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Sample records for large arf1 guanine

  1. Filamin A regulates neuronal migration through brefeldin A-inhibited guanine exchange factor 2-dependent Arf1 activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingping; Neal, Jason; Lian, Gewei; Hu, Jianjun; Lu, Jie; Sheen, Volney

    2013-10-01

    Periventricular heterotopias is a malformation of cortical development, characterized by ectopic neuronal nodules around ventricle lining and caused by an initial migration defect during early brain development. Human mutations in the Filamin A (FLNA) and ADP-ribosylation factor guanine exchange factor 2 [ARFGEF2; encoding brefeldin-A-inhibited guanine exchange factor-2 (BIG2)] genes give rise to this disorder. Previously, we have reported that Big2 inhibition impairs neuronal migration and binds to FlnA, and its loss promotes FlnA phosphorylation. FlnA phosphorylation dictates FlnA-actin binding affinity and consequently alters focal adhesion size and number to effect neuronal migration. Here we show that FlnA loss similarly impairs migration, reciprocally enhances Big2 expression, but also alters Big2 subcellular localization in both null and conditional FlnA mice. FlnA phosphorylation promotes relocalization of Big2 from the Golgi toward the lipid ruffles, thereby activating Big2-dependent Arf1 at the cell membrane. Loss of FlnA phosphorylation or Big2 function impairs Arf1-dependent vesicle trafficking at the periphery, and Arf1 is required for maintenance of cell-cell junction connectivity and focal adhesion assembly. Loss of Arf1 activity disrupts neuronal migration and cell adhesion. Collectively, these studies demonstrate a potential mechanism whereby coordinated interactions between actin (through FlnA) and vesicle trafficking (through Big2-Arf) direct the assembly and disassembly of membrane protein complexes required for neuronal migration and neuroependymal integrity. PMID:24089482

  2. The Sec7 N-terminal regulatory domains facilitate membrane-proximal activation of the Arf1 GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Brian C; Halaby, Steve L; Gustafson, Margaret A; Fromme, J Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi complex is the central sorting compartment of eukaryotic cells. Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors (Arf-GEFs) regulate virtually all traffic through the Golgi by activating Arf GTPase trafficking pathways. The Golgi Arf-GEFs contain multiple autoregulatory domains, but the precise mechanisms underlying their function remain largely undefined. We report a crystal structure revealing that the N-terminal DCB and HUS regulatory domains of the Arf-GEF Sec7 form a single structural unit. We demonstrate that the established role of the N-terminal region in dimerization is not conserved; instead, a C-terminal autoinhibitory domain is responsible for dimerization of Sec7. We find that the DCB/HUS domain amplifies the ability of Sec7 to activate Arf1 on the membrane surface by facilitating membrane insertion of the Arf1 amphipathic helix. This enhancing function of the Sec7 N-terminal domains is consistent with the high rate of Arf1-dependent trafficking to the plasma membrane necessary for maximal cell growth. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12411.001 PMID:26765562

  3. Arf1 and Arf6 Promote Ventral Actin Structures formed by acute Activation of Protein Kinase C and Src

    PubMed Central

    Caviston, Juliane P.; Cohen, Lee Ann; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2016-01-01

    Arf proteins regulate membrane traffic and organelle structure. Although Arf6 is known to initiate actin-based changes in cell surface architecture, Arf1 may also function at the plasma membrane. Here we show that acute activation of protein kinase C (PKC) induced by the phorbol ester PMA led to the formation of motile actin structures on the ventral surface of Beas-2b cells, a lung bronchial epithelial cell line. Ventral actin structures also formed in PMA-treated HeLa cells that had elevated levels of Arf activation. For both cell types, formation of the ventral actin structures was enhanced by expression of active forms of either Arf1 or Arf6, and by the expression of guanine nucleotide exchange factors that activate these Arfs. By contrast, formation of these structures was blocked by inhibitors of PKC and Src, and required phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate, Rac, Arf6 and Arf1. Furthermore, expression of ASAP1, an Arf1 GTPase activating protein (GAP) was more effective at inhibiting the ventral actin structures than was ACAP1, an Arf6 GAP. This study adds to the expanding role for Arf1 in the periphery and identifies a requirement for Arf1, a “Golgi Arf”, in the reorganization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton on ventral surfaces, against the substratum. PMID:24916416

  4. Mouse Hepatitis Coronavirus RNA Replication Depends on GBF1-Mediated ARF1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Verheije, Monique H.; Raaben, Matthijs; Mari, Muriel; te Lintelo, Eddie G.; Reggiori, Fulvio; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.; Rottier, Peter J. M.; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Coronaviruses induce in infected cells the formation of double membrane vesicles, which are the sites of RNA replication. Not much is known about the formation of these vesicles, although recent observations indicate an important role for the endoplasmic reticulum in the formation of the mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) replication complexes (RCs). We now show that MHV replication is sensitive to brefeldin A (BFA). Consistently, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of ARF1, known to mimic the action of the drug, inhibited MHV infection profoundly. Immunofluorescence analysis and quantitative electron microscopy demonstrated that BFA did not block the formation of RCs per se, but rather reduced their number. MHV RNA replication was not sensitive to BFA in MDCK cells, which are known to express the BFA-resistant guanine nucleotide exchange factor GBF1. Accordingly, individual knockdown of the Golgi-resident targets of BFA by transfection of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) showed that GBF1, but not BIG1 or BIG2, was critically involved in MHV RNA replication. ARF1, the cellular effector of GBF1, also appeared to be involved in MHV replication, as siRNAs targeting this small GTPase inhibited MHV infection significantly. Collectively, our results demonstrate that GBF1-mediated ARF1 activation is required for efficient MHV RNA replication and reveal that the early secretory pathway and MHV replication complex formation are closely connected. PMID:18551169

  5. The small GTPase Arf1 modulates mitochondrial morphology and function

    PubMed Central

    Ackema, Karin B; Hench, Jürgen; Böckler, Stefan; Wang, Shyi Chyi; Sauder, Ursula; Mergentaler, Heidi; Westermann, Benedikt; Bard, Frédéric; Frank, Stephan; Spang, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The small GTPase Arf1 plays critical roles in membrane traffic by initiating the recruitment of coat proteins and by modulating the activity of lipid-modifying enzymes. Here, we report an unexpected but evolutionarily conserved role for Arf1 and the ArfGEF GBF1 at mitochondria. Loss of function of ARF-1 or GBF-1 impaired mitochondrial morphology and activity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Similarly, mitochondrial defects were observed in mammalian and yeast cells. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aberrant clusters of the mitofusin Fzo1 accumulated in arf1-11 mutants and were resolved by overexpression of Cdc48, an AAA-ATPase involved in ER and mitochondria-associated degradation processes. Yeast Arf1 co-fractionated with ER and mitochondrial membranes and interacted genetically with the contact site component Gem1. Furthermore, similar mitochondrial abnormalities resulted from knockdown of either GBF-1 or contact site components in worms, suggesting that the role of Arf1 in mitochondrial functioning is linked to ER–mitochondrial contacts. Thus, Arf1 is involved in mitochondrial homeostasis and dynamics, independent of its role in vesicular traffic. PMID:25190516

  6. The Drosophila Arf1 homologue Arf79F is essential for lamellipodium formation.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Daniel; Liu, Tao; Davidson, Anthony C; Hume, Peter J; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2012-12-01

    The WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) drives the polymerisation of actin filaments located beneath the plasma membrane to generate lamellipodia that are pivotal to cell architecture and movement. By reconstituting WRC-dependent actin assembly at the membrane, we recently discovered that several classes of Arf family GTPases directly recruit and activate WRC in cell extracts, and that Arf cooperates with Rac1 to trigger actin polymerisation. Here, we demonstrate that the Class 1 Arf1 homologue Arf79F colocalises with the WRC at dynamic lamellipodia. We report that Arf79F is required for lamellipodium formation in Drosophila S2R+ cells, which only express one Arf isoform for each class. Impeding Arf function either by dominant-negative Arf expression or by Arf double-stranded RNA interference (dsRNAi)-mediated knockdown uncovered that Arf-dependent lamellipodium formation was specific to Arf79F, establishing that Class 1 Arfs, but not Class 2 or Class 3 Arfs, are crucial for lamellipodia. Lamellipodium formation in Arf79F-silenced cells was restored by expressing mammalian Arf1, but not by constitutively active Rac1, showing that Arf79F does not act via Rac1. Abolition of lamellipodium formation in Arf79F-silenced cells was not due to Golgi disruption. Blocking Arf79F activation with guanine nucleotide exchange factor inhibitors impaired WRC localisation to the plasma membrane and concomitant generation of lamellipodia. Our data indicate that the Class I Arf GTPase is a central component in WRC-driven lamellipodium formation. PMID:22992458

  7. Biochemical methods for studying kinetic regulation of Arf1 activation by Sec7

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Brian C.; Fromme, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The Arf family of small GTPases regulates vesicular transport at several locations within the cell, and is in turn regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) via a conserved catalytic domain, termed the Sec7 domain. The catalytic activity of the Sec7 domain is well characterized in the context of a few GEFs acting at the periphery of the cell. This chapter describes techniques used to extend biochemical analysis of activity to the much larger GEFs acting on the Arf family in the core secretory pathway, using the activity of S. cerevisiae Sec7 on Arf1, regulating export from the trans-Golgi network (TGN), as a model. Complete methods for purification to near-homogeneity of all proteins required, including several Sec7 constructs and multiple relevant small GTPases, are detailed. These are followed by methods for quantification of the nucleotide exchange activity of Sec7 in a physiologically relevant context, including modifications required to dissect the signal integration functions of Sec7 as an effector of several other small GTPases, and methods for identifying stable Sec7-small GTPase interactions in the presence of membranes. These techniques may be extended to analysis of similar members of the Sec7 GEF subfamily in other species and acting elsewhere in the secretory pathway. PMID:26360031

  8. IGF-1 drives chromogranin A secretion via activation of Arf1 in human neuroendocrine tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Münzberg, Christin; Höhn, Katharina; Krndija, Denis; Maaß, Ulrike; Bartsch, Detlef K; Slater, Emily P; Oswald, Franz; Walther, Paul; Seufferlein, Thomas; von Wichert, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Hypersecretion is the major symptom of functional neuroendocrine tumours. The mechanisms that contribute to this excessive secretion of hormones are still elusive. A key event in secretion is the exit of secretory products from the Golgi apparatus. ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are known to control vesicle budding and trafficking, and have a leading function in the regulation of formation of secretory granula at the Golgi. Here, we show that Arf1 is the predominant Arf protein family member expressed in the neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines BON and QGP-1. In BON cells Arf1 colocalizes with Golgi markers as well as chromogranin A, and shows significant basal activity. The inhibition of Arf1 activity or expression significantly impaired secretion of chromogranin A. Furthermore, we show that the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a major regulator of growth and secretion in BON cells, induces Arf1 activity. We found that activation of Arf1 upon IGF-1 receptor stimulation is mediated by MEK/ERK signalling pathway in BON and QGP-1 cells. Moreover, the activity of Arf1 in BON cells is mediated by autocrinely secreted IGF-1, and concomitantly, autocrine IGF1 secretion is maintained by Arf1 activity. In summary, our data indicate an important regulatory role for Arf1 at the Golgi in hypersecretion in neuroendocrine cancer cells. PMID:25754106

  9. Recruitment of PI4KIIIβ to Coxsackievirus B3 Replication Organelles Is Independent of ACBD3, GBF1, and Arf1

    PubMed Central

    Dorobantu, Cristina M.; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Ford, Lauren A.; Strating, Jeroen R. P. M.; Ulferts, Rachel; Fang, Ying; Belov, George

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the Enterovirus (poliovirus [PV], coxsackieviruses, and human rhinoviruses) and Kobuvirus (Aichi virus) genera in the Picornaviridae family rely on PI4KIIIβ (phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase IIIβ) for efficient replication. The small membrane-anchored enteroviral protein 3A recruits PI4KIIIβ to replication organelles, yet the underlying mechanism has remained elusive. Recently, it was shown that kobuviruses recruit PI4KIIIβ through interaction with ACBD3 (acyl coenzyme A [acyl-CoA]-binding protein domain 3), a novel interaction partner of PI4KIIIβ. Therefore, we investigated a possible role for ACBD3 in recruiting PI4KIIIβ to enterovirus replication organelles. Although ACBD3 interacted directly with coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) 3A, its depletion from cells by RNA interference did not affect PI4KIIIβ recruitment to replication organelles and did not impair CVB3 RNA replication. Enterovirus 3A was previously also proposed to recruit PI4KIIIβ via GBF1/Arf1, based on the known interaction of 3A with GBF1, an important regulator of secretory pathway transport and a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) of Arf1. However, our results demonstrate that inhibition of GBF1 or Arf1 either by pharmacological inhibition or depletion with small interfering RNA (siRNA) treatment did not affect the ability of 3A to recruit PI4KIIIβ. Furthermore, we show that a 3A mutant that no longer binds GBF1 was capable of recruiting PI4KIIIβ, even in ACBD3-depleted cells. Together, our findings indicate that unlike originally envisaged, coxsackievirus recruits PI4KIIIβ to replication organelles independently of ACBD3 and GBF1/Arf1. IMPORTANCE A hallmark of enteroviral infection is the generation of new membranous structures to support viral RNA replication. The functionality of these “replication organelles” depends on the concerted actions of both viral nonstructural proteins and co-opted host factors. It is thus essential to understand how these structures are

  10. Membrane curvature induced by Arf1-GTP is essential for vesicle formation

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Rainer; Sun, Zhe; Adolf, Frank; Rutz, Chistoph; Bassler, Jochen; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard; Hurt, Ed; Brügger, Britta; Béthune, Julien; Wieland, Felix

    2008-01-01

    The GTPase Arf1 is considered as a molecular switch that regulates binding and release of coat proteins that polymerize on membranes to form transport vesicles. Here, we show that Arf1-GTP induces positive membrane curvature and find that the small GTPase can dimerize dependent on GTP. Investigating a possible link between Arf dimerization and curvature formation, we isolated an Arf1 mutant that cannot dimerize. Although it was capable of exerting the classical role of Arf1 as a coat receptor, it could not mediate the formation of COPI vesicles from Golgi-membranes and was lethal when expressed in yeast. Strikingly, this mutant was not able to deform membranes, suggesting that GTP-induced dimerization of Arf1 is a critical step inducing membrane curvature during the formation of coated vesicles. PMID:18689681

  11. A role for Arf1 in mitotic Golgi disassembly, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Altan-Bonnet, Nihal; Phair, Robert D.; Polishchuk, Roman S.; Weigert, Roberto; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    In mitosis, chromosome, cytoskeleton, and organelle dynamics must be coordinated for successful cell division. Here, we present evidence for a role for Arf1, a small GTPase associated with the Golgi apparatus, in the orchestration of mitotic Golgi breakdown, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis. We show that early in mitosis Arf1 becomes inactive and dissociates from Golgi membranes. This is followed by the dispersal of numerous Arf1-dependent peripheral Golgi proteins and subsequent Golgi disassembly. If Arf1 is kept in an active state by treatment with the small molecule H89 or expression of its GTP-locked form, intact Golgi membranes with bound peripheral proteins persist throughout mitosis. These cells enter mitosis but exhibit gross defects in chromosome segregation and cytokinetic furrow ingression. These findings suggest that mitotic Golgi disassembly depends on Arf1 inactivation and is used by the cell to disperse numerous peripheral Golgi proteins for coordinating the behavior of Golgi membranes, chromosomes, and cytoskeleton during mitosis. PMID:14585930

  12. The leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor LARG is required for efficient replication stress signaling

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Ryan D; Staples, Christopher J; Patil, Abhijit A; Myers, Katie N; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J Mark; Boulton, Simon J; Collis, Spencer J

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified and characterized TELO2 as a human protein that facilitates efficient DNA damage response (DDR) signaling. A subsequent yeast 2-hybrid screen identified LARG; Leukemia-Associated Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (also known as Arhgef12), as a potential novel TELO2 interactor. LARG was previously shown to interact with Pericentrin (PCNT), which, like TELO2, is required for efficient replication stress signaling. Here we confirm interactions between LARG, TELO2 and PCNT and show that a sub-set of LARG co-localizes with PCNT at the centrosome. LARG-deficient cells exhibit replication stress signaling defects as evidenced by; supernumerary centrosomes, reduced replication stress-induced γH2AX and RPA nuclear foci formation, and reduced activation of the replication stress signaling effector kinase Chk1 in response to hydroxyurea. As such, LARG-deficient cells are sensitive to replication stress-inducing agents such as hydroxyurea and mitomycin C. Conversely we also show that depletion of TELO2 and the replication stress signaling kinase ATR leads to RhoA signaling defects. These data therefore reveal a level of crosstalk between the RhoA and DDR signaling pathways. Given that mutations in both ATR and PCNT can give rise to the related primordial dwarfism disorders of Seckel Syndrome and Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPDII) respectively, which both exhibit defects in ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling, these data also raise the possibility that mutations in LARG or disruption to RhoA signaling may be contributory factors to the etiology of a sub-set of primordial dwarfism disorders. PMID:25485589

  13. ARF1 activation dissociates ADRP from lipid droplets to promote HCV assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Yin, Peiqi; Zhou, Liya; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Leiliang

    2016-06-17

    Lipid droplets are the place for HCV assembly and ADRP is an abundant lipid droplets-associated protein. However, little is known about the mechanisms how ADRP is involved in HCV life cycle. Here we demonstrate that activation of ARF1 dissociates ADRP from lipid droplets. A constitute active form of ARF1 (ARF1Q71I) promotes HCV assembly. We found that ADRP plays a positive role in HCV replication and a negative role in HCV assembly. Overexpression of ADRP increases the size of lipid droplets, while silencing ADRP reduces the size of lipid droplets. These findings provide new insight into the role of lipid droplets proteins in life cycle of HCV. PMID:27157138

  14. The clathrin adaptor AP-1 complex and Arf1 regulate planar cell polarity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Meg; Dussert, Aurore; Collu, Giovanna; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Weber, Ursula; Ciruna, Brian; Mlodzik, Marek

    2015-01-01

    A key step in generating planar cell polarity (PCP) is the formation of restricted junctional domains containing Frizzled/Dishevelled/Diego (Fz/Dsh/Dgo) or Van Gogh/Prickle (Vang/Pk) complexes within the same cell, stabilized via Flamingo (Fmi) across cell membranes. Although models have been proposed for how these complexes acquire and maintain their polarized localization, the machinery involved in moving core PCP proteins around cells remains unknown. We describe the AP-1 adaptor complex and Arf1 as major regulators of PCP protein trafficking in vivo. AP-1 and Arf1 disruption affects the accumulation of Fz/Fmi and Vang/Fmi complexes in the proximo–distal axis, producing severe PCP phenotypes. Using novel tools, we demonstrate a direct and specific Arf1 involvement in Fz trafficking in vivo. Moreover, we uncover a conserved Arf1 PCP function in vertebrates. Our data support a model whereby the trafficking machinery plays an important part during PCP establishment, promoting formation of polarized PCP-core complexes in vivo. PMID:25849195

  15. Kinetic analysis of GTP hydrolysis catalysed by the Arf1-GTP–ASAP1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ruibai; Ahvazi, Bijan; Amariei, Diana; Shroder, Deborah; Burrola, Beatriz; Losert, Wolfgang; Randazzo, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) GAPs (GTPase-activating proteins) are enzymes that catalyse the hydrolysis of GTP bound to the small GTP-binding protein Arf. They have also been proposed to function as Arf effectors and oncogenes. We have set out to characterize the kinetics of the GAP-induced GTP hydrolysis using a truncated form of ASAP1 [Arf GAP with SH3 (Src homology 3) domain, ankyrin repeats and PH (pleckstrin homology) domains 1] as a model. We found that ASAP1 used Arf1-GTP as a substrate with a kcat of 57±5 s−1 and a Km of 2.2±0.5 μM determined by steady-state kinetics and a kcat of 56±7 s−1 determined by single-turnover kinetics. Tetrafluoroaluminate (AlF4−), which stabilizes complexes of other Ras family members with their cognate GAPs, also stabilized a complex of Arf1-GDP with ASAP1. As anticipated, mutation of Arg-497 to a lysine residue affected kcat to a much greater extent than Km. Changing Trp-479, Iso-490, Arg-505, Leu-511 or Asp-512 was predicted, based on previous studies, to affect affinity for Arf1-GTP. Instead, these mutations primarily affected the kcat. Mutants that lacked activity in vitro similarly lacked activity in an in vivo assay of ASAP1 function, the inhibition of dorsal ruffle formation. Our results support the conclusion that the Arf GAP ASAP1 functions in binary complex with Arf1-GTP to induce a transition state towards GTP hydrolysis. The results have led us to speculate that Arf1-GTP–ASAP1 undergoes a significant conformational change when transitioning from the ground to catalytically active state. The ramifications for the putative effector function of ASAP1 are discussed. PMID:17112341

  16. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression of human ADP-ribosylation factors: two guanine nucleotide-dependent activators of cholera toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Bobak, D A; Nightingale, M S; Murtagh, J J; Price, S R; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1989-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are small guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that enhance the enzymatic activities of cholera toxin. Two ARF cDNAs, ARF1 and ARF3, were cloned from a human cerebellum library. Based on deduced amino acid sequences and patterns of hybridization of cDNA and oligonucleotide probes with mammalian brain poly(A)+ RNA, human ARF1 is the homologue of bovine ARF1. Human ARF3, which differs from bovine ARF1 and bovine ARF2, appears to represent a newly identified third type of ARF. Hybridization patterns of human ARF cDNA and clone-specific oligonucleotides with poly(A)+ RNA are consistent with the presence of at least two, and perhaps four, separate ARF messages in human brain. In vitro translation of ARF1, ARF2, and ARF3 produced proteins that behaved, by SDS/PAGE, similar to a purified soluble brain ARF. Deduced amino acid sequences of human ARF1 and ARF3 contain regions, similar to those in other G proteins, that are believed to be involved in GTP binding and hydrolysis. ARFs also exhibit a modest degree of homology with a bovine phospholipase C. The observations reported here support the conclusion that the ARFs are members of a multigene family of small guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Definition of the regulation of ARF mRNAs and of function(s) of recombinant ARF proteins will aid in the elucidation of the physiologic role(s) of ARFs. Images PMID:2474826

  17. Differential expression during development of ADP-ribosylation factors, 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding protein activators of cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Tsuchiya, M; Chang, P P; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1991-05-01

    Cholera toxin exerts its effects on cells in large part through the ADP-ribosylation of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation is enhanced by approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins termed ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), which are allosteric activators of the toxin catalytic unit. Rabbit antiserum against a purified bovine brain ARF (sARF II) reacted on immunoblots with two approximately 20-kDa ARF-like proteins (sARF I and II) in tissue extracts from bovine, rat, frog, and chicken. Levels of ARF were higher in brain than in non-neural tissues. In rat brain, on the second postnatal day, amounts of sARF I and II were similar. By the 10th postnatal day and thereafter, sARF II predominated. Relative levels of ARF determined by immunoreactivity were in agreement with levels assessed in functional assays of cholera toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. Based on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of human and bovine cDNAs, there appear to be at least six different ARF-like genes. Northern blots of rat brain poly(A)+ RNA were hybridized with cDNA and oligonucleotide probes specific for each of the human and bovine ARF genes. From the second to the 27th postnatal day, ARF 3 mRNA increased, whereas mRNAs for ARFs 2 and 4 decreased; and those for ARFs 1, 5, and 6 were apparently unchanged. Partial amino acid sequence of sARF II is consistent with it being either the ARF 1 or 3 gene product. The developmental changes in rat brain ARF parallel neuronal maturation and synapse formation. PMID:1902473

  18. The role of ARF1 and rab GTPases in polarization of the Golgi stack.

    PubMed

    Bannykh, Serguei I; Plutner, Helen; Matteson, Jeanne; Balch, William E

    2005-09-01

    The organization and sorting of proteins within the Golgi stack to establish and maintain its cis to trans polarization remains an enigma. The function of Golgi compartments involves coat assemblages that facilitate vesicle traffic, Rab-tether-SNAP receptor (SNARE) machineries that dictate membrane identity, as well as matrix components that maintain structure. We have investigated how the Golgi complex achieves compartmentalization in response to a key component of the coat complex I (COPI) coat assembly pathway, the ARF1 GTPase, in relationship to GTPases-regulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) exit (Sar1) and targeting fusion (Rab1). Following collapse of the Golgi into the ER in response to inhibition of activation of ARF1 by Brefeldin A, we found that Sar1- and Rab1-dependent Golgi reformation took place at multiple peripheral and perinuclear ER exit sites. These rapidly converged into immature Golgi that appeared as onion-like structures composed of multiple concentrically arrayed cisternae of mixed enzyme composition. During clustering to the perinuclear region, Golgi enzymes were sorted to achieve the degree of polarization within the stack found in mature Golgi. Surprisingly, we found that sorting of Golgi enzymes into their subcompartments was insensitive to the dominant negative GTP-restricted ARF1 mutant, a potent inhibitor of COPI coat disassembly and vesicular traffic. We suggest that a COPI-independent, Rab-dependent mechanism is involved in the rapid reorganization of resident enzymes within the Golgi stack following synchronized release from the ER, suggesting an important role for Rab hubs in directing Golgi polarization. PMID:16101683

  19. Regulating the large Sec7 ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factors: the when, where and how of activation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, John; Kahn, Richard A.; Sztul, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells require selective sorting and transport of cargo between intracellular compartments. This is accomplished at least in part by vesicles that bud from a donor compartment, sequestering a subset of resident protein “cargos” destined for transport to an acceptor compartment. A key step in vesicle formation and targeting is the recruitment of specific proteins that form a coat on the outside of the vesicle in a process requiring the activation of regulatory GTPases of the ARF family. Like all such GTPases, ARFs cycle between inactive, GDP-bound, and membrane-associated active, GTP-bound, conformations. And like most regulatory GTPases the activating step is slow and thought to be rate limiting in cells, requiring the use of ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEFs). ARF GEFs are characterized by the presence of a conserved, catalytic Sec7 domain, though they also contain motifs or additional domains that confer specificity to localization and regulation of activity. These domains have been used to define and classify five different sub-families of ARF GEFs. One of these, the BIG/GBF1 family, includes three proteins that are each key regulators of the secretory pathway. GEF activity initiates the coating of nascent vesicles via the localized generation of activated ARFs and thus these GEFs are the upstream regulators that define the site and timing of vesicle production. Paradoxically, while we have detailed molecular knowledge of how GEFs activate ARFs, we know very little about how GEFs are recruited and/or activated at the right time and place to initiate transport. This review summarizes the current knowledge of GEF regulation and explores the still uncertain mechanisms that position GEFs at “budding ready” membrane sites to generate highly localized activated ARFs. PMID:24728583

  20. Nuclear localization and molecular partners of BIG1, a brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein for ADP-ribosylation factors.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Philip Ian; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2004-03-01

    Brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein 1 (BIG1) is an approximately 200-kDa brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein that preferentially activates ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) and ARF3. BIG1 was found in cytosol in a multiprotein complex with a similar ARF-activating protein, BIG2, which is also an A kinase-anchoring protein. In HepG2 cells growing with serum, BIG1 was primarily cytosolic and Golgi-associated. After incubation overnight without serum, a large fraction of endogenous BIG1 was in the nuclei. By confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, BIG1 was localized with nucleoporin p62 at the nuclear envelope (probably during nucleocytoplasmic transport) and also in nucleoli, clearly visible against the less concentrated overall matrix staining. BIG1 was also identified by Western blot analyses in purified subnuclear fractions (e.g., nucleoli and nuclear matrix). Antibodies against BIG1, nucleoporin, or nucleolin coimmunoprecipitated the other two proteins from purified nuclei. In contrast, BIG2 was not associated with nuclear BIG1. Also of note, ARF was never detected among proteins precipitated from purified nuclei by anti-BIG1 antibodies, although microscopically the two proteins do appear sometimes to be colocalized in the nucleus. These data are consistent with independent intracellular movements and actions of BIG1 and BIG2, and they are also evidence of the participation of BIG1 in both Golgi and nuclear functions. PMID:14973189

  1. CLN3 deficient cells display defects in the ARF1-Cdc42 pathway and actin-dependent events.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Mark L; Tecedor, Luis; Stein, Colleen S; Stamnes, Mark A; Davidson, Beverly L

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile Batten disease (juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, JNCL) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in CLN3, a protein of undefined function. Cell lines derived from patients or mice with CLN3 deficiency have impairments in actin-regulated processes such as endocytosis, autophagy, vesicular trafficking, and cell migration. Here we demonstrate the small GTPase Cdc42 is misregulated in the absence of CLN3, and thus may be a common link to multiple cellular defects. We discover that active Cdc42 (Cdc42-GTP) is elevated in endothelial cells from CLN3 deficient mouse brain, and correlates with enhanced PAK-1 phosphorylation, LIMK membrane recruitment, and altered actin-driven events. We also demonstrate dramatically reduced plasma membrane recruitment of the Cdc42 GTPase activating protein, ARHGAP21. In line with this, GTP-loaded ARF1, an effector of ARHGAP21 recruitment, is depressed. Together these data implicate misregulated ARF1-Cdc42 signaling as a central defect in JNCL cells, which in-turn impairs various cell functions. Furthermore our findings support concerted action of ARF1, ARHGAP21, and Cdc42 to regulate fluid phase endocytosis in mammalian cells. The ARF1-Cdc42 pathway presents a promising new avenue for JNCL therapeutic development. PMID:24792215

  2. Molecular Basis of Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate and ARF1 GTPase Recognition by the FAPP1 Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.; Heroux, A.; Scott, J. L.; Roy, S.; Lenoir, M.; Overduin, M.; Stahelin, R. V.; Kutateladze, T. G.

    2011-05-27

    Four-phosphate-adaptor protein 1 (FAPP1) regulates secretory transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane. FAPP1 is recruited to the Golgi through binding of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) and a small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). Despite the critical role of FAPP1 in membrane trafficking, the molecular basis of its dual function remains unclear. Here, we report a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the FAPP1 PH domain and detail the molecular mechanisms of the PtdIns(4)P and ARF1 recognition. The FAPP1 PH domain folds into a seven-stranded {beta}-barrel capped by an {alpha}-helix at one edge, whereas the opposite edge is flanked by three loops and the {beta}4 and {beta}7 strands that form a lipid-binding pocket within the {beta}-barrel. The ARF1-binding site is located on the outer side of the {beta}-barrel as determined by NMR resonance perturbation analysis, mutagenesis, and measurements of binding affinities. The two binding sites have little overlap, allowing FAPP1 PH to associate with both ligands simultaneously and independently. Binding to PtdIns(4)P is enhanced in an acidic environment and is required for membrane penetration and tubulation activity of FAPP1, whereas the GTP-bound conformation of the GTPase is necessary for the interaction with ARF1. Together, these findings provide structural and biochemical insight into the multivalent membrane anchoring by the PH domain that may augment affinity and selectivity of FAPP1 toward the TGN membranes enriched in both PtdIns(4)P and GTP-bound ARF1.

  3. Molecular Basis of Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate and ARF1 GTPase Recognition by the FAPP1 Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain*

    PubMed Central

    He, Ju; Scott, Jordan L.; Heroux, Annie; Roy, Siddhartha; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Stahelin, Robert V.; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2011-01-01

    Four-phosphate-adaptor protein 1 (FAPP1) regulates secretory transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane. FAPP1 is recruited to the Golgi through binding of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) and a small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). Despite the critical role of FAPP1 in membrane trafficking, the molecular basis of its dual function remains unclear. Here, we report a 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the FAPP1 PH domain and detail the molecular mechanisms of the PtdIns(4)P and ARF1 recognition. The FAPP1 PH domain folds into a seven-stranded β-barrel capped by an α-helix at one edge, whereas the opposite edge is flanked by three loops and the β4 and β7 strands that form a lipid-binding pocket within the β-barrel. The ARF1-binding site is located on the outer side of the β-barrel as determined by NMR resonance perturbation analysis, mutagenesis, and measurements of binding affinities. The two binding sites have little overlap, allowing FAPP1 PH to associate with both ligands simultaneously and independently. Binding to PtdIns(4)P is enhanced in an acidic environment and is required for membrane penetration and tubulation activity of FAPP1, whereas the GTP-bound conformation of the GTPase is necessary for the interaction with ARF1. Together, these findings provide structural and biochemical insight into the multivalent membrane anchoring by the PH domain that may augment affinity and selectivity of FAPP1 toward the TGN membranes enriched in both PtdIns(4)P and GTP-bound ARF1. PMID:21454700

  4. Molecular basis of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and ARF1 GTPase recognition by the FAPP1 pleckstrin homology (PH) domain.

    PubMed

    He, Ju; Scott, Jordan L; Heroux, Annie; Roy, Siddhartha; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Stahelin, Robert V; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2011-05-27

    Four-phosphate-adaptor protein 1 (FAPP1) regulates secretory transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane. FAPP1 is recruited to the Golgi through binding of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) and a small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). Despite the critical role of FAPP1 in membrane trafficking, the molecular basis of its dual function remains unclear. Here, we report a 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the FAPP1 PH domain and detail the molecular mechanisms of the PtdIns(4)P and ARF1 recognition. The FAPP1 PH domain folds into a seven-stranded β-barrel capped by an α-helix at one edge, whereas the opposite edge is flanked by three loops and the β4 and β7 strands that form a lipid-binding pocket within the β-barrel. The ARF1-binding site is located on the outer side of the β-barrel as determined by NMR resonance perturbation analysis, mutagenesis, and measurements of binding affinities. The two binding sites have little overlap, allowing FAPP1 PH to associate with both ligands simultaneously and independently. Binding to PtdIns(4)P is enhanced in an acidic environment and is required for membrane penetration and tubulation activity of FAPP1, whereas the GTP-bound conformation of the GTPase is necessary for the interaction with ARF1. Together, these findings provide structural and biochemical insight into the multivalent membrane anchoring by the PH domain that may augment affinity and selectivity of FAPP1 toward the TGN membranes enriched in both PtdIns(4)P and GTP-bound ARF1. PMID:21454700

  5. ARNO3, a Sec7-domain guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ADP ribosylation factor 1, is involved in the control of Golgi structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Michel; Boretto, Joëlle; Robineau, Sylviane; Monier, Solange; Goud, Bruno; Chardin, Pierre; Chavrier, Philippe

    1998-01-01

    Budding of transport vesicles in the Golgi apparatus requires the recruitment of coat proteins and is regulated by ADP ribosylation factor (ARF) 1. ARF1 activation is promoted by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the transition to GTP-bound ARF1. We recently have identified a human protein, ARNO (ARF nucleotide-binding-site opener), as an ARF1-GEF that shares a conserved domain with the yeast Sec7 protein. We now describe a human Sec7 domain-containing GEF referred to as ARNO3. ARNO and ARNO3, as well as a third GEF called cytohesin-1, form a family of highly related proteins with identical structural organization that consists of a central Sec7 domain and a carboxy-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. We show that all three proteins act as ARF1 GEF in vitro, whereas they have no effect on ARF6, an ARF protein implicated in the early endocytic pathway. Substrate specificity of ARNO-like GEFs for ARF1 depends solely on the Sec7 domain. Overexpression of ARNO3 in mammalian cells results in (i) fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus, (ii) redistribution of Golgi resident proteins as well as the coat component β-COP, and (iii) inhibition of SEAP transport (secreted form of alkaline phosphatase). In contrast, the distribution of endocytic markers is not affected. This study indicates that Sec7 domain-containing GEFs control intracellular membrane compartment structure and function through the regulation of specific ARF proteins in mammalian cells. PMID:9707577

  6. Interaction of ARF-1.1 and neuronal calcium sensor-1 in the control of the temperature-dependency of locomotion in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Paul A. C.; McCue, Hannah V.; Haynes, Lee P.; Barclay, Jeff W.; Burgoyne, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1) mediates changes in cellular function by regulating various target proteins. Many potential targets have been identified but the physiological significance of only a few has been established. Upon temperature elevation, Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits reversible paralysis. In the absence of NCS-1, worms show delayed onset and a shorter duration of paralysis. This phenotype can be rescued by re-expression of ncs-1 in AIY neurons. Mutants with defects in four potential NCS-1 targets (arf-1.1, pifk-1, trp-1 and trp-2) showed qualitatively similar phenotypes to ncs-1 null worms, although the effect of pifk-1 mutation on time to paralysis was considerably delayed. Inhibition of pifk-1 also resulted in a locomotion phenotype. Analysis of double mutants showed no additive effects between mutations in ncs-1 and trp-1 or trp-2. In contrast, double mutants of arf-1.1 and ncs-1 had an intermediate phenotype, consistent with NCS-1 and ARF-1.1 acting in the same pathway. Over-expression of arf-1.1 in the AIY neurons was sufficient to rescue partially the phenotype of both the arf-1.1 and the ncs-1 null worms. These findings suggest that ARF-1.1 interacts with NCS-1 in AIY neurons and potentially pifk-1 in the Ca2+ signaling pathway that leads to inhibited locomotion at an elevated temperature. PMID:27435667

  7. Arf1-GTP-induced Tubule Formation Suggests a Function of Arf Family Proteins in Curvature Acquisition at Sites of Vesicle Budding*

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Michael; Jia, Jun-Yong; Roux, Aurélien; Beck, Rainer; Wieland, Felix T.; De Camilli, Pietro; Haucke, Volker

    2008-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) and related small GTPases play crucial roles in membrane traffic within the exo- and endocytic pathways. Arf proteins in their GTP-bound state are associated with curved membrane buds and tubules, frequently together with effector coat proteins to which they bind. Here we report that Arf1 is found on membrane tubules originating from the Golgi complex where it colocalizes with COPI and GGA1 vesicle coat proteins. Arf1 also induces tubulation of liposomes in vitro. Mutations within the amino-terminal amphipathic helix (NTH) of Arf1 affect the number of Arf1-positive tubules in vivo and its property to tubulate liposomes. Moreover, hydrophilic substitutions within the hydrophobic part of its NTH impair Arf1-catalyzed budding of COPI vesicles in vitro. Our data indicate that GTP-controlled local induction of high curvature membranes is an important property of Arf1 that might be shared by a subgroup of Arf/Arl family GTPases. PMID:18693248

  8. Interaction of ARF-1.1 and neuronal calcium sensor-1 in the control of the temperature-dependency of locomotion in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Todd, Paul A C; McCue, Hannah V; Haynes, Lee P; Barclay, Jeff W; Burgoyne, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1) mediates changes in cellular function by regulating various target proteins. Many potential targets have been identified but the physiological significance of only a few has been established. Upon temperature elevation, Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits reversible paralysis. In the absence of NCS-1, worms show delayed onset and a shorter duration of paralysis. This phenotype can be rescued by re-expression of ncs-1 in AIY neurons. Mutants with defects in four potential NCS-1 targets (arf-1.1, pifk-1, trp-1 and trp-2) showed qualitatively similar phenotypes to ncs-1 null worms, although the effect of pifk-1 mutation on time to paralysis was considerably delayed. Inhibition of pifk-1 also resulted in a locomotion phenotype. Analysis of double mutants showed no additive effects between mutations in ncs-1 and trp-1 or trp-2. In contrast, double mutants of arf-1.1 and ncs-1 had an intermediate phenotype, consistent with NCS-1 and ARF-1.1 acting in the same pathway. Over-expression of arf-1.1 in the AIY neurons was sufficient to rescue partially the phenotype of both the arf-1.1 and the ncs-1 null worms. These findings suggest that ARF-1.1 interacts with NCS-1 in AIY neurons and potentially pifk-1 in the Ca(2+) signaling pathway that leads to inhibited locomotion at an elevated temperature. PMID:27435667

  9. An arf1Delta synthetic lethal screen identifies a new clathrin heavy chain conditional allele that perturbs vacuolar protein transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C Y; Graham, T R

    1998-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) is a small GTP-binding protein that is thought to regulate the assembly of coat proteins on transport vesicles. To identify factors that functionally interact with ARF, we have performed a genetic screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for mutations that exhibit synthetic lethality with an arf1Delta allele and defined seven genes by complementation tests (SWA1-7 for synthetically lethal with arf1Delta). Most of the swa mutants exhibit phenotypes comparable to arf1Delta mutants such as temperature-conditional growth, hypersensitivity to fluoride ions, and partial protein transport and glycosylation defects. Here, we report that swa5-1 is a new temperature-sensitive allele of the clathrin heavy chain gene (chc1-5), which carries a frameshift mutation near the 3' end of the CHC1 open reading frame. This genetic interaction between arf1 and chc1 provides in vivo evidence for a role for ARF in clathrin coat assembly. Surprisingly, strains harboring chc1-5 exhibited a significant defect in transport of carboxypeptidase Y or carboxypeptidase S to the vacuole that was not observed in other chc1 ts mutants. The kinetics of invertase secretion or transport of alkaline phosphatase to the vacuole were not significantly affected in the chc1-5 mutant, further implicating clathrin specifically in the Golgi to vacuole transport pathway for carboxypeptidase Y. PMID:9755191

  10. 21 CFR 73.1329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... eye, in amounts consistent with good manufacturing practice. (d) Labeling. The color additive and any... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1329 Guanine. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive guanine is... derived. (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with guanine may contain only those diluents...

  11. Radical-radical interactions among oxidized guanine bases including guanine radical cation and dehydrogenated guanine radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Yang, Hongfang; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Ping; Bu, Yuxiang

    2013-09-19

    We present here a theoretical investigation of the structural and electronic properties of di-ionized GG base pairs (G(•+)G(•+),G(-H1)(•)G(•+), and G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•)) consisting of the guanine cation radical (G(•+)) and/or dehydrogenated guanine radical (G(-H1)(•)) using density functional theory calculations. Different coupling modes (Watson-Crick/WC, Hoogsteen/Hoog, and minor groove/min hydrogen bonding, and π-π stacking modes) are considered. We infer that a series of G(•+)G(•+) complexes can be formed by the high-energy radiation. On the basis of density functional theory and complete active space self-consistent (CASSCF) calculations, we reveal that in the H-bonded and N-N cross-linked modes, (G(•+)G(•+))WC, (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))WC, (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))minI, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))minIII have the triplet ground states; (G(•+)G(•+))HoogI, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))WC, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))HoogI, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))minI, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))minII, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))minII possess open-shell broken-symmetry diradical-characterized singlet ground states; and (G(•+)G(•+))HoogII, (G(•+)G(•+))minI, (G(•+)G(•+))minII, (G(•+)G(•+))minIII, (G(•+)G(•+))HoHo, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))minIII, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))HoHo, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))HoHo are the closed-shell systems. For these H-bonded diradical complexes, the magnetic interactions are weak, especially in the diradical G(•+)G(•+) series and G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•) series. The magnetic coupling interactions of the diradical systems are controlled by intermolecular interactions (H-bond, electrostatic repulsion, and radical coupling). The radical-radical interaction in the π-π stacked di-ionized GG base pairs ((G(•+)G(•+))ππ, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))ππ, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))ππ) are also considered, and the magnetic coupling interactions in these π-π stacked base pairs are large. This is the first theoretical prediction that some di

  12. Guanine base stacking in G-quadruplex nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Lech, Christopher Jacques; Heddi, Brahim; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2013-02-01

    G-quadruplexes constitute a class of nucleic acid structures defined by stacked guanine tetrads (or G-tetrads) with guanine bases from neighboring tetrads stacking with one another within the G-tetrad core. Individual G-quadruplexes can also stack with one another at their G-tetrad interface leading to higher-order structures as observed in telomeric repeat-containing DNA and RNA. In this study, we investigate how guanine base stacking influences the stability of G-quadruplexes and their stacked higher-order structures. A structural survey of the Protein Data Bank is conducted to characterize experimentally observed guanine base stacking geometries within the core of G-quadruplexes and at the interface between stacked G-quadruplex structures. We couple this survey with a systematic computational examination of stacked G-tetrad energy landscapes using quantum mechanical computations. Energy calculations of stacked G-tetrads reveal large energy differences of up to 12 kcal/mol between experimentally observed geometries at the interface of stacked G-quadruplexes. Energy landscapes are also computed using an AMBER molecular mechanics description of stacking energy and are shown to agree quite well with quantum mechanical calculated landscapes. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a structural explanation for the experimentally observed preference of parallel G-quadruplexes to stack in a 5'-5' manner based on different accessible tetrad stacking modes at the stacking interfaces of 5'-5' and 3'-3' stacked G-quadruplexes. PMID:23268444

  13. Identification of a brefeldin A-insensitive guanine nucleotide-exchange protein for ADP-ribosylation factor in bovine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1994-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that participate in vesicular transport in the Golgi and other intracellular compartments and stimulate cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. ARFs are active in the GTP-bound form; hydrolysis of bound GTP to GDP, possibly with the assistance of a GTP hydrolysis (GTPase)-activating protein results in inactivation. Exchange of GDP for GTP and reactivation were shown by other workers to be enhanced by Golgi membranes in a brefeldin A-sensitive reaction, leading to the proposal that the guanine nucleotide-exchange protein (GEP) was a target of brefeldin A. In the studies reported here, a soluble GEP was partially purified from bovine brain. Exchange of nucleotide on ARFs 1 and 3, based on increased ARF activity in a toxin assay and stimulation of binding of guanosine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio]triphosphate, was dependent on phospholipids, with phosphatidylserine being more effective than cardiolipin. GEP appeared to increase the rate of nucleotide exchange but did not affect the affinity of ARF for GTP. Whereas the crude GEP had a size of approximately 700 kDa, the partially purified GEP behaved on Ultrogel AcA 54 as a protein of 60 kDa. With purification, the GEP activity became insensitive to brefeldin A, consistent with the conclusion that, in contrast to earlier inferences, the exchange protein is not itself the target of brefeldin A. PMID:8159707

  14. 21 CFR 73.2329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2329 Guanine. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The... coloring cosmetics generally, only those diluents listed under § 73.1001(a)(1); (ii) For coloring externally applied cosmetics, only those diluents listed in § 73.1001(b) and, in addition, nitrocellulose....

  15. 21 CFR 73.2329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2329 Guanine. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The... coloring cosmetics generally, only those diluents listed under § 73.1001(a)(1); (ii) For coloring externally applied cosmetics, only those diluents listed in § 73.1001(b) and, in addition, nitrocellulose....

  16. 21 CFR 73.2329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2329 Guanine. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The... coloring cosmetics generally, only those diluents listed under § 73.1001(a)(1); (ii) For coloring externally applied cosmetics, only those diluents listed in § 73.1001(b) and, in addition, nitrocellulose....

  17. 21 CFR 73.2329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2329 Guanine. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The... coloring cosmetics generally, only those diluents listed under § 73.1001(a)(1); (ii) For coloring externally applied cosmetics, only those diluents listed in § 73.1001(b) and, in addition, nitrocellulose....

  18. 21 CFR 73.2329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2329 Guanine. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The... coloring cosmetics generally, only those diluents listed under § 73.1001(a)(1); (ii) For coloring externally applied cosmetics, only those diluents listed in § 73.1001(b) and, in addition, nitrocellulose....

  19. 21 CFR 73.1329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the crystalline material obtained from fish scales and consists principally of the two purines... vary from 3 to 25 percent, depending on the particular fish and tissue from which the crystals are... total purines. Mercury (as Hg), not more than 1 part per million. (c) Uses and restrictions. Guanine...

  20. 21 CFR 73.1329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the crystalline material obtained from fish scales and consists principally of the two purines... vary from 3 to 25 percent, depending on the particular fish and tissue from which the crystals are... total purines. Mercury (as Hg), not more than 1 part per million. (c) Uses and restrictions. Guanine...

  1. Secretion of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sVEGFR1/sFlt1) requires Arf1, Arf6, and Rab11 GTPases.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Joon; Tiwari, Ajit; Inamdar, Shivangi M; Thomas, Christie P; Goel, Apollina; Choudhury, Amit

    2012-01-01

    The soluble form of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sVEGFR-1/sFlt1) is generated by alternative splicing of the FLT1 gene. Secretion of sFlt1 from endothelial cells plays an important role in blood vessel sprouting and morphogenesis. However, excess sFlt1 secretion is associated with diseases such as preeclampsia and chronic kidney disease. To date, the secretory transport process involved in the secretion of sFlt1 is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the itinerary of sFlt1 trafficking along the secretory pathway. To understand the timecourse of sFlt1 secretion, endothelial cells stably expressing sFlt1 were metabolically radiolabeled with [(35)S]-methionine and cysteine. Our results indicate that after initial synthesis the levels of secreted [(35)S]-sFlt1 in the extracellular medium peaks at 8 hours. Treatment with brefeldin A (BFA), a drug which blocks trafficking between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi complex, inhibited extracellular release of sFlt1 suggesting that ER to Golgi and intra-Golgi trafficking of sFlt1 are essential for its secretion. Furthermore, we show that ectopic expression of dominant-negative mutant forms of Arf1, Arf6, and Rab11 as well as siRNA-mediated knockdown of these GTPases block secretion of sFlt1 during normoxic and hypoxic conditions suggesting role for these small GTPases. This work is the first to report role of regulatory proteins involved in sFlt1 trafficking along the secretory pathway and may provide insights and new molecular targets for the modulation of sFlt-1 release during physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:22962618

  2. Guanine tetraplex formation by short DNA fragments containing runs of guanine and cytosine.

    PubMed Central

    Penázová, H; Vorlicková, M

    1997-01-01

    Using CD spectroscopy, guanine tetraplex formation was studied with short DNA fragments in which cytosine residues were systematically added to runs of guanine either at the 5' or 3' ends. Potassium cations induced the G-tetraplex more easily with fragments having the guanine run at the 5' end, which is just an opposite tendency to what was reported for (G+T) oligonucleotides. However, the present (G+C) fragments simultaneously adopted other conformers that complicated the analysis. We demonstrate that repeated freezing/thawing, performed at low ionic strength, is a suitable method to exclusively stabilize the tetraplex in the (G+C) DNA fragments. In contrast to KCl, the repeated freeze/thaw cycles better stabilized the tetraplex with fragments having the guanine run on the 3' end. The tendency of guanine blocks to generate the tetraplex destabilized the d(G5).d(C5) duplex whose strands dissociated, giving rise to a stable tetraplex of (dG5) and single-stranded (dC5). In contrast to d(G3C3) and d(G5C5), repeated freezing/thawing induced the tetraplex even with the self-complementary d(C3G3) or d(C5G5); hence the latter oligonucleotides preferred the tetraplex to the apparently very stable duplex. The tetraplexes only included guanine blocks while the 5' end cytosines interfered neither with the tetraplex formation nor the tetraplex structure. PMID:9336200

  3. Identification of small molecule compounds with higher binding affinity to guanine deaminase (cypin) than guanine.

    PubMed

    Fernández, José R; Sweet, Eric S; Welsh, William J; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2010-09-15

    Guanine deaminase (GDA; cypin) is an important metalloenzyme that processes the first step in purine catabolism, converting guanine to xanthine by hydrolytic deamination. In higher eukaryotes, GDA also plays an important role in the development of neuronal morphology by regulating dendritic arborization. In addition to its role in the maturing brain, GDA is thought to be involved in proper liver function since increased levels of GDA activity have been correlated with liver disease and transplant rejection. Although mammalian GDA is an attractive and potential drug target for treatment of both liver diseases and cognitive disorders, prospective novel inhibitors and/or activators of this enzyme have not been actively pursued. In this study, we employed the combination of protein structure analysis and experimental kinetic studies to seek novel potential ligands for human guanine deaminase. Using virtual screening and biochemical analysis, we identified common small molecule compounds that demonstrate a higher binding affinity to GDA than does guanine. In vitro analysis demonstrates that these compounds inhibit guanine deamination, and more surprisingly, affect GDA (cypin)-mediated microtubule assembly. The results in this study provide evidence that an in silico drug discovery strategy coupled with in vitro validation assays can be successfully implemented to discover compounds that may possess therapeutic value for the treatment of diseases and disorders where GDA activity is abnormal. PMID:20716488

  4. Electronic transitions of guanine tautomers, their stacked dimers, trimers and sodium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, P. S.; Kumar, Anil; Mishra, P. C.

    2004-02-01

    each, the stacked dimers and trimers of the two tautomers were calculated using configuration interaction involving single electron excitations (CIS). The relative absorption intensities of the two tautomers of guanine near 275 and 248 nm in the monomer, dimer, and trimer are predicated to be in the opposite order. Thus the absorption intensity oscillation observed using a guanine aqueous solution can be explained in terms of oscillation of relative populations of the two tautomers of the molecule. The 248 nm absorption peak would be appreciably red-shifted on formation of the cation of guanine. Binding of the Na + ion with the two tautomers of guanine reduces intensities of their transitions appreciably and also it causes large red-shifts in the same.

  5. IR spectra of guanine and hypoxanthine isolated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheina, G. G.; Stepanian, S. G.; Radchenko, E. D.; Blagoi, Yu. P.

    1987-05-01

    High resolution spectra of guanine, hypoxanthine, isocytosine, 2-aminopyrimidine and their deutero- and methyl derivatives obtained in Ar matrices by the low temperature IR spectroscopy method are reported. Normal modes of enol tautomers of guanine, 9-CH 3-guanine, hypoxanthine and 2-aminopurine are calculated. Force fields are the same as for purine. Results calculated are used to interpret the experimental spectra. Keto—enol tautomerism is shown to exist in guanine and hypoxanthine, the proportions of enol tautomer being 50 and 5%, respectively. Possible biological applications of the results obtained are discussed.

  6. Guanine-vacancy–bearing G-quadruplexes responsive to guanine derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-min; Zheng, Ke-wei; Zhang, Jia-yu; Liu, Hong-he; He, Yi-de; Yuan, Bi-feng; Hao, Yu-hua; Tan, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplex structures formed by guanine-rich nucleic acids are implicated in essential physiological and pathological processes and nanodevices. G-quadruplexes are normally composed of four Gn (n ≥ 3) tracts assembled into a core of multiple stacked G-quartet layers. By dimethyl sulfate footprinting, circular dichroism spectroscopy, thermal melting, and photo-cross-linking, here we describe a unique type of intramolecular G-quadruplex that forms with one G2 and three G3 tracts and bears a guanine vacancy (G-vacancy) in one of the G-quartet layers. The G-vacancy can be filled up by a guanine base from GTP or GMP to complete an intact G-quartet by Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding, resulting in significant G-quadruplex stabilization that can effectively alter DNA replication in vitro at physiological concentration of GTP and Mg2+. A bioinformatic survey shows motifs of such G-quadruplexes are evolutionally selected in genes with unique distribution pattern in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, implying such G-vacancy–bearing G-quadruplexes are present and play a role in gene regulation. Because guanine derivatives are natural metabolites in cells, the formation of such G-quadruplexes and guanine fill-in (G-fill-in) may grant an environment-responsive regulation in cellular processes. Our findings thus not only expand the sequence definition of G-quadruplex formation, but more importantly, reveal a structural and functional property not seen in the standard canonical G-quadruplexes. PMID:26553979

  7. Interaction of cyclic cytosine-, guanine-, thymine-, uracil- and mixed guanine-cytosine base tetrads with K+, Na+ and Li+ ions -- a density functional study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Michael; Sühnel, Jürgen

    2003-02-01

    We have carried out B3LYP hybrid density functional studies of complexes formed by cyclic cytosine-, guanine-, thymine-, uracil- and mixed guanine cytosine-tetrads with Li+, Na+ and K+ ions to determine their structures and interaction energies. The conformations studied have been restricted to a hydrogen bond pattern closely related to the tetrads observed in experimental nucleic acid structures. A comparison of the alkali metal ion/tetrad complexes with the tetrads without cations indicates that alkali metal ions modulate the tetrad structures significantly and that even the hydrogen bond pattern may change. Guanine-tetrad cation complexes show the strongest interaction energy compared to other tetrads that occur less frequently in experimental structures. The most stable G-tetrad/metal ion structure adopts a nearly planar geometry that is especially suitable for tetraplex formation, which requires approximately parallel tetrad planes. In the cytosine-tetrad there is a very large central cavity suitable for cation recognition, but the complexes adopt a non-planar structure unsuitable for stacking, except possibly for ions with very large radii. Uracil and thymine tetrads show a significant different characteristics which may contribute to the differences between DNA and RNA PMID:12529150

  8. Chlorophyll fluorescence control in microalgae by biogenic guanine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Yuito; Iwasaka, Masakazu; Endo, Hirotoshi

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic fields were applied to water suspensions of guanine crystals to induce changes in light scattering as a possible way to control photosynthesis in microalgae. The effect of guanine microcrystals with and without an applied magnetic field on the photosynthesis of a unicellular microalgae (plant), Pleurochrysis. carterae (P. carterae), was investigated by examining chlorophyll fluorescence. The fluorescence intensity at 600-700 nm of the photosynthetic cells increased remarkably when the concentration ratio of guanine microcrystals was 10 times larger than that of the cells. This increase in fluorescence occurred reproducibly and was proportional to the amount of guanine microcrystals added. It is speculated that the guanine microcrystals enhance the intensity of the excitation light on the cells by concentrating the excitation light or prolonging the time of light exposure to the cells. Moreover, applying a 500-mT magnetic field allowed modulation of the fluorescence intensity, depending on the direction of the fluorescence light.

  9. Guanine quadruplex structures localize to heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Roland F; Moshkin, Yuri M; Mouton, Stijn; Grzeschik, Nicola A; Kalicharan, Ruby D; Kuipers, Jeroen; Wolters, Anouk H G; Nishida, Kazuki; Romashchenko, Aleksander V; Postberg, Jan; Lipps, Hans; Berezikov, Eugene; Sibon, Ody C M; Giepmans, Ben N G; Lansdorp, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Increasing amounts of data support a role for guanine quadruplex (G4) DNA and RNA structures in various cellular processes. We stained different organisms with monoclonal antibody 1H6 specific for G4 DNA. Strikingly, immuno-electron microscopy showed exquisite specificity for heterochromatin. Polytene chromosomes from Drosophila salivary glands showed bands that co-localized with heterochromatin proteins HP1 and the SNF2 domain-containing protein SUUR. Staining was retained in SUUR knock-out mutants but lost upon overexpression of SUUR. Somatic cells in Macrostomum lignano were strongly labeled, but pluripotent stem cells labeled weakly. Similarly, germline stem cells in Drosophila ovaries were weakly labeled compared to most other cells. The unexpected presence of G4 structures in heterochromatin and the difference in G4 staining between somatic cells and stem cells with germline DNA in ciliates, flatworms, flies and mammals point to a conserved role for G4 structures in nuclear organization and cellular differentiation. PMID:26384414

  10. Guanine quadruplex structures localize to heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Roland F.; Moshkin, Yuri M.; Mouton, Stijn; Grzeschik, Nicola A.; Kalicharan, Ruby D.; Kuipers, Jeroen; Wolters, Anouk H.G.; Nishida, Kazuki; Romashchenko, Aleksander V.; Postberg, Jan; Lipps, Hans; Berezikov, Eugene; Sibon, Ody C.M.; Giepmans, Ben N.G.; Lansdorp, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing amounts of data support a role for guanine quadruplex (G4) DNA and RNA structures in various cellular processes. We stained different organisms with monoclonal antibody 1H6 specific for G4 DNA. Strikingly, immuno-electron microscopy showed exquisite specificity for heterochromatin. Polytene chromosomes from Drosophila salivary glands showed bands that co-localized with heterochromatin proteins HP1 and the SNF2 domain-containing protein SUUR. Staining was retained in SUUR knock-out mutants but lost upon overexpression of SUUR. Somatic cells in Macrostomum lignano were strongly labeled, but pluripotent stem cells labeled weakly. Similarly, germline stem cells in Drosophila ovaries were weakly labeled compared to most other cells. The unexpected presence of G4 structures in heterochromatin and the difference in G4 staining between somatic cells and stem cells with germline DNA in ciliates, flatworms, flies and mammals point to a conserved role for G4 structures in nuclear organization and cellular differentiation. PMID:26384414

  11. Signal transduction by guanine nucleotide binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A M

    1987-01-01

    High affinity binding of guanine nucleotides and the ability to hydrolyze bound GTP to GDP are characteristics of an extended family of intracellular proteins. Subsets of this family include cytosolic initiation and elongation factors involved in protein synthesis, and cytoskeletal proteins such as tubulin (Hughes, S.M. (1983) FEBS Lett. 164, 1-8). A distinct subset of guanine nucleotide binding proteins is membrane-associated; members of this subset include the ras gene products (Ellis, R.W. et al. (1981) Nature 292, 506-511) and the heterotrimeric G-proteins (also termed N-proteins) (Gilman, A.G. (1984) Cell 36, 577-579). Substantial evidence indicates that G-proteins act as signal transducers by coupling receptors (R) to effectors (E). A similar function has been suggested but not proven for the ras gene products. Known G-proteins include Gs and Gi, the G-proteins associated with stimulation and inhibition, respectively, of adenylate cyclase; transducin (TD), the G-protein coupling rhodopsin to cGMP phosphodiesterase in rod photoreceptors (Bitensky, M.W. et al. (1981) Curr. Top. Membr. Transp. 15, 237-271; Stryer, L. (1986) Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 9, 87-119), and Go, a G-protein of unknown function that is highly abundant in brain (Sternweis, P.C. and Robishaw, J.D. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 13806-13813; Neer, E.J. et al. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 14222-14229). G-proteins also participate in other signal transduction pathways, notably that involving phosphoinositide breakdown. In this review, I highlight recent progress in our understanding of the structure, function, and diversity of G-proteins. PMID:2435586

  12. Experimental observation of guanine tautomers with VUV photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jia; Kostko, Oleg; Nicolas, Christophe; Tang, Xiaonan; Belau, Leonid; de Vries, Mattanjah S.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-12-01

    Two methods of preparing guanine in the gas phase, thermal vaporization and laser desorption, have been investigated. The guanine generated by each method is entrained in a molecular beam, single photon ionized with tunable VUV synchrotron radiation, and analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. The recorded photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves show a dramatic difference for experiments performed via thermal vaporization compared to laser desorption. The calculated vertical and adiabatic ionization energies for the eight lowest lying tautomers of guanine suggest the experimental observations arise from different tautomers being populated in the two different experimental methods.

  13. Guanine- Formation During the Thermal Polymerization of Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Caw, B. K.; Munoz, E. F.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Young, R. S.

    1964-01-01

    The action of heat on a mixture of amino acids was studied as a possible abiological pathway for the synthesis of purines and pyrimidines. Guanine was detected. This result is significant in the context of chemical evolution.

  14. Capturing Transient Endoperoxide in the Singlet Oxygen Oxidation of Guanine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenchao; Liu, Jianbo

    2016-02-24

    The chemistry of singlet O2 toward the guanine base of DNA is highly relevant to DNA lesion, mutation, cell death, and pathological conditions. This oxidative damage is initiated by the formation of a transient endoperoxide through the Diels-Alder cycloaddition of singlet O2 to the guanine imidazole ring. However, no endoperoxide formation was directly detected in native guanine or guanosine, even at -100 °C. Herein, gas-phase ion-molecule scattering mass spectrometry was utilized to capture unstable endoperoxides in the collisions of hydrated guanine ions (protonated or deprotonated) with singlet O2 at ambient temperature. Corroborated by results from potential energy surface exploration, kinetic modeling, and dynamics simulations, various aspects of endoperoxide formation and transformation (including its dependence on guanine ionization and hydration states, as well as on collision energy) were determined. This work has pieced together reaction mechanisms, kinetics, and dynamics data concerning the early stage of singlet O2 induced guanine oxidation, which is missing from conventional condensed-phase studies. PMID:26813583

  15. Exploring the characterization tools of Guanine-Quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Mahima; Kaushik, Shikha; Kukreti, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    Occurrence of guanine-rich sequences throughout the genome at specific locations like chromosomal ends (telomeres), promoters and Untranslated regions (UTR's) is very well documented. Quite recently, visualization of guanine-quadruplex in human and mammalian cells have also provided a very significant evidence for the in vivo existence of guanine-quadruplex, reconfirming their biological relevance in cellular processes like replication, transcription, recombination, etc. Guanine quadruplexes have enormous potential of exhibiting various topologies which differ, by number/ orientation of strands or loop orientations etc. Some relatively new polymorphic structures like 3+1 quadruplex, G-triplex, and Tri-G-quadruplex have also been proposed for the guanine-rich sequences. Various biochemical and biophysical techniques have been used to characterize these multistranded DNA structures. An extensive review of the mechanistic models of the already existing and newly emerging techniques is actually required, which may further facilitate our understanding about these structures. This review aims to summarize some of these techniques along with their requirements and limitations, which might further give some insights for the fine tuning of the solution and environmental conditions needed for facilitating guanine-quadruplex formation. PMID:26709787

  16. PolyGuanine methacrylate cryogels for ribonucleic acid purification.

    PubMed

    Köse, Kazım; Uzun, Lokman

    2016-05-01

    The isolation and purification of ribonucleic acid have attracted attention recently for the understanding of the functions in detail because of the necessity for the treatment of genetic diseases. In this study, guanine-incorporated polymeric cryogels were developed to obtain highly purified ribonucleic acid. The satisfactory purification performance was achieved with the guanine-incorporated poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-guanine methacrylate) cryogels. The most crucial advantages to use guanine as a functional monomer are to obtain a real natural interaction between guanine on the polymeric material and cytosine on the ribonucleic acid. Moreover, using cryogel with a highly porous structure and high swelling ratio provide advantages of getting more water within the structure to get more analyte to interact. The characterization of cryogels has proved the success of the synthesis and the perfect natural interaction to be taken place between the ligand (guanine methacrylate) and the cytosine in the ribonucleic acid molecules. Although the pores within the structure of cryogels are small, they provide efficient and fast adsorption. The chromatographic separation performance was investigated for different conditions (pH, temperature etc.). The desorption ratio and reusability were also analyzed at the end of the five adsorption-desorption cycles with no significant changes. PMID:27004613

  17. ESI-MS Characterization of a Novel Pyrrole-Inosine Nucleoside that Interacts with Guanine Bases

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Sarah E.; Sherman, Courtney L.; Jayawickramarajah, Janarthanan; Lawrence, Candace M.; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2008-01-01

    Based on binding studies undertaken by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, a synthetic pyrrole-inosine nucleoside, 1, capable of forming an extended three-point Hoogsteen-type hydrogen-bonding interaction with guanine, is shown to form specific complexes with two different quadruplex DNA structures [dTG4T]4 and d(T2G4)4 as well as guanine rich duplex DNA. The binding interactions of two other analogs were evaluated in order to unravel the structural features that contribute to specific DNA recognition. The importance of the Hoogsteen interactions was confirmed through the absence of specific binding when the pyrrole NH hydrogen-bonding site was blocked or removed. While 2, with a large blocking group, was not found to interact with virtually any form of DNA, 3, with the pyrrole functionality missing, was found to interact non-specifically with several types of DNA. The specific binding of 1 to guanine rich DNA emphasizes the necessity of careful ligand design for specific sequence recognition. PMID:18790136

  18. N-Sulfomethylation of guanine, adenine and cytosine with formaldehyde-bisulfite. A selective modification of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, H; Yamashita, Y; Yui, S; Yamagata, Y; Tomita, K; Negishi, K

    1982-10-25

    When guanine-, adenine- and cytosine-nucleosides and nucleotides were treated with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite, stable N-sulfomethyl compounds were formed. N2-Sulfomethylguanine, N6-sulfomethyladenine, N4-sulfomthylcytosine and N6-sulfomethyl-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine were isolated as crystals and characterized. A guanine-specific sulfomethylation was brought about by treatment and denatured single-stranded DNA with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite at pH 7 and 4 degrees C. Since native double-stranded DNA was not modified by this treatment, this new method of modification is expected to be useful as a conformational probe for polynucleotides. PMID:7177848

  19. N-Sulfomethylation of guanine, adenine and cytosine with formaldehyde-bisulfite. A selective modification of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hayatsu, H; Yamashita, Y; Yui, S; Yamagata, Y; Tomita, K; Negishi, K

    1982-01-01

    When guanine-, adenine- and cytosine-nucleosides and nucleotides were treated with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite, stable N-sulfomethyl compounds were formed. N2-Sulfomethylguanine, N6-sulfomethyladenine, N4-sulfomthylcytosine and N6-sulfomethyl-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine were isolated as crystals and characterized. A guanine-specific sulfomethylation was brought about by treatment and denatured single-stranded DNA with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite at pH 7 and 4 degrees C. Since native double-stranded DNA was not modified by this treatment, this new method of modification is expected to be useful as a conformational probe for polynucleotides. PMID:7177848

  20. Association of guanine nucleotide-exchange protein BIG1 in HepG2 cell nuclei with nucleolin, U3 snoRNA, and fibrillarin.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Philip Ian; Uhart, Marina; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Peculis, Brenda A; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2008-03-01

    BIG1, a brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein, activates class I ADP-ribosylation factors (ARF1-3) by catalyzing the replacement of bound GDP by GTP, an action critical for the regulation of protein transport in eukaryotic cells. Our earlier report [Padilla PI, Pancheco-Rodriguez G, Moss J, Vaughan M (2004) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101:2752-2757] that BIG1 concentrated in nucleoli of serum-starved HepG2 cells prompted us to identify molecules associated with BIG1 in dynamic nucleolar structures. Antibodies against BIG1 or nucleolin coprecipitated both proteins from nuclei, which was abolished by the incubation of nuclei with RNase A or DNase, indicating that the interaction depended on nucleic acids. (32)P labeling of RNAs immunoprecipitated with BIG1 or nucleolin from nuclei revealed bands of approximately 210 bases that also hybridized with U3 small nucleolar (sno)RNA-specific oligonucleotides. Clones of U3 snoRNA cDNAs from the material precipitated by antibodies against BIG1 or nucleolin yielded identical nucleotide sequences that also were found in genomic DNA. Later analyses revealed the presence of fibrillarin, nucleoporin p62, and La in BIG1 and nucleolin immunoprecipitates. Our data demonstrate that BIG1, nucleolin, U3, the U3-binding protein fibrillarin, and the RNA-binding protein La may exist together in nuclear complexes, consistent with a potential role for BIG1 in nucleolar processes. Evidence that BIG1 and nucleolin, but not fibrillarin, can be present with p62 at the nuclear envelope confirms the presence of BIG1 and nucleolin in dynamic molecular complexes that change in composition while moving through nuclei. Nuclear functions of BIG1 remain to be determined. PMID:18292223

  1. Camptothecins guanine interactions: mechanism of charge transfer reaction upon photoactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenkeste, K.; Guiot, E.; Tfibel, F.; Pernot, P.; Mérola, F.; Georges, P.; Fontaine-Aupart, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    The potent activity exhibited by the antitumoral camptothecin (CPT) and its analog irinotecan (CPT-11) is known to be related to a close contact between the drug and the nucleic acid base guanine. This specificity of interaction between these two chromophores was examined by following changes in the photophysical properties of the drug using steady-state as well as time-resolved absorption and fluorescence methods. The observed effects on absorption, fluorescence emission and singlet excited state lifetimes give evidence for the occurrence of a stacking complex formation restricted to the quinoline part of CPT or CPT-11 and the guanine base but also with the adenine base. The triplet excited state properties of the drugs have been also characterized in absence and in presence of guanosine monophosphate and reveal the occurrence of an electron transfer from the guanine base to the drug. Support for this conclusion was obtained from the studies of a set of biological targets of various oxido-reduction potentials, adenosine monophosphate, cytidine, cytosine, tryptophan, tyrosine and phenylalanine. This finding gives an interpretation of the CPT-induced guanine photolesions previously reported in the literature. These data taken together are discussed in connection with the drug activity. The stacking complex CPT/guanine is necessary but not sufficient to explain the role of the chirality and of the lactone structure in the function of the drug. A stereospecific interaction with the enzyme topoisomerase I seems necessary to stabilize the stacking complex. The first experiments using time-resolved fluorescence by two-photon excitation confirms that CPT does not bind to the isolated enzyme.

  2. Photochemistry of quinolylmethylisothioronium salts. Guanine selective DNA photocleavage reagents.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, U; Larsen, C; Karup, G; Jeppesen, C; Nielsen, P E; Buchardt, O

    1991-03-01

    Quinolylmethylisothioronium salts (1a and 4a) cleave DNA upon irradiation. The cleavage is more than 10-fold enhanced by piperidine treatment and subsequently shows a high preference for guanines. Photolysis of 1a, 2a and 4a in water at lambda greater than 300 nm resulted in photoheterolysis. Irradiation of 1a in 2-propanol gave only products from photohomolysis, irradiation of 1a in methanol and 2a and 4a in 2-propanol resulted in products from both photoheterolysis and photohomolysis. Quantum yields for the disappearance of 1a in water and 2-propanol were determined. The presence or absence of oxygen had no effect in water, whereas oxidation products were observed upon irradiation in methanol and 2-propanol in the presence of oxygen. The guanine specific DNA photoreaction is proposed to take place by alkylation at N7 via the quinolylmethyl carbocation and thus to represent a photoalkylation. PMID:2062877

  3. Impedimetric investigation of gold nanoparticles - guanine modified electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Vulcu, A.; Pruneanu, S.; Berghian-Grosan, C.; Olenic, L.; Muresan, L. M.; Barbu-Tudoran, L.

    2013-11-13

    In this paper we report the preparation of a modified electrode with gold nanoparticles and guanine. The colloidal suspension of gold nanoparticles was obtained by Turkevich method and was next analyzed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The gold electrode was modified by self-assembling the gold nanoparticles with guanine, the organic molecule playing also the role of linker. The electrochemical characteristics of the bare and modified electrode were investigated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). A theoretical model was developed based on an electrical equivalent circuit which contain solution resistance (R{sub s}), charge transfer resistance (R{sub ct}), Warburg impedance (Z{sub W}) and double layer capacitance (C{sub dl})

  4. Radical-based alkylation of guanine derivatives in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Caminal, Clara; Mulazzani, Quinto G

    2011-05-01

    The radical-based alkylation of 8-bromoguanosine (1a) and 8-bromo-2'-deoxyguanosine (1b) at the C8 position has been investigated in aqueous solutions. Alkyl radicals were generated by scavenging of the primary species of γ-radiolysis by the alcohol substrate. These reactions result in the efficient formation of intermolecular C-C bonds in aqueous media, by using the reactivity of α-hydroxyalkyl radicals derived from alcohols with 1a and 1b. A mechanism for the formation of C8 guanine alkylated adducts has been proposed, based on the quantification of radiation chemical yields for the disappearance of starting material and the formation of all products. Two α-hydroxyalkyl radicals are needed to form an alkylated guanine, the first one adding to C8 followed by ejection of Br(-) with formation of guanyl adduct and the second one acting as reducing agent of the guanyl adduct. PMID:21431230

  5. Scambio, a novel guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Christina; Hemmeryckx, Bianca; Haataja, Leena; Senadheera, Dinithi; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2004-01-01

    Background Small GTPases of the Rho family are critical regulators of various cellular functions including actin cytoskeleton organization, activation of kinase cascades and mitogenesis. For this reason, a major objective has been to understand the mechanisms of Rho GTPase regulation. Here, we examine the function of a novel protein, Scambio, which shares homology with the DH-PH domains of several known guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rho family members. Results Scambio is located on human chromosome 14q11.1, encodes a protein of around 181 kDa, and is highly expressed in both heart and skeletal muscle. In contrast to most DH-PH-domain containing proteins, it binds the activated, GTP-bound forms of Rac and Cdc42. However, it fails to associate with V14RhoA. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that Scambio and activated Rac3 colocalize in membrane ruffles at the cell periphery. In accordance with these findings, Scambio does not activate either Rac or Cdc42 but rather, stimulates guanine nucleotide exchange on RhoA and its close relative, RhoC. Conclusion Scambio associates with Rac in its activated conformation and functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho. PMID:15107133

  6. `Guanigma': the revised structure of biogenic anhydrous guanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Anna; Gur, Dvir; Polishchuk, Iryna; Levy, Davide; Pokroy, Boaz; Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J.; Addadi, Lia; Kronik, Leeor; Leiserowitz, Leslie

    Living organisms display a spectrum of colors, produced by pigmentation, structural coloration, or both. A relatively well-studied system, which produces colors via an array of alternating anhydrous guanine crystals and cytoplasm, is responsible for the metallic luster of many fish. The structure of biogenic anhydrous guanine was believed to be the same as that of the synthetic one - a monoclinic polymorph. Here we re-examine the structure of biogenic guanine, using experimental X-ray and electron diffraction (ED) data exposing troublesome inconsistencies - namely, a 'guanigma'. To address this, we sought alternative candidate polymorphs using symmetry and packing considerations, then used first principles calculations to determine whether the selected candidates could be energetically stable. We identified theoretically a different monoclinic polymorph, were able to synthesize it, and to confirm using X-ray diffraction that it is this polymorph that occurs in biogenic samples. However, the ED data were still not consistent with this polymorph, but rather with a theoretically generated orthorhombic polymorph. This apparent inconsistency was resolved by showing how the ED pattern could be affected by crystal structural faults composed of offset molecular layers.

  7. Formation of guanine ribonucleotidyl-(3'-5')-adenosine in a flavinogenic strain of Eremothecium ashbyii.

    PubMed

    Mitsuda, H; Nishikawa, Y; Nakajima, K

    1976-01-01

    The addition of caffeine caused the accumulation of a new nucleotide compound simultaneously with the rigid inhibition of ribofalvin production in non-growing cells of Eremothecium ashbyii. In the present study we tried to identify the structure of the nucleotide compound using non-growing cells of the mold. 1) It became possible to obtain a large amount of mycelia by masscultivation in a reagent tank. 2) A new nucleotide compound, referred to as compound A in the paper, was extracted with perchloric acid solution and purified by the following subsequent procedures: 1) Dowex 1 x 2 (HCOO-) column, 2) charcoal treatment, 3) DEAE-Sephadex A25 (CI-) column, 4) Dowex 1 x 2 (C1-) column, and 5) DEAE-Sephadex A25 (HCO3-) column. 3) The structure of the new nucleotide compound was proved to be guanine ribonucleotidyl-(3'-5')-adenosine (GpA) from the results of the following analyses: 1) alkaline degradation, 2) UV-spectra, IR-spectra and NMR-spectra, and 3) enzymatic treatments with RNase T2 and phosphodiesterase. 4) The roles of caffeine and guanine ribonucleotidyl-(3'-5')-adenosine in connection with flavinogenesis of this mold were discussed. PMID:182940

  8. Isolation and characterization of human liver guanine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Gupta, N K; Glantz, M D

    1985-01-01

    Guanine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.3, guanine aminohydrolase [GAH]) was purified 3248-fold from human liver to homogeneity with a specific activity of 21.5. A combination of ammonium sulfate fractionation, and DEAE-cellulose, hydroxylapatite, and affinity chromatography with guanine triphosphate ligand were used to purify the enzyme. The enzyme was a dimer protein of a molecular weight of 120,000 with each subunit of 59,000 as determined by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. Isoelectric focusing gave a pI of 4.76. It was found to be an acidic protein, as evidenced by the amino acid analysis, enriched with glutamate, aspartate, alanine and glycine. It showed a sharp pH optimum of 8.0. The apparent Km for guanine was determined to be 1.53 X 10(-5) M at pH 6.0 and 2 X 10(-4) M for 8-azaguanine as a substrate at pH 6.0. The enzyme was found to be sensitive to p-hydroxymercuribenzoate inhibition with a Ki of 1.53 X 10(-5) M and a Ki of 5 X 10(-5) M with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide as an inhibitor. The inhibition with iodoacetic acid showed only a 7% loss in the activity at 1 X 10(-4) M and a 24% loss at 1 X 10(-3) M after 30 min of incubation, whereas p-hydroxymercuribenzoate incubation for 30 min resulted in a 91% loss of activity at a concentration of 1 X 10(-4) M. Guanine was the substrate for all of the inhibition studies. The enzyme was observed to be stable up to 40 degrees C, with a loss of almost all activity at 65 degrees C with 30 min incubation. Two pKa values were obtained at 5.85 and 8.0. Analysis of the N-terminal amino acid proved to be valine while the C-terminal residue was identified as alanine. PMID:3966794

  9. Use of HeLa cell guanine nucleotides by Chlamydia psittaci.

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, M M; Hatch, T P

    1979-01-01

    Exogenous guanine was found to be incorporated into the nucleic acids of Chlamydia psittaci when the parasite was grown in HeLa cells containing hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) activity but not when the parasite was grown in transferase-deficient HeLa cells. No evidence for a chlamydia-specific transferase activity was found in either transferase-containing or transferase-deficient infected HeLa cells. It is concluded that C. psittaci is incapable of metabolizing guanine, but that the parasite can use host-generated guanine nucleotides as precursors for nucleic acid synthesis. Images PMID:478649

  10. Production of guanine from NH(4)CN polymerizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, M.; Miller, S. L.; Oro, J.

    1999-01-01

    The synthesis of adenine from the polymerization of concentrated ammonium cyanide solutions is well known. We show here that guanine is also produced by this reaction but at yields ranging from 10 to 40 times less than that of adenine. This synthesis is effective at both +80 and -20 degrees C. Since high concentrations of NH(4)CN are obtainable only by freezing, this prebiotic synthesis would be applicable to frozen regions of the primitive Earth, the Jovian satellite Europa and other icy satellites, and the parent body of the Murchison meteorite.

  11. Production of guanine from NH(4)CN polymerizations.

    PubMed

    Levy, M; Miller, S L; Oró, J

    1999-08-01

    The synthesis of adenine from the polymerization of concentrated ammonium cyanide solutions is well known. We show here that guanine is also produced by this reaction but at yields ranging from 10 to 40 times less than that of adenine. This synthesis is effective at both +80 and -20 degrees C. Since high concentrations of NH(4)CN are obtainable only by freezing, this prebiotic synthesis would be applicable to frozen regions of the primitive Earth, the Jovian satellite Europa and other icy satellites, and the parent body of the Murchison meteorite. PMID:10441668

  12. Regulation of adenylyl cyclase from Blastocladiella emersonii by guanine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Terenzi, H; Maia, J C

    1993-11-01

    GTP gamma S stimulates adenylyl cyclase in particulate fractions of Blastocladiella emersonii zoospores. Cholera toxin catalyses the ADP-ribosylation of a membrane protein of a molecular weight (46,000) similar to that of the alpha subunit of Gs found in vertebrate cells. A membrane protein of 46 kDa can also be recognized in Western blots by an antipeptide antiserum (RM/1) raised against the C-terminus of G alpha 2-subunits. These results suggest that a G-protein mediates the regulation of Blastocladiella adenylyl cyclase by guanine nucleotides. PMID:8224237

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal the balance of forces governing the formation of a guanine tetrad—a common structural unit of G-quadruplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kogut, Mateusz; Kleist, Cyprian; Czub, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (G4) are nucleic acid conformations of guanine-rich sequences, in which guanines are arranged in the square-planar G-tetrads, stacked on one another. G4 motifs form in vivo and are implicated in regulation of such processes as gene expression and chromosome maintenance. The structure and stability of various G4 topologies were determined experimentally; however, the driving forces for their formation are not fully understood at the molecular level. Here, we used all-atom molecular dynamics to probe the microscopic origin of the G4 motif stability. By computing the free energy profiles governing the dissociation of the 3′-terminal G-tetrad in the telomeric parallel-stranded G4, we examined the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of a single G-tetrad, as a common structural unit of G4 DNA. Our results indicate that the energetics of guanine association alone does not explain the overall stability of the G-tetrad and that interactions involving sugar–phosphate backbone, in particular, the constrained minimization of the phosphate–phosphate repulsion energy, are crucial in providing the observed enthalpic stabilization. This enthalpic gain is largely compensated by the unfavorable entropy change due to guanine association and optimization of the backbone topology. PMID:26980278

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal the balance of forces governing the formation of a guanine tetrad-a common structural unit of G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Kogut, Mateusz; Kleist, Cyprian; Czub, Jacek

    2016-04-20

    G-quadruplexes (G4) are nucleic acid conformations of guanine-rich sequences, in which guanines are arranged in the square-planar G-tetrads, stacked on one another. G4 motifs formin vivoand are implicated in regulation of such processes as gene expression and chromosome maintenance. The structure and stability of various G4 topologies were determined experimentally; however, the driving forces for their formation are not fully understood at the molecular level. Here, we used all-atom molecular dynamics to probe the microscopic origin of the G4 motif stability. By computing the free energy profiles governing the dissociation of the 3'-terminal G-tetrad in the telomeric parallel-stranded G4, we examined the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of a single G-tetrad, as a common structural unit of G4 DNA. Our results indicate that the energetics of guanine association alone does not explain the overall stability of the G-tetrad and that interactions involving sugar-phosphate backbone, in particular, the constrained minimization of the phosphate-phosphate repulsion energy, are crucial in providing the observed enthalpic stabilization. This enthalpic gain is largely compensated by the unfavorable entropy change due to guanine association and optimization of the backbone topology. PMID:26980278

  15. Kinetic mechanism of Plasmodium falciparum hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sourav; Nagappa, Lakshmeesha K; Prahladarao, Vasudeva S; Balaram, Hemalatha

    2015-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (PfHGXPRT) exhibits a kinetic mechanism that differs from that of the human homolog. Human HGPRT follows a steady-state ordered mechanism, wherein PRPP binding precedes the binding of hypoxanthine/guanine and release of product IMP/GMP is the rate limiting step. In the current study, initial velocity kinetics with PfHGXPRT indicates a steady-state ordered mechanism, wherein xanthine binding is conditional to the binding of PRPP. The value of the rate constant for IMP dissociation is greater by 183-fold than the kcat for hypoxanthine phosphoribosylation and this results in the absence of burst in progress curves from pre-steady-state kinetics. Further, IMP binding is 1000 times faster (4s(-1) at 0.5μM IMP) when compared to the kcat (3.9±0.2×10(-3)s(-1)) for the reverse IMP pyrophosphorolysis reaction. These results lend support to the fact that in both forward and reverse reactions, the process of chemical conversion (formation of IMP/hypoxanthine) is slow and the events of ligand association and dissociation are faster. PMID:26902413

  16. Activated Ras interacts with the Ral guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator.

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, F; Fields, S; Schneider, C; Martin, G S

    1994-01-01

    The yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify proteins that interact with Ras. The H-Ras protein was found to interact with a guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator (GDS) that has been previously shown to regulate guanine nucleotide exchange on another member of the Ras protein family, Ral. The interaction is mediated by the C-terminal, noncatalytic segment of the RalGDS and can be detected both in vivo, using the two-hybrid system, and in vitro, with purified recombinant proteins. The interaction of the RalGDS C-terminal segment with Ras is specific, dependent on activation of Ras by GTP, and blocked by a mutation that affects Ras effector function. These characteristics are similar to those previously demonstrated for the interaction between Ras and its putative effector, Raf, suggesting that the RalGDS may also be a Ras effector. Consistent with this idea, the RalGDS was found to inhibit the binding of Raf to Ras. Images PMID:7972015

  17. Distance measurements between paramagnetic ligands bound to parallel stranded guanine quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Donohue, M P; Szalai, V A

    2016-06-01

    Aside from a double helix, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) folds into non-canonical structures, one of which is the guanine quadruplex. Cationic porphyrins bind guanine quadruplexes, but the effects of ligand binding on the structure of guanine quadruplexes with more than four contiguous guanine quartets remains to be fully elucidated. Double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy conducted at 9.5 GHz (X-band) using broadband, shaped inversion pulses was used to measure the distances between cationic copper porphyrins bound to model parallel-stranded guanine quadruplexes with increasing numbers of guanine quartets. A single Gaussian component was found to best model the time domain datasets, characteristic of a 2 : 1 binding stoichiometry between the porphyrins and each quadruplex. The measured Cu(2+)-Cu(2+) distances were found to be linearly proportional with the number of guanines. Rather unexpectedly, the ligand end-stacking distance was found to monotonically decreases the overall quadruplex length was extended, suggesting a conformational change in the quadruplex secondary structure dependent upon the number of successive guanine quartets. PMID:27218217

  18. Guanine-based photonic crystals in fish scales form from an amorphous precursor.

    PubMed

    Gur, Dvir; Politi, Yael; Sivan, Berta; Fratzl, Peter; Weiner, Steve; Addadi, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Starting from disorder: anhydrous guanine crystals compose the photonic arrays responsible for the skin and scale iridescence found in Japanese Koi fish. These guanine crystals were found to form in intracellular vesicles through an amorphous precursor phase. A combined cryo-SEM and synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction study showed the evolution of the crystals in great detail. PMID:22951999

  19. Ab initio study of guanine damage by hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Galina M; Wang, Dunyou; Huo, Winifred M

    2015-01-15

    Multiconfigurational ab initio methods are used in this study to examine two initial reactions that take place during the OH radical attack of the DNA base guanine: a ring opening reaction and a hydrogen transfer reaction. The same reactions are also studied in the presence of a single water molecule. The ring opening reaction has a moderate barrier height of ∼20-25 kcal/mol that is relatively insensitive to the presence of water. The barrier of the H-transfer reaction, on the other hand, is lowered from ∼50 to ∼22 kcal/mol when one water molecule is added, thus becoming comparable to the barrier height of the ring opening reaction. PMID:25517252

  20. Novel electrochemical sensor based on functionalized graphene for simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Niu, De-Jun; Sun, Jun-Yong; Han, Cong-Hui; Wu, Zhi-Wei; Li, Yan-Li; Xiong, Xiao-Qin

    2011-02-01

    A nano-material carboxylic acid functionalized graphene (graphene-COOH) was prepared and used to construct a novel biosensor for the simultaneous detection of adenine and guanine. The direct electrooxidation behaviors of adenine and guanine on the graphene-COOH modified glassy carbon electrode (graphene-COOH/GCE) were carefully investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The results indicated that both adenine and guanine showed the increase of the oxidation peak currents with the negative shift of the oxidation peak potentials in contrast to that on the bare glassy carbon electrode. The electrochemical parameters of adenine and guanine on the graphene-COOH/GCE were calculated and a simple and reliable electroanalytical method was developed for the detection of adenine and guanine, respectively. The modified electrode exhibited good behaviors in the simultaneous detection of adenine and guanine with the peak separation as 0.334V. The detection limit for individual determination of guanine and adenine was 5.0×10(-8)M and 2.5×10(-8)M (S/N=3), respectively. Furthermore, the measurements of thermally denatured single-stranded DNA were carried out and the value of (G+C)/(A+T) of single-stranded DNA was calculated as 0.80. The biosensor exhibited some advantages, such as simplicity, rapidity, high sensitivity, good reproducibility and long-term stability. PMID:21050729

  1. Quantum molecular modeling of the interaction between guanine and alkylating agents--1--sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Broch, H; Hamza, A; Vasilescu, D

    1996-06-01

    Interaction between Guanine and the episulfonium form of Sulfur mustard (HD) was studied using the ab initio LCAO-MO method at the HF/6-31G level. The alkylation mechanism on guanine-N7 was analyzed by using a supermolecular modeling. Our stereostructural results associated with the molecular electrostatic potentials and HOMO-LUMO properties, show that in vacuum the alkylation of the N7 of guanine by HD in the aggressive episulfonium form is a direct process without transition state and of which the pathway is determined. PMID:8832373

  2. Mechanisms involved in the antinociception induced by spinal administration of inosine or guanine in mice.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Enderson D; Schallenberger, Cristhine; Böhmer, Ana Elisa; Hansel, Gisele; Fagundes, Aécio C; Milman, Michael; Silva, Marcos D P; Oses, Jean P; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Portela, Luís V; Elisabetsky, Elaine; Souza, Diogo O; Schmidt, André P

    2016-02-01

    It is well known that adenine-based purines exert multiple effects on pain transmission. Recently, we have demonstrated that guanine-based purines may produce some antinociceptive effects against chemical and thermal pain in mice. The present study was designed to investigate the antinociceptive effects of intrathecal (i.t.) administration of inosine or guanine in mice. Additionally, investigation into the mechanisms of action of these purines, their general toxicity and measurements of CSF purine levels were performed. Animals received an i.t. injection of vehicle (30mN NaOH), inosine or guanine (up to 600nmol) and submitted to several pain models and behavioural paradigms. Guanine and inosine produced dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in the tail-flick, hot-plate, intraplantar (i.pl.) glutamate, i.pl. capsaicin and acetic acid pain models. Additionally, i.t. inosine inhibited the biting behaviour induced by spinal injection of capsaicin and i.t. guanine reduced the biting behaviour induced by spinal injection of glutamate or AMPA. Intrathecal administration of inosine (200nmol) induced an approximately 115-fold increase on CSF inosine levels. This study provides new evidence on the mechanism of action of extracellular guanine and inosine presenting antinociceptive effects following spinal administration. These effects seem to be related, at least partially, to the modulation of A1 adenosine receptors. PMID:26712379

  3. Horizontal gene transfer of a Chlamydial tRNA-guanine transglycosylase gene to eukaryotic microbes.

    PubMed

    Manna, Sam; Harman, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    tRNA-guanine transglycosylases are found in all domains of life and mediate the base exchange of guanine with queuine in the anticodon loop of tRNAs. They can also regulate virulence in bacteria such as Shigella flexneri, which has prompted the development of drugs that inhibit the function of these enzymes. Here we report a group of tRNA-guanine transglycosylases in eukaryotic microbes (algae and protozoa) which are more similar to their bacterial counterparts than previously characterized eukaryotic tRNA-guanine transglycosylases. We provide evidence demonstrating that the genes encoding these enzymes were acquired by these eukaryotic lineages via horizontal gene transfer from the Chlamydiae group of bacteria. Given that the S. flexneri tRNA-guanine transglycosylase can be targeted by drugs, we propose that the bacterial-like tRNA-guanine transglycosylases could potentially be targeted in a similar fashion in pathogenic amoebae that possess these enzymes such as Acanthamoeba castellanii. This work also presents ancient prokaryote-to-eukaryote horizontal gene transfer events as an untapped resource of potential drug target identification in pathogenic eukaryotes. PMID:26435002

  4. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the studies of guanine quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Juskowiak, Bernard; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2006-01-01

    A guanine (G)-quadruplex DNA motif has recently emerged as a biologically important structure that is believed to interfere with telomere maintenance by telomerase. G-quadruplexes exhibit four-stranded structures containing one or more nucleic acid strands with central channel able to accommodate metal cations. Coordination of certain metal cations stabilizes G-quadruplex as with some promising small organic molecules that promote the formation and/or stabilization of G-quadruplex. Among many techniques employed to explore properties of G-quadruplexes, the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique has been recognized as a powerful tool to study G-quadruplex formation. This review summarizes the current developments in the uses of FRET technique for the fundamental structural investigations and its practical applications. Applications include FRET-based selection of efficient quadruplex-binding ligands, design of a nanomolecular machine, and a molecular aptamer beacon for protein recognition. We also describe a technique for detection of potassium ions in aqueous solution with the use of quadruplex-based sensor (potassium-sensing oligonucleotide). PMID:16785636

  5. Fluorescence enhancement of DNA-silver nanoclusters from guanine proximity

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Hsin-chih; Sharma, Jaswinder; Yoo, Hyojong; Martinez, Jennifer S

    2010-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-templated, silver nanoclusters (DNA/Ag NCs) are a versatile set of fluorophores and have already been used for live cell imaging, detection of specific metal ions, and single-nucleotide variation identification. Compared to commonly used organic dyes, these fluorescent nanoclusters have much better photostability and are often a few times brighter. Owing to their small size, simple preparation, and biocompatibility (i.e. made of nontoxic metals), DNA/Ag NCs should find more applications in biological imaging and chemical detection in the years to come. While clearly promising as new fluorophores, DNA/Ag NCs possess a unique and poorly understood dynamic process not shared by organic dyes or photoluminescent nanocrystals - the conversion among different NC species due to silver oxidation/reduction or NC regrouping. While this environmental sensitivity can be viewed as a drawback, in the appropriate context, it can be used as a sensor or reporter. Often reversible, conversions among different NC species have been found to depend upon a number of factors, including time, temperature, oxygen and salt content. In this communication, we report significant fluorescence enhancement of DNA/Ag NCs via interactions with guanine-rich DNA sequences. Moreover, we demonstrated this property can be used for sensitive detection of specific target DNA from a human oncogene (i.e. Braf gene).

  6. Real-Space Evidence of Rare Guanine Tautomer Induced by Water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Xie, Lei; Ding, Yuanqi; Sun, Qiang; Xu, Wei

    2016-03-22

    Water is vital for life as a solvent. Specifically, it has been well established that DNA molecules are hydrated in vivo, and water has been found to be responsible for the presence of some noncanonical DNA base tautomers. Theoretical investigations have shown that the existence of water could significantly influence the relative stability of different DNA base tautomers, reduce the energy barrier of tautomeric conversions, and thus promote the formation of some rare base tautomers. In this work, we report the real-space experimental evidence of rare base tautomers. From the high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy imaging, we surprisingly find the formation of the rare guanine tautomer, i.e., G/(3H,7H) form, on the Au(111) surface by delicately introducing water into the system. The key to the formation of this rare tautomer is proposed to be the "water bridge" that largely reduces the energy barriers of intramolecular proton-transfer processes as revealed by extensive density functional theory calculations. The real-space experimental evidence and the proposed mechanism make a step forward toward the fundamental understanding of water-assisted base tautomerization processes. PMID:26876579

  7. Electronic excited states of guanine-cytosine hairpins and duplexes studied by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brazard, Johanna; Thazhathveetil, Arun K; Vayá, Ignacio; Lewis, Frederick D; Gustavsson, Thomas; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2013-08-01

    Guanine-cytosine hairpins, containing a hexaethylene glycol bridge, are studied by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy and time-correlated single photon counting; their properties are compared to those of duplexes with the same sequence. It is shown that, both in hairpins and in duplexes, base pairing induces quenching of the ππ* fluorescence, the quantum yield decreasing by at least two orders of magnitude. When the size of the systems increases from two to ten base pairs, a fluorescent component decaying on the nanosecond time-scale appears at energy higher than that stemming from the bright states of non-interacting mono-nucleotides (ca. 330 nm). For ten base pairs, this new fluorescence forms a well-defined band peaking at 305 nm. Its intensity is about 20% higher for the hairpin compared to the duplex. Its position (red-shifted by 1600 cm(-1)) and width (broader by 1800 cm(-1) FWHM) differ from those observed for large duplexes containing 1000 base pairs, suggesting the involvement of electronic coupling. Fluorescence anisotropy reveals that the excited states responsible for high energy emission are not populated directly upon photon absorption but are reached during a relaxation process. They are assigned to charge transfer states. According to the emerging picture, the amplitude of conformational motions determines whether instantaneous deactivation to the ground state or emission from charge transfer states will take place, while ππ* fluorescence is associated to imperfect base-pairing. PMID:23736116

  8. Proteomic analysis of Rac1 signaling regulation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-08-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 is implicated in various cellular processes that are essential for normal cell function. Deregulation of Rac1 signaling has also been linked to a number of diseases, including cancer. The diversity of Rac1 functioning in cells is mainly attributed to its ability to bind to a multitude of downstream effectors following activation by Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factors (GEFs). Despite the identification of a large number of Rac1 binding partners, factors influencing downstream specificity are poorly defined, thus hindering the detailed understanding of both Rac1's normal and pathological functions. In a recent study, we demonstrated a role for 2 Rac-specific GEFs, Tiam1 and P-Rex1, in mediating Rac1 anti- versus pro-migratory effects, respectively. Importantly, via conducting a quantitative proteomic screen, we identified distinct changes in the Rac1 interactome following activation by either GEF, indicating that these opposing effects are mediated through GEF modulation of the Rac1 interactome. Here, we present the full list of identified Rac1 interactors together with functional annotation of the differentially regulated Rac1 binding partners. In light of this data, we also provide additional insights into known and novel signaling cascades that might account for the GEF-mediated Rac1-driven cellular effects. PMID:27152953

  9. Proteomic analysis of Rac1 signaling regulation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors

    PubMed Central

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The small GTPase Rac1 is implicated in various cellular processes that are essential for normal cell function. Deregulation of Rac1 signaling has also been linked to a number of diseases, including cancer. The diversity of Rac1 functioning in cells is mainly attributed to its ability to bind to a multitude of downstream effectors following activation by Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factors (GEFs). Despite the identification of a large number of Rac1 binding partners, factors influencing downstream specificity are poorly defined, thus hindering the detailed understanding of both Rac1's normal and pathological functions. In a recent study, we demonstrated a role for 2 Rac-specific GEFs, Tiam1 and P-Rex1, in mediating Rac1 anti- versus pro-migratory effects, respectively. Importantly, via conducting a quantitative proteomic screen, we identified distinct changes in the Rac1 interactome following activation by either GEF, indicating that these opposing effects are mediated through GEF modulation of the Rac1 interactome. Here, we present the full list of identified Rac1 interactors together with functional annotation of the differentially regulated Rac1 binding partners. In light of this data, we also provide additional insights into known and novel signaling cascades that might account for the GEF-mediated Rac1-driven cellular effects. PMID:27152953

  10. Guanine deaminase inhibitor from rat liver. Isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ali, S; Sitaramayya, A; Kumar, K S; Krishnan, P S

    1974-01-01

    1. An inhibitor of cytoplasmic guanine deaminase of rat liver was isolated from liver ;heavy mitochondrial' fraction after freezing and thawing and treatment with Triton X-100. 2. Submitochondrial fractionation revealed that the inhibitor was localized in the outer-membrane fraction. 3. The method of purification of inhibitor, involving precipitation with (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, its precipitability by trichloroacetic acid and the pattern of absorption in the u.v. indicated that the inhibitor was a protein. In confirmation, tryptic digestion of the isolated material resulted in destruction of the inhibitor activity. The inhibitor was stable to acid, but labile to heat. 4. The isolated inhibitor required phosphatidylcholine (lecithin) for activity. Phosphatidylcholine also partially protected the inhibitor against heat inactivation. 5. When detergent treatment was omitted, the inhibitor activity of frozen mitochondria was precipitated by (NH(4))(2)SO(4) in a fully active form without supplementation with phosphatidylcholine, indicating that Triton X-100 ruptured the linkage between inhibitor and lipid. 6. A reconstituted sample of inhibitor-phosphatidylcholine complex was precipitated in a fully active form by dialysis against 2-mercaptoethanol, but treatment of the precipitate with NaCl yielded an extract which was inactive unless supplemented with fresh phosphatidylcholine. 7. We interpret the results as evidence that the inhibitor was present in vivo as a lipoprotein and that once the complex was dissociated by the action of detergent and the protein precipitated, there was an absolute need for exogenous phosphatidylcholine for its activity. The manner in which inhibitor associated with the outer membrane of rat liver mitochondria might regulate the activity of the enzyme in the supernatant has been suggested. PMID:4821397

  11. RasGRP Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ksionda, Olga; Limnander, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Summary RasGRP proteins are activators of Ras and other related small GTPases by the virtue of functioning as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). In vertebrates, four RasGRP family members have been described. RasGRP-1 through −4 share many structural domains but there are also subtle differences between each of the different family members. Whereas SOS RasGEFs are ubiquitously expressed, RasGRP proteins are expressed in distinct patterns, such as in different cells of the hematopoietic system and in the brain. Most studies have concentrated on the role of RasGRP proteins in the development and function of immune cell types because of the predominant RasGRP expression profiles in these cells and the immune phenotypes of mice deficient for Rasgrp genes. However, more recent studies demonstrate that RasGRPs also play an important role in tumorigenesis. Examples are skin- and hematological-cancers but also solid malignancies such as melanoma or prostate cancer. These novel studies bring up many new and unanswered questions related to the molecular mechanism of RasGRP-driven oncogenesis, such as new receptor systems that RasGRP appears to respond to as well as regulatory mechanism for RasGRP expression that appear to be perturbed in these cancers. Here we will review some of the known aspects of RasGRP biology in lymphocytes and will discuss the exciting new notion that RasGRP Ras exchange factors play a role in oncogenesis downstream of various growth factor receptors. PMID:24744772

  12. The crystal structure of a parallel-stranded guanine tetraplex at 0.95 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Phillips, K; Dauter, Z; Murchie, A I; Lilley, D M; Luisi, B

    1997-10-17

    In both DNA and RNA, stretches of guanine bases can form stable four-stranded helices in the presence of sodium or potassium ions. Sequences with a propensity to form guanine tetraplexes have been found in chromosomal telomers, immunoglobulin switch regions, and recombination sites. We report the crystal structure at 0.95 A resolution of a parallel-stranded tetraplex formed by the hexanucleotide d(TG4T) in the presence of sodium ions. The four strands form a right-handed helix that is stabilized by hydrogen-bonding tetrads of co-planar guanine bases. Well-resolved sodium ions are found between and, at defined points, within tetrad planes and are coordinated with the guanine O6 groups. Nine calcium ions have been identified, each with a well-defined hepta-coordinate hydration shell. Hydrogen-bonding water patterns are observed within the tetraplex's helical grooves and clustered about the phosphate groups. Water molecules in the groove may form a hydrogen bond with the O4', and may affect the stacking behavior of guanine. Two distinct stacking arrangements are noted for the guanine tetrads. The thymine bases do not contribute to the four-stranded conformation, but instead stack to stabilize the crystal lattice. We present evidence that the sugar conformation is strained and propose that this originates from forces that optimize guanine base stacking. Discrete conformational disorder is observed at several places in the phosphodiester backbone, which results from a simple crankshaft rotation that requires no net change in the sugar conformation. PMID:9367755

  13. Experimental and first-principles study of guanine adsorption on ZnO clusters.

    PubMed

    Chandraboss, V L; Karthikeyan, B; Senthilvelan, S

    2014-11-14

    Theoretical investigation of guanine, DNA base adsorption on the ZnO model clusters, viz., Zn2O2, Zn3O3, Zn4O4 ring (R) and Zn4O4 wurtzite (W) in terms of geometry, binding site, binding energy (EB), energy gap (Eg), electronic and spectral properties were studied by a density functional theory (DFT) method. The guanine adsorption on the ZnO (G-ZnO) clusters is modeled by the B3LYP/LanL2DZ method. The calculated binding energy (EB) and energy gap (Eg) of the guanine molecule are highly dependent on the nature of the cluster size and vary with the size of the clusters. Physisorption proceeded via formation of the NZn bond between guanine and the active Zn(2+) site on ZnO. The HOMO-LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs in the G-ZnO clusters, from ZnO to guanine to better understand the interaction. The Mulliken charges are computed. The electronic properties of ZnO and G-ZnO clusters were compared with different basis sets (B3LYP/6-31G, B3LYP/6-311G, MP2/6-31G and MP2/LanL2DZ). Experimental information like microscopic and spectroscopic evidence is also included for understanding the guanine-ZnO interactions. The G-ZnO composite was prepared by a precipitation method and characterized by SEM with EDX, FT-IR and FT-RAMAN analysis. The interaction of guanine with ZnO nanoparticles was observed by UV-vis spectroscopy. The experimental results are compared with the DFT results in the light of these new insights. PMID:25266048

  14. Absolute effective cross sections of ionization of adenine and guanine molecules by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafranyosh, I. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu.; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Minaev, B. F.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.

    2015-10-01

    Effective cross sections of the formation of positive ions of nitrous nucleic acids of adenine and guanine are determined by the crossed electron and molecular beam method in the energy interval from the threshold to 200 eV. It is found that the maximal value of the total cross section of adenine ionization is attained at an energy of 90 eV and is equal to (2.8 ± 0.6) × 10-15 cm2. The maximal value of the total cross section of guanine ionization is equal to (3.2 ± 0.7) × 10-15 cm2 and is observed at an energy of 88 eV. The energy ionization thresholds are determined, which amount to (8.8 ± 0.2) eV for adenine and to (8.3 ± 0.2) eV for guanine. The adenine and guanine mass spectra are measured. The absolute values of partial ionization cross sections of adenine and guanine molecules are determined.

  15. Inhibitory effects of the guanine moiety on Suzuki couplings of unprotected halonucleosides in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Western, Elizabeth C; Shaughnessy, Kevin H

    2005-08-01

    In the Suzuki arylations of unprotected halonucleosides in aqueous media, 8-bromo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8BrdG) couplings were slower to reach completion than the corresponding 8-bromo-2'-deoxyadenosine (8BrdA) couplings. The guanine moiety has an acidic proton, which under our Suzuki conditions (pH congruent with 10) may be deprotonated to give an anion that can coordinate to palladium. The possibility that guanine coordination was responsible for the observed slower rates was explored using additive experiments in which nonhalogenated nucleosides were added to the Suzuki coupling reaction of 8BrdA or 4-bromotoluene and PhB(OH)2 and the reaction progress monitored by HPLC or GC. Adding dG slowed these reactions, and an induction period was observed. The addition of dA or 1-methyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (1MedG) to these couplings did not affect the rate of conversion to product. Guanine coordination was further explored using 13C and 31P NMR spectroscopy, which implies that guanine is coordinating to palladium through N-1 or O-6, or both. Furthermore, the presence of dG inhibited the formation of the active palladium(0) catalytic species, which may account for both the observed induction period and the sluggishness of reactions where guanine is involved. PMID:16050700

  16. Highly sensitive and selective fluorescent assay for guanine based on the Cu2 +/eosin Y system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Huimin; Cui, Yi; Gong, Yijun; Feng, Suling

    2016-05-01

    A fluorescent probe has been developed for the determination of guanine based on the quenched fluorescence signal of Cu2 +/eosin Y. Cu2 + interacted with eosin Y, resulting in fluorescence quenching. Subsequently, with the addition of guanine to the Cu2 +/eosin Y system, guanine reacted with Cu2 + to form 1:1 chelate cation, which further combined with eosin Y to form a 1:1 ternary ion-association complex by electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic interaction, resulting in significant decrease of the fluorescence. Hence, a fluorescent system was constructed for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of guanine with a detection limit as low as 1.5 nmol L- 1 and a linear range of 3.3-116 nmol L- 1. The method has been applied satisfactorily to the determination of guanine in DNA and urine samples with the recoveries from 98.7% to 105%. This study significantly expands the realm of application of ternary ion-association complex in fluorescence probe.

  17. Theoretical Study of the Photophysics of 8-Vinylguanine, an Isomorphic Fluorescent Analogue of Guanine.

    PubMed

    Kochman, Michał A; Pola, Martina; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2016-08-11

    Paving the way for the application of the algebraic-diagrammatic construction scheme of second-order (ADC(2)) to systems based on the guanine chromophore, we demonstrate the this excited-state electronic structure method provides a realistic description of the photochemistry of 9H-guanine, in close agreement with the benchmark provided by the CASPT2 method. We then proceed to apply the ADC(2) method to the photochemistry of 8-vinylguanine (8vG), a minimally modified analogue of guanine which, unlike the naturally occurring nucleobase, displays intense fluorescence, indicative of a much longer-lived excited electronic state. The emissive electronic state of 8vG is identified as an ππ*-type intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state, in which a charge of roughly -0.2 e is transferred from the guanine moiety onto the vinyl substituent. The main radiationless deactivation pathway competing with fluorescence is predicted to involve the molecule leaving the minimum on the ICT ππ* state, and reaching a region of the S1 adiabatic state where it resembles the La ππ* state of unmodified 9H-guanine. The topology of the La ππ* region of the S1 state favors subsequent internal conversion at a crossing seam with the ground electronic state. The sensitivity of this process to environment polarity may explain the experimentally observed fluorescence quenching of 8vG upon incorporation in single- and double-stranded DNA. PMID:27427772

  18. Effect of intense magnetic fields on the convection of biogenic guanine crystals in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Mizukawa, Y.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the basic magneto-optic properties of biogenic microcrystals in aqueous media were investigated. Microcrystals, mica plates, silica, and microcrystals from a diatom cell and biogenic guanine crystals from goldfish showed light scattering inhibition when the crystals were observed in water under a 5 T magnetic field and dark-field illumination. In particular, in 50% ethanol/water medium, convection of the biogenic guanine particle aggregates was reversibly inhibited when the microcrystal suspension was exposed to a 5 T magnetic field. Microscopic observation comparing the biogenic guanine crystals in water with 95% ethanol or 99% acetone revealed that light flickering on the surface of the crystals was affected by the surface interaction of the crystal with the surrounding medium. By considering both the magnetic orientation of the microcrystals and the possible interactions of crystals with the surrounding medium, a magnetically controllable fluidic tracer was suggested.

  19. Guanine riboswitch variants from Mesoplasma florum selectively recognize 2′-deoxyguanosine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jane N.; Roth, Adam; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2007-01-01

    Several mRNA aptamers have been identified in Mesoplasma florum that have sequence and structural features resembling those of guanine and adenine riboswitches. Two features distinguish these RNAs from established purine-sensing riboswitches. All possess shortened hairpin-loop sequences expected to alter tertiary contacts known to be critical for aptamer folding. The RNAs also carry nucleotide changes in the core of each aptamer that otherwise is strictly conserved in guanine and adenine riboswitches. Some aptamers retain the ability to selectively bind guanine or adenine despite these mutations. However, one variant type exhibits selective and high-affinity binding of 2′-deoxyguanosine, which is consistent with its occurrence in the 5′ untranslated region of an operon containing ribonucleotide reductase genes. The identification of riboswitch variants that bind nucleosides and reject nucleobases reveals that natural metabolite-sensing RNA motifs can accrue mutations that expand the diversity of ligand detection in bacteria. PMID:17911257

  20. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with uracil, guanine, thymine and L-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silambarasan, D.; Iyakutti, K.; Vasu, V.

    2014-06-01

    Experimental investigation of functionalization of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (OSWCNTs) with three nucleic acid bases such as uracil, guanine, thymine and one amino acid, L-alanine is carried out. Initially, the SWCNTs are oxidized by acid treatment. Further, the oxidized SWCNTs are effectively functionalized with aforementioned biological compounds by ultrasonication. The diameter of OSWCNTs has increased after the adsorption of biological compounds. The cumulative Π-Π stacking, hydrogen bond and polar interaction are the key factors to realize the adsorption. The amount of adsorption of each biological compound is estimated. The adsorption of guanine is more among all the four biological compounds.

  1. Transcription profiling of guanine nucleotide binding proteins during developmental regulation, and pesticide response in Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guanine nucleotide binding proteins (GNBP or G-protein) are glycoproteins anchored on the cytoplasmic cell membrane, and are mediators for many cellular processes. Complete cDNA of guanine nucleotide-binding protein gene ß-subunit (SiGNBP) was cloned and sequenced from S. invicta workers. To detect ...

  2. Catching Functional Modes and Structural Communication in Dbl Family Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Francesco; Felline, Angelo; Fanelli, Francesca

    2015-09-28

    Computational approaches such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Elastic Network Model-Normal Mode Analysis (ENM-NMA) are proving to be of great value in investigating relevant biological problems linked to slow motions with no demand in computer power. In this study, these approaches have been coupled to the graph theory-based Protein Structure Network (PSN) analysis to dissect functional dynamics and structural communication in the Dbl family of Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (RhoGEFs). They are multidomain proteins whose common structural feature is a DH-PH tandem domain deputed to the GEF activity that makes them play a central role in cell and cancer biology. While their common GEF action is accomplished by the DH domain, their regulatory mechanisms are highly variegate and depend on the PH and the additional domains as well as on interacting proteins. Major evolutionary-driven deformations as inferred from PCA concern the α6 helix of DH that dictates the orientation of the PH domain. Such deformations seem to depend on the mechanisms adopted by the GEF to prevent Rho binding, i.e. functional specialization linked to autoinhibition. In line with PCA, ENM-NMA indicates α6 and the linked PH domain as the portions of the tandem domain holding almost the totality of intrinsic and functional dynamics, with the α6/β1 junction acting as a hinge point for the collective motions of PH. In contrast, the DH domain holds a static scaffolding and hub behavior, with structural communication playing a central role in the regulatory actions by other domains/proteins. Possible allosteric communication pathways involving essentially DH were indeed found in those RhoGEFs acting as effectors of small or heterotrimeric RasGTPases. The employed methodology is suitable for deciphering structure/dynamics relationships in large sets of homologous or analogous proteins. PMID:26322553

  3. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors involved in cyclic-stretch-induced reorientation of vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abiko, Hiyori; Fujiwara, Sachiko; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Hiatari, Ryuichi; Mashiko, Toshiya; Sakamoto, Naoya; Sato, Masaaki; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic stretch is an artificial model of mechanical force loading, which induces the reorientation of vascular endothelial cells and their stress fibers in a direction perpendicular to the stretch axis. Rho family GTPases are crucial for cyclic-stretch-induced endothelial cell reorientation; however, the mechanism underlying stretch-induced activation of Rho family GTPases is unknown. A screen of short hairpin RNAs targeting 63 Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (Rho-GEFs) revealed that at least 11 Rho-GEFs – Abr, alsin, ARHGEF10, Bcr, GEF-H1 (also known as ARHGEF2), LARG (also known as ARHGEF12), p190RhoGEF (also known as ARHGEF28), PLEKHG1, P-REX2, Solo (also known as ARHGEF40) and α-PIX (also known as ARHGEF6) – which specifically or broadly target RhoA, Rac1 and/or Cdc42, are involved in cyclic-stretch-induced perpendicular reorientation of endothelial cells. Overexpression of Solo induced RhoA activation and F-actin accumulation at cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion sites. Knockdown of Solo suppressed cyclic-stretch- or tensile-force-induced RhoA activation. Moreover, knockdown of Solo significantly reduced cyclic-stretch-induced perpendicular reorientation of endothelial cells when cells were cultured at high density, but not when they were cultured at low density or pretreated with EGTA or VE-cadherin-targeting small interfering RNAs. These results suggest that Solo is involved in cell-cell-adhesion-mediated mechanical signal transduction during cyclic-stretch-induced endothelial cell reorientation. PMID:25795300

  4. Coupling of guanine nucleotide inhibitory protein to somatostatin receptors on pancreatic acinar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, C.; Matozaki, T.; Nagao, M.; Baba, S.

    1987-09-01

    Guanine nucleotides and pertussis toxin were used to investigate whether somatostatin receptors interact with the guanine nucleotide inhibitory protein (NI) on pancreatic acinar membranes in the rat. Guanine nucleotides reduced /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 1/)somatostatin binding to acinar membranes up to 80%, with rank order of potency being 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p)>GTP>TDP>GMP. Scatchard analysis revealed that the decrease in somatostatin binding caused by Gpp(NH)p was due to the decrease in the maximum binding capacity without a significant change in the binding affinity. The inhibitory effect of Gpp(NH)p was partially abolished in the absence of Mg/sup 2 +/. When pancreatic acini were treated with 1 ..mu..g/ml pertussis toxin for 4 h, subsequent /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 1/)somatostatin binding to acinar membranes was reduced. Pertussis toxin treatment also abolished the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on vasoactive intestinal peptide-stimulated increase in cellular content of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in the acini. The present results suggest that 1) somatostatin probably functions in the pancreas to regulate adenylate cyclase enzyme system via Ni, 2) the extent of modification of Ni is correlated with the ability of somatostatin to inhibit cAMP accumulation in acini, and 3) guanine nucleotides also inhibit somatostatin binding to its receptor.

  5. Density functional theory study on the interaction between keto-9H guanine and aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Harris, Patrina Thompson; Hill, Glake A

    2012-05-01

    A theoretical study was performed using density functional theory (DFT) to investigate hydrogen bonding interactions in signature complexes formed between keto-9H guanine (Gua) and aspartic acid (Asp) at neutral pH. Optimized geometries, binding energies and the theoretical IR spectra of guanine, aspartic acid and their corresponding complexes (Gua-Asp) were calculated using the B3LYP method and the 6-31+G(d) basis set. Stationary points found to be at local minima on the potential energy surface were verified by second derivative harmonic vibrational frequency calculations at the same level of theory. AIM theory was used to analyze the hydrogen bonding characteristics of these DNA base complex systems. Our results show that the binding motif for the most stable complex is strikingly similar to a Watson-Crick motif observed in the guanine-cytosine base pair. We have found a range of hydrogen bonding interactions between guanine and aspartic acid in the six complexes. This was further verified by theoretical IR spectra of ω(C-H--O-H) cm(-1) stretches for the Gua-Asp complexes. The electron density plot indicates strong hydrogen bonding as shown by the 2p(z) dominant HOMO orbital character. PMID:21877157

  6. Improved bioactivity of G-rich triplex-forming oligonucleotides containing modified guanine bases.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Faye A; Lloyd, Janice A; Tiwari, Meetu Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    Triplex structures generated by sequence-specific triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) have proven to be promising tools for gene targeting strategies. In addition, triplex technology has been highly utilized to study the molecular mechanisms of DNA repair, recombination and mutagenesis. However, triplex formation utilizing guanine-rich oligonucleotides as third strands can be inhibited by potassium-induced self-association resulting in G-quadruplex formation. We report here that guanine-rich TFOs partially substituted with 8-aza-7-deaza-guanine (PPG) have improved target site binding in potassium compared with TFOs containing the natural guanine base. We designed PPG-substituted TFOs to bind to a polypurine sequence in the supFG1 reporter gene. The binding efficiency of PPG-substituted TFOs to the target sequence was analyzed using electrophoresis mobility gel shift assays. We have determined that in the presence of potassium, the non-substituted TFO, AG30 did not bind to its target sequence, however binding was observed with the PPG-substituted AG30 under conditions with up to 140 mM KCl. The PPG-TFOs were able to maintain their ability to induce genomic modifications as measured by an assay for gene-targeted mutagenesis. In addition, these compounds were capable of triplex-induced DNA double strand breaks, which resulted in activation of apoptosis. PMID:25483840

  7. Improved bioactivity of G-rich triplex-forming oligonucleotides containing modified guanine bases

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Faye A; Lloyd, Janice A; Tiwari, Meetu Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    Triplex structures generated by sequence-specific triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) have proven to be promising tools for gene targeting strategies. In addition, triplex technology has been highly utilized to study the molecular mechanisms of DNA repair, recombination and mutagenesis. However, triplex formation utilizing guanine-rich oligonucleotides as third strands can be inhibited by potassium-induced self-association resulting in G-quadruplex formation. We report here that guanine-rich TFOs partially substituted with 8-aza-7-deaza-guanine (PPG) have improved target site binding in potassium compared with TFOs containing the natural guanine base. We designed PPG-substituted TFOs to bind to a polypurine sequence in the supFG1 reporter gene. The binding efficiency of PPG-substituted TFOs to the target sequence was analyzed using electrophoresis mobility gel shift assays. We have determined that in the presence of potassium, the non-substituted TFO, AG30 did not bind to its target sequence, however binding was observed with the PPG-substituted AG30 under conditions with up to 140 mM KCl. The PPG-TFOs were able to maintain their ability to induce genomic modifications as measured by an assay for gene-targeted mutagenesis. In addition, these compounds were capable of triplex-induced DNA double strand breaks, which resulted in activation of apoptosis. PMID:25483840

  8. Aptamer-mediated turn-on fluorescence assay for prion protein based on guanine quenched fluophor.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Sai Jin; Hu, Ping Ping; Li, Yuan Fang; Huang, Cheng Zhi; Huang, Tao; Xiao, Geng Fu

    2009-10-15

    An aptamer-participated haprin structure was designed by employing cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) as a model protein, and thus an aptamer-mediated turn-on fluorescence assay for proteins was developed in this contribution. The designed aptamer-participated haprin structure consists of three segments. Namely, an aptamer sequence located in the loop, three guanine bases at 3'-terminal, and a fluophor modified at 5'-terminal. It was found that the guanine bases at the 3'-terminal could quench the fluorescence of the fluophor such as tetramethyl-6-carboxyrhodamine (TAMRA) at the 5'-terminal about 76.6% via electron transfer if the guanine bases are close enough to the fluophor, and the quenched fluorescence could get restored when the target protein is present since the interaction, which could be confirmed by measuring fluorescence lifetime, between TAMRA-aptamer and the target protein forces the guanines away from TAMRA so that TAMRA-modified aptamer changes into turn-on state. A linear relationship was then constructed between the turn-on fluorescence intensity and the concentration of PrP(C) in the range from 1.1 to 44.7 microg/mL with a limit of detection of 0.3 microg/mL (3sigma). PMID:19635360

  9. Human Sos1: A guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ras that binds to GRB2

    SciTech Connect

    Chardin, P. ); Camonis, J.; Gale, N.W.; Aelst, L. Van; Wigler, M.H.; Bar-Sagi, D. ); Schlessinger, J. )

    1993-05-28

    A human complementary DNA was isolated that encodes a widely expressed protein, hSos1, that is closely related to Sos, the product of the Drosophila son of sevenless gene. The hSos1 protein contains a region of significant sequence similarity to CDC25, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras from yeast. A fragment of hSos1 encoding the CDC25-related domain complemented loss of CDC25 function in yeast. This hSos1 domain specifically stimulated guanine nucleotide exchange on mammalian Ras proteins in vitro. Mammalian cells overexpressing full-length hSos1 had increased guanine nucleotide exchange activity. Thus hSos1 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras. The hSos1 interacted with growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2) in vivo and in vitro. This interaction was mediated by the carboxyl-terminal domain of hSos1 and the Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of GRB2. These results suggest that the coupling of receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras signaling is mediated by a molecular complex consisting of GRB2 and hSos1. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Structural insights into the interactions of xpt riboswitch with novel guanine analogues: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swapan S; Sonavane, Uddhavesh B; Uppuladinne, Mallikarjunachari V N; McLaughlin, Emily C; Wang, Weiqing; Black, Sheneil; Joshi, Rajendra R

    2015-01-01

    Ligand recognition in purine riboswitches is a complex process requiring different levels of conformational changes. Recent efforts in the area of purine riboswitch research have focused on ligand analogue binding studies. In the case of the guanine xanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (xpt) riboswitch, synthetic analogues that resemble guanine have the potential to tightly bind and subsequently influence the genetic expression of xpt mRNA in prokaryotes. We have carried out 25 ns Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation studies of the aptamer domain of the xpt G-riboswitch in four different states: guanine riboswitch in free form, riboswitch bound with its cognate ligand guanine, and with two guanine analogues SJ1 and SJ2. Our work reveals novel interactions of SJ1 and SJ2 ligands with the binding core residues of the riboswitch. The ligands proposed in this work bind to the riboswitch with greater overall stability and lower root mean square deviations and fluctuations compared to guanine ligand. Reporter gene assay data demonstrate that the ligand analogues, upon binding to the RNA, lower the genetic expression of the guanine riboswitch. Our work has important implications for future ligand design and binding studies in the exciting field of riboswitches. PMID:24404773

  11. Defective Guanine Nucleotide Exchange in the Elongation Factor-like 1 (EFL1) GTPase by Mutations in the Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome Protein*

    PubMed Central

    García-Márquez, Adrián; Gijsbers, Abril; de la Mora, Eugenio; Sánchez-Puig, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is orchestrated by the action of several accessory factors that provide time and directionality to the process. One such accessory factor is the GTPase EFL1 involved in the cytoplasmic maturation of the ribosomal 60S subunit. EFL1 and SBDS, the protein mutated in the Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SBDS), release the anti-association factor eIF6 from the surface of the ribosomal subunit 60S. Here we report a kinetic analysis of fluorescent guanine nucleotides binding to EFL1 alone and in the presence of SBDS using fluorescence stopped-flow spectroscopy. Binding kinetics of EFL1 to both GDP and GTP suggests a two-step mechanism with an initial binding event followed by a conformational change of the complex. Furthermore, the same behavior was observed in the presence of the SBDS protein irrespective of the guanine nucleotide evaluated. The affinity of EFL1 for GTP is 10-fold lower than that calculated for GDP. Association of EFL1 to SBDS did not modify the affinity for GTP but dramatically decreased that for GDP by increasing the dissociation rate of the nucleotide. Thus, SBDS acts as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for EFL1 promoting its activation by the release of GDP. Finally, fluorescence anisotropy measurements showed that the S143L mutation present in the Shwachman-Diamond syndrome altered a surface epitope for EFL1 and largely decreased the affinity for it. These results suggest that loss of interaction between these proteins due to mutations in the disease consequently prevents the nucleotide exchange regulation the SBDS exerts on EFL1. PMID:25991726

  12. Rapid magnetic wiper featuring biogenic guanine particles: Magnetic non-contact switching of opto-fluidic mirrors featuring biogenic guanine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Mizukawa, Y.; Miyashita, Y.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we prepared a diamagnetic fluid with magnetically controlled visual transparency. Light scattering control by the magnetic orientation of organic and diamagnetic microcrystals was applied for developing a functional diamagnetic fluid, by controlling its turbidity and transparency. The light scattering fluid was prepared by guanine crystal particles suspension (GPS), which were collected from the scales of goldfish, in an aqueous solution. It is revealed that GPS can control light scattering with magnetic fields. The method we developed can be utilized for controlling the visibility of light-reflective objects by using magnetic fields on a millitesla scale.

  13. Structure-wise discrimination of adenine and guanine by proteins on the basis of their nonbonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Usha, S; Selvaraj, S

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed the nonbonded interactions of the structurally similar moieties, adenine and guanine forming complexes with proteins. The results comprise (a) the amino acid-ligand atom preferences, (b) solvent accessibility of ligand atoms before and after complex formation with proteins, and (c) preferred amino acid residue atoms involved in the interactions. We have observed that the amino acid preferences involved in the hydrogen bonding interactions vary for adenine and guanine. The structural variation between the purine atoms is clearly reflected by their burial tendency in the solvent environment. Correlation of the mean amino acid preference values show the variation that exists between adenine and guanine preferences of all the amino acid residues. All our observations provide evidence for the discriminating nature of the proteins in recognizing adenine and guanine. PMID:25245205

  14. Guanine nanowire based amplification strategy: Enzyme-free biosensing of nucleic acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhong Feng; Huang, Yan Li; Ren, Wang; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2016-04-15

    Sensitive and specific detection of nucleic acids and proteins plays a vital role in food, forensic screening, clinical and environmental monitoring. There remains a great challenge in the development of signal amplification method for biomolecules detection. Herein, we describe a novel signal amplification strategy based on the formation of guanine nanowire for quantitative detection of nucleic acids and proteins (thrombin) at room temperature. In the presence of analytes and magnesium ions, the guanine nanowire could be formed within 10 min. Compared to the widely used single G-quadruplex biocatalytic label unit, the detection limits are improved by two orders of magnitude in our assay. The proposed enzyme-free method avoids fussy chemical label-ling process, complex programming task, and sophisticated equipment, which might provide an ideal candidate for the fabrication of selective and sensitive biosensing platform. PMID:26649493

  15. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Buey, Rubén M; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M; Revuelta, José L

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  16. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  17. Absence of hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity in murine Dunn osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, H.T.; Gorka, C.

    1983-09-01

    The transplantable murine Dunn osteosarcoma has no detectable hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) activity. This was established from the tumors directly and from tissue culture cell lines derived from the tumor using a variety of assays: e.g., no (3H)hypoxanthine uptake into tumor or tissue culture cells, no conversion of (3H)hypoxanthine to (3H)IMP by cell extracts from tumors or tissue culture cells, no growth of tissue culture cells in hypoxanthine:aminopterin:thymidine medium, and normal growth of these cells in 10 microM 6-mercaptopurine. Ten human osteosarcomas have been assayed, and two have no apparent hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enzyme activity. After high-dose methotrexate treatment in vivo, murine tumors could be selectively killed and normal tissues could be spared by using a rescue regimen of hypoxanthine-thymidine-allopurinol.

  18. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  19. A novel photoproduct of 2'-deoxyguanosine induced by acetone photosensitization: 8-(2,3,4-trihydroxybutyl)guanine.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, N D; Davies, R J; Phillips, D R; McCloskey, J A

    1989-01-01

    Acetone photosensitisation of 2'-deoxyguanosine in deaerated aqueous solution gives 8-(2,3,4-trihydroxybutyl)guanine as a major photoproduct. Its structure and that of its tetraacetate have been determined primarily by high resolution 1H NMR and mass spectrometry; a di-isopropylidene derivative has also been prepared. Mechanistic aspects of this novel photochemical transformation are discussed, particularly in relation to the alkaline cleavage of acetone photosensitised DNA at the sites of guanine bases. PMID:2922279

  20. Guanine nucleotide depletion inhibits pre-ribosomal RNA synthesis and causes nucleolar disruption.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Ji, Yanshan; Itahana, Koji; Zhang, Yanping; Mitchell, Beverly

    2008-01-01

    Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a pivotal enzyme in the de novo pathway of guanine nucleotide biosynthesis. Inhibitors of this enzyme decrease intracellular guanine nucleotide levels by 50-80% and have potential as anti-neoplastic agents. Both mycophenolic acid (MPA) and AVN-944 are highly specific inhibitors of IMPDH that cause cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in lymphocytes and leukemic cell lines. We have examined the mechanisms by which these two agents cause cytotoxicity. Both MPA and AVN-944 inhibit the growth of K562 cells, and induce apoptosis in Raji B and CCRF-CEM T cells. Both compounds strikingly inhibit RNA synthesis within 2 h of exposure. Depletion of guanine nucleotides by MPA and AVN-944 also causes an early and near-complete reduction in levels of the 45S precursor rRNA synthesis and the concomitant translocation of nucleolar proteins including nucleolin, nucleophosmin, and nucleostemin from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. This efflux correlates temporally with the sustained induction of p53 in cell lines with wild-type p53. We conclude that inhibition of IMPDH causes a primary reduction in rRNA synthesis and secondary nucleolar disruption and efflux of nucleolar proteins that most likely mediate cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. The ability of AVN-944 to induce apoptosis in a number of leukemic cell lines supports its potential utility in the treatment of hematologic malignancies. PMID:17462731

  1. Covalent Bonding of Pyrrolobenzodiazepines (PBDs) to Terminal Guanine Residues within Duplex and Hairpin DNA Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Mantaj, Julia; Jackson, Paul J. M.; Karu, Kersti; Rahman, Khondaker M.; Thurston, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Pyrrolobenzodiazepines (PBDs) are covalent-binding DNA-interactive agents with growing importance as payloads in Antibody Drug Conjugates (ADCs). Until now, PBDs were thought to covalently bond to C2-NH2 groups of guanines in the DNA-minor groove across a three-base-pair recognition sequence. Using HPLC/MS methodology with designed hairpin and duplex oligonucleotides, we have now demonstrated that the PBD Dimer SJG-136 and the C8-conjugated PBD Monomer GWL-78 can covalently bond to a terminal guanine of DNA, with the PBD skeleton spanning only two base pairs. Control experiments with the non-C8-conjugated anthramycin along with molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the C8-substituent of a PBD Monomer, or one-half of a PBD Dimer, may provide stability for the adduct. This observation highlights the importance of PBD C8-substituents, and also suggests that PBDs may bind to terminal guanines within stretches of DNA in cells, thus representing a potentially novel mechanism of action at the end of DNA strand breaks. PMID:27055050

  2. Activation of G Proteins by Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Relies on GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Rob J.; Thomas, Geraint M. H.

    2016-01-01

    G proteins are an important family of signalling molecules controlled by guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity in what is commonly called an ‘activation/inactivation cycle’. The molecular mechanism by which guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyse the activation of monomeric G proteins is well-established, however the complete reversibility of this mechanism is often overlooked. Here, we use a theoretical approach to prove that GEFs are unable to positively control G protein systems at steady-state in the absence of GTPase activity. Instead, positive regulation of G proteins must be seen as a product of the competition between guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity—emphasising a central role for GTPase activity beyond merely signal termination. We conclude that a more accurate description of the regulation of G proteins via these processes is as a ‘balance/imbalance’ mechanism. This result has implications for the understanding of intracellular signalling processes, and for experimental strategies that rely on modulating G protein systems. PMID:26986850

  3. N7-(carboxymethyl)guanine-Lithium Crystalline Complex: A Bioinspired Solid Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Dipak; Nagapradeep, N.; Zhu, Haijin; Forsyth, Maria; Verma, Sandeep; Bhattacharyya, Aninda J.

    2016-04-01

    Electrochemical device with components having direct significance to biological life processes is a potent futuristic strategy for the realization of all-round green and sustainable development. We present here synthesis design, structural analysis and ion transport of a novel solid organic electrolyte (G7Li), a compound reminiscent of ion channels, derived from regioisomeric N7-guanine-carboxylate conjugate and Li-ions. G7Li, with it’s in-built supply of Li+-ions, exhibited remarkably high lithium-ion transference number (= 0.75) and tunable room temperature ionic conductivity spanning three decades (≈10‑7 to 10‑3 Ω‑1 cm‑1) as a function of moisture content. The ionic conductivity show a distinct reversible transition around 80–100 °C, from a dual Li+ and H+ (<100 °C) to a pure Li+ conductor (>100 °C). Systematic studies reveal a transition from water-assisted Li-ion transport to Li hopping-like mechanism involving guanine-Li coordination. While as-synthesized G7Li has potential in humidity sensors, the anhydrous G7Li is attractive for rechargeable batteries.

  4. N7-(carboxymethyl)guanine-Lithium Crystalline Complex: A Bioinspired Solid Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Dipak; Nagapradeep, N; Zhu, Haijin; Forsyth, Maria; Verma, Sandeep; Bhattacharyya, Aninda J

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical device with components having direct significance to biological life processes is a potent futuristic strategy for the realization of all-round green and sustainable development. We present here synthesis design, structural analysis and ion transport of a novel solid organic electrolyte (G7Li), a compound reminiscent of ion channels, derived from regioisomeric N7-guanine-carboxylate conjugate and Li-ions. G7Li, with it's in-built supply of Li(+)-ions, exhibited remarkably high lithium-ion transference number (= 0.75) and tunable room temperature ionic conductivity spanning three decades (≈10(-7) to 10(-3) Ω(-1) cm(-1)) as a function of moisture content. The ionic conductivity show a distinct reversible transition around 80-100 °C, from a dual Li(+) and H(+) (<100 °C) to a pure Li(+) conductor (>100 °C). Systematic studies reveal a transition from water-assisted Li-ion transport to Li hopping-like mechanism involving guanine-Li coordination. While as-synthesized G7Li has potential in humidity sensors, the anhydrous G7Li is attractive for rechargeable batteries. PMID:27091631

  5. Singlet Oxygen Attack on Guanine: Reactivity and Structural Signature within the B-DNA Helix.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Elise; Grüber, Raymond; Bignon, Emmanuelle; Morell, Christophe; Aranda, Juan; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2016-08-22

    Oxidatively generated DNA lesions are numerous and versatile, and have been the subject of intensive research since the discovery of 8-oxoguanine in 1984. Even for this prototypical lesion, the precise mechanism of formation remains elusive due to the inherent difficulties in characterizing high-energy intermediates. We have probed the stability of the guanine endoperoxide in B-DNA as a key intermediate and determined a unique activation free energy of around 6 kcal mol(-1) for the formation of the first C-O covalent bond upon the attack of singlet molecular oxygen ((1) O2 ) on the central guanine of a solvated 13 base-pair poly(dG-dC), described by means of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations. The B-helix remains stable upon oxidation in spite of the bulky character of the guanine endoperoxide. Our modeling study has revealed the nature of the versatile (1) O2 attack in terms of free energy and shows a sensitivity to electrostatics and solvation as it involves a charge-separated intermediate. PMID:27440482

  6. Electron microscopic visualization of complementary labeled DNA with platinum-containing guanine derivative.

    PubMed

    Loukanov, Alexandre; Filipov, Chavdar; Mladenova, Polina; Toshev, Svetlin; Emin, Saim

    2016-04-01

    The object of the present report is to provide a method for a visualization of DNA in TEM by complementary labeling of cytosine with guanine derivative, which contains platinum as contrast-enhanced heavy element. The stretched single-chain DNA was obtained by modifying double-stranded DNA. The labeling method comprises the following steps: (i) stretching and adsorption of DNA on the support film of an electron microscope grid (the hydrophobic carbon film holding negative charged DNA); (ii) complementary labeling of the cytosine bases from the stretched single-stranded DNA pieces on the support film with platinum containing guanine derivative to form base-specific hydrogen bond; and (iii) producing a magnified image of the base-specific labeled DNA. Stretched single-stranded DNA on a support film is obtained by a rapid elongation of DNA pieces on the surface between air and aqueous buffer solution. The attached platinum-containing guanine derivative serves as a high-dense marker and it can be discriminated from the surrounding background of support carbon film and visualized by use of conventional TEM observation at 100 kV accelerated voltage. This method allows examination of specific nucleic macromolecules through atom-by-atom analysis and it is promising way toward future DNA-sequencing or molecular diagnostics of nucleic acids by electron microscopic observation. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:280-284, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26805035

  7. Rates of Chemical Cleavage of DNA and RNA Oligomers Containing Guanine Oxidation Products

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The nucleobase guanine in DNA (dG) and RNA (rG) has the lowest standard reduction potential of the bases, rendering it a major site of oxidative damage in these polymers. Mapping the sites at which oxidation occurs in an oligomer via chemical reagents utilizes hot piperidine for cleaving oxidized DNA and aniline (pH 4.5) for cleaving oxidized RNA. In the present studies, a series of time-dependent cleavages of DNA and RNA strands containing various guanine lesions were examined to determine the strand scission rate constants. The guanine base lesions 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG), spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), 5-guanidinohydantoin (Gh), 2,2,4-triamino-2H-oxazol-5-one (Z), and 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin (2Ih) were evaluated in piperidine-treated DNA and aniline-treated RNA. These data identified wide variability in the chemical lability of the lesions studied in both DNA and RNA. Further, the rate constants for cleaving lesions in RNA were generally found to be significantly smaller than for lesions in DNA. The OG nucleotides were poorly cleaved in DNA and RNA; Sp nucleotides were slowly cleaved in DNA and did not cleave significantly in RNA; Gh and Z nucleotides cleaved in both DNA and RNA at intermediate rates; and 2Ih oligonucleotides cleaved relatively quickly in both DNA and RNA. The data are compared and contrasted with respect to future experimental design. PMID:25853314

  8. Non-covalent functionalization of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets with guanine.

    PubMed

    Anota, E Chigo; Tlapale, Y; Villanueva, M Salazar; Márquez, J A Rivera

    2015-08-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to analyze changes in the structural and electronic properties generated by the interaction of a single nucleobase group (guanine) with the surface of boron nitride nanosheets with hexagonal symmetry (hBNNs). Nanosheets in two contexts were tested: pristine sheets and with point defects (doped with carbon atoms). The criterion of energy minimum was used to find the ground state of the nine possible isomers generated by the hBNNs-guanine interaction. The phenomenon of physisorption is known to occur at values less than 1.0 eV; the adsorption energy results revealed that the preferential geometry was a parallel arrangement between the two partners, with van der Waals-type bonds generated for the hBNNs doped with two carbon atoms. This was the only energetically stable configuration, thus revealing a vibrational mode rather than imaginaries. Furthermore, the hBNNs/C-guanine system has a low value for work function, and therefore could be used in health applications such drug transport and delivery. The increased polarity values suggest that these nanosheets could be solubilized in common solvents used in experimental processes. PMID:26227065

  9. N7-(carboxymethyl)guanine-Lithium Crystalline Complex: A Bioinspired Solid Electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Dipak; Nagapradeep, N.; Zhu, Haijin; Forsyth, Maria; Verma, Sandeep; Bhattacharyya, Aninda J.

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical device with components having direct significance to biological life processes is a potent futuristic strategy for the realization of all-round green and sustainable development. We present here synthesis design, structural analysis and ion transport of a novel solid organic electrolyte (G7Li), a compound reminiscent of ion channels, derived from regioisomeric N7-guanine-carboxylate conjugate and Li-ions. G7Li, with it’s in-built supply of Li+-ions, exhibited remarkably high lithium-ion transference number (= 0.75) and tunable room temperature ionic conductivity spanning three decades (≈10−7 to 10−3 Ω−1 cm−1) as a function of moisture content. The ionic conductivity show a distinct reversible transition around 80–100 °C, from a dual Li+ and H+ (<100 °C) to a pure Li+ conductor (>100 °C). Systematic studies reveal a transition from water-assisted Li-ion transport to Li hopping-like mechanism involving guanine-Li coordination. While as-synthesized G7Li has potential in humidity sensors, the anhydrous G7Li is attractive for rechargeable batteries. PMID:27091631

  10. Crosslinking reactions of 4-amino-6-oxo-2-vinylpyrimidine with guanine derivatives and structural analysis of the adducts

    PubMed Central

    Kusano, Shuhei; Ishiyama, Shogo; Lam, Sik Lok; Mashima, Tsukasa; Katahira, Masato; Miyamoto, Kengo; Aida, Misako; Nagatsugi, Fumi

    2015-01-01

    DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) are the primary mechanism for the cytotoxic activity of many clinical anticancer drugs, and numerous strategies for forming ICLs have been developed. One such method is using crosslink-forming oligonucleotides (CFOs). In this study, we designed a 4-amino-6-oxo-2-vinylpyrimidine (AOVP) derivative with an acyclic spacer to react selectively with guanine. The AOVP CFO exhibited selective crosslinking reactivity with guanine and thymine in DNA, and with guanine in RNA. These crosslinking reactions with guanine were accelerated in the presence of CoCl2, NiCl2, ZnCl2 and MnCl2. In addition, we demonstrated that the AOVP CFO was reactive toward 8-oxoguanine opposite AOVP in the duplex DNA. The structural analysis of each guanine and 8-oxoguanine adduct in the duplex DNA was investigated by high-resolution NMR. The results suggested that AOVP reacts at the N2 amine in guanine and at the N1 or N2 amines in 8-oxoguanine in the duplex DNA. This study demonstrated the first direct determination of the adduct structure in duplex DNA without enzyme digestion. PMID:26245348

  11. Interactions of amino acids with oxidized guanine in the gas phase associated with the protection of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Yang, Hongfang; Zhang, Meng; Bu, Yuxiang

    2013-04-01

    Density functional theory calculations were employed to study the stabilization process of the guanine radical cation through amino acid interactions as well as to understand the protection mechanisms. On the basis of our calculations, several protection mechanisms are proposed in this work subject to the type of the amino acid. Our results indicate that a series of three-electron bonds can be formed between the amino acids and the guanine radical cation which may serve as relay stations supporting hole transport. In the three-electron-bonded, π-π-stacked, and H-bonded modes, amino acids can protect guanine from oxidation or radiation damage by sharing the hole, while amino acids with reducing properties can repair the guanine radical cation through proton-coupled electron transfer or electron transfer. Another important finding is that positively charged amino acids (ArgH(+), LysH(+), and HisH(+)) can inhibit ionization of guanine through raising its ionization potential. In this situation, a negative dissociation energy for hydrogen bonds in the hole-trapped and positively charged amino acid-Guanine dimer is observed, which explains the low hole-trapping efficiency. We hope that this work provides valuable information on how to protect DNA from oxidation- or radiation-induced damages in biological systems. PMID:23427004

  12. Rapid and sensitive detection of potassium ion based on K(+)-induced G-quadruplex and guanine chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jingjing; Zhao, Hengzhi; Zhou, Fulin; Li, Baoxin

    2016-03-01

    A simple and rapid method for detection of potassium ion (K(+)) based on a guanine chemiluminescence (CL) system is presented. In this system, one guanine-rich DNA molecule is used as the recognition element. K(+) can cause the guanine-rich DNA to form a G-quadruplex conformation, resulting in remarkable quenching of the guanine CL intensity of guanine-rich DNA. The CL intensity of this CL system decreased with increasing K(+) concentration, revealing a linear relationship in K(+) concentration range from 3 × 10(-5) to 1 × 10(-3) M. A complete detection process can be accomplished in about 5 min. Other common cations (such as Na(+), NH4 (+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), and Pb(2+)) did not notably interfere with K(+) detection. The mechanism of this strategy is also discussed. The sensing strategy is low cost and simple without the requirement of complex labeling of probe DNA. The scheme is applicable to the detection of other guanine-rich aptamer-binding chemicals or biomolecules. PMID:26781100

  13. Enforced Presentation of an Extrahelical Guanine to the Lesion Recognition Pocket of Human 8-Oxoguanine Glycosylase, hOGG1*

    PubMed Central

    Crenshaw, Charisse M.; Nam, Kwangho; Oo, Kimberly; Kutchukian, Peter S.; Bowman, Brian R.; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2012-01-01

    A poorly understood aspect of DNA repair proteins is their ability to identify exceedingly rare sites of damage embedded in a large excess of nearly identical undamaged DNA, while catalyzing repair only at the damaged sites. Progress toward understanding this problem has been made by comparing the structures and biochemical behavior of these enzymes when they are presented with either a target lesion or a corresponding undamaged nucleobase. Trapping and analyzing such DNA-protein complexes is particularly difficult in the case of base extrusion DNA repair proteins because of the complexity of the repair reaction, which involves extrusion of the target base from DNA followed by its insertion into the active site where glycosidic bond cleavage is catalyzed. Here we report the structure of a human 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) DNA glycosylase, hOGG1, in which a normal guanine from DNA has been forcibly inserted into the enzyme active site. Although the interactions of the nucleobase with the active site are only subtly different for G versus oxoG, hOGG1 fails to catalyze excision of the normal nucleobase. This study demonstrates that even if hOGG1 mistakenly inserts a normal base into its active site, the enzyme can still reject it on the basis of catalytic incompatibility. PMID:22511791

  14. Detection of benzo[a]pyrene-guanine adducts in single-stranded DNA using the α-hemolysin nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Rukshan T.; Fleming, Aaron M.; Johnson, Robert P.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; White, Henry S.

    2015-02-01

    The carcinogenic precursor benzo[a]pyrene (BP), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is released into the environment through the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. Metabolism of BP in the human body yields a potent alkylating agent (benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide, BPDE) that reacts with guanine (G) in DNA to form an adduct implicated in cancer initiation. We report that the α-hemolysin (αHL) nanopore platform can be used to detect a BPDE adduct to G in synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides. Translocation of a 41-mer poly-2‧-deoxycytidine strand with a centrally located BPDE adduct to G through αHL in 1 M KCl produces a unique multi-level current signature allowing the adduct to be detected. This readily distinguishable current modulation was observed when the BPDE-adducted DNA strand translocated from either the 5‧ or 3‧ directions. This study suggests that BPDE adducts and other large aromatic biomarkers can be detected with αHL, presenting opportunities for the monitoring, quantification, and sequencing of mutagenic compounds from cellular DNA samples.

  15. Enforced Presentation of an Extrahelical Guanine to the Lesion Recognition Pocket of Human 8-Oxoguanine Glycosylase, hOGG1

    SciTech Connect

    Crenshaw, Charisse M.; Nam, Kwangho; Oo, Kimberly; Kutchukian, Peter S.; Bowman, Brian R.; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2012-09-05

    A poorly understood aspect of DNA repair proteins is their ability to identify exceedingly rare sites of damage embedded in a large excess of nearly identical undamaged DNA, while catalyzing repair only at the damaged sites. Progress toward understanding this problem has been made by comparing the structures and biochemical behavior of these enzymes when they are presented with either a target lesion or a corresponding undamaged nucleobase. Trapping and analyzing such DNA-protein complexes is particularly difficult in the case of base extrusion DNA repair proteins because of the complexity of the repair reaction, which involves extrusion of the target base from DNA followed by its insertion into the active site where glycosidic bond cleavage is catalyzed. Here we report the structure of a human 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) DNA glycosylase, hOGG1, in which a normal guanine from DNA has been forcibly inserted into the enzyme active site. Although the interactions of the nucleobase with the active site are only subtly different for G versus oxoG, hOGG1 fails to catalyze excision of the normal nucleobase. This study demonstrates that even if hOGG1 mistakenly inserts a normal base into its active site, the enzyme can still reject it on the basis of catalytic incompatibility.

  16. The role of N7 protonation of guanine in determining the structure, stability and function of RNA base pairs.

    PubMed

    Halder, Antarip; Bhattacharya, Sohini; Datta, Ayan; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Mitra, Abhijit

    2015-10-21

    The roles of protonated nucleobases in stabilizing different structural motifs and in facilitating catalytic functions of RNA are well known. Among different polar sites of all the nucleobases, N7 of guanine has the highest protonation propensity at physiological pH. However, unlike other easily protonable sites such as N1 and N3 of adenine or N3 of cytosine, N7 protonation of guanine does not lead to the stabilization of base pairs involving its protonated Hoogsteen edge. It also does not facilitate its participation in any acid-base catalysis process. To explore the possible roles of N7 protonated guanine, we have studied its base pairing potentials involving WatsonCrick and sugar edges, which undergo major charge redistribution upon N7 protonation. We have carried out quantum chemical geometry optimization at the M05-2X/6-311G+(2d,2p) level, followed by interaction energy calculation at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level, along with the analysis of the context of occurrence for selected base pairs involving the sugar edge or the WatsonCrick edge of guanine within a non-redundant set of 167 RNA crystal structures. Our results suggest that, four base pairs - G:C W:W trans, G:rC W:S cis, G:G W:H cis and G:G S:H trans may involve N7 protonated guanine. These base pairs deviate significantly from their respective experimental geometries upon QM optimization, but they retain their experimental geometries if guanine N7 protonation is considered during optimization. Our study also reveals the role of guanine N7 protonation (i) in stabilizing important RNA structural motifs, (ii) in providing a framework for designing pH driven molecular motors and (iii) in providing an alternative strategy to mimic the effect of post-transcriptional changes. PMID:26382322

  17. Interactions of. beta. -adrenergic receptors with guanine nucleotide-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors were investigated with radioligand binding assays using the agonists (/sup 3/H)hydroxybenzyl-isoproterenol (/sup 3/H-HBI) and (/sup 3/H)epinephrine (/sup 3/H-EPI), and the antagonist (/sup 125/I)iodopindolol (/sup 125/I-IPIN). Membranes prepared from L6 myoblasts bound (/sup 3/H)HBI, (/sup 3/H)EPI, and (/sup 125/I)IPIN with high affinity and Scatchard plots revealed densities of 222 +/- 23, 111 +/- 7, and 325 +/- 37 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. Binding of (/sup 3/H)HBI and (/sup 3/H)EPI was inhibited allosterically by guanine nucleotides. Membranes prepared from wild-type S49 lymphoma cells bound (/sup 3/H)HBI and (/sup 125/I)IPIN with high affinity and Scatchard plots revealed densities of 48.9 +/- 7.1 and 196 +/- 29 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. Binding of (/sup 3/H)HBI was inhibited allosterically by GTP. Similar results were obtained with membranes prepared from the adenylate cyclase deficient variant of S49 lymphoma cells (cyc-), which does not contain a functional stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (N/sub s/), but does contain a functional inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (N/sub i/). Binding of (/sup 3/H)HBI to membranes prepared from cyc- S49 cells was inhibited by pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin. These results suggest that ..beta..-adrenergic receptors on membranes prepared from cyc- S49 cells interact with N/sub i/ to form a ternary complex composed of agonist, receptor, and N/sub i/.

  18. Fragmentation of the adenine and guanine molecules induced by electron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Minaev, B. F. E-mail: boris@theochem.kth.se; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, I. I.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.

    2014-05-07

    Secondary electron emission is the most important stage in the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA biopolymers induced by primary ionizing radiation. These secondary electrons ejected by the primary electron impacts can produce further ionizations, initiating an avalanche effect, leading to genome damage through the energy transfer from the primary objects to sensitive biomolecular targets, such as nitrogenous bases, saccharides, and other DNA and peptide components. In this work, the formation of positive and negative ions of purine bases of nucleic acids (adenine and guanine molecules) under the impact of slow electrons (from 0.1 till 200 eV) is studied by the crossed electron and molecular beams technique. The method used makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the total cross-sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of the studied molecules, their energy dependences, and absolute values. It is found that the maximum cross section for formation of the adenine and guanine positive ions is reached at about 90 eV energy of the electron beam and their absolute values are equal to 2.8 × 10{sup −15} and 3.2 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2}, respectively. The total cross section for formation of the negative ions is 6.1 × 10{sup −18} and 7.6 × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} at the energy of 1.1 eV for adenine and guanine, respectively. The absolute cross-section values for the molecular ions are measured and the cross-sections of dissociative ionization are determined. Quantum chemical calculations are performed for the studied molecules, ions and fragments for interpretation of the crossed beams experiments.

  19. Effect of 10-T magnetic fields on structural colors in guanine crystals of fish scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Miyashita, Y.; Kudo, M.; Kurita, S.; Owada, N.

    2012-04-01

    This work reports the magnetically modulated structural colors in the chromatophore of goldfish scales under static magnetic fields up to 10 T. A fiber optic system for spectroscopy measurements and a CCD microscope were set in the horizontal bore of a 10-T superconducting magnet. One leaf of a fish scale was set in a glass chamber, exposed to visible light from its side direction, and then static magnetic fields were applied perpendicular to the surface of the scale. In addition, an optical fiber for spectroscopy was directed perpendicular to the surface. During the magnetic field sweep-up, the aggregate of guanine thin plates partially showed a rapid light quenching under 0.26 to 2 T; however, most of the thin plates continued to scatter the side-light and showed changing iridescence, which was displayed individually by each guanine plate. For example, an aggregate in the chromatophore exhibited a dynamic change in structural color from white-green to dark blue when the magnetic fields changed from 2 to 10 T. The spectrum profile, which was obtained by the fiber optic system, confirmed the image color changes under magnetic field exposure. Also, a linearly polarized light transmission was measured on fish scales by utilizing an optical polarizer and analyzer. The transmitted polarized light intensities increased in the range of 500-550 nm compared to the intensity at 700 nm during the magnetic field sweep-up. These results indicate that the multi-lamella structure of nano-mirror plates in guanine hexagonal micro-plates exhibit diamagnetically modulated structure changes, and its light interference is affected by strong magnetic fields.

  20. Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism during platelet storage at 22 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Edenbrandt, C.M.; Murphy, S. )

    1990-11-01

    Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism of platelet concentrates (PCs) was studied during storage for transfusion at 22 +/- 2 degrees C over a 7-day period using high-pressure liquid chromatography. There was a steady decrease in platelet adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP), which was balanced quantitatively by an increase in plasma hypoxanthine. As expected, ammonia accumulated along with hypoxanthine but at a far greater rate. A fall in platelet guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and guanosine diphosphate (GDP) paralleled the fall in ATP + ADP. When adenine was present in the primary anticoagulant, it was carried over into the PC and metabolized. ATP, GTP, total adenine nucleotides, and total guanine nucleotides declined more slowly in the presence of adenine than in its absence. With adenine, the increase in hypoxanthine concentration was more rapid and quantitatively balanced the decrease in adenine and platelet ATP + ADP. Plasma xanthine rose during storage but at a rate that exceeded the decline in GTP + GDP. When platelet ATP + ADP was labeled with 14C-adenine at the initiation of storage, half of the radioactivity was transferred to hypoxanthine (45%) and GTP + GDP + xanthine (5%) by the time storage was completed. The isotopic data were consistent with the presence of a radioactive (metabolic) and a nonradioactive (storage) pool of ATP + ADP at the initiation of storage with each pool contributing approximately equally to the decline in ATP + ADP during storage. The results suggested a continuing synthesis of GTP + GDP from ATP + ADP, explaining the slower rate of fall of GTP + GDP relative to the rate of rise of plasma xanthine. Throughout storage, platelets were able to incorporate 14C-hypoxanthine into both adenine and guanine nucleotides but at a rate that was only one fourth the rate of hypoxanthine accumulation.

  1. Silver (I) as DNA glue: Ag(+)-mediated guanine pairing revealed by removing Watson-Crick constraints.

    PubMed

    Swasey, Steven M; Leal, Leonardo Espinosa; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga; Pavlovich, James; Gwinn, Elisabeth G

    2015-01-01

    Metal ion interactions with DNA have far-reaching implications in biochemistry and DNA nanotechnology. Ag(+) is uniquely interesting because it binds exclusively to the bases rather than the backbone of DNA, without the toxicity of Hg(2+). In contrast to prior studies of Ag(+) incorporation into double-stranded DNA, we remove the constraints of Watson-Crick pairing by focusing on homo-base DNA oligomers of the canonical bases. High resolution electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry reveals an unanticipated Ag(+)-mediated pairing of guanine homo-base strands, with higher stability than canonical guanine-cytosine pairing. By exploring unrestricted binding geometries, quantum chemical calculations find that Ag(+) bridges between non-canonical sites on guanine bases. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that the Ag(+)-mediated structuring of guanine homobase strands persists to at least 90 °C under conditions for which canonical guanine-cytosine duplexes melt below 20 °C. These findings are promising for DNA nanotechnology and metal-ion based biomedical science. PMID:25973536

  2. Simultaneous Determination of Adenine and Guanine Using Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots-Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Modified Electrode.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, Arumugam; Narayanan, Sangilimuthu Sriman

    2015-06-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor was fabricated by immobilizing Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots (CdSe QDs)-Graphene Oxide (GO) nanocomposite on a paraffin wax impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE) and was used for the simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine. The CdSe QDs-GO nanocomposite was prepared by ultrasonication and was characterized with spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The nanocomposite modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidative determination of adenine and guanine with a good peak separation of 0.31 V. This may be due to the high surface area and fast electron transfer kinetics of the nanocomposite. The modified electrode exhibited wide linear ranges from 0.167 μM to 245 μM for Guanine and 0.083 μM to 291 μM for Adenine with detection limits of 0.055 μM Guanine and 0.028 μM of Adenine (S/N = 3) respectively. Further, the modified electrode was used for the quantitative determination of adenine and guanine in herring sperm DNA with satisfactory results. The modified electrode showed acceptable selectivity, reproducibility and stability under optimal conditions. PMID:26369099

  3. Silver (I) as DNA glue: Ag+-mediated guanine pairing revealed by removing Watson-Crick constraints

    PubMed Central

    Swasey, Steven M.; Leal, Leonardo Espinosa; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga; Pavlovich, James; Gwinn, Elisabeth G.

    2015-01-01

    Metal ion interactions with DNA have far-reaching implications in biochemistry and DNA nanotechnology. Ag+ is uniquely interesting because it binds exclusively to the bases rather than the backbone of DNA, without the toxicity of Hg2+. In contrast to prior studies of Ag+ incorporation into double-stranded DNA, we remove the constraints of Watson-Crick pairing by focusing on homo-base DNA oligomers of the canonical bases. High resolution electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry reveals an unanticipated Ag+-mediated pairing of guanine homo-base strands, with higher stability than canonical guanine-cytosine pairing. By exploring unrestricted binding geometries, quantum chemical calculations find that Ag+ bridges between non-canonical sites on guanine bases. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that the Ag+-mediated structuring of guanine homobase strands persists to at least 90 °C under conditions for which canonical guanine-cytosine duplexes melt below 20 °C. These findings are promising for DNA nanotechnology and metal-ion based biomedical science. PMID:25973536

  4. Silver (I) as DNA glue: Ag+-mediated guanine pairing revealed by removing Watson-Crick constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swasey, Steven M.; Leal, Leonardo Espinosa; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga; Pavlovich, James; Gwinn, Elisabeth G.

    2015-05-01

    Metal ion interactions with DNA have far-reaching implications in biochemistry and DNA nanotechnology. Ag+ is uniquely interesting because it binds exclusively to the bases rather than the backbone of DNA, without the toxicity of Hg2+. In contrast to prior studies of Ag+ incorporation into double-stranded DNA, we remove the constraints of Watson-Crick pairing by focusing on homo-base DNA oligomers of the canonical bases. High resolution electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry reveals an unanticipated Ag+-mediated pairing of guanine homo-base strands, with higher stability than canonical guanine-cytosine pairing. By exploring unrestricted binding geometries, quantum chemical calculations find that Ag+ bridges between non-canonical sites on guanine bases. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that the Ag+-mediated structuring of guanine homobase strands persists to at least 90 °C under conditions for which canonical guanine-cytosine duplexes melt below 20 °C. These findings are promising for DNA nanotechnology and metal-ion based biomedical science.

  5. Acyclic phosph(on)ate inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Clinch, Keith; Crump, Douglas R.; Evans, Gary B.; Hazleton, Keith Z.; Mason, Jennifer M.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenic protozoa responsible for malaria lack enzymes for the de novo synthesis of purines and rely on purine salvage from the host. In Plasmodium falciparum (Pf), hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) converts hypoxanthine to inosine monophosphate and is essential for purine salvage making the enzyme an anti-malarial drug target. We have synthesized a number of simple acyclic aza-C- nucleosides and shown that some are potent inhibitors of Pf HGXPRT while showing excellent selectivity for the Pf versus the human enzyme. PMID:23810424

  6. Fluorescent Sensing of Guanine and Guanosine Monophosphate with Conjugated Receptors Incorporating Aniline and Naphthyridine Moieties.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shao-Hung; Phang, Riping; Fang, Jim-Min

    2016-04-15

    Ethyne-linked naphthyridine-aniline conjugated molecules are selective sensors of decylguanine in dichloromethane and guanosine monophosphate in water (Kass = 16 000 M(-1)). The 2-acetamido-1,8-naphthyridine moiety binds with guanine in a DAA-ADD triply hydrogen-bonded motif. The aniline moiety enhances an electron-donating effect, and the substituent is tuned to attain extra hydrogen bonds, π-π stacking, and electrostatic interactions. The proposed binding modes are supported by a Job plot, ESI-MS, (1)H NMR, UV-vis, and fluorescence spectral analyses. PMID:27018895

  7. Purine salvage pathways of Bacillus subtilis and effect of guanine on growth of GMP reductase mutants.

    PubMed

    Endo, T; Uratani, B; Freese, E

    1983-07-01

    We have isolated numerous mutants containing mutations in the salvage pathways of purine synthesis. The mutations cause deficiencies in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (adeF), in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (guaF), in adenine deaminase (adeC), in inosine-guanosine phosphorylase, (guaP), and in GMP reductase (guaC). The physiological properties of mutants containing one or more of these mutations and corresponding enzyme measurements have been used to derive a metabolic chart of the purine salvage pathway of Bacillus subtilis. PMID:6408059

  8. Purine salvage pathways of Bacillus subtilis and effect of guanine on growth of GMP reductase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Endo, T; Uratani, B; Freese, E

    1983-01-01

    We have isolated numerous mutants containing mutations in the salvage pathways of purine synthesis. The mutations cause deficiencies in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (adeF), in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (guaF), in adenine deaminase (adeC), in inosine-guanosine phosphorylase, (guaP), and in GMP reductase (guaC). The physiological properties of mutants containing one or more of these mutations and corresponding enzyme measurements have been used to derive a metabolic chart of the purine salvage pathway of Bacillus subtilis. PMID:6408059

  9. Fine structure mapping of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene region of the human X chromosome (Xq26).

    PubMed Central

    Nicklas, J A; Hunter, T C; O'Neill, J P; Albertini, R J

    1991-01-01

    The Xq26-q27 region of the X chromosome is interesting, as an unusually large number of genes and anonymous RFLP probes have been mapped in this area. A number of studies have used classical linkage analysis in families to map this region. Here, we use mutant human T-lymphocyte clones known to be deleted for all or part of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene, to order anonymous probes known to map to Xq26. Fifty-seven T-cell clones were studied, including 44 derived from in vivo mutation and 13 from in vitro irradiated T-lymphocyte cultures. Twenty anonymous probes (DXS10, DXS11, DXS19, DXS37, DXS42, DXS51, DXS53, DXS59, DXS79, DXS86, DXS92, DXS99, DXS100d, DXS102, DXS107, DXS144, DXS172, DXS174, DXS177, and DNF1) were tested for codeletion with the hprt gene by Southern blotting methods. Five of these probes (DXS10, DXS53, DXS79, DXS86 and DXS177) showed codeletion with hprt in some mutants. The mutants established the following unambiguous ordering of the probes relative to the hprt gene: DXS53-DXS79-5'hprt3'-DXS86-DXS10-DXS177 . The centromere appears to map proximal to DXS53. These mappings order several closely linked but previously unordered probes. In addition, these studies indicate that rather large deletions of the functionally haploid X chromosome can occur while still retaining T-cell viability. Images Figure 1 PMID:1678246

  10. The emerging role of guanine nucleotide exchange factors in ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Droppelmann, Cristian A.; Campos-Melo, Danae; Volkening, Kathryn; Strong, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Small GTPases participate in a broad range of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and migration. The exchange of GDP for GTP resulting in the activation of these GTPases is catalyzed by a group of enzymes called guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), of which two classes: Dbl-related exchange factors and the more recently described dedicator of cytokinesis proteins family exchange factors. Increasingly, deregulation of normal GEF activity or function has been associated with a broad range of disease states, including neurodegeneration and neurodevelopmental disorders. In this review, we examine this evidence with special emphasis on the novel role of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RGNEF/p190RhoGEF) in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. RGNEF is the first neurodegeneration-linked GEF that regulates not only RhoA GTPase activation but also functions as an RNA binding protein that directly acts with low molecular weight neurofilament mRNA 3′ untranslated region to regulate its stability. This dual role for RGNEF, coupled with the increasing understanding of the key role for GEFs in modulating the GTPase function in cell survival suggests a prominent role for GEFs in mediating a critical balance between cytotoxicity and neuroprotection which, when disturbed, contributes to neuronal loss. PMID:25309324

  11. Cytosolic Na+ Controls an Epithelial Na+ Channel Via the Go Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Regulatory Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komwatana, P.; Dinudom, A.; Young, J. A.; Cook, D. I.

    1996-07-01

    In tight Na+-absorbing epithelial cells, the rate of Na+ entry through amiloride-sensitive apical membrane Na+ channels is matched to basolateral Na+ extrusion so that cell Na+ concentration and volume remain steady. Control of this process by regulation of apical Na+ channels has been attributed to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration or pH, secondary to changes in cytosolic Na+ concentration, although cytosolic Cl- seems also to be involved. Using mouse mandibular gland duct cells, we now demonstrate that increasing cytosolic Na+ concentration inhibits apical Na+ channels independent of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, pH, or Cl-, and the effect is blocked by GDP-β -S, pertussis toxin, and antibodies against the α -subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Go). In contrast, the inhibitory effect of cytosolic anions is blocked by antibodies to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Gi1/Gi2. It thus appears that apical Na+ channels are regulated by Go and Gi proteins, the activities of which are controlled, respectively, by cytosolic Na+ and Cl-.

  12. Time evolution of the Infrared Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of DNA bases Guanine and Adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, L.; Rubio, L.; Camacho, J. J.

    2013-03-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) of DNA bases Guanine and Adenine was studied using a high-power CO2 pulsed laser ( λ=10.591 μm, τ FWHM=64 ns and fluences ranging from 25 to 70 J/cm2). The strong emission of the adenine and guanine plasma, collected using a high-resolution spectrometer, at medium-vacuum conditions (4 Pa) and at 1 mm from the target, exhibits excited molecular bands of CN (B2 Σ +-X2 Σ +) and excited neutral H and ionized N+ and C+. The medium-weak emission is due to excited species C2+, C3+, N, O, O+, O2+ and molecular band systems of C2(d3\\varPig{-}a3\\varPiu; D1\\varSigmau+{-}X1\\varSigmag+), OH(A2 Σ +-X2 Π), NH(A3 Π-X3 Σ -), CH(A2 Π-X2 Π), N2+(B2\\varSigmau+{-} X2\\varSigmag+) and N2(C3 Π u-B3 Π g). We focus our attention on the temporal evolution of different atomic/ionic and molecular species. The velocity distributions for various (different) species were obtained from time-of-flight (TOF) measurements. Intensities of some lines from C+ were used for determining electron temperature and their Stark-broadened profiles were employed to estimate the temporal evolution of electron density.

  13. Monitoring one-electron photo-oxidation of guanine in DNA crystals using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hall, James P; Poynton, Fergus E; Keane, Páraic M; Gurung, Sarah P; Brazier, John A; Cardin, David J; Winter, Graeme; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur; Sazanovich, Igor V; Towrie, Michael; Cardin, Christine J; Kelly, John M; Quinn, Susan J

    2015-12-01

    To understand the molecular origins of diseases caused by ultraviolet and visible light, and also to develop photodynamic therapy, it is important to resolve the mechanism of photoinduced DNA damage. Damage to DNA bound to a photosensitizer molecule frequently proceeds by one-electron photo-oxidation of guanine, but the precise dynamics of this process are sensitive to the location and the orientation of the photosensitizer, which are very difficult to define in solution. To overcome this, ultrafast time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy was performed on photoexcited ruthenium polypyridyl-DNA crystals, the atomic structure of which was determined by X-ray crystallography. By combining the X-ray and TRIR data we are able to define both the geometry of the reaction site and the rates of individual steps in a reversible photoinduced electron-transfer process. This allows us to propose an individual guanine as the reaction site and, intriguingly, reveals that the dynamics in the crystal state are quite similar to those observed in the solvent medium. PMID:26587711

  14. The guanine-rich fragile X chromosome repeats are reluctant to form tetraplexes

    PubMed Central

    Fojtík, Petr; Kejnovská, Iva; Vorlíčková, Michaela

    2004-01-01

    Using circular dichroism spectroscopy, UV absorption spectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we studied conformational properties of guanine-rich DNA strands of the fragile X chromosome repeats d(GGC)n, d(GCG)n and d(CGG)n, with n = 2, 4, 8 and 16. These strands are generally considered in the literature to form guanine tetraplexes responsible for the repeat expansion. However, we show in this paper that the repeats are reluctant to form tetraplexes. At physiological concentrations of either Na+ or K+ ions, the hexamers and dodecamers associate to form homoduplexes and the longer repeats generate homoduplexes and hairpins. The tetraplexes are rarely observed being relatively most stable with d(GGC)n and least stable with d(GCG)n. The tetraplexes are exclusively formed in the presence of K+ ions, at salt concentrations higher than physiological, more easily at higher than physiological temperatures, and they arise with extremely long kinetics (even days). Moreover, the capability to form tetraplexes sharply diminishes with the oligonucleotide length. These facts make the concept of the tetraplex appearance in this motif in vivo very improbable. Rather, a hairpin of the fragile X repeats, whose stability increases with the repeat length, is the probable structure responsible for the repeat expansion in genomes. PMID:14718550

  15. Monitoring one-electron photo-oxidation of guanine in DNA crystals using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, James P.; Poynton, Fergus E.; Keane, Páraic M.; Gurung, Sarah P.; Brazier, John A.; Cardin, David J.; Winter, Graeme; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Towrie, Michael; Cardin, Christine J.; Kelly, John M.; Quinn, Susan J.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the molecular origins of diseases caused by ultraviolet and visible light, and also to develop photodynamic therapy, it is important to resolve the mechanism of photoinduced DNA damage. Damage to DNA bound to a photosensitizer molecule frequently proceeds by one-electron photo-oxidation of guanine, but the precise dynamics of this process are sensitive to the location and the orientation of the photosensitizer, which are very difficult to define in solution. To overcome this, ultrafast time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy was performed on photoexcited ruthenium polypyridyl-DNA crystals, the atomic structure of which was determined by X-ray crystallography. By combining the X-ray and TRIR data we are able to define both the geometry of the reaction site and the rates of individual steps in a reversible photoinduced electron-transfer process. This allows us to propose an individual guanine as the reaction site and, intriguingly, reveals that the dynamics in the crystal state are quite similar to those observed in the solvent medium.

  16. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Blatt, C; Eversole-Cire, P; Cohn, V H; Zollman, S; Fournier, R E; Mohandas, L T; Nesbitt, M; Lugo, T; Jones, D T; Reed, R R

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding alpha-subunit proteins, two different beta subunits, and one gamma subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The beta subunits were also assigned--GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extent of the G alpha gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases with genes corresponding to G proteins. PMID:2902634

  17. Biologically relevant oxidants cause bound proteins to readily oxidatively cross-link at Guanine.

    PubMed

    Solivio, Morwena J; Nemera, Dessalegn B; Sallans, Larry; Merino, Edward J

    2012-02-20

    Oxidative DNA-protein cross-links have received less attention than other types of DNA damage and remain as one of the least understood types of oxidative lesion. A model system using ribonuclease A and a 27-nucleotide DNA was used to determine the propensity of oxidative cross-linking to occur in the presence of oxidants. Cross-link formation was examined using four different oxidation systems that generate singlet oxygen, superoxide, and metal-based Fenton reactions. It is shown that oxidative cross-linking occurs in yields ranging from 14% to a maximal yield of 61% in all oxidative systems when equivalent concentrations of DNA and protein are present. Because singlet oxygen is the most efficient oxidation system in generating DNA-protein cross-links, it was chosen for further analyses. Cross-linking occurred with single-stranded DNA binding protein and not with bovine serum albumin. Addition of salt lowered nonspecific binding affinity and lowered cross-link yield by up to 59%. The yield of cross-linking increased with increased ratios of protein compared with DNA. Cross-linking was highly dependent on the number of guanines in a DNA sequence. Loss of guanine content on the 27-nucleotide DNA led to nearly complete loss in cross-linking, while primer extension studies showed cross-links to predominantly occur at guanine base on a 100-nucleotide DNA. The chemical species generated were examined using two peptides derived from the ribonuclease A sequence, N-acetyl-AAAKF and N-acetyl-AYKTT, which were cross-linked to 2'-deoxyguanosine. The cross-link products were spiroiminodihydantoin, guanidinohydantoin, and tyrosyl-based adducts. Formation of tyrosine-based adducts may be competitive with the more well-studied lysine-based cross-links. We conclude that oxidative cross-links may be present at high levels in cells since the propensity to oxidatively cross-link is high and so much of the genomic DNA is coated with protein. PMID:22216745

  18. The Guanine Cation Radical: Investigation of Deprotonation States by ESR and DFT

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Becker, David; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    This work reports ESR studies that identify the favored site of deprotonation of the guanine cation radical (G•+) in an aqueous medium at 77 K. Using ESR and UV-visible spectroscopy, one-electron oxidized guanine is investigated in frozen aqueous D2O solutions of 2′-deoxyguanosine (dGuo) at low temperatures at various pHs at which the guanine cation, G•+ (pH 3–5), singly deprotonated species, G(-H)• (pH 7–9) and doubly deprotonated species, G(-2H)•− (pH>11) are found. C-8-deuteration of dGuo to give 8-D-dGuo removes the major proton hyperfine coupling at C-8. This isolates the anisotropic nitrogen couplings for each of the three species and aids our analyses. These anisotropic nitrogen couplings were assigned to specific nitrogen sites by use of 15N substituted derivatives at N1, N2 N3 atoms in dGuo. Both ESR and UV-visible spectra are reported for each of the species: G•+, G(-H)•, and G(-2H)•−. The experimental anisotropic ESR hyperfine couplings are compared to those obtained from DFT calculations for the various tautomers of G(-H)•. Using the B3LYP/6–31G(d) method, the geometries and energies of G•+ and its singly deprotonated state in its two tautomeric forms, G(N1-H)• and G(N2-H)•, were investigated. In a non-hydrated state G(N2-H)• is found to be more stable than G(N1-H)• but on hydration with 7 water molecules G(N1-H)• is found to be more stable than G(N2-H)•. The theoretically calculated hyperfine coupling constants (HFCC) of G•+, G(N1-H)• and G(-2H)•− match the experimentally observed HFCCs best on hydration with 7 or more waters. For G(-2H)•−, the hyperfine coupling constant (HFCC) at the exocyclic nitrogen atom (N2) is especially sensitive to the number of hydrating water molecules; good agreement with experiment is not obtained until 9 or 10 waters of hydration are included. PMID:17125389

  19. Hydroxyl radical (OH•) reaction with guanine in an aqueous environment: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Pottiboyina, Venkata; Sevilla, Michael D

    2011-12-22

    The reaction of hydroxyl radical (OH(•)) with DNA accounts for about half of radiation-induced DNA damage in living systems. Previous literature reports point out that the reaction of OH(•) with DNA proceeds mainly through the addition of OH(•) to the C═C bonds of the DNA bases. However, recently it has been reported that the principal reaction of OH(•) with dGuo (deoxyguanosine) is the direct hydrogen atom abstraction from its exocyclic amine group rather than addition of OH(•) to the C═C bonds. In the present work, these two reaction pathways of OH(•) attack on guanine (G) in the presence of water molecules (aqueous environment) are investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method with 6-31G* and 6-31++G** basis sets. The calculations show that the initial addition of the OH(•) at C(4)═C(5) double bond of guanine is barrier free and the adduct radical (G-OH(•)) has only a small activation barrier of ca. 1-6 kcal/mol leading to the formation of a metastable ion-pair intermediate (G(•+)---OH(-)). The formation of ion-pair is a result of the highly oxidizing nature of the OH(•) in aqueous media. The resulting ion-pair (G(•+)---OH(-)) deprotonates to form H(2)O and neutral G radicals favoring G(N(1)-H)(•) with an activation barrier of ca. 5 kcal/mol. The overall process from the G(C(4))-OH(•) (adduct) to G(N(1)-H)(•) and water is found to be exothermic in nature by more than 13 kcal/mol. (G-OH(•)), (G(•+)---OH(-)), and G(N(1)-H)(•) were further characterized by the CAM-B3LYP calculations of their UV-vis spectra and good agreement between theory and experiment is achieved. Our calculations for the direct hydrogen abstraction pathway from N(1) and N(2) sites of guanine by the OH(•) show that this is also a competitive route to produce G(N(2)-H)(•), G(N(1)-H)(•) and H(2)O. PMID:22050033

  20. Hydroxyl Radical (OH•) Reaction with Guanine in an Aqueous Environment: A DFT Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil; Pottiboyina, Venkata; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    The reaction of hydroxyl radical (OH•) with DNA accounts for about half of radiation-induced DNA damage in living systems. Previous literature reports point out that the reaction of OH• with DNA proceeds mainly through the addition of OH• to the C=C bond of the DNA bases. However, recently it has been reported that the principal reaction of OH• with dGuo (deoxyguanosine) is the direct hydrogen atom abstraction from its exocyclic amine group rather than addition of OH• to the C=C bond. In the present work, these two reaction pathways of OH• attack on guanine (G) in the presence of water molecules (aqueous environment) are investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method with 6-31G* and 6-31++G** basis sets. The calculations show that the initial addition of the OH• at C4=C5 double bond of guanine is barrier free and the adduct radical (G-OH•) has only a small activation barrier of ca. 1 – 6 kcal/mol leading to the formation of a metastable ion-pair intermediate (G•+---OH−). The formation of ion-pair is a result of the highly oxidizing nature of the OH• in aqueous media. The resulting ion-pair (G•+---OH−) deprotonates to form H2O and neutral G radicals favoring G(N1-H)• with an activation barrier of ca. 5 kcal/mol. The overall process from the G(C4)-OH• (adduct) to G(N1-H)• and water is found to be exothermic in nature by more than 13 kcal/mol. (G-OH•), (G•+---OH−), and G(N1-H)• were further characterized by the CAM-B3LYP calculations of their UV-visible spectra and good agreement between theory and experiment is achieved. Our calculations for the direct hydrogen abstraction pathway from N1 and N2 sites of guanine by the OH• show that this is also a competitive route to produce G(N2-H)•, G(N1-H)• and H2O. PMID:22050033

  1. The role of alkali metal cations in the stabilization of guanine quadruplexes: why K(+) is the best.

    PubMed

    Zaccaria, F; Paragi, G; Fonseca Guerra, C

    2016-08-21

    The alkali metal ion affinity of guanine quadruplexes has been studied using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D). We have done computational investigations in aqueous solution that mimics artificial supramolecular conditions where guanine bases assemble into stacked quartets as well as biological environments in which telomeric quadruplexes are formed. In both cases, an alkali metal cation is needed to assist self-assembly. Our quantum chemical computations on these supramolecular systems are able to reproduce the experimental order of affinity of the guanine quadruplexes for the cations Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). The strongest binding is computed between the potassium cation and the quadruplex as it occurs in nature. The desolvation and the size of alkali metal cations are thought to be responsible for the order of affinity. Until now, the relative importance of these two factors has remained unclear and debated. By assessing the quantum chemical 'size' of the cation, determining the amount of deformation of the quadruplex needed to accommodate the cation and through the energy decomposition analysis (EDA) of the interaction energy between the cation and the guanines, we reveal that the desolvation and size of the alkali metal cation are both almost equally responsible for the order of affinity. PMID:27185388

  2. Examination of the effect of the annealing cation on higher order structures containing guanine or isoguanine repeats

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Sarah E.; Wang, Junmei; Jayawickramarajah, Janarthanan; Hamilton, Andrew D.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2010-01-01

    Isoguanine (2-oxo-6-amino-guanine), a natural but non-standard base, exhibits unique self-association properties compared to its isomer, guanine, and results in formation of different higher order DNA structures. In this work, the higher order structures formed by oligonucleotides containing guanine repeats or isoguanine repeats after annealing in solutions containing various cations are evaluated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The guanine-containing strand (G9) consistently formed quadruplexes upon annealing, whereas the isoguanine strand (Ig9) formed both pentaplexes and quadruplexes depending on the annealing cation. Quadruplex formation with G9 showed some dependence on the identity of the cation present during annealing with high relative quadruplex formation detected with six of ten cations. Analogous annealing experiments with Ig9 resulted in complex formation with all ten cations, and the majority of the resulting complexes were pentaplexes. CD results indicated most of the original complexes survived the desalting process necessary for ESI-MS analysis. In addition, several complexes, especially the pentaplexes, were found to be capable of cation exchange with ammonium ions. Ab initio calculations were conducted for isoguanine tetrads and pentads coordinated with all ten cations to predict the most energetically stable structures of the complexes in the gas phase. The observed preference of forming quadruplexes versus pentaplexes as a function of the coordinated cation can be interpreted by the calculated reaction energies of both the tetrads and pentads in combination with the distortion energies of tetrads. PMID:19746468

  3. Antiviral activity and its mechanism of guanine 7-N-oxide on DNA and RNA viruses derived from salmonid.

    PubMed

    Hasobe, M; Saneyoshi, M; Isono, K

    1985-11-01

    Guanine 7-N-oxide produced by Streptomyces sp. was found to inhibit in vitro the replication of herpes virus (Oncorhynchus masou virus, OMV), rhabdo virus (infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, IHNV) and a bi-segmented double-strand virus (infectious pancreatic necrosis virus, IPNV) derived from salmonids with IC50 values of about 10 micrograms/ml, 20 micrograms/ml and 32 micrograms/ml, respectively. The agent was not toxic for the host cells (chinook salmon embryo, CHSE-214) at the IC50 concentrations. Labeling of IHNV viral RNA and host cellular DNA and RNA with [3H]uridine and [3H]thymidine during drug treatment showed that guanine 7-N-oxide did not reduce the incorporation of these precusors into RNA and DNA. The anti-IHNV activity of guanine 7-N-oxide was enhanced synergistically by neplanocin A, an inhibitor of RNA methylation. The mechanism of action of guanine 7-N-oxide is discussed, in regard to maturation of viral messenger RNA including capping. PMID:3841124

  4. UVA-visible photo-excitation of guanine radical cations produces sugar radicals in DNA and model structures

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Malkhasian, Aramice Y. S.; Collins, Sean; Koppen, Jessica; Becker, David; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents evidence that photo-excitation of guanine radical cations results in high yields of deoxyribose sugar radicals in DNA, guanine deoxyribonucleosides and deoxyribonucleotides. In dsDNA at low temperatures, formation of C1′• is observed from photo-excitation of G•+ in the 310–480 nm range with no C1′• formation observed ≥520 nm. Illumination of guanine radical cations in 2′dG, 3′-dGMP and 5′-dGMP in aqueous LiCl glasses at 143 K is found to result in remarkably high yields (∼85–95%) of sugar radicals, namely C1′•, C3′• and C5′•. The amount of each of the sugar radicals formed varies dramatically with compound structure and temperature of illumination. Radical assignments were confirmed using selective deuteration at C5′ or C3′ in 2′-dG and at C8 in all the guanine nucleosides/tides. Studies of the effect of temperature, pH, and wavelength of excitation provide important information about the mechanism of formation of these sugar radicals. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations verify that specific excited states in G•+ show considerable hole delocalization into the sugar structure, in accord with our proposed mechanism of action, namely deprotonation from the sugar moiety of the excited molecular radical cation. PMID:16204456

  5. N-phosphonocarbonylpyrrolidine derivatives of guanine: a new class of bi-substrate inhibitors of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Rejman, Dominik; Panova, Natalya; Klener, Pavel; Maswabi, Bokang; Pohl, Radek; Rosenberg, Ivan

    2012-02-23

    A complete series of pyrrolidine nucleotides, (3R)- and (3S)-3-(guanin-9-yl)pyrrolidin-1-N-ylcarbonylphosphonic acids and (3S,4R)-, (3R,4S)-, (3S,4S)-, and (3R,4R)-4-(guanin-9-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidin-1-N-ylcarbonylphosphonic acids, were synthesized and evaluated as potential inhibitors of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and cell lines of myeloid and lymphoid origin. Two compounds, (S)-3-(guanin-9-yl)pyrrolidin-1-N-ylcarbonylphosphonic acid (2a) and (3S,4R)-4-(guanin-9-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidin-1-N-ylcarbonylphosphonic acid (6a), were recognized as nanomolar competitive inhibitors of PNP isolated from cell lines with K(i) values within the ranges of 16-100 and 10-24 nM, respectively. The low (MESG)K(i) and (Pi)K(i) values of both compounds for PNP isolated from PBMCs suggest that these compounds could be bisubstrate inhibitors that occupy both the phosphate and nucleoside binding sites of the enzyme. PMID:22264015

  6. Highly Oxidizing Excited States of One-Electron Oxidized Guanine in DNA: Wavelength and pH Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Khanduri, Deepti; Adhikary, Amitava; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Excited states of one-electron oxidized guanine in DNA are known to induce hole transfer to the sugar moiety and on deprotonation result in neutral sugar radicals that are precursors of DNA-strand breaks. This work carried out in homogeneous aqueous glass (7.5 M LiCl) at low temperatures (77 to 175 K) shows the extent of photoconversion of one-electron oxidized guanine and the associated yields of individual sugar radicals and are crucially controlled by photon energy, protonation state, and strandedness of the oligomer. In addition to forming sugar radicals, highly oxidizing excited states of one-electron oxidized guanine are produced with 405 nm light at pH 5 and below that are able to oxidize chloride ion in the surrounding solution to form Cl2•− via an excited state hole transfer process. Among the various DNA model systems studied in this work, the maximum amount of Cl2•− is produced with ds (double stranded) DNA where the one-electron oxidized guanine exists in its cation radical (G•+:C) form. Thus, via excited state hole transfer, the dsDNA is apparently able to protect itself from cation radical excited states by transfer of damage to the surrounding environment. PMID:21381665

  7. Solution structures of oligonucleotides containing either a guanine or a cytosine in front of a gap of one nucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulard, Y.; Faibis, V.; Fazakerley, G. V.

    1999-10-01

    We report NMR and molecular modelling studies on two DNA duplexes containing a gap of one nucleotides. The difference between the two oligonucleotides lies in the central base face to the gap, a guanine or a cytosine. For the gapG, we observed in solution a B-form conformation where the guanine stacks in the helix. For the gapC, we reveal the existence of two species, one majority where the cytosine is inside the helix and a second for which the cytosine is extrahelical. Nous présentons une étude par RMN et modélisation moléculaire sur deux duplexes d'ADN contenant une lacune de un nucléotide. La différence entre les deux oligonucléotides réside dans la base centrale en face de la lacune, une guanine ou une cytosine. Pour le duplex appelé gapG, nous observons en solution une hélice de type B dans laquelle la guanine est empilée à l'intérieur de l'hélice. Dans le cas du duplex gapC, nous montrons l'existence de deux formes, l'une où la cytosine est à l'intérieur de l'hélice; la seconde où la cytosine est extra hélicale.

  8. Adaptive ligand binding by the purine riboswitch in the recognition of guanine and adenine analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Sunny D.; Reyes, Francis E.; Edwards, Andrea L.; Batey, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Purine riboswitches discriminate between guanine and adenine by at least 10,000-fold based on the identity of a single pyrimidine (Y74) that forms a Watson-Crick base pair with the ligand. To understand how this high degree of specificity for closely related compounds is achieved through simple pairing, we investigated their interaction with purine analogs with varying functional groups at the 2- and 6-positions that have the potential to alter interactions with Y74. Using a combination of crystallographic and calorimetric approaches, we find that binding these purines is often facilitated by either small structural changes in the RNA or tautomeric changes in the ligand. This work also reveals that, along with base pairing, conformational restriction of Y74 significantly contributes to nucleobase selectivity. These results reveal that compounds that exploit the inherent local flexibility within riboswitch binding pockets can alter their ligand specificity. PMID:19523903

  9. Solubilization and characterization of guanine nucleotide-sensitive muscarinic agonist binding sites from rat myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Berrie, C. P.; Birdsall, N. J.; Hulme, E. C.; Keen, M.; Stockton, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors from rat myocardial membranes may be solubilized by digitonin in good yield at low temperatures in the presence of Mg2+. Under these conditions, up to 60% of the soluble receptors show high affinity binding for the potent agonist [3H]-oxotremorine-M (KA = 10(9)M-1), which is inhibited by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate. The muscarinic binding site labelled with [3H]-oxotremorine-M has a higher sedimentation coefficient (13.4 s) than sites labelled with a 3H antagonist in the presence of guanylylimidodiphosphate (11.6 s) and probably represents a complex between the ligand binding subunit of the receptor and a guanine nucleotide binding protein. PMID:6478115

  10. An experimental and theoretical core-level study of tautomerism in guanine.

    PubMed

    Plekan, Oksana; Feyer, Vitaliy; Richter, Robert; Coreno, Marcello; Vall-Llosera, Gemma; Prince, Kevin C; Trofimov, Alexander B; Zaytseva, Irina L; Moskovskaya, Tatyana E; Gromov, Evgeniy V; Schirmer, Jochen

    2009-08-20

    The core level photoemission and near edge X-ray photoabsorption spectra of guanine in the gas phase have been measured and the results interpreted with the aid of high level ab initio calculations. Tautomers are clearly identified spectroscopically, and their relative free energies and Boltzmann populations at the temperature of the experiment (600 K) have been calculated and compared with the experimental results and with previous calculations. We obtain good agreement between experiment and the Boltzmann weighted theoretical photoemission spectra, which allows a quantitative determination of the ratio of oxo to hydroxy tautomer populations. For the photoabsorption spectra, good agreement is found for the C 1s and O 1s spectra but only fair agreement for the N 1s edge. PMID:19634878

  11. Zizimin and Dock guanine nucleotide exchange factors in cell function and disease.

    PubMed

    Pakes, Nicholl K; Veltman, Douwe M; Williams, Robin S B

    2013-01-01

    Zizimin proteins belong to the Dock (Dedicator of Cytokinesis) superfamily of Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) proteins. This family of proteins plays a role in the regulation of Rho family small GTPases. Together the Rho family of small GTPases and the Dock/Zizimin proteins play a vital role in a number of cell processes including cell migration, apoptosis, cell division and cell adhesion. Our recent studies of Zizimin proteins, using a simple biomedical model, the eukaryotic social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, have helped to elucidate the cellular role of these proteins. In this article, we discuss the domain structure of Zizimin proteins from an evolutionary viewpoint. We also compare what is currently known about the mammalian Zizimin proteins to that of related Dock proteins. Understanding the cellular functions of these proteins will provide a better insight into their role in cell signaling, and may help in treating disease pathology associated with mutations in Dock/Zizimin proteins. PMID:23247359

  12. Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency: Activity in Normal, Mutant, and Heterozygote-Cultured Human Skin Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Wilfred Y.; Seegmiller, J. Edwin

    1970-01-01

    Cultured skin fibroblasts from patients deficient for the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (PRT) activity show very low but nevertheless significant levels of apparent PRT enzyme despite absence of detectable activity (<0.004% of normal) in erythrocytes of the same patients. In fibroblasts this mutant enzyme is more heat labile than the normal enzyme. These findings indicate that PRT deficiency in this disorder is not due to a deletion mutation of the PRT locus. Individual cultured skin fibroblasts from heterozygote females for PRT deficiency show normal, intermediate, or very low levels of PRT activity. The mosaicism demonstrated in the heterozygotes for this X-linked disorder accounts for the cells with normal and very low activities of PRT. Intermediate activity can best be explained by the phenomenon of metabolic cooperation presumably from the transfer of either PRT enzyme or messenger RNA, from normal to mutant cells. Images PMID:5267139

  13. Oncogenic potential of guanine nucleotide stimulatory factor alpha subunit in thyroid glands of transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Michiels, F M; Caillou, B; Talbot, M; Dessarps-Freichey, F; Maunoury, M T; Schlumberger, M; Mercken, L; Monier, R; Feunteun, J

    1994-01-01

    Transgenic mice have been used to address the issue of the oncogenic potential of mutant guanine nucleotide stimulatory factor (Gs) alpha subunit in the thyroid gland. The expression of the mutant Arg-201-->His Gs alpha subunit transgene has been directed to murine thyroid epithelial cells by bovine thyroglobulin promoter. The transgenic animals develop hyperfunctioning thyroid adenomas with increased intracellular cAMP levels and high uptake of [125I]iodine and produced elevated levels of circulating triiodothyronine and thyroxine. These animals demonstrate that the mutant form of Gs alpha subunit carries an oncogenic activity, thus supporting the model that deregulation of cAMP level alters growth control in thyroid epithelium. These animals represent models for humans with autonomously functioning thyroid nodules. Images PMID:7937980

  14. Acyclic Immucillin Phosphonates. Second-Generation Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine- Guanine-Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelton, Keith Z.; Ho, Meng-Chaio; Cassera, Maria B.; Clinch, Keith; Crump, Douglas R.; Rosario Jr., Irving; Merino, Emilio F.; Almo, Steve C.; Tyler, Peter C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2012-06-22

    We found that Plasmodium falciparum is the primary cause of deaths from malaria. It is a purine auxotroph and relies on hypoxanthine salvage from the host purine pool. Purine starvation as an antimalarial target has been validated by inhibition of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Hypoxanthine depletion kills Plasmodium falciparum in cell culture and in Aotus monkey infections. Hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) from P. falciparum is required for hypoxanthine salvage by forming inosine 5'-monophosphate, a branchpoint for all purine nucleotide synthesis in the parasite. We present a class of HGXPRT inhibitors, the acyclic immucillin phosphonates (AIPs), and cell permeable AIP prodrugs. The AIPs are simple, potent, selective, and biologically stable inhibitors. The AIP prodrugs block proliferation of cultured parasites by inhibiting the incorporation of hypoxanthine into the parasite nucleotide pool and validates HGXPRT as a target in malaria.

  15. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palella, T.D.; Silverman, L.J.; Schroll, C.T.; Homa, F.L.; Levine, M.; Kelley, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of the Gene Cluster Encoding Allantoinase and Guanine Deaminase in Klebsiella pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Karla; Badia, Josefa; Giménez, Rosa; Aguilar, Juan; Baldoma, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Purines can be used as the sole source of nitrogen by several strains of K. pneumoniae under aerobic conditions. The genes responsible for the assimilation of purine nitrogens are distributed in three separated clusters in the K. pneumoniae genome. Here, we characterize the cluster encompassing genes KPN_01787 to KPN_01791, which is involved in the conversion of allantoin into allantoate and in the deamination of guanine to xanthine. These genes are organized in three transcriptional units, hpxSAB, hpxC, and guaD. Gene hpxS encodes a regulatory protein of the GntR family that mediates regulation of this system by growth on allantoin. Proteins encoded by hpxB and guaD display allantoinase and guanine deaminase activity, respectively. In this cluster, hpxSAB is the most tightly regulated unit. This operon was activated by growth on allantoin as a nitrogen source; however, addition of allantoin to nitrogen excess cultures did not result in hpxSAB induction. Neither guaD nor hpxC was induced by allantoin. Expression of guaD is mainly regulated by nitrogen availability through the action of NtrC. Full induction of hpxSAB by allantoin requires both HpxS and NAC. HpxS may have a dual role, acting as a repressor in the absence of allantoin and as an activator in its presence. HpxS binds to tandem sites, S1 and S2, overlapping the −10 and −35 sequences of the hpxSAB promoter, respectively. The NAC binding site is located between S1 and S2 and partially overlaps S2. In the presence of allantoin, interplay between NAC and HpxS is proposed. PMID:21357483

  17. A pyrimidine-guanine sequence-specific ribonuclease from Rana catesbeiana (bullfrog) oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Y D

    1992-01-01

    A pyrimidine-guanine sequence-specific ribonuclease (RC-RNase) was purified from Rana catesbeiana (bullfrog) oocytes by sequential phosphocellulose, Sephadex G75, heparin Sepharose CL 6B and CM-Sepharose CL 6B column chromatography. The purified enzyme with molecular weight of 13,000 daltons gave a single band on SDS-polyacrylamide gel. One CNBr-cleaved fragment has a sequence of NVLSTTRFQLNT/TRTSITPR, which is identical to residues 59-79 of a sialic acid binding lectin from R. catesbeiana eggs, and is 71% homologous to residues 60-80 of an RNase from R. catesbeaina liver. The RC-RNase preferentially cleaved RNA at pyrimidine residues with a 3' flanking guanine under various conditions. The sequence specificity of RC-RNase was further confirmed with dinucleotide as substrates, which were analyzed by thin layer chromatography after enzyme digestion. The values of kcat/km for pCpG, pUpG and pUpU were 2.66 x 10(7) M-1s-1, 2.50 x 10(7) M-1s-1 and 2.44 x 10(6) M-1s-1 respectively, however, those for other phosphorylated dinucleotides were less than 2% of pCpG and pUpG. As compared to single strand RNA, double strand RNA was relatively resistant to RC-RNase. Besides poly (A) and poly (G), most of synthetic homo- and heteropolynucleotides were also susceptible to RC-RNase. The RC-RNase was stable in the acidic (pH 2) and alkaline (pH 12) condition, but could be inactivated by heating to 80 degrees C for 15 min. No divalent cation was required for its activity. Furthermore, the enzyme activity could be enhanced by 2 M urea, and inhibited to 50% by 0.12 M NaCl or 0.02% SDS. Images PMID:1373237

  18. The formation of DNA sugar radicals from photoexcitation of guanine cation radicals.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Lata I; Pazdro, Robert; Huang, James; DeVreugd, Christopher; Becker, David; Sevilla, Michael D

    2004-05-01

    In this investigation of radical formation and reaction in gamma- irradiated DNA and model compounds, we report the conversion of the guanine cation radical (one-electron oxidized guanine, G(.+)) to the C1' sugar radical and another sugar radical at the C3' or C4' position (designated C3'(.)/C4'(.)) by visible and UV photolysis. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopic investigations were performed on salmon testes DNA as well as 5'-dGMP, 3'-dGMP, 2'-deoxyguanosine and other nucleosides/nucleotides as model systems. DNA samples (25- 150 mg/ml D(2)O) were prepared with Tl(3+) or Fe(CN)(3-)(6) as electron scavengers. Upon gamma irradiation of such samples at 77 K, the electron-gain path in the DNA is strongly suppressed and predominantly G(.+) is found; after UV or visible photolysis, the fraction of the C1' sugar radical increases with a concomitant reduction in the fraction of G(.+). In model systems, 3'- dGMP(+.) and 5'-dGMP(+.) were produced by attack of Cl(.-)(2) on the parent nucleotide in 7 M LiCl glass. Subsequent visible photolysis of the 3'-dGMP(+.) (77 K) results predominantly in formation of C1'(.) whereas photolysis of 5'-dGMP(+.) results predominantly in formation of C3'(.)/C4'(.). We propose that sugar radical formation is a result of delocalization of the hole in the electronically excited base cation radical into the sugar ring, followed by deprotonation at specific sites on the sugar. PMID:15161365

  19. Guanine Holes Are Prominent Targets for Mutation in Cancer and Inherited Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bacolla, Albino; Temiz, Nuri A.; Yi, Ming; Ivanic, Joseph; Cer, Regina Z.; Donohue, Duncan E.; Ball, Edward V.; Mudunuri, Uma S.; Wang, Guliang; Jain, Aklank; Volfovsky, Natalia; Luke, Brian T.; Stephens, Robert M.; Cooper, David N.; Collins, Jack R.; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2013-01-01

    Single base substitutions constitute the most frequent type of human gene mutation and are a leading cause of cancer and inherited disease. These alterations occur non-randomly in DNA, being strongly influenced by the local nucleotide sequence context. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying such sequence context-dependent mutagenesis are not fully understood. Using bioinformatics, computational and molecular modeling analyses, we have determined the frequencies of mutation at G•C bp in the context of all 64 5′-NGNN-3′ motifs that contain the mutation at the second position. Twenty-four datasets were employed, comprising >530,000 somatic single base substitutions from 21 cancer genomes, >77,000 germline single-base substitutions causing or associated with human inherited disease and 16.7 million benign germline single-nucleotide variants. In several cancer types, the number of mutated motifs correlated both with the free energies of base stacking and the energies required for abstracting an electron from the target guanines (ionization potentials). Similar correlations were also evident for the pathological missense and nonsense germline mutations, but only when the target guanines were located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. Likewise, pathogenic splicing mutations predominantly affected positions in which a purine was located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. Novel candidate driver mutations and tissue-specific mutational patterns were also identified in the cancer datasets. We conclude that electron transfer reactions within the DNA molecule contribute to sequence context-dependent mutagenesis, involving both somatic driver and passenger mutations in cancer, as well as germline alterations causing or associated with inherited disease. PMID:24086153

  20. Activation of immobilized, biotinylated choleragen AI protein by a 19-kilodalton guanine nucleotide-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Noda, M; Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Bobak, D A; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1989-09-19

    Cholera toxin catalyzes the ADP-ribosylation that results in activation of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein of the adenylyl cyclase system, known as Gs. The toxin also ADP-ribosylates other proteins and simple guanidino compounds and auto-ADP-ribosylates its AI protein (CTA1). All of the ADP-ribosyltransferase activities of CTAI are enhanced by 19-21-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins known as ADP-ribosylation factors, or ARFs. CTAI contains a single cysteine located near the carboxy terminus. CTAI was immobilized through this cysteine by reaction with iodoacetyl-N-biotinyl-hexylenediamine and binding of the resulting biotinylated protein to avidin-agarose. Immobilized CTAI catalyzed the ARF-stimulated ADP-ribosylation of agmatine. The reaction was enhanced by detergents and phospholipid, but the fold stimulation by purified sARF-II from bovine brain was considerably less than that observed with free CTA. ADP-ribosylation of Gsa by immobilized CTAI, which was somewhat enhanced by sARF-II, was much less than predicted on the basis of the NAD:agmatine ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Immobilized CTAI catalyzed its own auto-ADP-ribosylation as well as the ADP-ribosylation of the immobilized avidin and CTA2, with relatively little stimulation by sARF-II. ADP-ribosylation of CTA2 by free CTAI is minimal. These observations are consistent with the conclusion that the cysteine near the carboxy terminus of the toxin is not critical for ADP-ribosyltransferase activity or for its regulation by sARF-II. Biotinylation and immobilization of the toxin through this cysteine may, however, limit accessibility to Gsa or SARF-II, or perhaps otherwise reduce interaction with these proteins whether as substrates or activator. PMID:2514798

  1. Depletion of guanine nucleotides leads to the Mdm2-dependent proteasomal degradation of nucleostemin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Itahana, Koji; Zhang, Yanping; Mitchell, Beverly S

    2009-04-01

    Nucleostemin is a positive regulator of cell proliferation and is highly expressed in a variety of stem cells, tumors, and tumor cell lines. The protein shuttles between the nucleolus and the nucleus in a GTP-dependent fashion. Selective depletion of intracellular guanine nucleotides by AVN-944, an inhibitor of the de novo purine synthetic enzyme, IMP dehydrogenase, leads to the rapid disappearance of nucleostemin protein in tumor cell lines, an effect that does not occur with two other nucleolar proteins, nucleophosmin or nucleolin. Endogenous nucleostemin protein is completely stabilized by MG132, an inhibitor of the 26S proteasome, as are the levels of expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged nucleostemin, both wild-type protein and protein containing mutations at the G(1) GTP binding site. Nutlin-3a, a small molecule that disrupts the binding of the E3 ubiquitin ligase, Mdm2, to p53, stabilizes nucleostemin protein in the face of guanine nucleotide depletion, as does siRNA-mediated knockdown of Mdm2 expression and overexpression of a dominant-negative form of Mdm2. Neither Doxorubicin nor Actinomycin D, which cause the release of nucleostemin from the nucleolus, results in nucleostemin degradation. We conclude that nucleostemin is a target for Mdm2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation when not bound to GTP. Because this effect does not occur with other chemotherapeutic agents, the induction of nucleostemin protein degradation in tumor cells by IMP dehydrogenase inhibition or by other small molecules that disrupt GTP binding may offer a new approach to the treatment of certain neoplastic diseases. PMID:19318567

  2. Dissecting Complex Metabolic Integration Provides Direct Genetic Evidence for CodY Activation by Guanine Nucleotides▿

    PubMed Central

    Brinsmade, Shaun R.; Sonenshein, Abraham L.

    2011-01-01

    The global regulator CodY controls the expression of dozens of metabolic genes and genes mediating adaptation to nutrient availability in many low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria. Branched-chain amino acids l-isoleucine, l-leucine, and l-valine (ILV) activate CodY both in vivo and in vitro, and genes that direct their synthesis (ilv, ybgE, and ywaA) are highly repressed by CodY, creating a potential negative feedback loop. The nucleoside triphosphate GTP also activates CodY in vitro, but the evidence for activation by GTP in vivo is limited and indirect. We constructed a Bacillus subtilis strain (ybgE bcd ywaA) that is unable to convert branched-chain α-keto acids to ILV or to use ILV as a precursor for branched-chain fatty acid synthesis. Unexpectedly, the strain was not viable on rich medium. Supplementing rich medium with short, branched-chain fatty acids or derepressing expression of genes for de novo ILV synthesis bypassed the original lethality, restoring growth and showing that the lack of viability was due to insufficient intracellular production of the precursors of branched-chain fatty acids. Spontaneous extragenic suppressor mutants that arose in the triple mutant population proved to have additional mutations in guaA or guaB or codY. Expression of ILV biosynthetic genes in codY mutants was increased. The gua mutations caused guanine/guanosine auxotrophy and led to partial derepression of direct CodY-repressed targets, including ILV biosynthetic genes, under conditions similar to those that caused the original lethality. We conclude that a guanine derivative, most likely GTP, controls CodY activity in vivo. PMID:21856856

  3. Guanine nucleotide regulatory protein co-purifies with the D/sub 2/-dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Senogles, S.E.; Caron, M.G.

    1986-05-01

    The D/sub 2/-dopamine receptor from bovine anterior pituitary was purified approx.1000 fold by affinity chromatography on CMOS-Sepharose. Reconstitution of the affinity-purified receptor into phospholipid vesicles revealed the presence of high and low affinity agonist sites as detected by N-n-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) competition experiments with /sup 3/H-spiperone. High affinity agonist binding could be converted to the low affinity form by guanine nucleotides, indicating the presence of an endogenous guanine nucleotide binding protein (N protein) in the affinity-purified D/sub 2/ receptor preparations. Furthermore, this preparation contained an agonist-sensitive GTPase activity which was stimulated 2-3 fold over basal by 10 ..mu..M NPA. /sup 35/S-GTP..gamma..S binding to these preparations revealed a stoichiometry of 0.4-0.7 mole N protein/mole receptor, suggesting the N protein may be specifically coupled with the purified D/sub 2/-dopamine receptor and not present as a contaminant. Pertussis toxin treatment of the affinity purified receptor preparations prevented high affinity agonist binding, as well as agonist stimulation of the GTPase activity, presumably by inactivating the associated N protein. Pertussis toxin lead to the ADP-ribosylation of a protein of 39-40K on SDS-PAGE. These findings indicate that an endogenous N protein, N/sub i/ or N/sub o/, co-purifies with the D/sub 2/-dopamine receptor which may reflect a precoupling of this receptor with an N protein within the membranes.

  4. Theoretical study of valence orbital response to guanine tautomerization in coordinate and momentum spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zejin; Duffy, Patrick; Zhu, Quan; Takahashi, Masahiko; Wang, Feng

    2015-10-01

    The binding energy spectra and electron momentum spectra of eight stable guanine tautomers are calculated in the complete valence space. The present results show that the canonical keto (C=O) guanine N(9)H tautomer (GU1) possesses the largest dipole moment, molecular electronic spatial extent, molecular hardness value, and the minimum first vertical ionization potential (VIP). Valence orbital profile investigations find that several orbitals remain almost unchanged during tautomerization, such as frontier highest occupied molecular orbital 39a and 18a. Several orbitals with interchanged order and inverse direction in charge spatial orientations are also detected. Outer valence orbitals (with smaller VIPs) show more complex orbital shapes in the momentum space than those of inner ones (larger VIPs) due mainly to the relatively strong inter-orbital interaction and delocalized electronic distributions. Proton rotation along C-O(H) and C-N(H) axes within hexagonal ring causes smaller influence to orbital profiles than those of proton migration within pentagonal and/or hexagonal rings. Orbital variation trends between enol (GU3-GU5) and keto (GU1, GU2, GU6-GU8) tautomers are observed, including the signature orbitals of enol form, the variation tendency of total orbital intensity, and the variation order of the maximum orbital intensity. In the outer valence momentum space (outside 26a), orbital composed by pz electrons show single peak with a gradual increasing peak site from 0.5 a.u. of inner valence orbital to 1.0 a.u. of outer valence orbital, whereas orbitals composed by px,y electrons form double peaks with respective sites at about 0.5 and 1.5 a.u., only three px,y-orbitals present single peaks (33a,34a,36a). The general variation trends in the complete valence space for all the valence orbitals on their intensities, peak sites, and orbital components are concluded.

  5. Guanine-based purines modulate the effect of L-NAME on learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, P; Buccella, P; Ballerini, P; Ciccarelli, R; D'alimonte, I; Cicchitti, S; Petragnani, N; Natale, S; Iacovella, G; Caciagli, F; Di Iorio, P

    2012-11-01

    Guanosine has been reported to exert neuroprotective effects. We recently reported that, following intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection to rats, it resulted to be widely distributed. Its metabolic product guanine also rapidly increased in all the tissues, including brain, after i.p. injection of guanosine and consistently we found a significant enzymatic activity of a soluble purine nucleoside phosphorylase in the plasma of the treated animals. In this study the effect of per os administration of guanosine or guanine to rats submitted to passive avoidance task has been evaluated. Guanosine (4 and 8 mg/kg) administered pretraining impaired retention in the passive avoidance task and was unable to prevent the amnesic effect caused by 100 mg/kg N-omega-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) known to reduce the capability of treated animals to acquire or retain informations in several learning tasks. On the contrary, guanine (4 and 8 mg/kg), which per se did not modify the latency to step-trough in the passive avoidance task, when administered pretraining 15 min before L-NAME prevented, in a dose dependent manner, the amnesic effect of the NOS inihibitor. Moreover the nucleobase was able to rescue the memory trace also when administered after training. Neither guanosine nor guanine had effects on locomotor activity. These results indicate that guanine can exert important biological activities which may be different from those mediated by its precursor guanosine, thus this evenience should be taken into account when the biological effects of guanosine are evaluated. PMID:23138719

  6. Guanine-based purines modulate the effect of L-NAME on learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, P; Buccella, S; Ballerini, P; Ciccarelli, R; D'Alimonte, I; Cicchitti, S; Petragnani, N; Natale, S; Iacovella, G; Caciagli, F; Di Iorio, P

    2012-12-01

    Guanosine has been reported to exert neuroprotective effects. We recently reported that, following intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection to rats, it resulted to be widely distributed. Its metabolic product guanine also rapidly increased in all the tissues, including brain, after i.p. injection of guanosine and consistently we found a significant enzymatic activity of a soluble purine nucleoside phosphorylase in the plasma of the treated animals. In this study the effect of per os administration of guanosine or guanine to rats submitted to passive avoidance task has been evaluated. Guanosine (4 and 8 mg/kg) administered pretraining impaired retention in the passive avoidance task and was unable to prevent the amnesic effect caused by 100 mg/kg N-omega-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) known to reduce the capability of treated animals to acquire or retain informations in several learning tasks. On the contrary, guanine (4 and 8 mg/kg), which per se did not modify the latency to step-trough in the passive avoidance task, when administered pretraining 15 min before L-NAME prevented, in a dose dependent manner, the amnesic effect of the NOS inhibitor. Moreover the nucleobase was able to rescue the memory trace also when administered after training. Neither guanosine nor guanine had effects on locomotor activity. These results indicate that guanine can exert important biological activities which may be different from those mediated by its precursor guanosine, thus this evenience should be taken into account when the biological effects of guanosine are evaluated. PMID:23241935

  7. Trichomonas vaginalis NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase hydrolyze guanine nucleotides and increase extracellular guanosine levels under serum restriction.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Camila Braz; Durgante, Juliano; de Oliveira, Rafael Rodrigues; Dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes; Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Dos Santos, Odelta; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-05-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aethiologic agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The purinergic signaling pathway is mediated by extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides that are involved in many biological effects as neurotransmission, immunomodulation and inflammation. Extracellular nucleotides can be hydrolyzed by a family of enzymes known as ectonucleotidases including the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) family which hydrolyses nucleosides triphosphate and diphosphate as preferential substrates and ecto-5'-nucleotidase which catalyzes the conversion of monophosphates into nucleosides. In T. vaginalis the E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities upon adenine nucleotides have already been characterized in intact trophozoites but little is known concerning guanine nucleotides and nucleoside. These enzymes may exert a crucial role on nucleoside generation, providing the purine sources for the synthesis de novo of these essential nutrients, sustaining parasite growth and survival. In this study, we investigated the hydrolysis profile of guanine-related nucleotides and nucleoside in intact trophozoites from long-term-grown and fresh clinical isolates of T. vaginalis. Knowing that guanine nucleotides are also substrates for T. vaginalis ectoenzymes, we evaluated the profile of nucleotides consumption and guanosine uptake in trophozoites submitted to a serum limitation condition. Results show that guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP, GMP) were substrates for T. vaginalis ectonucleotidases, with expected kinetic parameters for this enzyme family. Different T. vaginalis isolates (two from the ATCC and nine fresh clinical isolates) presented a heterogeneous hydrolysis profile. The serum culture condition increased E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities with high consumption of extracellular GTP generating enhanced GDP, GMP and guanosine levels as demonstrated by HPLC, with final

  8. Highly Sensitive Bacteria Quantification Using Immunomagnetic Separation and Electrochemical Detection of Guanine-Labeled Secondary Beads

    PubMed Central

    Jayamohan, Harikrishnan; Gale, Bruce K.; Minson, Bj; Lambert, Christopher J.; Gordon, Neil; Sant, Himanshu J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the ultra-sensitive indirect electrochemical detection of E. coli O157:H7 using antibody functionalized primary (magnetic) beads for capture and polyguanine (polyG) oligonucleotide functionalized secondary (polystyrene) beads as an electrochemical tag. Vacuum filtration in combination with E. coli O157:H7 specific antibody modified magnetic beads were used for extraction of E. coli O157:H7 from 100 mL samples. The magnetic bead conjugated E. coli O157:H7 cells were then attached to polyG functionalized secondary beads to form a sandwich complex (magnetic bead/E. coli/ secondary bead). While the use of magnetic beads for immuno-based capture is well characterized, the use of oligonucleotide functionalized secondary beads helps combine amplification and potential multiplexing into the system. The antibody functionalized secondary beads can be easily modified with a different antibody to detect other pathogens from the same sample and enable potential multiplexing. The polyGs on the secondary beads enable signal amplification up to 108 guanine tags per secondary bead (7.5 × 106 biotin-FITC per secondary bead, 20 guanines per oligonucleotide) bound to the target (E. coli). A single-stranded DNA probe functionalized reduced graphene oxide modified glassy carbon electrode was used to bind the polyGs on the secondary beads. Fluorescent imaging was performed to confirm the hybridization of the complex to the electrode surface. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to quantify the amount of polyG involved in the hybridization event with tris(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) ( Ru(bpy)32+) as the mediator. The amount of polyG signal can be correlated to the amount of E. coli O157:H7 in the sample. The method was able to detect concentrations of E. coli O157:H7 down to 3 CFU/100 mL, which is 67 times lower than the most sensitive technique reported in literature. The signal to noise ratio for this work was 3. We also demonstrate the use of the

  9. Highly sensitive bacteria quantification using immunomagnetic separation and electrochemical detection of guanine-labeled secondary beads.

    PubMed

    Jayamohan, Harikrishnan; Gale, Bruce K; Minson, Bj; Lambert, Christopher J; Gordon, Neil; Sant, Himanshu J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the ultra-sensitive indirect electrochemical detection of E. coli O157:H7 using antibody functionalized primary (magnetic) beads for capture and polyguanine (polyG) oligonucleotide functionalized secondary (polystyrene) beads as an electrochemical tag. Vacuum filtration in combination with E. coli O157:H7 specific antibody modified magnetic beads were used for extraction of E. coli O157:H7 from 100 mL samples. The magnetic bead conjugated E. coli O157:H7 cells were then attached to polyG functionalized secondary beads to form a sandwich complex (magnetic bead/E. coli secondary bead). While the use of magnetic beads for immuno-based capture is well characterized, the use of oligonucleotide functionalized secondary beads helps combine amplification and potential multiplexing into the system. The antibody functionalized secondary beads can be easily modified with a different antibody to detect other pathogens from the same sample and enable potential multiplexing. The polyGs on the secondary beads enable signal amplification up to 10⁸ guanine tags per secondary bead (7.5 x 10⁶ biotin-FITC per secondary bead, 20 guanines per oligonucleotide) bound to the target (E. coli). A single-stranded DNA probe functionalized reduced graphene oxide modified glassy carbon electrode was used to bind the polyGs on the secondary beads. Fluorescent imaging was performed to confirm the hybridization of the complex to the electrode surface. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to quantify the amount of polyG involved in the hybridization event with tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy)3(2+)) as the mediator. The amount of polyG signal can be correlated to the amount of E. coli O157:H7 in the sample. The method was able to detect concentrations of E. coli O157:H7 down to 3 CFU/100 mL, which is 67 times lower than the most sensitive technique reported in literature. The signal to noise ratio for this work was 3. We also demonstrate the use of the

  10. Lpg0393 of Legionella pneumophila Is a Guanine-Nucleotide Exchange Factor for Rab5, Rab21 and Rab22

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Young-Sik; Shin, Ho-Chul; Park, Wei Sun; Ge, Jianning; Kim, Chan-Hee; Lee, Bok Luel; Do Heo, Won; Jung, Jae U.; Rigden, Daniel John; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a human intracellular pathogen, encodes about 290 effector proteins that are translocated into host cells through a secretion machinery. Some of these proteins have been shown to manipulate or subvert cellular processes during infection, but functional roles of a majority of them remain unknown. Lpg0393 is a newly identified Legionella effector classified as a hypothetical protein. Through X-ray crystallographic analysis, we show that Lpg0393 contains a Vps9-like domain, which is structurally most similar to the catalytic core of human Rabex-5 that activates the endosomal Rab proteins Rab5, Rab21 and Rab22. Consistently, Lpg0393 exhibited a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor activity toward the endosomal Rabs. This work identifies the first example of a bacterial guanine-nucleotide exchange factor that is active towards the Rab5 sub-cluster members, implying that the activation of these Rab proteins might be advantageous for the intracellular survival of Legionella. PMID:25821953

  11. Synthesis of adenine, guanine, cytosine, and other nitrogen organic compounds by a Fischer-Tropsch-like process.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. C.; Oro, J.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the formation of purines, pyrimidines, and other bases from CO, H2, and NH3 under conditions similar to those used in the Fischer-Tropsch process. It is found that industrial nickel/iron alloy catalyzes the synthesis of adenine, guanine, cytosine, and other nitrogenous compounds from mixtures of CO, H2, and NH3 at temperatures of about 600 C. Sufficient sample was accumulated to isolate as solid products adenine, guanine, and cytosine, which were identified by infrared spectrophotometry. In the absence of nickel/iron catalyst, at 650 C, or in the presence of this catalyst, at 450 C, no purines or pyrimidines were synthesized. These results confirm and extend some of the work reported by Kayatsu et al. (1968).

  12. Guanine deaminase functions as dihydropterin deaminase in the biosynthesis of aurodrosopterin, a minor red eye pigment of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaekwang; Park, Sang Ick; Ahn, Chiyoung; Kim, Heuijong; Yim, Jeongbin

    2009-08-28

    Dihydropterin deaminase, which catalyzes the conversion of 7,8-dihydropterin to 7,8-dihydrolumazine, was purified 5850-fold to apparent homogeneity from Drosophila melanogaster. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 48 kDa by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE, indicating that it is a monomer under native conditions. The pI value, temperature, and optimal pH of the enzyme were 5.5, 40 degrees C, and 7.5, respectively. Interestingly the enzyme had much higher activity for guanine than for 7,8-dihydropterin. The specificity constant (k(cat)/K(m)) for guanine (8.6 x 10(6) m(-1).s(-1)) was 860-fold higher than that for 7,8-dihydropterin (1.0 x 10(4) m(-1).s(-1)). The structural gene of the enzyme was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis as CG18143, located at region 82A1 on chromosome 3R. The cloned and expressed CG18143 exhibited both 7,8-dihydropterin and guanine deaminase activities. Flies with mutations in CG18143, SUPor-P/Df(3R)A321R1 transheterozygotes, had severely decreased activities in both deaminases compared with the wild type. Among several red eye pigments, the level of aurodrosopterin was specifically decreased in the mutant, and the amount of xanthine and uric acid also decreased considerably to 76 and 59% of the amounts in the wild type, respectively. In conclusion, dihydropterin deaminase encoded by CG18143 plays a role in the biosynthesis of aurodrosopterin by providing one of its precursors, 7,8-dihydrolumazine, from 7,8-dihydropterin. Dihydropterin deaminase also functions as guanine deaminase, an important enzyme for purine metabolism. PMID:19567870

  13. Overoxidized polypyrrole/graphene nanocomposite with good electrochemical performance as novel electrode material for the detection of adenine and guanine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan-Sha; Xu, Jing-Kun; Lu, Li-Min; Wu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Kai-Xin; Nie, Tao; Zhu, Xiao-Fei; Wu, Yao

    2014-12-15

    Most conducting polymer/graphene composites have excellent electrical conductivity. However, the background currents of these composites modified electrodes are much larger. In order to improve the sensitivities of these methods, it is necessary to decrease the background signal. In this paper, porous structure films of overoxidized polypyrrole/graphene (PPyox/GR) have been electrochemically coated onto glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and successfully utilized as an efficient electrode material for the quantitive detection of adenine and guanine, two of the most important components of DNA and RNA. The permselective polymer coatings with low background current could improve the selectivity and sensitivity of microelectrodes for the electropositive purine bases. The GRs into these polymers would further improve sensitivity by increasing the electroactive surface area. The electrochemical sensor can be applied to the quantification of adenine and guanine with a linear range covering 0.06-100 µM and 0.04-100 µM, and a low detection limit of 0.02 μM and 0.01 μM, respectively. More importantly, the proposed method was applied to quantify adenine and guanine in calf thymus DNA with satisfactory results. PMID:25022509

  14. The Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor SWAP-70 Modulates the Migration and Invasiveness of Human Malignant Glioma Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Ho Jun; Smith, Christian A; Salhia, Bodour; Rutka, James T

    2009-01-01

    The malignant glioma is the most common primary human brain tumor. Its tendency to invade away from the primary tumor mass is considered a leading cause of tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Accordingly, the molecular pathogenesis of glioma invasion is currently under investigation. Previously, we examined a gene expression array database comparing human gliomas to nonneoplastic controls and identified several Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors with differential expression. Here, we report that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor SWAP-70 has increased expression in malignant gliomas and strongly correlates with lowered patient survival. SWAP-70 is a multifunctional signaling protein involved in membrane ruffling that works cooperatively with activated Rac. Using a glioma tissue microarray, we validated that SWAP-70 demonstrates higher expression in malignant gliomas compared with low-grade gliomas or nonneoplastic brain tissue. Through immunofluorescence, SWAP-70 localizes to membrane ruffles in response to the growth factor, epidermal growth factor. To assess the role of SWAP-70 in glioma migration and invasion, we inhibited its expression withsmall interfering RNAs and observed decreased glioma cell migration and invasion. SWAP-70 overexpression led to increased levels of active Rac even in low-serum conditions. In addition, when SWAP-70 was overexpressed in glioma cells, we observed enhanced membrane ruffle formation followed by increased cellmigration and invasiveness. Taken together, our findings suggest that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor SWAP-70 plays an important role in the migration and invasion of human gliomas into the surrounding tissue. PMID:19956392

  15. Multisite-specific archaeosine tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (ArcTGT) from Thermoplasma acidophilum, a thermo-acidophilic archaeon

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Takuya; Hirata, Akira; Ohno, Satoshi; Nomura, Yuichiro; Nagano, Tomoko; Nameki, Nobukazu; Yokogawa, Takashi; Hori, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Archaeosine (G+), which is found only at position 15 in many archaeal tRNA, is formed by two steps, the replacement of the guanine base with preQ0 by archaeosine tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (ArcTGT) and the subsequent modification of preQ0 to G+ by archaeosine synthase. However, tRNALeu from Thermoplasma acidophilum, a thermo-acidophilic archaeon, exceptionally has two G+13 and G+15 modifications. In this study, we focused on the biosynthesis mechanism of G+13 and G+15 modifications in this tRNALeu. Purified ArcTGT from Pyrococcus horikoshii, for which the tRNA recognition mechanism and structure were previously characterized, exchanged only the G15 base in a tRNALeu transcript with 14C-guanine. In contrast, T. acidophilum cell extract exchanged both G13 and G15 bases. Because T. acidophilum ArcTGT could not be expressed as a soluble protein in Escherichia coli, we employed an expression system using another thermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus kodakarensis. The arcTGT gene in T. kodakarensis was disrupted, complemented with the T. acidophilum arcTGT gene, and tRNALeu variants were expressed. Mass spectrometry analysis of purified tRNALeu variants revealed the modifications of G+13 and G+15 in the wild-type tRNALeu. Thus, T. acidophilum ArcTGT has a multisite specificity and is responsible for the formation of both G+13 and G+15 modifications. PMID:26721388

  16. Characterizing radiation-induced oxidation of DNA by way of the monohydrated guanine-cytosine radical cation.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Heather M; Schaefer, Henry F

    2009-06-11

    The interaction of one water molecule with the guanine-cytosine radical cation has been studied with ab initio and density functional methods in order to help elucidate the nature of oxidized aqueous DNA. The theoretical spin density of [GC]*(+) reveals that the radical center is localized on guanine. The adiabatic ionization potential lowers from 7.63 to 6.71 eV in concurrence with the formation of the Watson-Crick base pair and hydration by one water molecule. A natural bond orbital analysis of partial charges shows that approximately 80% of the positive charge persists on guanine upon hydration and formation of the Watson-Crick base pair with cytosine. Hydration energies were computed with second-order Z-averaged perturbation theory (ZAPT2) using the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set at 11 stationary points on the B3LYP/DZP++ potential energy surface. The hydration energy at the global minimum is 14.2 kcal mol(-1). The lowest energy structures correspond to hydration near the glycosidic bond sites. Structural changes in the Watson-Crick base pair are predominantly seen for monohydration in the groove regions of double-helix DNA. PMID:19445496

  17. QuadBase2: web server for multiplexed guanine quadruplex mining and visualization.

    PubMed

    Dhapola, Parashar; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2016-07-01

    DNA guanine quadruplexes or G4s are non-canonical DNA secondary structures which affect genomic processes like replication, transcription and recombination. G4s are computationally identified by specific nucleotide motifs which are also called putative G4 (PG4) motifs. Despite the general relevance of these structures, there is currently no tool available that can allow batch queries and genome-wide analysis of these motifs in a user-friendly interface. QuadBase2 (quadbase.igib.res.in) presents a completely reinvented web server version of previously published QuadBase database. QuadBase2 enables users to mine PG4 motifs in up to 178 eukaryotes through the EuQuad module. This module interfaces with Ensembl Compara database, to allow users mine PG4 motifs in the orthologues of genes of interest across eukaryotes. PG4 motifs can be mined across genes and their promoter sequences in 1719 prokaryotes through ProQuad module. This module includes a feature that allows genome-wide mining of PG4 motifs and their visualization as circular histograms. TetraplexFinder, the module for mining PG4 motifs in user-provided sequences is now capable of handling up to 20 MB of data. QuadBase2 is a comprehensive PG4 motif mining tool that further expands the configurations and algorithms for mining PG4 motifs in a user-friendly way. PMID:27185890

  18. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor H1 can be a new biomarker of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jie; Guo, Bingyu; Zhang, Yu; Hui, Qiang; Chang, Peng; Tao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factor H1 (GEF-H1), which couples microtubule dynamics to RhoA activation, is a microtubule-regulated exchange factor. Studies have shown that GEF-H1 can be involved in various cancer pathways; however, the clinical significance of GEF-H1 expression and functions in melanoma has not been established. In this study, we investigated the relationship between clinical outcomes and GEF-H1 functions in melanoma. A total of 60 cases of different grades of melanoma samples were used to detect the expression of GEF-H1. Results showed that both messenger RNA and protein levels of GEF-H1 were significantly higher in high-grade melanomas. Furthermore, patients with high GEF-H1 expression had a shorter overall survival (22 months) than patients with low level of GEF-H1 expression (33.38 months). We also found that GEF-H1 can promote the proliferation and metastasis of melanoma cells. In summary, these results suggested that GEF-H1 may be a valuable biomarker for assessing the degree and prognosis of melanoma following surgery. PMID:27462139

  19. bis-Molybdopterin Guanine Dinucleotide Is Required for Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Monique J.; Shanley, Crystal A.; Zilavy, Andrew; Peixoto, Blas; Manca, Claudia; Kaplan, Gilla; Orme, Ian M.; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is able to synthesize molybdopterin cofactor (MoCo), which is utilized by numerous enzymes that catalyze redox reactions in carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur metabolism. In bacteria, MoCo is further modified through the activity of a guanylyltransferase, MobA, which converts MoCo to bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (bis-MGD), a form of the cofactor that is required by the dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase family of enzymes, which includes the nitrate reductase NarGHI. In this study, the functionality of the mobA homolog in M. tuberculosis was confirmed by demonstrating the loss of assimilatory and respiratory nitrate reductase activity in a mobA deletion mutant. This mutant displayed no survival defects in human monocytes or mouse lungs but failed to persist in the lungs of guinea pigs. These results implicate one or more bis-MGD-dependent enzymes in the persistence of M. tuberculosis in guinea pig lungs and underscore the applicability of this animal model for assessing the role of molybdoenzymes in this pathogen. PMID:25404027

  20. Guanine and inosine nucleotides, nucleosides and oxypurines in snail muscles as potential biomarkers of fluoride toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rać, Monika E; Safranow, Krzysztof; Dołegowska, Barbara; Machoy, Zygmunt

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the toxicity of fluorides on energy metabolism in muscles of the Helix aspersa maxima snail. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of purine compounds was performed in slices of foot from mature snails with high-performance liquid chromatography. Fluoride concentrations were measured using an ion-selective electrode and gas chromatography. The results show that exposure to fluoride pollution was accompanied by a statistically significant increase in fluoride concentrations in soft tissues. This effect was already noticeable with the smallest fluoride dose. Accumulation was greatest in the shell. There is a significant and positive correlation between fluoride concentrations in foot muscles and guanine and inosine nucleotides or uridine content. The content of low-energy guanylate, inosylate and oxypurine in foot muscles significantly increased with rising dose of fluoride. The difference as compared with controls was significant only for the highest dose of fluoride. Interestingly, uric acid, the final product of purine catabolism, dominated quantitatively in the foot muscles of snails. In conclusion, increased low-energy guanylate and inosylate as well as decreased xanthine concentrations in snail muscle can be indicators of the toxic influence of fluoride on the organism. The measuring of fluoride accumulation in the shell is the most suitable bioindicator of fluoride pollution in the environment. PMID:18274260

  1. QuadBase2: web server for multiplexed guanine quadruplex mining and visualization

    PubMed Central

    Dhapola, Parashar; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2016-01-01

    DNA guanine quadruplexes or G4s are non-canonical DNA secondary structures which affect genomic processes like replication, transcription and recombination. G4s are computationally identified by specific nucleotide motifs which are also called putative G4 (PG4) motifs. Despite the general relevance of these structures, there is currently no tool available that can allow batch queries and genome-wide analysis of these motifs in a user-friendly interface. QuadBase2 (quadbase.igib.res.in) presents a completely reinvented web server version of previously published QuadBase database. QuadBase2 enables users to mine PG4 motifs in up to 178 eukaryotes through the EuQuad module. This module interfaces with Ensembl Compara database, to allow users mine PG4 motifs in the orthologues of genes of interest across eukaryotes. PG4 motifs can be mined across genes and their promoter sequences in 1719 prokaryotes through ProQuad module. This module includes a feature that allows genome-wide mining of PG4 motifs and their visualization as circular histograms. TetraplexFinder, the module for mining PG4 motifs in user-provided sequences is now capable of handling up to 20 MB of data. QuadBase2 is a comprehensive PG4 motif mining tool that further expands the configurations and algorithms for mining PG4 motifs in a user-friendly way. PMID:27185890

  2. Synthesis and biological properties of caffeic acid-PNA dimers containing guanine.

    PubMed

    Gaglione, Maria; Malgieri, Gaetano; Pacifico, Severina; Severino, Valeria; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Russo, Luigi; Fiorentino, Antonio; Messere, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA; 3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) is endowed with high antioxidant activity. CA derivatives (such as amides) have gained a lot of attention due to their antioxidative, antitumor and antimicrobial properties as well as stable characteristics. Caffeoyl-peptide derivatives showed different antioxidant activity depending on the type and the sequence of amino acid used. For these reasons, we decided to combine CA with Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) to test whether the new PNA-CA amide derivatives would result in an improvement or gain of CA's biological (i.e., antioxidant, cytotoxic, cytoprotective) properties. We performed the synthesis and characterization of seven dimer conjugates with various combinations of nucleic acid bases and focused NMR studies on the model compound ga-CA dimer. We demonstrate that PNA dimers containing guanine conjugated to CA exhibited different biological activities depending on composition and sequence of the nucleobases. The dimer ag-CA protected HepG2, SK-B-NE(2), and C6 cells from a cytotoxic dose of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). PMID:23912270

  3. Prep1/Pbx2 Complexes Regulate CCL2 Expression Through the −2578 Guanine Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Edward K.; Page, Stephen H.; Barber, Sheila A.; Clements, Janice E.

    2008-01-01

    CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) is the major chemoattractant protein that recruits monocytes to sites of inflammation and increased expression of CCL2 is associated with numerous inflammatory diseases including human immunodeficiency virus-associated dementia (HIV-D). The −2578 guanine polymorphism in the CCL2 promoter has been associated with increased expression of CCL2 as well as pathogenesis of HIV-D; however, the molecular mechanism of regulation is unknown. We propose a molecular model for −2578G regulated CCL2 expression in astrocytes, which are major producers of CCL2 in the brain. The −2578G polymorphism creates a consensus binding site for the transcriptional regulator Prep1, which along with binding partner Pbx2, preferentially binds the −2578G allele. CCL2 promoters harboring the G allele under unstimulated conditions exhibit a lower basal activity compared to the ancestral A allele. Upon IL-1β stimulation, Prep1/Pbx2 complexes maintain the ability to bind −2578G alleles, yet transcription levels from promoters that harbor the A allele or G allele are equally activated, suggesting that the −2578 region does not influence CCL2 transcription under pro-inflammatory conditions. Therefore, promoters that harbor the −2578G allele undergo a higher fold induction and by extension, individuals homozygous for −2578G would be expected to exhibit hyper-responsive CCL2 phenotypes during periods of inflammation. PMID:18480829

  4. Electron correlation effects and density analysis of the first-order hyperpolarizability of neutral guanine tautomers.

    PubMed

    Alparone, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    Dipole moments (μ), charge distributions, and static electronic first-order hyperpolarizabilities (β(μ)) of the two lowest-energy keto tautomers of guanine (7H and 9H) were determined in the gas phase using Hartree-Fock, Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2 and MP4), and DFT (PBE1PBE, B97-1, B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP) methods with Dunning's correlation-consistent aug-cc-pVDZ and d-aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets. The most stable isomer 7H exhibits a μ value smaller than that of the 9H form by a factor of ca. 3.5. The β μ value of the 9H tautomer is strongly dependent on the computational method employed, as it dramatically influences the β(μ) (9H)/β(μ) (7H) ratio, which at the highest correlated MP4/aug-cc-pVDZ level is predicted to be ca. 5. The Coulomb-attenuating hybrid exchange-correlation CAM-B3LYP method is superior to the conventional PBE1PBE, B3LYP, and B97-1 functionals in predicting the β(μ) values. Differences between the largest diagonal hyperpolarizability components were clarified through hyperpolarizability density analyses. Dipole moment and first-order hyperpolarizability are molecular properties that are potentially useful for distinguishing the 7H from the 9H tautomer. PMID:23605138

  5. The Guanine-Based Purinergic System: The Tale of An Orphan Neuromodulation

    PubMed Central

    Garozzo, Roberta; Frinchi, Monica; Fernandez-Dueñas, Víctor; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Ciccarelli, Renata; Caciagli, Francesco; Condorelli, Daniele F.; Ciruela, Francisco; Belluardo, Natale

    2016-01-01

    Guanine-based purines (GBPs) have been recently proposed to be not only metabolic agents but also extracellular signaling molecules that regulate important functions in the central nervous system. In such way, GBPs-mediated neuroprotection, behavioral responses and neuronal plasticity have been broadly described in the literature. However, while a number of these functions (i.e., GBPs neurothophic effects) have been well-established, the molecular mechanisms behind these GBPs-dependent effects are still unknown. Furthermore, no plasma membrane receptors for GBPs have been described so far, thus GBPs are still considered orphan neuromodulators. Interestingly, an intricate and controversial functional interplay between GBPs effects and adenosine receptors activity has been recently described, thus triggering the hypothesis that GBPs mechanism of action might somehow involve adenosine receptors. Here, we review recent data describing the GBPs role in the brain. We focus on the involvement of GBPs regulating neuronal plasticity, and on the new hypothesis based on putative GBPs receptors. Overall, we expect to shed some light on the GBPs world since although these molecules might represent excellent candidates for certain neurological diseases management, the lack of putative GBPs receptors precludes any high throughput screening intent for the search of effective GBPs-based drugs. PMID:27378923

  6. The effect of size on the optical properties of guanine nanostructures: a femtosecond to nanosecond study.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ying; Changenet-Barret, Pascale; Gustavsson, Thomas; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2013-05-21

    G-quadruplexes, whose building blocks are guanine tetrads, encounter increasing interest with respect to their potential applications in the field of molecular electronics. Here we study how the size of these nanostructures affects their fluorescence. We compare the properties of thymine capped G-quadruplexes, formed by association of four single DNA strands d(TG3T), d(TG4T) and d(TG5T) and stabilized by K(+) ions. We show that an increase in the number of tetrads induces a narrowing of the fluorescence spectrum, an increase in the fluorescence quantum yield, a lengthening of fluorescence lifetime and a decrease of the anisotropy detected on the femtosecond time-scale. The in-plane depolarization of the fluorescence, occurring in less than 1 ps, is attributed to population of Franck-Condon exciton states and ultrafast intraband scattering, leading to energy transfer. The persistence of excitons with partial J-aggregate character on the picosecond time-scale increases with the G-quadruplex size, which enhances the stiffness of the system. PMID:23580086

  7. How Does Guanine-Cytosine Base Pair Affect Excess-Electron Transfer in DNA?

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-06-25

    Charge transfer and proton transfer in DNA have attracted wide attention due to their relevance in biological processes and so on. Especially, excess-electron transfer (EET) in DNA has strong relation to DNA repair. However, our understanding on EET in DNA still remains limited. Herein, by using a strongly electron-donating photosensitizer, trimer of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (3E), and an electron acceptor, diphenylacetylene (DPA), two series of functionalized DNA oligomers were synthesized for investigation of EET dynamics in DNA. The transient absorption measurements during femtosecond laser flash photolysis showed that guanine:cytosine (G:C) base pair affects EET dynamics in DNA by two possible mechanisms: the excess-electron quenching by proton transfer with the complementary G after formation of C(•-) and the EET hindrance by inserting a G:C base pair as a potential barrier in consecutive thymines (T's). In the present paper, we provided useful information based on the direct kinetic measurements, which allowed us to discuss EET through oligonucleotides for the investigation of DNA damage/repair. PMID:26042867

  8. Structural basis for auto-inhibition of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor FARP2

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaojing; Kuo, Yi-Chun; Rosche, Tyler J.; Zhang, Xuewu

    2013-01-01

    Summary FARP2 is a Dbl-family guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that contains a 4.1, ezrin, radixin and moesin (FERM) domain, a Dbl-homology (DH) domain and two pleckstrin homology (PH) domains. FARP2 activates Rac1 or Cdc42 in response to upstream signals, thereby regulating processes such as neuronal axon guidance and bone homeostasis. How the GEF activity of FARP2 is regulated remained poorly understood. We have determined the crystal structures of the catalytic DH domain and the DH-PH-PH domains of FARP2. The structures reveal an auto-inhibited conformation in which the GEF substrate-binding site is blocked collectively by the last helix in the DH domain and the two PH domains. This conformation is stabilized by multiple interactions among the domains and two well-structured inter-domain linkers. Our cell-based activity assays confirm the suppression of the FARP2 GEF activity by these auto-inhibitory elements. PMID:23375260

  9. Mutation at a distance caused by homopolymeric guanine repeats in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Michael J.; Yu, Yen-Hsin; Guo, Jheng-Fen; Chong, Shin Yen; Kao, Cheng-Fu; Leu, Jun-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Mutation provides the raw material from which natural selection shapes adaptations. The rate at which new mutations arise is therefore a key factor that determines the tempo and mode of evolution. However, an accurate assessment of the mutation rate of a given organism is difficult because mutation rate varies on a fine scale within a genome. A central challenge of evolutionary genetics is to determine the underlying causes of this variation. In earlier work, we had shown that repeat sequences not only are prone to a high rate of expansion and contraction but also can cause an increase in mutation rate (on the order of kilobases) of the sequence surrounding the repeat. We perform experiments that show that simple guanine repeats 13 bp (base pairs) in length or longer (G13+) increase the substitution rate 4- to 18-fold in the downstream DNA sequence, and this correlates with DNA replication timing (R = 0.89). We show that G13+ mutagenicity results from the interplay of both error-prone translesion synthesis and homologous recombination repair pathways. The mutagenic repeats that we study have the potential to be exploited for the artificial elevation of mutation rate in systems biology and synthetic biology applications. PMID:27386516

  10. Brefeldin A-inhibited guanine exchange factor 2 regulates filamin A phosphorylation and neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingping; Neal, Jason; Lian, Gewei; Shi, Bingxing; Ferland, Russell J; Sheen, Volney

    2012-09-01

    Periventricular heterotopia (PH) is a human malformation of cortical development associated with gene mutations in ADP-ribosylation factor guanine exchange factor 2 (ARFGEF2 encodes for Big2 protein) and Filamin A (FLNA). PH is thought to derive from neuroependymal disruption, but the extent to which neuronal migration contributes to this phenotype is unknown. Here, we show that Arfgef2 null mice develop PH and exhibit impaired neural migration with increased protein expression for both FlnA and phosphoFlnA at Ser2152. Big2 physically interacts with FlnA and overexpression of phosphomimetic Ser2512 FLNA impairs neuronal migration. FlnA phosphorylation directs FlnA localization toward the cell cytoplasm, diminishes its binding affinity to actin skeleton, and alters the number and size of paxillin focal adhesions. Collectively, our results demonstrate a molecular mechanism whereby Big2 inhibition promotes phosphoFlnA (Ser2152) expression, and increased phosphoFlnA impairs its actin binding affinity and the distribution of focal adhesions, thereby disrupting cell intrinsic neuronal migration. PMID:22956851

  11. Crystal Structure of a Replicative DNA Polymerase Bound to the Oxidized Guanine Lesion Guanidinohydantoin

    SciTech Connect

    Aller, Pierre; Ye, Yu; Wallace, Susan S.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Doubli, Sylvie

    2010-04-12

    The oxidation of guanine generates one of the most common DNA lesions, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG). The further oxidation of 8-oxoG can produce either guanidinohydantoin (Gh) in duplex DNA or spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) in nucleosides and ssDNA. Although Gh can be a strong block for replicative DNA polymerases such as RB69 DNA polymerase, this lesion is also mutagenic: DNA polymerases bypass Gh by preferentially incorporating a purine with a slight preference for adenine, which results in G {center_dot} C {yields} T {center_dot} A or G {center_dot} C {yields} C {center_dot} G transversions. The 2.15 {angstrom} crystal structure of the replicative RB69 DNA polymerase in complex with DNA containing Gh reveals that Gh is extrahelical and rotated toward the major groove. In this conformation Gh is no longer in position to serve as a templating base for the incorporation of an incoming nucleotide. This work also constitutes the first crystallographic structure of Gh, which is stabilized in the R configuration in the two polymerase/DNA complexes present in the crystal asymmetric unit. In contrast to 8-oxoG, Gh is found in a high syn conformation in the DNA duplex and therefore presents the same hydrogen bond donor and acceptor pattern as thymine, which explains the propensity of DNA polymerases to incorporate a purine opposite Gh when bypass occurs.

  12. Prep1/Pbx2 complexes regulate CCL2 expression through the -2578 guanine polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Wright, E K; Page, S H; Barber, S A; Clements, J E

    2008-07-01

    CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) is the major chemoattractant protein that recruits monocytes to sites of inflammation and increased expression of CCL2 is associated with numerous inflammatory diseases including human immunodeficiency virus-associated dementia (HIV-D). The -2578 guanine polymorphism in the CCL2 promoter has been associated with increased expression of CCL2 as well as pathogenesis of HIV-D; however, the molecular mechanism of regulation is unknown. We propose a molecular model for -2578 G-regulated CCL2 expression in astrocytes, which are major producers of CCL2 in the brain. The -2578 G polymorphism creates a consensus-binding site for the transcriptional regulator Prep1, which along with binding partner Pbx2, preferentially binds the -2578 G allele. CCL2 promoters harboring the G allele under unstimulated conditions exhibit a lower basal activity compared to the ancestral A allele. Upon interleukin-1 beta stimulation, Prep1/Pbx2 complexes maintain the ability to bind -2578 G alleles, yet transcription levels from promoters that harbor the A or G allele are equally activated, suggesting that the -2578 region does not influence CCL2 transcription under proinflammatory conditions. Therefore, promoters that harbor the -2578 G allele undergo a higher fold induction and by extension, individuals homozygous for -2578 G would be expected to exhibit hyper-responsive CCL2 phenotypes during periods of inflammation. PMID:18480829

  13. Mutation at a distance caused by homopolymeric guanine repeats in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Michael J; Yu, Yen-Hsin; Guo, Jheng-Fen; Chong, Shin Yen; Kao, Cheng-Fu; Leu, Jun-Yi

    2016-05-01

    Mutation provides the raw material from which natural selection shapes adaptations. The rate at which new mutations arise is therefore a key factor that determines the tempo and mode of evolution. However, an accurate assessment of the mutation rate of a given organism is difficult because mutation rate varies on a fine scale within a genome. A central challenge of evolutionary genetics is to determine the underlying causes of this variation. In earlier work, we had shown that repeat sequences not only are prone to a high rate of expansion and contraction but also can cause an increase in mutation rate (on the order of kilobases) of the sequence surrounding the repeat. We perform experiments that show that simple guanine repeats 13 bp (base pairs) in length or longer (G 13+ ) increase the substitution rate 4- to 18-fold in the downstream DNA sequence, and this correlates with DNA replication timing (R = 0.89). We show that G 13+ mutagenicity results from the interplay of both error-prone translesion synthesis and homologous recombination repair pathways. The mutagenic repeats that we study have the potential to be exploited for the artificial elevation of mutation rate in systems biology and synthetic biology applications. PMID:27386516

  14. Rab5-family guanine nucleotide exchange factors bind retromer and promote its recruitment to endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Bjorn D. M.; Davey, Michael; Snider, Jamie; Jessulat, Matthew; Deineko, Viktor; Tinney, Matthew; Stagljar, Igor; Babu, Mohan; Conibear, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The retromer complex facilitates the sorting of integral membrane proteins from the endosome to the late Golgi. In mammalian cells, the efficient recruitment of retromer to endosomes requires the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) as well as Rab5 and Rab7 GTPases. However, in yeast, the role of Rabs in recruiting retromer to endosomes is less clear. We identified novel physical interactions between retromer and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae VPS9-domain Rab5-family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) Muk1 and Vps9. Furthermore, we identified a new yeast VPS9 domain-containing protein, VARP-like 1 (Vrl1), which is related to the human VARP protein. All three VPS9 domain–containing proteins show localization to endosomes, and the presence of any one of them is necessary for the endosomal recruitment of retromer. We find that expression of an active VPS9-domain protein is required for correct localization of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase Vps34 and the production of endosomal PI3P. These results suggest that VPS9 GEFs promote retromer recruitment by establishing PI3P-enriched domains at the endosomal membrane. The interaction of retromer with distinct VPS9 GEFs could thus link GEF-dependent regulatory inputs to the temporal or spatial coordination of retromer assembly or function. PMID:25609093

  15. Arf6 guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-2 regulates myelination in nerves.

    PubMed

    Torii, Tomohiro; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Miyamoto, Yuki; Kawahara, Kazuko; Saitoh, Yurika; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Takashima, Shou; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2015-05-01

    In postnatal development of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), Schwann cells differentiate to insulate neuronal axons with myelin sheaths, increasing the nerve conduction velocity. To produce the mature myelin sheath with its multiple layers, Schwann cells undergo dynamic morphological changes. While extracellular molecules such as growth factors and cell adhesion ligands are known to regulate the myelination process, the intracellular molecular mechanism underlying myelination remains unclear. In this study, we have produced Schwann cell-specific conditional knockout mice for cytohesin-2, a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) specifically activating Arf6. Arf6, a member of the Ras-like protein family, participates in various cellular functions including cell morphological changes. Cytohesin-2 knockout mice exhibit decreased Arf6 activity and reduced myelin thickness in the sciatic nerves, with decreased expression levels of myelin protein zero (MPZ), the major myelin marker protein. These results are consistent with those of experiments in which Schwann cell-neuronal cultures were treated with pan-cytohesin inhibitor SecinH3. On the other hand, the numbers of Ki67-positive cells in knockout mice and controls are comparable, indicating that cytohesin-2 does not have a positive effect on cell numbers. Thus, signaling through cytohesin-2 is required for myelination by Schwann cells, and cytohesin-2 is added to the list of molecules known to underlie PNS myelination. PMID:25824033

  16. Mechanism of cholera toxin activation by a guanine nucleotide-dependent 19 kDa protein.

    PubMed

    Noda, M; Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1990-05-16

    Cholera toxin causes the devastating diarrheal syndrome characteristic of cholera by catalyzing the ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha, a GTP-binding regulatory protein, resulting in activation of adenylyl cyclase. ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha is enhanced by 19 kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins known as ADP-ribosylation factors or ARFs. We investigated the effects of agents known to alter toxin-catalyzed activation of adenylyl cyclase on the stimulation of toxin- and toxin subunit-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha and other substrates by an ADP-ribosylation factor purified from a soluble fraction of bovine brain (sARF II). In the presence of GTP, sARF II enhanced activity of both the toxin catalytic unit and a reduced and alkylated fragment ('A1'), as a result of an increase in substrate affinity with no significant effects on Vmax. Activation of toxin was independent of Gs alpha and was stimulated 4-fold by sodium dodecyl sulfate, but abolished by Triton X-100. sARF II therefore serves as a direct allosteric activator of the A1 protein and may thus amplify the pathological effects of cholera toxin. PMID:2112955

  17. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors: regulators of Rho GTPase activity in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Danielle R.; Rossman, Kent L.; Der, Channing J.

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant activity of Ras homologous (Rho) family small GTPases (20 human members) has been implicated in cancer and other human diseases. However, in contrast to the direct mutational activation of Ras found in cancer and developmental disorders, Rho GTPases are activated most commonly by indirect mechanisms in disease. One prevalent mechanism involves aberrant Rho activation via the deregulated expression and/or activity of Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs). RhoGEFs promote formation of the active GTP-bound state of Rho GTPases. The largest family of RhoGEFs is comprised of the Dbl family RhoGEFs with 70 human members. The multitude of RhoGEFs that activate a single Rho GTPase reflect the very specific role of each RhoGEF in controlling distinct signaling mechanisms involved in Rho activation. In this review, we summarize the role of Dbl RhoGEFs in development and disease, with a focus on Ect2, Tiam1, Vav and P-Rex1/2. PMID:24037532

  18. Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 is a potential prognosis indicator of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Dong, Shuang; Hu, Jiangfeng; Duan, Bensong; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ruiyun; Zhou, Hongmei; Sheng, Haihui; Gao, Hengjun; Li, Shunlong; Zhang, Xianwen

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 (GNL3) is a GIP-binding nuclear protein that has been reported to be involved in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, cellular senescence and tumorigenesis. This study aimed to investigate the expression level of GNL3 in gastric cancer and to evaluate the relationship between its expression and clinical variables and overall survival of gastric cancer patients. The expression level of GNL3 was examined in 89 human gastric cancer samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. GNL3 in gastric cancer tissues was significantly upregulated compared with paracancerous tissues. GNL3 expression in adjacent non-cancerous tissues was associated with sex and tumor size. Survival analyses showed that GNL3 expression in both gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancerous tissues were not related to overall survival. However, in the subgroup of patients with larger tumor size (≥ 6 cm), a close association was found between GNL3 expression in gastric cancer tissues and overall survival. GNL3-positive patients had a shorter survival than GNL3-negative patients. Our study suggests that GNL3 might play an important role in the progression of gastric cancer and serve as a biomarker for poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients. PMID:26722529

  19. RESTRICTED EXPRESSION OF NEW GUANINE NUCLEOTIDE EXCHANGE FACTOR ZIZIMIN2 IN AGED ACQUIRED IMMUNE SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    JIA, YANJUN; SAKABE, ISAMU; MATSUDA, TAKENORI; HAYAKAWA, TOMOKO; MARUYAMA, MITSUO

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The activity of various biological functions, such as nervous, endocrine and immune systems including acquired immunity, is known to decline along with aging. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of this phenomenon, we here compared the number of thymocytes, splenocytes, and bone marrow lymphocytes in young and aged mice and found the age-related functional fragility of the immune system. However, the molecular mechanisms or even the key molecules remain elusive. Therefore, we further focused on a candidate for immunosenesence-related molecules, Zizimin2, which we have recently isolated and identified as a novel guanine nucleotide exchange factor that is highly expressed in murine splenic germinal center B cells after immunization with a T cell-dependent antigen. Here, we showed that endogenous Zizimin2 protein as well as mRNA expression levels in immune organs are strictly suppressed in aged mice. We further observed that the serum antigen specific antibody response is hampered in aged mice compared to that in young animals. Moreover, the Zizimin2 mRNA expression level was not activated after immunization in aged mice. Taken together, these data suggested that Zizimin2 is associated with the reduction of immune response in acquired immunity along with aging. PMID:23092103

  20. The Chiral Potential of Phenanthriplatin and Its Influence on Guanine Binding

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The monofunctional platinum complex cis-[Pt(NH3)2Cl(Am)]+, also known as phenanthriplatin, where Am is the N-heterocyclic base phenanthridine, has promising anticancer activity. Unlike bifunctional compounds such as cisplatin, phenanthriplatin can form only one covalent bond to DNA. Another distinguishing feature is that phenanthriplatin is chiral. Rotation about the Pt–N bond of the phenanthridine ligand racemizes the complex, and the question arises as to whether this process is sufficiently slow under physiological conditions to impact its DNA-binding properties. Here we present the results of NMR spectroscopic, X-ray crystallographic, molecular dynamics, and density functional theoretical investigations of diastereomeric phenanthriplatin analogs in order to probe the internal dynamics of phenanthriplatin. These results reveal that phenanthriplatin rapidly racemizes under physiological conditions. The information also facilitated the interpretation of the NMR spectra of small molecule models of phenanthriplatin-platinated DNA. These studies indicate, inter alia, that one diastereomeric form of the complexes cis-[Pt(NH3)2(Am)(R-Gua)]2+, where R-Gua is 9-methyl- or 9-ethylguanine, is preferred over the other, the origin of which stems from an intramolecular interaction between the carbonyl oxygen of the platinated guanine base and a cis-coordinated ammine. The relevance of this finding to the DNA-damaging properties of phenanthriplatin and its biological activity is discussed. PMID:24417436

  1. Amyloid Precursor Protein Translation Is Regulated by a 3’UTR Guanine Quadruplex

    PubMed Central

    Sharoni, Michal; Olson, Kalee; Sebastian, Neeraj P.; Ansaloni, Sara; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Akins, Michael R.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.; Saunders, Aleister J.

    2015-01-01

    A central event in Alzheimer’s disease is the accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides generated by the proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). APP overexpression leads to increased Aβ generation and Alzheimer’s disease in humans and altered neuronal migration and increased long term depression in mice. Conversely, reduction of APP expression results in decreased Aβ levels in mice as well as impaired learning and memory and decreased numbers of dendritic spines. Together these findings indicate that therapeutic interventions that aim to restore APP and Aβ levels must do so within an ideal range. To better understand the effects of modulating APP levels, we explored the mechanisms regulating APP expression focusing on post-transcriptional regulation. Such regulation can be mediated by RNA regulatory elements such as guanine quadruplexes (G-quadruplexes), non-canonical structured RNA motifs that affect RNA stability and translation. Via a bioinformatics approach, we identified a candidate G-quadruplex within the APP mRNA in its 3’UTR (untranslated region) at residues 3008–3027 (NM_201414.2). This sequence exhibited characteristics of a parallel G-quadruplex structure as revealed by circular dichroism spectrophotometry. Further, as with other G-quadruplexes, the formation of this structure was dependent on the presence of potassium ions. This G-quadruplex has no apparent role in regulating transcription or mRNA stability as wild type and mutant constructs exhibited equivalent mRNA levels as determined by real time PCR. Instead, we demonstrate that this G-quadruplex negatively regulates APP protein expression using dual luciferase reporter and Western blot analysis. Taken together, our studies reveal post-transcriptional regulation by a 3’UTR G-quadruplex as a novel mechanism regulating APP expression. PMID:26618502

  2. Vacuum-Ultraviolet photoionization studies of the microhydrationof DNA bases (Guanine, Cytosine, Adenine and Thymine)

    SciTech Connect

    Belau, L.; Wilson, K.R.; Leone, S.R.; Musahid, Ahmed

    2007-01-22

    In this work, we report on a photoionization study of the microhydration of the four DNA bases. Gas-phase clusters of water with DNA bases [guanine (G), cytosine (C), adenine (A), and thymine (T)] are generated via thermal vaporization of the bases and expansion of the resultant vapor in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single-photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves are recorded for the DNA bases and the following water (W) clusters: G, GW{sub n} (n = 1-3); C, CW{sub n} (n = 1-3); A, AW{sub n} (n = 1,2); and T, TW{sub n} (n = 1-3). Appearance energies (AE) are derived from the onset of these PIE curves (all energies in eV): G (8.1 {+-} 0.1), GW (8.0 {+-} 0.1), GW{sub 2} (8.0 {+-} 0.1), and GW{sub 3} (8.0); C (8.65 {+-} 0.05), CW (8.45 {+-} 0.05), CW{sub 2} (8.4 {+-} 0.1), and CW{sub 3} (8.3 {+-} 0.1); A (8.30 {+-} 0.05), AW (8.20 {+-} 0.05), and AW{sub 2} (8.1 {+-} 0.1); T (8.90 {+-} 0.05); and TW (8.75 {+-} 0.05), TW{sub 2} (8.6 {+-} 0.1), and TW{sub 3} (8.6 {+-} 0.1). The AEs of the DNA bases decrease slightly with the addition of water molecules (up to three) but do not converge to values found for photoinduced electron removal from DNA bases in solution.

  3. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein regulation of melatonin receptors in lizard brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkees, S.A.; Carlson, L.L.; Reppert, S.M. )

    1989-05-01

    Melatonin receptors were identified and characterized in crude membrane preparations from lizard brain by using {sup 125}I-labeled melatonin ({sup 125}I-Mel), a potent melatonin agonist. {sup 125}I-Mel binding sites were saturable; Scatchard analysis revealed high-affinity and lower affinity binding sites, with apparent K{sub d} of 2.3 {plus minus} 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} M and 2.06 {plus minus} 0.43 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} M, respectively. Binding was reversible and inhibited by melatonin and closely related analogs but not by serotonin or norepinephrine. Treatment of crude membranes with the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)), significantly reduced the number of high-affinity receptors and increased the dissociation rate of {sup 125}I-Mel from its receptor. Furthermore, GTP({gamma}S) treatment of ligand-receptor complexes solubilized by Triton X-100 also led to a rapid dissociation of {sup 125}I-Mel from solubilized ligand-receptor complexes. Gel filtration chromatography of solubilized ligand-receptor complexes revealed two major peaks of radioactivity corresponding to M{sub r} > 400,000 and M{sub r} ca. 110,000. This elution profile was markedly altered by pretreatment with GTP({gamma}S) before solubilization; only the M{sub r} 110,000 peak was present in GTP({gamma}S)-pretreated membranes. The results strongly suggest that {sup 125}I-mel binding sites in lizard brain are melatonin receptors, with agonist-promoted guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) coupling and that the apparent molecular size of receptors uncoupled from G proteins is about 110,000.

  4. Myristoylated. cap alpha. subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, J.E.; Mumby, S.M.; Casey, P.J.; Gilman, A.G.; Sefton, B.M.

    1987-11-01

    Antisera directed against specific subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) were used to immunoprecipitate these polypeptides from metabolically labeled cells. This technique detects, in extracts of a human astrocytoma cell line, the ..cap alpha.. subunits of G/sub s/ (stimulatory) (..cap alpha../sub 45/ and ..cap alpha../sub 52/), a 41-kDa subunit of G/sub i/ (inhibitory) (..cap alpha../sub 41/), a 40-kDa protein (..cap alpha../sub 40/), and the 36-kDa ..beta.. subunit. No protein that comigrated with the ..cap alpha.. subunit of G/sup 0/ (unknown function) (..cap alpha../sub 39/) was detected. In cells grown in the presence of (/sup 3/H)myristic acid, ..cap alpha../sub 41/ and ..cap alpha../sub 40/ contained /sup 3/H label, while the ..beta.. subunit did not. Chemical analysis of lipids attached covalently to purified ..cap alpha../sub 41/ and ..cap alpha../sub 39/ from bovine brain also revealed myristic acid. Similar analysis of brain G protein ..beta.. and ..gamma.. subunits and of G/sub t/ (Transducin) subunits (..cap alpha.., ..beta.., and ..gamma..) failed to reveal fatty acids. The fatty acid associated with ..cap alpha../sub 41/ , ..cap alpha../sub 40/, and ..cap alpha../sub 39/ was stable to treatment with base, suggesting that the lipid is linked to the polypeptide via an amide bond. These GTP binding proteins are thus identified as members of a select group of proteins that contains myristic acid covalently attached to the peptide backbone. Myristate may play an important role in stabilizing interactions of G proteins with phospholipid or with membrane-bound proteins.

  5. Transduction proteins of olfactory receptor cells: identification of guanine nucleotide binding proteins and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Anholt, R.R.H.; Mumby, S.M.; Stoffers, D.A.; Girard, P.R.; Kuo, J.F.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-02-10

    The authors have analyzed guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) in the olfactory epithelium of Rana catesbeiana using subunit-specific antisera. The olfactory epithelium contained the ..cap alpha.. subunits of three G-proteins, migrating on polyacrylamide gels in SDS with apparent molecular weights of 45,000, 42,000, and 40,000, corresponding to G/sub s/, G/sub i/, and G/sub o/, respectively. A single ..beta.. subunit with an apparent molecular weight of 36,000 was detected. An antiserum against the ..cap alpha.. subunit of retinal transducin failed to detect immunoreactive proteins in olfactory cilia detached from the epithelium. The olfactory cilia appeared to be enriched in immunoreactive G/sub s..cap alpha../ relative to G/sub ichemically bond/ and G/sub ochemically bond/ when compared to membranes prepared from the olfactory epithelium after detachment of the cilia. Bound antibody was detected by autoradiography after incubation with (/sup 125/I)protein. Immunohistochemical studies using an antiserum against the ..beta.. subunit of G-proteins revealed intense staining of the ciliary surface of the olfactory epithelium and of the axon bundles in the lamina propria. In contrast, an antiserum against a common sequence of the ..cap alpha.. subunits preferentially stained the cell membranes of the olfactory receptor cells and the acinar cells of Bowman's glands and the deep submucosal glands. In addition to G-proteins, they have identified protein kinase C in olfactory cilia via a protein kinase C specific antiserum and via phorbol ester binding. However, in contrast to the G-proteins, protein kinase C occurred also in cilia isolated from respiratory epithelium.

  6. Expression Pattern and Localization Dynamics of Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor RIC8 during Mouse Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tõnissoo, Tambet; Meier, Riho; Kask, Keiu; Ruisu, Katrin; Karis, Alar; Salumets, Andres; Pooga, Margus

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of G proteins to the cell cortex and their activation is one of the triggers of both asymmetric and symmetric cell division. Resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase 8 (RIC8), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, activates a certain subgroup of G protein α-subunits in a receptor independent manner. RIC8 controls the asymmetric cell division in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, and symmetric cell division in cultured mammalian cells, where it regulates the mitotic spindle orientation. Although intensely studied in mitosis, the function of RIC8 in mammalian meiosis has remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that the expression and subcellular localization of RIC8 changes profoundly during mouse oogenesis. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that RIC8 expression is dependent on oocyte growth and cell cycle phase. During oocyte growth, RIC8 is abundantly present in cytoplasm of oocytes at primordial, primary and secondary preantral follicle stages. Later, upon oocyte maturation RIC8 also populates the germinal vesicle, its localization becomes cell cycle dependent, and it associates with chromatin and the meiotic spindle. After fertilization, RIC8 protein converges to the pronuclei and is also detectable at high levels in the nucleolus precursor bodies of both maternal and paternal pronucleus. During first cleavage of zygote RIC8 localizes in the mitotic spindle and cell cortex of forming blastomeres. In addition, we demonstrate that RIC8 co-localizes with its interaction partners Gαi1/2:GDP and LGN in meiotic/mitotic spindle, cell cortex and polar bodies of maturing oocytes and zygotes. Downregulation of Ric8 by siRNA leads to interferred translocation of Gαi1/2 to cortical region of maturing oocytes and reduction of its levels. RIC8 is also expressed at high level in female reproductive organs e.g. oviduct. Therefore we suggest a regulatory function for RIC8 in mammalian gametogenesis and fertility. PMID:26062014

  7. Sugar radicals formed by photo-excitation of guanine cation radical in oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Collins, Sean; Khanduri, Deepti; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    This work presents evidence that photo-excitation of guanine cation radical (G•+) in dGpdG and DNA-oligonucleotides: TGT, TGGT, TGGGT, TTGTT, TTGGTT, TTGGTTGGTT, AGA and AGGGA in frozen glassy aqueous solutions at low temperatures leads to hole transfer to the sugar phosphate backbone and results in high yields of deoxyribose radicals. In this series of oligonucleotides we find that, G•+ on photo-excitation, at 143 K leads to the formation of predominantly C5′• and C1′• with small amounts of C3′•. Photo-conversion yields of G•+ to sugar radicals in oligonucleotides decreased as the overall chain length increased. However, for high molecular weight dsDNA (salmon testes) in frozen aqueous solutions substantial conversion of G•+ to C1′• (only) sugar radical is still found (ca. 50%). Within the cohort of sugar radicals formed we find a relative increase in the formation of C1′• with length of the oligonucleotide along with decreases in C3′• and C5′• For dsDNA in frozen solutions, only the formation of C1′• is found via photo-excitation of G•+ without a significant temperature dependence (77 K to 180 K). Long wavelength visible light (>540 nm) is observed to be about as effective as light under 540 nm for photoconversion of G•+ to sugar radicals for short oligonucleotides but gradually loses effectiveness with chain length. This wavelength dependence is attributed to base-to-base hole transfer for wavelengths >540 nm. Base-to-sugar hole transfer is suggested to dominate under 540 nm. These results may have implications for a number of investigations of hole transfer through DNA in which DNA-holes are subjected to continuous visible illumination. PMID:17547448

  8. Guanine-centric self-assembly of nucleotides in water: an important consideration in prebiotic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Lauren M; Burcar, Bradley T; Stevens, Wyatt; Moriarty, Elizabeth M; McGown, Linda B

    2014-10-01

    Investigations of plausible prebiotic chemistry on early Earth must consider not only chemical reactions to form more complex products such as proto-biopolymers but also reversible, molecular self-assembly that would influence the availability, organization, and sequestration of reactant molecules. The self-assembly of guanosine compounds into higher-order structures and lyotropic liquid crystalline "gel" phases through formation of hydrogen-bonded guanine tetrads (G-tetrads) is one such consideration that is particularly relevant to an RNA-world scenario. G-tetrad-based gelation has been well studied for individual guanosine compounds and was recently observed in mixtures of guanosine with 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) as well. The present work investigates the self-assembly of GMP in the presence of the other RNA nucleotides. Effects of the total concentration and relative proportion of the nucleotides in the mixtures, the form (disodium salt vs. free acid) of the nucleotides, temperature, pH, and salt concentration were determined by visual observations and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The results show that formation of cholesteric G-tetrad phases is influenced by interactions with other nucleotides, likely through association (e.g., intercalation) of the nucleotides with the G-tetrad structures. These interactions affect the structure and stability of the G-tetrad gel phase, as well as the formation of alternate self-assembled GMP structures such as a continuous, hydrogen-bonded GMP helix or dimers and aggregates of GMP. These interactions and multiple equilibria are influenced by the presence of cations, especially in the presence of K(+). This work could have important implications for the emergence of an RNA or proto-RNA world, which would require mixtures of nucleotides at sufficiently high, local concentrations for abiotic polymerization to occur. PMID:25285982

  9. Guanine-Centric Self-Assembly of Nucleotides in Water: An Important Consideration in Prebiotic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Lauren M.; Burcar, Bradley T.; Stevens, Wyatt; Moriarty, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Investigations of plausible prebiotic chemistry on early Earth must consider not only chemical reactions to form more complex products such as proto-biopolymers but also reversible, molecular self-assembly that would influence the availability, organization, and sequestration of reactant molecules. The self-assembly of guanosine compounds into higher-order structures and lyotropic liquid crystalline “gel” phases through formation of hydrogen-bonded guanine tetrads (G-tetrads) is one such consideration that is particularly relevant to an RNA-world scenario. G-tetrad-based gelation has been well studied for individual guanosine compounds and was recently observed in mixtures of guanosine with 5′-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) as well. The present work investigates the self-assembly of GMP in the presence of the other RNA nucleotides. Effects of the total concentration and relative proportion of the nucleotides in the mixtures, the form (disodium salt vs. free acid) of the nucleotides, temperature, pH, and salt concentration were determined by visual observations and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The results show that formation of cholesteric G-tetrad phases is influenced by interactions with other nucleotides, likely through association (e.g., intercalation) of the nucleotides with the G-tetrad structures. These interactions affect the structure and stability of the G-tetrad gel phase, as well as the formation of alternate self-assembled GMP structures such as a continuous, hydrogen-bonded GMP helix or dimers and aggregates of GMP. These interactions and multiple equilibria are influenced by the presence of cations, especially in the presence of K+. This work could have important implications for the emergence of an RNA or proto-RNA world, which would require mixtures of nucleotides at sufficiently high, local concentrations for abiotic polymerization to occur. Key Words: RNA world—Prebiotic chemistry—RNA polymerization

  10. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  11. Deciphering the photochemical mechanisms describing the UV-induced processes occurring in solvated guanine monophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altavilla, Salvatore; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Nenov, Artur; Conti, Irene; Rivalta, Ivan; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The photophysics and photochemistry of water-solvated guanine monophosphate (GMP) are here characterized by means of a multireference quantum-chemical/molecular mechanics theoretical approach (CASPT2//CASSCF/AMBER) in order to elucidate the main photo-processes occurring upon UV-light irradiation. The effect of the solvent and of the phosphate group on the energetics and structural features of this system are evaluated for the first time employing high-level ab initio methods and thoroughly compared to those in vacuo previously reported in the literature and to the experimental evidence to assess to which extent they influence the photoinduced mechanisms. Solvated electronic excitation energies of solvated GMP at the Franck-Condon (FC) region show a red shift for the ππ* La and Lb states, whereas the energy of the oxygen lone-pair nπ* state is blue-shifted. The main photoinduced decay route is promoted through a ring-puckering motion along the bright lowest-lying La state towards a conical intersection (CI) with the ground state, involving a very shallow stationary point along the minimum energy pathway in contrast to the barrierless profile found in gas-phase, the point being placed at the end of the minimum energy path (MEP) thus endorsing its ultrafast deactivation in accordance with time-resolved transient and photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. The role of the nπ* state in the solvated system is severely diminished as the crossings with the initially populated La state and also with the Lb state are placed too high energetically to partake prominently in the deactivation photo-process. The proposed mechanism present in solvated and in vacuo DNA/RNA chromophores validates the intrinsic photostability mechanism through CI-mediated non-radiative processes accompanying the bright excited-state population towards the ground state and subsequent relaxation back to the FC region.

  12. The selective phosphorylation of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Receptor-activated signal transduction pathways regulate the responsiveness of cells to external stimuli. These transduction pathways themselves are subject to regulation, most commonly by phosphorylation. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G Proteins), as requisite signal transducing elements for many plasma membrane receptors, are considered likely targets for regulation by phosphorylation. Protein kinase C (PKC) has been shown to phosphorylate the {alpha} subunit of G{sub i} and other G proteins in solution. However, the occurrence of the phosphorylation of G{sub 1} within intact cells in response to activation of PKC has not been rigorously demonstrated. In this thesis, the extent to which the {alpha} subunits of G{sub i} undergo phosphorylation within human platelets in response to activation of PKC was examined by means of radiolabeling and immunoprecipitation. Incubation of platelets with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a potent activator of PKC, promoted the phosphorylation of several proteins within saponin-permeabilized and intact platelets incubated with ({gamma}{sup 32}P)ATP and ({sup 32}P)H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, respectively. None of the phosphoproteins, however, were precipitated by either of two antisera containing antibodies differing in specificities for epitopes within G{sub i{alpha}}-despite precipitation of a substantial fraction of the subunit itself. In contrast, other antisera, containing antibodies specific for the recently describe G{sub z{alpha}}, or antibodies for both G{sub z{alpha}} and G{sub i{alpha}}, precipitated a 40-kDa phosphoprotein.

  13. The role of topoisomerase I in suppressing genome instability associated with a highly transcribed guanine-rich sequence is not restricted to preventing RNA:DNA hybrid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Puja; Owiti, Norah; Kim, Nayun

    2016-01-01

    Highly transcribed guanine-run containing sequences, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, become unstable when topoisomerase I (Top1) is disrupted. Topological changes, such as the formation of extended RNA:DNA hybrids or R-loops or non-canonical DNA structures including G-quadruplexes has been proposed as the major underlying cause of the transcription-linked genome instability. Here, we report that R-loop accumulation at a guanine-rich sequence, which is capable of assembling into the four-stranded G4 DNA structure, is dependent on the level and the orientation of transcription. In the absence of Top1 or RNase Hs, R-loops accumulated to substantially higher extent when guanine-runs were located on the non-transcribed strand. This coincides with the orientation where higher genome instability was observed. However, we further report that there are significant differences between the disruption of RNase Hs and Top1 in regards to the orientation-specific elevation in genome instability at the guanine-rich sequence. Additionally, genome instability in Top1-deficient yeasts is not completely suppressed by removal of negative supercoils and further aggravated by expression of mutant Top1. Together, our data provide a strong support for a function of Top1 in suppressing genome instability at the guanine-run containing sequence that goes beyond preventing the transcription-associated RNA:DNA hybrid formation. PMID:26527723

  14. The role of topoisomerase I in suppressing genome instability associated with a highly transcribed guanine-rich sequence is not restricted to preventing RNA:DNA hybrid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Puja; Owiti, Norah; Kim, Nayun

    2016-01-29

    Highly transcribed guanine-run containing sequences, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, become unstable when topoisomerase I (Top1) is disrupted. Topological changes, such as the formation of extended RNA:DNA hybrids or R-loops or non-canonical DNA structures including G-quadruplexes has been proposed as the major underlying cause of the transcription-linked genome instability. Here, we report that R-loop accumulation at a guanine-rich sequence, which is capable of assembling into the four-stranded G4 DNA structure, is dependent on the level and the orientation of transcription. In the absence of Top1 or RNase Hs, R-loops accumulated to substantially higher extent when guanine-runs were located on the non-transcribed strand. This coincides with the orientation where higher genome instability was observed. However, we further report that there are significant differences between the disruption of RNase Hs and Top1 in regards to the orientation-specific elevation in genome instability at the guanine-rich sequence. Additionally, genome instability in Top1-deficient yeasts is not completely suppressed by removal of negative supercoils and further aggravated by expression of mutant Top1. Together, our data provide a strong support for a function of Top1 in suppressing genome instability at the guanine-run containing sequence that goes beyond preventing the transcription-associated RNA:DNA hybrid formation. PMID:26527723

  15. Guanine nucleotide is essential and Ca2+ is a modulator in the exocytotic reaction of permeabilized rat mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lillie, T H; Gomperts, B D

    1992-01-01

    Exocytosis from metabolically depleted permeabilized rat mast cells was measured in response to provision of Ca2+ and guanine nucleotide [GTP or guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S])]. For cells permeabilized in simple salt solutions (NaCl), both of these effectors were required to induce secretion. Exclusion of Mg2+ caused an increase in both the sensitivity of the system to GTP and the extent of secretion elicited, while having no such effects on secretion induced by GTP[S]. The effect of Mg2+ depletion on the ability of GTP to stimulate secretion is probably due to the dependence on Mg2+ of the GTPase activity of GE (a postulated GTP-binding protein which mediates exocytosis). This argues that a persistent stimulus to the G-protein is required to support secretion. Affinity for both GTP[S] and GTP is enhanced when the cells are permeabilized in zwitterionic electrolytes (glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, glycine) instead of NaCl. Under these conditions, secretion occurs in response to provision of either GTP[S] [in the effective absence of Ca2+ (pCa 9)] or Ca2+ (in the absence of guanine nucleotide). Secretion induced by GTP[S] is strongly promoted by the presence of Mg2+ at concentrations in the millimolar range; this promotion by Mg2+ declines as the concentration of Ca2+ is elevated towards pCa 7. At pCa 6, Mg2+ is without effect. Ca(2+)-induced secretion requires the provision of MgATP. Since this is further enhanced by low concentrations (< 100 microM) and then inhibited by high concentrations of GDP, the essential role of ATP is likely to be in the maintenance of GTP via transphosphorylation by a nucleoside diphosphate kinase reaction. Thus, under conditions of high affinity (glutamate environment), GTP[S] alone is capable of inducing exocytosis. Ca2+ acts in concert with guanine nucleotides: it enhances the rate and extent of secretion and increases the affinity for Mg2+ and guanine nucleotides in the activation of the GTP-binding protein (GE

  16. Gene-Specific Assessment of Guanine Oxidation as an Epigenetic Modulator for Cardiac Specification of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joonghoon; Park, Jong Woo; Oh, Hawmok; Maria, Fernanda S.; Kang, Jaeku; Tian, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics have essential roles in development and human diseases. Compared to the complex histone modifications, epigenetic changes on mammalian DNA are as simple as methylation on cytosine. Guanine, however, can be oxidized as an epigenetic change which can undergo base-pair transversion, causing a genetic difference. Accumulating evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules for embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation, possibly through transient changes on genomic DNA such as 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). Technical limitations on detecting such DNA modifications, however, restrict the investigation of the role of 8-oxoG in ESC differentiation. Here, we developed a Hoogsteen base pairing-mediated PCR-sequencing assay to detect 8-oxoG lesions that can subsequently cause G to T transversions during PCR. We then used this assay to assess the epigenetic and transient 8-oxoG formation in the Tbx5 gene of R1 mouse ESCs subjected to oxidative stress by removing 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) from the culture media. To our surprise, significantly higher numbers of 8-oxoG-mediated G∙C to C∙G transversion, not G∙C to T∙A, were detected at 7th and 9th base position from the transcription start site of exon 1 of Tbx5 in ESCs in the (-)2ME than (+)2ME group (p < 0.05). This was consistent with the decrease in the amount of amplifiable of DNA harboring the 8-oxoG lesions at the Tbx5 promoter region in the oxidative stressed ESCs. The ESCs responded to oxidative stress, possibly through the epigenetic effects of guanine oxidation with decreased proliferation (p < 0.05) and increased formation of beating embryoid bodies (EBs; p < 0.001). Additionally, the epigenetic changes of guanine induced up-regulation of Ogg1 and PolB, two base excision repairing genes for 8-oxoG, in ESCs treated with (-)2ME (p < 0.01). Together, we developed a gene-specific and direct quantification assay for guanine oxidation. Using oxidative stressed

  17. Dehydromonocrotaline generates sequence-selective N-7 guanine alkylation and heat and alkali stable multiple fragment DNA crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Pereira, T N; Webb, R I; Reilly, P E; Seawright, A A; Prakash, A S

    1998-12-01

    Monocrotaline is a pyrrolizidine alkaloid known to cause toxicity in humans and animals. Its mechanism of biological action is still unclear although DNA crosslinking has been suggested to a play a role in its activity. In this study we found that an active metabolite of monocrotaline, dehydromonocrotaline (DHM), alkylates guanines at the N7 position of DNA with a preference for 5'-GG and 5'-GA sequences. In addition, it generates piperidine- and heat-resistant multiple DNA crosslinks, as confirmed by electrophoresis and electron microscopy. On the basis of these findings, we propose that DHM undergoes rapid polymerization to a structure which is able to crosslink several fragments of DNA. PMID:9826770

  18. Dehydromonocrotaline generates sequence-selective N-7 guanine alkylation and heat and alkali stable multiple fragment DNA crosslinks.

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, T N; Webb, R I; Reilly, P E; Seawright, A A; Prakash, A S

    1998-01-01

    Monocrotaline is a pyrrolizidine alkaloid known to cause toxicity in humans and animals. Its mechanism of biological action is still unclear although DNA crosslinking has been suggested to a play a role in its activity. In this study we found that an active metabolite of monocrotaline, dehydromonocrotaline (DHM), alkylates guanines at the N7 position of DNA with a preference for 5'-GG and 5'-GA sequences. In addition, it generates piperidine- and heat-resistant multiple DNA crosslinks, as confirmed by electrophoresis and electron microscopy. On the basis of these findings, we propose that DHM undergoes rapid polymerization to a structure which is able to crosslink several fragments of DNA. PMID:9826770

  19. The Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF5 promotes tumor malignancy via epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Komiya, Y; Onodera, Y; Kuroiwa, M; Nomimura, S; Kubo, Y; Nam, J-M; Kajiwara, K; Nada, S; Oneyama, C; Sabe, H; Okada, M

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial tumor cells often acquire malignant properties, such as invasion/metastasis and uncontrolled cell growth, by undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the mechanisms by which EMT contributes to malignant progression remain elusive. Here we show that the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) ARHGEF5 promotes tumor malignancy in a manner dependent on EMT status. We previously identified ARHGEF5, a member of the Dbl family of GEFs, as a multifunctional mediator of Src-induced cell invasion and tumor growth. In the present study, ARHGEF5 was upregulated during tumor growth factor-β-induced EMT in human epithelial MCF10A cells, and promoted cell migration by activating the Rho-ROCK pathway. ARHGEF5 was necessary for the invasive and in vivo metastatic activity of human colorectal cancer HCT116 cells. These findings underscore the crucial role of ARHGEF5 in cell migration and invasion/metastasis. An in vivo tumorigenesis assay revealed that ARHGEF5 had the potential to promote tumor growth via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. However, ARHGEF5 was not required for tumor growth in epithelial-like human colorectal cancer HCT116 and HT29 cells, whereas the growth of mesenchymal-like SW480 and SW620 cells depended on ARHGEF5. Induction of EMT by tumor necrosis factor-α or Slug in HCT116 cells resulted in the dependence of tumor growth on ARHGEF5. In these mesenchymal-like cells, Akt was activated via ARHGEF5 and its activity was required for tumor growth. Analysis of a transcriptome data set revealed that the combination of ARHGEF5 upregulation and E-cadherin downregulation or Snail upregulation was significantly correlated with poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancers. Taken together, our findings suggest that EMT-induced ARHGEF5 activation contributes to the progression of tumor malignancy. ARHGEF5 may serve as a potential therapeutic target in a subset of malignant tumors that have undergone EMT. PMID

  20. Genetic interactions in yeast between Ypt GTPases and Arf guanine nucleotide exchangers.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S; Jedd, G; Kahn, R A; Franzusoff, A; Bartolini, F; Segev, N

    1999-01-01

    Two families of GTPases, Arfs and Ypt/rabs, are key regulators of vesicular transport. While Arf proteins are implicated in vesicle budding from the donor compartment, Ypt/rab proteins are involved in the targeting of vesicles to the acceptor compartment. Recently, we have shown a role for Ypt31/32p in exit from the yeast trans-Golgi, suggesting a possible function for Ypt/rab proteins in vesicle budding as well. Here we report the identification of a new member of the Sec7-domain family, SYT1, as a high-copy suppressor of a ypt31/32 mutation. Several proteins that belong to the Sec7-domain family, including the yeast Gea1p, have recently been shown to stimulate nucleotide exchange by Arf GTPases. Nucleotide exchange by Arf GTPases, the switch from the GDP- to the GTP-bound form, is thought to be crucial for their function. Sec7p itself has an important role in the yeast secretory pathway. However, its mechanism of action is not yet understood. We show that all members of the Sec7-domain family exhibit distinct genetic interactions with the YPT genes. Biochemical assays demonstrate that, although the homology between the members of the Sec7-domain family is relatively low (20-35%) and limited to a small domain, they all can act as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Arf proteins, but not for Ypt GTPases. The Sec7-domain of Sec7p is sufficient for this activity. Interestingly, the Sec7 domain activity is inhibited by brefeldin A (BFA), a fungal metabolite that inhibits some of the Arf-GEFs, indicating that this domain is a target for BFA. These results demonstrate that the ability to act as Arf-GEFs is a general property of all Sec7-domain proteins in yeast. The genetic interactions observed between Arf GEFs and Ypt GTPases suggest the existence of a Ypt-Arf GTPase cascade in the secretory pathway. PMID:10430582

  1. Evolution of eukaryal tRNA-guanine transglycosylase: insight gained from the heterocyclic substrate recognition by the wild-type and mutant human and Escherichia coli tRNA-guanine transglycosylases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Chen; Brooks, Allen F.; Goodenough-Lashua, DeeAnne M.; Kittendorf, Jeffrey D.; Showalter, Hollis D.; Garcia, George A.

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (TGT) is involved in the queuosine modification of tRNAs in eukarya and eubacteria and in the archaeosine modification of tRNAs in archaea. However, the different classes of TGTs utilize different heterocyclic substrates (and tRNA in the case of archaea). Based on the X-ray structural analyses, an earlier study [Stengl et al. (2005) Mechanism and substrate specificity of tRNA-guanine transglycosylases (TGTs): tRNA-modifying enzymes from the three different kingdoms of life share a common catalytic mechanism. Chembiochem, 6, 1926–1939] has made a compelling case for the divergent evolution of the eubacterial and archaeal TGTs. The X-ray structure of the eukaryal class of TGTs is not known. We performed sequence homology and phylogenetic analyses, and carried out enzyme kinetics studies with the wild-type and mutant TGTs from Escherichia coli and human using various heterocyclic substrates that we synthesized. Observations with the Cys145Val (E. coli) and the corresponding Val161Cys (human) TGTs are consistent with the idea that the Cys145 evolved in eubacterial TGTs to recognize preQ1 but not queuine, whereas the eukaryal equivalent, Val161, evolved for increased recognition of queuine and a concomitantly decreased recognition of preQ1. Both the phylogenetic and kinetic analyses support the conclusion that all TGTs have divergently evolved to specifically recognize their cognate heterocyclic substrates. PMID:21131277

  2. Simultaneous protection of organic p- and n-channels in complementary inverter from aging and bias-stress by DNA-base guanine/Al2O3 double layer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junyeong; Hwang, Hyuncheol; Min, Sung-Wook; Shin, Jae Min; Kim, Jin Sung; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Lee, Hee Sung; Im, Seongil

    2015-01-28

    Although organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) have various advantages of lightweight, low-cost, mechanical flexibility, and nowadays even higher mobility than amorphous Si-based FET, stability issue under bias and ambient condition critically hinder its practical application. One of the most detrimental effects on organic layer comes from penetrated atmospheric species such as oxygen and water. To solve such degradation problems, several molecular engineering tactics are introduced: forming a kinetic barrier, lowering the level of molecule orbitals, and increasing the band gap. However, direct passivation of organic channels, the most promising strategy, has not been reported as often as other methods. Here, we resolved the ambient stability issues of p-type (heptazole)/or n-type (PTCDI-C13) OFETs and their bias-stability issues at once, using DNA-base small molecule guanine (C5H5N5O)/Al2O3 bilayer. The guanine protects the organic channels as buffer/and H getter layer between the channels and capping Al2O3, whereas the oxide capping resists ambient molecules. As a result, both p-type and n-type OFETs are simultaneously protected from gate-bias stress and 30 days-long ambient aging, finally demonstrating a highly stable, high-gain complementary-type logic inverter. PMID:25537523

  3. Synthesis of 5' cap-0 and cap-1 RNAs using solid-phase chemistry coupled with enzymatic methylation by human (guanine-N⁷)-methyl transferase.

    PubMed

    Thillier, Yann; Decroly, Etienne; Morvan, François; Canard, Bruno; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Debart, Françoise

    2012-04-01

    The 5' end of eukaryotic mRNA carries a N(7)-methylguanosine residue linked by a 5'-5' triphosphate bond. This cap moiety ((7m)GpppN) is an essential RNA structural modification allowing its efficient translation, limiting its degradation by cellular 5' exonucleases and avoiding its recognition as "nonself" by the innate immunity machinery. In vitro synthesis of capped RNA is an important bottleneck for many biological studies. Moreover, the lack of methods allowing the synthesis of large amounts of RNA starting with a specific 5'-end sequence have hampered biological and structural studies of proteins recognizing the cap structure or involved in the capping pathway. Due to the chemical nature of N(7)-methylguanosine, the synthesis of RNAs possessing a cap structure at the 5' end is still a significant challenge. In the present work, we combined a chemical synthesis method and an enzymatic methylation assay in order to produce large amounts of RNA oligonucleotides carrying a cap-0 or cap-1. Short RNAs were synthesized on solid support by the phosphoramidite 2'-O-pivaloyloxymethyl chemistry. The cap structure was then coupled by the addition of GDP after phosphorylation of the terminal 5'-OH and activation by imidazole. After deprotection and release from the support, GpppN-RNAs or GpppN(2'-Om)-RNAs were purified before the N(7)-methyl group was added by enzymatic means using the human (guanine-N(7))-methyl transferase to yield (7m)GpppN-RNAs (cap-0) or (7m)GpppN(2'-Om)-RNAs (cap-1). The RNAs carrying different cap structures (cap, cap-0 or, cap-1) act as bona fide substrates mimicking cellular capped RNAs and can be used for biochemical and structural studies. PMID:22334760

  4. Role of guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) in vasopressin-induced responses of a vascular smooth muscle cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Nambi, P.; Aiyar, N.; Whitman, M.; Stassen, F.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A-10) carry vascular V1 vasopressin receptors. In these cells, vasopressin inhibits isoproterenol-induced cAMP accumulation and stimulates phosphatidylinositol turnover and Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization. Pretreatment of the cells with phorbol esters resulted in inhibition of the vasopressin-induced responses. The inactive phorbol ester aPDD was ineffective. These data suggested that phorbol ester might cause phosphorylation of the vasopressin receptor and/or coupling protein(s). Here, they studied the role of guanine nucleotide binding proteins by employing the novel radiolabeled vasopressin antagonist (/sup 3/H)-SKF 101926. In competition experiments with cell membranes, Gpp(NH)p shifted the vasopressin curve to the right indicating decreased agonist affinity. Phorbol ester pretreatment abolished the Gpp(NH)p effect. Pretreatment of the cells with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) resulted in inhibition of vasopressin-induced phosphatidyinositol turnover. NEM also abolished the decrease in agonist affinity caused by Gpp(NH)p. These data showed that NEM and phorbol ester pretreatment of smooth muscle cells functionally uncoupled the vasopressin receptors and suggested that vasopressin V1 receptor responses are mediated through guanine nucleotide binding protein(s).

  5. Crystal structures of Apo and GMP bound hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase from Legionella pneumophila and the implications in gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nannan; Gong, Xiaojian; Lu, Min; Chen, Xiaofang; Qin, Ximing; Ge, Honghua

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) (EC 2.4.2.8) reversibly catalyzes the transfer of the 5-phophoribosyl group from 5-phosphoribosyl-alpha-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to hypoxanthine or guanine to form inosine monophosphate (IMP) or guanosine monophosphate (GMP) in the purine salvage pathway. To investigate the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme in the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila, we determined the crystal structures of the L. pneumophila HGPRT (LpHGPRT) both in its apo-form and in complex with GMP. The structures reveal that LpHGPRT comprises a core domain and a hood domain which are packed together to create a cavity for GMP-binding and the enzymatic catalysis. The binding of GMP induces conformational changes of the stable loop II. This new binding site is closely related to the Gout arthritis-linked human HGPRT mutation site (Ser103Arg). Finally, these structures of LpHGPRT provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of HGPRT. PMID:26968365

  6. Sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions by fluorescent DNA/Ag nanoclusters in guanine-rich DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun; Ling, Jian; Zhang, Xiu-Qing; Bai, Hui-Ping; Zheng, Liyan; Cao, Qiu-E; Ding, Zhong-Tao

    2015-02-25

    In this work, we designed a new fluorescent oligonucleotides-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) probe for sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions. This probe contains two tailored DNA sequence. One is a signal probe contains a cytosine-rich sequence template for AgNCs synthesis and link sequence at both ends. The other is a guanine-rich sequence for signal enhancement and link sequence complementary to the link sequence of the signal probe. After hybridization, the fluorescence of hybridized double-strand DNA/AgNCs is 200-fold enhanced based on the fluorescence enhancement effect of DNA/AgNCs in proximity of guanine-rich DNA sequence. The double-strand DNA/AgNCs probe is brighter and stable than that of single-strand DNA/AgNCs, and more importantly, can be used as novel fluorescent probes for detecting mercury and copper ions. Mercury and copper ions in the range of 6.0-160.0 and 6-240 nM, can be linearly detected with the detection limits of 2.1 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Our results indicated that the analytical parameters of the method for mercury and copper ions detection are much better than which using a single-strand DNA/AgNCs. PMID:25305618

  7. Sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions by fluorescent DNA/Ag nanoclusters in guanine-rich DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jun; Ling, Jian; Zhang, Xiu-Qing; Bai, Hui-Ping; Zheng, Liyan; Cao, Qiu-E.; Ding, Zhong-Tao

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we designed a new fluorescent oligonucleotides-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) probe for sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions. This probe contains two tailored DNA sequence. One is a signal probe contains a cytosine-rich sequence template for AgNCs synthesis and link sequence at both ends. The other is a guanine-rich sequence for signal enhancement and link sequence complementary to the link sequence of the signal probe. After hybridization, the fluorescence of hybridized double-strand DNA/AgNCs is 200-fold enhanced based on the fluorescence enhancement effect of DNA/AgNCs in proximity of guanine-rich DNA sequence. The double-strand DNA/AgNCs probe is brighter and stable than that of single-strand DNA/AgNCs, and more importantly, can be used as novel fluorescent probes for detecting mercury and copper ions. Mercury and copper ions in the range of 6.0-160.0 and 6-240 nM, can be linearly detected with the detection limits of 2.1 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Our results indicated that the analytical parameters of the method for mercury and copper ions detection are much better than which using a single-strand DNA/AgNCs.

  8. Reduced aggregation and improved specificity of G-rich oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine guanine bases

    PubMed Central

    Kutyavin, Igor V.; Lokhov, Sergey G.; Afonina, Irina A.; Dempcy, Robert; Gall, Alexander A.; Gorn, Vladimir V.; Lukhtanov, Eugene; Metcalf, Mark; Mills, Alan; Reed, Michael W.; Sanders, Sylvia; Shishkina, Irina; Vermeulen, Nicolaas M. J.

    2002-01-01

    Guanine (G)-rich oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) can form undesired complexes by self association through non-Watson–Crick interactions. These aggregates can compromise performance of DNA probes and make genetic analysis unpredictable. We found that the 8-aza-7-deazaguanine (PPG), a pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine analog, reduces guanine self association of G-rich ODNs. In the PPG heterocycle, the N-7 and C-8 atoms of G are interposed. This leaves the ring system with an electron density similar to G, but prevents Hoogsteen-bonding associated with N-7. ODNs containing multiple PPG bases were easily prepared using a dimethylformamidine-protected phosphoramidite reagent. Substitution of PPG for G in ODNs allowed formation of more stable DNA duplexes. When one or more PPGs were substituted for G in ODNs containing four or more consecutive Gs, G aggregation was eliminated. Substitution of PPG for G also improved discrimination of G/A, G/G and G/T mismatches in Watson–Crick hybrids. Use of PPG in fluorogenic minor groove binder probes was also explored. PPG prevented aggregation in MGB probes (MGBTM is a trademark of Epoch Biosciences) and allowed use of G-rich sequences. An increased signal was observed in 5′-PPG probes due to reduced quenching of fluorescein by PPG. In summary, substitution of PPG for G enhances affinity, specificity, sensitivity and predictability of G-rich DNA probes. PMID:12433999

  9. Mutagenic effects induced by the attack of NO2 radical to the guanine-cytosine base pair

    PubMed Central

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P.; Requena, Alberto; Zúñiga, José; Jacquemin, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the attack of the nitrogen dioxide radical (NO•2) to the guanine—cytosine (GC) base pair and the subsequent tautomeric reactions able to induce mutations, by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The conducted simulations allow us to identify the most reactive sites of the GC base pair. Indeed, the computed relative energies demonstrate that the addition of the NO•2 radical to the C8 position of the guanine base forms to the most stable adduct. Although the initial adducts might evolve to non-canonical structures via inter-base hydrogen bonds rearrangements, the probability for the proton exchange to occur lies in the same range as that observed for undamaged DNA. As a result, tautomeric errors in NO2-attacked DNA arises at the same rate as in canonical DNA, with no macroscopic impact on the overall stability of DNA. The potential mutagenic effects of the GC–NO•2 radical adducts likely involve side reactions, e.g., the GC deprotonation to the solvent, rather than proton exchange between guanine and cytosine basis. PMID:25798437

  10. Comparison of static and dynamic methods of treatment of anharmonicity for the vibrational study of isolated and aqueous forms of guanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thicoipe, Sandrine; Carbonniere, Philippe; Pouchan, Claude

    2014-01-01

    This theoretical study provides the anharmonic vibrational wavenumbers of isolated and aqueous guanine. They were performed at the DFT B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory using two different ways for the treatment of anharmonicity: time-independent (VPT2) and time-dependent (molecular dynamics) approaches. The wavenumbers obtained are compared to experimental data for isolated and aqueous forms: the VPT2 approach is slightly better than MD, especially for the determination of stretching and wagging (NH) motions. Finally, the structural model of solvatation used for aqueous guanine which combines an explicit solvent model with a polarizable continuum model (PCM) was validated.