes caused by this lens for a plane wave are exactly the same as those caused by a parabolic lens without any additional corrections when they have the same focal length, which will provide good focusing; at the same time, the total transmission and effective aperture of this lens are both larger than those of a compound kinoform lens with the same focal length, geometrical aperture and feature size. This geometry can have a large aperture that is not limited by the feature size of the lens. Prototype nickel lenses with an aperture of 1.77 mm and focal length of 3 m were fabricated by LIGA technology, and were tested using CCD camera and knife-edge scan method at the X-ray Imaging and Biomedical Application Beamline BL13W1 at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, and provided a focal width of 7.7 µm and a photon flux gain of 14 at an X-ray energy of 50 keV. PMID:27577761

  19. Study of an ultrahigh-numerical-aperture fiber continuum generation source for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Daniel L.; Oldenburg, Amy L.; Reynolds, J. Joshua; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2002-11-01

    The axial resolution of optical coherence tomography images is primarily dependent on the bandwidth of the illumination source. Continuum generation is one way to generate the single-mode, high-bandwidth light needed for point illumination. We present an inexpensive and easy-to-implement augmentation to a Ti:sapphire laser that widens the bandwidth from 20 to over 200 nm with commerically available ultrahigh-numerical-aperture fiber. This technique can provide a readily available broad-bandwidth source for researchers and a practical enhancement to a fiber-optic optical coherence tomography system.

  20. Study of an ultrahigh-numerical-aperture fiber continuum generation source for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Marks, Daniel L; Oldenburg, Amy L; Reynolds, J Joshua; Boppart, Stephen A

    2002-11-15

    The axial resolution of optical coherence tomography images is primarily dependent on the bandwidth of the illumination source. Continuum generation is one way to generate the single-mode, high-bandwidth light needed for point illumination. We present an inexpensive and easy-to-implement augmentation to a Ti:sapphire laser that widens the bandwidth from 20 to over 200 nm with commerically available ultrahigh-numerical-aperture fiber. This technique can provide a readily available broad-bandwidth source for researchers and a practical enhancement to a fiber-optic optical coherence tomography system. PMID:18033428

  1. Large aperture and polarizer-free liquid crystal lenses for ophthalmic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Hung-Shan; Chang, Chia-Ming; Wang, Yu-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Large aperture and polarizer-free liquid crystal lenses (LC lenses) based on a double-layered structure for ophthalmic applications are demonstrated. The polarizer-free LC lens functions as both of a positive lens and a negative lens with large aperture size of 10mm. The lens power is electrically and continuously tunable ranging from -1.32 Diopter to 1.83 Diopter. To demonstrate the polarization independency, the wavefronts of the LC lenses under different polarized light were measured and discussed. The detail operations of the applied voltage and frequency are also discussed. The imaging performance of the LC lens is also evaluated. This study provide a detail understanding of the polarizer-free LC lenses based on a double-layered structure.

  2. High-power narrow-band terahertz generation using large-aperture photoconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.G.; Weiner, A.M.; Melloch, M.R. . School of Electrical and Computer Engineering); Siders, C.W.; Siders, J.L.W.; Taylor, A.J. )

    1999-08-01

    Large-aperture biased photoconductive emitters which can generate high-power narrow-band terahertz (THz) radiation are developed. These emitters avoid saturation at high fluence excitation and achieve enhanced peak power spectral density by employing a thick layer of short-lifetime low-temperature-grown GaAs (LT-GaAs) photoconductor and multiple-pulse excitation. THz waveforms are calculated from the saturation theory of large-aperture photoconductors, and a comparison is made between theory and measurement. A direct comparison of the multiple-pulse saturation properties of THz emission from semi-insulating GaAs and LT-GaAs emitters reveals a strong dependence on the carrier lifetime. In particular, the data demonstrate that saturation is avoided only when the interpulse spacing is longer than the carrier lifetime.

  3. [Research of spectrum signal-to-noise ratio of large aperture static imaging spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Li, Li-Bo; Pi, Hai-Feng

    2014-03-01

    The process of acquiring hyperspectral data cube of a Large Aperture Static Imaging Spectrometer (LASIS) includes several vital and essential steps, such as interferometer modulation, rectangular convolution sampling by pixels of detector and spectra retrieving. In this process, how to precisely evaluate the Signal-Noise Ratio (SNR) of spectra and how to wholly establish a related evaluation model were both generally very complicated. After a full consideration of the transmission process, utilizing the theory of rectangular convolution sampling and the spectral retrieving method regarding the computation of real part of the discrete Fourier transform of interferogram, formulas of both spectral signal and spectral noise were deduced theoretically, and then a evaluation model regarding the spectral SNR of LASIS was established. By using this model and other design factors of LASIS involving the wavenumber related optical transmittance, the interferometer beam splitter efficiency, the detector quantum efficiency and the main circuit noise, a simulation of spectral SNR was implemented. The simulation result was compared with the measurement result of the SNR of a LASIS instrument. The SNR lines and trends of the two match each other basically in single spectral band. The average deviation between them is proved to be 3.58%. This comparison result demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of the evaluation model. This SNR evaluation model consisting of the main technical aspects of typical LASIS instrument from the input spectral radiation to the output spectrum data is possible to be applied widely in practical design and implement of LASIS, as well as may provide valuable reference on SNR calculation and evaluation for other imaging spectrometers. PMID:25208427

  4. Optical Property Enhancement and Durability Evaluation of Heat Receiver Aperture Shield Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Smith, Daniela C.

    1998-01-01

    Under the Solar Dynamic Flight Demonstration (SDFD) program, NASA Lewis Research Center worked with AlliedSignal Aerospace, the heat receiver contractor, on the development, characterization and durability testing of refractory metals to obtain appropriate optical and thermal properties for the SDFD heat receiver aperture shield. Molybdenum and tungsten foils were grit-blasted using silicon carbide or alumina grit under various grit-blasting conditions for optical property enhancement. Black rhenium coated tungsten foil was also evaluated. Tungsten, black rhenium-coated tungsten, and grit-blasted tungsten screens of various mesh sizes were placed over the pristine and grit-blasted foils for optical property characterization. Grit-blasting was found to be effective in decreasing the specular reflectance and the absorptance/emittance ratio of the refractory foils. The placement of a screen further enhanced these optical properties, with a grit-blasted screen over a grit-blasted foil producing the best results. Based on the optical property enhancement results, samples were tested for atomic oxygen and vacuum heat treatment durability. Grit-blasted (Al2O3 grit) 2 mil tungsten foil was chosen for the exterior layer of the SDFD heat receiver aperture shield. A 0.007 in. wire diameter, 20 x 20 mesh tungsten screen was chosen to cover the tungsten foil. Based on these test results, a heat receiver aperture shield test unit has been built with the screen covered grit-blast tungsten foil exterior layers. The aperture shield was tested and verified the thermal and structural durability of the outer foil layers during an off-pointing period.

  5. Depth-encoded synthetic aperture optical coherence tomography of biological tissues with extended focal depth.

    PubMed

    Mo, Jianhua; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F

    2015-02-23

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be able to provide three-dimensional (3D) volumetric images of scattering biological tissues for in vivo medical diagnostics. Unlike conventional optical microscopy, its depth-resolving ability (axial resolution) is exclusively determined by the laser source and therefore invariant over the full imaging depth. In contrast, its transverse resolution is determined by the objective's numerical aperture and the wavelength which is only approximately maintained over twice the Rayleigh range. However, the prevailing laser sources for OCT allow image depths of more than 5 mm which is considerably longer than the Rayleigh range. This limits high transverse resolution imaging with OCT. Previously, we reported a novel method to extend the depth-of-focus (DOF) of OCT imaging in Mo et al.Opt. Express 21, 10048 (2013)]. The approach is to create three different optical apertures via pupil segmentation with an annular phase plate. These three optical apertures produce three OCT images from the same sample, which are encoded to different depth positions in a single OCT B-scan. This allows for correcting the defocus-induced curvature of wave front in the pupil so as to improve the focus. As a consequence, the three images originating from those three optical apertures can be used to reconstruct a new image with an extended DOF. In this study, we successfully applied this method for the first time to both an artificial phantom and biological tissues over a four times larger depth range. The results demonstrate a significant DOF improvement, paving the way for 3D high resolution OCT imaging beyond the conventional Rayleigh range. PMID:25836528

  6. Comparison of full-aperture interferometry to sub-aperture stitched interferometry for a large diameter fast mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catanzaro, B.; Thomas, J.; Cohen, E.

    2001-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory (formerly known as FIRST) consists of a 3.5 m space telescope. Stitching sub aperture interferograms may offer considerable cost savings during testing of the flight telescope as compared to other techniques. A comparative demonstration is presented of interferogram stitching techniques that enable a composite map of a 3-D surface to be assembled from a sequence of sub-aperture measurements. This paper describes the fundamental procedures for stitching together component data sets and demonstrates such techniques with real data sets.

  7. Fabrication of large aperture kinoform phase plates in fused silica for smoothing focal plane intensity profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Rushford, M.; Dixit, S.; Thomas, I.; Perry, M.

    1996-04-26

    We have fabricated large aperture (40-cm) kinoform phase plates for producing super-Gaussian focal plane intensity profiles. The continuous phase screen, designed using a new iterative procedure, was fabricated in fused silica as a 16-level, one-wave deep rewrapped phase profile using a lithographic process and wet etching in buffered hydrofluoric acid. The observed far-field contains 94% of the incident energy inside the desired spot.

  8. Analysis of fratricide effect observed with GeMS and its relevance for large aperture astronomical telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otarola, Angel; Neichel, Benoit; Wang, Lianqi; Boyer, Corinne; Ellerbroek, Brent; Rigaut, François

    2013-12-01

    Large aperture ground-based telescopes require Adaptive Optics (AO) to correct for the distortions induced by atmospheric turbulence and achieve diffraction limited imaging quality. These AO systems rely on Natural and Laser Guide Stars (NGS and LGS) to provide the information required to measure the wavefront from the astronomical sources under observation. In particular one such LGS method consists in creating an artificial star by means of fluorescence of the sodium atoms at the altitude of the Earth's mesosphere. This is achieved by propagating one or more lasers, at the wavelength of the Na D2a resonance, from the telescope up to the mesosphere. Lasers can be launched from either behind the secondary mirror or from the perimeter of the main aperture. The so-called central- and side-launch systems, respectively. The central-launch system, while helpful to reduce the LGS spot elongation, introduces the so-called "fratricide" effect. This consists of an increase in the photon-noise in the AO Wave Front Sensors (WFS) sub-apertures, with photons that are the result of laser photons back-scattering from atmospheric molecules (Rayleigh scattering) and atmospheric aerosols (dust and/or cirrus clouds ice particles). This affects the performance of the algorithms intended to compute the LGS centroids and subsequently compute and correct the turbulence-induced wavefront distortions. In the frame of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) project and using actual LGS WFS data obtained with the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (Gemini MCAO a.k.a. GeMS), we show results from an analysis of the temporal variability of the observed fratricide effect, as well as comparison of the absolute magnitude of fratricide photon-flux level with simulations using models that account for molecular (Rayleigh) scattering and photons backscattered from cirrus clouds.

  9. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2008-06-27

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

  10. Application of Modern Aperture Integration (AI) and Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) Techniques for Analysis of Large Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudduck, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The application of aperture integration (AI) and geometrical theory of diffraction (GTO) techniques to analyze large reflector antennas is outlined. The following techniques were used: computer modeling, validation of analysis and computer codes, computer aided design modifications, limitation on the conventional aperture integration (AIC) method, extended aperture integration (AIE) method, the AIE method for feed scattering calculations, near field probing predictions for 15 meter model, limitation on AIC for surface tolerance effects, aperture integration on the surface (AIS) method, and AIC and GTD calculations for compact range reflector.

  11. Single-molecule detection at high concentrations with optical aperture nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Shah; Karim, Farzia; Zhao, Chenglong

    2016-05-14

    Single-molecule detection has become an indispensable technology in life science, and medical research. In order to get meaningful information on many biological processes, single-molecule analysis is required in micro-molar concentrations. At such high concentrations, it is very challenging to isolate a single molecule with conventional diffraction-limited optics. Recently, optical aperture nanoantennas (OANs) have emerged as a powerful tool to enhance the single-molecule detection under a physiological environment. The OANs, which consist of nano-scale apertures on a metallic film, have the following unique properties: (1) nanoscale light confinement; (2) enhanced fluorescence emission; (3) tunable radiation pattern; (4) reduced background noise; and (5) massive parallel detection. This review presents the fundamentals, recent developments and future perspectives in this emerging field. PMID:27120086

  12. Single-molecule detection at high concentrations with optical aperture nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md Shah; Karim, Farzia; Zhao, Chenglong

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule detection has become an indispensable technology in life science, and medical research. In order to get meaningful information on many biological processes, single-molecule analysis is required in micro-molar concentrations. At such high concentrations, it is very challenging to isolate a single molecule with conventional diffraction-limited optics. Recently, optical aperture nanoantennas (OANs) have emerged as a powerful tool to enhance the single-molecule detection under a physiological environment. The OANs, which consist of nano-scale apertures on a metallic film, have the following unique properties: (1) nanoscale light confinement; (2) enhanced fluorescence emission; (3) tunable radiation pattern; (4) reduced background noise; and (5) massive parallel detection. This review presents the fundamentals, recent developments and future perspectives in this emerging field.

  13. An Engineering Design Reference Mission for a Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Crooke, Julie A.; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Stahl, H. Philip

    2016-01-01

    From the 2010 NRC Decadal Survey and the NASA Thirty-Year Roadmap, Enduring Quests, Daring Visions, to the recent AURA report, From Cosmic Birth to Living Earths, multiple community assessments have recommended development of a large-aperture UVOIR space observatory capable of achieving a broad range of compelling scientific goals. Of these priority science goals, the most technically challenging is the search for spectroscopic biomarkers in the atmospheres of exoplanets in the solar neighborhood. Here we present an engineering design reference mission (EDRM) for the Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST), which was conceived from the start as capable of breakthrough science paired with an emphasis on cost control and cost effectiveness. An EDRM allows the engineering design trade space to be explored in depth to determine what are the most demanding requirements and where there are opportunities for margin against requirements. Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. The ATLAST observatory is designed to operate at a Sun-Earth L2 orbit, which provides a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Our reference designs have emphasized a serviceable 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five-meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. As part of our cost-management effort, this particular reference mission builds upon the engineering design for JWST. Moreover, it is scalable to a variety of launch vehicle fairings. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of additional reference designs, including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  14. Cross-validation of interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy and optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Tyler S; Adie, Steven G; Marks, Daniel L; Boppart, Stephen A; Carney, P Scott

    2010-05-15

    Computationally reconstructed interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy is coregistered with optical coherence tomography (OCT) focal plane data to provide quantitative cross validation with OCT. This is accomplished through a qualitative comparison of images and a quantitative analysis of the width of the point-spread function in simulation and experiment. The width of the ISAM point-spread function is seen to be independent of depth, in contrast to OCT. PMID:20479849

  15. Photosensor aperture shaping to reduce aliasing in optical-mechanical line-scan imaging systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, S. J.; Huck, F. O.; Wall, S. D.

    1973-01-01

    Review of optical-mechanical scanning techniques that are generally employed in instruments specifically designed to characterize variations in scene brightness spectrally or radiometrically. Special attention is given to the effect of aliasing on the spatial detail of the reconstructed image. Aliasing may be caused by linescan sampling and can, in turn, severely degrade images that emphasize the spatial characterization of a scene. Photosensor aperture shaping and line-scan spacing are investigated as means for reducing this degradation.

  16. Visualization of the birth of an optical vortex using diffraction from a triangular aperture.

    PubMed

    Mourka, A; Baumgartl, J; Shanor, C; Dholakia, K; Wright, E M

    2011-03-28

    The study and application of optical vortices have gained significant prominence over the last two decades. An interesting challenge remains the determination of the azimuthal index (topological charge) ℓ of an optical vortex beam for a range of applications. We explore the diffraction of such beams from a triangular aperture and observe that the form of the resultant diffraction pattern is dependent upon both the magnitude and sign of the azimuthal index and this is valid for both monochromatic and broadband light fields. For the first time we demonstrate that this behavior is related not only to the azimuthal index but crucially the Gouy phase component of the incident beam. In particular, we explore the far field diffraction pattern for incident fields incident upon a triangular aperture possessing non-integer values of the azimuthal index ℓ. Such fields have a complex vortex structure. We are able to infer the birth of a vortex which occurs at half-integer values of ℓ and explore its evolution by observations of the diffraction pattern. These results demonstrate the extended versatility of a triangular aperture for the study of optical vortices. PMID:21451601

  17. Dual-band co-aperture infrared optical system design for irradiance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Da; Mi, Shilong; Mu, Meng

    2014-11-01

    Irradiance is a basic parameter in radiation measurement and play a big role in the research of radiation source.Since infrared target simulator is difficult to precisely calibrate itself and the irradiance value of standard blackbody is infinitely small,besides,some other objective environment factors like dust,dirty spot,vapour,especially the temperature lay worse effect on common infrared system,so it's crucial to decrease energy deficiency and various aberrations throughout integrated elements of optical system to increase measurement precision. Therefore,in this paper, a relatively precise imaging system is designed to measure the irradiance of the simulator itself--the dual-band co-aperture infrared optical system,it can work well under bad conditions said above,particularly when the target isn't fill up with the FOV(field of view). Generally infrared optical system needs big clear aperture, as for the objective of this system,an improved Cassegrain optical system as the co-aperture can be used to receive middle-wave infrared(MWIR3~5μm) and long-wave infrared(LWIR8~12μm) from standard blackbody radiation.As we all know that Cassegrain system has a satisfying relatively bigger aperture and reflective system has no chromatic aberration problem, a proper obstruction ratio of second lens and a hole in the centre of primary lens of the original system must be changed reasonably .So the radiation with least energy deficiency and aberration can be received successfully now. The two beams depart from the hole of primary lens separated by a coated (reflect MWIR and transmit LWIR film or vice versa) beam splitter, then the two different wavelength waves can be divided into two different optical path and finally received by MWIR and LWIR detectors respectively.The design result shows that the distortions of system are both small and the curves of modulation transfer function (MTF) approach the diffraction limit simultaneously in MWIR( 3~5μm) and LWIR( 8~12

  18. Source-Search Sensitivity of a Large-Area, Coded-Aperture, Gamma-Ray Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, K P; Collins, J W; Craig, W W; Fabris, L; Lanza, R C; Gallagher, S; Horn, B P; Madden, N W; Smith, E; Woodring, M L

    2004-10-27

    We have recently completed a large-area, coded-aperture, gamma-ray imager for use in searching for radiation sources. The instrument was constructed to verify that weak point sources can be detected at considerable distances if one uses imaging to overcome fluctuations in the natural background. The instrument uses a rank-19, one-dimensional coded aperture to cast shadow patterns onto a 0.57 m{sup 2} NaI(Tl) detector composed of 57 individual cubes each 10 cm on a side. These are arranged in a 19 x 3 array. The mask is composed of four-centimeter thick, one-meter high, 10-cm wide lead blocks. The instrument is mounted in the back of a small truck from which images are obtained as one drives through a region. Results of first measurements obtained with the system are presented.

  19. Detection of and compensation for blocked elements using large coherent apertures: ex vivo studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovljevic, Marko; Bottenus, Nick; Kuo, Lily; Kumar, Shalki; Dahl, Jeremy; Trahey, Gregg

    2016-04-01

    When imaging with ultrasound through the chest wall, it is not uncommon for parts of the array to get blocked by ribs, which can limit the acoustic window and significantly impede visualization of the structures of interest. With the development of large-aperture, high-element-count, 2-D arrays and their potential use in transthoracic imaging, detecting and compensating for the blocked elements is becoming increasingly important. We synthesized large coherent 2-D apertures and used them to image a point target through excised samples of canine chest wall. Blocked elements are detected based on low amplitude of their signals. As a part of compensation, blocked elements are turned off on transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx), and point-target images are created using: coherent summation of the remaining channels, compounding of intercostal apertures, and adaptive weighting of the available Tx/Rx channel-pairs to recover the desired k-space response. The adaptive compensation method also includes a phase aberration correction to ensure that the non-blocked Tx/Rx channel pairs are summed coherently. To evaluate the methods, we compare the point-spread functions (PSFs) and near-field clutter levels for the transcostal and control acquisitions. Specifically, applying k-space compensation to the sparse aperture data created from the control acquisition reduces sidelobes from -6.6 dB to -12 dB. When applied to the transcostal data in combination with phase-aberration correction, the same method reduces sidelobes only by 3 dB, likely due to significant tissue induced acoustic noise. For the transcostal acquisition, turning off blocked elements and applying uniform weighting results in maximum clutter reduction of 5 dB on average, while the PSF stays intact. Compounding reduces clutter by about 3 dB while the k-space compensation increases clutter magnitude to the non-compensated levels.

  20. Dual FOV infrared lens design with the laser common aperture optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wei-jun; Zhang, Xuan-zhi; Luan, Ya-dong; Zhang, Bo

    2015-02-01

    With the demand of autonomous precision guidance of air defense missile, the system scheme of the IR imaging/Ladar dual-mode seeker with a common aperture was proposed, and the optical system used in was designed. The system had a common receiving aperture, and its structure was very compact, so it could meet the requirement for the miniaturization of the seeker. Besides, it also could meet the demands of a wide field of view for searching target, and the demands for accurately recognizing and tracking the target at the same time. In order to increase the narrow FOV tracking performance, the dual FOV infrared optical used the zooming mode which some components flip in or out the optical system to firm the target signal. The dual FOV optics are divided into the zooming part, with dual variable focal length, and the reimaging part which was chosen in such a way to minimize the objective lens while maintaining 100% cold shield efficiency. The final infrared optics including 4°×3°(NFOV) and 16°×12°(WFOV) was designed. The NFOV lens composed of two common IR/Ladar lens, three relay lens, a beam splitter and two reflective fold mirrors, while WFOV lens increased two lens such as Germanium and Silicon. The common IR/Ladar lens ZnS and ZnSe could refractive the IR optics and Laser optics. The beam splitter which refractived IR optics and reflected Laser optics was located in the middle of Germanium and Silicon. The designed optical system had good image quality, and fulfilled the performance requirement of seeker system.

  1. Blue laser and high-numerical-aperture optical disk system for digital video recording (DVR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Henk

    2001-02-01

    Based on a blue diode laser (405 nm wavelength) and a two- element objective lens with a numerical aperture of 0.85, a third generation optical recording system has been developed that is able to record 22.5 GB on a single sided 12 cm diameter disc, at a user data rate of 50 Mb/s. The system is referred to by the technical name DVR for high definition Digital Video Recording. In this paper, we review the physical and the system concept, the phase change media, the optical pick up unit, and the drive implementation.

  2. Three-dimensional speckle size in generalized optical systems with limiting apertures.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jennifer E; Kelly, Damien P; Sheridan, John T

    2009-08-01

    Correlation properties of speckle fields at the output of quadratic phase systems with hard square and circular apertures are examined. Using the linear canonical transform and ABCD ray matrix techniques to describe these general optical systems, we first derive analytical formulas for determining axial and lateral speckle sizes. Then using a numerical technique, we extend the analysis so that the correlation properties of nonaxial speckles can also be considered. Using some simple optical systems as examples, we demonstrate how this approach may be conveniently applied. The results of this analysis apply broadly both to the design of metrology systems and to speckle control schemes. PMID:19649124

  3. An optical technology study on large aperture telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsch, D.

    1985-01-01

    The difficult and crucial problem of selecting a suitable telescope concept for an advanced space observatory was examined. To this end two and four mirror telescopes were analyzed and compared. Both configurations are very practical and structurally similar. Parabolic primary and spherical primary four mirror telescope were compared with respect to their performance and the alignment sensitivities of the three correction mirrors. A 1 meter class afocal telescope system with lag angle compensation, to be used in a LIDAR experiment, was examined.

  4. Deployable large aperture optics system for remote sensing applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumali, Anton Hartono; Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John A.; Macke, Benjamin T.; Massad, Jordan Elias; Chaplya, Pavel Mikhail

    2004-04-01

    This report summarizes research into effects of electron gun control on piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) structures. The experimental apparatus specific to the electron gun control of this structure is detailed, and the equipment developed for the remote examination of the bimorph surface profile is outlined. Experiments conducted to determine the optimum electron beam characteristics for control are summarized. Clearer boundaries on the bimorphs control output capabilities were determined, as was the closed loop response. Further controllability analysis of the bimorph is outlined, and the results are examined. In this research, the bimorph response was tested through a matrix of control inputs of varying current, frequency, and amplitude. Experiments also studied the response to electron gun actuation of piezoelectric bimorph thin film covered with multiple spatial regions of control. Parameter ranges that yielded predictable control under certain circumstances were determined. Research has shown that electron gun control can be used to make macrocontrol and nanocontrol adjustments for PVDF structures. The control response and hysteresis are more linear for a small range of energy levels. Current levels needed for optimum control are established, and the generalized controllability of a PVDF bimorph structure is shown.

  5. High resolution beamforming on large aperture vertical line arrays: Processing synthetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Jean-Marie Q.; Hodgkiss, William S.

    1990-09-01

    This technical memorandum studies the beamforming of large aperture line arrays deployed vertically in the water column. The work concentrates on the use of high resolution techniques. Two processing strategies are envisioned: (1) full aperture coherent processing which offers in theory the best processing gain; and (2) subaperture processing which consists in extracting subapertures from the array and recombining the angular spectra estimated from these subarrays. The conventional beamformer, the minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) processor, the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm and the minimum norm method are used in this study. To validate the various processing techniques, the ATLAS normal mode program is used to generate synthetic data which constitute a realistic signals environment. A deep-water, range-independent sound velocity profile environment, characteristic of the North-East Pacific, is being studied for two different 128 sensor arrays: a very long one cut for 30 Hz and operating at 20 Hz; and a shorter one cut for 107 Hz and operating at 100 Hz. The simulated sound source is 5 m deep. The full aperture and subaperture processing are being implemented with curved and plane wavefront replica vectors. The beamforming results are examined and compared to the ray-theory results produced by the generic sonar model.

  6. MRF Applications: On the Road to Making Large-Aperture Ultraviolet Laser Resistant Continuous Phase Plates for High-Power Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A; Davis, P J; Steele, W A; Hachkowski, M R; Nelson, A; Xin, K

    2006-10-26

    Over the past two years we have developed MRF tools and procedures to manufacture large-aperture (430 X 430 mm) continuous phase plates (CPPs) that are capable of operating in the infrared portion (1053 nm) of high-power laser systems. This is accomplished by polishing prescribed patterns of continuously varying topographical features onto finished plano optics using MRF imprinting techniques. We have been successful in making, testing, and using large-aperture CPPs whose topography possesses spatial periods as low as 4 mm and surface peak-to-valleys as high as 8.6 {micro}m. Combining this application of MRF technology with advanced MRF finishing techniques that focus on ultraviolet laser damage resistance makes it potentially feasible to manufacture large-aperture CPPs that can operate in the ultraviolet (351 nm) without sustaining laser-induced damage. In this paper, we will discuss the CPP manufacturing process and the results of 351-nm/3-nsec equivalent laser performance experiments conducted on large-aperture CPPs manufactured using advanced MRF protocols.

  7. Note: Computer controlled rotation mount for large diameter optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakonjac, Ana; Roberts, Kris O.; Deb, Amita B.; Kjærgaard, Niels

    2013-02-01

    We describe the construction of a motorized optical rotation mount with a 40 mm clear aperture. The device is used to remotely control the power of large diameter laser beams for a magneto-optical trap. A piezo-electric ultrasonic motor on a printed circuit board provides rotation with a precision better than 0.03° and allows for a very compact design. The rotation unit is controlled from a computer via serial communication, making integration into most software control platforms straightforward.

  8. Dark-field microscopic image stitching method for surface defects evaluation of large fine optics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Shitong; Cao, Pin; Li, Lu; Cheng, Zhongtao; Gao, Xin; Yang, Yongying

    2013-03-11

    One of the challenges in surface defects evaluation of large fine optics is to detect defects of microns on surfaces of tens or hundreds of millimeters. Sub-aperture scanning and stitching is considered to be a practical and efficient method. But since there are usually few defects on the large aperture fine optics, resulting in no defects or only one run-through line feature in many sub-aperture images, traditional stitching methods encounter with mismatch problem. In this paper, a feature-based multi-cycle image stitching algorithm is proposed to solve the problem. The overlapping areas of sub-apertures are categorized based on the features they contain. Different types of overlapping areas are then stitched in different cycles with different methods. The stitching trace is changed to follow the one that determined by the features. The whole stitching procedure is a region-growing like process. Sub-aperture blocks grow bigger after each cycle and finally the full aperture image is obtained. Comparison experiment shows that the proposed method is very suitable to stitch sub-apertures that very few feature information exists in the overlapping areas and can stitch the dark-field microscopic sub-aperture images very well. PMID:23482166

  9. Large Coded Aperture Mask for Spaceflight Hard X-ray Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigneau, Danielle N.; Robinson, David W.

    2002-01-01

    The 2.6 square meter coded aperture mask is a vital part of the Burst Alert Telescope on the Swift mission. A random, but known pattern of more than 50,000 lead tiles, each 5 mm square, was bonded to a large honeycomb panel which projects a shadow on the detector array during a gamma ray burst. A two-year development process was necessary to explore ideas, apply techniques, and finalize procedures to meet the strict requirements for the coded aperture mask. Challenges included finding a honeycomb substrate with minimal gamma ray attenuation, selecting an adhesive with adequate bond strength to hold the tiles in place but soft enough to allow the tiles to expand and contract without distorting the panel under large temperature gradients, and eliminating excess adhesive from all untiled areas. The largest challenge was to find an efficient way to bond the > 50,000 lead tiles to the panel with positional tolerances measured in microns. In order to generate the desired bondline, adhesive was applied and allowed to cure to each tile. The pre-cured tiles were located in a tool to maintain positional accuracy, wet adhesive was applied to the panel, and it was lowered to the tile surface with synchronized actuators. Using this procedure, the entire tile pattern was transferred to the large honeycomb panel in a single bond. The pressure for the bond was achieved by enclosing the entire system in a vacuum bag. Thermal vacuum and acoustic tests validated this approach. This paper discusses the methods, materials, and techniques used to fabricate this very large and unique coded aperture mask for the Swift mission.

  10. Lupus I Observations from the 2010 Flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Tristan G.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angilè, Francesco E.; Benton, Steven J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Devlin, Mark J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Novak, Giles; Nutter, David; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A.; Soler, Juan Diego; Tachihara, Kengo; Thomas, Nicholas E.; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Tucker, Carole E.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2014-04-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was created by adding polarimetric capability to the BLAST experiment that was flown in 2003, 2005, and 2006. BLASTPol inherited BLAST's 1.8 m primary and its Herschel/SPIRE heritage focal plane that allows simultaneous observation at 250, 350, and 500 μm. We flew BLASTPol in 2010 and again in 2012. Both were long duration Antarctic flights. Here we present polarimetry of the nearby filamentary dark cloud Lupus I obtained during the 2010 flight. Despite limitations imposed by the effects of a damaged optical component, we were able to clearly detect submillimeter polarization on degree scales. We compare the resulting BLASTPol magnetic field map with a similar map made via optical polarimetry. (The optical data were published in 1998 by J. Rizzo and collaborators.) The two maps partially overlap and are reasonably consistent with one another. We compare these magnetic field maps to the orientations of filaments in Lupus I, and we find that the dominant filament in the cloud is approximately perpendicular to the large-scale field, while secondary filaments appear to run parallel to the magnetic fields in their vicinities. This is similar to what is observed in Serpens South via near-IR polarimetry, and consistent with what is seen in MHD simulations by F. Nakamura and Z. Li.

  11. LUPUS I observations from the 2010 flight of the Balloon-borne large aperture submillimeter telescope for polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Tristan G.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Novak, Giles; Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Nutter, David; Angilè, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeffrey; Benton, Steven J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Chapin, Edward L.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Olmi, Luca; and others

    2014-04-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was created by adding polarimetric capability to the BLAST experiment that was flown in 2003, 2005, and 2006. BLASTPol inherited BLAST's 1.8 m primary and its Herschel/SPIRE heritage focal plane that allows simultaneous observation at 250, 350, and 500 μm. We flew BLASTPol in 2010 and again in 2012. Both were long duration Antarctic flights. Here we present polarimetry of the nearby filamentary dark cloud Lupus I obtained during the 2010 flight. Despite limitations imposed by the effects of a damaged optical component, we were able to clearly detect submillimeter polarization on degree scales. We compare the resulting BLASTPol magnetic field map with a similar map made via optical polarimetry. (The optical data were published in 1998 by J. Rizzo and collaborators.) The two maps partially overlap and are reasonably consistent with one another. We compare these magnetic field maps to the orientations of filaments in Lupus I, and we find that the dominant filament in the cloud is approximately perpendicular to the large-scale field, while secondary filaments appear to run parallel to the magnetic fields in their vicinities. This is similar to what is observed in Serpens South via near-IR polarimetry, and consistent with what is seen in MHD simulations by F. Nakamura and Z. Li.

  12. Subwavelength-thick lenses with high numerical apertures and large efficiency based on high-contrast transmitarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbabi, Amir; Horie, Yu; Ball, Alexander J.; Bagheri, Mahmood; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-05-01

    Flat optical devices thinner than a wavelength promise to replace conventional free-space components for wavefront and polarization control. Transmissive flat lenses are particularly interesting for applications in imaging and on-chip optoelectronic integration. Several designs based on plasmonic metasurfaces, high-contrast transmitarrays and gratings have been recently implemented but have not provided a performance comparable to conventional curved lenses. Here we report polarization-insensitive, micron-thick, high-contrast transmitarray micro-lenses with focal spots as small as 0.57 λ. The measured focusing efficiency is up to 82%. A rigorous method for ultrathin lens design, and the trade-off between high efficiency and small spot size (or large numerical aperture) are discussed. The micro-lenses, composed of silicon nano-posts on glass, are fabricated in one lithographic step that could be performed with high-throughput photo or nanoimprint lithography, thus enabling widespread adoption.

  13. Subwavelength-thick lenses with high numerical apertures and large efficiency based on high-contrast transmitarrays.

    PubMed

    Arbabi, Amir; Horie, Yu; Ball, Alexander J; Bagheri, Mahmood; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Flat optical devices thinner than a wavelength promise to replace conventional free-space components for wavefront and polarization control. Transmissive flat lenses are particularly interesting for applications in imaging and on-chip optoelectronic integration. Several designs based on plasmonic metasurfaces, high-contrast transmitarrays and gratings have been recently implemented but have not provided a performance comparable to conventional curved lenses. Here we report polarization-insensitive, micron-thick, high-contrast transmitarray micro-lenses with focal spots as small as 0.57 λ. The measured focusing efficiency is up to 82%. A rigorous method for ultrathin lens design, and the trade-off between high efficiency and small spot size (or large numerical aperture) are discussed. The micro-lenses, composed of silicon nano-posts on glass, are fabricated in one lithographic step that could be performed with high-throughput photo or nanoimprint lithography, thus enabling widespread adoption. PMID:25947118

  14. A cryogenic rotation stage with a large clear aperture for the half-wave plates in the Spider instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Sean; Ade, Peter; Amiri, Mandana; Benton, Steven; Bihary, Richard; Bock, James; Bond, J. Richard; Chiang, H. Cynthia; Contaldi, Carlo; Crill, Brendan; Dore, Olivier; Elder, Benjamin; Filippini, Jeffrey; Fraisse, Aurelien; Gambrel, Anne; Gandilo, Natalie; Gudmundsson, Jon; Hasselfield, Matthew; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Gene; Holmes, Warren; Hristov, Viktor; Irwin, Kent; Jones, William; Kermish, Zigmund; Lawrie, Craig; MacTavish, Carrie; Mason, Peter; Megerian, Krikor; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Montroy, Thomas; Morford, Tracy; Nagy, Johanna; Netterfield, C. Barth; Padilla, Ivan; Rahlin, Alexandra S.; Reintsema, Carl; Riley, Daniel C.; Ruhl, John; Runyan, Marcus; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Shariff, Jamil; Soler, Juan; Trangsrud, Amy; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Rebecca; Turner, Anthony; Wen, Shyang; Wiebe, Donald; Young, Edward

    2016-01-01

    We describe the cryogenic half-wave plate rotation mechanisms built for and used in Spider, a polarization-sensitive balloon-borne telescope array that observed the cosmic microwave background at 95 GHz and 150 GHz during a stratospheric balloon flight from Antarctica in January 2015. The mechanisms operate at liquid helium temperature in flight. A three-point contact design keeps the mechanical bearings relatively small but allows for a large (305 mm) diameter clear aperture. A worm gear driven by a cryogenic stepper motor allows for precise positioning and prevents undesired rotation when the motors are depowered. A custom-built optical encoder system monitors the bearing angle to an absolute accuracy of ±0.1∘. The system performed well in Spider during its successful 16 day flight.

  15. A cryogenic rotation stage with a large clear aperture for the half-wave plates in the Spider instrument.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Sean; Ade, Peter; Amiri, Mandana; Benton, Steven; Bihary, Richard; Bock, James; Bond, J Richard; Chiang, H Cynthia; Contaldi, Carlo; Crill, Brendan; Dore, Olivier; Elder, Benjamin; Filippini, Jeffrey; Fraisse, Aurelien; Gambrel, Anne; Gandilo, Natalie; Gudmundsson, Jon; Hasselfield, Matthew; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Gene; Holmes, Warren; Hristov, Viktor; Irwin, Kent; Jones, William; Kermish, Zigmund; Lawrie, Craig; MacTavish, Carrie; Mason, Peter; Megerian, Krikor; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Montroy, Thomas; Morford, Tracy; Nagy, Johanna; Netterfield, C Barth; Padilla, Ivan; Rahlin, Alexandra S; Reintsema, Carl; Riley, Daniel C; Ruhl, John; Runyan, Marcus; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Shariff, Jamil; Soler, Juan; Trangsrud, Amy; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Rebecca; Turner, Anthony; Wen, Shyang; Wiebe, Donald; Young, Edward

    2016-01-01

    We describe the cryogenic half-wave plate rotation mechanisms built for and used in Spider, a polarization-sensitive balloon-borne telescope array that observed the cosmic microwave background at 95 GHz and 150 GHz during a stratospheric balloon flight from Antarctica in January 2015. The mechanisms operate at liquid helium temperature in flight. A three-point contact design keeps the mechanical bearings relatively small but allows for a large (305 mm) diameter clear aperture. A worm gear driven by a cryogenic stepper motor allows for precise positioning and prevents undesired rotation when the motors are depowered. A custom-built optical encoder system monitors the bearing angle to an absolute accuracy of ±0.1(∘). The system performed well in Spider during its successful 16 day flight. PMID:26827333

  16. A fundamental mode Nd:GdVO4 laser pumped by a large aperture 808 nm VCSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Y. Q.; Ma, J. L.; Yan, C. L.; Liu, G. J.; Ma, X. H.; Gong, J. F.; Feng, Y.; Wei, Z. P.; Wang, Y. X.; Zhao, Y. J.

    2013-05-01

    A fundamental mode Nd:GdVO4 laser pumped by a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) is experimentally demonstrated. The VCSEL has a circular output-beam which makes it easier for it to be directly coupled to a Nd:GdVO4 microcrystal. In our research, a large aperture 808 nm VCSEL, with a multi-ring-shaped aperture (MRSA) and an almost Gaussian-shaped far-field profile, is used as the pumping source. Experimental results for the Nd:GdVO4 laser pumped by the VCSEL are presented. The maximum output peak power of 0.754 W is obtained under a pump peak power of 1.3 W, and the corresponding opto-optic conversion efficiency is 58.1%. The average slope efficiency is 65.8% from the threshold pump power of 0.2 W to the pump power of 1.3 W. The laser beam quality factors are measured to be {M}x2=1.2 0 and {M}y2=1.1 5.

  17. Servomechanism for Doppler shift compensation in optical correlator for synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constaninides, N. J.; Bicknell, T. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus for correcting Doppler shifts in synthetic aperture radar data is described. An optical correlator for synthetic aperture radar data has a means for directing a laser beam at a signal film having radar return pulse intensity information recorded on it. A resultant laser beam passes through a range telescope, an azimuth telescope, and a Fourier transform filter located between the range and azimuth telescopes, and forms an image for recording on an image film. A compensation means for Doppler shift in the radar return pulse intensity information includes a beam splitter for reflecting the modulated laser beam, after having passed through the Fourier transform filter, to a detection screen having two photodiodes mounted on it.

  18. Optical Diffraction in Close Proximity to Plane Apertures. I. Boundary-Value Solutions for Circular Apertures and Slits

    PubMed Central

    Mielenz, Klaus D.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the classical Rayleigh-Sommerfeld and Kirchhoff boundary-value diffraction integrals are solved in closed form for circular apertures and slits illuminated by normally incident plane waves. The mathematical expressions obtained involve no simplifying approximations and are free of singularities, except in the aperture plane itself. Their use for numerical computations was straightforward and provided new insight into the nature of diffraction in the near zone where the Fresnel approximation does not apply. The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals were found to be very similar to each other, so that polarization effects appear to be negligibly small. On the other hand, they differ substantially at sub-wavelength differences from the aperture plane and do not correctly describe the diffracted field as an analytical continuation of the incident geometrical field.

  19. An approach to fabrication of large adaptive optics mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Eric; Rey, Justin; Blaszak, David; Cavaco, Jeffrey

    2014-07-01

    For more than two decades, Northrop Grumman Xinetics has been the principal supplier of small deformable mirrors that enable adaptive optical (AO) systems for the ground-based astronomical telescope community. With today's drive toward extremely large aperture systems, and the desire of telescope designers to include adaptive optics in the main optical path of the telescope, Xinetics has recognized the need for large active mirrors with the requisite bandwidth and actuator stoke. Presented in this paper is the proposed use of Northrop Grumman Xinetics' large, ultra-lightweight Silicon Carbide substrates with surface parallel actuation of sufficient spatial density and bandwidth to meet the requirements of tomorrow's AO systems, while reducing complexity and cost.

  20. Formation metrology and control for large separated optics space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, E.; Quadrelli, M.; Breckenridge, W.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present formation flying performance analysis initial results for a representative large space telescope composed of separated optical elements [Mett 02]. A virtual-structure construct (an equivalent rigid body) is created by unique metrology and control that combines both centralized and decentralized methods. The formation may be in orbit at GEO for super-resolution Earth observation, as in the case of Figure 1, or it may be in an Earth-trailing orbit for astrophysics, Figure 2. Extended applications are envisioned for exo-solar planet interferometric imaging by a formation of very large separated optics telescopes, Figure 3. Space telescopes, with such large apertures and f/10 to f/100 optics, are not feasible if connected by massive metering structures. Instead, the new virtual-structure paradigm of information and control connectivity between the formation elements provides the necessary spatial rigidity and alignment precision for the telescope.

  1. Development of an efficient large-aperture high damage-threshold sol-gel diffraction grating.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Carol S.; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Dunphy, Darren Robert; Branson, Eric D.; Smith, Ian Craig; Johnson, William Arthur; Reed, Scott T.; Cook, Adam W.

    2005-03-01

    In order to develop the next generation of high peak intensity lasers, new grating technology providing higher damage thresholds and large apertures is required. The current assumption is that this technical innovation will be multilayer dielectric gratings, wherein the uppermost layer of a thin film mirror is etched to create the desired binary phase grating. A variant of this is explored with the upper grating layer being a lower density gelatin-based volume phase grating in either sol-gel or dichromated gelatin. One key benefit is the elimination of the etching step.

  2. Spacecraft conceptual design for the 8-meter Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Randall C.; Capizzo, Peter; Fincher, Sharon; Hornsby, Linda S.; Jones, David; Mosier, Gary; Stahl, H. Philip; Thomas, Dan; Thompson, Kevin S.

    2010-07-01

    The Advanced Concepts Office at Marshall Space Flight Center completed a brief spacecraft design study for the 8- meter monolithic Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST-8m). This spacecraft concept provides all power, communication, telemetry, avionics, guidance and control, and thermal control for the observatory, and inserts the observatory into a halo orbit about the second Sun-Earth Lagrange point. The multidisciplinary design team created a simple spacecraft design that enables component and science instrument servicing, employs articulating solar panels for help with momentum management, and provides precise pointing control while at the same time fast slewing for the observatory.

  3. Spacecraft Conceptual Design for the 8-Meter Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Randall C.; Capizzo, Peter; Fincher, Sharon; Hornsby, Linda S.; Jones, David

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Concepts Office at Marshall Space Flight Center completed a brief spacecraft design study for the 8-meter monolithic Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST-8m). This spacecraft concept provides all power, communication, telemetry, avionics, guidance and control, and thermal control for the observatory, and inserts the observatory into a halo orbit about the second Sun-Earth Lagrange point. The multidisciplinary design team created a simple spacecraft design that enables component and science instrument servicing, employs articulating solar panels for help with momentum management, and provides precise pointing control while at the same time fast slewing for the observatory.

  4. A conceptual design of a large aperture microwave radiometer geostationary platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garn, Paul A.; Garrison, James L.; Jasinski, Rachel

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual design of a Large Aperture Microwave Radiometer (LAMR) Platform has been developed and technology areas essential to the design and on-orbit viability of the platform have been defined. Those technologies that must be developed to the requirement stated here for the LAMR mission to be viable include: advanced radiation resistant solar cells, integrated complex structures, large segmented reflector panels, sub 3 kg/m(exp 2) areal density large antennas, and electric propulsion systems. Technology areas that require further development to enhance the capabilities of the LAMR platform (but are not essential for viability) include: electrical power storage, on-orbit assembly, and on-orbit systems checkout and correction.

  5. Optically controlled dense current structures driven by relativistic plasma aperture-induced diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; Gray, Ross J.; King, Martin; Dance, Rachel J.; Wilson, Robbie; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M. H.; Capdessus, Remi; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S.; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The collective response of charged particles to intense fields is intrinsic to plasma accelerators and radiation sources, relativistic optics and many astrophysical phenomena. Here we show that a relativistic plasma aperture is generated in thin foils by intense laser light, resulting in the fundamental optical process of diffraction. The plasma electrons collectively respond to the resulting laser near-field diffraction pattern, producing a beam of energetic electrons with a spatial structure that can be controlled by variation of the laser pulse parameters. It is shown that static electron-beam and induced-magnetic-field structures can be made to rotate at fixed or variable angular frequencies depending on the degree of ellipticity in the laser polarization. The concept is demonstrated numerically and verified experimentally, and is an important step towards optical control of charged particle dynamics in laser-driven dense plasma sources.

  6. Repetitively pulsed regime of Nd : glass large-aperture laser amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmin, A A; Khazanov, Efim A; Shaykin, A A

    2012-04-30

    A repetitively pulsed operation regime of neodymium glass rod laser amplifiers with apertures of 4.5, 6, 8.5, and 10 cm is analysed using experimental data. The limits of an increase in the pulse repetition rates are determined. Universal dependences are obtained, which help finding a compromise between increasing the repetition rate and enhancing the gain for each particular case. In particular, it is shown that an amplifier 4.5-cm in diameter exhibits a five-fold safety factor with respect to a thermo-mechanical breakdown at a repetition rate of 1 pulse min{sup -1} and stored energy of above 100 J. A strong thermally induced birefringence in two such amplifiers is experimentally reduced to a 'cold' level by employing a 90 Degree-Sign optical rotator.

  7. Image formation properties and inverse imaging problem in aperture based scanning near field optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S; Klein, A E; Paul, T; Gross, H; Diziain, S; Steinert, M; Assafrao, A C; Pertsch, T; Urbach, H P; Rockstuhl, C

    2016-02-22

    Aperture based scanning near field optical microscopes are important instruments to study light at the nanoscale and to understand the optical functionality of photonic nanostructures. In general, a detected image is affected by both the transverse electric and magnetic field components of light. The discrimination of the individual field components is challenging as these four field components are contained within two signals in the case of a polarization resolved measurement. Here, we develop a methodology to solve the inverse imaging problem and to retrieve the vectorial field components from polarization and phase resolved measurements. Our methodology relies on the discussion of the image formation process in aperture based scanning near field optical microscopes. On this basis, we are also able to explain how the relative contributions of the electric and magnetic field components within detected images depend on the chosen probe. We can therefore also describe the influence of geometrical and material parameters of individual probes within the image formation process. This allows probes to be designed that are primarily sensitive either to the electric or magnetic field components of light. PMID:26907063

  8. Radiometric calibration method for large aperture infrared system with broad dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Chang, Songtao; Zhu, Wei

    2015-05-20

    Infrared radiometric measurements can acquire important data for missile defense systems. When observation is carried out by ground-based infrared systems, a missile is characterized by long distance, small size, and large variation of radiance. Therefore, the infrared systems should be manufactured with a larger aperture to enhance detection ability and calibrated at a broader dynamic range to extend measurable radiance. Nevertheless, the frequently used calibration methods demand an extended-area blackbody with broad dynamic range or a huge collimator for filling the system's field stop, which would greatly increase manufacturing costs and difficulties. To overcome this restriction, a calibration method based on amendment of inner and outer calibration is proposed. First, the principles and procedures of this method are introduced. Then, a shifting strategy of infrared systems for measuring targets with large fluctuations of infrared radiance is put forward. Finally, several experiments are performed on a shortwave infrared system with Φ400  mm aperture. The results indicate that the proposed method cannot only ensure accuracy of calibration but have the advantage of low cost, low power, and high motility. Hence, it is an effective radiometric calibration method in the outfield. PMID:26192499

  9. All-reflective optical target illumination system with high numerical aperture

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Carlton E.; Sigler, Robert D.; Hoeger, John G.

    1979-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for providing illumination of a target focal region at high numerical aperture from a pair of confluent collimated light beams. The collimated beams are each incident upon an associated concave eccentric pupil paraboloidal reflective surface, and thereby each focused through an opening in an associated outer ellipsoidal reflective surface onto a plane reflector. Each beam is reflected by its associated plane reflector onto the opposing concave surface of the outer ellipsoids to be focused through an opening in the plane surface onto an opposing inner concave ellipsoidal reflective surface, and thence onto the target region.

  10. Stitching interferometer for large optics: recent developments of a system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Michael

    1999-07-01

    We have developed a stitching interferometer for use with large optics, such as those used in Laser MegaJoule and NIF. The idea behind this technique is that, to keep resolution at its highest value, a 'small' aperture phase-shifting interferometer must be used. But this means that measurement of the complete component has to be performed by stitching the individual sub-apertures together. We have overcome most of the obstacles involved in stitching interferometry, and have been using one such system at our optical and laser production facility in Orleans for some years. We have previously reported transmission measurements performed on a Phebus laser slab. We present here measurements performed on Laser MegaJoule transport mirrors measured in a horizontal position, and on glass inhomogeneity without oil plates. This latter requires multiple takes on each sub-aperture, and additional computing, but the whole process has been automated. In addition, we contribute to the pretty picture department by showing graphical results perhaps never previously seen. This work was performed under contract from CEA-LV, as part of the Laser Megajoule development.

  11. Design of large aperture superferric quadrupole magnets for an in-flight fragment separator

    SciTech Connect

    Zaghloul, Aziz; Kim, Dogyun; Kim, Jangyoul; Kim, Mijung; Kim, Myeongjin; Yun, Chongcheoul; Kim, Jongwon

    2014-01-29

    Superferric quadrupole magnets to be used for in-flight fragment separator have been designed. A quadrupole magnet triplet for beam focusing is placed in a cryostat together with superconducting correction coils. To maximize acceptance of rare isotope beams produced by projectile fragmentation, it is essential to use large-aperture quadrupole magnets. The pole tip radius is 17 cm in the current design, and we tried to enlarge the aperture with 3D analysis on magnetic fields. In the front end of the separator, where a target and beam dump are located, we plan to use two sets of quadrupole triplets made of high-Tc superconductor (HTS) operating at 20-50 K considering high radiation heat load. The HTS magnet will use warm iron poles. Both low-Tc and high-Tc superconductors are acquired for test winding, and two kinds of dewar and cryostat are under construction to perform the coil and magnet tests. The magnetic design of superferric quadrupole is mainly discussed.

  12. Recent developments in wafer-level fabrication of micro-optical multi-aperture imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitel, R.; Dannberg, P.; Brückner, A.; Bräuer, A.

    2011-10-01

    Micro-optical systems, that utilize multiple channels for imaging instead of a single one, are frequently discussed for ultra-compact applications such as digital cameras. The strategy of their fabrication differs due to different concepts of image formation. Illustrated by recently implemented systems for multi-aperture imaging, typical steps of wafer-level fabrication are discussed in detail. In turn, the made progress may allow for additional degrees of freedom in optical design. Pressing ahead with very short overall lengths and multiple diaphragm array layers, results in the use of extremely thin glass substrates down to 100 microns in thickness. The desire for a wide field of view for imaging has led to chirped arrays of microlenses and diaphragms. Focusing on imaging quality, aberrations were corrected by introducing toroidal lenslets and elliptical apertures. Such lenslets had been generated by thermal reflow of lithographic patterned photoresist and subsequent molding. Where useful, the system's performance can be further increased by applying aspheric microlenses from reactive ion etching (RIE) transfer or by achromatic doublets from superimposing two moldings with different polymers. Multiple diaphragm arrays prevent channel crosstalk. But using simple metal layers may lead to multiple reflections and an increased appearance of ghost images. A way out are low reflecting black matrix polymers that can be directly patterned by lithography. But in case of environmental stability and high resolution, organic coatings should be replaced by patterned metal coatings that exhibit matched antireflective layers like the prominent black chromium. The mentioned components give an insight into the fabrication process of multi-aperture imaging systems. Finally, the competence in each step decides on the overall image quality.

  13. Comparison of full-aperture interferometry to subaperture stitched interferometry for a large-diameter fast mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzaro, Brian E.; Thomas, James A.; Cohen, Eri J.

    2001-11-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory (formerly known as FIRST) consists of a 3.5 m space telescope. Stitching sub aperture interferograms may offer considerable cost savings during testing of the flight telescope as compared to other techniques. A comparative demonstration is presented of interferogram stitching techniques that enable a composite map of a 3-D surface to be assembled from a sequence of sub-aperture measurements. This paper describes the fundamental procedures for stitching together component data sets and demonstrates such techniques with real data sets. A set of 14 sub-aperture measurements was made of a 2 m diameter all-composite mirror developed as part of the Herschel Space Observatory program and two different stitching software packages were employed to stitch together the sub-aperture surface maps. The software packages differ fundamentally in the way the sub-aperture maps are three-dimensionally stitched, one employing a local technique and the other using a global technique. The processed results from both algorithms are compared with each other and with a full-aperture reference measurement made of the same test optic. A summary of the results is presented and potential modifications and enhancements to the stitching techniques are discussed.

  14. Fabrication of Efficient, Large Aperture Transmission Diffraction Gratings by Ion-Beam Etching

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H T; Bryan, S R; Britten, J A; Perry, M D

    2000-09-14

    The utilization of high-power short pulse laser employing chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) for material processing and inertial confinement research is widely increasing. The performance of these high-power CPA laser system continues to be limited by the ability of the pulse compression gratings to hold up to the high-average-power or high-peak-power of the laser. Pulse compression gratings used in transmission and fabricated out of bulk fused silica have intrinsically the highest laser damage threshold when compared with metal or multilayer dielectric gratings that work in reflection. LLNL has developed processing capability to produce high efficiency fused silica transmission gratings at sizes useful to future Petawatt-class systems, and has demonstrated high efficiency at smaller aperture. This report shows that fused silica diffraction exhibiting >95% efficiency into the -1 diffraction order in transmission (90{sup o} deflection of the incident light, at an incidence angle of 45{sup o} to the grating face). The microstructure of this grating consisted of grooves ion-beam etched to a depth of 1.6 microns with a pitch of 0.75 microns, using a holographically produced photoresist mask that was subsequently stripped away in significance to the fabrication of the small scale high efficiency grating was the development of the processing technology and infrastructure for production of such gratings at up to 65 cm diameter. LLNL is the currently the only location in the world with the ability to coat, interferometrically expose, and ion etch diffractive optics at this aperture. Below, we describe the design, fabrication, performance and, the scaleup process for a producing a high-efficiency transmission grating on a 65 cm fused silica substrate.

  15. Ground demonstration of an optical control system for a space-based sparse-aperture telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Young, David B.; Dillow, James; Corcoran, Stephen P.; Andrews, Edwina V.; Yellowhair, Julius; Devries, Kevin

    1998-08-01

    SVS has recently completed a phase II small business innovative research (SBIR) project called low cost space imager (LCSI). As part of the SBIR project, a sparse aperture telescope design concept was developed. This design includes an optical control system capable of correcting the primary segments to within 38 nm piston and 17 nrad tilt as required by the optical tolerance analysis. The optical system utilizes a common secondary and primaries arranged in a Golay-6 configuration. The primaries are spherical, which eliminates the need for translation and rotation control. A laboratory experiment to validate the controls concept has been completed. This experiment culminated in the demonstration of autonomous capture, alignment, and phasing of an optical system with a three segment primary to tolerances consistent with the space optical system. The implementation of the controls scheme in the laboratory experiment is done using Matlab/Simulink for controller design and code generation the code is implemented real-time on a VME based computer system. Closed loop piston control, which utilizes a four-bin sensing scheme, of an actuated mirror to 25 nm RMS mirror motion has been demonstrated. Additionally, autonomous capture and phasing of three segmented primaries has been demonstrated. The technique for the phasing capture involves real-time implementation of image processing techniques to measure the white light fringe visibility in the far field.

  16. Ground demonstration of an optical control system for a space-based sparse aperture telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Young, David B.; Dillow, James; Corcoran, Stephen; Andrews, Edwina V.; Yellowhair, Julius; Devries, Kevin

    1998-09-01

    SVS has recently completed a phase II small business innovative research (SBIR) project called Low Cost Space Imager. As part of the SBIR project, a sparse aperture telescope design concept was developed. This design includes an optical control system capable of correcting the primary segments to within 38 nm piston and 17 nrad tilt as required by the optical tolerance analysis. The optical system utilizes a common secondary and primaries arranged in a Golay-6 configuration. The primaries are spherical, which eliminates the need for translation and rotation control. A laboratory experiment to validate the controls concept has ben completed. This experiment culminated in the demonstration of autonomous capture, alignment, and phasing of an optical system with a three segment primary to tolerances consistent with the space optical system. The implementation of the controls scheme in the laboratory experiment is done using Matlab/Simulink for controller design and code generation. The code is implemented real- time on a VME based computer system. Closed loop piston control, which utilizes a four-bin sensing scheme, of an actuated mirror to 25 nm RMS mirror motion has been demonstrated. Additionally, autonomous capture and phasing of three segmented primaries has been demonstrated. The technique for the phasing capture involves real-time implementation of image processing techniques to measure the white light fringe visibility in the far field.

  17. Optical and crystalline characteristics of large EFG sapphire sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Herbert E.; Jones, Christopher D.; Locher, John W.

    2005-05-01

    Edge Defined Film-fed Growth (EFGTM) Saphikon® sapphire crystals have been grown as large, thick sheet. The sheet is then precision-polished and coated into an infrared or laser transmission compatible window. The sapphire windows are subsequently assembled into a multi-panel configuration for advanced targeting, navigation, or reconnaissance applications. As future aerospace programs will require windows with larger apertures, material characteristics and uniformity such as refractive index homogeneity will increase in importance. Optical measurements, x-ray topography data and rocking curve analysis are presented The crystalline properties as they relate to refractive index inhomogeneity and wave front distortion are discussed.

  18. Optics in large-scale architectural projects: public aquariums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesar, John C.

    2002-09-01

    Submersed aquatic vegetation can survive to a depth of approximately 20% of surface water irradiance. Large displays featured in public aquariums are often open to the sky, but the building roof acts as an aperture and obscures much of the direct solar path. Side-walls within the tank often absorb more than they reflect or scatter and as a result plants and fish get little more than the diffuse solar component without supplemental illumination. The loss mechanisms are detailed and design suggestions are considered, including heliostats, lightpipes and tracked parabolic reflectors with fiber optics.

  19. Data correction techniques for the airborne large-aperture static image spectrometer based on image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Geng; Shi, Dalian; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Tao; Hu, Bingliang

    2015-01-01

    We propose an approach to correct the data of the airborne large-aperture static image spectrometer (LASIS). LASIS is a kind of stationary interferometer which compromises flux output and device stability. It acquires a series of interferograms to reconstruct the hyperspectral image cube. Reconstruction precision of the airborne LASIS data suffers from the instability of the plane platform. Usually, changes of plane attitudes, such as yaws, pitches, and rolls, can be precisely measured by the inertial measurement unit. However, the along-track and across-track translation errors are difficult to measure precisely. To solve this problem, we propose a co-optimization approach to compute the translation errors between the interferograms using an image registration technique which helps to correct the interferograms with subpixel precision. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, experiments are run on real airborne LASIS data and our results are compared with those of the state-of-the-art approaches.

  20. OASIS 1.0: Very Large-Aperture High-Power Lidar for Exploring Geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X.; Smith, J. A.; Chen, C.; Zhao, J.; Yu, Z.; Gardner, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    A new initiative, namely OASIS (the Observatory for Atmosphere Space Interaction Studies), has called for a very large-aperture high-power (VLAHP) lidar as its first step forward to acquire the unprecedented measurement capabilities for exploring the space-atmosphere interaction region (SAIR). Currently, there exists a serious observational gap of the Earth's neutral atmosphere above 100 km. Information on neutral winds and temperatures and on the plasma-neutral coupling in the SAIR, especially between 100 and 200 km, is either sparse or nonexistent. Fully exploring the SAIR requires measurements of the neutral atmosphere to complement radar observations of the plasma. Lidar measurements of neutral winds, temperatures and species can enable these explorations. Many of these topics will be addressed with the VLAHP lidar. Discoveries of thermospheric neutral Fe, Na and K layers up to nearly 200 km at McMurdo, Antarctica and other locations on Earth, have opened a new door to observing the neutral thermosphere with ground-based instruments. These neutral metal layers provide the tracers for resonance Doppler lidars to directly measure the neutral temperatures and winds in the thermosphere, thus enabling the VLAHP lidar dream! Because the thermospheric densities of these metal atoms are many times smaller than the layer peak densities near 90 km, high power-aperture product lidars, like the VLAHP lidar, are required to derive scientifically useful measurements. Furthermore, several key technical challenges for VLAHP lidar have been largely resolved in the last a few years through the successful development of Fe and Na Doppler lidars at Boulder. By combining Rayleigh and Raman with resonance lidar techniques and strategically operating the VLAHP lidar next to incoherent scatter radar and other complementary instruments, the VLAHP lidar will enable new cutting-edge exploration of the geospace. These new concepts and progresses will be introduced in this paper.

  1. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOEpatents

    Halpin, John M.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 .mu.m.

  2. Large Diffractive Optics for GEo-Based Earth Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R A

    2003-09-11

    The natural vantage point for performing Earth-centric operations from space is geosynchronous orbit (GEO); a platform there moves at the same rate as the Earth's surface, so appears to continually ''hover'' over a fixed site on the Earth. Unlike spacecraft in other orbits, which rapidly fly-over targets, a GEO-based platform remains in-position all the time. In order to insure continual access to sites using low earth orbit (LEO) platforms, one needs a large enough constellation ({approx} 50) of spacecraft so that one is always overhead; in contrast, a single GEO platform provides continuous coverage over sites throughout Euro-Asia. This permanent coverage comes, unfortunately, with a stiff price-tag; geosynchronous orbit is 36,000 km high, so space platforms there must operate at ranges roughly 100 times greater than ones located in LEO. For optical-based applications, this extreme range is difficult to deal with; for surveillance the price is a 100-fold loss of resolution, for laser weapons it is a 10,000-fold loss in flux-on-target. These huge performance penalties are almost always unacceptable, preventing us from successfully using GEO-based platforms. In practice, we are forced to either settle for brief, infrequent access to targets, or, if we demand continuous coverage, to invest in large, many-satellite, constellations. There is, fortunately, a way to use GEO-based optical platforms without incurring the huge, range-dependent, performance penalties; one must simply use bigger optics. As long as the aperture of a platform's optics increases as much as its operating range, then its performance (resolution and/or flux) does not suffer; the price for operating from GEO is simply 100-fold larger optics. This is, of course, a very stiff price; while meter-class optics may suffice for many low-earth-orbit applications, 100 meter apertures are needed in order to achieve similar performance from GEO. Since even the largest Earth-based telescope is only 10 meters

  3. ABCD matrix for apertured spherical waves.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Bernabeu, E; Alda, J

    1991-05-01

    An ABCD matrix for describing the hard aperture under a large Fresnel number is defined in this Technical Note based on Li and Wolf's formula. It is useful for analyzing focal shifts of complicated optical systems with hard apertures. PMID:20700324

  4. Large aperture kinoform phase plates in fused silica for spatial beam smoothing on Nova and the Beamlet Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rushford, M.C.; Dixit, S.N.; Thomas, I.M.; Martin, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1997-03-01

    It is now widely recognized that spatial beam smoothing (homogenization) is essential in coupling the laser energy to the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. For the indirect drive approach to ICF, it is desirable to distribute the laser energy into a uniformly speckled profile that has a flat-top super-Gaussian envelope (8th power or higher) and contains greater than 95% of the energy inside the super-Gaussian profile. Spatial smoothing is easily achieved by introducing a binary random phase plate (RPP) in the beam. This produces a homogenized far-field pattern which consists of an overall envelope function determined by the RPP element superimposed with a fine scale speckle pattern arising due to the interference among the various RPP elements. Although easy to fabricate and currently in routine use in many fusion laboratories, the binary RPPs do not meet the ICF requirements stated above since the far-field intensity profile is restricted to essentially an Airy function containing only 84% (an upper limit) of the energy inside the central spot. Approaches using lenslet arrays (refractive or diffractive) have limited use since they operate in the quasi-far-field and have a short depth of focus. The limitations of the RPPs can be overcome by relaxing the binary phase constraint. We have recently presented 5 continuously varying phase screens for tailoring the focal plane irradiance profiles. Called kinoform phase plates (KPPs), these phase screens offer complete flexibility in tailoring the focal plane envelope and, at the same time, increasing the energy efficiency inside the focal spot. In this paper we discuss the design and fabrication of such kinoform phase plates in fused silica for spatial beam smoothing on the Nova and the Beamlet lasers. Since the phase plates are used at the end of the laser chain, KPPs on Nova and Beamlet have to be fabricated on large aperture optics (65-cm diameter and 40-cm square substrates respectively). The following

  5. Large-Optics white light interferometer for laser wavefront test: apparatus and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Zhu; Liu, Liren; Wang, Lijuan; Liu, De'an

    2008-08-01

    There is transmitting optics of 250mm aperture with about 8 microradians in SILEX system. This is often large aperture and diffraction-limited laser beam in the laser communications. Large-Optics white light interferometer using double-shearing structure has been submitted to analysis the laser wavefront before. Six optical plates of 490 millimeters apertures are manufactured now one of which is also aperture-divided so that the precision of measured wave front is higher than the full aperture design. It is suitable for measurement of minimum diffraction-limited laser wave front and any wavelength. The interference is happened between equal optical path of the reflection and the other. The plates are the basic structures which are precisely parallel or perpendicular needed for either two plates. There are several tools equipped with the interferometer including white light test source and collimators and so on to confirm the precision of several seconds angle. The apparatus and application is explained in detail in this paper. The adjustment is important for the realization of white light test.

  6. Hybrid Electrostatic/Flextensional Mirror for Lightweight, Large-Aperture, and Cryogenic Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, Brian; Moore, James; Hackenberger, Wesley; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2013-01-01

    A lightweight, cryogenically capable, scalable, deformable mirror has been developed for space telescopes. This innovation makes use of polymer-based membrane mirror technology to enable large-aperture mirrors that can be easily launched and deployed. The key component of this innovation is a lightweight, large-stroke, cryogenic actuator array that combines the high degree of mirror figure control needed with a large actuator influence function. The latter aspect of the innovation allows membrane mirror figure correction with a relatively low actuator density, preserving the lightweight attributes of the system. The principal components of this technology are lightweight, low-profile, high-stroke, cryogenic-capable piezoelectric actuators based on PMN-PT (piezoelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate) single-crystal configured in a flextensional actuator format; high-quality, low-thermal-expansion polymer membrane mirror materials developed by NeXolve; and electrostatic coupling between the membrane mirror and the piezoelectric actuator assembly to minimize problems such as actuator print-through.

  7. Performance of a Fieldable Large-Area, Coded-Aperture, Gamma Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Habte Ghebretatios, Frezghi; Cunningham, Mark F; Fabris, Lorenzo; Ziock, Klaus-Peter

    2007-01-01

    We recently developed a fieldable large-area, coded-aperture, gamma imager (the Large Area Imager - LAI). The instrument was developed to detect weak radiation sources in a fluctuating natural background. Ideally, the efficacy of the instrument is determined using receiver-operator statistics generated from measurement data in terms of probability of detection versus probability of false alarm. However, due to the impracticality of hiding many sources in public areas, it is difficult to measure the data required to generate receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curves. Instead, we develop a high statistics "model source" from measurements of a real point source and then inject the model source into data collected from the world at large where, presumably, no source exists. In this paper we have applied this "source injection" technique to evaluate the performance of the LAI. We plotted ROC curves obtained for different source locations from the imager and for different source strengths when the source is injected at 50 m from the imager. The result shows that this prototype instrument provides excellent performance for a 1-mCi source at a distance of 50 m from the imager in a single pass at 25 mph.

  8. Propagation of flat-topped multi-Gaussian beams through an apertured ABCD optical system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan-Qi; Zhu, Bao-Qiang; Liu, Dai-Zhong; Lin, Zun-Qi

    2009-10-01

    The generalized analytical expression for the propagation of flat-topped multi-Gaussian beams through a misaligned apertured ABCD optical system is derived. Using this analytical expression, the propagation characteristics of flat-topped multi-Gaussian beams through a spatial filter are investigated. The analytical formula of the electric field distribution in the focal plane is also derived for revealing the effects of the misalignment parameters clearly. It is found that different misalignment parameters have different influences on the electric field distributions of the beam focus spot and the output beam characteristics. The intensity distribution of the beam is mainly determined by the misalignment matrix element E, and the phase distribution is affected by the misalignment matrix elements G and E. PMID:19798391

  9. Large-aperture two-dimensional x-ray refractive mosaic lenses.

    PubMed

    Nazmov, Vladimir; Reznikova, Elena; Mohr, Juergen; Saile, Volker; Tajiri, Hiroo; Voigt, Anja

    2016-09-01

    Lenses with high numerical aperture are required for images with very high spatial resolution, which is difficult to realize in the x-ray range because of low-refraction-index decrement and relatively high absorption of x-rays in the material. However, such an aperture can be realized by means of a mosaic lens, as shown in this work. PMID:27607293

  10. Large-explosive source, wide-recording aperture, seismic profiling on the Columbia Plateau, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Jarchow, C.M. . Dept. of Geophysics); Catchings, R.D.; Lutter, W.J. )

    1994-02-01

    Clear subsurface seismic images have been obtained at low cost on the Columbia Plateau, Washington. The Columbia Plateau is perhaps the most notorious of all bad-data'' areas because large impedance contrasts in surface flood basalts severely degrade the seismic wavefield. This degradation was mitigated in this study via a large-explosive source, wide-recording aperture shooting method. The shooting method emphasizes the wide-angle portion of the wavefield, where Fermat's principle guarantees reverberation will not interfere with the seismic manifestations of crucial geologic interfaces. The basalt diving wave, normally discarded in standard common midpoint (CMP) seismic profiling, can be used to image basalt velocity structure via travel-time inversion. Maximum depth-penetration of the diving wave tightly constrains basalt-sediment interface depth. An arrival observed only at shot-receiver offsets greater than 15 km can be used to determine the velocity and geometry of basement via simultaneous inversion. The results from this study suggest that previous geologic hypotheses and hydrocarbon play concepts for the Columbia Plateau may have been in error.

  11. Application of image entropy evaluation function for the leveling of large aperture components in auto defects detecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Pin; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Peng; Yang, Yong-ying; Wang, Shi-tong

    2012-10-01

    In large aperture component's dark-field scattering defects imaging system, the component's size is large and part with a wedge. When the component is in the completely level position, the surface defects image can be clearly acquired by a high magnification microscope. Otherwise, fuzzy defects image would be gained because of defocusing which makes digital identification can't be able to be done. For the problem of leveling large aperture, wedge component, this paper proposes a method that using image information entropy as focusing evaluation function for leveling large aperture components. Firstly, in three different points of component surface acquiring multi-images by the same continuous steps. Then calculating the images' entropy and fitting a curve to it. Based on minimum image information entropy value criterion, the focal plane can be found and each point's defocusingamount of the fist acquisition position can be gained. Relay on the relation model of acquisition points, adjust points and defocusingamount that has been built, each adjust point's adjustment can be got. The component's level position can be achieved by adjusting the adjust points. In the experiment that using a high magnification (of 16) microscope scans over the whole surface of the component with the size of 430mm×430mm. The image microscope is always in the depth of focus which shows that the leveling precision has achieved 20μm. Until now, this method has been successfully used in large aperture component's dark-field scattering defects imaging system.

  12. Remote optical sensing on the nanometer scale with a bowtie aperture nano-antenna on a fiber tip of scanning near-field optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Atie, Elie M.; Xie, Zhihua; El Eter, Ali; Salut, Roland; Baida, Fadi I.; Grosjean, Thierry; Nedeljkovic, Dusan; Tannous, Tony

    2015-04-13

    Plasmonic nano-antennas have proven the outstanding ability of sensing chemical and physical processes down to the nanometer scale. Sensing is usually achieved within the highly confined optical fields generated resonantly by the nano-antennas, i.e., in contact to the nanostructures. In this paper, we demonstrate the sensing capability of nano-antennas to their larger scale environment, well beyond their plasmonic confinement volume, leading to the concept of “remote” (non contact) sensing on the nanometer scale. On the basis of a bowtie-aperture nano-antenna (BNA) integrated at the apex of a SNOM (Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy) fiber tip, we introduce an ultra-compact, moveable, and background-free optical nanosensor for the remote sensing of a silicon surface (up to distance of 300 nm). Sensitivity of the BNA to its large scale environment is high enough to expect the monitoring and control of the spacing between the nano-antenna and a silicon surface with sub-nanometer accuracy. This work paves the way towards an alternative class of nanopositioning techniques, based on the monitoring of diffraction-free plasmon resonance, that are alternative to nanomechanical and diffraction-limited optical interference-based devices.

  13. A CLOSE COMPANION SEARCH AROUND L DWARFS USING APERTURE MASKING INTERFEROMETRY AND PALOMAR LASER GUIDE STAR ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Bernat, David; Bouchez, Antonin H.; Cromer, John L.; Dekany, Richard G.; Moore, Anna M.; Ireland, Michael; Tuthill, Peter; Martinache, Frantz; Angione, John; Burruss, Rick S.; Guiwits, Stephen R.; Henning, John R.; Hickey, Jeff; Kibblewhite, Edward; McKenna, Daniel L.; Petrie, Harold L.; Roberts, Jennifer; Shelton, J. Chris; Thicksten, Robert P.; Trinh, Thang

    2010-06-01

    We present a close companion search around 16 known early L dwarfs using aperture masking interferometry with Palomar laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS AO). The use of aperture masking allows the detection of close binaries, corresponding to projected physical separations of 0.6-10.0 AU for the targets of our survey. This survey achieved median contrast limits of {Delta}K {approx} 2.3 for separations between 1.2 {lambda}/D-4{lambda}/D and {Delta}K {approx} 1.4 at 2/3 {lambda}/D. We present four candidate binaries detected with moderate-to-high confidence (90%-98%). Two have projected physical separations less than 1.5 AU. This may indicate that tight-separation binaries contribute more significantly to the binary fraction than currently assumed, consistent with spectroscopic and photometric overluminosity studies. Ten targets of this survey have previously been observed with the Hubble Space Telescope as part of companion searches. We use the increased resolution of aperture masking to search for close or dim companions that would be obscured by full aperture imaging, finding two candidate binaries. This survey is the first application of aperture masking with LGS AO at Palomar. Several new techniques for the analysis of aperture masking data in the low signal-to-noise regime are explored.

  14. Performance of large aperture tapered fiber phase conjugate mirror with high pulse energy and 1-kHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhigang; Dong, Yantao; Pan, Sunqiang; Liu, Chong; Chen, Jun; Tong, Lixin; Gao, Qingsong; Tang, Chun

    2012-01-16

    A large aperture fused silica tapered fiber phase conjugate mirror is presented with a maximum 70% stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) reflectivity, which is obtained with 1 kHz repetition rate, 15 ns pulse width and 38 mJ input pulse energy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest SBS reflectivity ever reported by using optical fiber as a phase conjugate mirror for such high pulse repetition rate (1 kHz) and several tens of millijoule (mJ) input pulse energy. The influences of fiber end surface quality and pump pulse widths on SBS reflectivity are investigated experimentally. The results show that finer fiber end surface quality and longer input pulse widths are preferred for obtaining higher SBS reflectivity with higher input pulse energy. Double passing amplification experiments are also performed. 52 mJ pulse energy is achieved at 1 kHz repetition rate, with a reflected SBS pulse width of 1.5 ns and a M(2) factor of 2.3. The corresponding peak power reaches 34.6 MW. Obvious beam quality improvement is observed. PMID:22274534

  15. A scalable multi-chip architecture to realise large-format microshutter arrays for coded aperture applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNie, Mark E.; King, David O.; Smith, Gilbert W.; Stone, Steven M.; Brown, Alan G.; Gordon, Neil T.; Slinger, Christopher W.; Cannon, Kevin; Riches, Stephen; Rogers, Stanley

    2009-08-01

    Coded aperture imaging has been used for astronomical applications for several years. Typical implementations used a fixed mask pattern and are designed to operate in the X-Ray or gamma ray bands. Recently applications have emerged in the visible and infra red bands for low cost lens-less imaging systems and system studies have shown that considerable advantages in image resolution may accrue from the use of multiple different images of the same scene - requiring a reconfigurable mask. Previously we reported on the realization of a 2x2cm single chip mask in the mid-IR based on polysilicon micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) technology and its integration with ASIC drive electronics using conventional wire bonding. The MOEMS architecture employs interference effects to modulate incident light - achieved by tuning a large array of asymmetric Fabry-Perot optical cavities via an applied voltage and uses a hysteretic row/column scheme for addressing. In this paper we present the latest transmission results in the mid-IR band (3-5μm) and report on progress in developing a scalable architecture based on a tiled approach using multiple 2 x 2cm MOEMS chips with associated control ASICs integrated using flip chip technology. Initial work has focused on a 2 x 2 tiled array as a stepping stone towards an 8 x 8 array.

  16. A New Type of X-ray Condenser Lenses with Large Apertures Fabricated by Rolling of Structured Films

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.; Reznikova, E.; Nazmov, V.; Grund, T.; Last, A.

    2010-04-06

    In order to meet the demand for X-ray lenses with large apertures and, hence, photon flux, a new type of X-ray lenses has been developed: Rolled prismatic X-ray lenses feature a vast number of refracting surfaces to increase transparency and aperture, respectively. Prototypes of such lenses have been fabricated by molding and rolling of a structured polyimide film. In this work, rolled prismatic X-ray lenses are pictured, and results of first tests performed at the ANKA storage ring in Karlsruhe are presented.

  17. Design studies of large aperture, high-resolution Earth science microwave radiometers compatible with small launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Lyle C.; Bailey, M. C.; Harrington, Richard F.; Kendall, Bruce M.; Campbell, Thomas G.

    1994-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution microwave radiometer sensing from space with reasonable swath widths and revisit times favors large aperture systems. However, with traditional precision antenna design, the size and weight requirements for such systems are in conflict with the need to emphasize small launch vehicles. This paper describes tradeoffs between the science requirements, basic operational parameters, and expected sensor performance for selected satellite radiometer concepts utilizing novel lightweight compactly packaged real apertures. Antenna, feed, and radiometer subsystem design and calibration are presented. Preliminary results show that novel lightweight real aperture coupled with state-of-the-art radiometer designs are compatible with small launch systems, and hold promise for high-resolution earth science measurements of sea ice, precipitation, soil moisture, sea surface temperature, and ocean wind speeds.

  18. Origins of high-frequency scattered waves near PKKP from large aperture seismic array data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Earle, P.S.

    2002-01-01

    This article identifies the likely origin of 1-Hz scattered waves in the vicinity of PKKP by comparing measurements of slowness and onset time to ray-theoretical predictions. The measurements are obtained from slant stacks of Large Aperture Seismic Array (LASA) data from 36 earthquakes and six explosions in the range 30??-116??. Three types of scattered waves explain the main features seen in the stacks, including: P scattered to PKP near the Earth's surface (P.PKP), PKKP scattered near its core-mantle-boundary (CMB) reflection point (PK.KP), and SKKP scattered near its CMB reflection point (SK.KP). The LASA stacks image the amplitude and slowness variations of the scattered waves with time. They also show where these waves can be detected and where they are free from contaminating arrivals. SK.KP waves rise above the noise approximately 100 sec before the onset time of the main SKKP arrival near 113??. Observations of PK.KP span 30??-100??. However, at distances greater than 50?? they suffer from P.PKP contamination. At distances less than 40?? the PK.KP last for about 280 sec. This is approximately 130 sec longer than the maximum ray-theoretical prediction for waves scattered at the CMB, indicating a possible combination of near-surface scattering and contributions from the overlying mantle.

  19. A procedure for combining rotating-coil measurements of large-aperture accelerator magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, Oliver; Fiscarelli, Lucio; Russenschuck, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    The rotating search coil is a precise and widely used tool for measuring the magnetic field harmonics of accelerator magnets. This paper deals with combining several such multipole measurements, in order to cover magnet apertures largely exceeding the diameter of the available search coil. The method relies on the scaling laws for multipole coefficients and on the method of analytic continuation along zero-homotopic paths. By acquiring several measurements of the integrated magnetic flux density at different transverse positions within the bore of the accelerator magnet, the uncertainty on the field harmonics can be reduced at the expense of tight tolerances on the positioning. These positioning tolerances can be kept under control by mounting the rotating coil and its motor-drive unit on precision alignment stages. Therefore, the proposed technique is able to yield even more precise results for the higher-order field components than a dedicated rotating search coil of larger diameter. Moreover, the versatility of the measurement bench is enhanced by avoiding the construction of rotating search coils of different measurement radii.

  20. Tracking marine mammals and ships with small and large-aperture hydrophone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassmann, Martin

    Techniques for passive acoustic tracking in all three spatial dimensions of marine mammals and ships were developed for long-term acoustic datasets recorded continuously over months using custom-designed arrays of underwater microphones (hydrophones) with spacing ranging from meters to kilometers. From the three-dimensional tracks, the acoustical properties of toothed whales and ships, such as sound intensity and directionality, were estimated as they are needed for the passive acoustic abundance estimation of toothed whales and for a quantitative description of the contribution of ships to the underwater soundscape. In addition, the tracks of the toothed whales reveal their underwater movements and demonstrate the potential of the developed tracking techniques to investigate their natural behavior and responses to sound generated by human activity, such as from ships or military SONAR. To track the periodically emitted echolocation sounds of toothed whales in an acoustically refractive environment in the upper ocean, a propagation-model based technique was developed for a hydrophone array consisting of one vertical and two L-shaped subarrays deployed from the floating instrument platform R/P FLIP. The technique is illustrated by tracking a group of five shallow-diving killer whales showing coordinated behavior. The challenge of tracking the highly directional echolocation sounds of deep-diving (< 1 km) toothed whales, in particular Cuvier's beaked whales, was addressed by embedding volumetric small-aperture (≈ 1 m element spacing) arrays into a large-aperture (≈ 1 km element spacing) seafloor array to reduce the minimum number of required receivers from five to two. The capabilities of this technique are illustrated by tracking several groups of up to three individuals over time periods from 10 min to 33 min within an area of 20 km2 in the Southern California Bight. To track and measure the underwater radiated sound of ships, a frequency domain beamformer was

  1. Research of active panel technology for large aperture millimeter-wave/sub-millimeter-wave telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuhao; Cui, Xiangqun

    2010-05-01

    As Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) project was completed successfully, indicating the key technology of active optics has been mastered by the Chinese astronomical community, experts of Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology (NIAOT), builders of this project, started to consider how to use the technology developed in large optical telescope such as LAMOST to improve the performance of millimeterwave / sub-millimeter-wave telescope. In order to do more research work about active optics of millimeter submillimeter band and improve the performance of Delingha 13.7m millimeter-wave telescope, researchers of NIAOT intend to upgrade the reflect panel accuracy of this telescope. This paper will introduce the preliminary work of the accuracy-upgrading task, numerical simulation of the 13.7m telescope. In this presentation, the primary reflector finite element model (FEM) construction, gravity and thermal deformation, and modal analyze are described. The result shows that the gravity and thermal distortion of the reflector are contributed mostly by the back-structure and the active support for the panels is very necessary to restrain this kind of distortion.

  2. Estimation of turbulent sensible heat and momentum fluxes over a heterogeneous urban area using a large aperture scintillometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jun-Ho; Kim, Bo-Young

    2015-08-01

    The accurate determination of surface-layer turbulent fluxes over urban areas is critical to understanding urban boundary layer (UBL) evolution. In this study, a remote-sensing technique using a large aperture scintillometer (LAS) was investigated to estimate surface-layer turbulent fluxes over a highly heterogeneous urban area. The LAS system, with an optical path length of 2.1 km, was deployed in an urban area characterized by a complicated land-use mix (residential houses, water body, bare ground, etc.). The turbulent sensible heat ( Q H) and momentum fluxes (τ) were estimated from the scintillation measurements obtained from the LAS system during the cold season. Three-dimensional LAS footprint modeling was introduced to identify the source areas ("footprint") of the estimated turbulent fluxes. The analysis results showed that the LAS-derived turbulent fluxes for the highly heterogeneous urban area revealed reasonable temporal variation during daytime on clear days, in comparison to the land-surface process-resolving numerical modeling. A series of sensitivity tests indicated that the overall uncertainty in the LAS-derived daytime Q H was within 20%-30% in terms of the influence of input parameters and the nondimensional similarity function for the temperature structure function parameter, while the estimation errors in τ were less sensitive to the factors of influence, except aerodynamic roughness length. The 3D LAS footprint modeling characterized the source areas of the LAS-derived turbulent fluxes in the heterogeneous urban area, revealing that the representative spatial scales of the LAS system deployed with the 2.1 km optical path distance ranged from 0.2 to 2 km2 (a "micro- a scale"), depending on local meteorological conditions.

  3. Synthetic Aperture Radar (sar) and Optical Imagery Data Fusion: Crop Yield Analysis in Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, S. M.

    2012-08-01

    With the expanding energy crisis and rising food prices, crop yield analysis in Southeast Asia is an increasingly important topic in this region. Rice is the most important food crop in Southeast Asia and the ability to accurately predict crop yields during a growing season is useful for decision-makers, aid providers, and commercial trade organizations. The use of optical satellite image data by itself is difficult due to the almost constant cloud in many parts of Southeast Asia. However, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), or SAR data, which can image the Earth's surface through cloud cover, is suitable for many agricultural purposes, such as the detection of rice fields, and the identification of different crop species. Crop yield analysis is difficult in this region due to many factors. Rice cropping systems are often characterized by the type of rice planted, the size of rice field, the sowing dates for different fields, different types of rice cropping systems from one area to another, as well as cultural practices such as sowing and transplanting. This paper will discuss the use of SAR data fused with optical imagery to improve the ability to perform crop yield analysis on rice crops in Southeast Asia.

  4. Ray-tracing and physical-optics analysis of the aperture efficiency in a radio telescope.

    PubMed

    Olmi, Luca; Bolli, Pietro

    2007-07-01

    The performance of telescope systems working at microwave or visible-IR wavelengths is typically described in terms of different parameters according to the wavelength range. Most commercial ray-tracing packages have been specifically designed for use with visible-IR systems and thus, though very flexible and sophisticated, do not provide the appropriate parameters to fully describe microwave antennas and to compare with specifications. We demonstrate that the Strehl ratio is equal to the phase efficiency when the apodization factor is taken into account. The phase efficiency is the most critical contribution to the aperture efficiency of an antenna and the most difficult parameter to optimize during the telescope design. The equivalence between the Strehl ratio and the phase efficiency gives the designer/user of the telescope the opportunity to use the faster commercial ray-tracing software to optimize the design. We also discuss the results of several tests performed to check the validity of this relationship that we carried out using a ray-tracing software, ZEMAX, and a full Physical Optics software, GRASP9.3, applied to three different telescope designs that span a factor of approximately 10 in terms of D/lambda. The maximum measured discrepancy between phase efficiency and Strehl ratio varies between approximately 0.4% and 1.9% up to an offset angle of >40 beams, depending on the optical configuration, but it is always less than 0.5% where the Strehl ratio is >0.95. PMID:17571151

  5. Stylus profilometry of large optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills-Moren, William J.; Leadbeater, Peter B.

    1990-11-01

    This paper indicates the emerging requirements for profilometry instruments for use in the fabrication and characterization of modern optical systems. Important design principles are covered, together with some of the problems which can be experienced. Examples of a number of systems recently developed are given - both stand-alone systems and those which operate in situ to the machining process.

  6. Imaging the midcontinent rift beneath Lake Superior using large aperture seismic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trehu, Anne M.; Morel-a-l'Huissier, Patrick; Meyer, R.; Hajnal, Z.; Karl, J.; Mereu, R. F.; Sexton, J.; Shay, J.; Chan, W. K.; Epili, D.; Jefferson, T.; Shih, X. R.; Wendling, S.; Milkereit, B.; Green, A.; Hutchinson, Deborah R.

    1991-01-01

    We present a detailed velocity model across the 1.1 billion year old Midcontinent Rift System (MRS) in central Lake Superior. The model was derived primarily from onshore-offshore large-aperture seismic and gravity data. High velocities obtained within a highly reflective half-graben that was imaged on coincident seismic reflection data demonstrate the dominantly mafic composition of the graben fill and constrain its total thickness to be at least 30km. Strong wide-angle reflections are observed from the lower crust and Moho, indicating that the crust is thickest (55–60km) beneath the axis of the graben. The total crustal thickness decreases rapidly to about 40 km beneath the south shore of the lake and decreases more gradually to the north. Above the Moho is a high-velocity lower crust interpreted to result from syn-rift basaltic intrusion into and/or underplating beneath the Archean lower crust. The lower crust is thickest beneath the axis of the main rift half-graben. A second region of thick lower crust is found approximately 100km north of the axis of the rift beneath a smaller half graben that is interpreted to reflect an earlier stage of rifting. The crustal model presented here resembles recent models of some passive continental margins and is in marked contrast to many models of both active and extinct Phanerozoic continental rift zones. It demonstrates that the Moho is a dynamic feature, since the pre-rift Moho is probably within or above the high-velocity lower crust, whereas the post-rift Moho is defined as the base of this layer. In the absence of major tectonic activity, however, the Moho is very stable, since the large, abrupt variations in crustal thickness beneath the MRS have been preserved for at least a billion years.

  7. HI at z 20: The Large Aperture Experiment to Detect the Dark Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Werthimer, D.; Taylor, G.; Ellingson, S.; LEDA Collaboration

    2012-05-01

    When did the first stars form? Did supermassive black holes form at the same time, earlier, or later? One of the great challenges of cosmology today is the study of these first generation objects. The Large Aperture Experiment to Detect the Dark Ages (LEDA) project seeks to detect, in total-power, emission from neutral Hydrogen (21 cm rest wavelength) in the intergalactic medium about 100 million years after the Big Bang (redshifts 20). Detection would deliver the first observational constraints on models of structure formation and the first pockets of star and black holes formation in the Universe. LEDA will develop and integrate by 2013 signal processing instrumentation into the new first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA). This comprises a large-N correlator serving all 512 dipole antennas of the LWA1, leveraging a packetized CASPER architecture and combining FPGAs and GPUs for the F and X stages. Iterative calibration and imaging will rely on warped snapshot imaging and be drawn from a GPU-enabled library (cuWARP) that is designed specifically to support wide-field full polarization imaging with fixed dipole arrays. Calibration techniques will include peeling, correction for ionospheric refraction, direction dependent dipole gains, deconvolution via forward modeling, and exploration of pulsar data analysis to improve performance. Accurate calibration and imaging will be crucial requirements for LEDA, necessary to subtract the bright foreground sky and detect the faint neutral Hydrogen signal. From the computational standpoint, LEDA is a O(100) TeraFlop per second challenge that enables a scalable architecture looking toward development of radio arrays requiring power efficient 10 PetaFlop per second performance. Stage two of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA2) is one example.

  8. Distortion correction in surface defects evaluating system of large fine optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shitong; Liu, Dong; Yang, Yongying; Chen, Xiaoyu; Cao, Pin; Li, Lu; Yan, Lu; Cheng, Zhongtao; Shen, Yibing

    2014-02-01

    It is challenging to quantitate micron-scale defects on the surface of large optics. Based on microscopic scattering dark-field imaging, sub-aperture scanning and stitching, the Surface Defects Evaluating System (SDES) can spot and measure scratch and digs on large optics. In order to evaluate defects of down to sub-micron over apertures of hundreds of millimeters, high magnification zoom microscope and large format CCD camera are employed to balance between the efficiency and resolution. Unfortunately, large optical distortion in the sub-aperture images can be found, and feature recognition of defect images as well as mismatches of the sub-apertures stitching are greatly affected. In this paper, a distortion correction procedure based on the Brown-Conrady model is proposed. Grayscale surface fitting and bilinear interpolation techniques are employed to obtain better correction accuracy. A grids-patterned fused silica standard plate has been specifically made to calibrate the distortion. Comparison experiments indicate that the distortion in the SDES can be corrected by the proposed method very well.

  9. Large-scale and non-contact surface topography measurement using scanning ion conductance microscopy and sub-aperture stitching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jian; Guo, Renfei; Li, Fei; Yu, Dehong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a large-scale and non-contact surface topography measurement method using a non-contact scanning probe microscopy (SPM) technique, scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), combined with the sub-aperture stitching technique. The phase correlation techniques were first applied to the three-dimensional (3D) images measured by the SICM to acquire an initially coarse stitching position. Then the tip–tilt compensated sub-aperture stitching algorithm is utilized to eliminate tilts and translations among adjacent images and expand the lateral measuring range of the existing hopping mode SICM system. This SICM and the stitching based method has been used to measure some large-scale samples (micrometer to millimeter scale) in a non-contact, quantitative and high resolution way. Simulation and experimental results on these samples verify the feasibility of this method and the effectiveness of the stitching algorithm. A measuring range of 1.08 mm  ×  0.55 mm and a lateral resolution of 100 nm or even higher were obtained in these experiments. Compared with atomic force microscopy (AFM), the non-contact feature of the proposed method ensures less damage to the surface topography. The non-optical feature makes the data stitching simpler than the existing optical microscopic methods, which need consider how to compensate the vignetting effect caused by the inhomogeneity of light.

  10. Aperture averaging in multiple-input single-output free-space optical systems using partially coherent radial array beams.

    PubMed

    Gökçe, Muhsin Caner; Baykal, Yahya; Uysal, Murat

    2016-06-01

    Multiple-input single-output (MISO) techniques are employed in free-space optical (FSO) links to mitigate the degrading effects of atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, for the MISO FSO system, a partially coherent radial array and a finite-sized receiver aperture are used at the transmitter and the receiver, respectively. Using the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, we formulate the average power and the power correlation at the finite-sized slow detector in weak atmospheric turbulence. System performance indicators such as the power scintillation index and the aperture averaging factor are determined. Effects of the source size, ring radius, receiver aperture radius, link distance, and structure constant and the degree of source coherence are analyzed on the performance of the MISO FSO system. In the limiting cases, the numerical results are found to be the same when compared to the existing coherent and partially coherent Gaussian beam scintillation indices. PMID:27409430

  11. Coherent polarization stabilization in large-aperture rectangular post bottom-emitting vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Ning, Y. Q.; Tian, Z. H.; Zhang, X.; Shi, J. J.; Wang, Z. F.; Zhang, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Qin, L.; Wang, L. J.

    2011-03-01

    The output characteristics of large-aperture rectangular post bottom-emitting vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) were investigated. It was shown that the output power of the rectangle VCSELs can be up to 660 mW at a current of 5 A. Both H-polarization (horizontal) and V-polarization (vertical) demonstrated a coherent stabilization over the entire range of operation current, and coherent spectrum blue-shift of H-polarization light occurred with respect to V-polarization light at three different injected currents. The polarization states of output light were stabilized in the two orthogonal directions and H-polarization was the most principal polarization which was parallel to the longer side of the rectangular aperture. From the relationship between polarization ratio and aspect ratio of the oxidation confinement aperture (OCA), it was found that the highest polarization ratio (about 2:1) took place when the appropriate aspect ratio was 5:3, which meant better polarization stabilization in large-aperture VCSELs.

  12. Determining suitability of Large Aperture Scintillometer for validating remote sensing based evapotranspiration maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, G.; Gowda, P. H.; Howell, T. A.; Basu, S.; Colaizzi, P. D.; Marek, T.

    2013-12-01

    Scintillation method is a relatively new technique for measuring the sensible heat and water fluxes over land surfaces. Path integrating capabilities of scintillometer over heterogeneous landscapes make it a potential tool for comparing the energy fluxes derived from remote sensing based energy balance algorithms. For this reason, scintillometer-derived evapotranspiration (ET) fluxes are being used to evaluate remote sensing based energy balance algorithms for their ability to estimate ET fluxes. However, LAS' (Large Aperture Scintillometer) ability to derive ET fluxes is not thoroughly tested. The objective of this study was to evaluate LAS- and Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS)-derived fluxes against lysimetric data to determine LAS' suitability for validating remote sensing based evapotranspiration (ET) maps. The study was conducted during the Bushland Evapotranspiration and Agricultural Remote sensing EXperiment - 2008 (BEAREX-08) at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL), Bushland, Texas. SEBS was coded in a GIS environment to retrieve ET fluxes from the high resolution imageries acquired using airborne multispectral sensors. The CPRL has four large weighing lysimeters (3 m long x 3 m wide x 2.4 m deep), each located in the middle of approximately 5 ha fields, arranged in a block pattern. The two lysimeter fields located on the east (NE and SE) were managed under irrigated conditions, and the other two lysimeters on the west (NW and SW) were under dryland management. Each lysimeter field was equipped with an automated weather station that provided measurements for net radiation (Rn), Ts, soil heat flux (Go), Ta, relative humidity, and wind speed. During BEAREX08, the NE and SE fields were planted to cotton on May 21, and the NW and SW dryland lysimeters fields were planted to cotton on June 5. One LAS each was deployed across two large dryland lysimeter fields (NW and SW) and two large irrigated lysimeter fields (NE and SE). The

  13. Large stable aluminum optics for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukobratovich, Daniel; Schaefer, John P.

    2011-09-01

    Aluminum mirrors offer the advantages of lower cost, shorter fabrication time, more rugged mounting, and same material athermalization when compared to classical glass mirrors. In the past these advantages were offset by controversial dimensional stability and high surface scatter, limiting applications to IR systems. Raytheon developed processes to improve long term stability, and reduce surface scatter. Six 380 mm aperture aluminum mirrors made using these processes showed excellent stability, with figure changes of less than 0.01 wave RMS(1 wave = 633 nm) when cycled 10 times between -51 and +71 deg. C. The VQ process developed at ELCAN reduces surface scatter in bare aluminum mirrors to below 20 angstroms RMS, and has been used in thousands of production mirrors up to 300 mm aperture. These processes were employed in the fabrication of two lightweight single arch 600 mm aluminum mirrors. The two mirrors were produced in four months, with a mounted surface figure of 0.22 waves RMS and surface roughness of 20 angstroms. Mounted fundamental frequency was 218 Hz, and no figure distortion was observed at preload levels four times higher than design. Subsequently the mirrors performed well when subjected to severe environmental loadings in a Raytheon test system. This technology is being extended to ultra-lightweight sandwich mirrors, which are competitive with other material technologies used in advanced aerospace applications such as high-altitude UAV surveillance systems and satellite optics.

  14. Assessing Inter-Sensor Variability and Sensible Heat Flux Derivation Accuracy for a Large Aperture Scintillometer

    PubMed Central

    Rambikur, Evan H.; Chávez, José L.

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy in determining sensible heat flux (H) of three Kipp and Zonen large aperture scintillometers (LAS) was evaluated with reference to an eddy covariance (EC) system over relatively flat and uniform grassland near Timpas (CO, USA). Other tests have revealed inherent variability between Kipp and Zonen LAS units and bias to overestimate H. Average H fluxes were compared between LAS units and between LAS and EC. Despite good correlation, inter-LAS biases in H were found between 6% and 13% in terms of the linear regression slope. Physical misalignment was observed to result in increased scatter and bias between H solutions of a well-aligned and poorly-aligned LAS unit. Comparison of LAS and EC H showed little bias for one LAS unit, while the other two units overestimated EC H by more than 10%. A detector alignment issue may have caused the inter-LAS variability, supported by the observation in this study of differing power requirements between LAS units. It is possible that the LAS physical misalignment may have caused edge-of-beam signal noise as well as vulnerability to signal noise from wind-induced vibrations, both having an impact on the solution of H. In addition, there were some uncertainties in the solutions of H from the LAS and EC instruments, including lack of energy balance closure with the EC unit. However, the results obtained do not show clear evidence of inherent bias for the Kipp and Zonen LAS to overestimate H as found in other studies. PMID:24473285

  15. ExoEarth Yield Estimates for a Future Large Aperture Direct Imaging Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Christopher C.; Roberge, Aki; Mandell, Avi; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Robinson, Tyler

    2015-01-01

    ExoEarth yield is a critical science metric that will constrain the required aperture of a future exoplanet-imaging mission. I will present a numerically efficient method for maximizing the yield of exoEarth candidates by simultaneously optimizing the exposure time of every star, number of visits per star, and delay time between visits, while maximally adapting the target list to the mission's capabilities. This method can potentially double the exoEarth candidate yield compared to previous methods. I will show how the yield scales with mission parameters, including aperture size and high level coronagraph parameters, and address the impact of astrophysical uncertainties on exoEarth yield.

  16. Test results of a single aperture 10 tesla dipole model magnet for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Akira; Shintomi, Takakazu; Kimura, Nobuhiro

    1996-07-01

    A single aperture dipole magnet has been developed with a design magnetic field of 10 tesla by using Nb-Ti/Cu conductor to be operated at 1.8 K in pressurized super fluid helium. The magnet features double shell coil design by using high keystone Rutherford cable and compact non-magnetic steel collars to be adaptable in split/symmetric coil/collar design for twin aperture dipoles. A design central magnetic field of 10 tesla has been successfully achieved in excitation at 1.95 K in pressurized superfluid helium. Test results of the magnet with a summary of the design and fabrication will be presented.

  17. All-reflective optical target illumination system with high numerical aperture

    DOEpatents

    Sigler, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for providing illumination of a target focal region at high numerical aperture from a pair of co-axially, confluent collimated light beams. A target cavity is defined by a pair of opposed inner ellipsoidal reflectors having respective first focal points within a target region and second focal points at a vertex opening in the opposing reflector. Outwardly of each inner reflector is the opposed combination of a spherical reflector, and an outer generally ellipsoidal reflector having an aberrated first focal point coincident with the focus of the opposing spherical reflector and a second focal point coincident with the second focal point of the opposing inner ellipsoidal reflector through a vertex opening in the spherical reflector. The confluent collimated beams are incident through vertex openings in the outer ellipsoidal reflectors onto respective opposing spherical reflectors. Each beam is reflected by the associated spherical reflector onto the opposing outer ellipsoidal reflector and focused thereby onto the opposing inner ellipsoidal reflector, and then onto the target region.

  18. Photoplastic near-field optical probe with sub-100 nm aperture made by replication from a nanomould.

    PubMed

    Kim, G M; Kim, B J; Ten Have, E S; Segerink, F; Van Hulst, N F; Brugger, J

    2003-03-01

    Polymers have the ability to conform to surface contours down to a few nanometres. We studied the filling of transparent epoxy-type EPON SU-8 into nanoscale apertures made in a thin metal film as a new method for polymer/metal near-field optical structures. Mould replica processes combining silicon micromachining with the photo-curable SU-8 offer great potential for low-cost nanostructure fabrication. In addition to offering a route for mass production, the transparent pyramidal probes are expected to improve light transmission thanks to a wider geometry near the aperture. By combining silicon MEMS, mould geometry tuning by oxidation, anti-adhesion coating by self-assembled monolayer and mechanical release steps, we propose an advanced method for near-field optical probe fabrication. The major improvement is the possibility to fabricate nanoscale apertures directly on wafer scale during the microfabrication process and not on free-standing tips. Optical measurements were performed with the fabricated probes. The full width half maximum after a Gaussian fit of the intensity profile indicates a lateral optical resolution of approximately 60 nm. PMID:12641773

  19. New Aperture Partitioning Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, S.; Calef, B.; Williams, S.

    Postprocessing in an optical system can be aided by adding an optical element to partition the pupil into a number of segments. When imaging through the atmosphere, the recorded data are blurred by temperature-induced variations in the index of refraction along the line of sight. Using speckle imaging techniques developed in the astronomy community, this blurring can be corrected to some degree. The effectiveness of these techniques is diminished by redundant baselines in the pupil. Partitioning the pupil reduces the degree of baseline redundancy, and therefore improves the quality of images that can be obtained from the system. It is possible to implement the described approach on an optical system with a segmented primary mirror, but not very practical. This is because most optical systems do not have segmented primary mirrors, and those that do have relatively low bandwidth positioning of segments due to their large mass and inertia. It is much more practical to position an active aperture partitioning element at an aft optics pupil of the optical system. This paper describes the design, implementation and testing of a new aperture partitioning element that is completely reflective and reconfigurable. The device uses four independent, annular segments that can be positioned with a high degree of accuracy without impacting optical wavefront of each segment. This mirror has been produced and is currently deployed and working on the 3.6 m telescope.

  20. [Design of a dual-channel Mach-Zehnder lateral shearing interferometer for the large aperture static imaging spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Xiangli, Bin; Lü, Qun-bo; Jing, Juan-juan

    2012-02-01

    Large aperture static imaging spectrometry (LASIS) is a kind of joint temporally and spatially modulated Fourier transform imaging spectrometry. In such instruments, lateral shearing interferometer is a key element, the most frequently used type of which is the Sagnac interferometer. In this configuration, one half of the light entering the interferometer backtracks and causes a great decrease in energy efficiency. The present paper proposes a modified Mach-Zehnder lateral shearing interferometer structure to tackle this problem. With the ability to produce the same lateral shear, it features the advantage of dual channel output. We present a ray tracing procedure to induce the general expression of the lateral shear as well as analyze the contributions of error sources to the shear accuracy. The results serve as a new idea for the design of large aperture static imaging spectrometers and can be used to instruct the design and optimization of this kind of imaging spectrometer. PMID:22512210

  1. A novel measurement scheme for the radial group delay of large-aperture ultra-short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fenxiang; Xu, Yi; Li, Zhaoyang; Li, Wenkai; Lu, Jun; Wang, Cheng; Li, Yanyan; Liu, Yanqi; Lu, Xiaoming; Peng, Yujie; Wang, Ding; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin

    2016-05-01

    In femtosecond high-peak-power laser system, the radial group delay (RGD) of the pulse front introduced by conventional lens-based beam expanders can significantly decrease the achievable focal intensity, especially when it is larger than the pulse duration. In order to quantitatively analyze and compensate the RGD, a novel measurement scheme based on self-reference and second-order cross-correlation technology is proposed and applied to measure the RGD of the large-aperture ultra-short laser pulses directly. The measured result of the RGD in a 200 TW Ti:sapphire laser system is in good agreement with the theoretical calculation. To our knowledge, it is the first time to realize the direct RGD measurement of large-aperture ultra-short laser pulses.

  2. Figure measurement of a large optical flat with a Fizeau interferometer and stitching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunyu; Sprowl, Robert A.; Bray, Michael; Burge, James H.

    2006-08-01

    Large flat mirrors can be measured by using subaperture Fizeau interferometer and stitching the data. We have implemented such a system that can efficiently and accurately measure flat mirrors several meters in diameter using a 1 meter sub-aperture instantaneous Fizeau interferometer, coupled with sophisticated analysis software. The 1-m aperture optical system uses a fused silica test plate, reflective collimator, and commercial instantaneous interferometer. Collimator errors, mapping distortion, surface errors in the test plate, and other systematic effects were measured and compensated for individual measurements. Numerous individual maps were stitched together to determine the global shape of a 2-m class flat.

  3. Theoretical and Experimental Study of a Numerical Aperture for Multimode PCS Fiber Optics Using an Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saman, Q. Mawlud; Nahlah, Q. Muhamad

    2012-11-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally the properties of numerical aperture (NA) of multimode graded-index plastic core silica (PCS) fibers by using an image technique. A He-Ne laser at wavelength 632.8 nm and output power 1 mW is used as the transmitter light source. The output beam images and intensity profiles of an optical fiber are investigated by using an imaging technique. The laser beam profiles captured by a sensitive digital Nikon camera are processed and analyzed by using a Gaussian intensity distribution in a 2D graph. A MathCAD 14 program is used for converting the image of the laser output beam into data. The theoretical and experimental values of the numerical aperture for the used optical fiber in this study are found to be 0.5 and 0.4924, respectively. The theoretical value of V-number is also calculated to be approximately 2482.

  4. High numerical aperture injection-molded miniature objective for fiber-optic confocal reflectance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidley, Matthew Douglas

    This dissertation presents the design of a miniature injection-molded objective lens for a fiber-optic confocal reflectance microscope. This is part of an effort to demonstrate the ability to fabricate low cost, high performance biomedical optics for high resolution in vivo imaging. Disposable endoscopic microscope objectives could help in vivo confocal microscopy technology mature to enable large-scale clinical screening and detection of early cancers and pre-cancerous lesions. This five lens plastic objective has been tested as a stand-alone optical system and has been coupled to a confocal microscope for in vivo imaging of cells and tissue. Changing the spacing and rotation of the individual optical elements can compensate for fabrication inaccuracies and improve performance. An optical-bench testing system was constructed to allow interactive alignment during testing. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of the miniature objective lens is determined using the slanted-edge method. A custom MATLAB program, edgeMTF, was written to collect, analyze, and record test data. An estimated Strehl ratio of 0.64 and an MTF value of 0.70, at the fiber-optic bundle Nyquist frequency, have been obtained. The main performance limitations of the miniature objective are mechanical alignment and flow-induced birefringence. Annealing and experimental injection molding runs were conducted in effort to reduce birefringence.

  5. Initial Technology Assessment for the Large UV-Optical-Infrared (LUVOIR) Mission Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Feinberg, Lee D.; France, Kevin; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Redding, David; Schiminovich, David

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Divisions 30-Year Roadmap prioritized a future large-aperture space telescope operating in the ultra-violet-optical-infrared wavelength regime. The Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy envisioned a similar observatory, the High Definition Space Telescope. And a multi-institution group also studied the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope. In all three cases, a broad science case is outlined, combining general astrophysics with the search for bio-signatures via direct-imaging and spectroscopic characterization of habitable exo-planets. We present an initial technology assessment that enables such an observatory that is currently being studied for the 2020 Decadal Survey by the Large UV-Optical Infrared (LUVOIR) surveyor Science and Technology Definition Team. We present here the technology prioritization for the 2016 technology cycle and define the required technology capabilities and current state-of-the-art performance. Current, planned, and recommended technology development efforts are also reported.

  6. World atlas of large optical telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, S. P.

    1979-01-01

    By 1980 there will be approximately 100 large optical telescopes in the world with mirror or lens diameters of one meter (39 inches) and larger. This atlas gives information on these telescopes and shows their locations on continent-sized maps. Observatory locations considered suitable for the construction of future large telescopes are also shown.

  7. Design and construction of a large aperture quadrupole electromagnet for ILSE

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.; Vella, M.C.; Peters, C.; Stuart, M.; Faltens, A.

    1995-08-01

    We are currently constructing a prototype quadrupole electromagnet for the proposed Induction Linac Systems Experiment (ILSE) at LBNL. ILSE will address many physics and engineering issues relevant to the design of a heavy-ion fusion driver accelerator. The pulsed electromagnet has two layers of current windings and will produce a field gradient of 28 T/m, wi a usable aperture of 6 cm. It operates at a repetition rate of 1 Hz, steady-state. In this paper, we discuss how the interaction of various concerns such as maximum dynamic aperture, short lattice period, field quality, iron yoke weight, heat transfer, and voltage standoff have led to our particular design choices. We also present 2- and 3-D numerical calculations concerning field topography and the results of transport simulations of space-charge dominated ion beams with ILSE parameters.

  8. Effect of Internal Aperture Variability on Tracer Transport in Large Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, N.; Painter, S. L.; Hyman, J.; Karra, S.; Gable, C. W.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Aperture variability within individual fractures is usually neglected in modeling flow and transport through fractured media. Typically, individual fractures are assumed to be homogeneous. However, in reality, individual fractures are heterogeneous, which may affect flow and transport in fractured media. The relative importance of including in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling has been under debate for a long time. Previous studies have shown flow channeling on an individual fracture with internal variability, where the fracture is considered isolated from the rest of the fracture network. Although these studies yield some clear insights into the process, the boundary conditions are impractical for field-scale networks, where the realistic boundary conditions are determined by fracture connections in the network. Therefore, flow in a single fracture is controlled not only by in-fracture variability but also by boundary conditions. In order to address the question of the importance of in-fracture variability, the internal heterogeneity of every individual fracture is incorporated into a three-dimensional fracture network, represented by a composition of intersecting fractures. The new DFN simulation capability, dfnWorks, is used to generate a kilometer scale DFNs similar to the Forsmark, Sweden site. In our DFN model, the in-fracture aperture variability is scattered over each cell of the computational mesh along the fracture, representing by a stationary Gaussian random field with various correlation lengths. The Lagrangian particle tracking is conducted in multiple DFN realizations and the flow-dependent Lagrangian parameters, non-reacting travel time, τ, and cumulative reactivity parameter, β, are obtained along particles streamlines. It is shown that early particle travel times are more sensitive to in-fracture aperture variability than tails of travel time distributions, where no significant effect of the aperture variations and spatial

  9. A 16-m Telescope for the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Telescope (ATLAST) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillie, Charles F.; Dailey, D. R.; Polidan, R. S.

    2010-01-01

    Future space observatories will require increasingly large telescopes to study the earliest stars and galaxies, as well as faint nearby objects. Technologies now under development will enable telescopes much larger than the 6.5-meter diameter James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to be developed at comparable costs. Current segmented mirror and deployable optics technology enables the 6.5 meter JWST telescope to be folded for launch in the 5-meter diameter Ariane 5 payload fairing, and deployed autonomously after reaching orbit. Late in the next decade, when the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle payload fairing becomes operational, even larger telescope can be placed in orbit. In this paper we present our concept for a 16-meter JWST derivative, chord-fold telescope which could be stowed in the 10-m diameter Ares V fairing, plus a description of the new technologies that enable ATLAST to be developed at an affordable price.

  10. Operation of a DC large aperture volume-production H sup minus source

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, J.W.; Ackerman, G.D.; Anderson, O.A.; Chan, C.F.; Cooper, W.S.; deVries, G.J.; Leung, K.N.; Lietzke, A.F.; Steele, W.F.

    1989-04-01

    In testing a multicusp volume-production H{sup {minus}} ion source (20 cm diameter, 23 cm long), we optimized the gas pressure, the plasma electrode bias potential and the magnetic filter. At the optimum pressure of 9 mT, the H{sup {minus}} beam output increased linearly with discharge power. The maximum H{sup {minus}} beam, measured with a current transformer downstream of the accelerator, was 100 mA while using a 6.67 cm{sup 2} aperture. Presently we are limited by overheating of the cathodes by the plasma ions. Under similar discharge conditions the maximum H{sup {minus}} current density was found to vary as a{sup {minus}0.7} where a is the aperture radius. Results from emittance measurements showed that the effective H{sup {minus}} ion temperature increased with a for a {gt} 0.8 cm. Thus the brightness of the beam decreased with increasing aperture radius. Operating the source with cesium would increase the H{sup {minus}} output however our accelerator must be improved to avoid breakdowns caused by the cesium contamination. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Image Restoration of Y-type Fizeau Optical Synthetic Aperture Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhendong

    2015-08-01

    Based on the structure of the 4 aperture Y-type fizeau synthetic aperture, we simulate imaging system using the software Matlab, then use the image restoration algorithm of expectation maximum(OS-EM) to restore images with the poisson noise、gaussian noise and speckle noise. Through the image restoration, it can improve the image quality and can distinguish the detail of the image.

  12. Characterizing polarized illumination in high numerical aperture optical lithography with phase shifting masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Gregory Russell

    The primary objective of this dissertation is to develop the phase shifting mask (PSM) as a precision instrument to characterize effects in optical lithography related to the use of polarized partially coherent illumination. The intent is to provide an in-situ characterization technique to add to the lithographer's tool-kit to help enable the stable and repeatable mass production of integrated circuits with feature sizes approaching 1/6th the wavelength of light being used. A series of complex-valued mathematical functions have been derived from basic principles and recent advances in photomask fabrication technology have enabled their implementation with four-phase mask making. When located in the object plane of an imaging system, these test functions serve to engineer a wavefiront that interacts with one particular optical effect, creating a measurable signal in the image plane. In most cases, these test patterns leverage proximity effects to create a central image intensity and are theoretically the most sensitive to the desired effect. Five novel classes of test patterns have been developed for in-situ characterization. The first two classes, The Linear Phase Grating (LPG) and Linear Phase Ring (LPR), both serve to characterize illumination angular distribution and uniformity by creating signals dependent on illumination angular frequency. The third class consists of the Radial Phase Grating (RPG) and Proximity Effect Polarization Analyzers (PEPA), which each create a polarization-dependent signal by taking advantage of the image reversal of one polarization component at high numerical aperture (NA). PSM Polarimetry employs a series of these patterns to form a complete polarization characterization of any arbitrary illumination scheme. The fourth and fifth classes employ sub-resolution interferometric reference probes to coherently interact with proximity effect spillover from a surrounding pattern. They measure the effective phase and transmission of the

  13. A Large Sparse Aperture Densified Pupil Hypertelescope Concept for Ground Based Detection of Extra-Solar Earth-Like Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D.; Lyon, R.; Woodruff, R.; Labeyrie, A.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A concept is presented for a large (10 - 30 meter) sparse aperture hyper telescope to image extrasolar earth-like planets from the ground in the presence of atmospheric seeing. The telescope achieves high dynamic range very close to bright stellar sources with good image quality using pupil densification techniques. Active correction of the perturbed wavefront is simplified by using 36 small flat mirrors arranged in a parabolic steerable array structure, eliminating the need for large delat lines and operating at near-infrared (1 - 3 Micron) wavelengths with flats comparable in size to the seeing cells.

  14. Performance of a prototype for a large-aperture multipass Nd:glass laser for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Murray, J.R.; Campbell, J.H.; Speck, D.R.; Barker, C.E.; Smith, I.C.; Browning, D.F.; Behrendt, W.C.

    1997-07-01

    The Beamlet is a single-beam prototype of future multibeam megajoule-class Nd:glass laser drivers for inertial confinement fusion. It uses a multipass main amplifier, adaptive optics, and efficient, high-fluence frequency conversion to the third harmonic. The Beamlet amplifier contains Brewster-angle glass slabs with a clear aperture of 39 cm{times}39 cm and a full-aperture plasma-electrode Pockels cell switch. It has been successfully tested over a range of pulse lengths from 1{endash}10 ns up to energies at 1.053 {mu}m of 5.8 kJ at 1 ns and 17.3 kJ at 10 ns. A 39-actuator deformable mirror corrects the beam quality to a Strehl ratio of as much as 0.4. The 1.053-{mu}m output has been converted to the third harmonic at efficiencies as high as 80{percent} and fluences as high as 8.7 J/cm{sup 2} for 3-ns pulses. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  15. Radius of Curvature Measurement of Large Optics Using Interferometry and Laser Tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Connelly, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The determination of radius of curvature (ROC) of optics typically uses either a phase measuring interferometer on an adjustable stage to determine the position of the ROC and the optics surface under test. Alternatively, a spherometer or a profilometer are used for this measurement. The difficulty of this approach is that for large optics, translation of the interferometer or optic under test is problematic because of the distance of translation required and the mass of the optic. Profilometry and spherometry are alternative techniques that can work, but require a profilometer or a measurement of subapertures of the optic. The proposed approach allows a measurement of the optic figure simultaneous with the full aperture radius of curvature.

  16. Computation of scalar far-field patterns of large-aperture antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omalley, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    In computer programs used for evaluating the performance of high-gain antennas, efficient numerical methods for calculating the far-field patterns must be used since the majority of computer time and storage requirements may be attributed to this phase of the program. The numerical method most frequently used is the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which computes the far field as the Fourier transform of the field distribution in the antenna aperture. A new numerical method that in many applications is superior to the FFT in terms of reducing computer time and storage requirements is described.

  17. Processing method and process modeling of large aperture transparent magnesium aluminate spinel domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jian; McWilliams, Brandon; Kilczewski, Steven; Gilde, Gary; Lidie, Ashley; Sands, James

    2009-05-01

    Polycrystalline spinel serves as an alternative to materials such as sapphire and magnesium fluoride that are currently being used in electromagnetic window applications such as missile domes, where high strength, high hardness and high transmittance in the visible and infrared spectra are required. The cubic crystal lattice of spinel imparts an isotropy to the bulk optical property, which eliminates optical distortion due to birefringence that occurs in sapphire and other non-cubic materials. The current study is to find a reliable manufacturing process to produce large magnesium aluminate spinel domes from powder consolidation efficiently. A binder-less dry ball milling process was used to deflocculate the spinel powder to increase its fluidity in an effort to ease the shape-forming. Dry ball milling time trials were conducted at several intervals to determine the appropriate level of time required to break up both the hard and soft agglomerates associated with the virgin spinel powder. The common problems encountered in dry powder shape-forming are crack growth and delamination of the green body during cold isostatic pressing (CIPing). The cracking and the delamination are due to the buildup of stress gradients on the green body that are created by the frictional force between the powder and the die wall or mold wall. To understand the stresses during the CIPing process, a finite element analysis of stresses on the green body was conducted. The simulation was used to evaluate the effect of die tooling and process characteristics on the development of stress gradients in the green body dome. Additionally, the effect of friction between the die wall and powder was examined by the simulation. It was found that by mitigating the frictional forces, cracking and delamination on the green body could be eliminated. A stepped-pressure CIPing technique was developed to reduce stress gradient build-up during CIPing. Also, oleic acid lubricant was applied to the die wall to

  18. Near-Space TOPSAR Large-Scene Full-Aperture Imaging Scheme Based on Two-Step Processing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianghui; Wu, Junjie; Li, Wenchao; Huang, Yulin; Yang, Jianyu; Yang, Haiguang

    2016-01-01

    Free of the constraints of orbit mechanisms, weather conditions and minimum antenna area, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) equipped on near-space platform is more suitable for sustained large-scene imaging compared with the spaceborne and airborne counterparts. Terrain observation by progressive scans (TOPS), which is a novel wide-swath imaging mode and allows the beam of SAR to scan along the azimuth, can reduce the time of echo acquisition for large scene. Thus, near-space TOPS-mode SAR (NS-TOPSAR) provides a new opportunity for sustained large-scene imaging. An efficient full-aperture imaging scheme for NS-TOPSAR is proposed in this paper. In this scheme, firstly, two-step processing (TSP) is adopted to eliminate the Doppler aliasing of the echo. Then, the data is focused in two-dimensional frequency domain (FD) based on Stolt interpolation. Finally, a modified TSP (MTSP) is performed to remove the azimuth aliasing. Simulations are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed imaging scheme for near-space large-scene imaging application. PMID:27472341

  19. Rapid Adaptive Optical Recovery of Optimal Resolution over LargeVolumes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Milkie, Dan; Saxena, Ankur; Engerer, Peter; Misgeld, Thomas; Bronner, Marianne E.; Mumm, Jeff; Betzig, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Using a de-scanned, laser-induced guide star and direct wavefront sensing, we demonstrate adaptive correction of complex optical aberrations at high numerical aperture and a 14 ms update rate. This permits us to compensate for the rapid spatial variation in aberration often encountered in biological specimens, and recover diffraction-limited imaging over large (> 240 μm)3 volumes. We applied this to image fine neuronal processes and subcellular dynamics within the zebrafish brain. PMID:24727653

  20. Plasma surface figuring of large optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdain, R.; Castelli, M.; Morantz, P.; Shore, P.

    2012-04-01

    Fast figuring of large optical components is well known as a highly challenging manufacturing issue. Different manufacturing technologies including: magnetorheological finishing, loose abrasive polishing, ion beam figuring are presently employed. Yet, these technologies are slow and lead to expensive optics. This explains why plasma-based processes operating at atmospheric pressure have been researched as a cost effective means for figure correction of metre scale optical surfaces. In this paper, fast figure correction of a large optical surface is reported using the Reactive Atom Plasma (RAP) process. Achievements are shown following the scaling-up of the RAP figuring process to a 400 mm diameter area of a substrate made of Corning ULE®. The pre-processing spherical surface is characterized by a 3 metres radius of curvature, 2.3 μm PVr (373nm RMS), and 1.2 nm Sq nanometre roughness. The nanometre scale correction figuring system used for this research work is named the HELIOS 1200, and it is equipped with a unique plasma torch which is driven by a dedicated tool path algorithm. Topography map measurements were carried out using a vertical work station instrumented by a Zygo DynaFiz interferometer. Figuring results, together with the processing times, convergence levels and number of iterations, are reported. The results illustrate the significant potential and advantage of plasma processing for figuring correction of large silicon based optical components.

  1. From Monolithics to Tethers to Freeflyers: The Spectrum of Large Aperture Sensing from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitner, Jesse; Quinn, David; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As part of NASA's endeavor to push the envelope and go where we have never been before, the Space Science Enterprise has laid out a vision which includes several missions that revolutionize the collection of scientific data from space. Many of the missions designed to meet the objectives of these programs depend heavily on the ability to perform space-based interferometry, which has recently become a rapidly growing field of investigation for both the scientific and engineering communities. While scientists are faced with the challenges of designing high fidelity optical systems capable of making detailed observations, engineers wrestle with the problem of providing s-pace-based platforms that can permit this data gathering to occur. Observational data gathering is desired at's variety of spectral wavelengths and resolutions, calling for interferometers with a range of baseline requirements. Approaches to configuration design are as varied as the missions themselves from large monolithic spacecraft to multiple free-flying small spacecraft and everything in between. As will be discussed, no one approach provides a 'panacea' of solutions rather each has its place in terms of the mission requirements. The purpose here is to identify the advantages and disadvantages of the various approaches, to discuss the driving factors in design selection and determine the relative range of applicability of each design approach.

  2. Large-field-of-view laser-scanning OR-PAM using a fibre optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T. J.; Zhang, E.; Beard, P. C.

    2015-03-01

    Laser-Scanning-Optical-Resolution Photoacoustic Microscopy (LSOR-PAM) requires an ultrasound detector with a low noise equivalent pressure (NEP) and a large angular detection aperture in order to image a large field of view (FOV). It is however challenging to meet these requirements when using piezoelectric receivers since using a small sensing element size (<100μm) in order to achieve a large angular detection aperture will inevitability reduce the sensitivity of the detector as it scales with decreasing element size. Fibre optic ultrasound sensors based on a Fabry Perot cavity do not suffer from this limitation and can provide high detection sensitivity (NEP<0.1kPa over a 20 MHz measurement bandwidth) with a large angular detection aperture due to their small active element size (~10μm). A LSOR-PAM system was developed and combined with this type of fibre optic ultrasound sensor. A set of phantom studies were undertaken. The first study demonstrated that a high resolution image over a large field of view (Ø11mm) could be obtained with a sampledetector separation of only 1.6mm. In the second study, a 12μm diameter tube filled with methylene blue whose absorption coefficient was similar to that of blood was visualised demonstrating that the fibre optic sensor could provide sufficient SNR for in-vivo microvascular OR-PAM imaging. These preliminary results suggest that the fibre optic sensor has the potential to outperform piezoelectric detectors for Laser-Scanning Optical Resolution Photoacoustic Microscopy (LSOR-PAM).

  3. Amplification of femtosecond pulses to above 1 J with large aperture Cr:LiSrAIF{sub 6} amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Ditmire, T.; Perry, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have developed a chirped pulse amplification system capable of producing femtosecond pulses with energy above one joule. This is accomplished by using a large aperture, flashlamp pumped Cr-LiSrAlF{sub 6} (Cr:LiSAF) amplifier. Optimum design of the 19 mm diameter amplifier results in a single pass gain of 5 with good beam quality. This amplifier produces 1.05 J pulses after compression with a width of < 125 fs at a repetition rate of 0.05 Hz.

  4. HI-CLASS on AEOS: a large-aperture laser radar for space surveillance/situational awareness investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, Mark A.; Dryden, Gordon L.; Pohle, Richard H.; Ayers, Kirstie; Carreras, Richard A.; Crawford, Linda L.; Taft, Russell

    2001-12-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory/Directed Energy Directorate (AFRL/DE) via the ALVA (Applications of Lidars for Vehicles with Analysis) program installed in late 2000 a wideband, 12 J 15 Hz CO2 laser radar (ladar) on the 3.67 meter aperture AEOS (Advanced Electro-Optics System) telescope. This system is part of the Maui Space Surveillance System (MSSS), on the summit of Haleakala, Maui, HI. This ladar adopts the technology successfully demonstrated by the first generation HI-CLASS (High Performance CO2) Ladar Surveillance Sensor) operating on the nearby 0.6 meter aperture Laser Beam Director (LBD) and developed under the Field Ladar Demonstration program, jointly sponsored by AFRL/DE and the Army's Space and Missile Defense Command. The moderate power (approximately 180 watts) HI-CLASS/AEOS system generates multiple, coherent waveforms for precision satellite tracking and characterization of space objects for 1 m2 targets at ranges out to 10,000 km. This system also will be used to track space objects smaller than30 cm at ranges to 2,000 km. A third application of this system is to provide data for developing satellite identification, characterization, health and status techniques. This paper will discuss the operating characteristics and innovative features of the new system. The paper will also review recent results in support of AF needs, demonstrations, experiments, as well as planned activities that directly support applications in the DoD, scientific, and commercial arenas.

  5. Large-aperture deformable mirror correction of tiled-grating wavefront error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruschwitz, B. E.; Jungquist, R.; Qiao, J.; Abbey, S.; Dean, S. E.; Maywar, D. N.; Moore, M. D.; Waxer, L. J.; Wilson, M. E.

    2006-06-01

    When tiling three gratings, with each individually exhibiting astigmatism and power due to holographic errors and coating stress, the resulting wavefront aberrations contain high-frequency components as well as the fundamental frequency, which is nearly three cycles across the aperture in the tiling direction. A deformable mirror (DM) that was designed to compensate for much slower errors (e.g., those arising from distortion in amplifier disks) is being used to compensate for this tiling-induced error. This investigation studies the effectiveness of compensating only the fundamental frequency of the tiled aberration, and shows that this provides a significant improvement that is adequate for a range of expected aberrations. Limitations of the DM correction technique are also studied.

  6. Astrometric plates obtained at the primary focus of large aperture reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markos, A.

    1984-01-01

    Coma, astigmatism, and great differences in stellar magnitudes between photographed object and reference stars constitute the main sources of errors in measuring positional plates. These three sources of error can easily be eliminated by the method used at the Klet Observatory for obtaining precise observations of faint objects. The astrometric plates are taken by the method of two diaphragms. The first diaphragm, with a small central aperture; is located in front of the photographic plate. The second diaphragm is situated in front of the mirror. By a very short (of the order of tens of seconds) exposure a sufficient number of reference stars can be obtained throughout the entire plate. The stars are very well defined to the very edge of the plate and are easy to measure. Moreover, this method makes it possible to use plates of larger dimensions than usual so that it is always possible to find the necessary reference stars.

  7. Alternative Beam Efficiency Calculations for a Large-aperture Multiple-frequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The fundamental definition of beam efficiency, given in terms of a far field radiation pattern, was used to develop alternative definitions which improve accuracy, reduce the amount of calculation required, and isolate the separate factors composing beam efficiency. Well-known definitions of aperture efficiency were introduced successively to simplify the denominator of the fundamental definition. The superposition of complex vector spillover and backscattered fields was examined, and beam efficiency analysis in terms of power patterns was carried out. An extension from single to dual reflector geometries was included. It is noted that the alternative definitions are advantageous in the mathematical simulation of a radiometer system, and are not intended for the measurements discipline where fields have merged and therefore lost their identity.

  8. Design and construction of a large aperture, quadrupole electromagnet prototype for ILSE

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, M.; Faltens, A.; Fawley, W.M.; Peters, C.; Vella, M.C.

    1995-04-01

    We are currently constructing a prototype quadrupole electromagnet for the proposed Induction Linac Systems Experiment (ILSE) at LBL. ILSE will address many physi and engineering issues relevant to the design of a heavy-ion fusion driver accelerator. The pulsed electromagnet has two layers of current windings and will produce a field gradient exceeding 25 T/m at a repetition rate of 1 Hz steady-state. In this paper, we discuss how the interaction of various concerns such as maximum dynamic aperture, short lattice period, field quality, iron yoke weight, heat transfer, and voltage standoff have led to our particular design choices. We also present 2- and 3-D numerical calculations concerning field topography and the results of transport simulations of space-charge dominated ion beams with ILSE parameters.

  9. Magnetorheological finishing and subaperture stitching interferometry of large and lightweight optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorey, Aric B.; Kordonski, William; Tricard, Marc

    2004-09-01

    Significant challenges are faced in the manufacturing of the complex optics for the next generation of astronomical telescopes. Process improvements are required to establish cost effective techniques to finish the optics to the tight specification required in a timely manner. An added complication is realized when the optics are lightweight. The non-uniform support of the face-sheet in this case requires special efforts to avoid a print-through of the cell structure due to fabrication processes, gravity and/or cryogenic effects. Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a deterministic, sub-aperture polishing process that has been a revolutionary success in the fabrication of optics in the size range of 10-1000 mm. This production proven process is capable of polishing flats, spheres, aspheres and cylinders to a surface figure accuracy of better than 30 nm peak-to-valley (better than 5 nm rms), and microroughness better than 1 nm rms on a variety of glasses, glass ceramics and single crystal materials. Unique characteristics of MRF such as a high, stable removal rate, conformal nature of the sub-aperture tool and shear mode of material removal give it advantages in the finishing of large and lightweight optics. These qualities provide for a cost-effective process with a high rate of convergence that requires few iterations. Such a technology is ideally complemented by a system for the stitching of interferometric sub-aperture data. Stitching inherently enables the testing of larger apertures with higher resolution and, thanks to the built-in calibration, even to higher accuracy in many situations. While this approach enables the non-null testing of parts with greater aspheric departure and can lead to a significantly reduced non-common air path in the testing of long-radius concave parts, it is especially effective for convex optics. That is, stitching is particularly well suited to the testing of secondary mirrors and, alongside the testing of the off-axis primary

  10. Optical design of the COSMO large coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Dennis; Tomczyk, Steven; Zhang, Haiying; Nelson, Peter G.

    2012-09-01

    The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO) is a facility dedicated to measuring magnetic fields in the corona and chromosphere of the Sun. It will be located on a mountaintop in the Hawaiian Islands and will replace the current Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO). COSMO will employ a suite of instruments to determine the magnetic field and plasma conditions in the solar atmosphere and will enhance the value of data collected by other observatories on the ground (SOLIS, ATST, FASR) and in space (SDO, Hinode, SOHO, GOES, STEREO, DSCOVR, Solar Probe+, Solar Orbiter). The dynamics and energy flow in the corona are dominated by magnetic fields. To understand the formation of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), their relation to other forms of solar activity, and their progression out into the solar wind requires measurements of coronal magnetic fields. The COSMO suite includes the Large Coronagraph (LC), the Chromosphere and Prominence Magnetometer (ChroMag) and the K-Coronagraph. The Large Coronagraph will employ a 1.5 meter fuse silica singlet lens and birefringent filters to measure magnetic fields out to two solar radii. It will observe over a wide range of wavelengths from 500 to 1100 nm providing the capability of observing a number of coronal, chromospheric, and photospheric emission lines. Of particular importance to measuring coronal magnetic fields are the forbidden emission lines of Fe XIII at 1074.7 nm and 1079.8 nm. These lines are faint and require the very large aperture. NCAR and NSF have provided funding to bring the COSMO Large Coronagraph to a preliminary design review (PDR) state by the end of 2013.

  11. Optical design for large depth of field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yang; Wang, Hu; Yue, Pan; Xue, Yaoke; Liu, Jie; Ye, Shuifu

    2016-01-01

    Optical system with large depth of field and large field of view has been designed. To enforce optical system with focal length of 6 mm to imaging the object with object length of 200mmm-1200mm, accord to the equation of depth of field, in case of the CCD sensor with pixel of 5.5umx 5.5um square area, the entrance pupil diameter to ideal imaging will be 0.423mm. To enlarge the modulation transfer function (MTF) at spatial frequency of 90 lp/mm, the entrance pupil diameter is enlarged to 1mm.After design and optimization, with field of view of 80°, within object length of 200mm - 1200mm, the optical system can imaging well, the modulation transfer function (MTF) at spatial frequency of 90lp/mm is larger than 0.1, the distortion of full field of viewed is less than 3%.The optical system can be widely used in machine vision, surveillance cameras, etc.

  12. Micro-precision control/structure interaction technology for large optical space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirlin, Samuel W.; Laskin, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The CSI program at JPL is chartered to develop the structures and control technology needed for sub-micron level stabilization of future optical space systems. The extreme dimensional stability required for such systems derives from the need to maintain the alignment and figure of critical optical elements to a small fraction (typically 1/20th to 1/50th) of the wavelength of detected radiation. The wavelength is about 0.5 micron for visible light and 0.1 micron for ultra-violet light. This lambda/50 requirement is common to a broad class of optical systems including filled aperture telescopes (with monolithic or segmented primary mirrors), sparse aperture telescopes, and optical interferometers. The challenge for CSI arises when such systems become large, with spatially distributed optical elements mounted on a lightweight, flexible structure. In order to better understand the requirements for micro-precision CSI technology, a representative future optical system was identified and developed as an analytical testbed for CSI concepts and approaches. An optical interferometer was selected as a stressing example of the relevant mission class. The system that emerged was termed the Focus Mission Interferometer (FMI). This paper will describe the multi-layer control architecture used to address the FMI's nanometer level stabilization requirements. In addition the paper will discuss on-going and planned experimental work aimed at demonstrating that multi-layer CSI can work in practice in the relevant performance regime.

  13. The design, construction and testing of the optics for a 147-cm-aperture telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchroeder, R. A.; Elmore, L. H.; Shack, R. V.; Slater, P. N.

    1972-01-01

    Geodetic optics research for the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories (AFCRL) is described. The work consisted mainly of the fabrication of the optical components for a telescope with a 152-cm-diam (60-in.) primary mirror masked down to 147-cm-diam for use by the AFCRL for a lunar ranging experiment. Among the achievements of this contract were the following: completion of the primary and secondary mirrors for a high-quality 147-cm-diam telescope system in eight months from the start of edging the primary; manufacture and testing of a unique center mount for the primary according to an AFCRL design that allowed for a thin-edged and therefore less-massive mirror; and development of a quantitative analysis of the wire test for calculating the departure of the mirror figure from the design figure quickly and accurately after each polishing step. This analysis method in conjunction with a knowledge of polishing rates for given weights and diameters of tools, mirror, and polishing materials should considerably reduce the polishing time required for future large mirrors.

  14. Studies of coded aperture gamma-ray optics using an Anger camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambous, P. M.; Dean, A. J.; Stephen, J. B.; Young, N. G. S.; Gourlay, A. R.

    1983-08-01

    An experimental arrangement using an Anger camera as a position-sensitive focal plane, in conjunction with a series of coded aperture masks, has been employed to generate laboratory gamma-ray images. These tests were designed to investigate quantitatively a number of potential aberrations present in any practicable imaging system. It is shown that, by proper design, the major sources of image defects may be reduced to a level compatible with the production of good quality gamma-ray sky images.

  15. Potential of a Future Large Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory for Breakthrough Observations of Star and Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danchi, William C.; Grady, Carol A.; Padgett, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    A future large aperture space observatory operating from the UV to the near-infrared with a diameter between 10 and 15 meters will provide a unique opportunity for observations of star and planet formation, from nearby moving groups and associations to star formation in galaxies in the local universe. Our newly formed working group will examine the unique opportunities that such a telescope will give observers in a post-JWST/WFIRST-AFTA era that includes extremely large ground-based observatories such as the TMT, E-ELT, ALMA, and the VLTI. Given a potential suite of instruments for this observatory we will discuss some of the key areas of star and planet formation science where breakthroughs might occur.

  16. High refractive index immersion liquid for superresolution 3D imaging using sapphire-based aplanatic numerical aperture increasing lens optics.

    PubMed

    Laskar, Junaid M; Shravan Kumar, P; Herminghaus, Stephan; Daniels, Karen E; Schröter, Matthias

    2016-04-20

    Optically transparent immersion liquids with refractive index (n∼1.77) to match the sapphire-based aplanatic numerical aperture increasing lens (aNAIL) are necessary for achieving deep 3D imaging with high spatial resolution. We report that antimony tribromide (SbBr3) salt dissolved in liquid diiodomethane (CH2I2) provides a new high refractive index immersion liquid for optics applications. The refractive index is tunable from n=1.74 (pure) to n=1.873 (saturated), by adjusting either salt concentration or temperature; this allows it to match (or even exceed) the refractive index of sapphire. Importantly, the solution gives excellent light transmittance in the ultraviolet to near-infrared range, an improvement over commercially available immersion liquids. This refractive-index-matched immersion liquid formulation has enabled us to develop a sapphire-based aNAIL objective that has both high numerical aperture (NA=1.17) and long working distance (WD=12  mm). This opens up new possibilities for deep 3D imaging with high spatial resolution. PMID:27140083

  17. A coherent light scanner for optical processing of large format transparencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callen, W. R.; Weaver, J. E.; Shackelford, R. G.; Walsh, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A laser scanner is discussed in which the scanning beam is random-access addressable and perpendicular to the image input plane and the irradiance of the scanned beam is controlled so that a constant average irradiance is maintained after passage through the image plane. The scanner's optical system and design are described, and its performance is evaluated. It is noted that with this scanner, data in the form of large-format transparencies can be processed without the expense, space, maintenance, and precautions attendant to the operation of a high-power laser with large-aperture collimating optics. It is shown that the scanned format as well as the diameter of the scanning beam may be increased by simple design modifications and that higher scan rates can be achieved at the expense of resolution by employing acousto-optic deflectors with different relay optics.

  18. HYBRID BRIDGMAN ANVIL DESIGN: AN OPTICAL WINDOW FOR IN-SITU SPECTROSCOPY IN LARGE VOLUME PRESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Lipp, M J; Evans, W J; Yoo, C S

    2005-07-29

    The absence of in-situ optical probes for large volume presses often limits their application to high-pressure materials research. In this paper, we present a unique anvil/optical window-design for use in large volume presses, which consists of an inverted diamond anvil seated in a Bridgman type anvil. A small cylindrical aperture through the Bridgman anvil ending at the back of diamond anvil allows optical access to the sample chamber and permits direct optical spectroscopy measurements, such as ruby fluorescence (in-situ pressure) or Raman spectroscopy. This performance of this anvil-design has been demonstrated by loading KBr to a pressure of 14.5 GPa.

  19. Large-scale polarimetry of large optical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholomitskii, G. B.; Maslov, I. A.; Vitrichenko, E. A.

    1999-11-01

    We present preliminary results of wide-field visual CCD polarimetry for large optical galaxies through a concentric multisector radial-tangential polaroid analyzer mounted at the intermediate focus of a Zeiss-1000 telescope. The mean degree of tangential polarization in a 13-arcmin field, which was determined by processing images with imprinted ``orthogonal'' sectors, ranges from several percent (M 82) and 0.51% (the spirals M 51, M 81) to lower values for elliptical galaxies (M 49, M 87). It is emphasized that the parameters of large-scale polarization can be properly determined by using physical models for galaxies; inclination and azimuthal dependences of the degree of polarization are given for spirals.

  20. The reliability test of center-aperture-detection-type magnetically induced super-resolution magneto-optical disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Sayoko; Nakatani, Morio; Sumi, Satoshi; Tanemura, Sakae

    2005-01-01

    The Center Aperture Detection (CAD) type Magnetically Induced Super-resolution (MSR) Magneto-optical Disk is one of method to overcome the limitation of optical resolution. For a reliability of the disk, it is important to investigate the stability of the magneto-static coupling between a readout layer and a recording layer through readout characteristics. In this paper, we tested the reliability of CAD tMSR magneto-optical disk. We used iD PHOTO disk for the CAD MSR magneto-optical disk. In the disk, the data is recorded on land and groove with a track pit of 0.6 μm and a bit length of 0.235 μm, by a method of laser pumped magnetic field modulation with an optical pickup of NA=0.62, λ=650 nm. The reliability was examined by PI error lines under the test condition of 80 °C-90 %RH. There were no considerable changes in read/write characteristics up to with an aging time of 2000 hour. The lifetime of the disk was estimated more than 7000 hour under the condition. By a method of the Arrhenius plots, we assumed that the lifetime of the disk would be more than 100 years under the condition of room temperature. We also confirmed that there were no significant changes in mechanical characteristics of the disks. These results show the disk using magneto-static coupling has sufficient reliability for consumer use.

  1. Multiple aperture window and seeker concepts for endo KEW applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shui, V.H.; Reeves, B.L.; Thyson, N.A.; Mueffelmann, W.H.; Werner, J.S.; Jones, G. Loral Infrared and Imaging Systems, Lexington, MA U.S. Army, Strategic Defense Command, Huntsville, AL )

    1992-05-01

    Hypersonic interceptors performing endoatmospheric hit-to-kill missions require very high seeker angle measurement accuracies in very severe aero-thermal environments. Wall jet window/aperture cooling usually leads to significant aero-optic degradation in seeker and hence interceptor performance. This paper describes window/aperture concepts that have the potential of eliminating or significantly reducing the need for coolant injection, together with a multiple aperture sensor concept that can provide a high angle measurement accuracy and a large field of regard, with a small aperture size. 15 refs.

  2. Multiple aperture window and seeker concepts for endo KEW applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shui, V. H.; Reeves, B. L.; Thyson, N. A.; Mueffelmann, W. H.; Werner, J. S.; Jones, G.

    1992-05-01

    Hypersonic interceptors performing endoatmospheric hit-to-kill missions require very high seeker angle measurement accuracies in very severe aero-thermal environments. Wall jet window/aperture cooling usually leads to significant aero-optic degradation in seeker and hence interceptor performance. This paper describes window/aperture concepts that have the potential of eliminating or significantly reducing the need for coolant injection, together with a multiple aperture sensor concept that can provide a high angle measurement accuracy and a large field of regard, with a small aperture size.

  3. A 2x2 multi-chip reconfigurable MOEMS mask: a stepping stone to large format microshutter arrays for coded aperture applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNie, Mark E.; Brown, Alan G.; King, David O.; Smith, Gilbert W.; Gordon, Neil T.; Riches, Stephen; Rogers, Stanley

    2010-08-01

    Coded aperture imaging has been used for astronomical applications for several years. Typical implementations used a fixed mask pattern and are designed to operate in the X-Ray or gamma ray bands. Recently applications have emerged in the visible and infra red bands for low cost lens-less imaging systems and system studies have shown that considerable advantages in image resolution may accrue from the use of multiple different images of the same scene - requiring a reconfigurable mask. Previously reported work focused on realising a 2x2cm single chip mask in the mid-IR based on polysilicon micro-optoelectro- mechanical systems (MOEMS) technology and its integration with ASIC drive electronics using conventional wire bonding. It employs interference effects to modulate incident light - achieved by tuning a large array of asymmetric Fabry-Perot optical cavities via an applied voltage and uses a hysteretic row/column scheme for addressing. In this paper we report on the latest results in the mid-IR for the single chip reconfigurable MOEMS mask, trials in scaling up to a mask based on a 2x2 multi-chip array and report on progress towards realising a large format mask comprising 44 MOEMS chips. We also explore the potential of such large, transmissive IR spatial light modulator arrays for other applications and in the current and alternative architectures.

  4. The design of double telecentric lens with large aperture based on machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Meng; Xiang, Yang; Tong, Jian; Li, Qi

    2014-12-01

    In recent years machine vision technology obtained the application in many fields, such as the industry, medical systems and national defence. Researches on the machine vision of the on-line and real-time detecting system. By the aid of optical engineering software ZEMAX, a telecentric optical system is designed, which uses a 1 inch CCD image sensor with 5.5μm pixel size. It can measure the target size and non-contact, with the maximum measurement range of 300mm and the resolution of 0.2mm, magnification is -0.053, the distortion is less than 0.1 percent. The MTF of this system is more than 0.5 in 70lp/mm, and all sorts of the aberrations are corrected well, and the image quality is uniform in all the fields. As the limits of magnification and pixel size of the CCD, the technology of CCD pixel subdivision can be used, and the accuracy can be increased to dozens of times, the accuracy of on-line non-contact measurement System can reach the micron-size. The telecentric degree of the double telecentric lens is very small when the object moves along the optical axis.

  5. Thermo/opto/mechanical analysis of large apertures for exoplanet detection using Cielo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Elizabeth O.; Chainyk, Mike; Habbal, Feras; Hoff, Claus; Levine, Marie; Moore, Greg

    2009-08-01

    The next generation of space telescopes will be designed to meet increasingly challenging science goals. The operating environment and required precision of these telescopes will make complete verification via ground tests impossible, and will place a greater reliance on numerical simulation. The current state of the art in thermal, mechanical and optical modeling involves three disparate computational models, several analysis codes and tools to transition results between these models. However, the active controls necessary to meet the next generation of requirements for space telescopes will require integrated thermal, structural, optical and controls analysis. To meet these challenges, JPL has developed Cielo, an in-house finite element tool capable of multi-physics simulations using a common finite element model, for thermal, structural and optical aberration analysis. In this paper, we will discuss the use of Cielo for analysis of a coronagraph and an occulter designed to observe Earth-like planets around nearby stars. We will compare thermal and structural results from Cielo with results from commercial off the shelf (COTS) tools to verify the new approach. We will perform variations of key parameters to demonstrate how margins and uncertainties can be quantified using the new approach.

  6. Large directional optical anisotropy in multiferroic ferroborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmenko, A. M.; Dziom, V.; Shuvaev, A.; Pimenov, Anna; Schiebl, M.; Mukhin, A. A.; Ivanov, V. Yu.; Gudim, I. A.; Bezmaternykh, L. N.; Pimenov, A.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most fascinating and counterintuitive recent effects in multiferroics is directional anisotropy, the asymmetry of light propagation with respect to the direction of propagation. In such case the absorption in a material can be different for opposite directions. Besides absorption, different velocities of light for different directions of propagation may be also expected, which is termed directional birefringence. In this work, we demonstrate large directional anisotropy in multiferroic samarium ferroborate. The effect is observed for linear polarization of light in the range of millimeter wavelengths, and it survives down to low frequencies. The dispersion and absorption close to the electromagnon resonance can be controlled by external magnetic field and are fully suppressed in one direction. By changing the geometry of the external field, samarium ferroborate shows giant optical activity, which makes this material a universal tool for optical control: with a magnetic field as an external parameter it allows switching between two functionalities: polarization rotation and directional anisotropy.

  7. Temporally focused femtosecond laser pulses for low numerical aperture micromachining through optically transparent materials

    PubMed Central

    Vitek, Dawn N.; Adams, Daniel E.; Johnson, Adrea; Tsai, Philbert S.; Backus, Sterling; Durfee, Charles G.; Kleinfeld, David; Squier, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Temporal focusing of spatially chirped femtosecond laser pulses overcomes previous limitations for ablating high aspect ratio features with low numerical aperture (NA) beams. Simultaneous spatial and temporal focusing reduces nonlinear interactions, such as self-focusing, prior to the focal plane so that deep (~1 mm) features with parallel sidewalls are ablated at high material removal rates (25 µm3 per 80 µJ pulse) at 0.04-0.05 NA. This technique is applied to the fabrication of microfluidic devices by ablation through the back surface of thick (6 mm) fused silica substrates. It is also used to ablate bone under aqueous immersion to produce craniotomies. PMID:20721196

  8. Optical metrology devices for high-power laser large optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daurios, J.; Bouillet, S.; Gaborit, G.; Poncetta, J. C.

    2007-06-01

    High power laser systems such as the LMJ laser or the LIL laser, its prototype, require large optical components with very strict and various specifications. Technologies used for the fabrication of these components are now usually compatible of such specifications, but need the implementation at the providers' sites of different kind of metrology like interferometry, photometry, surface inspection, etc., systematically performed on the components. So, during the production for the LIL and now for the LMJ, CEA has also equipped itself with a wide range of specific metrology devices used to verify the effective quality of these large optics. These various systems are now used to characterize and validate the LMJ vendors' processes or to perform specific controls dedicated to analyzes which are going further than the simple "quality control" of the component (mechanical mount effect, environment effect, ageing effect,...). After a short introduction on the LMJ laser and corresponding optical specifications for components, we will focus on different metrology devices concerning interferometry and photometry measurements or surface inspection. These systems are individually illustrated here by the mean of different results obtained during controls done in the last few years.

  9. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLAST-Pol): Instrument and 2010 Science Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandilo, Natalie; BLAST-Pol Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLAST-Pol) is a 1.8-m telescope that observes polarized dust emission with a resolution of 1'. BLAST-Pol images the sky onto a focal plane that consists of 270 feed-horn coupled bolometers at 250, 350, and 500 microns. In January 2011, BLAST-Pol completed a successful 9.5-day flight over Antarctica. Eight science targets were observed, and a second flight is planned for December 2012. I will give an overview of the instrument performance during the first science campaign and present preliminary maps. BLAST-Pol maps will provide an excellent dataset for studying the role of magnetic fields in star formation.

  10. The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Science Drivers, Technology Developments, and Synergies with Other Future Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers that define the main performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 m to 2.4 m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We will also discuss the synergy between ATLAST and other anticipated future facilities (e.g., TMT, EELT, ALMA) and the priorities for technology development that will enable the construction for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions.

  11. Comparison of Turbulent Sensible Heat Flux Determined by Large-Aperture Scintillometer and Eddy Covariance over Urban and Suburban Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He; Zhang, Hongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Field observations of the atmospheric boundary layer were made over urban and suburban areas in the Yangtze River Delta, China. Sensible heat fluxes were obtained by eddy-covariance (EC) systems and large-aperture scintillometers (LASs). The results indicated that (1) the sensible heat flux obtained by LAS was less noisy and slightly larger than that obtained by EC over both urban and suburban surfaces; (2) the values of were higher when the correlation coefficient of vertical wind speed and temperature () was smaller. Lower values of were due to low-frequency trends. The urban values of were smaller than suburban values at low values; (3) the sensible heat flux determined by LAS was improved by use of the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory of the temperature structure parameter over urban and suburban areas, and the improvement is more significant over urban surface areas.

  12. A survey of near-field testing methods for large aperture antennas and future trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, a near-field antenna measurements have progressed from theoretical concepts to a wide variety of operational measurement systems. The current status of this work is summarized and its possible application to large space antennas is discussed.

  13. Large extinction ratio optical electrowetting shutter.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Ryan D; Underwood, Kenneth; Terrab, Soraya; Watson, Alexander M; Bright, Victor M; Gopinath, Juliet T

    2016-05-01

    A large extinction ratio optical shutter has been demonstrated using electrowetting liquids. The device is based on switching between a liquid-liquid interface curvature that produces total internal reflection and one that does not. The interface radius of curvature can be tuned continuously from 9 mm at 0 V to -45 mm at 26 V. Extinction ratios from 55.8 to 66.5 dB were measured. The device shows promise for ultracold chip-scale atomic clocks. PMID:27137579

  14. Planarization of amorphous silicon thin film transistors for high-aperture-ratio and large-area active-matrix liquid crystal displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Je-Hsiung

    The reduction of the backlight power consumption and the improvement of the display image uniformity for future large-area and high-resolution active-matrix liquid- crystal displays (AM-LCDs) are very important. One possible method to achieve the former goal is to increase the pixel electrode aperture-ratio. This can be realized by overlapping the pixel electrode with both gate/data buslines. While for the latter, reduction of the RC-delay by using a low resistance gate metal line is the key. Both of these approaches can be realized by using planarization technology. In this dissertation, the planarization technology based on low dielectric constant organic polymer, benzocyclobutene (BCB), is demonstrated, and this technology has been successfully applied to hydrogenated amorphous-silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film transistor (TFT) arrays and thick metal gate buslines/electrodes. Through the planarization technology, a high-aperture-ratio (HAR) pixel electrode structure has been fabricated. The parasitic capacitance and crosstalk issues in the HAR pixel electrode have been studied through interconnect analysis and circuit simulation. The impact of the parasitic capacitance on display performances, such as feedthrough voltage, vertical crosstalk, pixel electrode aperture-ratio, pixel charging behavior, and gate busline RC-delay issues, has been thoroughly discussed. Some key issues during the process integration of the HAR pixel electrode structure have been addressed. These include the BCB contact via formation, the patterning of the ITO pixel electrodes on BCB layer, the selection of Ar plasma treatment conditions for BCB surface, and the optical transmittance evaluation of the ITO/BCB double-layer structure. In addition, the BCB passivation effects on back-channel etched type a-Si:H TFTs have been investigated. It is found that there is no degradation in the TFT electrical performance and reliability after the BCB passivation. Finally, the planarization technology is

  15. Quantitative comparison of terahertz emission from (100) InAs surfaces and a GaAs large-aperture photoconductive switch at high fluences.

    PubMed

    Reid, Matthew; Fedosejevs, Robert

    2005-01-01

    InAs has previously been reported to be an efficient emitter of terahertz radiation at low excitation fluences by use of femtosecond laser pulses. The scaling and saturation of terahertz emission from a (100) InAs surface as a function of excitation fluence is measured and quantitatively compared with the emission from a GaAs large-aperture photoconductive switch. We find that, although the instantaneous peak radiated terahertz field from (100) InAs exceeds the peak radiated signals from a GaAs large-aperture photoconductive switch biased at 1.6 kV/cm, the pulse duration is shorter. For the InAs source the total energy radiated is less than can be obtained from a GaAs large-aperture photoconductive switch. PMID:15662896

  16. Optical encryption for large-sized images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanpei, Takuho; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Kakue, Takashi; Endo, Yutaka; Hirayama, Ryuji; Hiyama, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Satoki; Nagahama, Yuki; Sano, Marie; Oikawa, Minoru; Sugie, Takashige; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2016-02-01

    We propose an optical encryption framework that can encrypt and decrypt large-sized images beyond the size of the encrypted image using our two methods: random phase-free method and scaled diffraction. In order to record the entire image information on the encrypted image, the large-sized images require the random phase to widely diffuse the object light over the encrypted image; however, the random phase gives rise to the speckle noise on the decrypted images, and it may be difficult to recognize the decrypted images. In order to reduce the speckle noise, we apply our random phase-free method to the framework. In addition, we employ scaled diffraction that calculates light propagation between planes with different sizes by changing the sampling rates.

  17. Maintaining Flatness of a Large Aperture Potassium Bromide Beamsplitter through Mounting and Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Losch, Patricia; Lyons, James, III; Morell, Armando; Heaney, Jim

    1998-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument on the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997. The CIRS instrument contains a mid-infrared and a far-infrared interferometer and operates at 170 Kelvin. The mid-infrared interferometer is a Michelson- type Fourier transform spectrometer utilizing a 3 inch diameter potassium bromide beamsplitter/compensator pair. The potassium bromide elements were tested to verify effects of cooldown and vibration prior to integration into the instrument. The instrument was then aligned at ambient temperatures, tested cryogenically and re-verified after vibration. The stringent design optical figure requirements for the beamsplitter and compensator included fabrication errors, mounting stresses and vibration load effects. This paper describes the challenges encountered in mounting the elements to minimize distortion and to survive vibration.

  18. Maintaining Flatness of a Large Aperture Potassium Bromide Beamsplitter Through Mounting and Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Losch, Patricia; Lyons, James J., III; Morell, Armando; Heaney, Jim

    1998-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument on the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997. The CIRS instrument contains a mid-infrared (MIR) and a far-infrared interferometer (FIR) and operates at 170 Kelvin. The MIR is a Michelson Fourier transform spectrometer utilizing a 76 mm (3 inch) diameter potassium bromide beamsplitter and compensator pair. The potassium bromide elements were tested to verify effects of cooldown and vibration prior to integration into the instrument. The instrument was then aligned at ambient temperatures, tested cryogenically and re-verified after vibration. 'Me stringent design optical figure requirements for the beamsplitter and compensator included fabrication errors, mounting stresses and vibration load effects. This paper describes the challenges encountered in mounting the elements to minimize distortion and to survive vibration.

  19. Preliminary evaluation of sensible heat flux measurements from a large aperture scintillometer using lysimetric data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The path integrating capabilities of scintillometers over several kilometers make it a potential tool that can bridge the gap between primary point based observations (lysimeters, Bowen ratio, or eddy covariance) and the demand for large-scale spatially averaged surface fluxes. Further, the spatial...

  20. New technologies for the actuation and controls of large aperture lightweight quality mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lih, S. S.; Yang, E. H.; Gullapalli, S. N.; Flood, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a set of candidate components: MEMS based large stroke (>100 microns) ultra lightweight (0.01 gm) discrete inch worm actuator technology, and a distributed actuator technology, in the context of a novel lightweight active flexure-hinged substrate concept that uses the nanolaminate face sheet.

  1. Optical receivers with large-diameter photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swoboda, Robert; Schneider, Kerstin; Zimmermann, Horst

    2006-04-01

    This work presents two types of optical receivers with large-diameter photodiodes. Both are optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEICs) realized in 0.6μm BiCMOS Si technology integrating PIN photodiode, transimpedance amplifier (TIA) and output circuit on chip. The two circuits are an optocoupler with a photodiode diameter of 780μm and a rise- and falltime of 5ns and 4.9ns respectively at 850nm light and a plastic optical fiber (POF) receiver with a photodiode diameter of 500μm and upper -3dB cut-off frequencies of 165MHz at 660nm light and 148MHz at 850nm light. The measured rise- and falltime of the POF receiver was 1.78ns and 2.45ns at 660nm light and 1.94ns and 2.5ns at 850ns, respectively. The presented results combine the advantage of easier handling of large-diameter photodiode receivers and high performance.

  2. Optical Diffraction in Close Proximity to Plane Apertures. II. Comparison of Half-Plane Diffraction Theories

    PubMed Central

    Mielenz, Klaus D.

    2003-01-01

    The accuracy and physical significance of the classical Rayleigh-Sommerfeld and Kirchhoff diffraction integrals are assessed in the context of Sommerfeld’s rigorous theory of half-plane diffraction and Maxwell’s equations. It is shown that the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals are in satisfactory agreement with Sommerfeld’s theory in most of the positive near zone, except at sub-wavelength distances from the screen. On account of the bidirectional nature of diffraction by metallic screens the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals themselves cannot be used for irradiance calculations, but must first be resolved into their forward and reverse components and it is found that Kirchhoff’s integral is the appropriate measure of the forward irradiance. Because of the inadequate boundary conditions assumed in their derivation the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld and Kirchhoff integrals do not correctly describe the flow of energy through the aperture.

  3. Optical Design for Extremely Large Telescope Adaptive Optics Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J

    2003-11-26

    Designing an adaptive optics (AO) system for extremely large telescopes (ELT's) will present new optical engineering challenges. Several of these challenges are addressed in this work, including first-order design of multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems, pyramid wavefront sensors (PWFS's), and laser guide star (LGS) spot elongation. MCAO systems need to be designed in consideration of various constraints, including deformable mirror size and correction height. The y,{bar y} method of first-order optical design is a graphical technique that uses a plot with marginal and chief ray heights as coordinates; the optical system is represented as a segmented line. This method is shown to be a powerful tool in designing MCAO systems. From these analyses, important conclusions about configurations are derived. PWFS's, which offer an alternative to Shack-Hartmann (SH) wavefront sensors (WFS's), are envisioned as the workhorse of layer-oriented adaptive optics. Current approaches use a 4-faceted glass pyramid to create a WFS analogous to a quad-cell SH WFS. PWFS's and SH WFS's are compared and some newly-considered similarities and PWFS advantages are presented. Techniques to extend PWFS's are offered: First, PWFS's can be extended to more pixels in the image by tiling pyramids contiguously. Second, pyramids, which are difficult to manufacture, can be replaced by less expensive lenslet arrays. An approach is outlined to convert existing SH WFS's to PWFS's for easy evaluation of PWFS's. Also, a demonstration of PWFS's in sensing varying amounts of an aberration is presented. For ELT's, the finite altitude and finite thickness of LGS's means that the LGS will appear elongated from the viewpoint of subapertures not directly under the telescope. Two techniques for dealing with LGS spot elongation in SH WFS's are presented. One method assumes that the laser will be pulsed and uses a segmented micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) to track the LGS light subaperture by

  4. Achieving high focusing power for a large-aperture liquid crystal lens with novel hole-and-ring electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chi-Wei; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Chao, Paul C-P; Fuh, Andy Y-G

    2008-11-10

    Aiming to equip commercial camera modules, such as the optical imaging systems with a CMOS sensor module in 3 Mega pixels, an ultra thin liquid crystal lens with designed hole-and-ring electrodes is proposed in this study to achieve high focusing power. The LC lens with proposed electrodes improves the central intensity of electric field which leads to better focusing quality. The overall thickness of the LC lens can be as thin as 1.2 mm and the shortest focal length of the 4 mm-aperture lens occurs at 20 cm under an applied voltage of 30 V at 1 KHz. The inner ring electrode requires only 40% of applied voltage of the external hole electrode. The applied voltages for this internal ring and external hole electrodes can simply be realized by a pre-designed parallel resistance pair and a single voltage source. Experiments are conducted for validation and it shows that the designed LC lens owns good image clearness and contrast at the focal plane. The proposed design reduces the thickness of LC lens and is capable of achieving relative higher focusing power than past studies with lower applied voltage. PMID:19582020

  5. Nocturnal aerosol optical depth measurements with a small-aperture automated photometer using the moon as a light source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berkoff, T.A.; Sorokin, M.; Stone, T.; Eck, T.F.; Hoff, R.; Welton, E.; Holben, B.

    2011-01-01

    A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to provide high-precision lunar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance predictions for a ground-based sensor location, and when combined with ground measurement viewing geometry, provided the column optical transmittance for retrievals of AOD. Automated multiwavelength lunar measurements were obtained using an unmodified Cimel-318 sunphotometer sensor to assess existing capabilities and enhancements needed for day/night operation in NASA's Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Results show that even existing photometers can provide the ability for retrievals of aerosol optical depths at night near full moon. With an additional photodetector signal-to-noise improvement of 10-100, routine use over the bright half of the lunar phase and a much wider range of wavelengths and conditions can be achieved. Although the lunar cycle is expected to limit the frequency of observations to 30%-40% compared to solar measurements, nevertheless this is an attractive extension of AERONET capabilities. ?? 2011 American Meteorological Society.

  6. Nocturnal Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements with a Small-Aperture Automated Photometer Using the Moon as a Light Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkoff, Timothy A.; Sorokin, Mikail; Stone, Tom; Eck, Thomas F.; Hoff, Raymond; Welton, Ellsworth; Holben, Brent

    2011-01-01

    A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to provide high-precision lunar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance predictions for a ground-based sensor location, and when combined with ground measurement viewing geometry, provided the column optical transmittance for retrievals of AOD. Automated multiwavelength lunar measurements were obtained using an unmodified Cimel-318 sunphotometer sensor to assess existing capabilities and enhancements needed for day/night operation in NASA s Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Results show that even existing photometers can provide the ability for retrievals of aerosol optical depths at night near full moon. With an additional photodetector signal-to-noise improvement of 10-100, routine use over the bright half of the lunar phase and a much wider range of wavelengths and conditions can be achieved. Although the lunar cycle is expected to limit the frequency of observations to 30%-40% compared to solar measurements, nevertheless this is an attractive extension of AERONET capabilities.

  7. Industrial large-aperture XeCl laser for surface processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letardi, Tommaso; Baldesi, Alessandro; Bollanti, Sarah; Bonfigli, Francesca; Di Lazzaro, Paolo; Flora, Francesco; Giordano, Gualtiero; Marinai, Alessandro; Murra, Daniele; Schina, Giovanni; Zheng, Cheng En

    2000-02-01

    In the frame of a large project on new materials technologies for photovoltaic and microelectronic applications (FOTO), the process of amorphous silicon (a-Si) transformation into polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) by means of laser irradiation has been tested with a long-pulse (160 ns), 8 J/p XeCl source. Following the positive results, a laser source, having design parameters of 10 J/p, 120 ns, 10 Hz, has been designed and built, with the aim of realizing a laboratory line for the production of thin film transistors (TFTs) devices.

  8. Wide-aperture acousto-optic tunable filters for visible and UV lights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Andrei N.; Rodionov, Igor D.; Teterin, George E.

    1995-02-01

    Acousto optic filters (AOF) with optical size approximately 8 - 10 mm for visible and ultraviolet spectrum on the base of TeO2 and KH2 PO4 crystals correspondingly are developed and manufactured. The spectral resolution is better than 1 nm. The frequency bandwidth of both filters is 55 - 90 MHz, that allows us to use the only high frequency generator with two different power amplifiers. Acoustic power level for the AOFs on the base of TeO2 and KH2PO4 was about 1 W and 5 W, respectively. The optical tuning is carried out by means of a computer program.

  9. Optical system for Argus 355-nm 90-mm aperture target-illumination experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.C.; Boyd, R.; Hermes, G.; Hildum, J.S.; Linford, G.; Martin, W.E.

    1982-02-01

    The requirements of laser alignment, crystal tuning, target alignment, and laser beam diagnosis are provided by this optical system. Initial setup and preshot alignment techniques are discussed. Layout and operation are contrasted with the 532 nm target experiments.

  10. Observing single protein binding by optical transmission through a double nanohole aperture in a metal film

    PubMed Central

    Al Balushi, Ahmed A.; Zehtabi-Oskuie, Ana; Gordon, Reuven

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate protein binding at the single particle level. A double nanohole (DNH) optical trap was used to hold onto a 20 nm biotin-coated polystyrene (PS) particle which subsequently is bound to streptavidin. Biotin-streptavidin binding has been detected by an increase in the optical transmission through the DNH. Similar optical transmission behavior was not observed when streptavidin binding sites where blocked by mixing streptavidin with excess biotin. Furthermore, interaction of non-functionalized PS particles with streptavidin did not induce a change in the optical transmission through the DNH. These results are promising as the DNH trap can make an excellent single molecule resolution sensor which would enable studying biomolecular interactions and dynamics at a single particle/molecule level. PMID:24049672

  11. Design of large aperture four group elements mid-wave infrared zoom lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yiqun; Shi, Rongbao; He, Hucheng; Shen, Weimin

    2012-10-01

    Zoom lens with variable focal length is well fit for researching objectives far and near. Design of zoom lens working at mid-wave infrared wavelength (7.7-10.3_m) and its view field 10 degrees is presented. Determination of the initial configuration of the variable and the compensate groups are discussed according to the mechanism compensate curves. The compensate group is determined with positive power. Its focal length changes during a large scope, which is from 300mm to 100mm. And the corresponding F number variables from 3.75 to 1.25. So the residual aberration needs to be carefully corrected. The optimized zoom lens is composed of four group elements, and its performance reaches diffraction limited at each focal position.

  12. Study on the Stressed Mirror Polishing with a Continuous Polishing Machine for Large Aperture Off-axis Aspheric Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-nan; Zhang, Hai-ying; Cui, Xiang-qun; Jiang, Zi-bo; Zheng, Yi; Liu, Xing-tao; Ni, Hou-kun

    2012-10-01

    A special stressed annular polishing technique is proposed to mill the off-axis aspheric sub-mirrors of a large segmented mirror with an annular polishing machine. Based on the basic principle of stressed annular polishing technique, a set of special stressing mechanisms are designed to convert milling the aspheric surfaces of sub-mirrors with different off-axis distances into milling the spherical surfaces with identical radii of curvature, so that they can be pol- ished simultaneously on a continuous polishing machine. It took about contin- uous 40 hours to polish a scaled-down mirror of the planning Chinese Future Giant Telescope (CFGT) using this technique. This mirror has the 330 mm di- ameter, 3.6 m off-axis distance, and the 21.6 m radius of curvature, and its max- imum asphericity is 16 micron. The experiment shows that this method has a high effciency, suits batch manufacturing, especially the batch manufacturing of aspheric sub-mirrors of the segmented primary mirror of an extremely large aperture telescope.

  13. Direct Measurement of Large, Diffuse, Optical Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saif, Babak N.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee; Wyant, J. C.; Atkinson, C.

    2004-01-01

    Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry (DSPI) is a well-established method for the measurement of diffuse objects in experimental mechanics. DSPIs are phase shifting interferometers. Three or four bucket temporal phase shifting algorithms are commonly used to provide phase shifting. These algorithms are sensitive to vibrations and can not be used to measure large optical structures far away from the interferometer. In this research a simultaneous phase shifted interferometer, PhaseCam product of 4D Technology Corporation in Tucson Arizona, is modified to be a Simultaneous phase shifted Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometer (SDSPI). Repeatability, dynamic range, and accuracy of the SDSPI are characterized by measuring a 5 cm x 5 cm carbon fiber coupon.

  14. T/R module development for large aperture L-band phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Andricos, Constantine; Kumley, Kendra; Berkun, Andrew; Hodges, Richard; Spitz, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a transmit / receive (T/R) module for a large L-band space based radar active phased array being developed at JPL. Electrical performance and construction techniques are described, with emphasis on the former. The T/R modules have a bandwidth of more than 80 MHz centered at 1260MHz and support dual, switched polarizations. Phase and amplitude are controlled by a 6-bit phase shifter and a 6-bit attenuator, respectively. The transmitter power amplifier generates 2.4 W into a nominal 50 ohm load with 36% overall efficiency. The receiver noise figure is 4.4 dB including all front-end losses. The module weighs 32 g and has a footprint of 8 cm x 4.5 cm. Fourteen of these T/R modules were fabricated at the JPL Pick-and-Place Facility and were tested using a computer-controlled measurement facility developed at JPL. Calibrated performance of this set of T/R modules is presented and shows good agreement with design predictions.

  15. Neutral density estimation derived from meteoroid measurements using high-power, large-aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, A.; Close, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new method to estimate the neutral density of the lower thermosphere/upper mesosphere given deceleration measurements from meteoroids as they enter Earth's atmosphere. By tracking the plasma (referred to as head echoes) surrounding the ablating meteoroid, we are able to measure the range and velocity of the meteoroid in 3-D. This is accomplished at Advanced Research Projects Agency Long-Range Tracking and Instrumentation Radar (ALTAIR) with the use of four additional receiving horns. Combined with the momentum and ablation equations, we can feed large quantities of data into a minimization function which estimates the associated constants related to the ablation process and, more importantly, the density ratios between successive layers of the atmosphere. Furthermore, if we take statistics of the masses and bulk densities of the meteoroids, we can calculate the neutral densities and its associated error by the ratio distribution on the minimum error statistic. A standard deviation of approximately 10% can be achieved, neglecting measurement error from the radar. Errors in velocity and deceleration compound this uncertainty, which in the best case amounts to an additional 4% error. The accuracy can be further improved if we take increasing amounts of measurements, limited only by the quality of the ranging measurements and the probability of knowing the median of the distribution. Data analyzed consist mainly of approximately 500 meteoroids over a span of 20 min on two separate days. The results are compared to the existing atmospheric model NRLMSISE-00, which predicts lower density ratios and static neutral densities at these altitudes.

  16. Constraining lowermost mantle structure with PcP/P amplitude ratios from large aperture arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventosa, S.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of weak short-period teleseismic body waves help to resolve lowermost mantle structure at short wavelengths, which is essential for understanding mantle dynamics and the interactions between the mantle and core. Their limited amount and uneven distribution are however major obstacles to solve for volumetric structure of the D" region, topography of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and D" discontinuity, and the trade-offs among them. While PcP-P differential travel times provide important information, there are trade-offs between velocity structure and core-mantle boundary topography, which PcP/P amplitude ratios can help resolve, as long as lateral variations in attenuation and biases due to focusing are small or can be corrected for. Dense broadband seismic networks help to improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the target phases and signal-to-interference ratio (SIR) of other mantle phases when the slowness difference is large enough. To improve SIR and SNR of teleseismic PcP data, we have introduced the slant-stacklet transform to define coherent-guided filters able to separate and enhance signals according to their slowness, time of arrival and frequency content. We thus obtain optimal PcP/P amplitude ratios in the least-square sense using two short sliding windows to match the P signal with a candidate PcP signal. This method allows us to dramatically increase the amount of high-quality observations of short-period PcP/P amplitude ratios by allowing for smaller events and wider epicentral distance and depth ranges.We present the results of measurement of PcP/P amplitude ratios, sampling regions around the Pacific using dense arrays in North America and Japan. We observe that short-period P waves traveling through slabs are strongly affected by focusing, in agreement with the bias we have observed and corrected for due to mantle heterogeneities on PcP-P travel time differences. In Central America, this bias is by far the stronger anomaly we observe

  17. Aperture averaging of optical scintillations in CO{sub 2} DIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Petrin, R.R.; Schmitt, M.J.; Whitehead, M.C.; Walters, D.L.

    1997-10-01

    Atmospheric turbulence causes several effects on a propagating laser beam. The authors have previously studied the effects of beam spreading and beam wander, and feel they have a good understanding of their impact on CO{sub 2} DIAL. Another effect is scintillation where atmospheric turbulence causes irradiance fluctuations within the envelope of the beam profile. They believe that scintillation at the target plays an important role in LIDAR return statistics. A Huygens-Fresnel wave optics computer simulation for propagating beams through atmospheric optical turbulence has been previously developed. They modify this simulation to include the effects of reflective speckle and examine its application in comparison with experimental data.

  18. Large stroke actuators for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, B.; Kubby, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we review the use of a 3-dimensional MEMS fabrication process to prototype long stroke (>10 μm) actuators as are required for use in future adaptive optics systems in astronomy and vision science. The Electrochemical Fabrication (EFAB TM) process that was used creates metal micro-structures by electroplating multiple, independently patterned layers. The process has the design freedom of rapid prototyping where multiple patterned layers are stacked to build structures with virtually any desired geometry, but in contrast has much greater precision, the capability for batch fabrication and provides parts in engineering materials such as nickel. The design freedom enabled by this process has been used to make both parallel plate and comb drive actuator deformable mirror designs that can have large vertical heights of up to 1 mm. As the thickness of the sacrificial layers used to release the actuator is specified by the designer, rather than by constraints of the fabrication process, the design of large-stroke actuators is straightforward and does not require any new process development. Since the number of material layers in the EFAB TM process is also specified by the designer it has been possible to gang multiple parallel plate actuators together to decrease the voltage required for long-stroke actuators.

  19. To construct a stable and tunable optical trap in the focal region of a high numerical aperture lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, Gokulakrishnan; Ponnan, Suresh; Sivasubramonia Pillai, T. V.; Balasundaram, Rajesh K.

    2014-05-01

    Based on the diffraction theory, the focusing properties of a radially polarized quadratic Bessel-Gaussian beam (QBG) with on-axis radial phase variance wavefront are investigated theoretically in the focal region of a high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens. The phase wavefront C and pupil beam parameter μ of QBG are the functions of the radial coordinate. The detailed numerical calculation of the focusing property of a QBG beam is presented. The numerical calculation shows that the beam parameter μ and phase parameter C have greater effect on the total electric field intensity distribution. It is observed that under the condition of different μ, evolution principle of focal pattern differs very remarkably on increasing C. Also, some different focal shapes may appear, including rhombic shape, quadrangular shape, two-spherical crust focus shape, two-peak shape, one dark hollow focus, two dark hollow focuses pattern, and triangle dark hollow focus, which find wide optical applications such as optical trapping and nanopatterning.

  20. Optical tweezers and surface plasmon resonance combination system based on the high numerical aperture lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Xuchen; Zhang, Bei; Lan, Guoqiang; Wang, Yiqiao; Liu, Shugang

    2015-11-01

    Biology and medicine sample measurement takes an important role in the microscopic optical technology. Optical tweezer has the advantage of accurate capture and non-pollution of the sample. The SPR(surface plasmon resonance) sensor has so many advantages include high sensitivity, fast measurement, less consumption of sample and label-free detection of biological sample that the SPR sensing technique has been used for surface topography, analysis of biochemical and immune, drug screening and environmental monitoring. If they combine, they will play an important role in the biological, chemical and other subjects. The system we propose use the multi-axis cage system, by using the methods of reflection and transmiss ion to improve the space utilization. The SPR system and optical tweezer were builtup and combined in one system. The cage of multi-axis system gives full play to its accuracy, simplicity and flexibility. The size of the system is 20 * 15 * 40 cm3 and thus the sample can be replaced to switch between the optical tweezers system and the SPR system in the small space. It means that we get the refractive index of the sample and control the particle in the same system. In order to control the revolving stage, get the picture and achieve the data stored automatically, we write a LabVIEW procedure. Then according to the data from the back focal plane calculate the refractive index of the sample. By changing the slide we can trap the particle as optical tweezer, which makes us measurement and trap the sample at the same time.

  1. Systematic investigation of the principal and first secondary maxima of ultrashort optical pulses focused by a high numerical aperture aplanatic lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindlein, Norbert; Loosen, Florian; Fries, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    The electromagnetic field in the focus of an ideal aplanatic lens with high numerical aperture, which is illuminated by an ultrashort optical pulse and plane wave front, is simulated by taking the vectorial Debye integral and the coherent superposition of a frequency spectrum of monochromatic waves. The behavior of the principal maxima and the first secondary maxima as function of the numerical aperture (NA) and the pulse duration T is investigated systematically for light incident with linear polarization. First, one would not expect remarkable deviations from the stationary case. But also this simple system of an ideal aplanatic lens without any chromatic or monochromatic aberrations (of course only simple from the point of theory, but not at all from the point of practical realization) shows some remarkable results. If the NA (in vacuum) tends to the limiting case of 1.0 the maximum value of |E|2 increases faster than expected from the scalar theory (Airy disc) with a maximum deviation of about 13%. The second effect really comes from very short pulses, i.e. very small values T. Then, the value of |E|2 compared to the expected linear increase with 1/T decreases slightly (only less than 2%), but systematically for all NAs. Even more interesting is the dependence of the height of the first secondary maxima along the x-axis and y-axis on the NA and 1/T. It can be seen that along both axes the first secondary maxima nearly vanish for very short pulses, i.e. large values 1/T.

  2. Spaceborne Microwave Instrument for High Resolution Remote Sensing of the Earth's Surface Using a Large-Aperture Mesh Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E.; Wilson, W.; Yueh, S.; Freeland, R.; Helms, R.; Edelstein, W.; Sadowy, G.; Farra, D.; West, R.; Oxnevad, K.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a two-year study of a large-aperture, lightweight, deployable mesh antenna system for radiometer and radar remote sensing of the Earth from space. The study focused specifically on an instrument to measure ocean salinity and Soil moisture. Measurements of ocean salinity and soil moisture are of critical . importance in improving knowledge and prediction of key ocean and land surface processes, but are not currently obtainable from space. A mission using this instrument would be the first demonstration of deployable mesh antenna technology for remote sensing and could lead to potential applications in other remote sensing disciplines that require high spatial resolution measurements. The study concept features a rotating 6-m-diameter deployable mesh antenna, with radiometer and radar sensors, to measure microwave emission and backscatter from the Earth's surface. The sensors operate at L and S bands, with multiple polarizations and a constant look angle, scanning across a wide swath. The study included detailed analyses of science requirements, reflector and feedhorn design and performance, microwave emissivity measurements of mesh samples, design and test of lightweight radar electronic., launch vehicle accommodations, rotational dynamics simulations, and an analysis of attitude control issues associated with the antenna and spacecraft, The goal of the study was to advance the technology readiness of the overall concept to a level appropriate for an Earth science emission.

  3. Low stress ion-assisted coatings on fused silica substrates for large aperture laser pulse compression gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Douglas J.; McCullough, Mike; Smith, Claire; Mikami, Takuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2008-10-01

    Large aperture laser pulse compressor designs use several diffraction gratings in series and sometimes tiled together to compress an amplified 1 to 10 ns pulse to 0.1 to 10 ps. The wavefront of the compressed pulse must be well controlled to allow focusing to a small spot on a target. Traditionally, multilayer dielectric gratings (MLDG) have been fabricated onto high thermal expansion substrates such as BK7 glass to prevent crazing and excessive bending due to tensile coating stress when operated in high vacuum. However, the high CTE of the BK7 can cause wavefront distortion and changes in the period of the grating. This work uses ion-assisted deposition of HfO2/SiO2 films to increase the compressive stress in MLD layers to allow use of silica substrates in the compressor vacuum environment. Stress, coating uniformity, and damage results are reported. The process was scaled to full size (91cm × 42cm) MLD gratings for use in the Osaka University LFEX laser system. Diffracted wavefront results from the full scale gratings is presented.

  4. Seasonal variability of turbulent fluxes over a vegetated subtropical coastal wetland measured by large aperture scintillometry and eddy covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot, Adrien; Gray, Michael; Riesenkamp, Michiel; Lockington, David; McGowan, Hamish

    2016-04-01

    Subtropical coastal wetlands are particularly susceptible to the impacts of climate variability: their recharge rates strongly depend on rainfall, and the occurrence of prolonged droughts or wet periods have direct consequences for wetland health and bio-diversity. There is therefore a need to close the water budget of these ecosystems and this requires the quantification of rates of evaporation/evapotranspiration. However, few studies have documented land-atmosphere exchanges over wetlands for which water level varies considerably during a typical annual cycle. Here, we present a year of turbulent flux observations over a wetland on the subtropical coast of eastern Australia. Large Aperture Scintillometry and Eddy Covariance are used to derive sensible heat fluxes. Latent heat fluxes are also derived through an energy balance for both instruments' observations and also directly through Eddy Covariance. Careful sensitivity analysis of the instrumental footprints, seasonal variations of land surface parameters such as roughness length and displacement height are examined and subsequent uncertainties in the derived turbulent fluxes are discussed. Finally we show how these observations can also help better understand hydrological processes at the catchment scale.

  5. Genetic apertures: an improved sparse aperture design framework.

    PubMed

    Salvaggio, Philip S; Schott, John R; McKeown, Donald M

    2016-04-20

    The majority of optical sparse aperture imaging research in the remote sensing field has been confined to a small set of aperture layouts. While these layouts possess some desirable properties for imaging, they may not be ideal for all applications. This work introduces an optimization framework for sparse aperture layouts based on genetic algorithms as well as a small set of fitness functions for incoherent sparse aperture image quality. The optimization results demonstrate the merits of existing designs and the opportunity for creating new sparse aperture layouts. PMID:27140086

  6. Wide-aperture diffraction of unpolarised radiation in a system of two acousto-optic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Magdich, L N; Yushkov, K B; Voloshinov, V B

    2009-04-30

    Light diffraction is studied in two tandem acousto-optic cells filtering unpolarised radiation with a wide angular spectrum. It is shown that the side lobes of the ultrasonic radiation pattern of a piezoelectric transducer produce side diffraction intensity maxima at the output of the system consisting of two filters. Diffraction in paratellurite filters is studied experimentally at 1.06 {mu}m. (light modulation)

  7. KAPAO: A Natural Guide Star Adaptive Optics System for Small Aperture Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severson, Scott A.; Choi, P. I.; Spjut, E.; Contreras, D. S.; Gilbreth, B. N.; McGonigle, L. P.; Morrison, W. A.; Rudy, A. R.; Xue, A.; Baranec, C.; Riddle, R.

    2012-05-01

    We describe KAPAO, our project to develop and deploy a low-cost, remote-access, natural guide star adaptive optics system for the Pomona College Table Mountain Observatory (TMO) 1-meter telescope. The system will offer simultaneous dual-band, diffraction-limited imaging at visible and near-infrared wavelengths and will deliver an order-of-magnitude improvement in point source sensitivity and angular resolution relative to the current TMO seeing limits. We have adopted off-the-shelf core hardware components to ensure reliability, minimize costs and encourage replication efforts. These components include a MEMS deformable mirror, a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a piezo-electric tip-tilt mirror. We present: project motivation, goals and milestones; the instrument optical design; the instrument opto-mechanical design and tolerances; and an overview of KAPAO Alpha, our on-the-sky testbed using off-the-shelf optics. Beyond the expanded scientific capabilities enabled by AO-enhanced resolution and sensitivity, the interdisciplinary nature of the instrument development effort provides an exceptional opportunity to train a broad range of undergraduate STEM students in AO technologies and techniques. The breadth of our collaboration, which includes both public (Sonoma State University) and private (Pomona and Harvey Mudd Colleges) undergraduate institutions has enabled us to engage students ranging from physics, astronomy, engineering and computer science in the all stages of this project. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0960343.

  8. Remote sensing of a dynamic sub-arctic peatland reservoir using optical and synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larter, Jarod Lee

    Stephens Lake, Manitoba is an example of a peatland reservoir that has undergone physical changes related to mineral erosion and peatland disintegration processes since its initial impoundment. In this thesis I focused on the processes of peatland upheaval, transport, and disintegration as the primary drivers of dynamic change within the reservoir. The changes related to these processes are most frequent after initial reservoir impoundment and decline over time. They continue to occur over 35 years after initial flooding. I developed a remote sensing approach that employs both optical and microwave sensors for discriminating land (Le. floating peatlands, forested land, and barren land) from open water within the reservoir. High spatial resolution visible and near-infrared (VNIR) optical data obtained from the QuickBird satellite, and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) microwave data obtained from the RADARSAT-1 satellite were implemented. The approach was facilitated with a Geographic Information System (GIS) based validation map for the extraction of optical and SAR pixel data. Each sensor's extracted data set was first analyzed separately using univariate and multivariate statistical methods to determine the discriminant ability of each sensor. The initial analyses were followed by an integrated sensor approach; the development of an image classification model; and a change detection analysis. Results showed excellent (> 95%) classification accuracy using QuickBird satellite image data. Discrimination and classification of studied land cover classes using SAR image texture data resulted in lower overall classification accuracies (˜ 60%). SAR data classification accuracy improved to > 90% when classifying only land and water, demonstrating SAR's utility as a land and water mapping tool. An integrated sensor data approach showed no considerable improvement over the use of optical satellite image data alone. An image classification model was developed that could be

  9. Comparison of Aperture Averaging and Receiver Diversity Techniques for Free Space Optical Links in Presence of Turbulence and Various Weather Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Prabhmandeep; Jain, Virander Kumar; Kar, Subrat

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of a Free Space Optic (FSO) link considering the impairments caused by the presence of various weather conditions such as very clear air, drizzle, haze, fog, etc., and turbulence in the atmosphere. Analytic expression for the outage probability is derived using the gamma-gamma distribution for turbulence and accounting the effect of weather conditions using the Beer-Lambert's law. The effect of receiver diversity schemes using aperture averaging and array receivers on the outage probability is studied and compared. As the aperture diameter is increased, the outage probability decreases irrespective of the turbulence strength (weak, moderate and strong) and weather conditions. Similar effects are observed when the number of direct detection receivers in the array are increased. However, it is seen that as the desired level of performance in terms of the outage probability decreases, array receiver becomes the preferred choice as compared to the receiver with aperture averaging.

  10. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19

    The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

  11. Evolving Design Criteria for Very Large Aperture Space Based Telescopes and Their Influence on the Need for Integrated Tools in the Optimization Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William R., Sr.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) program has been developing the means to design and build the future generations of space based telescopes. With the nearing completion of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the astrophysics community is already starting to define the requirements for follow-on observatories. The restrictions of available launch vehicles and the possibilities of planned future vehicles have fueled the competition between monolithic primaries (with better optical quality) and segmented primaries (with larger apertures, but with diffraction, costs and figure control issues). Regardless of the current shroud sizes and lift capacities, these competing architectures share the need for rapid design tools. As part of the AMTD program a number of tools have been developed and tested to speed up the design process. Starting with the Arnold Mirror Modeler (which creates Finite Element Models (FEM) for structural analysis) and now also feeds these models into thermal stability analyses. They share common file formats and interchangeable results. During the development of the program, numerous trade studies were created for 4-meter and 8-meter monolithic primaries, complete with support systems. Evaluation of these results has led to a better understanding of how the specification drives the results. This paper will show some of the early trade studies for typical specification requirements such as lowest mirror bending frequency and suspension system lowest frequency. The results use representative allowable stress values for each mirror substrate material and construction method and generic material properties. These studies lead to some interesting relationships between feasible designs and the realities of actually trying to build these mirrors. Much of the traditional specifications were developed for much smaller systems, where the mass and volume of the primary where a small portion of the overall satellite. JWST shows us that as

  12. Parallel optical memories for very large databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitkas, Pericles A.; Berra, P. B.

    1993-02-01

    The steady increase in volume of current and future databases dictates the development of massive secondary storage devices that allow parallel access and exhibit high I/O data rates. Optical memories, such as parallel optical disks and holograms, can satisfy these requirements because they combine high recording density and parallel one- or two-dimensional output. Several configurations for database storage involving different types of optical memory devices are investigated. All these approaches include some level of optical preprocessing in the form of data filtering in an attempt to reduce the amount of data per transaction that reach the electronic front-end.

  13. Resolving the Effects of Aperture and Volume Restriction of the Flow by Semi-Porous Barriers Using Large-Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatziefstratiou, Efthalia K.; Velissariou, Vasilia; Bohrer, Gil

    2014-09-01

    The Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS)-based Forest Large-Eddy Simulation (RAFLES) model is used to simulate the effects of large rectangular prism-shaped semi-porous barriers of varying densities under neutrally buoyant conditions. RAFLES model resolves flows inside and above forested canopies and other semi-porous barriers, and it accounts for barrier-induced drag on the flow and surface flux exchange between the barrier and the air. Unlike most other models, RAFLES model also accounts for the barrier-induced volume and aperture restriction via a modified version of the cut-cell coordinate system. We explicitly tested the effects of the numerical representation of volume restriction, independent of the effects of the drag, by comparing drag-only simulations (where we prescribed neither volume nor aperture restrictions to the flow), restriction-only simulations (where we prescribed no drag), and control simulations where both drag and volume plus aperture restrictions were included. Previous modelling and empirical work have revealed the development of important areas of increased uplift upwind of forward-facing steps, and recirculation zones downwind of backward-facing steps. Our simulations show that representation of the effects of the volume and aperture restriction due to the presence of semi-porous barriers leads to differences in the strengths and locations of increased-updraft and recirculation zones, and the length and strength of impact and adjustment zones when compared to simulation solutions with a drag-only representation. These are mostly driven by differences to the momentum budget of the streamwise wind velocity by resolved turbulence and pressure gradient fields around the front and back edges of the barrier. We propose that volume plus aperture restriction is an important component of the flow system in semi-porous environments such as forests and cities and should be considered by large-eddy simulation (LES).

  14. High-aperture binary axicons for the formation of the longitudinal electric field component on the optical axis for linear and circular polarizations of the illuminating beam

    SciTech Connect

    Khonina, S. N. Savelyev, D. A.

    2013-10-15

    Diffraction of uniformly polarized laser beams with vortex phase singularity is theoretically analyzed using the plane wave expansion. It is shown that for a high numerical aperture, an intense longitudinal electric field component is formed on the optical axis in this case. It is numerically demonstrated that an analogous effect is ensured for diffraction of a conventional Gaussian beam from asymmetric binary axicons. The field intensity on the optical axis can be varied either by rotating the optical element or by changing the direction of polarization of radiation.

  15. Sub-nanometer interferometry and precision turning for large optical fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Klingmann, J L; Sommargren, G E

    1999-04-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we have the unique combination of precision turning and metrology capabilities critical to the fabrication of large optical elements. We have developed a self-referenced interferometer to measure errors in aspheric optics to sub- nanometer accuracy over 200-millimeter apertures, a dynamic range of 5{approximately}10. We have utilized diamond turning to figure optics for X-ray to IR wavelengths and, with fast-tool-servo technology, can move optical segments from off-axis to on-axis. With part capacities to 2.3-meters diameter and the metrology described above, segments of very large, ultra-lightweight mirrors can potentially be figured to final requirements. precision of diamond-turning will carryover although the surface finish may be degraded. Finally, the most critical component of a fabrication process is the metrology that enables an accurate part. Well characterized machines are very repeatable and part accuracy must come from proper metrology. A self- referencing interferometer has been developed that can measure accurately to sub-nanometer values. As with traditional interferometers, measurements are fast and post- processed data provides useful feedback to the user. The simplicity of the device allows it to be used on large optics and systems.

  16. Modeling the global micrometeor input function in the upper atmosphere observed by high power and large aperture radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, Diego; Heinselman, Craig J.; Chau, Jorge L.; Chandran, Amal; Woodman, Ronald

    2006-07-01

    We report initial results of an effort to model the diurnal and seasonal variability of the meteor rate detected by high power and large aperture (HPLA) radars. The model uses Monte Carlo simulation techniques and at present assumes that most of the detected particles originate from three radiant distributions with the most dominant concentrated around the Earth's apex. The other two sources are centered 80° in ecliptic longitude to each side of the apex and are commonly known as helion and antihelion. To reproduce the measurements, the apex source flux was set to provide ˜70% of the total number of particles while the other ˜30% is provided by the combined contribution of the two remaining sources. The results of the model are in excellent agreement with observed diurnal curves obtained at different seasons and locations using the 430 MHz Arecibo radar in Puerto Rico, the 50 MHz Jicamarca radar in Perú, and the 1.29 GHz Sondrestrom radar in Greenland. To obtain agreement with the observed diurnal and seasonal variability of the meteor rate, an empirical atmospheric filtering effect was introduced in the simulation which prevents meteors with low-elevation radiants (≤20°) from being detected by the radars at mesospheric altitudes. The filtering effect is probably produced by a combination of factors related to the interaction of the meteor with the air molecules such as electron production and/or the ablation at higher altitudes. On the basis of these results we calculate the micrometeor global, diurnal, and seasonal input in the upper atmosphere.

  17. Determining meteoroid bulk densities using a plasma scattering model with high-power large-aperture radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Sigrid; Volz, Ryan; Loveland, Rohan; Macdonell, Alex; Colestock, Patrick; Linscott, Ivan; Oppenheim, Meers

    2012-09-01

    We present an improved technique for calculating bulk densities of low-mass (<1 g) meteoroids using a scattering model applied to the high-density plasma formed around the meteoroid as it enters Earth’s atmosphere. These plasmas, referred to as head echoes, travel at or near the speed of the meteoroid, thereby allowing the determination of the ballistic coefficient (mass divided by physical cross-section), which depends upon speed and deceleration. Concurrently, we apply a scattering model to the returned signal strength of the head echo in order to correlate radar-cross-section (RCS) to plasma density and meteoroid mass. In this way, we can uniquely solve for the meteoroid mass, radius and bulk density independently. We have applied this new technique to head echo data collected in 2007 and 2008 simultaneously at VHF (160 MHz) and UHF (422 MHz) at ALTAIR, which is a high-power large-aperture radar located on the Kwajalein Atoll. These data include approximately 20,000 detections with dual-frequency, dual-polarization, and monopulse (i.e. angle) returns. From 2000 detections with the smallest monopulse errors, we find a mean meteoroid bulk density of 0.9 g/cm3 with observations spanning almost three orders of magnitude from 0.01 g/cm3 to 8 g/cm3. Our results show a clear dependence between meteoroid bulk density and altitude of head echo formation, as well as dependence between meteoroid bulk density and 3D speed. The highest bulk densities are detected at the lowest altitudes and lowest speeds. Additionally, we stipulate that the approximations used to derive the ballistic parameter, in addition to neglecting fragmentation, suggest that the traditional ballistic parameter must be used with caution when determining meteoroid parameters.

  18. Large-aperture fast multilevel Fresnel zone lenses in glass and ultrathin polymer films for visible and near-infrared imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Britten, Jerald A; Dixit, Shamusundar N; DeBruyckere, Michael; Steadfast, Daniel; Hackett, James; Farmer, Brandon; Poe, Garrett; Patrick, Brian; Atcheson, Paul D; Domber, Jeanette L; Seltzer, Aaron

    2014-04-10

    The ability to fabricate 4-level diffractive structures with 1 µm critical dimensions has been demonstrated for the creation of fast (∼f/3.1 at 633 nm) Fresnel zone lenses (FZLs) with >60% diffraction efficiency into the -1 focusing order and nearly complete suppression of 0 and +1 orders. This is done using tooling capable of producing optics with 800 mm apertures. A 4-level grating fabricated in glass at 300 mm aperture is shown to have <15  nm rms holographic phase error. Glass FZLs have also been used as mandrels for casting zero-thermal-expansion, 20 µm thick polymer films created with the 4-level structure as a route to mass replication of efficient diffractive membranes for ultralight segmented space-based telescope applications. PMID:24787399

  19. Design and prototype tests of a large-aperture 37-53 MHz ferrite-tuned booster synchrotron cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Mark S. Champion et al.

    2001-07-12

    The Booster synchrotron at Fermilab employs eighteen 37-53 MHz ferrite-tuned double-gap coaxial radiofrequency cavities for acceleration of protons from 400 MeV to 8 GeV. The cavities have an aperture of 2.25 inches and operate at 55 kV per cavity. Future high duty factor operation of the Booster will be problematic due to unavoidable beam loss at the cavities resulting in excessive activation. The power amplifiers, high maintenance items, are mounted directly to the cavities in the tunnel. A proposed replacement for the Booster, the Proton Driver, will utilize the Booster radiofrequency cavities and requires not only a larger aperture, but also higher voltage. A research and development program is underway at Fermilab to modify the Booster cavities to provide a 5-inch aperture and a 20% voltage increase. A prototype has been constructed and high power tests have bee completed. The cavity design and test results is presented.

  20. Agile multiple aperture imager receiver development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, David E. B.; Dillon, Robert F.

    1990-02-01

    A variety of unconventional imaging schemes have been investigated in recent years that rely on small, unphased optical apertures (subaperture) to measure properties of an incoming optical wavefront and recover images of distant objects without using precisely figured, large aperture optical elements. Such schemes offer several attractive features. They provide the potential to create very lare effective aperture that are expandable over time and can be launched into space in small pieces. Since the subapertures are identical in construction, they may be mass producible at potentially low cost. A preliminary design for a practical low cost optical receiver is presented. The multiple aperture design has high sensitivity, wide field-of-view, and is lightweight. A combination of spectral, temporal, and spatial background suppression are used to achieve daytime operation at low signal levels. Modular packaging to make the number of receiver subapertures conveniently scalable is also presented. The design is appropriate to a ground-base proof-of-concept experiment for long range active speckle imaging.

  1. Optica aperture synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Avoort, Casper

    2006-05-01

    aperture mask, these optical paths are stated to be homothetic. In short, these two types will be addressed as the Michelson or the Homothetic type. The other two types are addressed as Densified and Staircase. The first one is short for densified pupil imaging, an imaging technique very similar to the Homothetic type, be it that the natural course of light after the aperture mask is altered. However, the combination of the beams of light is again in focus. The Staircase method is an alternative to the co-axial Michelson method and lends its name from the fact that a staircase-shaped mirror is placed in an intermediate focal plane after each telescope in the array, before combining the beams of light co-axially. This addition allows stellar imaging as with the Michelson type, with the advantage of covering a large field-of-view. The details of these methods will intensively be discussed in this thesis, but the introduction of them at this point allows a short list of results, found by comparing them for equal imaging tasks. Homothetic imagers are best suited for covering a wide field-of-view, considering the information content of the interferometric signals these arrays produce. The large number of detectors does not seem to limit the imaging performance in the presence of noise, due to the high ratio of coherent versus incoherent information in the detector signal. The imaging efficiency of a Michelson type array is also high, although -considering only polychromatic wide-field imaging tasks- the ratio of coherent versus incoherent information in the detected signals is very low. This results in very large observation times needed to produce images comparable to those obtained with a Homothetic array. A detailed presentation of the characteristics of the detected signals in a co-axial Michelson array reveal that such signals, obtained by polychromatic observation of extended sources, have fringe envelope functions that do not allow Fourier-spectroscopy to obtain high

  2. High-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with dual deformable mirrors for large aberration correction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D; Jones, S M; Silva, D A; Olivier, S S

    2007-01-25

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopes with adaptive optics (AOSLO) have been shown previously to provide a noninvasive, cellular-scale view of the living human retina. However, the clinical utility of these systems has been limited by the available deformable mirror technology. In this paper, we demonstrate that the use of dual deformable mirrors can effectively compensate large aberrations in the human retina, making the AOSLO system a viable, non-invasive, high-resolution imaging tool for clinical diagnostics. We used a bimorph deformable mirror to correct low-order aberrations with relatively large amplitudes. The bimorph mirror is manufactured by Aoptix, Inc. with 37 elements and 18 {micro}m stroke in a 10 mm aperture. We used a MEMS deformable mirror to correct high-order aberrations with lower amplitudes. The MEMS mirror is manufactured by Boston Micromachine, Inc with 144 elements and 1.5 {micro}m stroke in a 3 mm aperture. We have achieved near diffraction-limited retina images using the dual deformable mirrors to correct large aberrations up to {+-} 3D of defocus and {+-} 3D of cylindrical aberrations with test subjects. This increases the range of spectacle corrections by the AO systems by a factor of 10, which is crucial for use in the clinical environment. This ability for large phase compensation can eliminate accurate refractive error fitting for the patients, which greatly improves the system ease of use and efficiency in the clinical environment.

  3. Horizontal Shear Wave Imaging of Large Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Quarry, M J

    2007-09-05

    When complete the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be the world's largest and most energetic laser and will be capable of achieving for the first time fusion ignition in the laboratory. Detecting optics features within the laser beamlines and sizing them at diameters of 0.1 mm to 10 mm allows timely decisions concerning refurbishment and will help with the routine operation of the system. Horizontally polarized shear waves at 10 MHz were shown to accurately detect, locate, and size features created by laser operations from 0.5 mm to 8 mm by placing sensors at the edge of the optic. The shear wave technique utilizes highly directed beams. The outer edge of an optic can be covered with shear wave transducers on four sides. Each transducer sends a pulse into the optic and any damage reflects the pulse back to the transmitter. The transducers are multiplexed, and the collected time waveforms are enveloped and replicated across the width of the element. Multiplying the data sets from four directions produces a map of reflected amplitude to the fourth power, which images the surface of the optic. Surface area can be measured directly from the image, and maximum depth was shown to be correlated to maximum amplitude of the reflected waveform.

  4. Biomass Mapping of US forests using synergy of Synthetic Aperture Radar and optical Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellndorfer, J. M.; Baccini, A.; Bishop, J.; Cartus, O.; Cormier, T.; Walker, W. S.; Santoro, M.

    2011-12-01

    Santoro et al. (2011) for hyper-temporal stacks of ENVISAT ASAR C-band intensity, in which a semi-empirical model, relating backscatter to forest biophysical parameters, is trained with the aid of the MODIS VCF (Hansen et al., 2003) or similar optical remote sensing products. This algorithm allows accounting for environmental (soil/canopy moisture) or weather (freeze/thaw, rain) related effects on the backscatter signatures over forest without further need for in situ data. Once the model has been trained, it can be inverted to estimate the biomass for each image at pixel level. Where multi-temporal data was available, a weighted multi-temporal combination of the single-image estimates was done to improve the estimates. A comparison with the NBCD map indicated that at full resolution the accuracy of the ALOS biomass maps were relatively low with root mean square differences, RMSD, in the range of 80 to 100 t/ha. When, however, aggregating the maps to pixel size of >500 m, the RMSD reduced to less than 30 t/ha. The feasibility of accuracte ALOS based biomass mapping, at least at aggregated scales, was confirmed when extracting from the maps county level biomass statistics and comparing these to FIA county-level statistics (R2=0.95).

  5. Large-Aperture [O I] 6300 A Photometry of Comet Hale-Bopp: Implications for the Photochemistry of OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenthaler, Jeffrey P.; Harris, Walter M.; Scherb, Frank; Anderson, Christopher M.; Oliversen, Ronald J.; Doane, Nathaniel E.; Combi, Michael R.; Marconi, Maximus L.; Smyth, William H.

    2001-01-01

    Large-aperture photometric observations of comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) in the forbidden red line of neutral oxygen ([O I] 6300 angstroms) with the 150 mm dual-etalon Fabry-Perot spectrometer that comprises the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper and a 50 mm dual-etalon Fabry-Perot spectrometer at the McMath-Pierce main telescope from 1997 late February to mid April yield a total metastable O((sup 1)D) production rate of (2.3-5.9) x 10(exp 30)/s. Applying the standard H2O and OH photodissociation branching ratios, we derive a water production rate, Q(H2O), of (2.6-6.1) x 10(exp 31)/s, which disagrees with Q(H2O = 1x10(exp 31)/s determined by independent H2O, OH, and H measurements. Furthermore, our own [O I] 6300 observations of the inner coma (< 30,000 km) using the 3.5 m Wisconsin-Indiana-Yale-NOAO telescope Hydra and Densepak multi-object spectrographs yield Q(H2O) = 1 x 10(exp 31)/s. Using our [O I] 6300 data, which cover spatial scales ranging from 2,000 to 1x10(exp 6) km, and a complementary set of wide-field ground-based OH images, we can constrain the sources of the apparent excess O((sup 1)D) emission to the outer coma, where photodissociation of OH is assumed to be the dominant O((sup 1)D) production mechanism. From production rates of other oxygen-bearing volatiles (e.g., CO and CO2), we can account for at most 30% of the observed excess O((sup 1)D) emission. Since even less O((sup 1)D) should be coming from other sources (e.g., electron excitation of neutral O and distributed nonnuclear sources of H2O), we hypothesize that the bulk of the excess O((sup 1)D) is likely coming from photodissociating OH. Using the experimental OH photo-dissociation cross section of Nee and Lee at Ly-alpha as a guide in modifying the theoretical OH cross sections of van Dishoeck and Dalgarno, we can account for approximately 60% of the observed O((sup 1)D) excess without requiring major modifications to the other OH branching ratios or the total OH photodissociation lifetime.

  6. A new look at Fresnel field computation using the Jacobi-Bessel series. [large aperture antenna design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, V.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Computational procedures that would be useful in finding the Fresnel field from a knowledge of the Jacobi-Bessel expansion of the far field are considered. The range of validity of the Fresnel approximation is carefully examined by comparing it with the exact closed form solution for the uniform circular aperture. Also investigated numerically, and in great detail, is the range of validity (over theta) of the Fresnel small angle (FSA) approximation. For moderate sized apertures as small as 10 wavelengths, it is found that the FSA approximation is very accurate to angles as wide as four or more sidelobes (as seen in the far zone). A very efficient computational method is shown to exist for the radiation integral in the form of a single series expansion that is analytically continuous and convergent for a wide range of observation points in three-dimensional space.

  7. The future of large optical system verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Gary

    2005-08-01

    As optical systems grow in size, there becomes a point in which traditional system verification prior to launch will become impossible. This implies that observatory ground testing will not be completed. Our history does not support this premise and therefore results in an unacceptable programmatic risk. But, if the dream of building 20-30 meter systems is ever to become true, these realities must be accepted. To make this possible, new and better analytical tools and processes must be developed and certified on programs that can be tested on the ground. This change in paradigm does not eliminate critical testing; it just does it at different assembly levels and most likely adds alignment flexibility to correct optical errors after launch. This paper provides ideas on how the hardware, analysis tools, and testing may evolve to support these ambitious future programs.

  8. Structure of optical turbulence over large city

    SciTech Connect

    Kallistratova, M.A.; Pekour, M.S.

    1994-12-31

    The results of an experimental investigation of optically active turbulence in the atmospheric boundary lower (ABL) over Moscow are given. Both quantitative and qualitative data on the ABL structure are obtained due to remote acoustic sensing. Statistical data are given on dairy variations in the mean value of the refractive index structure parameter C{sub n}{sup 2} (for winter and summer), on the vertical profiles of C{sub n}{sup 2} for different types of the ABL thermal stratification and also on the seasonal occurrence of the type of stratification. The distinctions in the behavior of optical turbulence over a city and a homogeneous terrain are discussed as well as the deviations of the real profiles of C{sub n}{sup 2} in the urban ABL from the known model representations.

  9. The saga of the LEP dynamic aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdier, A.

    1999-05-01

    The large electron-positron collider LEP at CERN provides a beautiful example of our conceptual limits concerning the problem of dynamic aperture (short term stability of the transverse oscillations of particle trajectories) in circular machines. For the operation at 45 GeV (Z0 peak) the dynamic aperture did not pose any problem although its measurement gave a value much smaller than that predicted up to the end of 1993. After this date the measurements gave the same result as predicted but it was not possible to trace back the origin of the discrepancy. At high energy (the maximum operating energy foreseen is 100 GeV) the beam emittance increases with the square of the beam energy. Therefore, low emittance optics were proposed. These optics suffer from large anharmonicities because of the increased sextupole strengths. This led to an unexpected limitation of the beam lifetime.

  10. Development of design technique for vacuum insulation in large size multi-aperture multi-grid accelerator for nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Kojima, A; Hanada, M; Tobari, H; Nishikiori, R; Hiratsuka, J; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Yoshida, M; Ichikawa, M; Watanabe, K; Yamano, Y; Grisham, L R

    2016-02-01

    Design techniques for the vacuum insulation have been developed in order to realize a reliable voltage holding capability of multi-aperture multi-grid (MAMuG) accelerators for fusion application. In this method, the nested multi-stage configuration of the MAMuG accelerator can be uniquely designed to satisfy the target voltage within given boundary conditions. The evaluation of the voltage holding capabilities of each acceleration stages was based on the previous experimental results about the area effect and the multi-aperture effect. Since the multi-grid effect was found to be the extension of the area effect by the total facing area this time, the total voltage holding capability of the multi-stage can be estimated from that per single stage by assuming the stage with the highest electric field, the total facing area, and the total apertures. By applying these consideration, the analysis on the 3-stage MAMuG accelerator for JT-60SA agreed well with the past gap-scan experiments with an accuracy of less than 10% variation, which demonstrated the high reliability to design MAMuG accelerators and also multi-stage high voltage bushings. PMID:26932032

  11. Development of design technique for vacuum insulation in large size multi-aperture multi-grid accelerator for nuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, A.; Hanada, M.; Tobari, H.; Nishikiori, R.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Yoshida, M.; Ichikawa, M.; Watanabe, K.; Yamano, Y.; Grisham, L. R.

    2016-02-01

    Design techniques for the vacuum insulation have been developed in order to realize a reliable voltage holding capability of multi-aperture multi-grid (MAMuG) accelerators for fusion application. In this method, the nested multi-stage configuration of the MAMuG accelerator can be uniquely designed to satisfy the target voltage within given boundary conditions. The evaluation of the voltage holding capabilities of each acceleration stages was based on the previous experimental results about the area effect and the multi-aperture effect. Since the multi-grid effect was found to be the extension of the area effect by the total facing area this time, the total voltage holding capability of the multi-stage can be estimated from that per single stage by assuming the stage with the highest electric field, the total facing area, and the total apertures. By applying these consideration, the analysis on the 3-stage MAMuG accelerator for JT-60SA agreed well with the past gap-scan experiments with an accuracy of less than 10% variation, which demonstrated the high reliability to design MAMuG accelerators and also multi-stage high voltage bushings.

  12. Control strategies and algorithms for large astronomical optical telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shihai

    2010-07-01

    This paper gives a summary on control strategies and algorithms for contemporary large astronomical optical telescopes. The study lays emphasis on high precision tracking for large astronomical optical telescopes with large inertia, ultra-low speed and multi-disturbance. The control strategies and algorithms of some telescopes based on direct drive or friction drive are analyzed carefully. Finally, the future development in this field is presented.

  13. Group and phase delay sensing for cophasing large optical arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourard, D.; Dali Ali, W.; Meilland, A.; Tarmoul, N.; Patru, F.; Clausse, J. M.; Girard, P.; Hénault, F.; Marcotto, A.; Mauclert, N.

    2014-12-01

    The next generation of optical interferometers will provide high-resolution imaging of celestial objects by using either the aperture synthesis technique or the direct imaging principle. To determine the technical requirements, we have developed an interferometric test bench, called SIRIUS. To preserve the quality of the image, fast corrections of the optical path differences within a fraction of a wavelength have to be applied: this is the cophasing of the array, whereas making it coherent aims at stabilizing the optical path differences within a fraction of the coherence length. In the SIRIUS test bench, coherence and cophasing are achieved by fibred delay lines. Air delay lines are also used for the raw delay equalization. We present an original implementation of a piston sensor, called chromatic phase diversity, which is adaptable to any interferometer, whatever the configuration of the entrance pupil and the number of sub-pupils and whatever the interferometric combiner. Our method is based on the dispersed fringes principle and uses a derived version of the dispersed speckles method. The numerical simulation shows the performance of the method in terms of cophasing, accuracy and limiting magnitude. Experimental tests have been carried out both with optical turbulence and without. They show good results in both cases, despite some instrument-related limitations that can be eliminated. We show that our method is able to handle an amplitude of correction of ±11(λ/2) with an accuracy of ˜λ/30 over many minutes.

  14. Aperture-ratio dependence of the efficiency of magneto-optical first-order diffraction in GdFe stripe arrays with alternating perpendicular magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Kakeru; Antos, Roman; Aoshima, Ken-ichi; Machida, Kenji; Kuga, Kiyoshi; Ono, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Shimidzu, Naoki; Ishibashi, Takayuki

    2016-07-01

    The efficiency of magneto-optical (MO) diffraction in GdFe stripe arrays with alternating directions of perpendicular magnetization is investigated. The diffraction efficiency depends on the aperture ratio, as theoretically analyzed for an array composed of magnetic and nonmagnetic materials, with the magnetization directions parallel or antiparallel. The stripe patterns are composed of two ferromagnetic alloys of different compositions, Gd19.7Fe80.3 and Gd23.4Fe76.6 (denoted GF1 and GF2), having different coercivities in the parallel and antiparallel configurations. The stripe patterns are separated by nonmagnetic SiO2 stripes of different widths to obtain aperture ratios of 100, 75, 50 and 25%. The magnetization distributions in the samples is confirmed by MO microscopy. The diffraction efficiencies at a wavelength of 532 nm are measured to be 1.27×10-6, 1.04×10-6, 6.2×10-7 and 2.0×10-7 for aperture ratios of 100, 75, 50, and 25%, respectively. Those values are in accord with calculations using the measured MO and optical parameters of the GF1 layer, including the Kerr rotation angle of 0.12°, the Kerr ellipticity of -0.1° and the reflectance of 0.37.

  15. Study on key techniques for synthetic aperture ladar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Changqing; Zeng, Xiaodong; Feng, Zhejun; Zhang, Wenrui; Su, Lei

    2008-03-01

    The spatial resolution of a conventional imaging LADAR system is constrained by the diffraction limit of the telescope aperture. The purpose of this work is to investigate Synthetic Aperture Imaging LADAR (SAIL), which employs aperture synthesis with coherent laser radar to overcome the diffraction limit and achieve fine-resolution, long range, two-dimensional imaging with modest aperture diameters. Because of many advantages, LADAR based on synthetic aperture theory is becoming research hotspot and practicality. Synthetic Aperture LADAR (SAL) technology satisfies the critical need for reliable, long-range battlefield awareness. An image that takes radar tens of seconds to produce can be produced in a few thousands of a second at optical frequencies. While radar waves respond to macroscopic features such as corners, edges, and facets, laser waves interact with microscopic surface characteristics, which results in imagery that appears more familiar and is more easily interpreted. SAL could provide high resolution optical/infrared imaging. In the present paper we have tried to answer three questions: (1) the process of collecting the samples over the large "synthetic" aperture; (2) differences between SAR and SAL; (3) the key techniques for SAL system. The principle and progress of SAL are introduced and a typical SAL system is described. Beam stabilization, chirp laser, and heterodyne detection, which are among the most challenging aspects of SAL, are discussed in detail.

  16. System concepts for a large UV/optical/IR telescope on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nein, Max E.; Davis, Billy

    1991-01-01

    To assess the systems and technological requirements for constructing lunar telescopes in conjunction with the buildup of a lunar base for scientific exploration and as a waypoint for travel to Mars, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center conducted concept studies of a 16-m-aperture large lunar telescope (LLT) and a 4-m-aperture precursor telescope, both operating in the UV/visible/IR spectral region. The feasibility of constructing a large telescope on the lunar surface is assessed, and its systems and subsystems are analyzed. Telescope site selection, environmental effects, and launch and assembly scenarios are also evaluated. It is argued that key technical drivers for the LLT must be tested in situ by precursor telescopes to evaluate such areas as the operations and long-term reliability of active optics, radiation protection of instruments, lunar dust mitigation, and thermal shielding of the telescope systems. For a manned lunar outpost or an LLT to become a reality, a low-cost dependable transportation system must be developed.

  17. A study program on large aperture electronic scanning phased array antennas for the shuttle imaging microwave system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Fundamental phased array theory and performance parameters are discussed in terms of their application to microwave radiometry, and four scanning phased arrays representing current examples of state-of-the-art phased array technology are evaluated for potential use as components of the multispectral antenna system for the space shuttle imaging microwave system (SIMS). A discussion of problem areas, both in performance and fabrication is included, with extrapolations of performance characteristics for phased array antennas of increased sizes up to 20 m by 20 m. The possibility of interlacing two or more phased arrays to achieve a multifrequency aperture is considered, and, finally, a specific antenna system is recommended for use with SIMS.

  18. Instrument Design of the Large Aperture Solar UV Visible and IR Observing Telescope (SUVIT) for the SOLAR-C Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suematsu, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Shimizu, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Takeyama, N.

    2012-12-01

    We present an instrumental design of one major solar observation payload planned for the SOLAR-C mission: the Solar Ultra-violet Visible and near IR observing Telescope (SUVIT). The SUVIT is designed to provide high-angular-resolution investigation of the lower solar atmosphere, from the photosphere to the uppermost chromosphere, with enhanced spectroscopic and spectro-polarimetric capability in wide wavelength regions from 280 nm (Mg II h&k lines) to 1100 nm (He I 1083 nm line) with 1.5 m class aperture and filtergraphic and spectrographic instruments.

  19. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 3: Optical telescope assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the optical telescope assembly for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The systems considerations are based on mission-related parameters and optical equipment requirements. Information is included on: (1) structural design and analysis, (2) thermal design, (3) stabilization and control, (4) alignment, focus, and figure control, (5) electronic subsystem, and (6) scientific instrument design.

  20. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adie, Steven G.; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Ralston, Tyler S.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    The trade-off between transverse resolution and depth-of-field, and the mitigation of optical aberrations, are long-standing problems in optical imaging. The deleterious impact of these problems on three-dimensional tomography increases with numerical aperture (NA), and so they represent a significant impediment for real-time cellular resolution tomography over the typical imaging depths achieved with OCT. With optical coherence microscopy (OCM), which utilizes higher-NA optics than OCT, the depth-of-field is severely reduced, and it has been postulated that aberrations play a major role in reducing the useful imaging depth in OCM. Even at lower transverse resolution, both these phenomena produce artifacts that degrade the imaging of fine tissue structures. Early approaches to the limited depth-of-field problem in time-domain OCT utilized dynamic focusing. In spectral-domain OCT, this focus-shifting approach to data acquisition leads to long acquisition times and large datasets. Adaptive optics (AO) has been utilized to correct optical aberrations, in particular for retinal OCT, but in addition to requiring elaborate and expensive setups, the real-time optimization requirements at the time of imaging, and the correction of spatially varying effects of aberrations throughout an imaged volume, remain as significant challenges. This chapter presents computed imaging solutions for the reconstruction of sample structure when imaging with ideal and aberrated Gaussian beams.

  1. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P.; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick–Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions. PMID:27097853

  2. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P.; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-04-01

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick–Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions.

  3. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick-Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions. PMID:27097853

  4. Differential Synthetic Aperture Ladar

    SciTech Connect

    Stappaerts, E A; Scharlemann, E

    2005-02-07

    We report a differential synthetic aperture ladar (DSAL) concept that relaxes platform and laser requirements compared to conventional SAL. Line-of-sight translation/vibration constraints are reduced by several orders of magnitude, while laser frequency stability is typically relaxed by an order of magnitude. The technique is most advantageous for shorter laser wavelengths, ultraviolet to mid-infrared. Analytical and modeling results, including the effect of speckle and atmospheric turbulence, are presented. Synthetic aperture ladars are of growing interest, and several theoretical and experimental papers have been published on the subject. Compared to RF synthetic aperture radar (SAR), platform/ladar motion and transmitter bandwidth constraints are especially demanding at optical wavelengths. For mid-IR and shorter wavelengths, deviations from a linear trajectory along the synthetic aperture length have to be submicron, or their magnitude must be measured to that precision for compensation. The laser coherence time has to be the synthetic aperture transit time, or transmitter phase has to be recorded and a correction applied on detection.

  5. Comparison of CNES spherical and NASA hemispherical large aperture integrating sources. I - Using a laboratory transfer spectroradiometer. II - Using the SPOT-2 satellite instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guenther, B.; Mclean, J.; Leroy, M.; Henry, P.

    1990-01-01

    CNES spherical and NASA hemispherical large aperture calibration sources are examined using a laboratory transfer spectroradiometer and SPOT-2 instruments. The sources, collected at Matra in France during October 1987, are compared in terms of absolute calibration, linearity, and uniformity. The laboratory transfer spectroradiometer data reveal that the calibration results correspond to within about 7 percent absolute accuracy level and the linearity of the CNES source with lamp level is good. It is observed using the satellite data that both sources have an excellent uniformity over a 4 deg field of view.

  6. Plane-polar Fresnel and far-field computations using the Fresnel-Wilcox and Jacobi-Bessel expansions. [for large aperture antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Galindo-Israel, V.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that the computation of the Fresnel fields for large aperture antennas is significant for many applications. The present investigation is concerned with an approach for the effective utilization of the coefficients of the Jacobi-Bessel series for the far-field to obtain an analytically continuous representation of the antenna field which is valid from the Fresnel region into the far field. Attention is given to exact formulations and closed form solutions, Fresnel and Fresnel small angle approximations, aspects of field expansion, the accuracy of the Fresnel and Fresnel small angle approximations, and the Jacobi-Bessel expansion applied to the Fresnel small angle approximation.

  7. Sub-surface damage issues for effective fabrication of large optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonnellier, X.; Shore, P.; Morantz, P.; Baldwin, A.; Walker, D.; Yu, G.; Evans, R.

    2008-07-01

    A new ultra precision large optics grinding machine, BoX® has been developed at Cranfield University. BoX® is located at the UK's Ultra Precision Surfaces laboratory at the OpTIC Technium. This machine offers a rapid and economic solution for grinding large off-axis aspherical and free-form optical components. This paper presents an analysis of subsurface damage assessments of optical ground materials produced using diamond resin bonded grinding wheels. The specific materials used, Zerodur® and ULE® are currently under study for making extremely large telescope (ELT) segmented mirrors such as in the E-ELT project. The grinding experiments have been conducted on the BoX® grinding machine using wheels with grits sizes of 76 μm, 46 μm and 25 μm. Grinding process data was collected using a Kistler dynamometer platform. The highest material removal rate (187.5 mm3/s) used ensures that a 1 metre diameter optic can be ground in less than 10 hours. The surface roughness and surface profile were measured using a Form Talysurf. The subsurface damage was revealed using a sub aperture polishing process in combination with an etching technique. These results are compared with the targeted form accuracy of 1 μm p-v over a 1 metre part, surface roughness of 50-150 nm RMS and subsurface damage in the range of 2-5 μm. This process stage was validated on a 400 mm ULE® blank and a 1 metre hexagonal Zerodur® part.

  8. Measurement of large strains in ropes using plastic optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Jerry Gene; Smith, David Barton; Muhs, Jeffrey David

    2006-02-14

    A method for the direct measurement of large strains in ropes in situ using a plastic optical fiber, for example, perfluorocarbon or polymethyl methacrylate and Optical Time-Domain Reflectometer or other light time-of-flight measurement instrumentation. Protective sheaths and guides are incorporated to protect the plastic optical fiber. In one embodiment, a small rope is braided around the plastic optical fiber to impose lateral compressive forces to restrain the plastic optical fiber from slipping and thus experience the same strain as the rope. Methods are described for making reflective interfaces along the length of the plastic optical fiber and to provide the capability to measure strain within discrete segments of the rope. Interpretation of the data allows one to calculate the accumulated strain at any point in time and to determine if the rope has experienced local damage.

  9. Large capacity spatially multiplexed optical memories for incoherent correlator application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Francis T.

    1987-05-01

    We have, in this research program, completed various significant aspects on the study of a Large Capacity Spatially Multiplexed Optical Correlator. They are summarized in the following paragraphs: We have quantitatively analyzed the noise performance of an incoherent optical signal processor. The effects due to temporal coherence and due to spatial coherence were studied. In this period, we have also completed research on a real-time large-capacity rapid-scanning optical correlator utilizing a rotating grating concept. We have shown that the proposed optical scanning correlator is capable of processing large-capacity optical memories with rapid spectrum scanning. With the implementation of a closed-circuit TV system the OSC system can be applied in real-world situations. A study of polychromatic correlation by spectral-spatial matched filtering has been conducted. Application of this technique to large capability spatially multiplexing matched filter synthesis is discussed. This technique offers true color signal detection, which is suitable for color image recognition and identification. We have also developed a joint transform correlation concept. This technique utilizes a magneto-optic device with a liquid crystal light valve.

  10. Configurable Aperture Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Bendek, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In December 2014, we were awarded Center Innovation Fund to evaluate an optical and mechanical concept for a novel implementation of a segmented telescope based on modular, interconnected small sats (satlets). The concept is called CAST, a Configurable Aperture Space Telescope. With a current TRL is 2 we will aim to reach TLR 3 in Sept 2015 by demonstrating a 2x2 mirror system to validate our optical model and error budget, provide straw man mechanical architecture and structural damping analyses, and derive future satlet-based observatory performance requirements. CAST provides an alternative access to visible and/or UV wavelength space telescope with 1-meter or larger aperture for NASA SMD Astrophysics and Planetary Science community after the retirement of HST

  11. Optical ‘magnetic mirror’ metasurfaces using interference between Fabry-Pérot cavity resonances in coaxial apertures

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekharan, Ranjith; Roberts, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Here we propose and computationally demonstrate a quasi-planar metasurface consisting of arrays of pairs of concentric coaxial apertures in a metallic film. The structure relies on destructive interference between Fabry-Pérot modes excited in each aperture at resonance producing transmitted fields that interfere destructively leading to suppressed transmission. Conversely, we show that in the case of a perfect conductor, near-perfect, broadband reflection can be achieved with zero phase change in the electric field and a variation of 2π on passing through the coincident resonances. Extending the concept to shorter wavelengths, we show that mirrors exhibiting close to a 2π phase excursion, albeit with a reduction in the amplitude reflection coefficient at resonance and a lower Q, can be also achieved. Structures such as these can be used to enhance light-matter interactions at surfaces and act as high impedance ground planes for antenna applications. PMID:26020728

  12. Integrated electrochromic aperture diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutschmann, T.; Oesterschulze, E.

    2014-05-01

    In the last years, the triumphal march of handheld electronics with integrated cameras has opened amazing fields for small high performing optical systems. For this purpose miniaturized iris apertures are of practical importance because they are essential to control both the dynamic range of the imaging system and the depth of focus. Therefore, we invented a micro optical iris based on an electrochromic (EC) material. This material changes its absorption in response to an applied voltage. A coaxial arrangement of annular rings of the EC material is used to establish an iris aperture without need of any mechanical moving parts. The advantages of this device do not only arise from the space-saving design with a thickness of the device layer of 50μm. But it also benefits from low power consumption. In fact, its transmission state is stable in an open circuit, phrased memory effect. Only changes of the absorption require a voltage of up to 2 V. In contrast to mechanical iris apertures the absorption may be controlled on an analog scale offering the opportunity for apodization. These properties make our device the ideal candidate for battery powered and space-saving systems. We present optical measurements concerning control of the transmitted intensity and depth of focus, and studies dealing with switching times, light scattering, and stability. While the EC polymer used in this study still has limitations concerning color and contrast, the presented device features all functions of an iris aperture. In contrast to conventional devices it offers some special features. Owing to the variable chemistry of the EC material, its spectral response may be adjusted to certain applications like color filtering in different spectral regimes (UV, optical range, infrared). Furthermore, all segments may be switched individually to establish functions like spatial Fourier filtering or lateral tunable intensity filters.

  13. Large Optic Drying Station: Summary of Dryer Certification Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Barbee, T W; Ayers, S L; Ayers, M J

    2009-08-28

    The purpose of this document is to outline the methodology used to baseline and maintain the cleanliness status of the newly built and installed Large Optic Cleaning Station (LOCS). The station has currently been in use for eleven months; and after many cleaning studies and implementation of resulting improvements appears to be cleaning optics to a level that is acceptable for the fabrication of Nano-Laminates.

  14. Tracking in a ground-to-satellite optical link: effects due to lead-ahead and aperture mismatch, including temporal tracking response.

    PubMed

    Basu, Santasri; Voelz, David

    2008-07-01

    Establishing a link between a ground station and a geosynchronous orbiting satellite can be aided greatly with the use of a beacon on the satellite. A tracker, or even an adaptive optics system, can use the beacon during communication or tracking activities to correct beam pointing for atmospheric turbulence and mount jitter effects. However, the pointing lead-ahead required to illuminate the moving object and an aperture mismatch between the tracking and the pointing apertures can limit the effectiveness of the correction, as the sensed tilt will not be the same as the tilt required for optimal transmission to the satellite. We have developed an analytical model that addresses the combined impact of these tracking issues in a ground-to-satellite optical link. We present these results for different tracker/pointer configurations. By setting the low-pass cutoff frequency of the tracking servo properly, the tracking errors can be minimized. The analysis considers geosynchronous Earth orbit satellites as well as low Earth orbit satellites. PMID:18594615

  15. Selective aggregation of single-walled carbon nanotubes using the large optical field gradient of a focused laser beam.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Thomas; Shoji, Satoru; Sekkat, Zouheir; Kawata, Satoshi

    2008-09-19

    We demonstrate the selective aggregation of single-walled carbon nanotubes by photon forces, using the large optical field gradient of a laser focused through a high numerical aperture objective lens. The nanotubes, dispersed in an aqueous solution with a surfactant, are detected via Raman scattering from the confocal volume of the optical trap. By using a visible-light laser for both trapping and detection, the dynamics of the radial breathing mode signal taken at short intervals shows an increase of a single breathing mode over time, indicating the increase in the density of only one species of tube in the focal volume. This result represents a significant step toward the development of techniques for the arbitrary manipulation and sorting of nanotubes by optical fields. PMID:18851409

  16. Contrails of Small and Very Large Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, David; Wang, Zhien

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with two kinds of contrails. The first comprises a large number of optically thin contrails near the tropopause. They are mapped geographically using a lidar to obtain their height and a camera to obtain azimuth and elevation. These high-resolution maps provide the local contrail geometry and the amount of optically clear atmosphere. The second kind is a single trail of unprecedentedly large optical thickness that occurs at a lower height. The latter was observed fortuitously when an aircraft moving along the wind direction passed over the lidar, thus providing measurements for more than 3 h and an equivalent distance of 620 km. It was also observed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) sensors. The lidar measured an optical depth of 2.3. The corresponding extinction coefficient of 0.023 per kilometer and ice water content of 0.063 grams per cubic meter are close to the maximum values found for midlatitude cirrus. The associated large radar reflectivity compares to that measured by ultrasensitive radar, thus providing support for the reality of the large optical depth.

  17. Optical position measurement for a Large Gap Magnetic Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Sharon S.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Clemmons, James I.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the design of an optical position measurement system which is being built as part of the NASA Langley Large Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS). The LGMSS is a five degree-of-freedom, large-gap magnetic suspension system which is being built for Langley Research Center as part of the Advanced Controls Test Facility (ACTF). The LGMSS consists of a planar array of electromagnets which levitate and position a cylindrically shaped model containing a permanent magnet core. The optical position measurement system provides information on the location and orientation of the model to the LGMSS control system to stabilize levitation of the model.

  18. Prediction of nonlinear optical properties of large organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    1992-01-01

    The preparation of materials with large nonlinear responses usually requires involved synthetic processes. Thus, it is very advantageous for materials scientists to have a means of predicting nonlinear optical properties. The prediction of nonlinear optical properties has to be addressed first at the molecular level and then as bulk material. For relatively large molecules, two types of calculations may be used, which are the sum-over-states and the finite-field approach. The finite-field method was selected for this research, because this approach is better suited for larger molecules.

  19. Phasing rectangular apertures.

    PubMed

    Baker, K L; Homoelle, D; Utterback, E; Jones, S M

    2009-10-26

    Several techniques have been developed to phase apertures in the context of astronomical telescopes with segmented mirrors. Phasing multiple apertures, however, is important in a wide range of optical applications. The application of primary interest in this paper is the phasing of multiple short pulse laser beams for fast ignition fusion experiments. In this paper analytic expressions are derived for parameters such as the far-field distribution, a line-integrated form of the far-field distribution that could be fit to measured data, enclosed energy or energy-in-a-bucket and center-of-mass that can then be used to phase two rectangular apertures. Experimental data is taken with a MEMS device to simulate the two apertures and comparisons are made between the analytic parameters and those derived from the measurements. Two methods, fitting the measured far-field distribution to the theoretical distribution and measuring the ensquared energy in the far-field, produced overall phase variance between the 100 measurements of less than 0.005 rad(2) or an RMS displacement of less than 12 nm. PMID:19997175

  20. Fresnel diffraction of aperture with rough edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yuwei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Junhong; Zhang, Meina; Teng, Shuyun

    2015-06-01

    The Fresnel diffraction of an aperture with a rough edge is studied in this paper. Circular and elliptical apertures with sinusoidal and random edges are chosen as examples to investigate the influence of the aperture edge on the diffraction. The numerical calculation results indicate intuitively the variations of the transverse and longitude diffraction intensity distributions with the edge parameters of the aperture. The data files of aperture models are obtained through the numerical calculations, and the aperture samples are obtained with the help of a liquid crystal light modulator (LCLM). Thus, the practical experiments of the diffractions of apertures with rough edges are carried out. The measured results are consistent with the calculated ones. The approximate analytic expressions of the diffraction by the modified aperture are deduced on the basis of the Fresnel diffraction theory and the statistic optics, and the reasonable explanations for the influence of edge parameters on the diffraction are given through the theoretical analysis.

  1. A flat laser array aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadakis, Stergios J.; Ricciardi, Gerald F.; Gross, Michael C.; Krill, Jerry A.

    2010-04-01

    We describe a design concept for a flat (or conformal) thin-plate laser phased-array aperture. The aperture consists of a substrate supporting a grid of single-mode optical waveguides fabricated from a linear electro-optic material. The waveguides are coupled to a single laser source or detector. An arrangement of electrodes provides for two-dimensional beam steering by controlling the phase of the light entering the grid. The electrodes can also be modulated to simultaneously provide atmospheric turbulence modulation for long-range free-space optical communication. An approach for fabrication is also outlined.

  2. Large Optical Nonlinearity Induced by Singlet Fission in Pentacene Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunlong; Zhang, Chunfeng; Xiao, Min

    2015-03-01

    By creating two triplet excitons from one photo-excited singlet exciton, singlet fission in organic semiconductors has drawn tremendous attention for its potential application in boosting the efficiency of solar conversion. Here, we show that this carrier-multiplication effect can be used to dramatically improve the nonlinear optical response in organic materials. With the technique of dual-wavelength optical Kerr effect (OKE), we have observed large optical nonlinearity with a magnitude of χ (3) up to 10-9 esu in pentacene films, which is further shown to be a result of singlet fission as demonstrated by the detailed temporal dynamics and wavelength dependence experiment. Through the use of optical heterodyne detected OKE experiment, we have determined both the sign and value of Reχ (3) of the pentacene film. Such efficient third order nonlinear optical response has been successfully applied to demonstrate the all-optical switching. The results observed in this work indicate that the singlet fission could be served as an effective strategy to promote the optical nonlinearity in organic molecule systems. This work is supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (2013CB932903 and 2012CB921801, MOST), the National Science Foundation of China (91233103, 61108001, 11227406 and 11321063).

  3. Improved Optical Design for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

    SciTech Connect

    Seppala, L

    2002-09-24

    This paper presents an improved optical design for the LSST, an fll.25 three-mirror telescope covering 3.0 degrees full field angle, with 6.9 m effective aperture diameter. The telescope operates at five wavelength bands spanning 386.5 nm to 1040 nm (B, V, R, I and Z). For all bands, 80% of the polychromatic diffracted energy is collected within 0.20 arc-seconds diameter. The reflective telescope uses an 8.4 m f/1.06 concave primary, a 3.4 m convex secondary and a 5.2 m concave tertiary in a Paul geometry. The system length is 9.2 m. A refractive corrector near the detector uses three fused silica lenses, rather than the two lenses of previous designs. Earlier designs required that one element be a vacuum barrier, but now the detector sits in an inert gas at ambient pressure. The last lens is the gas barrier. Small adjustments lead to optimal correction at each band. The filters have different axial thicknesses. The primary and tertiary mirrors are repositioned for each wavelength band. The new optical design incorporates features to simplify manufacturing. They include a flat detector, a far less aspheric convex secondary (10 {micro}m from best fit sphere) and reduced aspheric departures on the lenses and tertiary mirror. Five aspheric surfaces, on all three mirrors and on two lenses, are used. The primary is nearly parabolic. The telescope is fully baffled so that no specularly reflected light from any field angle, inside or outside of the full field angle of 3.0 degrees, can reach the detector.

  4. Evolving design criteria for very large aperture space-based telescopes and their influence on the need for intergrated tools in the optimization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, William R.

    2015-09-01

    NASA's Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) program has been developing the means to design and build the future generations of space based telescopes. With the nearing completion of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the astrophysics community is already starting to define the requirements for follow on observatories. The restrictions of available launch vehicles and the possibilities of planned future vehicles have fueled the competition between monolithic primaries (with better optical quality) and segmented primaries (with larger apertures, but with diffraction, costs and figure control issues). Regardless of the current shroud sizes and lift capacities, these competing architectures share the need for rapid design tools. As part of the AMTD program a number of tools have been developed and tested to speed up the design process. Starting with the Arnold Mirror Modeler (which creates Finite Element Models (FEM) for structural analysis) and now also feeds these models into thermal stability analyses. They share common file formats and interchangeable results. During the development of the program, numerous trade studies were created for 4 meter and 8 meter monolithic primaries, complete with support systems. Evaluation of these results has led to a better understanding of how the specification drives the results. This paper will show some of the early trade studies for typical specification requirements such as lowest mirror bending frequency and suspension system lowest frequency. The results use representative allowable stress values for each mirror substrate material and construction method and generic material properties. These studies lead to some interesting relationships between feasible designs and the realities of actually trying to build these mirrors. Much of the traditional specifications were developed for much smaller systems, where the mass and volume of the primary where a small portion of the overall satellite. JWST shows us that as

  5. Evolving Design Criteria for Very Large Aperture Space-Based Telescopes and Their Influence on the Need for Integrated Tools in the Optimization Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William R., Sr.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) program has been developing the means to design and build the future generations of space based telescopes. With the nearing completion of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the astrophysics community is already starting to define the requirements for follow on observatories. The restrictions of available launch vehicles and the possibilities of planned future vehicles have fueled the competition between monolithic primaries (with better optical quality) and segmented primaries (with larger apertures, but with diffraction, costs and figure control issues). Regardless of the current shroud sizes and lift capacities, these competing architectures share the need for rapid design tools. As part of the AMTD program a number of tools have been developed and tested to speed up the design process. Starting with the Arnold Mirror Modeler (which creates Finite Element Models (FEM) for structural analysis) and now also feeds these models into thermal stability analyses. They share common file formats and interchangeable results. During the development of the program, numerous trade studies were created for 4 meter and 8 meter monolithic primaries, complete with support systems. Evaluation of these results has led to a better understanding of how the specification drives the results. This paper will show some of the early trade studies for typical specification requirements such as lowest mirror bending frequency and suspension system lowest frequency. The results use representative allowable stress values for each mirror substrate material and construction method and generic material properties. These studies lead to some interesting relationships between feasible designs and the realities of actually trying to build these mirrors. Much of the traditional specifications were developed for much smaller systems, where the mass and volume of the primary where a small portion of the overall satellite. JWST shows us that as

  6. Vitreous seeding from a large optic disc melanocytoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haoyi; Li, Yujun; Chen, Zhao; Guo, Xirang

    2014-09-01

    We report the case of a 17 year-old man with a large optic disc melanocytoma that underwent spontaneous rupture and seeding of the vitreous with pigmented cells. Potential pathogenic mechanisms and visual prognosis of this rare event are discussed. PMID:24897010

  7. CCD AND PIN-CMOS DEVELOPMENTS FOR LARGE OPTICAL TELESCOPE.

    SciTech Connect

    RADEKA, V.

    2006-04-03

    Higher quantum efficiency in near-IR, narrower point spread function and higher readout speed than with conventional sensors have been receiving increased emphasis in the development of CCDs and silicon PIN-CMOS sensors for use in large optical telescopes. Some key aspects in the development of such devices are reviewed.

  8. Integration of optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images to differentiate grassland and alfalfa in Prairie area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Gang; Zhang, Aining; Zhou, Fuqun; Brisco, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Alfalfa presents a huge potential biofuel source in the Prairie Provinces of Canada. However, it remains a challenge to find an ideal single satellite sensor to monitor the regional spatial distribution of alfalfa on an annual basis. The primary interest of this study is to identify alfalfa spatial distribution through effectively differentiating alfalfa from grasslands, given their spectral similarity and same growth calendars. MODIS and RADARSAT-2 ScanSAR narrow mode were selected for regional-level grassland and alfalfa differentiation in the Prairie Provinces, due to the high frequency revisit of MODIS, the weather independence of ScanSAR as well as the large area coverage and the complementary characteristics SAR and optical images. Combining MODIS and ScanSAR in differentiating alfalfa and grassland is very challenging, since there is a large spatial resolution difference between MODIS (250 m) and ScanSAR narrow (50 m). This study investigated an innovative image fusion technique for combining MODIS and ScanSAR and obtaining a synthetic image which has the high spatial details derived from ScanSAR and the colour information from MODIS. The field trip was arranged to collect ground truth to label and validate the classification results. The fusion classification result shows significant accuracy improvement when compared with either ScanSAR or MODIS alone or with other commonly-used data combination methods, such as multiple files composites. This study has shown that the image fusion technique used in this study can combine the structural information from high resolution ScanSAR and colour information from MODIS to significantly improve the classification accuracy between alfalfa and grassland.

  9. Location of Body Wave Microseism Sources Using Three-Component Data From a Large Aperture Seismic Array in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.; Ni, S.; Wang, F.

    2015-12-01

    From September 2013 through October 2014 up to 100 Guralp CMG-3 broadband seismometers were deployed in the WT-Array (WTA) in northwest China. The aperture of WTA is about 700 km, with an average station spacing of approximately 50 km. Here, we process continuous, three-component WTA data to detect and locate body wave microseism sources in four distinct period bands: 1.0-2.5 s, 2.5-5 s, 5-10 s, and 10-20 s. We back-project vertical component data through a 1D reference Earth model (AK135) to a global grid of hypothetical source locations, assuming P-wave (30o-90o), PP-wave (60o-180o), and S-wave (30o-75o) propagation. At the same time, we rotate the horizontals and back-project the radial and transverse components of the wavefield. For each frequency band, grid point, and assumed origin time, the array power is calculated from the amplitude of a windowed, filtered, and tapered time domain beam constructed with fourth-root stacking. We find strong P-wave and S-wave noise sources in the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans. Shorter period sources (2.5-5 s) are mainly observed in the North Pacific Ocean, while both short and long period (2.5-20 s) sources are observed in the North Atlantic Ocean. Median power plots for each month during September 2013 through October 2014 show distinct seasonal variations. The energy peaks in the North Atlantic are visible from November to March and strong energy is also observed in the North Pacific from October to April. We also observe PP-waves in the Southern Ocean, especially for May-August 2014. Using classical f-k analysis and plane-wave propagation, we are able to confirm the back-projection results. To improve our understanding of body wave microseism generation, we compare the observed P, S, and PP wave microseism locations with the predictions of significant wave height and wave-wave interactions derived from the WAVEWATCH III ocean model.From September 2013 through October 2014 up to 100 Guralp CMG-3 broadband

  10. The effect of air flow on the temperature distribution and the harmonic conversion efficiency of the ADP crystal with large aperture in the temperature control scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fuzhong; Zhang, Peng; Lu, Lihua; Xiang, Yong; Bai, Qingshun

    2016-03-01

    This paper presented a temperature control scheme for ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) crystal of Ф80 mm in diameter, and the influence of the air flow was also studied. This research aims to obtain the high energy, high frequency laser with large aperture under the non-critical phase matching (NCPM). Firstly, thermal analysis was carried out to investigate the air flow property in the cavity, as well as the effect of ambient temperature was analyzed. Secondly, the temperature distributions of air flow were achieved using the Finite Volume Method (FVM), and this prediction was validated by the experiment results. Finally, the effect of air flow in the cavity was obtained from the heating method, and the variation of harmonic conversion efficiency caused by the ambient temperature was also highlighted.

  11. Large optical 3D MEMS switches in access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madamopoulos, Nicholas; Kaman, Volkan; Yuan, Shifu; Jerphagnon, Olivier; Helkey, Roger; Bowers, John E.

    2007-09-01

    Interest is high among residential customers and businesses for advanced, broadband services such as fast Internet access, electronic commerce, video-on-demand, digital broadcasting, teleconferencing and telemedicine. In order to satisfy such growing demand of end-customers, access technologies such as fiber-to-the-home/building (FTTH/B) are increasingly being deployed. Carriers can reduce maintenance costs, minimize technology obsolescence and introduce new services easily by reducing active elements in the fiber access network. However, having a passive optical network (PON) also introduces operational and maintenance challenges. Increased diagnostic monitoring capability of the network becomes a necessity as more and more fibers are provisioned to deliver services to the end-customers. This paper demonstrates the clear advantages that large 3D optical MEMS switches offer in solving these access network problems. The advantages in preventative maintenance, remote monitoring, test and diagnostic capability are highlighted. The low optical insertion loss for all switch optical connections of the switch enables the monitoring, grooming and serving of a large number of PON lines and customers. Furthermore, the 3D MEMS switch is transparent to optical wavelengths and data formats, thus making it easy to incorporate future upgrades, such higher bit rates or DWDM overlay to a PON.

  12. Large optics fabrication and testing at the College of Optical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burge, James H.

    2014-10-01

    The origin of the Optical Sciences Center (OSC) at the University of Arizona was closely tied to the need to expand the national capability for manufacturing large optics. This connection allowed OSC to grow quickly to become a truly unique place where new technologies are born and applied and where students have opportunities to apply academic lessons to real-world projects. In the decades that follow, OSC has grown to become a leader in many other optical disciplines, including photonics, imaging, optical engineering, and optical physics. But the core capability of optical fabrication and testing has remained as a unique University of Arizona asset. The last decade has seen explosive growth in development and implementation of new technologies for manufacturing and measuring large optics at the College of Optical Sciences. The classic polishing techniques have given way to advanced computer controlled machines and highly engineered laps. New measuring methods have enabled accurate metrology of steeply aspheric surfaces, concave and convex, symmetric and freeform. This paper discusses the history of optical fabrication and testing at University of Arizona and reviews some recent major projects and the technical developments that have enabled their success.

  13. Vertical interferometer workstation for testing large spherical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truax, B.

    2013-09-01

    The design of an interferometer workstation for the testing of large concave and convex spherical optics is presented. The workstation handles optical components and mounts up to 425 mm in diameter with mass of up to 40 kg with 6 axes of adjustment. A unique method for the implementation of focus, roll and pitch was used allowing for extremely precise adjustment. The completed system includes transmission spheres with f-numbers from f/1.6 to f/0.82 incorporating reference surface diameters of up to 306 mm and surface accuracies of better than 63 nm PVr. The design challenges and resulting solutions are discussed. System performance results are presented.

  14. Large nonlocal nonlinear optical response of castor oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Rogério F.; Alencar, Márcio A. R. C.; Meneghetti, Mario R.; Hickmann, Jandir M.

    2009-09-01

    The nonlocal nonlinearity of castor oil was investigated using the Z-scan technique in the CW regime at 514 nm and in femtosecond regime at 810 nm. Large negative nonlinear refractive indexes of thermal origin, thermo-optical coefficients and degree of nonlocality were obtained for both laser excitation wavelengths. The results indicate that the electronic part of the nonlinear refractive index and nonlinear absorption were negligible. Our results suggest that castor oil is promising candidate as a nonlinear medium for several nonlocal optical applications, such as in spatial soliton propagation, as well as a dispersant agent in the measurement of absorptive properties of nanoparticles.

  15. Wide-band acousto-optic deflectors for large field of view two-photon microscope.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Runhua; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2012-04-01

    Acousto-optic deflector (AOD) is an attractive scanner for two-photon microscopy because it can provide fast and versatile laser scanning and does not involve any mechanical movements. However, due to the small scan range of available AOD, the field of view (FOV) of the AOD-based microscope is typically smaller than that of the conventional galvanometer-based microscope. Here, we developed a novel wide-band AOD to enlarge the scan angle. Considering the maximum acceptable acoustic attenuation in the acousto-optic crystal, relatively lower operating frequencies and moderate aperture were adopted. The custom AOD was able to provide 60 MHz 3-dB bandwidth and 80% peak diffraction efficiency at 840 nm wavelength. Based on a pair of such AOD, a large FOV two-photon microscope was built with a FOV up to 418.5 μm (40× objective). The spatiotemporal dispersion was compensated simultaneously with a single custom-made prism. By means of dynamic power modulation, the variation of laser intensity within the FOV was reduced below 5%. The lateral and axial resolution of the system were 0.58-2.12 μm and 2.17-3.07 μm, respectively. Pollen grain images acquired by this system were presented to demonstrate the imaging capability at different positions across the entire FOV. PMID:22559541

  16. Science and Instrument Design of 1.5-m Aperture Solar Optical Telescope for the SOLAR-C Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suematsu, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ichimoto, K.; Shimizu, T.

    2012-12-01

    We present science cases and a design of one of major instruments for SOLAR-C mission; 1.5-m-class aperture solar ultra-violet visible and near IR observing Telescope (SUVIT). The SOLAR-C mission aims at fully understanding dynamism and magnetic nature of the solar atmosphere by observing small-scale plasma processes and structures. The SUVIT is designed to provide high-angular-resolution investigation of lower atmosphere from the photosphere to the uppermost chromosphere with enhanced spectroscopic and spectro-polarimetric capability covering a wide wavelength region from 280 nm (Mg II h&k) to 1100 nm (He I 1083 nm), using focal plane instruments: wide-band and narrow-band filtergraphs and a spectrograph for high-precision spectro-polarimetry in the solar photospheric and chromospheric lines. We will discuss about instrument design to realize the science cases.

  17. Measuring Large Optical Transmission Matrices of Disordered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hyeonseung; Hillman, Timothy R.; Choi, Wonshik; Lee, Ji Oon; Feld, Michael S.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Park, YongKeun

    2013-10-01

    We report a measurement of the large optical transmission matrix (TM) of a complex turbid medium. The TM is acquired using polarization-sensitive, full-field interferometric microscopy equipped with a rotating galvanometer mirror. It is represented with respect to input and output bases of optical modes, which correspond to plane wave components of the respective illumination and transmitted waves. The modes are sampled so finely in angular spectrum space that their number exceeds the total number of resolvable modes for the illuminated area of the sample. As such, we investigate the singular value spectrum of the TM in order to detect evidence of open transmission channels, predicted by random-matrix theory. Our results comport with theoretical expectations, given the experimental limitations of the system. We consider the impact of these limitations on the usefulness of transmission matrices in optical measurements.

  18. Measuring large optical transmission matrices of disordered media.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hyeonseung; Hillman, Timothy R; Choi, Wonshik; Lee, Ji Oon; Feld, Michael S; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Park, YongKeun

    2013-10-11

    We report a measurement of the large optical transmission matrix (TM) of a complex turbid medium. The TM is acquired using polarization-sensitive, full-field interferometric microscopy equipped with a rotating galvanometer mirror. It is represented with respect to input and output bases of optical modes, which correspond to plane wave components of the respective illumination and transmitted waves. The modes are sampled so finely in angular spectrum space that their number exceeds the total number of resolvable modes for the illuminated area of the sample. As such, we investigate the singular value spectrum of the TM in order to detect evidence of open transmission channels, predicted by random-matrix theory. Our results comport with theoretical expectations, given the experimental limitations of the system. We consider the impact of these limitations on the usefulness of transmission matrices in optical measurements. PMID:24160602

  19. Large optical nonlinearity induced by singlet fission in pentacene films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunlong; Zhang, Chunfeng; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Bo; Tan, Zhanao; Wang, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Min

    2015-05-18

    By creating two triplet excitons from one photo-excited singlet exciton, singlet fission in organic semiconductors has drawn tremendous attention for its potential applications in boosting the efficiency of solar conversion. Here, we show that this carrier-multiplication effect can also be used to dramatically improve the nonlinear optical response in organic materials. We have observed large optical nonlinearity with a magnitude of χ((3)) up to 10(-9) esu in pentacene films, which is further shown to be a result of singlet fission by monitoring the temporal dynamics. The potential application of such efficient nonlinear optical response has been demonstrated with a singlet-fission-induced polarization rotation. PMID:25845461

  20. Deterministic measurement and correction of the pad shape in full-aperture polishing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, D.; Zhang, Q.; Xie, R.; Chen, X.; Zhao, S.; Wang, J.

    2015-11-01

    Full-aperture polishing is a significant process in fabricating large optical flats because it restrains Mid-Spatial Frequency errors and removes material quickly on the whole optic surface. Nevertheless, optical flats fabricated by full-aperture polishing generally fail to meet the stringent requirement of surface figure, which has to be corrected by sub-aperture polishing processes. Surface figure of optical flats in full-aperture polishing processes is primarily dependent on the pressure distribution uniformity which correlates intensively with the lap shape. At present, practical and precise means are urgently desired for measuring and correcting the lap shape, especially the polyurethane pad lap. In the study, we present a novel method for deterministic measurement of the pad shape. The method obtains the height of the pad at spirally distributed locations implemented by the revolution of the pad and translation of the laser displacement sensor. The pad shape in terms of matrixes whose elements representing the heights at the corresponding locations is then calculated by interpolation algorithm based on the obtained data. Further, we propose a method for deterministic correction of the pad shape utilizing a small conditioning tool. The dwell time algorithm and implementation strategy for the dwell time are provided for common full-aperture polishers. These solutions for the deterministic measurement and correction of the pad shape have been validated on a full-aperture polisher with polyurethane pad. The polishing experiments revealed that the optic surface figure was obviously improved.

  1. Optical Storage System for 0.4 mm Substrate Media Using 405 nm Laser Diode and Numerical Aperture 0.60/0.65 Objective Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jungwan; Park, In Sik; Yoon, Du-Seop; Chung, Chong-Sam; Kim, Yoon-Gi; Ro, Myong-Do; Doh, Tae-Yong; Shin, Dong-Ho

    2001-03-01

    The most important application of the blue-laser optical storage system is the recording high-definition digital broadcasting. For this application, the next-generation blue laser optical storage system requires a data capacity of at least 2 h of a digital broadcasting data stream with a data transfer rate of 23.5 megabits per second (Mbps). In addition to the capacity goal, system compatibility with the conventional digital versatile disc (DVD) system as well as the compact disc (CD) system is important. In order to satisfy the requirements of blue-laser optical storage, a system for media with a substrates thickness of 0.4 mm was proposed, and improved molding technology, crosstalk cancellation technology, dynamic tilt compensation technology and quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) modulated wobble addressing method were developed for the system. We confirm the feasibility of the proposed system for media with a 0.4 mm substrate using a 405 nm blue laser diode and objective lens with a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.6 (0.65 for rewritable system).

  2. Pixelized Device Control Actuators for Large Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Gareth J.; Bird, Ross W.; Shea, Brian; Chen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A fully integrated, compact, adaptive space optic mirror assembly has been developed, incorporating new advances in ultralight, high-performance composite mirrors. The composite mirrors use Q-switch matrix architecture-based pixelized control (PMN-PT) actuators, which achieve high-performance, large adaptive optic capability, while reducing the weight of present adaptive optic systems. The self-contained, fully assembled, 11x11x4-in. (approx.= 28x28x10-cm) unit integrates a very-high-performance 8-in. (approx.=20-cm) optic, and has 8-kHz true bandwidth. The assembled unit weighs less than 15 pounds (=6.8 kg), including all mechanical assemblies, power electronics, control electronics, drive electronics, face sheet, wiring, and cabling. It requires just three wires to be attached (power, ground, and signal) for full-function systems integration, and uses a steel-frame and epoxied electronics. The three main innovations are: 1. Ultralightweight composite optics: A new replication method for fabrication of very thin composite 20-cm-diameter laminate face sheets with good as-fabricated optical figure was developed. The approach is a new mandrel resin surface deposition onto previously fabricated thin composite laminates. 2. Matrix (regenerative) power topology: Waveform correction can be achieved across an entire face sheet at 6 kHz, even for large actuator counts. In practice, it was found to be better to develop a quadrant drive, that is, four quadrants of 169 actuators behind the face sheet. Each quadrant has a single, small, regenerative power supply driving all 169 actuators at 8 kHz in effective parallel. 3. Q-switch drive architecture: The Q-switch innovation is at the heart of the matrix architecture, and allows for a very fast current draw into a desired actuator element in 120 counts of a MHz clock without any actuator coupling.

  3. Development of a metrology instrument for mapping the crystallographic axis in large optics

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbard, R L; Liou, L W; Michie, R B; Summers, M D

    1998-10-21

    A metrology instrument has been developed to scan crystals and map the peak tuning angles for frequency conversion from the infrared to the ultra violet over large apertures. The need for such a device emerged from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) program where frequency conversion crystals have been found to have significant crystallographic axis wander at the large NIF aperture size of 4 1 cm square. With only limited access to a large aperture laser system capable of testing these crystals, scientists have been unable to determine which crystal life-cycle components most affect these angular anomalies. A system that can scan crystals with a small diameter probe laser beam and deliver microradian accuracy and repeatability from probe point to probe point is needed. The Crystal Alignment Verification Equipment (CAVE) is the instrument designed to meet these needs and fit into the budget and time constraints of the ongoing NIF development. In order to measure NIF crystals, the CAVE has a workspace of 50 x 50 cm and an angular measurement accuracy of 10 {micro}radians. Other precision requirements are probe beam energy measurement to 2% of peak, thermal control to 20 0. 1°C around the crystal, crystal mounting surface flatness of 1 {micro}m over 40 cm square, and clean operations to Class 100 standards. Crystals are measured in a vertical position in a kinematic mount capable of tuning the crystal to 1 {micro}radian. The mirrors steering the probe beam can be aligned to the same precision. Making tip/tilt mounts with microradian level adjustment is relatively commonplace. The real precision engineering challenge of the CAVE system is maintaining the angular alignment accuracy of the probe laser relative to the crystal for each spatial position to be measured. The design team determined that a precision XY stage with the required workspace and angular accuracy would be prohibitive to develop under the given tight time constraints. Instead the CAVE uses

  4. Large Space Optics: From Hubble to JWST and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    If necessity truly is the mother of invention, then advances in lightweight space mirror technology have been driven by launch vehicle mass and volume constraints. In the late 1970 s, at the start of Hubble development, the state of the art in ground based telescopes was 3 to 4 meter monolithic primary mirrors with masses of 6000 to 10,000 kg - clearly too massive for the planned space shuttle 25,000 kg capability to LEO. Necessity led Hubble to a different solution. Launch vehicle mass constraints (and cost) resulted in the development of a 2.4 meter lightweight eggcrate mirror. At 810 kg (180 kg/m2), this mirror was approximately 7.4% of HST s total 11,110 kg mass. And, the total observatory structure at 4.3 m x 13.2 m fit snuggly inside the space shuttle 4.6 m x 18.3 m payload bay. In the early 1990 s, at the start of JWST development, the state of the art in ground based telescopes was 8 meter class monolithic primary mirrors (16,000 to 23,000 kg) and 10 meter segmented mirrors (14,400 kg). Unfortunately, launch vehicles were still constrained to 4.5 meter payloads and 25,000 kg to LEO or 6,600 kg to L2. Furthermore, science now demanded a space telescope with 6 to 8 meter aperture operating at L2. Mirror technology was identified as a critical capability necessary to enable the next generation of large aperture space telescopes. Specific telescope architectures were explored via three independent design concept studies conducted during the summer of 1996 (1). These studies identified two significant architectural constraints: segmentation and areal density. Because the launch vehicle fairing payload dynamic envelop diameter is approximately 4.5 meters, the only way to launch an 8 meter class mirror is to segment it, fold it and deploy it on orbit - resulting in actuation and control requirements. And, because of launch vehicle mass limits, the primary mirror allocation was only 1000 kg - resulting in a maximum areal density of 20 kg/m2. At the inception of

  5. Power Spectral Density Specification and Analysis of Large Optical Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2009-01-01

    The 2-dimensional Power Spectral Density (PSD) can be used to characterize the mid- and the high-spatial frequency components of the surface height errors of an optical surface. We found it necessary to have a complete, easy-to-use approach for specifying and evaluating the PSD characteristics of large optical surfaces, an approach that allows one to specify the surface quality of a large optical surface based on simulated results using a PSD function and to evaluate the measured surface profile data of the same optic in comparison with those predicted by the simulations during the specification-derivation process. This paper provides a complete mathematical description of PSD error, and proposes a new approach in which a 2-dimentional (2D) PSD is converted into a 1-dimentional (1D) one by azimuthally averaging the 2D-PSD. The 1D-PSD calculated this way has the same unit and the same profile as the original PSD function, thus allows one to compare the two with each other directly.

  6. High-speed optical switch fabrics with large port count.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Yong-Kee; Xu, Zhaowen; Wang, Dawei; Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Yixin; Cheng, Tee-Hiang

    2009-06-22

    We report a novel architecture that can be used to construct optical switch fabrics with very high port count and nanoseconds switching speed. It is well known that optical switch fabrics with very fast switching time and high port count are challenging to realize. Currently, one of the most promising solutions is based on a combination of wavelength-tunable lasers and the arrayed waveguide grating router (AWGR). To scale up the number of ports in such switches, a direct method is to use AWGRs with a high channel count. However, such AWGRs introduce very large crosstalk noise due to the close wavelength channel spacing. In this paper, we propose an architecture for realizing a high-port count optical switch fabric using a combination of low-port count AWGRs, optical ON-OFF gates and WDM couplers. Using this new methodology, we constructed a proof-of concept experiment to demonstrate the feasibility of a 256 x 256 optical switch fabric. To our knowledge, this port count is the highest ever reported for switch fabrics of this type. PMID:19550498

  7. Adaptive Optics Control Strategies for Extremely Large Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D T

    2001-07-26

    Adaptive optics for the 30-100 meter class telescopes now being considered will require an extension in almost every area of AO system component technology. In this paper, we present scaling laws and strawman error budgets for AO systems on extremely large telescopes (ELTs) and discuss the implications for component technology and computational architecture. In the component technology area, we discuss the advanced efforts being pursued at the NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) in the development of large number of degrees of freedom deformable mirrors, wavefront sensors, and guidestar lasers. It is important to note that the scaling of present wavefront reconstructor algorithms will become computationally intractable for ELTs and will require the development of new algorithms and advanced numerical mathematics techniques. We present the computational issues and discuss the characteristics of new algorithmic approaches that show promise in scaling to ELT AO systems.

  8. Synthetic Aperture Radiometer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.

    1999-01-01

    Aperture synthesis is a new technology for passive microwave remote sensing from space which has the potential to overcome the limitations set in the past by antenna size. This is an interferometric technique in which pairs of small antennas and signal processing are used to obtain the resolution of a single large antenna. The technique has been demonstrated successfully at L-band with the aircraft prototype instrument, ESTAR. Proposals have been submitted to demonstrate this technology in space (HYDROSTAR and MIRAS).

  9. Precision large field scanning system for high numerical aperture lenses and application to femtosecond micromachining of ophthalmic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, D. R.; Brown, N. S.; Savage, D. E.; Wang, C.; Knox, W. H.; Ellis, J. D.

    2014-06-01

    A precision, large stroke (nearly 1 cm) scanning system was designed, built, and calibrated for micromachining of ophthalmic materials including hydrogels and cornea (excised and in vivo). This system comprises a flexure stage with an attached objective on stacked vertical and horizontal translation stages. This paper outlines the design process leading to our most current version including the specifications that were used in the design and the drawbacks of other methods that were previously used. Initial measurements of the current version are also given. The current flexure was measured to have a 27 Hz natural frequency with no load.

  10. Plasmonic nanofocusing with a metallic pyramid and an integrated C-shaped aperture

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Nathan C.; Johnson, Timothy W.; Nagpal, Prashant; Norris, David J.; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the design, fabrication and characterization of a near-field plasmonic nanofocusing probe with a hybrid tip-plus-aperture design. By combining template stripping with focused ion beam lithography, a variety of aperture-based near-field probes can be fabricated with high optical performance. In particular, the combination of large transmission through a C-shaped aperture aligned to the sharp apex (<10 nm radius) of a template-stripped metallic pyramid allows the efficient delivery of light—via the C-shaped aperture—while providing a nanometric hotspot determined by the sharpness of the tip itself. PMID:23676841

  11. Planetary Remote Sensing Science Enabled by MIDAS (Multiple Instrument Distributed Aperture Sensor)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitman, Joe; Duncan, Alan; Stubbs, David; Sigler, Robert; Kendrick, Rick; Chilese, John; Lipps, Jere; Manga, Mike; Graham, James; dePater, Imke

    2004-01-01

    The science capabilities and features of an innovative and revolutionary approach to remote sensing imaging systems, aimed at increasing the return on future space science missions many fold, are described. Our concept, called Multiple Instrument Distributed Aperture Sensor (MIDAS), provides a large-aperture, wide-field, diffraction-limited telescope at a fraction of the cost, mass and volume of conventional telescopes, by integrating optical interferometry technologies into a mature multiple aperture array concept that addresses one of the highest needs for advancing future planetary science remote sensing.

  12. Wave-front aberrations analysis by Zernike polynomials based on the annular sub-aperture stitching system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lei; Hui, Mei; Deng, Jiayuan; Gong, Cheng; Zhao, Yuejin

    2012-11-01

    Annular sub-aperture stitching method was developed for testing large-aperture aspheric surfaces without using of any compensating element for measurement. It is necessary to correct measurement of aspheric optical aberrations and create mathematical description to describe wave-front aberrations. Zernike polynomials are suitable to describe wave aberration functions and data fitting of experimental measurements for the annular sub-aperture stitching system. This paper uses Zernike polynomials to describe the wave-front aberrations of full wave-front and reconstructed wave-front by annular sub-aperture stitching algorithm. At the same time, the imaging quality of the aspheric optical element can be contrasted. The stitching result shows good agreement with the full aperture result.

  13. Large aperture Fizeau interferometer commissioning and preliminary measurements of a long x-ray mirror at European X-ray Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannoni, M.; Freijo Martín, I.

    2016-05-01

    The European XFEL (X-ray Free Electron Laser) is a large facility under construction in Hamburg, Germany. It will provide a transversally fully coherent x-ray radiation with outstanding characteristics: high repetition rate (up to 2700 pulses with a 0.6 ms long pulse train at 10 Hz), short wavelength (down to 0.05 nm), short pulse (in the femtoseconds scale), and high average brilliance (1.6 ṡ 1025 (photons s-1 mm-2 mrad-2)/0.1% bandwidth). The beam has very high pulse energy; therefore, it has to be spread out on a relatively long mirror (about 1 m). Due to the very short wavelength, the mirrors need to have a high quality surface on their entire length, and this is considered very challenging even with the most advanced polishing methods. In order to measure the mirrors and to characterize their interaction with the mechanical mount, we equipped a metrology laboratory with a large aperture Fizeau interferometer. The system is a classical 100 mm diameter commercial Fizeau, with an additional expander providing a 300 mm diameter beam. Despite the commercial nature of the system, special care has been taken in the polishing of the reference flats and in the expander quality. We report the first commissioning of the instrument, its calibration, and performance characterization, together with some preliminary results with the measurement of a 950 mm silicon substrate. The intended application is to characterize the final XFEL mirrors with nanometer accuracy.

  14. Fast Optical Transillumination Tomography with Large-Size Projection Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Xia, Jinjun; Haidekker, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Techniques such as optical coherence tomography and diffuse optical tomography have been shown to effectively image highly scattering samples such as tissue. An additional modality has received much less attention: Optical transillumination tomography (OT), a modality that promises very high acquisition speed for volumetric scans. With the motivation to image tissue-engineered blood vessels for possible biomechanical testing, we have developed a fast OT device using a collimated, non-coherent beam with a large diameter together with a large-size CMOS camera that has the ability to acquire 3D projections in a single revolution of the sample. In addition, we used accelerated iterative reconstruction techniques to improve image reconstruction speed, while at the same time obtaining better image quality than through filtered back projection. The device was tested using ink-filled PTFE tubes to determine geometric reconstruction accuracy and recovery of absorbance. Even in the presence of minor refractive index mismatch, the weighted error of the measured radius was less than 5% in all cases, and a high linear correlation of ink absorbance determined with a photospectrometer of R 2 =0.99 was found, although the OT device systematically underestimated absorbance. Reconstruction time was improved from several hours (standard arithmetic reconstruction) to 90 seconds per slice with our optimized algorithm. Composed of only a light source, two spatial filters, a sample bath, and a CMOS camera, this device was extremely simple and cost-efficient to build. PMID:18704687

  15. Fast figuring of large optics by reactive atom plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Marco; Jourdain, Renaud; Morantz, Paul; Shore, Paul

    2012-09-01

    The next generation of ground-based astronomical observatories will require fabrication and maintenance of extremely large segmented mirrors tens of meters in diameter. At present, the large production of segments required by projects like E-ELT and TMT poses time frames and costs feasibility questions. This is principally due to a bottleneck stage in the optical fabrication chain: the final figuring step. State-of-the-art figure correction techniques, so far, have failed to meet the needs of the astronomical community for mass production of large, ultra-precise optical surfaces. In this context, Reactive Atom Plasma (RAP) is proposed as a candidate figuring process that combines nanometer level accuracy with high material removal rates. RAP is a form of plasma enhanced chemical etching at atmospheric pressure based on Inductively Coupled Plasma technology. The rapid figuring capability of the RAP process has already been proven on medium sized optical surfaces made of silicon based materials. In this paper, the figure correction of a 3 meters radius of curvature, 400 mm diameter spherical ULE mirror is presented. This work demonstrates the large scale figuring capability of the Reactive Atom Plasma process. The figuring is carried out by applying an in-house developed procedure that promotes rapid convergence. A 2.3 μm p-v initial figure error is removed within three iterations, for a total processing time of 2.5 hours. The same surface is then re-polished and the residual error corrected again down to λ/20 nm rms. These results highlight the possibility of figuring a metre-class mirror in about ten hours.

  16. LIGHT MODULATION: Wide-aperture diffraction of unpolarised radiation in a system of two acousto-optic filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdich, L. N.; Yushkov, K. B.; Voloshinov, V. B.

    2009-04-01

    Light diffraction is studied in two tandem acousto-optic cells filtering unpolarised radiation with a wide angular spectrum. It is shown that the side lobes of the ultrasonic radiation pattern of a piezoelectric transducer produce side diffraction intensity maxima at the output of the system consisting of two filters. Diffraction in paratellurite filters is studied experimentally at 1.06 μm.

  17. Optimum synthetic-aperture imaging of extended astronomical objects.

    PubMed

    van der Avoort, Casper; Pereira, Silvania F; Braat, Joseph J M; den Herder, Jan-Willem

    2007-04-01

    In optical aperture-synthesis imaging of stellar objects, different beam combination strategies are used and proposed. Coaxial Michelson interferometers are very common and a homothetic multiaxial interferometer is recently realized in the Large Binocular Telescope. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated the working principles of two new approaches: densified pupil imaging and wide field-of-view (FOV) coaxial imaging using a staircase-shaped mirror. We develop a common mathematical formulation for direct comparison of the resolution and noise sensitivity of these four telescope configurations for combining beams from multiple apertures for interferometric synthetic aperture, wide-FOV imaging. Singular value decomposition techniques are used to compare the techniques and observe their distinct signal-to-noise ratio behaviors. We conclude that for a certain chosen stellar object, clear differences in performance of the imagers are identifiable. PMID:17361290

  18. Optical Distortion Evaluation in Large Area Windows using Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Skow, Miles; Nurge, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    It is important that imagery seen through large area windows, such as those used on space vehicles, not be substantially distorted. Many approaches are described in the literature for measuring the distortion of an optical window, but most suffer from either poor resolution or processing difficulties. In this paper a new definition of distortion is presented, allowing accurate measurement using an optical interferometer. This new definition is shown to be equivalent to the definitions provided by the military and the standards organizations. In order to determine the advantages and disadvantages of this new approach the distortion of an acrylic window is measured using three different methods; image comparison, Moiré interferometry, and phase-shifting interferometry.

  19. A systematic review of aperture shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, A. B.; Frazier, T. V.

    The paper discusses the application of apodization to reflecting telescopes. The diffraction pattern of a telescope, which is the image of a star, can be changed considerably by using different aperture shapes in combination with appropriately shaped occulting masks on the optical axis. Aperture shapes studied were the circular, square, and hexagonal. Polaris (α-UMin) was used as the test system.

  20. Large dynamic range optical vector analyzer based on optical single-sideband modulation and Hilbert transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Min; Pan, Shilong; Zhao, Yongjiu

    2016-07-01

    A large dynamic range optical vector analyzer (OVA) based on optical single-sideband modulation is proposed and demonstrated. By dividing the optical signal after optical device under test into two paths, reversing the phase of one swept sideband using a Hilbert transformer in one path, and detecting the two signals from the two paths with a balanced photodetector, the measurement errors induced by the residual -1st-order sideband and the high-order sidebands can be eliminated and the dynamic range of the measurement is increased. In a proof-of-concept experiment, the stimulated Brillouin scattering and a fiber Bragg grating are measured by OVAs with and without the Hilbert transform and balanced photodetection. Results show that about 40-dB improvement in the measurement dynamic range is realized by the proposed OVA.