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Sample records for large atomic displacement

  1. Large displacement spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

  2. Atomic displacements in ferroelectric trigonal and orthorhombic boracite structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowty, Eric; Clark, J.R.

    1972-01-01

    New crystal-structure refinements of Pca21 boracite, Mg3ClB7O13, and R??{lunate}c ericaite, Fe2.4Mg0.6ClB7O13, show that some boron and oxygen atoms are involved in the 'ferro' transitions as well as the metal and halogen atoms. The atomic displacements associated with the polarity changes are as large as 0.6A??. ?? 1972.

  3. Frictional behavior of large displacement experimental faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.; Blanpied, M.L.; Weeks, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The coefficient of friction and velocity dependence of friction of initially bare surfaces and 1-mm-thick simulated fault gouges (400 mm at 25??C and 25 MPa normal stress. Steady state negative friction velocity dependence and a steady state fault zone microstructure are achieved after ???18 mm displacement, and an approximately constant strength is reached after a few tens of millimeters of sliding on initially bare surfaces. Simulated fault gouges show a large but systematic variation of friction, velocity dependence of friction, dilatancy, and degree of localization with displacement. At short displacement (<10 mm), simulated gouge is strong, velocity strengthening and changes in sliding velocity are accompanied by relatively large changes in dilatancy rate. With continued displacement, simulated gouges become progressively weaker and less velocity strengthening, the velocity dependence of dilatancy rate decreases, and deformation becomes localized into a narrow basal shear which at its most localized is observed to be velocity weakening. With subsequent displacement, the fault restrengthens, returns to velocity strengthening, or to velocity neutral, the velocity dependence of dilatancy rate becomes larger, and deformation becomes distributed. Correlation of friction, velocity dependence of friction and of dilatancy rate, and degree of localization at all displacements in simulated gouge suggest that all quantities are interrelated. The observations do not distinguish the independent variables but suggest that the degree of localization is controlled by the fault strength, not by the friction velocity dependence. The friction velocity dependence and velocity dependence of dilatancy rate can be used as qualitative measures of the degree of localization in simulated gouge, in agreement with previous studies. Theory equating the friction velocity dependence of simulated gouge to the sum of the friction velocity dependence of bare surfaces and the velocity dependence of dilatancy rate of simulated gouge fails to quantitatively account for the experimental observations.

  4. Static atomic displacements in crystalline solid solution alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, G.; Sparks, C.; Robertson, J.L.; Epperson, J.E.; Jiang, Xiaogang

    1996-06-01

    Atomic size differences induce static displacements from an average alloy lattice and play an important role in controlling alloy phase stability and properties. Details of this, however, are difficult to study, as chemical order and displacements are strongly interrelated and static displacements are hard to measure. Diffuse x-ray scattering with tunable-synchrotron radiation can now measure element- specific static displacements with an accuracy of {+-}0.1 pm and can simultaneously measure local chemical order out to 20 shells or more. Ideal alloys for this are those that have previously been the most intractable: alloys with small Z contrast, alloys with only local order and alloys with small size differences. The combination of precise characterization of local chemical order and precise measurement of static displacement provides new information that challenges existing alloy models. This paper reports on an ongoing systematic study of static displacements in the Fe/Ni/Cr alloys and compares the observed static displacements to these predicted by current theories. Availability of more brilliant 3rd generation hard x-ray sources will greatly enhance these measurements.

  5. On the Origin of Large Interstitial Clusters in Displacement Cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, Calder F; Barashev, Aleksandr; Bacon, David J; Osetskiy, Yury N

    2010-01-01

    Displacement cascades with wide ranges of primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy and mass in iron were simulated using molecular dynamics. New visualisation techniques are introduced to show how the shock-front dynamics and internal structure of a cascade develop over time. These reveal that the nature of the final damage is determined early on in the cascade process. We define a zone (termed 'spaghetti') in which atoms are moved to new lattice sites and show how it is created by a supersonic shock-front expanding from the primary recoil event. A large cluster of self-interstitial atoms can form on the periphery of the spaghetti if a hypersonic recoil creates damage with a supersonic shock ahead of the main supersonic front. When the two fronts meet, the main one injects atoms into the low-density core of the other: these become interstitial atoms during the rapid recovery of the surrounding crystal. The hypersonic recoil occurs in less than 0.1 ps after the primary recoil and the interstitial cluster is formed before the onset of the thermal spike phase of the cascade process. The corresponding number of vacancies is then formed in the spaghetti core as the crystal cools, i.e. at times one to two orders of magnitude longer. By using the spaghetti zone to define cascade volume, the energy density of a cascade is shown to be almost independent of the PKA mass. This throws into doubt the conventional energy-density interpretation of an increased defect yield with increasing PKA mass in ion irradiation.

  6. A large displacement, high frequency, underwater microelectromechanical systems actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelzle, David J.; Chan, Clara K.; Scott, Michael B.; Lake, Melinda A.; Rowat, Amy C.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate an in situ electrostatic actuator that can operate underwater across a wide range of displacements and frequencies, achieving a displacement of approximately 10 μm at 500 Hz and 1 μm at 5 kHz; this performance surpasses that of existing underwater physical actuators. To attain these large displacements at such high speeds, we optimized critical design parameters using a computationally efficient description of the physics of low quality (Q) factor underwater electrostatic actuators. Our theoretical model accurately predicts actuator motion profiles as well as limits of bandwidth and displacement.

  7. Large displacement vertical translational actuator based on piezoelectric thin films

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhen; Pulskamp, Jeffrey S; Lin, Xianke; Rhee, Choong-Ho; Wang, Thomas; Polcawich, Ronald G; Oldham, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    A novel vertical translational microactuator based on thin-film piezoelectric actuation is presented, using a set of four compound bend-up/bend-down unimorphs to produce translational motion of a moving platform or stage. The actuation material is a chemical-solution deposited lead–zirconate–titanate (PZT) thin film. Prototype designs have shown as much as 120 μm of static displacement, with 80–90 μm displacements being typical, using four 920 μm long by 70 μm legs. Analytical models are presented that accurately describe nonlinear behavior in both static and dynamic operation of prototype stages when the dependence of piezoelectric coefficients on voltage is known. Resonance of the system is observed at a frequency of 200 Hz. The large displacement and high bandwidth of the actuators at low-voltage and low-power levels should make them useful to a variety of optical applications, including endoscopic microscopy. PMID:25506130

  8. Effect of magnetism and atomic order on static atomic displacements in the Invar alloy Fe-27 at.% Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sax, C. R.; Schönfeld, B.; Ruban, A. V.

    2015-08-01

    Fe-27 at.% Pt was aged at 1123 K and quenched to room temperature (RT) to set up a state of thermal equilibrium. The local atomic arrangement was studied by diffuse x-ray scattering above (at 427 K) and below (at RT) the Curie temperature as well as at RT under a saturating magnetic field. The separated short-range order scattering remained unchanged for all three states, with maxima at 100 positions. Effective pair interaction parameters determined by the inverse Monte Carlo method gave an order-disorder transition temperature of about 1088 K, close to direct experimental findings. The species-dependent static atomic displacements for the first two shells show large differences, with a strong increase in magnitude from the state at 427 K over RT to the state under saturating magnetic field. This outcome is in agreement with an increase in atomic volume of Fe with increasing local magnetic moment. Electronic-structure calculations closely reproduce the values for the static atomic displacements in the ferromagnetic state, and predict their dependence on the atomic configuration. They also reveal a strong dependence of the magnetic exchange interactions in Fe-Pt on the atomic configuration state and lattice parameter. In particular, the increase of the Curie temperature in a random state relative to that in the ordered one is demonstrated to be related to the corresponding change of the magnetic exchange interactions due to the different local atomic chemical environment. There exists a similar strong concentration dependence of the chemical interactions as in the case of magnetic exchange interactions. Theoretical effective interactions for Fe-27 at.% Pt alloy are in good agreement with experimental results, and they also reproduce well the L1 2-A1 transition temperature.

  9. Voltage-dependent Membrane Displacements Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mosbacher, J.; Langer, M.; Hörber, J.K.H.; Sachs, F.

    1998-01-01

    Cells use polar molecules in the membrane to sense changes in the transmembrane potential. The opening of voltage-gated ion channels and membrane bending due to the inverse flexoelectric effect are two examples of such electromechanical coupling. We have looked for membrane motions in an electric field using atomic (or scanning) force microscopy (AFM) with the intent of studying voltage-dependent conformational changes of ion channels. Voltage-clamped HEK293 cells were either untransfected controls or transfected with Shaker K+ channels. Using a ± 10-mV peak–peak AC carrier stimulus, untransfected cells moved 0.5–15 nm normal to the plane of the membrane. These movements tracked the voltage at frequencies >1 kHz with a phase lead of 60–120°, as expected of a displacement current. The movement was outward with depolarization, but the holding potential only weakly influenced the amplitude of the movement. In contrast, cells transfected with a noninactivating mutant of Shaker K+channels showed similar movements, but these were sensitive to the holding potential; decreasing with depolarization between −80 and 0 mV. Searching for artifactual origins of these movements, we used open or sealed pipettes and AFM cantilever placements just above the cells. These results were negative, suggesting that the observed movements were produced by the cell membrane rather than by movement of the patch pipette, or by acoustic or electrical interactions of the membrane with the AFM tip. In control cells, the electrical motor may arise from the flexoelectric effect, where changes in potential induce changes in curvature. In transfected cells, it appears that channel-specific movements also occurred. These experiments demonstrate that the AFM may be able to exploit voltage-dependent movements as a source of contrast for imaging membrane components. The electrically induced motility will cause twitching during action potentials, and may have physiological consequences. PMID:9417135

  10. Large displacements and stability analysis of nonlinear propeller structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The use of linear rigid formats in COSMIC NASTRAN without DMAP procedures for the analysis of nonlinear propeller structures is described. Approaches for updating geometry and applying follower forces for incremental loading are demonstrated. Comparisons are made with COSMIC NASTRAN rigid formats and other independent finite element programs. Specifically, the comparisons include results from the four approaches for updating the geometry using RIGID FORMAT 1, RIGID FORMATS 4 and 13, MARC and MSC/NASTRAN. It is shown that 'user friendly' updating approaches (without DMAPS) can be used to predict the large displacements and instability of these nonlinear structures. These user friendly approaches can be easily implemented by the user and predict conservative results.

  11. Calculations of dynamical properties of skutterudites: thermal conductivity, thermal expansivity and atomic mean square displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Noam; Feldman, J. L.; Singh, David J

    2010-01-01

    While the thermal conductivity of the filled skutterudites has been of great interest it had not been calculated within a microscopic theory. Here a central force, Guggenheim-McGlashen, model with parameters largely extracted from first-principles calculations and from spectroscopic data, specific to LaFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} or CoSb{sub 3}, is employed in a Green-Kubo/molecular dynamics calculation of thermal conductivity as a function of temperature. We find that the thermal conductivity of a filled solid is more than a factor of two lower than that of an unfilled solid, assuming the 'framework' interatomic force parameters are the same between filled and unfilled solids, and that this decrease is almost entirely due to the cubic anharmonic interaction between filling and framework atoms. In addition, partially as a test of our models, we calculate thermal expansivity and isotropic atomic mean-square displacements using both molecular dynamics and lattice dynamics methods. These quantities are in reasonable agreement with experiment, increasing our confidence in the anharmonic parameters of our models. We also find an anomalously large filling-atom mode Gruneisen parameter that is apparently observed for a filled skutterudite and is observed in a clathrate.

  12. Calculations of dynamical properties of skutterudites: Thermal conductivity, thermal expansivity, and atomic mean-square displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, N.; Feldman, J. L.; Singh, David J.

    2010-04-05

    While the thermal conductivity of the filled skutterudites has been of great interest it had not been calculated within a microscopic theory. Here a central force, Guggenheim-McGlashen, model with parameters largely extracted from first-principles calculations and from spectroscopic data, specific to LaFe{sub 4} Sb{sub 12} or CoSb{sub 3} , is employed in a Green-Kubo/molecular dynamics calculation of thermal conductivity as a function of temperature. We find that the thermal conductivity of a filled solid is more than a factor of two lower than that of an unfilled solid, assuming the “framework” interatomic force parameters are the same between filled and unfilled solids, and that this decrease is almost entirely due to the cubic anharmonic interaction between filling and framework atoms. In addition, partially as a test of our models, we calculate thermal expansivity and isotropic atomic mean-square displacements using both molecular dynamics and lattice dynamics methods. These quantities are in reasonable agreement with experiment, increasing our confidence in the anharmonic parameters of our models. We also find an anomalously large filling-atom mode Gruneisen parameter that is apparently observed for a filled skutterudite and is observed in a clathrate.

  13. Atomic structure of cascades of atomic displacements in metals and alloys after different types of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivchenko, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    Using the methods of field ion microscopy, we studied radiation induced defects on an atomically clean surface and within a subsurface volume of platinum initiated by the interaction of neutron (E > 0.1MeV) and Ar+ beams (E = 30 keV). It is shown that the interaction of fast neutrons (E > 0.1 MeV) F = 6.7-1021 m-2, F = 3.5-1022 m-2 with matter leads to the formation in the amount of platinum such as radiation damage which occur after ion irradiation by beams of charged Ar+ ions with E = 30 keV, F = 1020 ion/m2. They are observed at a depth of about 1.5-2 nm irradiated under the surface of Pt by ions Ar+. Thus, we have carried out modeling of neutron impact with matter when replacing the neutron beam by an ion beam that causes the same radiation damage in the bulk of the material. Experimental results on atomic-spatial investigation of radiative defect formation in surface layers of materials, initiated by neutron bombardment (of Pt, E > 0.1 MeV) and ion implantation (in Cu3Au: E = 40 keV, F = 1020 ion/m2, j = 10-3 A/cm2), are considered. Quantitative estimates obtained for the size, shape, and volume fraction of cascades of atomic displacements formed under various types of irradiation in the surface layers of the materials. It is showing that the average size of radiation clusters after irradiation of platinum to a fast neutron fluence of 6.7-1022 m-2 (E > 0.1 MeV) is about 3.2 nm. The experimentally established average size of a radiation cluster (disordered zone) in the alloy after ion bombardment is 4×4×1.5 nm.

  14. High-resolution electron-microscope images of crystals with correlated atomic displacements.

    PubMed

    Etheridge

    1999-03-01

    A coordinate-space multislice description of the scattering of high-energy electrons is constructed from consecutions of differential operators acting upon atomic potentials. It is used to find expressions for the intensity distribution in high-resolution electron-microscope images of crystals whose atoms are periodically displaced relative to a reference lattice according to a modulation wave. Both static correlated displacements, such as occur in modulated structures, and time-dependent correlated displacements, as are generated by phonons, are considered. Two aspects of the image are examined in detail; its translational symmetry and its dependence upon the correlations between the atomic displacements. It is shown that the intensity distribution due to scattering from static correlated displacements has the translational symmetry of the modulated structure in that projection, as determined by the component of the modulation wavevector perpendicular to the incident beam, whereas that due to scattering from phonons has the translational symmetry of the reference lattice in that projection. The former is a consequence of higher-order Laue-zone interactions. The intensity distribution due to scattering from static displacements depends upon the absolute phase of the displacement at each scattering atomic site whereas that due to scattering from phonons depends only upon the relative phase of the displacements between different scattering sites, both within the same atomic column parallel to the beam and in adjacent columns. In both cases, the influence of the component of the correlation wavevector parallel to the incident beam is different to that perpendicular to the beam; the former affects the intensity mostly at the atomic sites whilst the latter affects the intensity mostly between the atomic sites. It is also observed that, as a consequence of the periodic nature of the polarization-vector function, the interference terms are small, both relative to the non-interference term and in an absolute sense, particularly for phonon scattering. For this reason, the contribution to the image due to scattering from correlated atomic displacements will have greater and sharper atomic contrast than that due to scattering from the reference structure without displacements. In addition, this component of the intensity distribution will not exhibit strong contrast reversal when the objective-lens defocus is changed. PMID:10927244

  15. Direct observation of depth-dependent atomic displacements associated with dislocations in gallium nitride.

    PubMed

    Lozano, J G; Yang, H; Guerrero-Lebrero, M P; D'Alfonso, A J; Yasuhara, A; Okunishi, E; Zhang, S; Humphreys, C J; Allen, L J; Galindo, P L; Hirsch, P B; Nellist, P D

    2014-09-26

    We demonstrate that the aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope has a sufficiently small depth of field to observe depth-dependent atomic displacements in a crystal. The depth-dependent displacements associated with the Eshelby twist of dislocations in GaN normal to the foil with a screw component of the Burgers vector are directly imaged. We show that these displacements are observed as a rotation of the lattice between images taken in a focal series. From the sense of the rotation, the sign of the screw component can be determined. PMID:25302902

  16. Direct Observation of Depth-Dependent Atomic Displacements Associated with Dislocations in Gallium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, J. G.; Yang, H.; Guerrero-Lebrero, M. P.; D'Alfonso, A. J.; Yasuhara, A.; Okunishi, E.; Zhang, S.; Humphreys, C. J.; Allen, L. J.; Galindo, P. L.; Hirsch, P. B.; Nellist, P. D.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate that the aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope has a sufficiently small depth of field to observe depth-dependent atomic displacements in a crystal. The depth-dependent displacements associated with the Eshelby twist of dislocations in GaN normal to the foil with a screw component of the Burgers vector are directly imaged. We show that these displacements are observed as a rotation of the lattice between images taken in a focal series. From the sense of the rotation, the sign of the screw component can be determined.

  17. Note: Seesaw actuation of atomic force microscope probes for improved imaging bandwidth and displacement range

    SciTech Connect

    Torun, H.; Torello, D.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2011-08-15

    The authors describe a method of actuation for atomic force microscope (AFM) probes to improve imaging speed and displacement range simultaneously. Unlike conventional piezoelectric tube actuation, the proposed method involves a lever and fulcrum ''seesaw'' like actuation mechanism that uses a small, fast piezoelectric transducer. The lever arm of the seesaw mechanism increases the apparent displacement range by an adjustable gain factor, overcoming the standard tradeoff between imaging speed and displacement range. Experimental characterization of a cantilever holder implementing the method is provided together with comparative line scans obtained with contact mode imaging. An imaging bandwidth of 30 kHz in air with the current setup was demonstrated.

  18. Atomic physics using large electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, S.

    1989-01-01

    This article surveys some areas of atomic physics using large electro-static accelerators. Brief overviews of ion-atom collisions and ion-solid collisions are followed by a classified listing of recent paper. A single line, correlated electron ion recombination, is chosen to show the recent development of techniques to study various aspects of this phenomenon. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Note: Compact and light displacement sensor for a precision measurement system in large motion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Heon

    2015-08-15

    We developed a compact and light displacement sensor applicable to systems that require wide range motions of its sensing device. The proposed sensor utilized the optical pickup unit of the optical disk drive, which has been used applied to atomic force microscopy (AFM) because of its compactness and lightness as well as its high performance. We modified the structure of optical pickup unit and made the compact sensor driver attachable to a probe head of AFM to make large rotation. The feasibilities of the developed sensor for a general probe-moving measurement device and for probe-rotating AFM were verified. Moreover, a simple and precise measurement of alignment between centers of rotator and probe tip in probe-rotation AFM was experimentally demonstrated using the developed sensor.

  20. Mean square atomic displacements of LaFe4Sb12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Joseph; Singh, David

    2005-03-01

    Calculations in the harmonic approximation of the mean square atomic displacements (MSDs) for the filled skutterudite, LaFe4Sb12, are discussed, where the first-principles based force constant model that we recently proposed for this material is employed.^1 The various values of MSDs at high temperatures are as expected, following the differences in coordination and short range force constants. The results are primarily compared with temperature dependent neutron diffraction measurements^2 of MSDs in La.75Fe3CoSb12. The differences between theory and experiment are interpreted in terms of static disorder contributions to the MSDs. In the case of the isotropic MSDs, the resulting static disorder contributions are comparable to the corresponding minimum values previously obtained^2 from a data analysis, and both the Sb and Fe values are small compared to the La value of 0.0045å^2. Nevertheless the anisotropy in the Sb static disorder is large on the basis of our analysis, and in the direction of the neighboring La site the Sb disorder parameter is comparable to the above value for La. Finally, the effect of La interactions on the Sb- and Fe-MSDs is discussed within the context of our model, as is an Einstein model, fitted to the calculated La MSD. 1. J.L. Feldman et al., Phys. Rev. B 68, 094301 (2003).2. B.C. Chakoumakos et al., Acta Cryst. B 55,341 (1999).

  1. Diffuse scattering measurements of static atomic displacements in crystalline binary solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J.; Jiang, X.; Robertson, L.

    1997-09-01

    Diffuse x-ray scattering from crystalline solid solutions is sensitive to both local chemical order and local bond distances. In short-range ordered alloys, fluctuations of chemistry and bond distances break the long-range symmetry of the crystal within a local region and contribute to the total energy of the alloy. Recent use of tunable synchrotron radiation to change the x-ray scattering contrast between elements has greatly advanced the measurement of bond distances between the three kinds of atom pairs found in crystalline binary alloys. The estimated standard deviation on these recovered static displacements approaches {+-}0.001 {angstrom} (0.0001 nm) which is an order of magnitude more precise than obtained with EXAFS. In addition, both the radial and tangential displacements can be recovered to five near neighbors and beyond. These static displacement measurements provide new information which challenges the most advanced theoretical models of binary crystalline alloys. 29 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Nanoscale Atomic Displacements Ordering for Enhanced Piezoelectric Properties in Lead-Free ABO3 Ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Pramanick, Abhijit; Jørgensen, Mads R V; Diallo, Souleymane O; Christianson, Andrew D; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A; Hoffmann, Christina; Wang, Xiaoping; Lan, Si; Wang, Xun-Li

    2015-08-01

    In situ synchrotron X-ray diffuse scattering and inelastic neutron scattering measurements from a prototype ABO3 ferroelectric single-crystal are used to elucidate how electric fields along a nonpolar direction can enhance its piezoelectric properties. The central mechanism is found to be a nanoscale ordering of B atom displacements, which induces increased lattice instability and therefore a greater susceptibility to electric-field-induced mechanical deformation. PMID:26076654

  3. Atomic force microscope cantilever as an encoding sensor for real-time displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaomei; Koenders, Ludger; Wolff, Helmut; Haertig, Frank; Schilling, Meinhard

    2010-10-01

    A tuning fork-based atomic force microscope cantilever has been investigated for application as an encoding sensor for real-time displacement measurement. The algorithm used to encode the displacement is based on the direct count of the integer pitches of a known grating, and the calculation of the fractional parts of a pitch at the beginning and during displacement. A cross-correlation technique has been adopted and applied to the real-time signal filtering process for the determination of the pitch during scanning by using a half sinusoidal waveform template. For the first investigation, a 1D sinusoidal grating with the pitch of 300 nm is used. The repeatability of displacement measurements over a distance of 70 µm is better than 2.2 nm. As the first application, the real-time displacement of a scanning stage is measured by the new encoding principle as it is moved in an open-loop mode and closed-loop mode based on its built-in capacitance sensor.

  4. Spatial Configuration of Atoms with High-Energy Atomic Displacement Cascade in α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Lu; Wu, Xuebang; Liu, Wei; Fang, Q. F.; Liu, C. S.; Huang, Qun-Ying; Wu, Y. C.

    2012-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the primary damage formation in α-Fe through collision cascades with a cascade energy of up to 100 keV. The pair analysis technique was introduced to characterize the spatial local structure distributions of atoms. The damaged microstructural unit characteristics of the body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal structure, as well as the number of point defects, followed a similar trend. Furthermore, the damaged atoms exist mostly in the microstructural characteristics of icosahedral and short-range ordering in amorphous states during and at the end of cascades. Most local spatial structures of the damaged atoms can be divided into two groups based on their corresponding non-characteristic index-pair change trends with time. The curves of the first group coincided with the vacancy (V) that exhibited one peak, whereas the curves of the second group exhibiting two peaks corresponded to the self-interstitial atoms (SIA). The maximum distance at which defects could interact with each other in space was the fifth nearest-neighbor distance of the atoms of perfect lattices in the bcc lattice. The number of local structural units of the damaged atoms that were connected with a single point defect (either V or SIA) continued to increase with increasing cascade energy by the end of the simulation. By contrast, the number of units that were connected with both V and SIA decreased. These results may help us understand the spatial configuration of atoms in the course of collision cascades.

  5. Ultrahigh-resolution study of protein atomic displacement parameters at cryotemperatures obtained with a helium cryostat.

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, T.; Ginell, S.; Mitschler, A.; Hazemann, I.; Schneider, T.; Cousido, A.; Lunin, V.; Joachimiak, A.; Podjarny, A,; Biosciences Division; Russian Academy of Sciences; IGBMC; Inst. of Molecular Oncology

    2006-01-01

    Two X-ray data sets for a complex of human aldose reductase (h-AR) with the inhibitor IDD 594 and the cofactor NADP(+) were collected from two different parts of the same crystal to a resolution of 0.81 A at 15 and 60 K using cold helium gas as cryogen. The contribution of temperature to the atomic B values was estimated by comparison of the independently refined models. It was found that although being slightly different for different kinds of atoms, the differences (deltaB) in the isotropic equivalents B of atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) were approximately constant (about 1.7 A(2)) for well ordered atoms as the temperature was increased from 15 to 60 K. The mean value of this difference varied according to the number of non-H atoms covalently bound to the parent atom. Atoms having a B value of higher than 8 A(2) at 15 K showed much larger deviations of deltaB from the average value, which might reflect partial occupancy of atomic sites. An analysis of the anisotropy of ADPs for individual atoms revealed an increase in the isotropy of ADPs with the increase of the temperature from 15 to 60 K. In a separate experiment, a 0.93 A resolution data set was collected from a different crystal of the same complex at 100 K using cold nitrogen as a cryogen. The effects of various errors on the atomic B values were estimated by comparison of the refined models and the temperature-dependent component was inferred. It was found that both decreasing the data redundancy and increasing the resolution cutoff led to an approximately constant increase in atomic B values for well ordered atoms.

  6. Collective Atomic Displacements during Complex Phase Boundary Migration in Solid-Solid Phase Transformations.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Juliana; Harjunmaa, Ari; Terrell, Rye; Drautz, Ralf; Henkelman, Graeme; Rogal, Jutta

    2016-01-22

    The A15 to bcc phase transition is simulated at the atomic scale based on an interatomic potential for molybdenum. The migration of the phase boundary proceeds via long-range collective displacements of entire groups of atoms across the interface. To capture the kinetics of these complex atomic rearrangements over extended time scales we use the adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo approach. An effective barrier of 0.5 eV is determined for the formation of each new bcc layer. This barrier is not associated with any particular atomistic process that governs the dynamics of the phase boundary migration. Instead, the effective layer transformation barrier represents a collective property of the complex potential energy surface. PMID:26849603

  7. Collective Atomic Displacements during Complex Phase Boundary Migration in Solid-Solid Phase Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Juliana; Harjunmaa, Ari; Terrell, Rye; Drautz, Ralf; Henkelman, Graeme; Rogal, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    The A15 to bcc phase transition is simulated at the atomic scale based on an interatomic potential for molybdenum. The migration of the phase boundary proceeds via long-range collective displacements of entire groups of atoms across the interface. To capture the kinetics of these complex atomic rearrangements over extended time scales we use the adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo approach. An effective barrier of 0.5 eV is determined for the formation of each new bcc layer. This barrier is not associated with any particular atomistic process that governs the dynamics of the phase boundary migration. Instead, the effective layer transformation barrier represents a collective property of the complex potential energy surface.

  8. Mechanisms of defect production and atomic mixing in high energy displacement cascades: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Guinan, M.W.

    1991-06-05

    We have performed molecular dynamics computer simulation studies of displacement cascades in Cu at low temperature. For 25 keV recoils we observe the splitting of a cascade into subcascades and show that cascades in Cu may lead to the formation of vacancy and interstitial dislocation loops. We discuss a new mechanism of defect production based on the observation of interstitial prismatic dislocation loop punching from cascades at 10 K. We also show that below the subcascade threshold, atomic mixing in the cascade is recoil-energy dependent and obtain a mixing efficiency that scales as the square root of the primary recoil energy. 44 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Characterizing absolute piezoelectric microelectromechanical system displacement using an atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J. Chapman, S.

    2014-08-14

    Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM) is a popular tool for the study of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials at the nanometer level. Progress in the development of piezoelectric MEMS fabrication is highlighting the need to characterize absolute displacement at the nanometer and Ångstrom scales, something Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) might do but PFM cannot. Absolute displacement is measured by executing a polarization measurement of the ferroelectric or piezoelectric capacitor in question while monitoring the absolute vertical position of the sample surface with a stationary AFM cantilever. Two issues dominate the execution and precision of such a measurement: (1) the small amplitude of the electrical signal from the AFM at the Ångstrom level and (2) calibration of the AFM. The authors have developed a calibration routine and test technique for mitigating the two issues, making it possible to use an atomic force microscope to measure both the movement of a capacitor surface as well as the motion of a micro-machine structure actuated by that capacitor. The theory, procedures, pitfalls, and results of using an AFM for absolute piezoelectric measurement are provided.

  10. Atomic motion from the mean square displacement in a monatomic liquid.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Duane C; De Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Chisolm, Eric D

    2016-05-11

    V-T theory is constructed in the many-body Hamiltonian formulation, and is being developed as a novel approach to liquid dynamics theory. In this theory the liquid atomic motion consists of two contributions, normal mode vibrations in a single representative potential energy valley, and transits, which carry the system across boundaries between valleys. The mean square displacement time correlation function (the MSD) is a direct measure of the atomic motion, and our goal is to determine if the V-T formalism can produce a physically sensible account of this motion. We employ molecular dynamics (MD) data for a system representing liquid Na, and find the motion evolves in three successive time intervals: on the first 'vibrational' interval, the vibrational motion alone gives a highly accurate account of the MD data; on the second 'crossover' interval, the vibrational MSD saturates to a constant while the transit motion builds up from zero; on the third 'random walk' interval, the transit motion produces a purely diffusive random walk of the vibrational equilibrium positions. This motional evolution agrees with, and adds refinement to, the MSD atomic motion as described by current liquid dynamics theories. PMID:27058024

  11. Atomic motion from the mean square displacement in a monatomic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Duane C.; De Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Chisolm, Eric D.

    2016-05-01

    V-T theory is constructed in the many-body Hamiltonian formulation, and is being developed as a novel approach to liquid dynamics theory. In this theory the liquid atomic motion consists of two contributions, normal mode vibrations in a single representative potential energy valley, and transits, which carry the system across boundaries between valleys. The mean square displacement time correlation function (the MSD) is a direct measure of the atomic motion, and our goal is to determine if the V-T formalism can produce a physically sensible account of this motion. We employ molecular dynamics (MD) data for a system representing liquid Na, and find the motion evolves in three successive time intervals: on the first ‘vibrational’ interval, the vibrational motion alone gives a highly accurate account of the MD data; on the second ‘crossover’ interval, the vibrational MSD saturates to a constant while the transit motion builds up from zero; on the third ‘random walk’ interval, the transit motion produces a purely diffusive random walk of the vibrational equilibrium positions. This motional evolution agrees with, and adds refinement to, the MSD atomic motion as described by current liquid dynamics theories.

  12. Large displacement formulation of a three-dimensional beam element with cross-sectional warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, A.; White, D. W.

    1992-09-01

    A displacement-based three-node beam element is formulated for analysis of the large displacement/large rotation response of curved structural components of rectangular cross-section, including the effects of cross-sectional warping due to torsion. Master-slave relationships are derived which facilitate the modeling of eccentric stiffeners in plate and shell structures. Efficient and explicit relationships are developed for transformation between relative through-thickness displacement and global rotational degrees of freedom, between lamina and global coordinate systems, and between master and slave nodes as one composite operation. Simple functions are appended to the basic element displacements to account for cross-sectional warping deformations. The resulting formulation gives predictions which are close to the analytical response of an elastic beam subjected to torsion, yet the added computational expense is relatively small. Additional geometric stiffness terms associated with large rotation effects, which have been overlooked in many conventional formulations, are derived and elucidated. Examples are provided which demonstrate the significance of modeling cross-sectional warping and of incorporating the large rotation geometric stiffness terms in the analysis.

  13. Continuous atomic spectrometric measurement of ambient levels of sulfur dioxide in air by mercury displacement detection

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, G.; Midgley, D.

    1982-08-01

    The analytical atomic spectrometric technique of mercury displacement detection has been adapted so that sulfur dioxide can be determined at natural background levels in ambient air on a continuous basis with a 90% response time of 1-2 min. Sample air is drawn into the reaction vessel containing mercury (I) ion reagent and any sulfur dioxide present reacts to form elemental mercury which is measured, after being swept out of the solution by the same flow of sample air, by a mercury vapor detector. Reagent is continuously pumped through the analyzer and the instrument is calibrated with a permeation tube calibrator. The apparatus has a linear concentration range up to 100 ppB sulfur dioxide; this is much lower than can be obtained with existing commerical instruments. The apparatus is very precise and 6, 11, and 20 ppB sulfur dioxide can be measured with coefficients of variation of 1-2%.

  14. Direct measurement of photo-induced nanoscale surface displacement in solids using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, S. T.; Fonseca, E. J. S.; Jacinto, C.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Rodrigues, T. P.; Malacarne, L. C.

    2015-10-01

    The interaction between light and solid matter causes localized heating and surface displacement in the nanometer scale. The deformed surface can be analyzed by probing the time-dependent intensity of a laser reflected off of the surface using the thermal mirror (TM) method. This method provides quantitative measurements of thermal, optical and mechanical properties of a variety of materials. Here, we propose an alternative method to measure laser-induced surface deformation using atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM is employed to determine the time evolution of the surface deformation and a theoretical model is proposed to determine physical properties of semi-transparent materials. The results are found to be in excellent agreement compared to those obtained using TM.

  15. A spongy graphene based bimorph actuator with ultra-large displacement towards biomimetic application.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Lan, Tian; Wu, Guan; Zhu, Zicai; Chen, Wei

    2014-11-01

    Bimorph actuators, consisting of two layers with asymmetric expansion and generating bending displacement, have been widely researched. Their actuation performances greatly rely on the difference of coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) between the two material layers. Here, by introducing a spongy graphene (sG) paper with a large negative CTE as well as high electrical-to-thermal properties, an electromechanical sG/PDMS bimorph actuator is designed and fabricated, showing an ultra-large bending displacement output under low voltage stimulation (curvature of about 1.2 cm(-1) at 10 V for 3 s), a high displacement-to-length ratio (∼0.79), and vibration motion at AC voltage (up to 10 Hz), which is much larger and faster than that of the other electromechanical bimorph actuators. Based on the sG/PDMS bimorph serving as the "finger", a mechanical gripper is constructed to realize the fast manipulation of the objects under 0.1 Hz square wave voltage stimulation (0-8 V). The designed bimorph actuator coupled with ultra-large bending displacement, low driven voltage, and the ease of fabrication may open up substantial possibilities for the utilization of electromechanical actuators in practical biomimetic device applications. PMID:25220910

  16. Large amplitude free vibrations of Timoshenko beams at higher modes using coupled displacement field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Bhaskar, K.; Meera Saheb, K.

    2015-12-01

    A simple but accurate continuum solution for the shear flexible beam problem using the energy method involves in assuming suitable single term admissible functions for the lateral displacement and total rotation. This leads to two non-linear temporal differential equations in terms of the lateral displacement and the total rotation and are difficult, if not impossible, to solve to obtain the large amplitude fundamental frequencies of beams as a function of the amplitude and slenderness ratios of the vibrating beam. This situation can be avoided if one uses the concept of coupled displacement field where in the fields for lateral displacement and the total rotation are coupled through the static equilibrium equation. In this paper the lateral displacement field is assumed and the field for the total rotation is evaluated through the coupling equation. This approach leads to only one undetermined coefficient which can easily be used in the principle of conservation of total energy of the vibrating beam at a given time, neglecting damping. Finally, through a number of algebraic manipulations, one gets a nonlinear equation of Duffing type which can be solved using any standard method. To demonstrate the simplicity of the method discussed above the problem of large amplitude free vibrations of a uniform shear flexible hinged beam at higher modes with ends immovable to move axially has been solved. The numerical results obtained from the present formulation are in very good agreement with those obtained through finite element and other continuum methods for the fundamental mode, thus demonstrating the efficacy of the proposed method. Also some interesting observations are made with variation of frequency Vs amplitude at different modes.

  17. Large Out-of-Plane Displacement Bistable Electromagnetic Microswitch on a Single Wafer

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xiaodan; Dai, Xuhan; Huang, Yi; Ding, Guifu; Zhao, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a bistable microswitch fully batch-fabricated on a single glass wafer, comprising of a microactuator, a signal transformer, a microspring and a permanent magnet. The bistable mechanism of the microswitch with large displacement of 160 μm depends on the balance of the magnetic force and elastic force. Both the magnetic force and elastic force were optimized by finite-element simulation to predict the reliable of the device. The prototype was fabricated and characterized. By utilizing thick laminated photoresist sacrificial layer, the large displacement was obtained to ensure the insulation of the microswitch. The testing results show that the microswitch realized the bistable mechanism at a 3–5 V input voltage and closed in 0.96 ms, which verified the simulation. PMID:27164107

  18. Large Out-of-Plane Displacement Bistable Electromagnetic Microswitch on a Single Wafer.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xiaodan; Dai, Xuhan; Huang, Yi; Ding, Guifu; Zhao, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a bistable microswitch fully batch-fabricated on a single glass wafer, comprising of a microactuator, a signal transformer, a microspring and a permanent magnet. The bistable mechanism of the microswitch with large displacement of 160 μm depends on the balance of the magnetic force and elastic force. Both the magnetic force and elastic force were optimized by finite-element simulation to predict the reliable of the device. The prototype was fabricated and characterized. By utilizing thick laminated photoresist sacrificial layer, the large displacement was obtained to ensure the insulation of the microswitch. The testing results show that the microswitch realized the bistable mechanism at a 3-5 V input voltage and closed in 0.96 ms, which verified the simulation. PMID:27164107

  19. Calculated sputtering and atomic displacement cross-sections for applications to medium voltage analytical electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, C.R.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1987-08-01

    The development of medium voltage electron microscopes having high brightness electron sources and ultra-high vacuum environments has been anticipated by the microscopy community now for several years. The advantages of such a configuration have been discussed to great lengths, while the potential disadvantages have for the most part been neglected. The most detrimental of these relative to microcharacterization are the effects of electron sputtering and atomic displacement to the local specimen composition. These effects have in the past been considered mainly in the high voltage electron microscope regime and generally were ignored in lower voltage instruments. Recent experimental measurements have shown that the effects of electron sputtering as well as radiation induced segregation can be observed in conventional transmission electron microscopes. It is, therefore, important to determine at what point the effects will begin to manifest themselves in the new generation of medium voltage analytical electron microscopes. In this manuscript we present new calculations which allow the individual experimentalist to determine the potential threshold levels for a particular elemental system and thus avoid the dangers of introducing artifacts during microanalysis. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Large Displacement in Relaxor Ferroelectric Terpolymer Blend Derived Actuators Using Al Electrode for Braille Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, S. G.; Chen, X.; Levard, T.; Diglio, P. J.; Gorny, L. J.; Rahn, C. D.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2015-06-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) based polymers are attractive for applications for artificial muscles, high energy density storage devices etc. Recently these polymers have been found great potential for being used as actuators for refreshable full-page Braille displays for visually impaired people in terms of light weight, miniaturized size, and larger displacement, compared with currently used lead zirconate titanate ceramic actuators. The applied voltages of published polymer actuators, however, cannot be reduced to meet the requirements of using city power. Here, we report the polymer actuator generating quite large displacement and blocking force at a voltage close to the city power. Our embodiments also show good self-healing performance and disuse of lead-containing material, which makes the Braille device safer, more reliable and more environment-friendly.

  1. Large Displacement in Relaxor Ferroelectric Terpolymer Blend Derived Actuators Using Al Electrode for Braille Displays

    PubMed Central

    Lu, S. G.; Chen, X.; Levard, T.; Diglio, P. J.; Gorny, L. J.; Rahn, C. D.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) based polymers are attractive for applications for artificial muscles, high energy density storage devices etc. Recently these polymers have been found great potential for being used as actuators for refreshable full-page Braille displays for visually impaired people in terms of light weight, miniaturized size, and larger displacement, compared with currently used lead zirconate titanate ceramic actuators. The applied voltages of published polymer actuators, however, cannot be reduced to meet the requirements of using city power. Here, we report the polymer actuator generating quite large displacement and blocking force at a voltage close to the city power. Our embodiments also show good self-healing performance and disuse of lead-containing material, which makes the Braille device safer, more reliable and more environment-friendly. PMID:26079628

  2. Large Displacement in Relaxor Ferroelectric Terpolymer Blend Derived Actuators Using Al Electrode for Braille Displays.

    PubMed

    Lu, S G; Chen, X; Levard, T; Diglio, P J; Gorny, L J; Rahn, C D; Zhang, Q M

    2015-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) based polymers are attractive for applications for artificial muscles, high energy density storage devices etc. Recently these polymers have been found great potential for being used as actuators for refreshable full-page Braille displays for visually impaired people in terms of light weight, miniaturized size, and larger displacement, compared with currently used lead zirconate titanate ceramic actuators. The applied voltages of published polymer actuators, however, cannot be reduced to meet the requirements of using city power. Here, we report the polymer actuator generating quite large displacement and blocking force at a voltage close to the city power. Our embodiments also show good self-healing performance and disuse of lead-containing material, which makes the Braille device safer, more reliable and more environment-friendly. PMID:26079628

  3. Large-momentum-transfer Bragg interferometer with strontium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoni, T.; Zhang, X.; Del Aguila, R.; Salvi, L.; Poli, N.; Tino, G. M.

    2015-11-01

    We report on an atom interferometer based on Bragg diffraction in a fountain of alkaline-earth-metal atoms, namely 88Sr. We demonstrate large momentum transfer to the atoms up to eight photon recoils and the use of the interferometer as a gravimeter with a sensitivity δ g /g =4 ×10-8 . Thanks to the special characteristics of strontium atoms for precision measurements, this result introduces alternate possibilities for experiments in fundamental and applied physics.

  4. A thermo-hydraulic wax actuation system for high force and large displacement applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Craig S.; Loveday, Philip W.

    2007-04-01

    An actuation system, making use of paraffin wax as a smart material, has been developed for high force, large displacement applications. Wax actuators exploit the significant volumetric expansion (typically between 10 and 15%) experienced during the solid to liquid phase change of paraffin wax. When contained, this expansion results in considerable hydrostatic pressure. Traditionally, wax actuators are designed such that the wax acts directly, via a compliant seal, on an output device such as a piston. We propose using an additional intermediate (passive) fluid to transmit pressure to a separate remote actuator. In essence, we propose a solid-state 'pump' for hydraulic actuation, with no moving parts and which requires no maintenance. The pump makes use of paraffin wax pellets, submerged in hydraulic fluid. The pellets are encapsulated in silicone rubber to prevent contamination of the hydraulic fluid. Upon melting, the volumetric expansion is used to displace the hydraulic working fluid, which is in turn used to drive a conventional hydraulic actuator. Making use of only 65g of paraffin wax, heated from room temperature to 80ºC, the pump generated a blocked pressure of 45MPa and displaced 15.7ml of hydraulic fluid. The pump was used to drive a commercial actuator, and achieved a free stroke of 24.4mm and a blocked force of approximately 29kN.

  5. Electrooptic converter to control linear displacements of the large structures of the buildings and facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilev, Aleksandr S.; Konyakhin, Igor A.; Timofeev, Alexander N.; Lashmanov, Oleg U.; Molev, Fedor V.

    2015-05-01

    The paper analyzes the construction matters and metrological parameters of the electrooptic converter to control linear displacements of the large structures of the buildings and facilities. The converter includes the base module, the processing module and a set of the reference marks. The base module is the main unit of the system, it includes the receiving optical system and the CMOS photodetector array that realizes the instrument coordinate system that controls the mark coordinates in the space. The methods of the frame-to-frame difference, adaptive threshold filtration, binarization and objects search by the tied areas to detect the marks against accidental contrast background is the basis of the algorithm. The entire algorithm is performed during one image reading stage and is based on the FPGA. The developed and manufactured converter experimental model was tested in laboratory conditions at the metrological bench at the distance between the base module and the mark 50±0.2 m. The static characteristic was read during the experiment of the reference mark displacement at the pitch of 5 mm in the horizontal and vertical directions for the displacement range 400 mm. The converter experimental model error not exceeding ±0.5 mm was obtained in the result of the experiment.

  6. Generation of decoherence-free displaced squeezed states of radiation fields and a squeezed reservoir for atoms in cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werlang, T.; Guzmán, R.; Prado, F. O.; Villas-Bôas, C. J.

    2008-09-01

    We present a way to engineer an effective anti-Jaynes-Cumming and a Jaynes-Cumming interaction between an atomic system and a single cavity mode and show how to employ it in reservoir engineering processes. To construct the effective Hamiltonian, we analyze the interaction of an atomic system in a Λ configuration, driven by classical fields, with a single cavity mode. With this interaction, we first show how to generate a decoherence-free displaced squeezed state for the cavity field. In our scheme, an atomic beam works as a reservoir for the radiation field trapped inside the cavity, as employed recently by S. Pielawa [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 240401 (2007)] to generate an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entangled radiation state in high- Q resonators. In our scheme, all the atoms have to be prepared in the ground state and, as in the cited article, neither atomic detection nor precise interaction times between the atoms and the cavity mode are required. From this same interaction, we can also generate an ideal squeezed reservoir for atomic systems. For this purpose we have to assume, in addition to the engineered atom-field interaction, a strong decay of the cavity field (i.e., the cavity decay must be much stronger than the effective atom-field coupling). With this scheme, some interesting effects in the dynamics of an atom in a squeezed reservoir could be tested.

  7. On 'large-scale' stable fiber displacement during interfacial failure in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrich, R. R.; Koss, D. A.; Hellmann, J. R.; Kallas, M. N.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results are presented to show that interfacial failure in sapphire-reinforced niobium is characterized by 'large-scale' (5-15 microns) plasticity-controlled fiber displacements occurring under increasing loads. The results are based on the responses during thin-slice fiber pushout tests wherein the fiber is supported over a hole twice the fiber diameter. The results describe an interfacial failure process that should also occur near fiber ends during pullout when a fiber is well-bonded to a soft, ductile matrix, such that eventual failure occurs by shear within the matrix near the interface.

  8. Large-Deformation Displacement Transfer Functions for Shape Predictions of Highly Flexible Slender Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2013-01-01

    Large deformation displacement transfer functions were formulated for deformed shape predictions of highly flexible slender structures like aircraft wings. In the formulation, the embedded beam (depth wise cross section of structure along the surface strain sensing line) was first evenly discretized into multiple small domains, with surface strain sensing stations located at the domain junctures. Thus, the surface strain (bending strains) variation within each domain could be expressed with linear of nonlinear function. Such piecewise approach enabled piecewise integrations of the embedded beam curvature equations [classical (Eulerian), physical (Lagrangian), and shifted curvature equations] to yield closed form slope and deflection equations in recursive forms.

  9. Effect of mass of the primary knock-on atom on displacement cascade debris in alpha-iron

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, Calder F; Bacon, David J; Barashev, Aleksandr; Osetskiy, Yury N

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of displacement cascades created in -iron (Fe) by primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) with energy from 5 to 20 keV and mass chosen to represent C, Fe and Bi. Molecular Bi2 has also been simulated using two Bi PKAs, and PKA-Fe interaction potential has also been varied. Four effects are reported. First, the PKA mass has a major effect on cascade damage while the interaction potential has little if any. Second, the total number of point defects produced in a cascade decreases with increasing PKA mass. This fact is not accounted for in models used conventionally for estimating damage. Third, interstitial loops of <111> type and both vacancy and interstitial loops of <100> type are formed, the latter being observed in MD simulation for the first time. The probability of <100> loop appearance increases with increasing PKA mass as well as energy. Finally, there is a correlation between production of large vacancy and interstitial clusters in the same cascade.

  10. Evidence for large-scale effects of competition: niche displacement in Canada lynx and bobcat

    PubMed Central

    Peers, Michael J. L.; Thornton, Daniel H.; Murray, Dennis L.

    2013-01-01

    Determining the patterns, causes and consequences of character displacement is central to our understanding of competition in ecological communities. However, the majority of competition research has occurred over small spatial extents or focused on fine-scale differences in morphology or behaviour. The effects of competition on broad-scale distribution and niche characteristics of species remain poorly understood but critically important. Using range-wide species distribution models, we evaluated whether Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) or bobcat (Lynx rufus) were displaced in regions of sympatry. Consistent with our prediction, we found that lynx niches were less similar to those of bobcat in areas of sympatry versus allopatry, with a stronger reliance on snow cover driving lynx niche divergence in the sympatric zone. By contrast, bobcat increased niche breadth in zones of sympatry, and bobcat niches were equally similar to those of lynx in zones of sympatry and allopatry. These findings suggest that competitively disadvantaged species avoid competition at large scales by restricting their niche to highly suitable conditions, while superior competitors expand the diversity of environments used. Our results indicate that competition can manifest within climatic niche space across species’ ranges, highlighting the importance of biotic interactions occurring at large spatial scales on niche dynamics. PMID:24174116

  11. Exploiting Universality in Atoms with Large Scattering Lengths

    SciTech Connect

    Braaten, Eric

    2012-05-31

    The focus of this research project was atoms with scattering lengths that are large compared to the range of their interactions and which therefore exhibit universal behavior at sufficiently low energies. Recent dramatic advances in cooling atoms and in manipulating their scattering lengths have made this phenomenon of practical importance for controlling ultracold atoms and molecules. This research project was aimed at developing a systematically improvable method for calculating few-body observables for atoms with large scattering lengths starting from the universal results as a first approximation. Significant progress towards this goal was made during the five years of the project.

  12. A metrological large range atomic force microscope with improved performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Gaoliang; Wolff, Helmut; Pohlenz, Frank; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-04-15

    A metrological large range atomic force microscope (Met. LR-AFM) has been set up and improved over the past years at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Being designed as a scanning sample type instrument, the sample is moved in three dimensions by a mechanical ball bearing stage in combination with a compact z-piezostage. Its topography is detected by a position-stationary AFM head. The sample displacement is measured by three embedded miniature homodyne interferometers in the x, y, and z directions. The AFM head is aligned in such a way that its cantilever tip is positioned on the sample surface at the intersection point of the three interferometer measurement beams for satisfying the Abbe measurement principle. In this paper, further improvements of the Met. LR-AFM are reported. A new AFM head using the beam deflection principle has been developed to reduce the influence of parasitic optical interference phenomena. Furthermore, an off-line Heydemann correction method has been applied to reduce the inherent interferometer nonlinearities to less than 0.3 nm (p-v). Versatile scanning functions, for example, radial scanning or local AFM measurement functions, have been implemented to optimize the measurement process. The measurement software is also improved and allows comfortable operations of the instrument via graphical user interface or script-based command sets. The improved Met. LR-AFM is capable of measuring, for instance, the step height, lateral pitch, line width, nanoroughness, and other geometrical parameters of nanostructures. Calibration results of a one-dimensional grating and a set of film thickness standards are demonstrated, showing the excellent metrological performance of the instrument.

  13. Giant atomic displacement at a magnetic phase transition in metastable Mn3O4

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Shigeto; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F; Shapiro, Max C; Molaison, Jamie J; Pradhan, Neelam; Guthrie, Malcolm; Tulk, Christopher A; Fisher, Ian R; Mao, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    We present x-ray, neutron scattering, and heat capacity data that reveal a coupled first-order magnetic and structural phase transition of the metastable mixed-valence postspinel compound Mn3O4 at 210 K. Powder neutron diffraction measurements reveal a magnetic structure in which Mn3+ spins align antiferromagnetically along the edge-sharing a axis, with a magnetic propagation vector k = [1/2,0,0]. In contrast, the Mn2+ spins, which are geometrically frustrated, do not order until a much lower temperature. Although the Mn2+ spins do not directly participate in the magnetic phase transition at 210 K, structural refinements reveal a large atomic shift at this phase transition, corresponding to a physical motion of approximately 0.25 angstrom, even though the crystal symmetry remains unchanged. This "giant" response is due to the coupled effect of built-in strain in the metastable postspinel structure with the orbital realignment of the Mn3+ ion.

  14. Long-delayed bright dancing sprite with large Horizontal displacement from its parent flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Lu, Gaopeng; Lee, Li-Jou; Feng, Guili

    2015-07-01

    We reported in this paper the observation of a very bright long-delayed dancing sprite with distinct horizontal displacement from its parent stroke. The dancing sprite lasted only 60 ms, and the morphology consisted of three fields with two slim dim sprite elements in the first two fields and a very bright large element in the third field, different from other observations where the dancing sprites usually contained multiple elements over a longer time interval, and the sprite shape and brightness in the video field are often similar to the previous fields. The bright sprite was displaced at least 38 km from its parent cloud-to-ground (CG) stroke and occurred over comparatively higher cloud top region. The parent flash of this compact dancing sprite was of positive polarity, with only one return stroke (approximately +24 kA) and obvious continuing current process, and the charge moment change of stroke was small (barely above the threshold for sprite production). All the sprite elements occurred during the continuing current stage, and the bright long-delayed sprite element induced a considerable current pulse. The dancing feature of this sprite may be linked to the electrical charge structure, dynamics and microphysics of parent storm, and the inferred development of parent CG flash was consistent with previous very high-frequency (VHF) observations of lightning in the same region.

  15. A large outbreak of shigellosis commencing in an internally displaced population, Papua New Guinea, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Benny, Edwin; Mesere, Kelly; Pavlin, Boris I; Yakam, Logan; Ford, Rebecca; Yoannes, Mition; Kisa, Debbie; Abdad, Mohammad Y; Menda, Lincoln; Greenhill, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate a large outbreak of shigellosis in Papua New Guinea that began in a camp for internally displaced persons before spreading throughout the general community. Methods Outbreak mitigation strategies were implemented in the affected area to curtail the spread of the disease. Data were collected from the surveillance system and analysed by time, place and person. Rectal swab samples were tested by standard culture methods and real-time polymerase chain reaction to determine the etiology of the outbreak. Results Laboratory analysis at two independent institutions established that the outbreak was caused by Shigella sp., with one strain further characterized as Shigella flexneri serotype 2. Approximately 1200 suspected cases of shigellosis were reported in a two-month period from two townships in Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea. The outbreak resulted in at least five deaths, all in young children. Discussion This outbreak of shigellosis highlights the threat of enteric diseases to vulnerable populations such as internally displaced persons in Papua New Guinea, as has been observed in other global settings. PMID:25648967

  16. A study of temperature dependent local atomic displacements in a Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 superconductor.

    PubMed

    Hacisalihoglu, M Y; Paris, E; Joseph, B; Simonelli, L; Sato, T J; Mizokawa, T; Saini, N L

    2016-03-23

    We have studied the local structure of a Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 superconductor using temperature dependent extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements. Polarized EXAFS at the Fe K-edge on an optimally doped (x = 0.06) single crystal has permitted us to determine atomic displacements across the superconducting transition temperature (Tc). The Fe-As bondlength hardly shows any change with temperature; however, the Fe-Fe sublattice reveals a sharp anomaly across Tc, indicated by a significant drop in mean square relative displacements, similar to the one known for cuprates and A15-type superconductors. We have also found a large atomic disorder around the substituted Co, revealed by polarized Co K-edge EXAFS measurements. The Co-Fe/Co bonds are more flexible than the Fe-Fe bonds with the As-height in Co-containing tetrahedra being larger than the one in FeAs4. The results suggest that the local Fe-Fe bondlength fluctuations and the atomic disorder in this sub-lattice should have some important role in the superconductivity of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 pnictides. PMID:26966734

  17. Displaced linear slope and fluxon dynamics in large, one-dimensional Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, S.; Gambardella, U.

    1986-02-01

    A displaced linear slope (DLS) appears under particular conditions in the current-voltage characteristic of large Josephson tunnel junctions. The significant features that enable one to distinguish the DLS from other structures in the I--V characteristic are discussed. The experimental magnetic field behavior and the temperature dependence of the DLS in different geometrical configuration (cross, in-line, and overlap) are reported; a very consistent behavior has been found for all geometries. Different dynamical states of the junction as a function of both the external magnetic field and the bias current are analyzed. Possible explanations of the DLS in terms of the motion of flux quanta inside the junction are discussed.

  18. Large displacement haptic stimulus actuator using piezoelectric pump for wearable devices.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Taisuke; Izumi, Shintaro; Masaki, Kana; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Maenaka, Kazusuke; Yoshimoto, Masahiko

    2015-08-01

    Recently, given Japan's aging society background, wearable healthcare devices have increasingly attracted attention. Many devices have been developed, but most devices have only a sensing function. To expand the application area of wearable healthcare devices, an interactive communication function with the human body is required using an actuator. For example, a device must be useful for medication assistance, predictive alerts of a disease such as arrhythmia, and exercise. In this work, a haptic stimulus actuator using a piezoelectric pump is proposed to realize a large displacement in wearable devices. The proposed actuator drives tactile sensation of the human body. The measurement results obtained using a sensory examination demonstrate that the proposed actuator can generate sufficient stimuli even if adhered to the chest, which has fewer tactile receptors than either the fingertip or wrist. PMID:26736475

  19. Charge-screening role of c -axis atomic displacements in YBa2Cu3O6 +x and related superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Božin, E. S.; Huq, A.; Shen, Bing; Claus, H.; Kwok, W. K.; Tranquada, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    The importance of charge reservoir layers for supplying holes to the CuO2 planes of cuprate superconductors has long been recognized. Less attention has been paid to the screening of the charge transfer by the intervening ionic layers. We address this issue in the case of YBa2Cu3O6 +x , where CuO chains supply the holes for the planes. We present a simple dielectric-screening model that gives a linear correlation between the relative displacements of ions along the c axis, determined by neutron powder diffraction, and the hole density of the planes. Applying this model to the temperature-dependent shifts of ions along the c axis, we infer a charge transfer of 5-10% of the hole density from the planes to the chains on warming from the superconducting transition to room temperature. Given the significant coupling of c -axis displacements to the average charge density, we point out the relevance of local displacements for screening charge modulations and note recent evidence for dynamic screening of in-plane quasiparticles. This line of argument leads us to a simple model for atomic displacements and charge modulation that is consistent with images from scanning-tunneling microscopy for underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ .

  20. Large spin relaxation rates in trapped submerged-shell atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, Colin B.; Au, Yat Shan; Doret, S. Charles; Doyle, John M.; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2010-01-15

    Spin relaxation due to atom-atom collisions is measured for magnetically trapped erbium and thulium atoms at a temperature near 500 mK. The rate constants for Er-Er and Tm-Tm collisions are 3.0x10{sup -10} and 1.1x10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}, respectively, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than those observed for highly magnetic S-state atoms. This is strong evidence for an additional, dominant, spin relaxation mechanism, electronic interaction anisotropy, in collisions between these 'submerged-shell,' Lnot =0 atoms. These large spin relaxation rates imply that evaporative cooling of these atoms in a magnetic trap will be highly inefficient.

  1. Large atom number Bose-Einstein condensate machines

    SciTech Connect

    Streed, Erik W.; Chikkatur, Ananth P.; Gustavson, Todd L.; Boyd, Micah; Torii, Yoshio; Schneble, Dominik; Campbell, Gretchen K.; Pritchard, David E.; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2006-02-15

    We describe experimental setups for producing large Bose-Einstein condensates of {sup 23}Na and {sup 87}Rb. In both, a high-flux thermal atomic beam is decelerated by a Zeeman slower and is then captured and cooled in a magneto-optical trap. The atoms are then transferred into a cloverleaf-style Ioffe-Pritchard magnetic trap and cooled to quantum degeneracy with radio-frequency-induced forced evaporation. Typical condensates contain 20x10{sup 6} atoms. We discuss the similarities and differences between the techniques used for producing large {sup 87}Rb and {sup 23}Na condensates in the context of nearly identical setups.

  2. Fast edge-preserving PatchMatch for large displacement optical flow.

    PubMed

    Bao, Linchao; Yang, Qingxiong; Jin, Hailin

    2014-12-01

    The speed of optical flow algorithm is crucial for many video editing tasks such as slow motion synthesis, selection propagation, tone adjustment propagation, and so on. Variational coarse-to-fine optical flow algorithms can generally produce high-quality results but cannot fulfil the speed requirement of many practical applications. Besides, large motions in real-world videos also pose a difficult problem to coarse-to-fine variational approaches. We, in this paper, present a fast optical flow algorithm that can handle large displacement motions. Our algorithm is inspired by recent successes of local methods in visual correspondence searching as well as approximate nearest neighbor field algorithms. The main novelty is a fast randomized edge-preserving approximate nearest neighbor field algorithm, which propagates self-similarity patterns in addition to offsets. Experimental results on public optical flow benchmarks show that our method is significantly faster than state-of-the-art methods without compromising on quality, especially when scenes contain large motions. Finally, we show some demo applications by applying our technique into real-world video editing tasks. PMID:25252282

  3. Solvers for large-displacement fluid structure interaction problems: segregated versus monolithic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Matthias; Hazel, Andrew L.; Boyle, Jonathan

    2008-12-01

    We compare the relative performance of monolithic and segregated (partitioned) solvers for large- displacement fluid structure interaction (FSI) problems within the framework of oomph-lib, the object-oriented multi-physics finite-element library, available as open-source software at http://www.oomph-lib.org . Monolithic solvers are widely acknowledged to be more robust than their segregated counterparts, but are believed to be too expensive for use in large-scale problems. We demonstrate that monolithic solvers are competitive even for problems in which the fluid solid coupling is weak and, hence, the segregated solvers converge within a moderate number of iterations. The efficient monolithic solution of large-scale FSI problems requires the development of preconditioners for the iterative solution of the linear systems that arise during the solution of the monolithically coupled fluid and solid equations by Newton’s method. We demonstrate that recent improvements to oomph-lib’s FSI preconditioner result in mesh-independent convergence rates under uniform and non-uniform (adaptive) mesh refinement, and explore its performance in a number of two- and three-dimensional test problems involving the interaction of finite-Reynolds-number flows with shell and beam structures, as well as finite-thickness solids.

  4. Evolution of Rupture Style with Accumulation of Fault Displacement during Large-scale Biaxial Friction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Yamashita, F.; Mizoguchi, K.; Takizawa, S.; Kawakata, H.

    2014-12-01

    We report results with Indian Gabbro (Vs=3.62km/s) that are obtained from a series of large-scale biaxial friction experiments conducted at NIED. We focus on strain gage array data of stick-slip events loaded with 0.01mm/s and under 6.7MPa normal stress, and find the following: (1) During early stage when the contact surface is relatively intact, ruptures mainly behave as slow-slip events, with a transition from extremely slow slip (~ 10 m/s) to normal slow slip (~ 100 m/s). (2) With the accumulation of total fault displacement, grooves indicative of locally high normal-stress patches (i.e. asperities) are generated along the sliding surface, which are primarily elongated along the loading direction and are associated with gouge formation. On the other hand, the rest part of the surface continues being polished, indicated by a contrast in light reflectivity with respect to the initial level. At this stage, rupture speeds start to increase but are still well below the shear wave speed (~ 1/4Vs). (3) After long enough total fault displacement (> 500mm), grooves and gouges of a sufficient amount are generated. The following ruptures then show a classic behavior as documented by Ohnaka (2000), which composes of a quasi-static phase, an accelerating phase, and an unstable propagation phase. Although the terminal propagation speed usually reaches a level comparable to the shear wave speed, there is a significant variability for the earlier phases among different events, suggesting that those earlier phases are more sensitive to the evolving local fault structure and/or stress heterogeneity. Further investigation reveals that fault properties (e.g. grooves and gouges) as a function of the accumulated displacement can influence both the macroscopic and the local strain drop, which are most-likely responsible for the evolution of rupture behavior under the same macroscopic loading conditions. We aim to quantify this relation in a continued study.

  5. A novel large displacement electrostatic actuator: pre-stress comb-drive actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, J. C.; Lin, Y. J.

    2005-09-01

    This investigation proposes a novel large vertical displacement electrostatic actuator, called the pre-stress comb-drive actuator (PCA), which exhibits no pull-in and no hysteresis characteristics. The proposed PCA consists of a set of comb fingers fabricated along the composite beam and substrate. One end of the composite beam is clamped to the anchor, whereas the other end is elevated vertically by the residual stress. The actuation occurs when the electrostatic force, induced by the fringe effect, pulls the composite beam downward to the substrate. A post-heat treatment process was employed to increase the initial lift height of the PCA to obtain a large actuation stroke. A mathematical model, based on a newly developed modeling approach, is introduced to estimate the static characteristic of the PCA. A PCA was fabricated using the PolyMUMPs process based on the proposed design concept. Following packaging and applying a post-heat treatment process, a 110 µm initial tip height and a 90 µm vertical motion range were achieved. Neither pull-in nor hysteresis was observed. The simulation results were closely matched with the observations. This work also studies the frequency response and measurement of the maximum vibration of the PCA.

  6. A versatile MEMS bimorph actuator with large vertical displacement and high resolution: Design and fabrication process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangra, Aarushee; Maninder, K.; Soni, Shilpi; Rangra, K. J.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents design, simulation results and envisaged fabrication process for a versatile MEMS bimorph actuator with large out of plane displacement and high resolution. A comparative study of mechanical, thermal and electrical response of the micro-actuator is presented by using two well-known MEMS simulation tools. The bimorph structure measuring 700 × 1280 mm2 is fully integrable with CMOS fabrication process. It is indented for tunable filter applications where the precise vertical motion of the payload, the top metallic electrode anchored rigidly to bimorph `springs' spans the vertical range of 250-300 microns with submicron resolution. Each bimorph spring resembles a hair pin structure and is composed of materials with large difference in thermal expansion coefficients e.g. electroplated gold and polysilicon for optimal out-of-the plane deflection. The novel structure can also be configured for analog micro-mirror based optical and IR spectroscopy applications by controlling the actuation bias and top electrode surface parameters.

  7. Multiple Displacement Amplification Enables Large-Scale Clonal Analysis following Retroviral Gene Therapy▿

    PubMed Central

    Bleier, S.; Maier, P.; Allgayer, H.; Wenz, F.; Zeller, W. J.; Fruehauf, S.; Laufs, S.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the fate of retrovirally transduced cells after transplantation is often hampered by the scarcity of available DNA. We evaluated a promising method for whole-genome amplification, called multiple displacement amplification (MDA), with respect to even and accurate representation of retrovirally transduced genomic DNA. We proved that MDA is a suitable method to subsequently quantify engraftment efficiencies by quantitative real-time PCR by analyzing retrovirally transduced DNA in a background of untransduced DNA and retroviral integrations found in primary material from a retroviral transplantation model. The portion of these retroviral integrations in the amplified samples was 1.02-fold (range 0.2, to 2.1-fold) the portion determined in the original genomic DNA. Integration site analysis by ligation-mediated PCR (LM-PCR) is essential for the detection of retroviral integrations. The combination of MDA and LM-PCR showed an increase in the sensitivity of integration site analysis, as a specific integration site could be detected in a background of untransduced DNA, while the transduced DNA made up only 0.001%. These results show for the first time that MDA enables large-scale sensitive detection and reliable quantification of retrovirally transduced human genomic DNA and therefore facilitates follow-up analysis in gene therapy studies even from the smallest amounts of starting material. PMID:18077708

  8. Subpixelic Measurement of Large 1D Displacements: Principle, Processing Algorithms, Performances and Software

    PubMed Central

    Guelpa, Valérian; Laurent, Guillaume J.; Sandoz, Patrick; Zea, July Galeano; Clévy, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a visual measurement method able to sense 1D rigid body displacements with very high resolutions, large ranges and high processing rates. Sub-pixelic resolution is obtained thanks to a structured pattern placed on the target. The pattern is made of twin periodic grids with slightly different periods. The periodic frames are suited for Fourier-like phase calculations—leading to high resolution—while the period difference allows the removal of phase ambiguity and thus a high range-to-resolution ratio. The paper presents the measurement principle as well as the processing algorithms (source files are provided as supplementary materials). The theoretical and experimental performances are also discussed. The processing time is around 3 μs for a line of 780 pixels, which means that the measurement rate is mostly limited by the image acquisition frame rate. A 3-σ repeatability of 5 nm is experimentally demonstrated which has to be compared with the 168 μm measurement range. PMID:24625736

  9. An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation for solving moving boundary problems with large displacements and rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erzincanli, Belkis; Sahin, Mehmet

    2013-12-01

    An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation based on the unstructured finite volume method is proposed for solving moving boundary problems with large displacements and rotations. The numerical method is based on the side-centered arrangement of the primitive variables that does not require any ad-hoc modifications in order to enhance pressure coupling. The continuity equation is satisfied within each element at machine precision and the summation of the continuity equations can be exactly reduced to the domain boundary, which is important for the global mass conservation. A special attention is given to construct an ALE algorithm obeying the discrete geometric conservation law (DGCL). The mesh deformation algorithm is based on the indirect Radial Basis Function (RBF) algorithm at each time level while avoiding remeshing in order to enhance numerical robustness. For the parallel solution of resulting large-scale algebraic equations in a fully coupled form, a matrix factorization is introduced similar to that of the projection method for the whole system and the parallel algebraic multigrid solver BoomerAMG is used for the scaled discrete Laplacian provided by the HYPRE library which we access through the PETSc library. The present numerical algorithm is initially validated for the decaying Taylor-Green vortex flow, the flow past an oscillating circular cylinder in a channel and the flow induced by an oscillating sphere in a cubic cavity. Then the numerical algorithm is applied to the numerical simulation of flow field around a pair of flapping Drosophila wings in hover flight. The time variation of the Eulerian coherent structures in the near wake is shown along with the aerodynamic loads.

  10. Dynamic displacement measurement of large-scale structures based on the Lucas-Kanade template tracking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jie; Zhu, Chang`an

    2016-01-01

    The development of optics and computer technologies enables the application of the vision-based technique that uses digital cameras to the displacement measurement of large-scale structures. Compared with traditional contact measurements, vision-based technique allows for remote measurement, has a non-intrusive characteristic, and does not necessitate mass introduction. In this study, a high-speed camera system is developed to complete the displacement measurement in real time. The system consists of a high-speed camera and a notebook computer. The high-speed camera can capture images at a speed of hundreds of frames per second. To process the captured images in computer, the Lucas-Kanade template tracking algorithm in the field of computer vision is introduced. Additionally, a modified inverse compositional algorithm is proposed to reduce the computing time of the original algorithm and improve the efficiency further. The modified algorithm can rapidly accomplish one displacement extraction within 1 ms without having to install any pre-designed target panel onto the structures in advance. The accuracy and the efficiency of the system in the remote measurement of dynamic displacement are demonstrated in the experiments on motion platform and sound barrier on suspension viaduct. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can extract accurate displacement signal and accomplish the vibration measurement of large-scale structures.

  11. Discordant paleomagnetic poles from the Canadian Coast Plutonic Complex: Regional tilt rather than large-scale displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, R.F.; Gehrels, G.E.; McClelland, W.C. ); May, S.R.; Klepacki, D. )

    1989-08-01

    Stratigraphic, petrologic, and isotopic data indicate that parts of the Coast Plutonic Complex and the North Cascade Range have been tilted northeast-side-up by angles of {approximately}30{degree} about north-northwest-trending axes. These tilts can account for discordant paleomagnetic directions observed in mid-Cretaceous plutons from these regions without large-scale displacement relative to North America.

  12. Subradiance in a Large Cloud of Cold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerin, William; Araújo, Michelle O.; Kaiser, Robin

    2016-02-01

    Since Dicke's seminal paper on coherence in spontaneous radiation by atomic ensembles, superradiance has been extensively studied. Subradiance, on the contrary, has remained elusive, mainly because subradiant states are weakly coupled to the environment and are very sensitive to nonradiative decoherence processes. Here, we report the experimental observation of subradiance in an extended and dilute cold-atom sample containing a large number of particles. We use a far detuned laser to avoid multiple scattering and observe the temporal decay after a sudden switch-off of the laser beam. After the fast decay of most of the fluorescence, we detect a very slow decay, with time constants as long as 100 times the natural lifetime of the excited state of individual atoms. This subradiant time constant scales linearly with the cooperativity parameter, corresponding to the on-resonance optical depth of the sample, and is independent of the laser detuning, as expected from a coupled-dipole model.

  13. Atomic-Scale Simulation of Defect Cluster Formation in High-Energy Displacement Cascades in Zirconium.

    SciTech Connect

    Voskoboinikov, Roman E; Osetskiy, Yury N; Bacon, David J

    2006-01-01

    A systematic study of damage in high-energy cascades in Zr with primary knock-on-atom (PKA) energy up to 25 keV has been carried out by molecular dynamics (MD) over a temperature range from 100-600 K. The high number of simulations for each condition of temperature and energy has revealed the wide variety of defect clusters that can be created in cascades. Mobile or sessile, two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) clusters of both vacancy and interstitial type can be formed. The population statistics of clusters of each type and the fraction of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIA) in clusters, were obtained, and their dependence on the temperature and PKA energy were investigated. Both vacancy and SIA clusters can be mobile. However, depending on their type, self-interstitial clusters exhibit one-dimensional, planar, or three-dimensional motions, whereas vacancy clusters of only one type can glide in one dimension only. We have also performed separate MD simulations of some SIA and vacancy clusters to study their thermal stability and possible transformations.

  14. One-step displacement dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the selective determination of methylmercury in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Liang, Pei; Kang, Caiyan; Mo, Yajun

    2016-03-01

    A novel method for the selective determination of methylmercury (MeHg) was developed by one-step displacement dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (D-DLLME) coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. In the proposed method, Cu(II) reacted with diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) to form Cu-DDTC complex, which was used as the chelating agent instead of DDTC for the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) of MeHg. Because the stability of MeHg-DDTC is higher than that of Cu-DDTC, MeHg can displace Cu from the Cu-DDTC complex and be preconcentrated in a single DLLME procedure. MeHg could be extracted into the extraction solvent phase at pH 6 while Hg(II) remained in the sample solution. Potential interference from co-existing metal ions with lower DDTC complex stability was largely eliminated without the need of any masking reagent. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection of this method was 13.6ngL(-1) (as Hg), and an enhancement factor of 81 was achieved with a sample volume of 5.0mL. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace MeHg in some environmental samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26717807

  15. Measurement of transient atomic displacements in thin films with picosecond and femtometer resolution

    PubMed Central

    Kozina, M.; Hu, T.; Wittenberg, J. S.; Szilagyi, E.; Trigo, M.; Miller, T. A.; Uher, C.; Damodaran, A.; Martin, L.; Mehta, A.; Corbett, J.; Safranek, J.; Reis, D. A.; Lindenberg, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report measurements of the transient structural response of weakly photo-excited thin films of BiFeO3, Pb(Zr,Ti)O3, and Bi and time-scales for interfacial thermal transport. Utilizing picosecond x-ray diffraction at a 1.28 MHz repetition rate with time resolution extending down to 15 ps, transient changes in the diffraction angle are recorded. These changes are associated with photo-induced lattice strains within nanolayer thin films, resolved at the part-per-million level, corresponding to a shift in the scattering angle three orders of magnitude smaller than the rocking curve width and changes in the interlayer lattice spacing of fractions of a femtometer. The combination of high brightness, repetition rate, and stability of the synchrotron, in conjunction with high time resolution, represents a novel means to probe atomic-scale, near-equilibrium dynamics. PMID:26798776

  16. Molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades in 3C-SiC: Comparison of interatomic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyuk, G. D.; Osetsky, Y. N.; Stoller, R. E.

    2015-10-01

    We used molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades to characterize the nature of primary radiation damage in 3C-SiC. We demonstrated that the most commonly used interatomic potentials are inconsistent with ab initio calculations of defect energetics. Both the Tersoff potential used in this work and a modified embedded-atom method potential reveal a barrier to recombination of the carbon interstitial and carbon vacancy which is much higher than the density functional theory (DFT) results. The barrier obtained with a newer potential by Gao and Weber is closer to the DFT result. This difference results in significant differences in the cascade production of point defects. We have completed both 10 keV and 50 keV cascade simulations in 3C-SiC at a range of temperatures. In contrast to the Tersoff potential, the Gao-Weber potential produces almost twice as many C vacancies and interstitials at the time of maximum disorder (∼0.2 ps) but only about 25% more stable defects at the end of the simulation. Only about 20% of the carbon defects produced with the Tersoff potential recombine during the in-cascade annealing phase, while about 60% recombine with the Gao-Weber potential. The Gao-Weber potential appears to give a more realistic description of cascade dynamics in SiC, but still has some shortcomings when the defect migration barriers are compared to the ab initio results.

  17. Molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades in 3C-SiC: Comparison of interatomic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Samolyuk, German D.; Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-06-03

    We used molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades to characterize the nature of primary radiation damage in 3C-SiC. We demonstrated that the most commonly used interatomic potentials are inconsistent with ab initio calculations of defect energetics. Both the Tersoff potential used in this work and a modified embedded-atom method potential reveal a barrier to recombination of the carbon interstitial and carbon vacancy which is much higher than the density functional theory (DFT) results. The barrier obtained with a newer potential by Gao and Weber is closer to the DFT result. This difference results in significant differences in the cascade production of point defects. We have completed both 10 keV and 50 keV cascade simulations in 3C-SiC at a range of temperatures. In contrast to the Tersoff potential, the Gao-Weber potential produces almost twice as many C vacancies and interstitials at the time of maximum disorder (~0.2 ps) but only about 25% more stable defects at the end of the simulation. Only about 20% of the carbon defects produced with the Tersoff potential recombine during the in-cascade annealing phase, while about 60% recombine with the Gao-Weber potential.

  18. Molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades in 3C-SiC: Comparison of interatomic potentials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Samolyuk, German D.; Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-06-03

    We used molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades to characterize the nature of primary radiation damage in 3C-SiC. We demonstrated that the most commonly used interatomic potentials are inconsistent with ab initio calculations of defect energetics. Both the Tersoff potential used in this work and a modified embedded-atom method potential reveal a barrier to recombination of the carbon interstitial and carbon vacancy which is much higher than the density functional theory (DFT) results. The barrier obtained with a newer potential by Gao and Weber is closer to the DFT result. This difference results in significant differences in the cascademore » production of point defects. We have completed both 10 keV and 50 keV cascade simulations in 3C-SiC at a range of temperatures. In contrast to the Tersoff potential, the Gao-Weber potential produces almost twice as many C vacancies and interstitials at the time of maximum disorder (~0.2 ps) but only about 25% more stable defects at the end of the simulation. Only about 20% of the carbon defects produced with the Tersoff potential recombine during the in-cascade annealing phase, while about 60% recombine with the Gao-Weber potential.« less

  19. Intrinsic Optical Activity and Large-Amplitude Displacement: Conformational Flexibility in (R)-Glycidyl Methyl Ether.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Priyanka; Wiberg, Kenneth B; Vaccaro, Patrick H

    2015-07-30

    The dispersive optical activity of (R)-(-)-glycidyl methyl ether (R-GME) has been interrogated under ambient vapor-phase and solution-phase conditions, with quantum-chemical analyses built on density functional (B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP) and coupled-cluster (CCSD) implementations of linear-response theory exploited to interpret experimental findings. Inherent flexibility of the heavy atom skeleton leads to nine low-lying structural isomers that possess distinct chiroptical and physicochemical properties, as evinced by marked changes in the magnitude and the sign of rotatory powers observed in various media. These species are interconverted by independent motion along two large-amplitude torsional coordinates and are stabilized differentially by interaction with the surroundings, thereby reapportioning their relative contributions to the collective response evoked from a thermally equilibrated ensemble. The intrinsic behavior exhibited by isolated (vapor-phase) R-GME molecules was calculated through use of both conformer-averaging and restricted vibrational-averaging procedures, the former affording moderately good agreement with measurements of optical rotatory dispersion (ORD) and the latter providing strong evidence for sizable effects arising from vibrational degrees of freedom. A similar conformer-averaging ansatz based on the polarizable-continuum model (PCM) for implicit solvation was deployed to elucidate R-GME specific-rotation parameters acquired for six dilute solutions. This approach gave reasonable predictions for sodium D-line (589.3 nm) experiments performed in the extremes of solvent polarity represented by cyclohexane and acetonitrile but failed to reproduce the overall shape of ORD profiles and suggested more complex processes might be involved in the case of an aromatic medium. PMID:26120748

  20. High-resolution projection moiré and its application in out-of-plane displacement test on large area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jun; Xiong, Chen; Miao, Hong; Chen, Jubing

    2015-03-01

    This paper develops a set of projection Moiré system. It projects the grating onto the surface of specimen and forms grid lines of which the pitch is adjustable on large area through light source and projection grating. At the same time, the imaging system images the grid lines precisely onto the reference grating and then the Moiré fringes are formed. The modulation of out-of-plane displacement to grid lines transform into the distortion of Moiré fringes. The greatest advantage of this projection Moiré system is that what the CCD camera captures is the Moiré fringes, not the gird lines. The Moiré fringes can magnify the variation of out-of-plane displacement of the specimen with no distortion and the measuring resolution is improved a lot. Besides, this system is appropriate for large area measurement by using a wide-angle lens in imaging system. The full-field out-of-plane displacement can be acquired through image processing. The measuring resolution of this system can reach 10μm on a large area of 3m*3m.

  1. Prospects for atomic clocks based on large ion crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Kyle; Hajiyev, Elnur; Paez, Eduardo; Lee, Chern Hui; Barrett, M. D.; Bollinger, John

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of precision frequency metrology with large ion crystals. For clock candidates with a negative differential static polarizability, we show that micromotion effects should not impede the performance of the clock. Using Lu+ as a specific example, we show that quadrupole shifts due to the electric fields from neighboring ions do not significantly affect clock performance. We also show that effects from the tensor polarizability can be effectively managed with a compensation laser at least for a small number of ions (≲103 ). These results provide new possibilities for ion-based atomic clocks, allowing them to achieve stability levels comparable to neutral atoms in optical lattices and a viable path to greater levels of accuracy.

  2. Large-angle illumination STEM: Toward three-dimensional atom-by-atom imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lupini, Andrew R.; Hinuma, Yoyo; Pennycook, Stephen

    2014-11-26

    To completely understand and control materials and their properties, it is of critical importance to determine their atomic structures in all three dimensions. Recent revolutionary advances in electron optics – the inventions of geometric and chromatic aberration correctors as well as electron source monochromators – have provided fertile ground for performing optical depth sectioning at atomic-scale dimensions. In this study we theoretically demonstrate the imaging of top/sub-surface atomic structures and identify the depth of single dopants, single vacancies and the other point defects within materials by large-angle illumination scanning transmission electron microscopy (LAI-STEM). The proposed method also allows us tomore » measure specimen properties such as thickness or three-dimensional surface morphology using observations from a single crystallographic orientation.« less

  3. Large-angle illumination STEM: Toward three-dimensional atom-by-atom imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lupini, Andrew R.; Hinuma, Yoyo; Pennycook, Stephen

    2014-11-26

    To completely understand and control materials and their properties, it is of critical importance to determine their atomic structures in all three dimensions. Recent revolutionary advances in electron optics – the inventions of geometric and chromatic aberration correctors as well as electron source monochromators – have provided fertile ground for performing optical depth sectioning at atomic-scale dimensions. In this study we theoretically demonstrate the imaging of top/sub-surface atomic structures and identify the depth of single dopants, single vacancies and the other point defects within materials by large-angle illumination scanning transmission electron microscopy (LAI-STEM). The proposed method also allows us to measure specimen properties such as thickness or three-dimensional surface morphology using observations from a single crystallographic orientation.

  4. Chemical and displacement atomic pair correlations in crystalline solid solutions recovered by anomalous x-ray scattering in Fe-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J.; Shaffer, L.B.

    1992-12-31

    Short-range pair correlations of atoms in crystalline solid solutions consist of both chemical and displacement correlations. Measurement of these pair correlations is fundamental to understanding the properties of solid solutions. We discuss anomalous scattering techniques which have provided an important advance in our ability to recover these pair correlations and to model the local atomic arrangements in crystalline solid solutions of Fe-Ni alloys.

  5. Studying Displacement After a Disaster Using Large Scale Survey Methods: Sumatra After the 2004 Tsunami

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Clark; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Gillespie, Thomas; Sumantri, Cecep; Thomas, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of human vulnerability to environmental change has advanced in recent years, but measuring vulnerability and interpreting mobility across many sites differentially affected by change remains a significant challenge. Drawing on longitudinal data collected on the same respondents who were living in coastal areas of Indonesia before the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and were re-interviewed after the tsunami, this paper illustrates how the combination of population-based survey methods, satellite imagery and multivariate statistical analyses has the potential to provide new insights into vulnerability, mobility and impacts of major disasters on population well-being. The data are used to map and analyze vulnerability to post-tsunami displacement across the provinces of Aceh and North Sumatra and to compare patterns of migration after the tsunami between damaged areas and areas not directly affected by the tsunami. The comparison reveals that migration after a disaster is less selective overall than migration in other contexts. Gender and age, for example, are strong predictors of moving from undamaged areas but are not related to displacement in areas experiencing damage. In our analyses traditional predictors of vulnerability do not always operate in expected directions. Low levels of socioeconomic status and education were not predictive of moving after the tsunami, although for those who did move, they were predictive of displacement to a camp rather than a private home. This survey-based approach, though not without difficulties, is broadly applicable to many topics in human-environment research, and potentially opens the door to rigorous testing of new hypotheses in this literature. PMID:24839300

  6. Studying Displacement After a Disaster Using Large Scale Survey Methods: Sumatra After the 2004 Tsunami.

    PubMed

    Gray, Clark; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Gillespie, Thomas; Sumantri, Cecep; Thomas, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of human vulnerability to environmental change has advanced in recent years, but measuring vulnerability and interpreting mobility across many sites differentially affected by change remains a significant challenge. Drawing on longitudinal data collected on the same respondents who were living in coastal areas of Indonesia before the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and were re-interviewed after the tsunami, this paper illustrates how the combination of population-based survey methods, satellite imagery and multivariate statistical analyses has the potential to provide new insights into vulnerability, mobility and impacts of major disasters on population well-being. The data are used to map and analyze vulnerability to post-tsunami displacement across the provinces of Aceh and North Sumatra and to compare patterns of migration after the tsunami between damaged areas and areas not directly affected by the tsunami. The comparison reveals that migration after a disaster is less selective overall than migration in other contexts. Gender and age, for example, are strong predictors of moving from undamaged areas but are not related to displacement in areas experiencing damage. In our analyses traditional predictors of vulnerability do not always operate in expected directions. Low levels of socioeconomic status and education were not predictive of moving after the tsunami, although for those who did move, they were predictive of displacement to a camp rather than a private home. This survey-based approach, though not without difficulties, is broadly applicable to many topics in human-environment research, and potentially opens the door to rigorous testing of new hypotheses in this literature. PMID:24839300

  7. Dynamics and control of a large displacement suspension system for ground testing of flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reaves, Mercedes C.; Chew, Meng-Sang; Juang, Jer-Nan; Chiu, Steven H.

    1992-01-01

    As the development in flexible space structures expands, the need for an efficient and accurate suspension system for ground tests increases accordingly. In this article, a disk suspension system was developed. Analytical results describing the dynamics of a passive and active suspension system were generated given realistic parameters of the system. These results for the passive case, were then compared with the data obtained from an experimental model with initial displacement and random forcing inputs. The dynamics of the system was analyzed. Results show that the experimental model resembles closely the analytical model and therefore strongly suggests feasibility of such a suspension system.

  8. Large interferometers for small displacements: a technological view of gravitational wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strain, K. A.

    2009-10-01

    The search for gravitational waves has led to the development of km-scale interferometers with sub attometre displacement sensitivity. The challenge of meeting this goal is divided into two aspects. First the main optical components of the interferometer - the test masses - must be sufficiently quiet, and then the interferometric measurement of the relative test mass positions must be performed to the required degree of sensitivity. Key design elements of modern interferometers are discussed, reviewing the most important aspects. Gravitational astronomy will require 10 to 100 times improved sensitivity beyond that of the initial instruments and potential techniques are considered.

  9. Electron transfer and ionic displacements as the origin of the 2D electron gas at the LAO/STO interface: Direct measurements with atomic-column spatial resolution.

    SciTech Connect

    Cantoni, Claudia; Gazquez Alabart, Jaume; Miletto Granozio, Fabio; Oxley, Mark P; Varela del Arco, Maria; Lupini, Andrew R; Pennycook, Stephen J; Aruta, Carmela; Scotti di Uccio, Umberto; Perna, Paolo; Maccariello, Davide

    2012-01-01

    We present direct, atomic-column-resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss measurements of atomic displacements and Ti valence in abrupt, conductive LAO/STO interfaces. We find that two distinct but interrelated mechanisms are responsible for screening the diverging electric potential in the LAO film: 1) charge injection in the interfacial Ti planes, and 2) dielectric relaxation in both LAO and STO through ionic displacements. The injected charge density decays over a length of nearly 3 unit cells within the STO substrate. The total injected charge is lower than predicted by pure electronic reconstruction. The origin of this discrepancy is attributed to cation and oxygen displacements, which we observe in both LAO and STO, and generate a polarization opposite to the intrinsic polarization of the LAO film. Our data attribute a minor role to oxygen vacancies and cation intermixing.

  10. Large DFT: to 100 K atoms and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, Jonathan

    A quantum mechanical (QM) approach to materials science provides a gold standard atomistic picture of the mechanisms responsible for a range of phenomena seen in macroscopic and experimental situations. The need to understand materials science problems from atomistic to macroscale was the impetus for ARL to initiate the Enterprise for Multiscale Material Research. This long term project attempts to redefine how materials science questions are posed, and solved. To support this goal, current state-of-the-art QM capabilities need to be extended in the number of atoms which can be treated and the length scale of the dynamics which can be simulated. This extension is referred to as large scale QM, both large spatially and temporally. This will enable fundamental advances in the understanding of materials science problems.

  11. Fabry-Perot interferometer utilized for displacement measurement in a large measuring range

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yung-Cheng; Shyu, Lih-Horng; Chang, Chung-Ping

    2010-09-15

    The optical configuration of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is uncomplicated. This has already been applied in different measurement systems. For the displacement measurement with the Fabry-Perot interferometer, the result is significantly influenced by the tilt angles of the measurement mirror in the interferometer. Hence, only for the rather small measuring range, the Fabry-Perot interferometer is available. The goal of this investigation is to enhance the measuring range of Fabry-Perot interferometer by compensating the tilt angles. To verify the measuring characteristic of the self-developed Fabry-Perot interferometer, some comparison measurements with a reference standard have been performed. The maximum deviation of comparison experiments is less than 0.3 {mu}m in the traveling range of 30 mm. The experimental results show that the Fabry-Perot interferometer is highly stable, insensitive to environment effects, and can meet the measuring requirement of the submicrometer order.

  12. Fast figuring of large optics by reactive atom plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Marco; Jourdain, Renaud; Morantz, Paul; Shore, Paul

    2012-09-01

    The next generation of ground-based astronomical observatories will require fabrication and maintenance of extremely large segmented mirrors tens of meters in diameter. At present, the large production of segments required by projects like E-ELT and TMT poses time frames and costs feasibility questions. This is principally due to a bottleneck stage in the optical fabrication chain: the final figuring step. State-of-the-art figure correction techniques, so far, have failed to meet the needs of the astronomical community for mass production of large, ultra-precise optical surfaces. In this context, Reactive Atom Plasma (RAP) is proposed as a candidate figuring process that combines nanometer level accuracy with high material removal rates. RAP is a form of plasma enhanced chemical etching at atmospheric pressure based on Inductively Coupled Plasma technology. The rapid figuring capability of the RAP process has already been proven on medium sized optical surfaces made of silicon based materials. In this paper, the figure correction of a 3 meters radius of curvature, 400 mm diameter spherical ULE mirror is presented. This work demonstrates the large scale figuring capability of the Reactive Atom Plasma process. The figuring is carried out by applying an in-house developed procedure that promotes rapid convergence. A 2.3 μm p-v initial figure error is removed within three iterations, for a total processing time of 2.5 hours. The same surface is then re-polished and the residual error corrected again down to λ/20 nm rms. These results highlight the possibility of figuring a metre-class mirror in about ten hours.

  13. Dispersion effects in the miscible displacement of two fluids in a duct of large aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Frigaard, I. A.

    We study miscible displacements in long ducts in the dispersive limit of small \\varepsilon Pe, where \\varepsilon ≪ 1 is the inverse aspect ratio and Pe the Péclet number. We consider the class of generalized Newtonian fluids, with specified closure laws for the fluid properties of the concentration-dependent mixture. Regardless of viscosity ratio and the constitutive laws of the pure fluids, for sufficiently small \\varepsilon Pe these displacements are characterized by rapid cross-stream diffusion and slow streamwise dispersion, i.e. the concentration appears to be near-uniform across the duct and spreads slowly as it translates. Using the multiple-scales method we derive the leading-order asymptotic approximation to the average fluid concentration bar{c}_0. We show that bar{c}_0 evolves on the slow timescale t ˜ (\\varepsilon Pe)^{-1}, and satisfies a nonlinear diffusion equation in a frame of reference moving with the mean speed of the flow. In the case that the two fluids have identical rheologies and the concentration represents a passive tracer, the diffusion equation is linear. For Newtonian fluids we recover the classical results of Taylor (l953), Aris (1956), and for power-law fluids those of Vartuli et al. (1995). In the case that the fluids differ and/or that mixing is non-passive, bar{c}_0 satisfies a nonlinear diffusion equation in the moving frame of reference. Given a specific mixing/closure law for the rheological properties, we are able to compute the dispersive diffusivity D_T(bar{c}_0) and predict spreading along the channel. We show that D_T(bar{c}_0) can vary significantly with choice of mixing law and discuss why. This also opens the door to possibilities of controlling streamwise spreading by the rheological design of reactive mixtures, i.e. including chemical additives such that the rheology of the mixture behaves very differently to the rheology of either pure fluid. Computed examples illustrate the potential effects that might be achieved.

  14. Large-scale separation of amino acids by continuous displacement chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    DeCarli, J.P. II; Carta, G.; Byers, C.H.

    1989-10-01

    Continuous annular chromatography (CAC) is a developing technology that allows truly continuous chromatographic separations. Previous work has demonstrated the utility of this technology for the separation of various materials by isocratic elution on a bench scale. Novel applications and improved operation of the process were studied in this work, demonstrating that CAC is a versatile apparatus which is capable of separations at high throughput. Three specific separation systems were investigated. Pilot-scale separations at high loadings were performed using an industrial sugar mixture as an example of scale-up for isocratic separations. Bench-scale experiments of a low concentration metal ion mixture were performed to demonstrate stepwise elution, a chromatographic technique which decreases dilution and increases sorbent capacity. Finally, the separation of mixtures of amino acids by ion exchange was investigated to demonstrate the use of displacement development on the CAC. This technique, which perhaps has the most potential, when applied to the CAC allowed simultaneous separation and concentration of multicomponent mixtures on a continuous basis. Mathematical models were developed to describe the CAC performance and optimize the operating conditions. For all the systems investigated, the continuous separation performance of the CAC was found to be very nearly the same as the batchwise performance of conventional chromatography. The technology appears, thus, to be very promising for industrial applications.

  15. [Large-displacement spondylolisthesis in children and adolescents. Results of reduction-arthrodesis with front plates].

    PubMed

    Bitan, F; Padovani, J P; Glorion, C; Rigault, P; Touzet, P; Finidori, G

    1990-01-01

    Twenty seven children and adolescents with severe lombo-sacral spondylolisthesis (degre III and IV) were operated using an original procedure of reduction and fixation. It is a two stages procedure, in the same session. Through a posterior approach, the sciatic roots are released and two long screws are set through the sacrum. An anterior approach allows a progressive reduction using a bended plate fixed with the protruded long screws, and an anterior arthrodesis. Results were evaluated with a three years mean follow-up. Clinical results were excellent on pain and on the morphological aspect of the trunk. There were four cases of residual weakness in the L5 motor distribution. This complication can be avoided by a good preparation before the procedure and precise post-operative care. The anterior displacement was improved from 77 per cent to 11 per cent. The angular lombosacral kyphosis from -23 degrees (kyphosis) to + 11 degrees (lordosis). The initial fears in the early experience, about the risks of kyphosis or slipping of the L4-L5 level have not been proved. PMID:2149780

  16. Search for displaced supersymmetry in events with an electron and a muon with large impact parameters.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Luyckx, S; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dobur, D; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Grebenyuk, A; Léonard, A; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Zenoni, F; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Crucy, S; Dildick, S; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Salva Diblen, S; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jafari, A; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Perrini, L; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Aldá Júnior, W L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Dos Reis Martins, T; Mora Herrera, C; Pol, M E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santaolalla, J; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Bernardes, C A; Dogra, S; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Aleksandrov, A; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Marinov, A; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Plestina, R; Romeo, F; Tao, J; Wang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Bodlak, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Ellithi Kamel, A; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Talvitie, J; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Filipovic, N; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Mastrolorenzo, L; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Regnard, S; Salerno, R; Sauvan, J B; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Boudoul, G; Bouvier, E; Brochet, S; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fan, J; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sabes, D; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Xiao, H; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Bontenackels, M; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Hindrichs, O; Klein, K; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Brodski, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Knutzen, S; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Millet, P; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Papacz, P; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Weber, M; Cherepanov, V; Erdogan, Y; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Heister, A; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Künsken, A; Lingemann, J; Nowack, A; Nugent, I M; Perchalla, L; Pooth, O; Stahl, A; Asin, I; Bartosik, N; Behr, J; Behrenhoff, W; Behrens, U; Bell, A J; Bergholz, M; Bethani, A; Borras, K; Burgmeier, A; Cakir, A; Calligaris, L; Campbell, A; Choudhury, S; Costanza, F; Diez Pardos, C; Dooling, S; Dorland, T; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Eichhorn, T; Flucke, G; Garay Garcia, J; Geiser, A; Gunnellini, P; Hauk, J; Hempel, M; Horton, D; Jung, H; Kalogeropoulos, A; Kasemann, M; Katsas, P; Kieseler, J; Kleinwort, C; Krücker, D; Lange, W; Leonard, J; Lipka, K; Lobanov, A; Lohmann, W; Lutz, B; Mankel, R; Marfin, I; Melzer-Pellmann, I-A; Meyer, A B; Mittag, G; Mnich, J; Mussgiller, A; Naumann-Emme, S; Nayak, A; Novgorodova, O; Ntomari, E; Perrey, H; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Raspereza, A; Ribeiro Cipriano, P M; Roland, B; Ron, E; Sahin, M Ö; Salfeld-Nebgen, J; Saxena, P; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Seitz, C; Spannagel, S; Vargas Trevino, A D R; Walsh, R; Wissing, C; Aldaya Martin, M; Blobel, V; Centis Vignali, M; Draeger, A R; Erfle, J; Garutti, E; Goebel, K; Görner, M; Haller, J; Hoffmann, M; Höing, R S; Kirschenmann, H; Klanner, R; Kogler, R; Lange, J; Lapsien, T; Lenz, T; Marchesini, I; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Pietsch, N; Poehlsen, J; Poehlsen, T; Rathjens, D; Sander, C; Schettler, H; Schleper, P; Schlieckau, E; Schmidt, A; Seidel, M; Sola, V; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Troendle, D; Usai, E; Vanelderen, L; Vanhoefer, A; Barth, C; Baus, C; Berger, J; Böser, C; Butz, E; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Descroix, A; Dierlamm, A; Feindt, M; Frensch, F; Giffels, M; Hartmann, F; Hauth, T; Husemann, U; Katkov, I; Kornmayer, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lobelle Pardo, P; Mozer, M U; Müller, Th; Nürnberg, A; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Röcker, S; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Ulrich, R; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wayand, S; Weiler, T; Wolf, R; Anagnostou, G; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Giakoumopoulou, V A; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Psallidas, A; Topsis-Giotis, I; Kesisoglou, S; Panagiotou, A; Saoulidou, N; Stiliaris, E; Aslanoglou, X; Evangelou, I; Flouris, G; Foudas, C; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Paradas, E; Bencze, G; Hajdu, C; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Sikler, F; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Zsigmond, A J; Beni, N; Czellar, S; Karancsi, J; Molnar, J; Palinkas, J; Szillasi, Z; Raics, P; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Swain, S K; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Gupta, R; Bhawandeep, U; Kalsi, A K; Kaur, M; Kumar, R; Mittal, M; Nishu, N; Singh, J B; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S; Bhardwaj, A; Choudhary, B C; Kumar, A; Malhotra, S; Naimuddin, M; Ranjan, K; Sharma, V; Banerjee, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chatterjee, K; Dutta, S; Gomber, B; Jain, Sa; Jain, Sh; Khurana, R; Modak, A; Mukherjee, S; Roy, D; Sarkar, S; Sharan, M; Abdulsalam, A; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kumar, V; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Banerjee, S; Bhowmik, S; Chatterjee, R M; Dewanjee, R K; Dugad, S; Ganguly, S; Ghosh, S; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Kole, G; Kumar, S; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Mohanty, G B; Parida, B; Sudhakar, K; 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Gulhan, D; Klute, M; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; Gude, A; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Keller, J; Knowlton, D; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Meier, F; Snow, G R; Zvada, M; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wang, R-J; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Sung, K; Velasco, M; Won, S; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Drozdetskiy, A; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Antonelli, L; Brinson, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Hart, A; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Smith, G; Winer, B L; Wolfe, H; Wulsin, H W; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hebda, P; Hunt, A; Koay, S A; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Mendez, H; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Gutay, L; Hu, Z; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, K; Kress, M; Leonardo, N; Lopes Pegna, D; Maroussov, V; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shi, X; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Wang, F; Xie, W; Xu, L; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Khukhunaishvili, A; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Kaplan, S; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Rose, K; Spanier, S; York, A; Bouhali, O; Castaneda Hernandez, A; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Krutelyov, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kovitanggoon, K; Kunori, S; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Friis, E; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Levine, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Verwilligen, P; Vuosalo, C; Woods, N

    2015-02-13

    A search for new long-lived particles decaying to leptons is presented using proton-proton collisions produced by the LHC at √[s]=8  TeV. Data used for the analysis were collected by the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7  fb(-1). Events are selected with an electron and muon with opposite charges that both have transverse impact parameter values between 0.02 and 2 cm. The search has been designed to be sensitive to a wide range of models with nonprompt e-μ final states. Limits are set on the "displaced supersymmetry" model, with pair production of top squarks decaying into an e-μ final state via R-parity-violating interactions. The results are the most restrictive to date on this model, with the most stringent limit being obtained for a top squark lifetime corresponding to cτ=2  cm, excluding masses below 790 GeV at 95% confidence level. PMID:25723204

  17. Noise-immune conjugate large-area atom interferometers.

    PubMed

    Chiow, Sheng-Wey; Herrmann, Sven; Chu, Steven; Müller, Holger

    2009-07-31

    We present a pair of simultaneous conjugate Ramsey-Bordé atom interferometers using large (20variant Planck's over 2pik)-momentum transfer beam splitters, where variant Planck's over 2pik is the photon momentum. Simultaneous operation allows for common-mode rejection of vibrational noise. This allows us to surpass the enclosed space-time area of previous interferometers with a splitting of 20variant Planck's over 2pik by a factor of 2500. Using a splitting of 10variant Planck's over 2pik, we demonstrate a 3.4 ppb resolution in the measurement of the fine structure constant. Examples for applications in tests of fundamental laws of physics are given. PMID:19792468

  18. Long term simulation of point defect cluster size distributions from atomic displacement cascades in Fe70Cr20Ni10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souidi, A.; Hou, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.; De Backer, A.

    2015-06-01

    We have used an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model to simulate the long term evolution of the primary damage in Fe70Cr20Ni10 alloys. The mean number of Frenkel pairs created by different Primary Knocked on Atoms (PKA) was estimated by Molecular Dynamics using a ternary EAM potential developed in the framework of the PERFORM-60 European project. This number was then used to obtain the vacancy-interstitial recombination distance required in the calculation of displacement cascades in the Binary Collision Approximation (BCA) with code MARLOWE (Robinson, 1989). The BCA cascades have been generated in the 10-100 keV range with the MARLOWE code and two different screened Coulomb potentials, namely, the Molière approximation to the Thomas-Fermi potential and the so-called "Universal" potential by Ziegler, Biersack and Littmark (ZBL). These cascades have been used as input to the OKMC code LAKIMOCA (Domain et al., 2004), with a set of parameters for describing the mobility of point defect clusters based on ab initio calculations and experimental data. The cluster size distributions have been estimated for irradiation doses of 0.1 and 1 dpa, and a dose rate of 10-7 dpa/s at 600 K. We demonstrate that, like in the case of BCC iron, cluster size distributions in the long term are independent of the cascade energy and that the recursive cascade model suggested for BCC iron in Souidi et al. (2011) also applies to FCC Fe70Cr20Ni10. The results also show that the influence of the BCA potential is sizeable but the qualitative correspondence in the predicted long term evolution is excellent.

  19. Syntectonic remagnetization in the southern Methow block: Resolving large displacements in the southern Canadian Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enkin, Randolph J.; Mahoney, J. B.; Baker, Judith; Kiessling, Mark; Haugerud, Ralph A.

    2002-08-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Ventura Member of the Goat Wall unit in the southern Methow block of southern British Columbia and northern Washington State holds a syntectonic magnetization. Eight new sites from Manning Park in British Columbia give a mean direction of D = 27.5°, I = 60.1°, k = 304.7, α95 = 3.2° after optimal partial tilt correction. Of five groups of bedded sites from farther south in the basin reported by Bazard et al. [1990], four have a syntectonic remanence with a direction similar to what we observe. The exception is one group which has optimal concentration of remanence directions on >100% untilting and an abherent direction which must be rejected. Combining the accepted sites, the optimal differential syntilting direction is D = 11.8°, I = 61.5°, k = 39.3, α95 = 3.4° (N = 47), giving a mean pole of 79.8°N, 359.2°E, K = 19.5, and A95 = 4.8°. The age of the remagnetization is constrained to be between 88 and 80 Ma. Compared to cratonic North America, this result indicates that the southern Methow block was displaced from the south by 1800 +/- 500 km, meaning it lay south of the Sierra Nevada subduction zone but well north of other paleomagnetically constrained Cretaceous rock units from the Insular superterrane, including correlative strata of the Mount Tatlow area in the northern Methow block. Among several possibilities to reconcile this discrepancy, the most plausible has the whole Methow block translated coherently but with the southern Methow block strata remagnetized during transit.

  20. Syntectonic remagnetization in the southern Methow block: Resolving large displacements in the southern Canadian Cordillera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Enkin, R.J.; Mahoney, J.B.; Baker, J.; Kiessling, M.; Haugerud, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Ventura Member of the Goat Wall unit in the southern Methow block of southern British Columbia and northern Washington State holds a syntectonic magnetization. Eight new sites from Manning Park in British Columbia give a mean direction of D = 27.5??, I = 60.1??, k = 304.7, ??95 = 3.2?? after optimal partial tilt correction. Of five groups of bedded sites from farther south in the basin reported by Bazard et al. [1990], four have a syntectonic remanence with a direction similar to what we observe. The exception is one group which has optimal concentration of remanence directions on >100% untilting and an abherent direction which must be rejected. Combining the accepted sites, the optimal differential syntilting direction is D = 11.8??, I = 61.5??, k = 39.3, ??95 = 3.4?? (N = 47), giving a mean pole of 79.8??N, 359.2??E, K = 19.5, and A95 = 4.8??. The age of the remagnetization is constrained to be between 88 and 80 Ma. Compared to cratonic North America, this result indicates that the southern Methow block was displaced from the south by 1800 ?? 500 km, meaning it lay south of the Sierra Nevada subduction zone but well north of other paleomagnetically constrained Cretaceous rock units from the Insular superterrane, including correlative strata of the Mount Tatlow area in the northern Methow block. Among several possibilities to reconcile this discrepancy, the most plausible has the whole Methow block translated coherently but with the southern Methow block strata remagnetized during transit.

  1. Large Atomic Natural Orbital Basis Sets for the First Transition Row Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Large atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets are tabulated for the Sc to Cu. The primitive sets are taken from the large sets optimized by Partridge, namely (21s 13p 8d) for Sc and Ti and (20s 12p 9d) for V to Cu. These primitive sets are supplemented with three p, one d, six f, and four g functions. The ANO sets are derived from configuration interaction density matrices constructed as the average of the lowest states derived from the 3d(sup n)4s(sup 2) and 3d(sup n+1)4s(sup 1) occupations. For Ni, the 1S(3d(sup 10)) state is included in the averaging. The choice of basis sets for molecular calculations is discussed.

  2. A three-degree-of-freedom thin-film PZT-actuated microactuator with large out-of-plane displacement

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jongsoo; Qiu, Zhen; Rhee, Choong-Ho; Wang, Thomas; Oldham, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    A novel three degree-of-freedom microactuator based on thin-film lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) is described with its detailed structural model. Its central rectangular-shaped mirror platform, also referred to as the stage, is actuated by four symmetric PZT bending legs such that each leg provides vertical translation for one corner of the stage. It has been developed to support real-time in vivo vertical cross-sectional imaging with a dual axes confocal endomicroscope for early cancer detection, having large displacements in three axes (z, θx, θy) and a relatively high bandwidth in the z-axis direction. Prototype microactuators closely meet the performance requirements for this application; in the out-of-plane (z-axis) direction, it has shown more than 177 μm of displacement and about 84 Hz of structural natural frequency, when two diagonal legs are actuated at 14V. With all four legs, another prototype of the same design with lighter stage mass has achieved more than 430 μm of out-of-plane displacement at 15V and about 200 Hz of bandwidth. The former design has shown approximately 6.4° and 2.9° of stage tilting about the x-axis and y-axis, respectively, at 14V. This paper also presents a modeling technique that uses experimental data to account for the effects of fabrication uncertainties in residual stress and structural dimensions. The presented model predicts the static motion of the stage within an average absolute error of 14.6 μm, which approaches the desired imaging resolution, 5 μm, and also reasonably anticipates the structural dynamic behavior of the stage. The refined model will support development of a future trajectory tracking controller for the system. PMID:25506131

  3. A report of left dorsal displacement of the large colon in a tropical horse.

    PubMed

    Sasani, Farhang; Javanbakht, Javad; Ghamsari, Mehdi; Hassan, Mehdi Aghamohammad

    2013-04-01

    We report one such case which was diagnosed intraoperatively as left dorsal colon volvulus due to multiple mesenteric abnormalities. A 17-year-old castrated male horse was taken to the Tehran University Veterinary Hospital for treatment of metacarpal wound accompanied by severe abdominal distension and acute colic. The treatment and measurement were taken for a month, and the prepared biopsy indicated that the healing trend was obvious. Unfortunately, prior to discharge, the clinical colic manifestations emerged and the animal suddenly died. Dilated large intestine was palpated per rectum and a ventral midline exploratory laparotomy was performed, a complete volvulus of the ascending colon was identified with multiple mesenteric anomalies of unknown aetiology. The pathologic changes observed in this study accurately reflect those changes reported in horse with naturally occurring colonic volvulus and can serve as a reference for subsequent studies on attenuating bowel injury. The present study results can be used to make a scientific assessment of prognosis in the pre-operative, operative, and post-operative management of horses with large colon volvulus. PMID:23620860

  4. Entanglement of large atomic samples: A Gaussian-state analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sherson, Jacob; Moelmer, Klaus

    2005-03-01

    We present a Gaussian-state analysis of the entanglement generation between two macroscopic atomic ensembles due the continuous probing of collective spin variables by optical Faraday rotation. The evolution of the mean values and the variances of the atomic variables is determined, and the entanglement is characterized by the Gaussian entanglement of formation and the logarithmic negativity. The effects of induced opposite Larmor rotation of the samples and of light absorption and atomic decay are analyzed in detail.

  5. How large are nonadiabatic effects in atomic and diatomic systems?

    PubMed

    Yang, Yubo; Kylänpää, Ilkka; Tubman, Norm M; Krogel, Jaron T; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Ceperley, David M

    2015-09-28

    With recent developments in simulating nonadiabatic systems to high accuracy, it has become possible to determine how much energy is attributed to nuclear quantum effects beyond zero-point energy. In this work, we calculate the non-relativistic ground-state energies of atomic and molecular systems without the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. For this purpose, we utilize the fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo method, in which the nodes depend on both the electronic and ionic positions. We report ground-state energies for all systems studied, ionization energies for the first-row atoms and atomization energies for the first-row hydrides. We find the ionization energies of the atoms to be nearly independent of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, within the accuracy of our results. The atomization energies of molecular systems, however, show small effects of the nonadiabatic coupling between electrons and nuclei. PMID:26429012

  6. How large are nonadiabatic effects in atomic and diatomic systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yubo; Kylänpää, Ilkka; Tubman, Norm M.; Krogel, Jaron T.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Ceperley, David M.

    2015-09-01

    With recent developments in simulating nonadiabatic systems to high accuracy, it has become possible to determine how much energy is attributed to nuclear quantum effects beyond zero-point energy. In this work, we calculate the non-relativistic ground-state energies of atomic and molecular systems without the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. For this purpose, we utilize the fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo method, in which the nodes depend on both the electronic and ionic positions. We report ground-state energies for all systems studied, ionization energies for the first-row atoms and atomization energies for the first-row hydrides. We find the ionization energies of the atoms to be nearly independent of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, within the accuracy of our results. The atomization energies of molecular systems, however, show small effects of the nonadiabatic coupling between electrons and nuclei.

  7. Charge-screening role of c-axis atomic displacements in YBa2Cu3O6+x and related superconductors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    E. S. Bozin; Huq, A.; Shen, Bing; Claus, H.; Kwok, W. K.; Tranquada, J. M.

    2016-02-29

    Here, the importance of charge reservoir layers for supplying holes to the CuO2 planes of cuprate superconductors has long been recognized. Less attention has been paid to the screening of the charge transfer by the intervening ionic layers. We address this issue in the case of YBa2Cu3O6+x, where CuO chains supply the holes for the planes. We present a simple dielectric-screening model that gives a linear correlation between the relative displacements of ions along the c axis, determined by neutron powder diffraction, and the hole density of the planes. Applying this model to the temperature-dependent shifts of ions along themore » c axis, we infer a charge transfer of 5–10% of the hole density from the planes to the chains on warming from the superconducting transition to room temperature. Given the significant coupling of c-axis displacements to the average charge density, we point out the relevance of local displacements for screening charge modulations and note recent evidence for dynamic screening of in-plane quasiparticles. This line of argument leads us to a simple model for atomic displacements and charge modulation that is consistent with images from scanning-tunneling microscopy for underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ.« less

  8. Large-Area Atom Interferometry with Frequency-Swept Raman Adiabatic Passage.

    PubMed

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David L; Kinast, Joseph M; Stoner, Richard E

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate light-pulse atom interferometry with large-momentum-transfer atom optics based on stimulated Raman transitions and frequency-swept adiabatic rapid passage. Our atom optics have produced momentum splittings of up to 30 photon recoil momenta in an acceleration-sensitive interferometer for laser cooled atoms. We experimentally verify the enhancement of phase shift per unit acceleration and characterize interferometer contrast loss. By forgoing evaporative cooling and velocity selection, this method lowers the atom shot-noise-limited measurement uncertainty and enables large-area atom interferometry at higher data rates. PMID:26382675

  9. Large-Area Atom Interferometry with Frequency-Swept Raman Adiabatic Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David L.; Kinast, Joseph M.; Stoner, Richard E.

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate light-pulse atom interferometry with large-momentum-transfer atom optics based on stimulated Raman transitions and frequency-swept adiabatic rapid passage. Our atom optics have produced momentum splittings of up to 30 photon recoil momenta in an acceleration-sensitive interferometer for laser cooled atoms. We experimentally verify the enhancement of phase shift per unit acceleration and characterize interferometer contrast loss. By forgoing evaporative cooling and velocity selection, this method lowers the atom shot-noise-limited measurement uncertainty and enables large-area atom interferometry at higher data rates.

  10. Observation of a Large Atomic Parity Violation Effect in Ytterbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigutkin, K.; Dounas-Frazer, D.; Family, A.; Stalnaker, J. E.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Budker, D.

    2009-08-01

    Atomic parity violation has been observed in the 6s2S01→5d6sD13 408-nm forbidden transition of ytterbium. The parity-violating amplitude is found to be 2 orders of magnitude larger than in cesium, where the most precise experiments to date have been performed. This is in accordance with theoretical predictions and constitutes the largest atomic parity-violating amplitude yet observed. This also opens the way to future measurements of neutron distributions and anapole moments by comparing parity-violating amplitudes for various isotopes and hyperfine components of the transition.

  11. Simultaneous piston position and tilt angle sensing for large vertical displacement micromirrors by frequency detection inductive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, V. F.-G.; Xie, H.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a frequency detection based inductive eddy current sensing mechanism to simultaneously sense the piston position and tilt angle of the mirror plate of large vertical displacement micromirrors that exhibit piston scan ranges above 100 μm. This is accomplished by sensing the inductance change, and thus resonant frequency shift, of two microfabricated sensing coils packaged underneath the mirror plate. For demonstration purpose, the coils were paired with discrete circuit components to oscillate at 11.9 MHz and 12.5 MHz, respectively. The piston position and tilt angle of the mirror plate could be simultaneously monitored over a 500 μm piston scan range, achieving a maximum piston sensitivity of 4.15 kHz/μm with a piston sensing resolution of 96 nm and a maximum tilt angle sensitivity of 60.5 kHz/° with a tilt angle sensing resolution of 0.0013°. Analytical modeling of the coil inductance change via image theory was also conducted, showing that the sensor sensitivity and resolution could be improved by increasing the coil oscillation frequency and decreasing the coil size.

  12. A vision-based system for measuring the displacements of large structures: Simultaneous adaptive calibration and full motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, C. Almeida; Costa, C. Oliveira; Batista, J.

    2016-05-01

    The paper describes a kinematic model-based solution to estimate simultaneously the calibration parameters of the vision system and the full-motion (6-DOF) of large civil engineering structures, namely of long deck suspension bridges, from a sequence of stereo images captured by digital cameras. Using an arbitrary number of images and assuming a smooth structure motion, an Iterated Extended Kalman Filter is used to recursively estimate the projection matrices of the cameras and the structure full-motion (displacement and rotation) over time, helping to meet the structure health monitoring fulfilment. Results related to the performance evaluation, obtained by numerical simulation and with real experiments, are reported. The real experiments were carried out in indoor and outdoor environment using a reduced structure model to impose controlled motions. In both cases, the results obtained with a minimum setup comprising only two cameras and four non-coplanar tracking points, showed a high accuracy results for on-line camera calibration and structure full motion estimation.

  13. Low spring index, large displacement Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) coil actuators for use in macro- and micro-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holschuh, Brad; Newman, Dava

    2014-03-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) offer unique shape changing characteristics that can be exploited to produce low­ mass, low-bulk, large-stroke actuators. We are investigating the use of low spring index (defined as the ratio of coil diameter to wire diameter) SMA coils for use as actuators in morphing aerospace systems. Specifically, we describe the development and characterization of minimum achievable spring index coiled actuators made from 0.3048 mm (0.012") diameter shape memory alloy (SMA) wire for integration in textile architectures for future compression space suit applications. Production and shape setting of the coiled actuators, as well as experimental test methods, are described. Force, length and voltage relationships for multiple coil actuators are reported and discussed. The actuators exhibit a highly linear (R2 < 0.99) relationship between isometric blocking force and coil displacement, which is consistent with current SMA coil models; and SMA coil actuators demonstrate the ability to produce significant linear forces (i.e., greater than 8 N per coil) at strains up to 3x their initial (i.e., fully coiled) length. Discussions of both the potential use of these actuators in future compression space suit designs, and the broader viability of these actuators in both macro- and micro-systems, are presented.

  14. Thickness measurement of full field soap bubble film in real time based on large lateral shearing displacement interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wei; Zhou, Huai-chun; Zhu, Jin-rong

    2012-03-01

    Soap bubble has a profile nearly the same as a perfect sphere. Many researches focus on the measurement of the film thickness of the soap bubble over time in order to calculate the film drainage rate. Its thickness variation in gravitation field can be respectively approximated with many models, considering the cost and precision in different applications. In this research, fringe patterns of a soap bubble were captured continuously using the large lateral shearing displacement interferometry during the process from its formation to burst. From the analysis of three typical frames, it can be seen that the film thickness distribution along the gravity orientation shows a very good agreement with an exponential model. The ratio of its maximum error to the laser wavelength is 3/8, existing at the sphere's center. Moreover, it can be seen that the absolute value of the parameter k in the exponential model keeps increasing over time, while the parameter b keeps decreasing over time. Based on the parameter k from the exponential model, the maximum limit in the thickness measurement of the soap bubble film can be calculated from the function of the fringe pattern's resolution and its field coordinates. The result shows that there is a special point above the sphere's center, being the right place where the gradient of phase order changes its sign. The region near this point presents very high limitation in the film thickness measurement.

  15. Neutron scattering studies of short-range order, atomic displacements, and effective pair interactions in a null-matrix Ni0.5262Pt0.48 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. A.; Moss, S. C.; Robertson, J. L.; Copley, J. R. D.; Neumann, D. A.; Major, J.

    2006-09-01

    The best known exception to the Heine-Sampson and Bieber-Gauthier arguments for ordering effects in transition metal alloys (similar to the Hume-Rothery rules) is a NiPt alloy, whose phase diagram is similar to that of the CuAu system. Using neutron scattering we have investigated the local atomic order in a null-matrix Ni0.5262Pt0.48 single crystal. In a null-matrix alloy, the isotopic composition is adjusted so that the average neutron scattering length vanishes ( Ni62 has a negative scattering length nearly equal in magnitude to that of Pt). Consequently, all contributions to the total scattering depending on the average lattice are suppressed. The only remaining components of the elastic scattering are the short-range order (SRO) and size effect terms. These data permit the extraction of the SRO parameters (concentration-concentration correlations) as well as the displacement parameters (concentration-displacement correlations). Using the Krivoglaz-Clapp-Moss theory, we obtain the effective pair interactions (EPIs) between near neighbors in the alloy. The results can be used by theorists to model the alloy in the context of the electronic theory of alloy phase stability, including a preliminary evaluation of the local species-dependent displacements. Our maps of V(q) , the Fourier transform of the EPIs, show very similar shapes in the experimental and reconstructed data. This is of importance when comparing to electronic structure calculations.

  16. Large Phase-by-Phase Modulations in Atomic Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artoni, M.; Zavatta, A.

    2015-09-01

    Phase-resonant closed-loop optical transitions can be engineered to achieve broadly tunable light phase shifts. Such a novel phase-by-phase control mechanism does not require a cavity and is illustrated here for an atomic interface where a classical light pulse undergoes radian level phase modulations all-optically controllable over a few micron scale. It works even at low intensities and hence may be relevant to new applications of all-optical weak-light signal processing.

  17. Neutron scattering studies of short-range order and atomic displacements in a null-matrix nickel-62 platinum crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jose Abelardo

    The best known exception to the Heine-Samson and Bieber-Gautier arguments for ordering effects in transition metal alloys (similar to the Hume-Rothery rules) is a NiPt alloy, where the phase diagram is similar to the CuAu system. Using the Disk Chopper Spectrometer (DCS) at NIST, we have investigated a Null-Matrix Crystal 62 Ni0.52Pt0.48, (62 Ni has a negative scattering length, nearly equal in magnitude to Pt). Its composition has therefore been chosen whereby all effects depending on the average lattice scattering vanish. The only remaining contributions to the diffuse scattering are the Short Range Order (SRO) and Size Effect (SE) terms, to be discussed within. Such data permit the extraction of the SRO parameters (concentration-concentration correlations) as well as the displacement parameters (concentration-displacement correlations). Using the Krivoglaz-Clapp-Moss theory, we obtained the Effective Pair Interactions (EPI) between the several neighbors in the alloy. The results can be used to model the alloy in the context of electronic theory of alloy phase stability, including an evaluation of the potentially important aspect of charge transfer and ionicity.

  18. Atomic displacement and disorder in LiNbO(3) single crystal caused by high-energy (3)He ion irradiation: an x-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Vitova, T; Zamani-Meymian, M R; Peithmann, K; Maier, K; Hormes, J

    2009-12-01

    Nb K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra from a single lithium niobate (LN) crystal irradiated with high-energy (3)He ions of 41 MeV and from unexposed crystal as the reference material are compared. The differences in the x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra are interpreted by simulating Nb K-edge XANES spectra with the FEFF8.2 code. It is found that displacements of Nb and Li atoms, as well as Li and O vacancies, are likely to cause structural disorder leading to change in the refractive index of LN and to diminished birefringence. This finding is in agreement with previous results obtained from SRIM-2003 simulations and transmission electron microscopy measurements. PMID:21836195

  19. Optically trapped atom interferometry using the clock transition of large 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altin, P. A.; McDonald, G.; Döring, D.; Debs, J. E.; Barter, T. H.; Close, J. D.; Robins, N. P.; Haine, S. A.; Hanna, T. M.; Anderson, R. P.

    2011-06-01

    We present a Ramsey-type atom interferometer operating with an optically trapped sample of 106 Bose-condensed 87Rb atoms. We investigate this interferometer experimentally and theoretically with an eye to the construction of future high precision atomic sensors. Our results indicate that, with further experimental refinements, it will be possible to produce and measure the output of a sub-shot-noise-limited, large atom number BEC-based interferometer. The optical trap allows us to couple the |F=1, mF=0rang→|F=2, mF=0rang clock states using a single photon 6.8 GHz microwave transition, while state selective readout is achieved with absorption imaging. We analyse the process of absorption imaging and show that it is possible to observe atom number variance directly, with a signal-to-noise ratio ten times better than the atomic projection noise limit on 106 condensate atoms. We discuss the technical and fundamental noise sources that limit our current system, and present theoretical and experimental results on interferometer contrast, de-phasing and miscibility.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations from SNL's Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Plimpton, Steve; Thompson, Aidan; Crozier, Paul

    LAMMPS (http://lammps.sandia.gov/index.html) stands for Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator and is a code that can be used to model atoms or, as the LAMMPS website says, as a parallel particle simulator at the atomic, meso, or continuum scale. This Sandia-based website provides a long list of animations from large simulations. These were created using different visualization packages to read LAMMPS output, and each one provides the name of the PI and a brief description of the work done or visualization package used. See also the static images produced from simulations at http://lammps.sandia.gov/pictures.html The foundation paper for LAMMPS is: S. Plimpton, Fast Parallel Algorithms for Short-Range Molecular Dynamics, J Comp Phys, 117, 1-19 (1995), but the website also lists other papers describing contributions to LAMMPS over the years.

  1. Hydrogen transport diagnostics by atomic and molecular emission line profiles simultaneously measured for large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.

    2013-01-15

    We observe the Balmer-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} lines of hydrogen atoms and Q branches of the Fulcher-{alpha} band of hydrogen molecules simultaneously with their polarization resolved for large helical device. From the fit including the line splits and the polarization dependences by the Zeeman effect, the emission locations, intensities, and the temperatures of the atoms and molecules are determined. The emission locations of the hydrogen atoms are determined outside but close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS). The results are consistent with a previous work (Phys. Plasmas 12, 042501 (2005)). On the other hand, the emission locations of the molecules are determined to be in the divertor legs, which is farer from those of the atoms. The kinetic energy of the atoms is 1 {approx} 20 eV, while the rotational temperature of molecules is {approx}0.04 eV. Additionally, substantial wings, which originate from high velocity atoms and are not reproduced by the conventional spectral analysis, are observed in the Balmer line profiles. We develop a one-dimensional model to simulate the transport of the atoms and molecules. The model reproduces the differences of the emission locations of the atoms and molecules when their initial temperatures are assumed to be 3 eV and 0.04 eV, respectively. From the model, the wings of the Balmer-{alpha} line is attributed to the high velocity atoms exist deep inside the LCFS, which are generated by the charge exchange collisions with hot protons there.

  2. Contrasting styles of large-scale displacement of unconsolidated sand: examples from the early Jurassic Navajo Sandstone on the Colorado Plateau, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Gerald

    2015-04-01

    Large-scale soft-sediment deformation features in the Navajo Sandstone have been a topic of interest for nearly 40 years, ever since they were first explored as a criterion for discriminating between marine and continental processes in the depositional environment. For much of this time, evidence for large-scale sediment displacements was commonly attributed to processes of mass wasting. That is, gravity-driven movements of surficial sand. These slope failures were attributed to the inherent susceptibility of dune sand responding to environmental triggers such as earthquakes, floods, impacts, and the differential loading associated with dune topography. During the last decade, a new wave of research is focusing on the event significance of deformation features in more detail, revealing a broad diversity of large-scale deformation morphologies. This research has led to a better appreciation of subsurface dynamics in the early Jurassic deformation events recorded in the Navajo Sandstone, including the important role of intrastratal sediment flow. This report documents two illustrative examples of large-scale sediment displacements represented in extensive outcrops of the Navajo Sandstone along the Utah/Arizona border. Architectural relationships in these outcrops provide definitive constraints that enable the recognition of a large-scale sediment outflow, at one location, and an equally large-scale subsurface flow at the other. At both sites, evidence for associated processes of liquefaction appear at depths of at least 40 m below the original depositional surface, which is nearly an order of magnitude greater than has commonly been reported from modern settings. The surficial, mass flow feature displays attributes that are consistent with much smaller-scale sediment eruptions (sand volcanoes) that are often documented from modern earthquake zones, including the development of hydraulic pressure from localized, subsurface liquefaction and the subsequent escape of fluidized sand toward the unconfined conditions of the surface. The origin of the forces that produced the lateral, subsurface movement of a large body of sand at the other site is not readily apparent. The various constraints on modeling the generation of the lateral force required to produce the observed displacement are considered here, along with photodocumentation of key outcrop relationships.

  3. Production of exotic atoms at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bertulani, C. A.; Ellermann, M.

    2010-04-15

    We study in details the space-time dependence of the production of muonic, pionic, and other exotic atoms by the coherent photon exchange between nuclei at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. We show that a multipole expansion of the electromagnetic interaction yields an useful insight of the bound-free production mechanism which has not been explored in the literature. Predictions for the spatial, temporal, and angular distribution, as well as the total cross sections, for the production of exotic atoms are also included.

  4. Resonant atom-field interaction in large-size coupled-cavity arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccarello, Francesco

    2011-04-15

    We consider an array of coupled cavities with staggered intercavity couplings, where each cavity mode interacts with an atom. In contrast to large-size arrays with uniform hopping rates where the atomic dynamics is known to be frozen in the strong-hopping regime, we show that resonant atom-field dynamics with significant energy exchange can occur in the case of staggered hopping rates even in the thermodynamic limit. This effect arises from the joint emergence of an energy gap in the free photonic dispersion relation and a discrete frequency at the gap's center. The latter corresponds to a bound normal mode stemming solely from the finiteness of the array length. Depending on which cavity is excited, either the atomic dynamics is frozen or a Jaynes-Cummings-like energy exchange is triggered between the bound photonic mode and its atomic analog. As these phenomena are effective with any number of cavities, they are prone to be experimentally observed even in small-size arrays.

  5. A precision measurement of the photon recoil using large area atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiow, Sheng-Wey

    We report on progress of a precision measurement of the photon recoil of a cesium atom using atom interferometers consisting of multi-photon beamsplitters. We present large area atom interferometers with up to 24-photon Bragg diffraction as beamsplitters, which increase the phase shift 12-fold for the Mach-Zehnder geometry and 144-fold for the Ramsey-Borde geometry. Fringe visibilities as high as 52% in the Mach-Zehnder geometry and 36% (72% of the theoretical optimum) in the Ramsey-Borde geometry with 12h k-momentum-transfer beamsplitters are presented. The decrease of visibility at pulse separation time longer than 10 ms is mostly ascribed to residual vibrational noise. Moreover, we also demonstrate simultaneous conjugate large area atom interferometers for measuring the photon recoil frequency. Conjugate interferometers have the same phase shift due to local gravity and opposite shift due to the photon recoil. Performing them simultaneously allows a direct measurement of the photon recoil frequency, while local gravity, vibrational noise, and some laser noise are common mode and cancel. We present simultaneous conjugate interferometer fringes with ppm precision in the recoil frequency in 5 minutes. With ellipse fitting, common mode noise in simultaneous conjugate interferometers are removed, and sub-ppm precision is reached in 5 minutes. We expect to reach our goal of sub-ppb accuracy in determining the fine structure constant with current upgrades.

  6. Method for large-scale fabrication of atomic-scale structures on material surfaces using surface vacancies

    DOEpatents

    Lim, Chong Wee; Ohmori, Kenji; Petrov, Ivan Georgiev; Greene, Joseph E.

    2004-07-13

    A method for forming atomic-scale structures on a surface of a substrate on a large-scale includes creating a predetermined amount of surface vacancies on the surface of the substrate by removing an amount of atoms on the surface of the material corresponding to the predetermined amount of the surface vacancies. Once the surface vacancies have been created, atoms of a desired structure material are deposited on the surface of the substrate to enable the surface vacancies and the atoms of the structure material to interact. The interaction causes the atoms of the structure material to form the atomic-scale structures.

  7. Large scale growth and characterization of atomic hexagonal boron nitride layers.

    PubMed

    Song, Li; Ci, Lijie; Lu, Hao; Sorokin, Pavel B; Jin, Chuanhong; Ni, Jie; Kvashnin, Alexander G; Kvashnin, Dmitry G; Lou, Jun; Yakobson, Boris I; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2010-08-11

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), a layered material similar to graphite, is a promising dielectric. Monolayer h-BN, so-called "white graphene", has been isolated from bulk BN and could be useful as a complementary two-dimensional dielectric substrate for graphene electronics. Here we report the large area synthesis of h-BN films consisting of two to five atomic layers, using chemical vapor deposition. These atomic films show a large optical energy band gap of 5.5 eV and are highly transparent over a broad wavelength range. The mechanical properties of the h-BN films, measured by nanoindentation, show 2D elastic modulus in the range of 200-500 N/m, which is corroborated by corresponding theoretical calculations. PMID:20698639

  8. Simultaneous in-plane and out-of-plane displacement measurement based on a dual-camera imaging system and its application to inspection of large-scale space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ri, Shien; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Takeshi; Umebayashi, Takashi; Sato, Akiyoshi; Sato, Eiichi

    2015-07-01

    Optical methods providing full-field deformation data have potentially enormous interest for mechanical engineers. In this study, an in-plane and out-of-plane displacement measurement method based on a dual-camera imaging system is proposed. The in-plane and out-of-plane displacements are determined simultaneously using two measured in-plane displacement data observed from two digital cameras at different view angles. The fundamental measurement principle and experimental results of accuracy confirmation are presented. In addition, we applied this method to the displacement measurement in a static loading and bending test of a solid rocket motor case (CFRP material; 2.2 m diameter and 2.3 m long) for an up-to-date Epsilon rocket developed by JAXA. The effectiveness and measurement accuracy is confirmed by comparing with conventional displacement sensor. This method could be useful to diagnose the reliability of large-scale space structures in the rocket development.

  9. Large-displacement, hydrothermal frictional properties of DFDP-1 fault rocks, Alpine Fault, New Zealand: Implications for deep rupture propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, A. R.; Boulton, C.; Toy, V. G.; Townend, J.; Sutherland, R.

    2016-02-01

    The Alpine Fault, New Zealand, is a major plate-bounding fault that accommodates 65-75% of the total relative motion between the Australian and Pacific plates. Here we present data on the hydrothermal frictional properties of Alpine Fault rocks that surround the principal slip zones (PSZ) of the Alpine Fault and those comprising the PSZ itself. The samples were retrieved from relatively shallow depths during phase 1 of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1) at Gaunt Creek. Simulated fault gouges were sheared at temperatures of 25, 150, 300, 450, and 600°C in order to determine the friction coefficient as well as the velocity dependence of friction. Friction remains more or less constant with changes in temperature, but a transition from velocity-strengthening behavior to velocity-weakening behavior occurs at a temperature of T = 150°C. The transition depends on the absolute value of sliding velocity as well as temperature, with the velocity-weakening region restricted to higher velocity for higher temperatures. Friction was substantially lower for low-velocity shearing (V < 0.3 µm/s) at 600°C, but no transition to normal stress independence was observed. In the framework of rate-and-state friction, earthquake nucleation is most likely at an intermediate temperature of T = 300°C. The velocity-strengthening nature of the Alpine Fault rocks at higher temperatures may pose a barrier for rupture propagation to deeper levels, limiting the possible depth extent of large earthquakes. Our results highlight the importance of strain rate in controlling frictional behavior under conditions spanning the classical brittle-plastic transition for quartzofeldspathic compositions.

  10. Non-statistical fragmentation of large molecules in collisions with atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockett, M. H.; Adoui, L.; Anderson, E. K.; Chen, T.; Chesnel, J.-Y.; de Ruette, N.; Gatchell, M.; Giacomozzi, L.; Huber, B. A.; Kulyk, K.; Maclot, S.; Rousseau, P.; Wolf, M.; Zettergen, H.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.

    2015-09-01

    Non-statistical fragmentation processes are important when Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, fullerenes, or other large molecules collide with atoms at center- of-mass energies from a few tens to a few hundreds of eV. The typical result is the prompt, billiard-ball-like knockout of single atoms (CHx-loss). This is distinct from the well-known statistical fragmentation patterns of these molecules, which are dominated by H- and C2H2-loss for PAHs and C2-loss for fullerenes. We have explored the role of non-statistical fragmentation of PAHs and fullerenes in a series of experimental and theoretical studies. In general, the yield of non-statistical fragments depends sensitively on their stability against secondary statistical fragmentation following knockout.

  11. Large-Area Atomic Oxygen Facility Used to Clean Fire-Damaged Artwork

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Steuber, Thomas J.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    2000-01-01

    In addition to completely destroying artwork, fires in museums and public buildings can soil a displayed artwork with so much accumulated soot that it can no longer be used for study or be enjoyed by the public. In situations where the surface has not undergone extensive charring or melting, restoration can be attempted. However, soot deposits can be very difficult to remove from some types of painted surfaces, particularly when the paint is fragile or flaking or when the top surface of the paint binder has been damaged. Restoration typically involves the use of organic solvents to clean the surface, but these solvents may cause the paint layers to swell or leach out. Also, immersion of the surface or swabbing during solvent cleaning may move or remove pigment through mechanical contact, especially if the fire damage extends into the paint binder. A noncontact technique of removing organic deposits from surfaces was developed out of NASA research on the effects of oxygen atoms on various materials. Atomic oxygen is present in the atmosphere surrounding the Earth at the altitudes where satellites typically orbit. It can react chemically with surface coatings or deposits that contain carbon. In the reaction, the carbon is converted to carbon monoxide and some carbon dioxide. Water vapor is also a byproduct of the reaction if the surface contains carbon-hydrogen bonds. To study this reaction, NASA developed Earth-based facilities to produce atomic oxygen for material exposure and testing. A vacuum facility designed and built by the Electro-Physics Branch of the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to provide atomic oxygen over a large area for studying reactions in low Earth orbit has been used to successfully clean several full-size paintings. (This facility can accommodate paintings up to 1.5 by 2.1 m. The atomic oxygen plasma is produced between two large parallel aluminum plates using a radiofrequency power source operating at roughly 400 W. Atomic oxygen is generated uniformly over this area at an operating pressure of 1 to 5 mtorr.

  12. Large-scale quantum transport calculations for electronic devices with over ten thousand atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenchang; Lu, Yan; Xiao, Zhongcan; Hodak, Miro; Briggs, Emil; Bernholc, Jerry

    The non-equilibrium Green's function method (NEGF) has been implemented in our massively parallel DFT software, the real space multigrid (RMG) code suite. Our implementation employs multi-level parallelization strategies and fully utilizes both multi-core CPUs and GPU accelerators. Since the cost of the calculations increases dramatically with the number of orbitals, an optimal basis set is crucial for including a large number of atoms in the ``active device'' part of the simulations. In our implementation, the localized orbitals are separately optimized for each principal layer of the device region, in order to obtain an accurate and optimal basis set. As a large example, we calculated the transmission characteristics of a Si nanowire p-n junction. The nanowire is along (110) direction in order to minimize the number dangling bonds that are saturated by H atoms. Its diameter is 3 nm. The length of 24 nm is necessary because of the long-range screening length in Si. Our calculations clearly show the I-V characteristics of a diode, i.e., the current increases exponentially with forward bias and is near zero with backward bias. Other examples will also be presented, including three-terminal transistors and large sensor structures.

  13. Chemical assembly of atomically thin transistors and circuits in a large scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mervin; Ye, Yu; Han, Yimo; Xia, Yang; Zhu, Hanyu; Wang, Yuan; Muller, David; Zhang, Xiang

    Next-generation electronics calls for new materials beyond silicon for increased functionality, performance, and scaling in integrated circuits. 2D gapless graphene and semiconducting TMDCs have emerged as promising electronic materials due to their atomic thickness, chemical stability and scalability. However, difficulties in the assembly of 2D electronic structures arise in the precise spatial control over the conducting and semiconducting crystals, typically relying on physically transferring them. Ultimately, this renders them unsuitable for an industrial scale and impedes the maturity of integrating atomic elements in modern electronics. Here, we report the large-scale spatially controlled synthesis of the single-layer MoS2 laterally in electrical contact with graphene using a seeded growth method. TEM studies reveal that the single-layer MoS2 nucleates at the edge of the graphene, creating a lateral van der Waals heterostructure. The graphene allows for electrical injection into MoS2, creating 2D atomic transistors with high transconductance, on-off ratios, and mobility. In addition, we assemble 2D logic circuits, such as a heterostructure NMOS inverter with a high voltage gain, up to 70.

  14. Measuring vulnerability to disaster displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Susan A.; Khazai, Bijan; Power, Christopher; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2015-04-01

    Large scale disasters can cause devastating impacts in terms of population displacement. Between 2008 and 2013, on average 27 million people were displaced annually by disasters (Yonetani 2014). After large events such as hurricane Katrina or the Port-au-Prince earthquake, images of inadequate public shelter and concerns about large scale and often inequitable migration have been broadcast around the world. Population displacement can often be one of the most devastating and visible impacts of a natural disaster. Despite the importance of population displacement in disaster events, measures to understand the socio-economic vulnerability of a community often use broad metrics to estimate the total socio-economic risk of an event rather than focusing on the specific impacts that a community faces in a disaster. Population displacement is complex and multi-causal with the physical impact of a disaster interacting with vulnerability arising from the response, environmental issues (e.g., weather), cultural concerns (e.g., expectations of adequate shelter), and many individual factors (e.g., mobility, risk perception). In addition to the complexity of the causes, population displacement is difficult to measure because of the wide variety of different terms and definitions and its multi-dimensional nature. When we speak of severe population displacement, we may refer to a large number of displaced people, an extended length of displacement or associated difficulties such as poor shelter quality, risk of violence and crime in shelter communities, discrimination in aid, a lack of access to employment or other difficulties that can be associated with large scale population displacement. We have completed a thorough review of the literature on disaster population displacement. Research has been conducted on historic events to understand the types of negative impacts associated with population displacement and also the vulnerability of different groups to these impacts. We aggregate these ideas into a framework of disaster displacement vulnerability that distinguishes between three main aspects of disaster displacement. Disaster displacement can be considered in terms of the number of displaced people and the length of that displacement. However, the literature emphasizes that the severity of disaster displacement can not be measured completely in quantitative terms. Thus, we include a measure representing people who are trapped and unable to leave their homes due to mobility, resources or for other reasons. Finally the third main aspect considers the difficulties that are associated with displacement and reflects the difference between the experiences of those who are displaced into safe and supportive environments as compared to those whose only alternate shelter is dangerous and inadequate for their needs. Finally, we apply the framework to demonstrate a methodology to estimate vulnerability to disaster displacement. Using data from the Global Earthquake Model (GEM) Social and Economic Vulnerability sub-National Database, we generate an index to measure the vulnerability of Japanese prefectures to the dimensions of displacement included in the framework. References Yonitani, M. (2014). Global Estimates 2014: People displaced by disasters. http://www.internal-displacement.org/publications/2014/global-estimates-2014-people-displaced-by-disasters/

  15. Modeling optical properties of silicon clusters by first principles: From a few atoms to large nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurbawono, Argo; Liu, Shuanglong; Zhang, Chun

    2015-04-01

    Time dependent density functional tight binding (TDDFTB) method is implemented with sparse matrix techniques and improved parallelization algorithms. The method is employed to calculate the optical properties of various Si nanocrystals (NCs). The calculated light absorption spectra of small Si NCs from TDDFTB were found to be comparable with many body perturbation methods utilizing planewave basis sets. For large Si NCs (more than a thousand atoms) that are beyond the reach of conventional approaches, the TDDFTB method is able to produce reasonable results that are consistent with prior experiments. We also employed the method to study the effects of surface chemistry on the optical properties of large Si NCs. We learned that the optical properties of Si NCs can be manipulated with small molecule passivations such as methyl, hydroxyl, amino, and fluorine. In general, the shifts and profiles in the absorption spectra can be tuned with suitably chosen passivants.

  16. Modeling optical properties of silicon clusters by first principles: From a few atoms to large nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nurbawono, Argo; Liu, Shuanglong; Zhang, Chun

    2015-04-21

    Time dependent density functional tight binding (TDDFTB) method is implemented with sparse matrix techniques and improved parallelization algorithms. The method is employed to calculate the optical properties of various Si nanocrystals (NCs). The calculated light absorption spectra of small Si NCs from TDDFTB were found to be comparable with many body perturbation methods utilizing planewave basis sets. For large Si NCs (more than a thousand atoms) that are beyond the reach of conventional approaches, the TDDFTB method is able to produce reasonable results that are consistent with prior experiments. We also employed the method to study the effects of surface chemistry on the optical properties of large Si NCs. We learned that the optical properties of Si NCs can be manipulated with small molecule passivations such as methyl, hydroxyl, amino, and fluorine. In general, the shifts and profiles in the absorption spectra can be tuned with suitably chosen passivants.

  17. Halo phenomenon in finite many-fermion systems: Atom-positron complexes and large-scale study of atomic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rotival, V.; Bennaceur, K.

    2009-05-15

    The analysis method proposed in V. Rotival and T. Duguet [Phys. Rev. C 79, 054308 (2009)] is applied to characterize halo properties in finite many-fermion systems. First, the versatility of the method is highlighted by applying it to light- and medium-mass nuclei as well as to atom-positron and ion-positronium complexes. Second, the dependence of nuclear halo properties on the characteristics of the energy-density functional used in self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations is studied. We focus in particular on the influence of (i) the scheme used to regularize/renormalize the ultraviolet divergence of the local pairing functional, (ii) the angular-momentum cutoff in the single-particle basis, as well as (iii) the isoscalar effective mass, (iv) saturation density, and (v) tensor terms characterizing the particle-hole part of the energy functional. It is found that (a) the low-density behavior of the pairing functional and the regularization/renormalization scheme must be chosen coherently and with care to provide meaningful predictions, (b) the impact of pairing correlations on halo properties is significant and is the result of two competing effects, (c) the detailed characteristics of the pairing functional has, however, only little importance, and (d) halo properties depend significantly on any ingredient of the energy-density functional that influences the location of single-particle levels; i.e., the effective mass, the tensor terms, and the saturation density of nuclear matter. The latter dependencies give insights to how experimental data on medium-mass drip-line nuclei can be used in the distant future to constrain some characteristics of the nuclear energy-density functional. Last but not least, large-scale predictions of halos among all spherical even-even nuclei are performed using specific sets of particle-hole and particle-particle energy functionals. It is shown that halos in the ground state of medium-mass nuclei will be found only at the very limit of neutron stability and for a limited number of elements.

  18. The large-scale atomic and molecular gas in the Circinus galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, S. J.; Koribalski, B. S.; Bains, I.

    2008-09-01

    We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST) to map the large-scale atomic and molecular gas in the nearby (4Mpc) Circinus galaxy. The ATCA HI mosaic of Circinus exhibits the warps in position angle and inclination revealed in the single-pointing image of Jones et al., both of which appear to settle beyond the inner 30kpc which was previously imaged. The molecular gas has been mapped in both the CO J = 1 -> 0 and J = 2 -> 1 transitions down to a column density of (3σ), where we derive a total molecular gas mass of . Within a radius of 3kpc, i.e. where CO was clearly detected, the molecular fraction climbs steeply from ~ 0.7 to unity (where , cf. NHI = 1021cm-2) with proximity to the nucleus. Our HI mosaic gives an atomic gas mass of MHI ~ 6 × 109Msolar, which is 70 per cent of the fully mapped single dish value. Combining the atomic and molecular gas masses gives a total gas mass of , cf. the total dynamical mass of ~ 3 × 1011Msolar within the inner 50kpc of our mosaiced image. The total neutral gas mass to dynamical mass ratio is therefore 3 per cent, consistent with the SAS3 (Third Small Astronomy Satellite) classification of Circinus. The high (molecular) gas mass fraction of per cent found by Curran et al., only occurs close to the central ~ 0.5kpc and falls to <~10 per cent within and outwith this region, allaying previous concerns regarding the validity of applying the Galactic conversion ratio to Circinus. The rotation curve, as traced by both the HI and CO, exhibits a steep dip at ~ 1kpc, the edge of the atomic/molecular ring, within which the starburst is occurring. We find the atomic and molecular gases to trace different kinematical features and believe that the fastest part (>~130kms-1) of the subkpc ring consists overwhelmingly of molecular gas. Beyond the inner kpc, the velocity climbs to settle into a solid body rotation of ~ 150kms-1 at >~10kpc. Most of the starlight emanates from within this radius and so much of the dynamical mass, which remains climbing to the limit of our data (>~50kpc), must be due to the dark matter halo.

  19. The Enigmatic 2008 Mw 6.9 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku, Japan, Earthquake: A Large Shallow Thrust Event with Little Surface Displacement and Scant Evidence for Paleoseismic Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, S.; Maruyama, T.; Yoshimi, M.; Awata, Y.; Kaneda, H.; Yoshioka, T.; Ando, R.

    2008-12-01

    The 14 June 2008 Mw 6.9 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake struck the mountainous region in northern Honshu and was accompanied by isolated surface ruptures along ~20 km-long NNE-trend. To understand its relation to the seismogenic faulting at depth, we conducted field investigations immediately after the mainshock, performing detailed mapping and measuring fault displacements using a total station instrument and ground-based LiDAR. More than 12 fault-rupture sites suggest that the total length of the tectonic ground breakage reaches ~20 km. Contractional features such as thrust fault exposures, flexure, tilting, and buckling deformations predominate on the rupture zone, which is consistent with reverse faulting driven by the WNW-ESE compressional stress field in northern Honshu. Shortening as well as vertical displacements were visible on cultural features such as concrete, asphalt paved roads, sidewalks, guardrails, drainage ditches, and rice paddies. Soaked soil underlying paddy fields immediately after rice transplanting worked particularly well to measure such small deformations, separating them into emerged and submerged parts. Amounts of vertical offset and horizontal shortening measured using such cultural piercing points are mostly less than 50 cm, indicating ~1m of net fault slip. Near the southern end of the rupture zone, the fault structure and slip sense become complex and measured offsets are exceptionally large. We found a ~1-km-long E-W-striking continuous rupture with up to 7 m right-lateral and 4 m vertical offsets of a paved road, trails, and rills near the northern rim of the Aratozawa dam reservoir. LiDAR measurements together with our field observations reveal features typical of strike-slip faulting such as mole tracks, fissures, pressure ridges, bulges, tilted trees, and shutter ridges, as well as the offset rills and ridges. The mapped zone of ruptures approximately locates along the central part of the surface projection of an inferred ~40-km-long west- dipping source fault and associated 2-12 km-deep aftershock zone. It also corresponds to a patch of high slip estimated from seismic and geodetic inversions. However, from the viewpoint of the long-term predictability of damaging earthquakes from surface faults, the surface fracturing occurred where no active fault was previously mapped. Although there is geomorphic evidence that strands of this fault had ruptured prehistorically, it would not have allowed us to properly evaluate entire extent of the rupture and therefore the size of the shock.

  20. Large-Area Quality Control of Atomically-Thin Layered Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolen, Craig Merten

    Fast progress in chemical vapor deposition of graphene and other quasi-two-dimensional layered materials such as topological insulators call for development of a reliable high-throughput method of layered materials identification and quality control. The number of atomic planes in graphene or other ultra-thin films has to be determined very fast and over large wafer-scale areas. The previously existed methods of accurate counting of the number of atomic planes in few-layer graphene were primarily based on micro-Raman spectroscopy. These methods were local, slow, and could not be scaled up to characterize the whole wafers. In this dissertation research I proposed and developed an automatic approach for graphene inspection over the wafer-size areas. The proposed method can be scaled up for industrial use. It is based on the image processing analysis of the pseudo-color contrasts uniquely assigned to each few-layer graphene region characterized by a specific number of atomic planes. The initial calibration of the technique is performed with the help of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The image processing is also used to account for the lighting non-uniformity of the samples. Implementation of the technique developed in this dissertation research reduces the cost and time required for graphene identification and quality assessment, and can become the next major impetus for practical applications of graphene, few-layer graphene and other atomically-thin films. The technique was tested on mechanically exfoliated graphene and then extended to the chemical-vapor-deposited graphene, and to bismuth telluride topological insulator thin films. The second part of the dissertation research deals with development of the electrostatic transfer process. The investigated approach allows one to transfer the patterned few-layer graphene films controllably to Si3N4 substrates compatible with other materials. The large-area quality control and graphene transfer techniques developed in this dissertation research are important for the proposed practical applications of graphene in electronics and optoelectronics.

  1. Large Kerr index with amplification in an open four-level atomic system with twofold lower levels.

    PubMed

    Raheli, A; Sahrai, M; Namdar, A; Sadighi-Bonabi, R

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a new freedom, which is the result of atomic injection and exit rates from a cavity associated with an open system, thus leading to a remarkable giant Kerr nonlinearity with applications in all-optical switching. The influence of atomic injection and exit rate from the cavity on nonlinear susceptibility of an open four-level Λ-type atomic system with twofold lower levels is investigated. It is found that large Kerr nonlinearity accompanied with probe gain can be obtained by adjusting the atomic injection rates and exit rate from the cavity, which is completely different from those presented in previous closed atomic systems. Phase control of Kerr nonlinearity in such an open atomic system is then studied. PMID:26836685

  2. Virtual interface substructure synthesis method for normal mode analysis of super-large molecular complexes at atomic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuehui; Sun, Yunxiang; An, Xiongbo; Ming, Dengming

    2011-10-01

    Normal mode analysis of large biomolecular complexes at atomic resolution remains challenging in computational structure biology due to the requirement of large amount of memory space and central processing unit time. In this paper, we present a method called virtual interface substructure synthesis method or VISSM to calculate approximate normal modes of large biomolecular complexes at atomic resolution. VISSM introduces the subunit interfaces as independent substructures that join contacting molecules so as to keep the integrity of the system. Compared with other approximate methods, VISSM delivers atomic modes with no need of a coarse-graining-then-projection procedure. The method was examined for 54 protein-complexes with the conventional all-atom normal mode analysis using CHARMM simulation program and the overlap of the first 100 low-frequency modes is greater than 0.7 for 49 complexes, indicating its accuracy and reliability. We then applied VISSM to the satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV, 78 300 atoms) and to F-actin filament structures of up to 39-mer, 228 813 atoms and found that VISSM calculations capture functionally important conformational changes accessible to these structures at atomic resolution. Our results support the idea that the dynamics of a large biomolecular complex might be understood based on the motions of its component subunits and the way in which subunits bind one another.

  3. Neutron scattering studies of short-range order, atomic displacements, and effective pair interactions in a null-matrix {sup 62}Ni{sub 0.52}Pt{sub 0.48} crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J. A.; Moss, S. C.; Robertson, J. L.; Copley, J. R. D.; Neumann, D. A.; Major, J.

    2006-09-01

    The best known exception to the Heine-Sampson and Bieber-Gauthier arguments for ordering effects in transition metal alloys (similar to the Hume-Rothery rules) is a NiPt alloy, whose phase diagram is similar to that of the CuAu system. Using neutron scattering we have investigated the local atomic order in a null-matrix {sup 62}Ni{sub 0.52}Pt{sub 0.48} single crystal. In a null-matrix alloy, the isotopic composition is adjusted so that the average neutron scattering length vanishes ({sup 62}Ni has a negative scattering length nearly equal in magnitude to that of Pt). Consequently, all contributions to the total scattering depending on the average lattice are suppressed. The only remaining components of the elastic scattering are the short-range order (SRO) and size effect terms. These data permit the extraction of the SRO parameters (concentration-concentration correlations) as well as the displacement parameters (concentration-displacement correlations). Using the Krivoglaz-Clapp-Moss theory, we obtain the effective pair interactions (EPIs) between near neighbors in the alloy. The results can be used by theorists to model the alloy in the context of the electronic theory of alloy phase stability, including a preliminary evaluation of the local species-dependent displacements. Our maps of V(q), the Fourier transform of the EPIs, show very similar shapes in the experimental and reconstructed data. This is of importance when comparing to electronic structure calculations.

  4. An atomic-absorption method for the determination of gold in large samples of geologic materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    VanSickle, Gordon H.; Lakin, Hubert William

    1968-01-01

    A laboratory method for the determination of gold in large (100-gram) samples has been developed for use in the study of the gold content of placer deposits and of trace amounts of gold in other geologic materials. In this method the sample is digested with bromine and ethyl ether, the gold is extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone, and the determination is made by atomicabsorption spectrophotometry. The lower limit of detection is 0.005 part per million in the sample. The few data obtained so far by this method agree favorably with those obtained by assay and by other atomic-absorption methods. About 25 determinations can be made per man-day.

  5. Calculations of atomic sputtering and displacement cross-sections in solid elements by electrons with energies from threshold to 1. 5 MV

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, C.R.

    1988-12-01

    The kinetics of knock-on collisions of relativistic electrons with nuclei and details of the numerical evaluation of differential, recoil, and total Mott cross-sections are reviewed and discussed. The effects of electron beam induced displacement and sputtering, in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) environment, on microanalysis are analyzed with particular emphasis placed on the removal of material by knock-on sputtering. The mass loss predicted due to transmission knock-on sputtering is significant for many elements under conditions frequently encountered in microanalysis. Total Mott cross-sections are tabulated for all naturally occurring solid elements up to Z = 92 at displacement energies of one, two, four, and five times the sublimation energy and for accelerating voltages accessible in the transmission electron microscope. Fortran source code listings for the calculation of the differential Mott cross-section as a function of electron scattering angle (dMottCS), as a function of nuclear recoil angle (RECOIL), and the total Mott cross-section (TOTCS) are included. 48 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. RTV 21 Displacements

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-02-04

    A seal is needed for the cover of the Nitrogen Test Vessel in order to prevent leakage of the N{sub 2} gas. This seal is to be molded out of RTV 21. In this experiment, the Modulus of Elasticity of the RTV was sought after, and the displacements of the RTV due to various stresses were measured to see if they were large enough to provide a tight seal between the vessel and its cover.

  7. Recovery of SRO parameters and pairwise atomic displacements in a Fe{sub 46.5}Ni{sub 53.5} alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J.

    1994-12-31

    Resonant (anomalous) x-ray scattering is used to alter the contrast between atoms nearby in the periodic table to recover local pair correlations. Both Warren-Cowley short-range order parameters and chemically specific interatomic distances are recovered from diffusely scattered x-ray intensities measured at three different x-ray energies (3{lambda} method). Analysis of the statistical and systematic errors shows that the average values for the number and kinds of first nearest neighbors are recovered to about one atom in one hundred and their interatomic distances to about {+-}0.002 {angstrom}.

  8. Large extrinsic spin Hall effect in Au-Cu alloys by extensive atomic disorder scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, L. K.; Wang, S. H.; Zhang, Y.; Sun, J. R.; Cai, J. W.; Kang, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Spin Hall angle, which denotes the conversion efficiency between spin and charge current, is a key parameter in the pure spin current phenomenon. The search for materials with large spin Hall angle is indeed important for scientific interest and potential application in spintronics. Here the large enhanced spin Hall effect (SHE) of Au-Cu alloy is reported by investigating the spin Seebeck effect, spin Hall anomalous Hall effect, and spin Hall magnetoresistance of the Y3F e5O12 (YIG)/A uxC u1 -x hybrid structure over the full composition. At the near equiatomic Au-Cu composition with maximum atomic disorder scattering, the spin Hall angle of the Au-Cu alloy increases by two to three times together with a moderate spin diffusion length in comparison with Au. The longitudinal spin Seebeck voltage and the spin Hall magnetoresistance ratio also increase by two to three times. More importantly, no evidence of anomalous Hall effect is observed in all YIG/Au-Cu samples, in contrast to the cases of other giant SHE materials Pt(Pd), Ta, and W. This behavior makes Au-Cu free from any suspicion of the magnetic proximity effect involved in the hybrid structure, and thus the Au-Cu alloy can be an ideal material for pure spin current study.

  9. Epitaxial B-Graphene: Large-Scale Growth and Atomic Structure.

    PubMed

    Usachov, Dmitry Yu; Fedorov, Alexander V; Petukhov, Anatoly E; Vilkov, Oleg Yu; Rybkin, Artem G; Otrokov, Mikhail M; Arnau, Andrés; Chulkov, Evgueni V; Yashina, Lada V; Farjam, Mani; Adamchuk, Vera K; Senkovskiy, Boris V; Laubschat, Clemens; Vyalikh, Denis V

    2015-07-28

    Embedding foreign atoms or molecules in graphene has become the key approach in its functionalization and is intensively used for tuning its structural and electronic properties. Here, we present an efficient method based on chemical vapor deposition for large scale growth of boron-doped graphene (B-graphene) on Ni(111) and Co(0001) substrates using carborane molecules as the precursor. It is shown that up to 19 at. % of boron can be embedded in the graphene matrix and that a planar C-B sp(2) network is formed. It is resistant to air exposure and widely retains the electronic structure of graphene on metals. The large-scale and local structure of this material has been explored depending on boron content and substrate. By resolving individual impurities with scanning tunneling microscopy we have demonstrated the possibility for preferential substitution of carbon with boron in one of the graphene sublattices (unbalanced sublattice doping) at low doping level on the Ni(111) substrate. At high boron content the honeycomb lattice of B-graphene is strongly distorted, and therefore, it demonstrates no unballanced sublattice doping. PMID:26121999

  10. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H. Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  11. A thermal modelling of displacement cascades in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Garcia, P.; Sabathier, C.; Devynck, F.; Krack, M.; Maillard, S.

    2014-05-01

    The space and time dependent temperature distribution was studied in uranium dioxide during displacement cascades simulated by classical molecular dynamics (MD). The energy for each simulated radiation event ranged between 0.2 keV and 20 keV in cells at initial temperatures of 700 K or 1400 K. Spheres into which atomic velocities were rescaled (thermal spikes) have also been simulated by MD to simulate the thermal excitation induced by displacement cascades. Equipartition of energy was shown to occur in displacement cascades, half of the kinetic energy of the primary knock-on atom being converted after a few tenths of picoseconds into potential energy. The kinetic and potential parts of the system energy are however subjected to little variations during dedicated thermal spike simulations. This is probably due to the velocity rescaling process, which impacts a large number of atoms in this case and would drive the system away from a dynamical equilibrium. This result makes questionable MD simulations of thermal spikes carried out up to now (early 2014). The thermal history of cascades was compared to the heat equation solution of a punctual thermal excitation in UO2. The maximum volume brought to a temperature above the melting temperature during the simulated cascade events is well reproduced by this simple model. This volume eventually constitutes a relevant estimate of the volume affected by a displacement cascade in UO2. This definition of the cascade volume could also make sense in other materials, like iron.

  12. Photoresponse properties of large-area MoS2 atomic layer synthesized by vapor phase deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Siwei; Qi, Xiang; Ren, Long; Hao, Guolin; Fan, Yinping; Liu, Yundan; Han, Weijia; Zang, Chen; Li, Jun; Zhong, Jianxin

    2014-10-01

    Photoresponse properties of a large area MoS2 atomic layer synthesized by vapor phase deposition method without any catalyst are studied. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectrum, and photoluminescence spectrum characterizations confirm that the two-dimensional microstructures of MoS2 atomic layer are of high quality. Photoelectrical results indicate that the as-prepared MoS2 devices have an excellent sensitivity and a good reproducibility as a photodetector, which is proposed to be ascribed to the potential-assisted charge separation mechanism.

  13. Photoresponse properties of large-area MoS{sub 2} atomic layer synthesized by vapor phase deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Siwei; Qi, Xiang E-mail: jxzhong@xtu.edu.cn; Ren, Long; Hao, Guolin; Fan, Yinping; Liu, Yundan; Han, Weijia; Zang, Chen; Li, Jun; Zhong, Jianxin E-mail: jxzhong@xtu.edu.cn

    2014-10-28

    Photoresponse properties of a large area MoS{sub 2} atomic layer synthesized by vapor phase deposition method without any catalyst are studied. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectrum, and photoluminescence spectrum characterizations confirm that the two-dimensional microstructures of MoS{sub 2} atomic layer are of high quality. Photoelectrical results indicate that the as-prepared MoS{sub 2} devices have an excellent sensitivity and a good reproducibility as a photodetector, which is proposed to be ascribed to the potential-assisted charge separation mechanism.

  14. Lateral displacement and rotational displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Duden, Thomas

    2014-04-22

    A position measuring sensor formed from opposing sets of capacitor plates measures both rotational displacement and lateral displacement from the changes in capacitances as overlapping areas of capacitors change. Capacitances are measured by a measuring circuit. The measured capacitances are provided to a calculating circuit that performs calculations to obtain angular and lateral displacement from the capacitances measured by the measuring circuit.

  15. A large-deformation thin plate theory with application to one-atom-thick layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfani, M. R.; Shodja, H. M.

    2016-02-01

    Nowadays, two-dimensional materials due to their vast engineering and biomedical applications have been the focus of many researches. The present paper proposes a large-deformation theory for thin plates with application to one-atom-thick layers (OATLs). The deformation is formulated exactly in the mathematical framework of Lagrangian description. In particular, an exact finite strain analysis is given - in addition to the usual strain tensor associated to the middle surface, the second and third fundamental forms of the middle surface of the deformed thin plate are also maintained in the analysis. Exact closed-form solutions for a uniaxially curved thin plate due to pure bending in one case and due to a combination of vertical and horizontal loading in another are obtained. As a special case of the latter problem, the exact solution for the plane-strain bulge test of thin plates is derived. Subsequently, the approximation of Vlassak and Nix [Vlassak, J.J., Nix, W.D., 1992. J. Mater. Res., 7(12), 3242-3249] for the load-deflection equation is recovered. The given numerical results are devoted to graphene as the most well-known OATL.

  16. Rotary reactor for atomic layer deposition on large quantities of nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J. A.; Cloutier, B. L.; Weimer, A. W.; George, S. M.

    2007-01-15

    Challenges are encountered during atomic layer deposition (ALD) on large quantities of nanoparticles. The particles must be agitated or fluidized to perform the ALD surface reactions in reasonable times and to prevent the particles from being agglomerated by the ALD film. The high surface area of nanoparticles also demands efficient reactant usage because large quantities of reactant are required for the surface reactions to reach completion. The residence time of the reactant in a fluidized particle bed reactor may be too short for high efficiency if the ALD surface reactions have low reactive sticking coefficients. To address these challenges, a novel rotary reactor was developed to achieve constant particle agitation during static ALD reactant exposures. In the design of this new reactor, a cylindrical drum with porous metal walls was positioned inside a vacuum chamber. The porous cylindrical drum was rotated by a magnetically coupled rotary feedthrough. By rotating the cylindrical drum to obtain a centrifugal force of less than one gravitational force, the particles were agitated by a continuous 'avalanche' of particles. In addition, an inert N{sub 2} gas pulse helped to dislodge the particles from the porous walls and provided an efficient method to purge reactants and products from the particle bed. The effectiveness of this rotary reactor was demonstrated by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD on ZrO{sub 2} particles. A number of techniques including transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD film conformally coats the ZrO{sub 2} particles. Combining static reactant exposures with a very high surface area sample in the rotary reactor also provides unique opportunities for studying the surface chemistry during ALD.

  17. Origin of Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy and Large Orbital Moment in Fe Atoms on MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, S.; Donati, F.; Stepanow, S.; Rusponi, S.; Paul, W.; Gangopadhyay, S.; Rau, I. G.; Pacchioni, G. E.; Gragnaniello, L.; Pivetta, M.; Dreiser, J.; Piamonteze, C.; Lutz, C. P.; Macfarlane, R. M.; Jones, B. A.; Gambardella, P.; Heinrich, A. J.; Brune, H.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the magnetic properties of individual Fe atoms deposited on MgO(100) thin films probed by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We show that the Fe atoms have strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with a zero-field splitting of 14.0 ±0.3 meV /atom . This is a factor of 10 larger than the interface anisotropy of epitaxial Fe layers on MgO and the largest value reported for Fe atoms adsorbed on surfaces. The interplay between the ligand field at the O adsorption sites and spin-orbit coupling is analyzed by density functional theory and multiplet calculations, providing a comprehensive model of the magnetic properties of Fe atoms in a low-symmetry bonding environment.

  18. Origin of Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy and Large Orbital Moment in Fe Atoms on MgO.

    PubMed

    Baumann, S; Donati, F; Stepanow, S; Rusponi, S; Paul, W; Gangopadhyay, S; Rau, I G; Pacchioni, G E; Gragnaniello, L; Pivetta, M; Dreiser, J; Piamonteze, C; Lutz, C P; Macfarlane, R M; Jones, B A; Gambardella, P; Heinrich, A J; Brune, H

    2015-12-01

    We report on the magnetic properties of individual Fe atoms deposited on MgO(100) thin films probed by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We show that the Fe atoms have strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with a zero-field splitting of 14.0±0.3  meV/atom. This is a factor of 10 larger than the interface anisotropy of epitaxial Fe layers on MgO and the largest value reported for Fe atoms adsorbed on surfaces. The interplay between the ligand field at the O adsorption sites and spin-orbit coupling is analyzed by density functional theory and multiplet calculations, providing a comprehensive model of the magnetic properties of Fe atoms in a low-symmetry bonding environment. PMID:26684139

  19. Toward accurate thermochemical models for transition metals: G3Large basis sets for atoms Sc-Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayhall, Nicholas J.; Raghavachari, Krishnan; Redfern, Paul C.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Rassolov, Vitaly

    2008-04-01

    An augmented valence triple-zeta basis set, referred to as G3Large, is reported for the first-row transition metal elements Sc through Zn. The basis set is constructed in a manner similar to the G3Large basis set developed previously for other elements (H-Ar, K, Ca, Ga-Kr) and used as a key component in Gaussian-3 theory. It is based on a contraction of a set of 15s13p5d Gaussian primitives to 8s7p3d, and also includes sets of f and g polarization functions, diffuse spd functions, and core df polarization functions. The basis set is evaluated with triples-augmented coupled cluster [CCSD(T)] and Brueckner orbital [BD(T)] methods for a small test set involving energies of atoms, atomic ions, and diatomic hydrides. It performs well for the low-lying s →d excitation energies of atoms, atomic ionization energies, and the dissociation energies of the diatomic hydrides. The Brueckner orbital-based BD(T) method performs substantially better than Hartree-Fock-based CCSD(T) for molecules such as NiH, where the starting unrestricted Hartree-Fock wavefunction suffers from a high degree of spin contamination. Comparison with available data for geometries of transition metal hydrides also shows good agreement. A smaller basis set without core polarization functions, G3MP2Large, is also defined.

  20. Large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of single Co atom on MgO monolayer: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Bin; Shi, Wu-Jun; Feng, Min; Zuo, Xu

    2015-05-07

    Realizing the magnetic bit with a single atom is the ultimate goal for magnetic storage. Based on density functional theory, the magnetic anisotropy (MA) of single Co atom on MgO monolayer has been investigated. Results show that this two dimensional system possesses a large perpendicular MA, about 5.8 meV per Co atom. Besides, there exists remarkable unquenched orbital moments for different magnetization directions, which can be attributed to the reduction of coordination number in two dimensional system and is responsible for the enhanced MA. The Bloch pseudo-wavefunction and band structure of Co d-orbitals have been calculated to elucidate the origin of the perpendicular MA.

  1. Method for preparing ultraflat, atomically perfect areas on large regions of a crystal surface by heteroepitaxy deposition

    DOEpatents

    El Gabaly, Farid; Schmid, Andreas K.

    2013-03-19

    A novel method of forming large atomically flat areas is described in which a crystalline substrate having a stepped surface is exposed to a vapor of another material to deposit a material onto the substrate, which material under appropriate conditions self arranges to form 3D islands across the substrate surface. These islands are atomically flat at their top surface, and conform to the stepped surface of the substrate below at the island-substrate interface. Thereafter, the deposited materials are etched away, in the etch process the atomically flat surface areas of the islands transferred to the underlying substrate. Thereafter the substrate may be cleaned and annealed to remove any remaining unwanted contaminants, and eliminate any residual defects that may have remained in the substrate surface as a result of pre-existing imperfections of the substrate.

  2. Optically trapped atom interferometry using the clock transition of large 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altin, P. A.; McDonald, G.; Döring, D.; Debs, J. E.; Barter, T. H.; Robins, N. P.; Close, J. D.; Haine, S. A.; Hanna, T. M.; Anderson, R. P.

    2011-11-01

    In our original paper (Altin et al 2011 New J. Phys. 13 065020), we presented the results from a Ramsey atom interferometer operating with an optically trapped sample of up to 106 Bose-condensed 87Rb atoms in the mF = 0 clock states. We were unable to observe projection noise fluctuations on the interferometer output, which we attribute to the stability of our microwave oscillator and background magnetic field. Numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equations for our system show that dephasing due to spatial dynamics driven by interparticle interactions accounts for much of the observed decay in fringe visibility at long interrogation times. The simulations show good agreement with the experimental data when additional technical decoherence is accounted for, and suggest that the clock states are indeed immiscible. With smaller samples of 5 × 104 atoms, we observe a coherence time of τ = 1.0+0.5-0.3 s.

  3. Stabilization of a laser on a large-detuned atomic-reference frequency by resonant interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, Priscila M. T.; Nascimento, Guilherme G.; Araújo, Michelle O.; da Silva, Cícero M.; Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de S.; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine; Passerat de Silans, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    We report a simple technique for stabilization of a laser frequency at the wings of an atomic resonance. The reference signal used for stabilization issues from interference effects obtained in a low-quality cavity filled with a resonant atomic vapour. For a frequency detuned 2.6 GHz from the 133Cs D2 6S{}1/2 F = 4 to 6P{}3/2 F’ = 5 transition, the fractional frequency Allan deviation is 10-8 for averaging times of 300 s, corresponding to a frequency deviation of 4 MHz. Adequate choice of the atomic density and of the cell thickness allows locking the laser at detunings larger than 10 GHz. Such a simple technique does not require magnetic fields or signal modulation.

  4. Crystal structure and thermoelectric properties of clathrate, Ba{sub 8}Ni{sub 3.5}Si{sub 42.0}: Small cage volume and large disorder of the guest atom

    SciTech Connect

    Roudebush, John H.; Orellana, Mike; Bux, Sabah

    2012-08-15

    Samples with the type-I clathrate composition Ba{sub 8}Ni{sub x}Si{sub 46-x} have been synthesized and their structure and thermoelectric properties characterized. Microprobe analysis indicates the Ni incorporation to be 2.62{<=}x{<=}3.53. The x=3.5 phase crystallizes in the type-I clathrate structure (space group: Pm-3n) with a lattice parameter of 10.2813(3) A. The refined composition was Ba{sub 8}Ni{sub 3.5}Si{sub 42.0}, with small vacancies, 0.4 and 0.5 atoms per formula unit, at the 2a and 6c sites, respectively. The position of the Ba2 atom in the large cage was modeled using a 4-fold split position (24j site), displaced 0.18 A from the cage center (6d site). The volume of the large cage is calculated to be 146 A{sup 3}, smaller than other clathrates with similar cation displacement. The sample shows n-type behavior with a maximum of -50 {mu}V/K at 823 K above which the Seebeck coefficient decreases, suggesting mixed carriers. Lattice thermal conductivity, {kappa}{sub l}, is 55 mW/K above 600 K. - Graphical abstract: Seebeck coefficient and resistivity of the type-I clathrate Ba{sub 8}Ni{sub 3.5}Si{sub 41.0}. Structure show's large displacement of the Ba cation in the large cage (6c site). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystal structure of the Ba{sub 8}Ni{sub 3.5}Si{sub 41.0} reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vacancies at the 2a and 6c sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Large disorder of Ba guest atom, 0.18 A from cage center. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure is compared to Ba{sub 8}Si{sub 46} and other type-I clathrates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Max Seebeck of -50.7 {mu}V/C at 798.4 K, thermal conductivity {approx}55 mW/K.

  5. The case for character displacement in plants

    PubMed Central

    Beans, Carolyn M

    2014-01-01

    The evidence for character displacement as a widespread response to competition is now building. This progress is largely the result of the establishment of rigorous criteria for demonstrating character displacement in the animal literature. There are, however, relatively few well-supported examples of character displacement in plants. This review explores the potential for character displacement in plants by addressing the following questions: (1) Why aren't examples of character displacement in plants more common? (2) What are the requirements for character displacement to occur and how do plant populations meet those requirements? (3) What are the criteria for testing the pattern and process of character displacement and what methods can and have been used to address these criteria in the plant literature? (4) What are some additional approaches for studying character displacement in plants? While more research is needed, the few plant systems in which character displacement hypotheses have been rigorously tested suggest that character displacement may play a role in shaping plant communities. Plants are especially amenable to character displacement studies because of the experimental ease with which they can be used in common gardens, selection analyses, and breeding designs. A deeper investigation of character displacement in plants is critical for a more complete understanding of the ecological and evolutionary processes that permit the coexistence of plant species. PMID:24683467

  6. Large-Scale Atomistic Simulations of Solid State Materials -- Modeling Many Millions of Atoms on Parallel Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashishta, Priya

    2000-03-01

    Structural and dynamical correlations including crack propagation and fracture in nanophase materials, atomic level stresses in nanopixels, nanoindentation in crystalline and amorphous materials, and dynamics of oxidation in metallic nanoparticles will be discussed using large-scale atomistic simulations. Multiresolution molecular-dynamics (MRMD) approach for multimillion atom simulations has been used to carry out the 10-100 million atom simulations on a variety of parallel computer architectures including Cray T3E, SGI Origin, IBM SP, and large workstation clusters. Issues related to matching of length scales to carry out seamless simulations of electronic, atomic and continuum degrees of freedom will also be briefly discussed. Research presented in this talk is carried out in collaboration with Martina E. Bachlechner, Timothy Campbell, Ingvar Ebbsjo, Rajiv K. Kalia, Hideaki Kikuchi, Sanjay Kodiyalam, Elefterios Lidorikis, Anupam Madhukar, Aiichiro Nakano, Shuji Ogata, Subhash Saini, Fuyuki Shimojo, and Phillip Walsh. Research supported by the US DOE, NSF, AFOSR, ARO, USC-LSU MURI (DARPA & AFOSR), NASA, and LEQSF

  7. Ion and atomic species produced in large scale oxygen plasma used for treatments sensitive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasic, Kosta; Skoro, Nikola; Puac, Nevena; Malovic, Gordana; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2013-09-01

    Asymmetric CCP plasma system operating at 13.56 MHz was successfully used for treatments of textile, seeds and polymers. Central electrode (aluminium rod) was powered electrode while the cylindrical wall of the chamber was grounded electrode. We have used mass spectrometry for detections of ions and neutrals in order to get better insight in plasma chemistry involved in surface reactions on treated samples. Besides of ions, one of the important species for surface modifications is atomic oxygen. Actinometry was used as an additional diagnostic tool to determine the extent of atomic oxygen produced in plasma. Measurements were made in several different mixtures of oxygen with addition of several percent of argon. The range of pressures investigated was 150 to 450 mTorr for powers from 100 to 500 W. Measured atomic oxygen density has a steady rise with power (1019-1020 m-3) . Apart from atomic oxygen species we have detected mass spectra of positive and negative ions. Most abundant ion was O2+while the amounts of O+ and O- were smaller by the order of magnitude compared to O2+. Supported by MESTD, RS, III41011 and ON 171037.

  8. Quantitative spectroscopy of hot stars: accurate atomic data applied on a large scale as driver of recent breakthroughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybilla, Norbert; Schaffenroth, Veronika; Nieva, Maria-Fernanda

    2015-08-01

    OB-type stars present hotbeds for non-LTE physics because of their strong radiation fields that drive the atmospheric plasma out of local thermodynamic equilibrium. We report on recent breakthroughs in the quantitative analysis of the optical and UV-spectra of OB-type stars that were facilitated by application of accurate and precise atomic data on a large scale. An astophysicist's dream has come true, by bringing observed and model spectra into close match over wide parts of the observed wavelength ranges. This facilitates tight observational constraints to be derived from OB-type stars for wide applications in astrophysics. However, despite the progress made, many details of the modelling may be improved further. We discuss atomic data needs in terms of laboratory measurements and also ab-initio calculations. Particular emphasis is given to quantitative spectroscopy in the near-IR, which will be in focus in the era of the upcoming extremely large telescopes.

  9. GRASP92: a package for large-scale relativistic atomic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parpia, F. A.; Froese Fischer, C.; Grant, I. P.

    2006-12-01

    Program summaryTitle of program: GRASP92 Catalogue identifier: ADCU_v1_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADCU_v1_1 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: no Programming language used: Fortran Computer: IBM POWERstation 320H Operating system: IBM AIX 3.2.5+ RAM: 64M words No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 65 224 No of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 409 198 Distribution format: tar.gz Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADCU_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 94 (1996) 249 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Prediction of atomic spectra—atomic energy levels, oscillator strengths, and radiative decay rates—using a 'fully relativistic' approach. Solution method: Atomic orbitals are assumed to be four-component spinor eigenstates of the angular momentum operator, j=l+s, and the parity operator Π=βπ. Configuration state functions (CSFs) are linear combinations of Slater determinants of atomic orbitals, and are simultaneous eigenfunctions of the atomic electronic angular momentum operator, J, and the atomic parity operator, P. Lists of CSFs are either explicitly prescribed by the user or generated from a set of reference CSFs, a set of subshells, and rules for deriving other CSFs from these. Approximate atomic state functions (ASFs) are linear combinations of CSFs. A variational functional may be constructed by combining expressions for the energies of one or more ASFs. Average level (AL) functionals are weighted sums of energies of all possible ASFs that may be constructed from a set of CSFs; the number of ASFs is then the same as the number, n, of CSFs. Optimal level (OL) functionals are weighted sums of energies of some subset of ASFs; the GRASP92 package is optimized for this latter class of functionals. The composition of an ASF in terms of CSFs sharing the same quantum numbers is determined using the configuration-interaction (CI) procedure that results upon varying the expansion coefficients to determine the extremum of a variational functional. Radial functions may be determined by numerically solving the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) equations that result upon varying the orbital radial functions or some subset thereof so as to obtain an extremum of the variational functional. Radial wavefunctions may also be determined using a screened hydrogenic or Thomas-Fermi model, although these schemes generally provide initial estimates for MCDF self-consistent-field (SCF) calculations. Transition properties for pairs of ASFs are computed from matrix elements of multipole operators of the electromagnetic field. All matrix elements of CSFs are evaluated using the Racah algebra. Reasons for the new version: During recent studies using the general relativistic atomic structure package (GRASP92), several errors were found, some of which might have been present already in the earlier GRASP92 version (program ABJN_v1_0, Comput. Phys. Comm. 55 (1989) 425). These errors were reported and discussed by Froese Fischer, Gaigalas, and Ralchenko in a separate publication [C. Froese Fischer, G. Gaigalas, Y. Ralchenko, Comput. Phys. Comm. 175 (2006) 738-744. [7

  10. Gas Atomization Precursor Powder Approach for Simplified Large-Scale Production of Oxide Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, John; Anderson, Iver; Rieken, Joel; Byrd, David

    2011-04-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-based alloys show promise for future energy applications that require high-temperature and oxidation resistant properties. Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS), with a mixed (Ar/O{sub 2}) atomization gas, is being developed as a simplified route for producing ODS precursor powders. Internal oxidation studies determined Ni-Cr-Y-(Hf or Ti) containing systems are suitable for production of ODS alloys via hot consolidation, which is used to encourage oxygen exchange between the less stable surface oxide phase and reactive alloying elements, resulting in highly stable nano-metric dispersoid formation. Size control of powders is key to optimizing microstructural and strengthening features. Aspiration and, previously, water modeling experiments were used to develop atomization process parameters that encourage controlled powder production while maintaining reduced operating costs when implemented on an industrial scale. For an increase in pour tube extension: aspiration base pressure at any given operating pressure was found to decrease while wake closure pressure was found to increase. Aspiration hysteresis was observed as recorded previously in the literature. Light emission was observed above wake closure pressures.

  11. Large cross section for super energy transfer from hyperthermal atoms to ambient molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianqiang; Wilhelm, Michael J.; Smith, Jonathan M.; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2016-04-01

    The experimentally measured cross section for super energy transfer collisions between a hyperthermal H atom and an ambient molecule is presented here. This measurement substantiates an emerging energy transfer mechanism with significant cross section, whereby a major fraction of atomic translational energy is converted into molecular vibrational energy through a transient collision-induced reactive complex. Specifically, using nanosecond time-resolved infrared emission spectroscopy, it is revealed that collisions between hyperthermal hydrogen atoms (with 59 kcal/mol of kinetic energy) and ambient SO2 result in the production of vibrationally highly excited SO2 with >14 000 cm-1 of internal energy. The lower limit of the cross section for this super energy transfer process is determined to be 0.53 ±0.05 Å2, i.e., 2% of all hard-sphere collisions. This cross section is orders of magnitude greater than that predicted by the exponential energy gap law, which is commonly used for describing collisional energy transfer through repulsive interactions.

  12. Job Displacement Among Single Mothers:

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Jennie E.; Thomas, Juli Simon

    2015-01-01

    Given the recent era of economic upheaval, studying the effects of job displacement has seldom been so timely and consequential. Despite a large literature associating displacement with worker well-being, relatively few studies focus on the effects of parental displacement on child well-being, and fewer still focus on implications for children of single parent households. Moreover, notwithstanding a large literature on the relationship between single motherhood and children’s outcomes, research on intergenerational effects of involuntary employment separations among single mothers is limited. Using 30 years of nationally representative panel data and propensity score matching methods, we find significant negative effects of job displacement among single mothers on children’s educational attainment and social-psychological well-being in young adulthood. Effects are concentrated among older children and children whose mothers had a low likelihood of displacement, suggesting an important role for social stigma and relative deprivation in the effects of socioeconomic shocks on child well-being. PMID:25032267

  13. Large-scale circulation of atomic oxygen in the MLT region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, G.; Liu, G.; Roble, R.

    The atomic oxygen green line airglow at 557.7 nm, originating from the O(1S) level, has a long history of observation, beginning with John Strutt (Lord Rayleigh IV). He drew attention to its variability, a topic that has puzzled successive investigators for decades. More recently, global observations of the oxygen airglow, interpreted with the help of global circulation models have provided some understanding. Zonally averaged satellite observations clearly demonstrate the dynamical influence of tides on the daily variations. Global maps for a single day show a longitudinal variation results from planetary waves. For a single ground-station, the observations are influenced by both, involving variability over days or weeks. During the course of the year both annual and semi-annual components of the variation have been identified. In the present investigation these are studied using data from the WIND Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, and model results from the TIME-GCM model. The annual variation can be described in terms of a rapid buildup of atomic oxygen in the fall, manifested as high airglow levels at polar latitudes in early winter that decay gradually during the winter period, and are abruptly terminated by a strong atomic oxygen depletion in spring that has been called the springtime transition. The summer values remain low until the sudden autumn rise that can be called the autumnal transition. However, the observations show significant differences between the northern and southern hemispheres. The semi-annual variation dominates at latitudes below 30 and appears to be the result of changes in the mixing intensity that may be linked to the semi-annual variation in the amplitude of the diurnal tide.

  14. Atomic oxidation of large area epitaxial graphene on 4H-SiC(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Velez-Fort, E.; Ouerghi, A.; Silly, M. G.; Sirtti, F.; Eddrief, M.; Marangolo, M.; Shukla, A.

    2014-03-03

    Structural and electronic properties of epitaxial graphene on 4H-SiC were studied before and after an atomic oxidation process. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy indicates that oxygen penetrates into the substrate and decouples a part of the interface layer. Raman spectroscopy demonstrates the increase of defects due to the presence of oxygen. Interestingly, we observed on the near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra a splitting of the π* peak into two distinct resonances centered at 284.7 and 285.2 eV. This double structure smears out after the oxidation process and permits to probe the interface architecture between graphene and the substrate.

  15. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, S. E-mail: pradhans75@gmail.com; Poornima,; Dasgupta, K.; Mishra, S.; Behera, R.

    2015-06-15

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz{sup 1/2} @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity.

  16. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Mishra, S; Behera, R; Poornima; Dasgupta, K

    2015-06-01

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz(1/2) @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity. PMID:26133825

  17. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, S.; Mishra, S.; Behera, R.; Poornima, Dasgupta, K.

    2015-06-01

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz1/2 @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity.

  18. Large-area tungsten diselenide atomic layers on an insulator substrate grown by vapor phase chemical deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Kwonjae; Kang, Il-Suk; Park, Yehoon; Ahn, Chi Won; Shin, Jongwoo; Yool Jung, Dae; Cho, Byung Jin; Choi, Sung-Yool; Choi, Hongkyw

    2013-03-01

    Group IV transition metal dichalcogenides such as WS2 and WSe2 are one of attracting material classes which have a physical two dimension of one atomic layer and atomically thin layers like graphene. These materials have interesting features such as an indirect bulk gap makes a transition to a direct band gap in monolayer. Recent research results of FETs showed that a high effective hole mobility of 250 cm2 /V s with subthreshold swing of 60 mV/dec from an exfoliated monolayer. Indeed it is natural to think that artificial large area synthesis is needed for practical applications. Here we report the large-area tungsten diselenide layers on SiO2 substrate using vapor phase deposition method. Selenium source was evaporated from certain distances to a tungsten thin film on SiO2/Si wafer. Nitrogen gas was flowed during all processes as a carrier gas. Growth was performed at 700 ~ 900 Celsius degree. The size of atomic tungsten diselenide layers simply depends on a wafer and quartz tube size. Good qualities of selected tungsten diselenide layers were investigated by AFM/EFM, SEM/TEM, and Raman spectroscopy. FET and PL data also will be presented.

  19. Atomically flat Ge buffer layers and alternating shutter growth of CaGe2 for large area germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinsong; Katoch, Jyoti; Ahmed, Adam; Pinchuk, Igor; Williams, Robert; McComb, David; Kawakami, Roland

    Germanane (GeH), which is converted from CaGe2 by soaking in HCl acid, has recently attracted interest because of its novel properties, such as large band gap (1.56eV), spin orbit coupling and predictions of high mobility (18000 cm2/Vs). Previously CaGe2 was successfully grown on Ge(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth. But there were cracks between µm-sized islands, which is not desirable for scientific study and application, and limits the material quality. By growing atomically flat Ge buffer layers and using alternating shutter MBE growth, we are able to grow crack-free, large area films of CaGe2 films. Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns of Ge buffer layer and CaGe2 indicates high quality two dimensional surfaces, which is further confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), showing atomically flat and uniform Ge buffer layer and CaGe2. The appearance of Laue oscillation in X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Kiessig fringes in X-ray reflectivity (XRR) proves the uniformity of CaGe2 film and the smoothness of the interface. The high quality of CaGe2 film makes it promising to explore novel properties of GeH. Funded by NSF MRSEC DMR-1420451.

  20. Particle displacement tracking for PIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1990-01-01

    A new Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) data acquisition and analysis system, which is an order of magnitude faster than any previously proposed system has been constructed and tested. The new Particle Displacement Tracing (PDT) system is an all electronic technique employing a video camera and a large memory buffer frame-grabber board. Using a simple encoding scheme, a time sequence of single exposure images are time coded into a single image and then processed to track particle displacements and determine velocity vectors. Application of the PDT technique to a counter-rotating vortex flow produced over 1100 velocity vectors in 110 seconds when processed on an 80386 PC.

  1. Large-scale displacement along the Altyn Tagh Fault (North Tibet) since its Eocene initiation: Insight from detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology and subsurface data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Feng; Jolivet, Marc; Fu, Suotang; Zhang, Changhao; Zhang, Qiquan; Guo, Zhaojie

    2016-05-01

    Marking the northern boundary of the Tibetan plateau, the Altyn Tagh fault plays a crucial role in accommodating the Cenozoic crustal deformation affecting the plateau. However, its initiation time and amount of offset are still controversial despite being key information for the understanding of Tibet evolution. In this study, we present 1122 single LA-ICP-MS detrital zircon U-Pb ages obtained from 11 Mesozoic to Cenozoic sandstone samples, collected along two sections in the northwestern Qaidam basin (Eboliang and Huatugou). These data are combined with new 3D seismic reflection profiles to demonstrate that: (1) from the Paleocene to early Eocene, the Eboliang section was approximately located near the present position of Anxi, 360 ± 40 km southwest from its current location along the Altyn Tagh fault, and sediments were mainly derived from the Altyn Tagh Range. At the same period, the Huatugou section was approximately located near the present position of Tula, ca. 360 km southwest from its current location along the Altyn Tagh fault, and the Eastern Kunlun Range represented a significant sediment source. (2) Left-lateral strike-slip movement along the Altyn Tagh fault initiated during the early-middle Eocene, resulting in northeastward displacement of the two sections. (3) By early Miocene, the intensive deformation within the Altyn Tagh Range and northwestern Qaidam basin strongly modified the drainage system, preventing the materials derived from the Altyn Tagh Range to reach the Eboliang and the Huatugou sections. The post-Oligocene clastic material in the western Qaidam basin is generally derived from local sources and recycling of the deformed Paleocene to Oligocene strata. From these data, we suggest enhanced tectonic activity within the Altyn Tagh Range and northwestern Qaidam basin since Miocene time, and propose an early-middle Eocene initiation of left-lateral strike-slip faulting leading to a 360 ± 40 km offset along the Altyn Tagh fault.

  2. Large-area Sagnac atom interferometer with robust phase read out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackmann, Gunnar; Berg, Peter; Abend, Sven; Schubert, Christian; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst Maria

    2014-12-01

    We report on recent progress on our matter-wave Sagnac interferometer capable of resolving ultra-slow rotations below the μrads-1 level with a 1-s measurement time and a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Two Raman interferometers are employed that are susceptible to rotation and acceleration. We demonstrate two read-out schemes exploiting the strict phase correlation of the dual interferometer, the first one locking the interferometer to the mid-fringe position, and the second relying on phase modulation combined with ellipse fitting. In both, the sensitivity to gravity acceleration is employed for controlling the differential interferometer phase without influencing the rotation signal. Furthermore, we discuss errors in the rotation signal arising from atom source instabilities combined with a residual misalignment of the three pulsed light gratings used for atomic diffraction. Monitoring the source position fluctuations allows us to suppress this spurious signal. We achieve stable operation with a sensitivity of 850 nrads-1Hz - 1 / 2 for a 1-s measurement time, and 20 nrads-1 after 4000 s of averaging. xml:lang="fr"

  3. On the performance of large Gaussian basis sets for the computation of total atomization energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. M. L.

    1992-01-01

    The total atomization energies of a number of molecules have been computed using an augmented coupled-cluster method and (5s4p3d2f1g) and 4s3p2d1f) atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as well as the correlation consistent valence triple zeta plus polarization (cc-pVTZ) correlation consistent valence quadrupole zeta plus polarization (cc-pVQZ) basis sets. The performance of ANO and correlation consistent basis sets is comparable throughout, although the latter can result in significant CPU time savings. Whereas the inclusion of g functions has significant effects on the computed Sigma D(e) values, chemical accuracy is still not reached for molecules involving multiple bonds. A Gaussian-1 (G) type correction lowers the error, but not much beyond the accuracy of the G1 model itself. Using separate corrections for sigma bonds, pi bonds, and valence pairs brings down the mean absolute error to less than 1 kcal/mol for the spdf basis sets, and about 0.5 kcal/mol for the spdfg basis sets. Some conclusions on the success of the Gaussian-1 and Gaussian-2 models are drawn.

  4. Large numbers of cold positronium atoms created in laser-selected Rydberg states using resonant charge exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, R.; Gabrielse, G.; Kolthammer, W. S.; Richerme, P.; Müllers, A.; Walz, J.; Grzonka, D.; Zielinski, M.; Fitzakerley, D.; George, M. C.; Hessels, E. A.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; ATRAP Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Lasers are used to control the production of highly excited positronium atoms (Ps*). The laser light excites Cs atoms to Rydberg states that have a large cross section for resonant charge-exchange collisions with cold trapped positrons. For each trial with 30 million trapped positrons, more than 700 000 of the created Ps* have trajectories near the axis of the apparatus, and are detected using Stark ionization. This number of Ps* is 500 times higher than realized in an earlier proof-of-principle demonstration (2004 Phys. Lett. B 597 257). A second charge exchange of these near-axis Ps* with trapped antiprotons could be used to produce cold antihydrogen, and this antihydrogen production is expected to be increased by a similar factor.

  5. Displacement Cascade Damage Production in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Malerba, Lorenzo; Nordlund, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced changes in microstructure and mechanical properties in structural materials are the result of a complex set of physical processes initiated by the collision between an energetic particle (neutron or ion) and an atom in the lattice. This primary damage event is called an atomic displacement cascade. The simplest description of a displacement cascade is to view it as a series of many billiard-ball-like elastic collisions among the atoms in the material. This chapter describes the formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the relevant variables such as cascade energy and irradiation temperature is discussed, and defect formation in different materials is compared.

  6. Large-Scale Production of Large-Size Atomically Thin Semiconducting Molybdenum Dichalcogenide Sheets in Water and Its Application for Supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Xiang; Wu, Chien-Wei; Kuo, Ting-Yang; Chang, Yu-Lung; Jen, Ming-Hsing; Chen, I-Wen Peter

    2016-01-01

    To progress from laboratory research to commercial applications, it is necessary to develop an effective method to prepare large quantities and high-quality of the large-size atomically thin molybdenum dichalcogenides (MoS2). Aqueous-phase processes provide a viable method for producing thin MoS2 sheets using organolithium-assisted exfoliation; unfortunately, this method is hindered by changing pristine semiconducting 2H phase to distorted metallic 1T phase. Recovery of the intrinsic 2H phase typically involves heating of the 1T MoS2 sheets on solid substrates at high temperature. This has restricted and hindered the utilization of 2H phase MoS2 sheets suspensions. Here, we demonstrate that the synergistic effect of the rigid planar structure and charged nature of organic salt such as imidazole (ImH) can be successfully used to produce atomically thin 2H-MoS2 sheets suspension in water. Moreover, lateral size and area of the exfoliated sheet can be up to 50 μm and 1000 μm(2), respectively. According to the XPS measurements, nearly 100% of the 2H-MoS2 sheets was successfully prepared. A composite paper supercapacitor using the exfoliated 2H-MoS2 and carbon nanotubes delivered a superior volumetric capacitance of ~410 F/cm(3). Therefore, the organic salts-assisted liquid-phase exfoliation has great potential for large-scale production of 2H-MoS2 suspensions for supercapacitor application. PMID:27225297

  7. Large-scale modular quantum-computer architecture with atomic memory and photonic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, C.; Raussendorf, R.; Ruthven, A.; Brown, K. R.; Maunz, P.; Duan, L.-M.; Kim, J.

    2014-02-01

    The practical construction of scalable quantum-computer hardware capable of executing nontrivial quantum algorithms will require the juxtaposition of different types of quantum systems. We analyze a modular ion trap quantum-computer architecture with a hierarchy of interactions that can scale to very large numbers of qubits. Local entangling quantum gates between qubit memories within a single register are accomplished using natural interactions between the qubits, and entanglement between separate registers is completed via a probabilistic photonic interface between qubits in different registers, even over large distances. We show that this architecture can be made fault tolerant, and demonstrate its viability for fault-tolerant execution of modest size quantum circuits.

  8. Atomic Number Dependence of Hadron Production at Large Transverse Momentum in 300 GeV Proton--Nucleus Collisions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cronin, J. W.; Frisch, H. J.; Shochet, M. J.; Boymond, J. P.; Mermod, R.; Piroue, P. A.; Sumner, R. L.

    1974-07-15

    In an experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory we have compared the production of large transverse momentum hadrons from targets of W, Ti, and Be bombarded by 300 GeV protons. The hadron yields were measured at 90 degrees in the proton-nucleon c.m. system with a magnetic spectrometer equipped with 2 Cerenkov counters and a hadron calorimeter. The production cross-sections have a dependence on the atomic number A that grows with P{sub 1}, eventually leveling off proportional to A{sup 1.1}.

  9. Direct observation of dopant atom diffusion in a bulk semiconductor crystal enhanced by a large size mismatch.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Mishra, Rohan; Lupini, Andrew R; Findlay, Scott D; Taniguchi, Takashi; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2014-10-10

    Diffusion is one of the fundamental processes that govern the structure, processing, and properties of materials and it plays a crucial role in determining device lifetimes. However, direct observations of diffusion processes have been elusive and limited only to the surfaces of materials. Here we use an aberration-corrected electron microscope to locally excite and directly image the diffusion of single Ce and Mn dopants inside bulk wurtzite-type AlN single crystals, identifying correlated vacancy-dopant and interstitial-dopant kick-out mechanisms. Using a 200 kV electron beam to supply energy, we observe a higher frequency of dopant jumps for the larger and heavier Ce atoms than the smaller Mn atoms. These observations confirm density-functional-theory-based predictions of a decrease in diffusion barrier for large substitutional atoms. The results show that combining depth sensitive microscopy with theoretical calculations represents a new methodology to investigate diffusion mechanisms, not restricted to surface phenomena, but within bulk materials. PMID:25375721

  10. Precision displacement reference system

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Dubois, Robert R.; Strother, Jerry D.

    2000-02-22

    A precision displacement reference system is described, which enables real time accountability over the applied displacement feedback system to precision machine tools, positioning mechanisms, motion devices, and related operations. As independent measurements of tool location is taken by a displacement feedback system, a rotating reference disk compares feedback counts with performed motion. These measurements are compared to characterize and analyze real time mechanical and control performance during operation.

  11. Synthesis of Large and Few Atomic Layers of Hexagonal Boron Nitride on Melted Copper

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Majharul Haque; Huang, Zhenguo; Xiao, Feng; Casillas, Gilberto; Chen, Zhixin; Molino, Paul J.; Liu, Hua Kun

    2015-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (h-BNNS) have been proposed as an ideal substrate for graphene-based electronic devices, but the synthesis of large and homogeneous h-BNNS is still challenging. In this contribution, we report a facile synthesis of few-layer h-BNNS on melted copper via an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition process. Comparative studies confirm the advantage of using melted copper over solid copper as a catalyst substrate. The former leads to the formation of single crystalline h-BNNS that is several microns in size and mostly in mono- and bi-layer forms, in contrast to the polycrystalline and mixed multiple layers (1–10) yielded by the latter. This difference is likely to be due to the significantly reduced and uniformly distributed nucleation sites on the smooth melted surface, in contrast to the large amounts of unevenly distributed nucleation sites that are associated with grain boundaries and other defects on the solid surface. This synthesis is expected to contribute to the development of large-scale manufacturing of h-BNNS/graphene-based electronics. PMID:25582557

  12. Elucidating Common Structural Features of Human Pathogenic Variations Using Large-Scale Atomic-Resolution Protein Networks

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jishnu; Lee, Hao Ran; Sagar, Adithya; Fragoza, Robert; Liang, Jin; Wei, Xiaomu; Wang, Xiujuan; Mort, Matthew; Stenson, Peter D.; Cooper, David N.; Yu, Haiyuan

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid growth of structural genomics, numerous protein crystal structures have become available. However, the parallel increase in knowledge of the functional principles underlying biological processes, and more specifically the underlying molecular mechanisms of disease, has been less dramatic. This notwithstanding, the study of complex cellular networks has made possible the inference of protein functions on a large scale. Here, we combine the scale of network systems biology with the resolution of traditional structural biology to generate a large-scale atomic-resolution interactome-network comprising 3,398 interactions between 2,890 proteins with a well-defined interaction interface and interface residues for each interaction. Within the framework of this atomic-resolution network, we have explored the structural principles underlying variations causing human-inherited disease. We find that in-frame pathogenic variations are enriched at both the interface and in the interacting domain, suggesting that variations not only at interface “hot-spots,” but in the entire interacting domain can result in alterations of interactions. Further, the sites of pathogenic variations are closely related to the biophysical strength of the interactions they perturb. Finally, we show that biochemical alterations consequent to these variations are considerably more disruptive than evolutionary changes, with the most significant alterations at the protein interaction interface. PMID:24599843

  13. A large-N expansion based theoretical framework for modeling cold atoms in and out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Chih-Chun; Cooper, Fred; Timmermans, Eddy; Mihaila, Bogdan; Dawson, John

    2014-05-01

    The large-N expansion is a scheme for rearranging Feynman diagrams. Although this technique can be applied to cold atoms with contact interactions, for single-component ultra-cold bosons the leading-order large-N expansion does not reproduce Bogoliubov dispersion in the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) phase. However, we prove that the correct vacuum leads to a dispersion resembling Bogoliubov dispersion. Moreover, we have developed a theory, which includes the normal as well as the anomalous Green's functions. This theory, named leading-order auxiliary field theory, is gapless, conserving, and has a second-order phase transition. We also generalize it to describe a two-component Bose gas above its BEC transition temperature. The mixture to phase-separation transition is shown to survive at high temperature in this model without any BEC. Furthermore, the same theoretical framework can be applied to ultra-cold fermions and we found that the BCS-Leggett theory of BCS-BEC crossover can be derived as the leading-order theory from this framework. Importantly, our theoretical framework can be generalized to include time dependence so interesting dynamics in cold atoms could be investigated in a coherent fashion. Supported by US DOE via LANL/LDRD.

  14. Tunable electronics in large-area atomic layers of boron-nitrogen-carbon.

    PubMed

    Muchharla, Baleeswaraiah; Pathak, Arjun; Liu, Zheng; Song, Li; Jayasekera, Thushari; Kar, Swastik; Vajtai, Robert; Balicas, Luis; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Talapatra, Saikat; Ali, Naushad

    2013-08-14

    We report on the low-temperature electrical transport properties of large area boron and nitrogen codoped graphene layers (BNC). The temperature dependence of resistivity (5 K < T < 400 K) of BNC layers show semiconducting nature and display a band gap which increases with B and N content, in sharp contrast to large area graphene layers, which shows metallic behavior. Our investigations show that the amount of B dominates the semiconducting nature of the BNC layers. This experimental observations agree with the density functional theory (DFT) calculations performed on BNC structures similar in composition to the experimentally measured samples. In addition, the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity of these samples displays two regimes: at higher temperatures, the doped samples display an Arrhenius-like temperature dependence thus indicating a well-defined band gap. At the lowest temperatures, the temperature dependence of the conductivity deviates from activated behavior and displays a conduction mechanism consistent with Mott's two-dimensional (2D) variable range hopping (2D-VRH). The ability to tune the electronic properties of thin layers of BNC by simply varying the concentration of B and N will provide a tremendous boost for obtaining materials with tunable electronic properties relevant to applications in solid state electronics. PMID:23859076

  15. Large-dimension configuration-interaction calculations of positron binding to the group-II atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, M. W. J.; Mitroy, J.

    2006-03-15

    The configuration-interaction (CI) method is applied to the calculation of the structures of a number of positron binding systems, including e{sup +}Be, e{sup +}Mg, e{sup +}Ca, and e{sup +}Sr. These calculations were carried out in orbital spaces containing about 200 electron and 200 positron orbitals up to l=12. Despite the very large dimensions, the binding energy and annihilation rate converge slowly with l, and the final values do contain an appreciable correction obtained by extrapolating the calculation to the l{yields}{infinity} limit. The binding energies were 0.00317 hartree for e{sup +}Be, 0.0170 hartree for e{sup +}Mg, 0.0189 hartree for e{sup +}Ca, and 0.0131 hartree for e{sup +}Sr.

  16. Linking Species Traits to the Abiotic Template of Flowing Waters: Contrasting Eco physiologies Underlie Displacement of Zebra Mussels by Quagga Mussels in a Large River-Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, A. F.

    2005-05-01

    The St. Lawrence River-Estuary was the gateway of entry for dreissenids to North America and holds some of the oldest populations. The St. Lawrence also has four distinct physical-chemical water masses (a regional scale abiotic template) that both species inhabit. Despite their ecological similarities, quagga mussels are supplanting zebra mussels in much of their shared range. In order to try to better understand the changing distributions of these two species we compared glycogen, shell mass and tissue biomass in each of the water masses. This comparative physiological combined with experimental approaches (estuarine salinity experiments and reciprocal transplants) showed that while quagga mussels should dominate in most habitats, that abiotic/bioenergetic constraints in two regions (the Ottawa River plume and the freshwater-marine transition zone) might prevent them from dominating these locations. These findings are an example of how the interaction of landscape scale abiotic heterogeneity and a species-specific physiology can have strong impacts of distribution of biota large rivers.

  17. Amorphization of Silicon Carbide by Carbon Displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-05-10

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine the possibility of amorphizing silicon carbide (SiC) by exclusively displacing C atoms. At a defect generation corresponding to 0.2 displacements per atom, the enthalpy surpasses the level of melt-quenched SiC, the density decreases by about 15%, and the radial distribution function shows a lack of long-range order. Prior to amorphization, the surviving defects are mainly C Frenkel pairs (67%), but Si Frenkel pairs (18%) and anti-site defects (15%) are also present. The results indicate that SiC can be amorphized by C sublattice displacements. Chemical short-range disorder, arising mainly from interstitial production, plays a significant role in the amorphization.

  18. Meta-Atom Behavior in Clusters Revealing Large Spin Ground States.

    PubMed

    Hernández Sánchez, Raúl; Betley, Theodore A

    2015-11-01

    The field of single molecule magnetism remains predicated on super- and double exchange mechanisms to engender large spin ground states. An alternative approach to achieving high-spin architectures involves synthesizing weak-field clusters featuring close M-M interactions to produce a single valence orbital manifold. Population of this orbital manifold in accordance with Hund's rules could potentially yield thermally persistent high-spin ground states under which the valence electrons remain coupled. We now demonstrate this effect with a reduced hexanuclear iron cluster that achieves an S = 19/2 (χ(M)T ≈ 53 cm(3) K/mol) ground state that persists to 300 K, representing the largest spin ground state persistent to room temperature reported to date. The reduced cluster displays single molecule magnet behavior manifest in both variable-temperature zero-field (57)Fe Mössbauer and magnetometry with a spin reversal barrier of 42.5(8) cm(-1) and a magnetic blocking temperature of 2.9 K (0.059 K/min). PMID:26440452

  19. Accelerating solidification process simulation for large-sized system of liquid metal atoms using GPU with CUDA

    SciTech Connect

    Jie, Liang; Li, KenLi; National Supercomputing Center in Changsha, 410082 ; Shi, Lin; Liu, RangSu; Mei, Jing

    2014-01-15

    Molecular dynamics simulation is a powerful tool to simulate and analyze complex physical processes and phenomena at atomic characteristic for predicting the natural time-evolution of a system of atoms. Precise simulation of physical processes has strong requirements both in the simulation size and computing timescale. Therefore, finding available computing resources is crucial to accelerate computation. However, a tremendous computational resource (GPGPU) are recently being utilized for general purpose computing due to its high performance of floating-point arithmetic operation, wide memory bandwidth and enhanced programmability. As for the most time-consuming component in MD simulation calculation during the case of studying liquid metal solidification processes, this paper presents a fine-grained spatial decomposition method to accelerate the computation of update of neighbor lists and interaction force calculation by take advantage of modern graphics processors units (GPU), enlarging the scale of the simulation system to a simulation system involving 10 000 000 atoms. In addition, a number of evaluations and tests, ranging from executions on different precision enabled-CUDA versions, over various types of GPU (NVIDIA 480GTX, 580GTX and M2050) to CPU clusters with different number of CPU cores are discussed. The experimental results demonstrate that GPU-based calculations are typically 9∼11 times faster than the corresponding sequential execution and approximately 1.5∼2 times faster than 16 CPU cores clusters implementations. On the basis of the simulated results, the comparisons between the theoretical results and the experimental ones are executed, and the good agreement between the two and more complete and larger cluster structures in the actual macroscopic materials are observed. Moreover, different nucleation and evolution mechanism of nano-clusters and nano-crystals formed in the processes of metal solidification is observed with large-sized system.

  20. Multi-actuation and PI control: a simple recipe for high-speed and large-range atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Soltani Bozchalooi, I; Youcef-Toumi, K

    2014-11-01

    High speed atomic force microscopy enables observation of dynamic nano-scale processes. However, maintaining a minimal interaction force between the sample and the probe is challenging at high speed specially when using conventional piezo-tubes. While rigid AFM scanners are operational at high speeds with the drawback of reduced tracking range, multi-actuation schemes have shown potential for high-speed and large-range imaging. Here we present a method to seamlessly incorporate additional actuators into conventional AFMs. The equivalent behavior of the resulting multi-actuated setup resembles that of a single high-speed and large-range actuator with maximally flat frequency response. To achieve this, the dynamics of the individual actuators and their couplings are treated through a simple control scheme. Upon the implementation of the proposed technique, commonly used PI controllers are able to meet the requirements of high-speed imaging. This forms an ideal platform for retroactive enhancement of existing AFMs with minimal cost and without compromise on the tracking range. A conventional AFM with tube scanner is retroactively enhanced through the proposed method and shows an order of magnitude improvement in closed loop bandwidth performance while maintaining large range. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated on various types of samples imaged in contact and tapping modes, in air and in liquid. PMID:25164496

  1. Design and control of multi-actuated atomic force microscope for large-range and high-speed imaging.

    PubMed

    Soltani Bozchalooi, I; Careaga Houck, A; AlGhamdi, J; Youcef-Toumi, K

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and control of a high-speed and large-range atomic force microscopy (AFM). A multi-actuation scheme is proposed where several nano-positioners cooperate to achieve the range and speed requirements. A simple data-based control design methodology is presented to effectively operate the AFM scanner components. The proposed controllers compensate for the coupled dynamics and divide the positioning responsibilities between the scanner components. As a result, the multi-actuated scanner behavior is equivalent to that of a single X-Y-Z positioner with large range and high speed. The scanner of the designed AFM is composed of five nano-positioners, features 6μm out-of-plane and 120μm lateral ranges and is capable of high-speed operation. The presented AFM has a modular design with laser spot size of 3.5μm suitable for small cantilever, an optical view of the sample and probe, a conveniently large waterproof sample stage and a 20MHz data throughput for high resolution image acquisition at high imaging speeds. This AFM is used to visualize etching of calcite in a solution of sulfuric acid. Layer-by-layer dissolution and pit formation along the crystalline lines in a low pH environment is observed in real time. PMID:26547505

  2. Sensitivity function analysis of gravitational wave detection with single-laser and large-momentum-transfer atomic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Biao; Zhang, Bao-Cheng; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Ming-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a configuration using atomic interferometers (AIs) had been suggested for the detection of gravitational waves. A new AI with some additional laser pulses for implementing large momentum transfer was also put forward, in order to reduce the effect of shot noise and laser frequency noise. We use a sensitivity function to analyze all possible configurations of the new AI and to distinguish how many momenta are transferred in a specific configuration. By analyzing the new configuration, we further explore a detection scheme for gravitational waves, in particular, that ameliorates laser frequency noise. We find that the amelioration occurs in such a scheme, but novelly, in some cases, the frequency noise can be canceled completely by using a proper data processing method. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  3. Conflict, displacement and health in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Mowafi, Hani

    2011-01-01

    Displacement is a hallmark of modern humanitarian emergencies. Displacement itself is a traumatic event that can result in illness or death. Survivors face challenges including lack of adequate shelter, decreased access to health services, food insecurity, loss of livelihoods, social marginalisation as well as economic and sexual exploitation. Displacement takes many forms in the Middle East and the Arab World. Historical conflicts have resulted in long-term displacement of Palestinians. Internal conflicts have driven millions of Somalis and Sudanese from their homes. Iraqis have been displaced throughout the region by invasion and civil strife. In addition, large numbers of migrants transit Middle Eastern countries or live there illegally and suffer similar conditions as forcibly displaced people. Displacement in the Middle East is an urban phenomenon. Many displaced people live hidden among host country populations in poor urban neighbourhoods - often without legal status. This represents a challenge for groups attempting to access displaced populations. Furthermore, health information systems in host countries often do not collect data on displaced people, making it difficult to gather data needed to target interventions towards these vulnerable populations. The following is a discussion of the health impacts of conflict and displacement in the Middle East. A review was conducted of published literature on migration and displacement in the region. Different cases are discussed with an emphasis on the recent, large-scale and urban displacement of Iraqis to illustrate aspects of displacement in this region. PMID:21590557

  4. Large-scale B-spline R-matrix calculations of electron impact excitation and ionization processes in complex atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, the B-spline R-matrix (BSR) method has been applied to the treatment of a large number of atomic structure and electron-atom collision problems. Characteristic features of the BSR approach include the use of B-splines as a universal basis to describe the projectile electron inside the R-matrix box and the employment of term-dependent, and hence non-orthogonal, orbitals to construct the target states. The latter flexibility has proven to be of crucial importance for complex targets with several partially filled subshells. The published computer code has since been updated and extended to allow for a fully relativistic description at the level of the Dirac-Coulomb hamiltonian. Also, the systematic inclusion of a large number of pseudo-states in the close-coupling expansion has made it possible to extend the range of applicability from elastic and inelastic low-energy near-threshold phenomena to intermediate energies (up to several times the ionization threshold) and, in particular, to describe ionization processes as well. The basic ideas of the BSR approach will be reviewed, and its application will be illustrated for a variety of targets. Particular emphasis will be placed on systems of relevance for applications in gaseous electronics, such as the generation of complete datasets for electron collisions with the heavy noble gases Ne-Xe. Many of our data, which are needed for the description of transport processes in plasmas, are available through the LXCat database. This work was performed in collaboration with Klaus Bartschat. It is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1212450 and the XSEDE Allocation PHY-090031.

  5. Optical measuring displacement transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dich, L. Z.

    1994-09-01

    Trends in the development and production of photoelectric displacement transducers are analyzed. The technical characteristics of certain transducers are briefly presented. A table of comparisons is given, based on available information sources.

  6. Advanced Triangulation Displacement Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poteet, Wade M.; Cauthen, Harold K.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced optoelectronic triangulation displacement sensors undergoing development. Highly miniaturized, more stable, more accurate, and relatively easy to use. Incorporate wideband electronic circuits suitable for real-time monitoring and control of displacements. Measurements expected to be accurate to within nanometers. In principle, sensors mass-produced at relatively low unit cost. Potential applications numerous. Possible industrial application in measuring runout of rotating shaft or other moving part during fabrication in "zero-defect" manufacturing system, in which measured runout automatically corrected.

  7. Internal displacement in Burma.

    PubMed

    Lanjouw, S; Mortimer, G; Bamforth, V

    2000-09-01

    The internal displacement of populations in Burma is not a new phenomenon. Displacement is caused by numerous factors. Not all of it is due to outright violence, but much is a consequence of misguided social and economic development initiatives. Efforts to consolidate the state by assimilating populations in government-controlled areas by military authorities on the one hand, while brokering cease-fires with non-state actors on the other, has uprooted civilian populations throughout the country. Very few areas in which internally displaced persons (IDPs) are found are not facing social turmoil within a climate of impunity. Humanitarian access to IDP populations remains extremely problematic. While relatively little information has been collected, assistance has been focused on targeting accessible groups. International concern within Burma has couched the problems of displacement within general development modalities, while international attention along its borders has sought to contain displacement. With the exception of several recent initiatives, few approaches have gone beyond assistance and engaged in the prevention or protection of the displaced. PMID:11026156

  8. Implications of Research on Displaced Workers. ERIC Digest No. 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Michele

    Worker displacement is more closely related to structural features associated with firms than to the characteristics of the individuals who lost their jobs. Despite economic growth, large numbers of displaced workers continue to experience difficulty in making labor market adjustments. Programs to retrain and reemploy displaced workers exist at…

  9. Job Displacement and Labor Market Mobility. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podgursky, Michael; Swaim, Paul

    A study examined the labor market mobility of displaced workers, using a new data file that matches the January 1984, 1986, and 1988 Displaced Worker Surveys (DWS) to the March Current Population Surveys in the same years. This large database provides information on displaced workers and their families and permits comparison of the geographic…

  10. Displacement sensor based on plasmonic slot metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Ren, Mengxin; Pi, Biao; Cai, Wei; Xu, Jingjun

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a plasmonic type displacement sensor based on slot metamaterials. The sensors are formed by arranging metamaterial arrays with different dimension parameters adjacently. Hence, the measured spectra would be modified as a result of moving the sensors across the detecting area of the spectrometer. From the spectral changes, the displacement amount could be retrieved. The sensor is demonstrated to be capable of recognizing a displacement of 200 nm, which is equal to the period of the metamaterial lattice, and the sensitivity is largely dependent on the shape and size of the acquisition area of the spectrometer used for spectra analysis.

  11. Displaced vertices in extended supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesselbach, S.; Franke, F.; Fraas, H.

    2000-10-01

    In extended supersymmetric models with additional singlet Higgs fields displaced vertices could be observed if the decay width of the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle becomes very small due to a singlino dominated LSP. We study the supersymmetric parameter space where displaced vertices of the second lightest neutralino exist in the NMSSM and an E6 inspired model. For a mass difference between LSP and NLSP of more than 10 GeV the singlet vacuum expectation value has to be at least of the order of /100 TeV in order to obtain a lightest neutralino with a singlino component large enough for displaced vertices.

  12. Atomistic Simulation of Displacement Cascades in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J.; Corrales, Louis R.; BP McGrail and GA Cragnolino

    2002-05-06

    Low energy displacement cascades in zircon (ZrSiO4) initiated by a Zr primary knock-on atom have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations using a Coulombic model for long-range interactions, Buckingham potential for short-range interactions and Ziegler-Biersack potentials for close pair interactions. Displacements were found to occur mainly in the O sublattice, and O replacements by a ring mechanism were predominant. Clusters containing Si interstitials bridged by O interstitials, vacancy clusters and anti-site defects were found to occur. This Si-O-Si bridging is considerable in quenched liquid ZrSiO4.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of large-area and continuous MoS2 atomic layers by RF magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Sajjad; Shehzad, Muhammad Arslan; Vikraman, Dhanasekaran; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Singh, Jai; Choi, Dong-Chul; Seo, Yongho; Eom, Jonghwa; Lee, Wan-Gyu; Jung, Jongwan

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we report layer-controlled, continuous and large-area molydenum sulfide (MoS2) growth onto a SiO2/Si substrate by RF sputtering combined with sulfurization. A two-step process was employed to synthesize MoS2 films. In the first step, an atomically thin MoO3 film was deposited by RF magnetron sputtering at 300 °C. Subsequently, the as-sputtered MoO3 film was further subjected to post-annealing and sulfurization processes at 650 °C for 1 hour. It was observed that the number of layers of MoS2 can be controlled by adjusting the sputtering time. The fabricated MoS2 transistors exhibited high mobility values of ~21 cm2 V-1 s-1 (bilayer) and ~25 cm2 V-1 s-1 (trilayer), on/off ratios in the range of ~107 (bilayer) and 104-105 (trilayer), respectively. We believe that our proposed paradigm can start a new method for the growth of MoS2 in future electronics and optoelectronics applications.In this article, we report layer-controlled, continuous and large-area molydenum sulfide (MoS2) growth onto a SiO2/Si substrate by RF sputtering combined with sulfurization. A two-step process was employed to synthesize MoS2 films. In the first step, an atomically thin MoO3 film was deposited by RF magnetron sputtering at 300 °C. Subsequently, the as-sputtered MoO3 film was further subjected to post-annealing and sulfurization processes at 650 °C for 1 hour. It was observed that the number of layers of MoS2 can be controlled by adjusting the sputtering time. The fabricated MoS2 transistors exhibited high mobility values of ~21 cm2 V-1 s-1 (bilayer) and ~25 cm2 V-1 s-1 (trilayer), on/off ratios in the range of ~107 (bilayer) and 104-105 (trilayer), respectively. We believe that our proposed paradigm can start a new method for the growth of MoS2 in future electronics and optoelectronics applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: HRTEM images, XPS spectra and electrical properties. More Raman measurement spectra are obtained for MoS2 films synthesized with different amounts of sulfur. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr09032f

  14. Polymerase chain displacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Harris, Claire L; Sanchez-Vargas, Irma J; Olson, Ken E; Alphey, Luke; Fu, Guoliang

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative PCR assays are now the standard method for viral diagnostics. These assays must be specific, as well as sensitive, to detect the potentially low starting copy number of viral genomic material. We describe a new technique, polymerase chain displacement reaction (PCDR), which uses multiple nested primers in a rapid, capped, one-tube reaction that increases the sensitivity of normal quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. Sensitivity was increased by approximately 10-fold in a proof-of-principle test on dengue virus sequence. In PCDR, when extension occurs from the outer primer, it displaces the extension strand produced from the inner primer by utilizing a polymerase that has strand displacement activity. This allows a greater than 2-fold increase of amplification product for each amplification cycle and therefore increased sensitivity and speed over conventional PCR. Increased sensitivity in PCDR would be useful in nucleic acid detection for viral diagnostics. PMID:23384180

  15. Optical displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Dustin W.

    2008-04-08

    An optical displacement sensor is disclosed which uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coupled to an optical cavity formed by a moveable membrane and an output mirror of the VCSEL. This arrangement renders the lasing characteristics of the VCSEL sensitive to any movement of the membrane produced by sound, vibrations, pressure changes, acceleration, etc. Some embodiments of the optical displacement sensor can further include a light-reflective diffractive lens located on the membrane or adjacent to the VCSEL to control the amount of lasing light coupled back into the VCSEL. A photodetector detects a portion of the lasing light from the VCSEL to provide an electrical output signal for the optical displacement sensor which varies with the movement of the membrane.

  16. Water displacement mercury pump

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, Marshall G.

    1985-01-01

    A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

  17. Water displacement mercury pump

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, M.G.

    1984-04-20

    A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

  18. Internally displaced persons.

    PubMed

    Leus, X; Wallace, J; Loretti, A

    2001-01-01

    There were estimated to be over 20 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) at the end of 1999, a number that surpasses global estimates of refugees. Displacement exposes IDPs to new hazards and accrued vulnerability. These dynamics result in greater risk for the development of illness and death. Often, access of IDPs to health care and humanitarian assistance is excluded deliberately by conflicting parties. Furthermore, the arrival of IDPs into another community or region strains local health systems, and the host population ends up sharing the sufferings of the internally displaced. Health outcomes are dismaying. From a health perspective, the best option is to avoid human displacement. WHO contributes to the prevention of displacement by working for sustainable development. Placing health high on the political agenda helps maintain stability, and thereby, reduce the likelihood for displacement. Primary responsibility for assisting IDPs, irrespective of the cause, rests with the national government. However, where the government is unwilling or unable to provide the necessary aid, the international humanitarian community must step in, with WHO playing a major role in the health sector. There is consensus among the partners of the World Health Organization (WHO) that, in emergencies, the WHO must: 1) take the lead in rapid health assessment, epidemiological and nutritional surveillance, epidemic preparedness, essential drugs management, control of communicable diseases, and physical and psychosocial rehabilitation; and 2) provide guidelines and advice on nutritional requirements and rehabilitation, immunisation, medical relief items, and reproductive health. If the vital health needs of IDPs--security, food, water, shelter, sanitation and household items--are not satisfied, the provision of health services alone cannot save lives. Community participation is essential, and community participation implies bolstering the assets and capacities of the beneficiaries. PMID:11875794

  19. Synthesis and characterization of large-area and continuous MoS2 atomic layers by RF magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sajjad; Shehzad, Muhammad Arslan; Vikraman, Dhanasekaran; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Singh, Jai; Choi, Dong-Chul; Seo, Yongho; Eom, Jonghwa; Lee, Wan-Gyu; Jung, Jongwan

    2016-02-11

    In this article, we report layer-controlled, continuous and large-area molydenum sulfide (MoS2) growth onto a SiO2/Si substrate by RF sputtering combined with sulfurization. A two-step process was employed to synthesize MoS2 films. In the first step, an atomically thin MoO3 film was deposited by RF magnetron sputtering at 300 °C. Subsequently, the as-sputtered MoO3 film was further subjected to post-annealing and sulfurization processes at 650 °C for 1 hour. It was observed that the number of layers of MoS2 can be controlled by adjusting the sputtering time. The fabricated MoS2 transistors exhibited high mobility values of ∼21 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) (bilayer) and ∼25 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) (trilayer), on/off ratios in the range of ∼10(7) (bilayer) and 10(4)-10(5) (trilayer), respectively. We believe that our proposed paradigm can start a new method for the growth of MoS2 in future electronics and optoelectronics applications. PMID:26838294

  20. Efficient methods for including quantum effects in Monte Carlo calculations of large systems: Extension of the displaced points path integral method and other effective potential methods to calculate properties and distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Steven L.; Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Siepmann, J. Ilja; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2013-01-01

    We present a procedure to calculate ensemble averages, thermodynamic derivatives, and coordinate distributions by effective classical potential methods. In particular, we consider the displaced-points path integral (DPPI) method, which yields exact quantal partition functions and ensemble averages for a harmonic potential and approximate quantal ones for general potentials, and we discuss the implementation of the new procedure in two Monte Carlo simulation codes, one that uses uncorrelated samples to calculate absolute free energies, and another that employs Metropolis sampling to calculate relative free energies. The results of the new DPPI method are compared to those from accurate path integral calculations as well as to results of two other effective classical potential schemes for the case of an isolated water molecule. In addition to the partition function, we consider the heat capacity and expectation values of the energy, the potential energy, the bond angle, and the OH distance. We also consider coordinate distributions. The DPPI scheme performs best among the three effective potential schemes considered and achieves very good accuracy for all of the properties considered. A key advantage of the effective potential schemes is that they display much lower statistical sampling variances than those for accurate path integral calculations. The method presented here shows great promise for including quantum effects in calculations on large systems.

  1. Displaced Children: The Psychological Implications.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Paramjit T; Fayyad, John A

    2015-10-01

    Millions of people across the world have been displaced or live in exile and/or as refugees largely as a consequence of wars, acts of terrorism, and catastrophic natural disasters. There are serious psychological consequences as a result of these extremely difficult life circumstances. Adults often can express their needs and have them be heard, whereas children are unable to do so. The children may be provided food, shelter, and clothing and have their medical needs attended to, but their emotional and psychological needs go unrecognized and unmet, with dire and monumental long-term consequences. PMID:26346385

  2. HELIUM EFFECTS ON DISPLACEMENT CASCADE IN TUNGSTEN

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-09-30

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate He effects on displacement cascades in W. Helium content, proportion of interstitial and substitutional He and temperature were varied to reveal the various effects. The effect of interstitial He on the number of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced during cascade damage appears to be insignificant. However, interstitial He tends to fill a vacancy (V). Nevertheless, this process is less favorable than SIA-V recombination particularly when excess SIAs are present before a cascade. The efficiency of He filling and SIA-V recombination increases as temperature increases due to increased point defect mobility. Likewise, substitutional He is more susceptible to displacement during a collision cascade than W. This susceptibility increases towards higher temperatures. Consequently, the number of surviving V is governed by the interplay between displaced substitutional He and SIA-V recombination. The temperature dependence of these processes results in a minimum number of V reached at an intermediate temperature.

  3. Molecular-dynamics simulation of threshold displacement energies in BaTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, E.; Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.; Piñera, I.; Leyva, A.

    2015-09-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations were used to calculate threshold displacement energies for each atom type in BaTiO3 perovskite. A primary knock-on atom with an energy range between 10 and 300 eV in principal crystallographic directions at 300 K was introduced. A statistical approach has been applied calculating displacement probability curves along main crystallographic directions. For each sublattice, the simulation was repeated from different initial conditions to estimate the uncertainty in the threshold displacement energy calculated values. The threshold displacement energies vary considerably with crystallographic direction and sublattice. The weighted average threshold displacement energies are 40 eV for oxygen, 64 eV for barium and 97 eV for titanium atoms. These values are comparable to ab initio calculated and experimentally derived values in perovskites. These results are proposed as threshold displacement energies, ideal for simulation programs that use atomic displacement calculation algorithms.

  4. Displacement of large-scale open solar magnetic fields from the zone of active longitudes and the heliospheric storm of November 3-10, 2004: 2. "Explosion" of singularity and dynamics of sunspot formation and energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, K. G.

    2010-12-01

    A more detailed scenario of one stage (August-November 2004) of the quasibiennial MHD process "Origination ... and dissipation of the four-sector structure of the solar magnetic field" during the decline phase of cycle 23 has been constructed. It has been indicated that the following working hypothesis on the propagation of an MHD disturbance westward (in the direction of solar rotation) and eastward (toward the zone of active longitudes) with the displacement of the large-scale open solar magnetic field (LOSMF) from this zone can be constructed based on LOSMF model representations and data on sunspot formation, flares, active filaments, and coronal ejections as well as on the estimated contribution of sporadic energy release to the flare luminosity and kinetic energy of ejections: (1) The "explosion" of the LOSMF singularity and the formation in the explosion zone of an anemone active region (AR), which produced the satellite sunspot formation that continued west and east of the "anemone," represented a powerful and energy-intensive source of MHD processes at this stage. (2) This resulted in the origination of two "governing" large-scale MHD processes, which regulated various usual manifestations of solar activity: the fast LOSMF along the neutral line in the solar atmosphere, strongly affecting the zone of active longitudes, and the slow LOSMF in the outer layers of the convection zone. The fronts of these processes were identified by powerful (about 1031 erg) coronal ejections. (3) The collision of a wave reflected from the zone of active longitudes with the eastern front of the hydromagnetic impulse of the convection zone resulted in an increase in LOSMF magnetic fluxes, origination of an active sector boundary in the zone of active longitudes, shear-convergent motions, and generation and destabilization of the flare-productive AR 10696 responsible for the heliospheric storm of November 3-10, 2004.

  5. Stability of Helium Clusters during Displacement Cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Xiao, H. Y.; Gao, Fei; Heinisch, Howard L.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Zhiguo; Liu, K. Z.

    2007-02-01

    The interaction of displacement cascades with helium-vacancy clusters is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The He-vacancy clusters initially consist of 20 vacancies with a Helium-to-vacancy ratio ranging from 0.2 to 3. The primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy, Ep, varies from 2 keV to 10 keV, and the PKA direction is chosen such that a displacement cascade is able to directly interact with a helium-vacancy cluster. The simulation results show that the effect of displacement cascades on a helium-vacancy cluster strongly depends on both the helium-to-vacancy ratio and the PKA energy. For the same PKA energy, the size of helium-vacancy clusters increases with the He/V ratio, but for the same ratio, the cluster size changes more significantly with increasing PKA energy. It has been observed that the He-vacancy clusters can be dissolved when the He/V ratio less than 1, but they are able to re-nucleate during the thermal spike phase, forming small He-V nuclei. When the He/V ratio is larger than 1, the He-V clusters can absorb a number of vacancies produced by displacement cascades, forming larger He-V clusters. These results are discussed in terms of PKA energy, helium-to-vacancy ratio, number of vacancies produced by cascades, and mobility of helium atoms.

  6. Evidencing `Tight Bound States' in the Hydrogen Atom:. Empirical Manipulation of Large-Scale XD in Violation of QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.; Vigier, Jean-Pierre

    2013-09-01

    In this work we extend Vigier's recent theory of `tight bound state' (TBS) physics and propose empirical protocols to test not only for their putative existence, but also that their existence if demonstrated provides the 1st empirical evidence of string theory because it occurs in the context of large-scale extra dimensionality (LSXD) cast in a unique M-Theoretic vacuum corresponding to the new Holographic Anthropic Multiverse (HAM) cosmological paradigm. Physicists generally consider spacetime as a stochastic foam containing a zero-point field (ZPF) from which virtual particles restricted by the quantum uncertainty principle (to the Planck time) wink in and out of existence. According to the extended de Broglie-Bohm-Vigier causal stochastic interpretation of quantum theory spacetime and the matter embedded within it is created annihilated and recreated as a virtual locus of reality with a continuous quantum evolution (de Broglie matter waves) governed by a pilot wave - a `super quantum potential' extended in HAM cosmology to be synonymous with the a `force of coherence' inherent in the Unified Field, UF. We consider this backcloth to be a covariant polarized vacuum of the (generally ignored by contemporary physicists) Dirac type. We discuss open questions of the physics of point particles (fermionic nilpotent singularities). We propose a new set of experiments to test for TBS in a Dirac covariant polarized vacuum LSXD hyperspace suggestive of a recently tested special case of the Lorentz Transformation put forth by Kowalski and Vigier. These protocols reach far beyond the recent battery of atomic spectral violations of QED performed through NIST.

  7. The photoelectric displacement converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoner, Valeriu V.

    2005-02-01

    In the article are examined questions of constructing photoelectric displacement converter satisfying demands that are stated above. Converter has channels of approximate and precise readings. The approximate reading may be accomplished either by the method of reading from a code mask or by the method of the consecutive calculation of optical scale gaps number. Phase interpolator of mouar strips" gaps is determined as a precise measuring. It is shown mathematical model of converter that allow evaluating errors and operating speed of conversion.

  8. Tunable beam displacer

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar-Serrano, Luis José; Valencia, Alejandra; Torres, Juan P.

    2015-03-15

    We report the implementation of a tunable beam displacer, composed of a polarizing beam splitter (PBS) and two mirrors, that divides an initially polarized beam into two parallel beams whose separation can be continuously tuned. The two output beams are linearly polarized with either vertical or horizontal polarization and no optical path difference is introduced between them. The wavelength dependence of the device as well as the maximum separation between the beams achievable is limited mainly by the PBS characteristics.

  9. Variable displacement vane pump

    SciTech Connect

    Tschantz, J.S.; Bisson, B.J.

    1997-12-31

    What has been developed under this program is a pumping system which can vary the amount of fuel delivered according to engine needs, thereby reducing the temperature rise of the fuel to very low levels. This permits the elimination of the air/oil coolers and conserves the vital airflow through the fan. The variable displacement vane pump (VDVP) also permits a substantial simplification of the control system with the elimination of complex metering valves, offering a significant reduction in fuel system cost. This program was initiated to develop a technology that embodied the ruggedness of the gear pump with the efficiency and metering versatility of the variable displacement vane pump. Thick metal vanes emulate the teeth on pumping gears while the simple, elegant swing cam feature provides the variable displacement capability without the unwieldy multiple cam segments found in other concepts. The result is a pumping architecture which is rugged, light in weight and extremely versatile, having demonstrated superb heat management and controllability in extensive bench and engine testing. This paper will report the results that the pumps have achieved to date both in terms of durability and efficiency.

  10. A comprehensive Two-Fluid Model for Cavitation and Primary Atomization Modelling of liquid jets - Application to a large marine Diesel injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habchi, Chawki; Bohbot, Julien; Schmid, Andreas; Herrmann, Kai

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive two-fluid model is suggested in order to compute the in-nozzle cavitating flow and the primary atomization of liquid jets, simultaneously. This model has been applied to the computation of a typical large marine Diesel injector. The numerical results have shown a strong correlation between the in-nozzle cavitating flow and the ensuing spray orientation and atomization. Indeed, the results have confirmed the existence of an off-axis liquid core. This asymmetry is likely to be at the origin of the spray deviation observed experimentally. In addition, the primary atomization begins very close to the orifice exit as in the experiments, and the smallest droplets are generated due to cavitation pocket shape oscillations located at the same side, inside the orifice.

  11. Synthesis of finite displacements and displacements in continental margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speed, R. C.; Elison, M. W.; Heck, F. R.; Russo, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    The scope of the project is the analysis of displacement-rate fields in the transitional regions between cratonal and oceanic lithospheres over Phanerozoic time (last 700 ma). Associated goals are an improved understanding of range of widths of major displacement zones; the partition of displacement gradients and rotations with position and depth in such zones; the temporal characteristics of such zones-the steadiness, episodicity, and duration of uniform versus nonunifrom fields; and the mechanisms and controls of the establishment and kinematics of displacement zones. The objective is to provide a context of time-averaged kinematics of displacement zones. The initial phase is divided topically among the methodology of measurement and reduction of displacements in the lithosphere and the preliminary analysis from geologic and other data of actual displacement histories from the Cordillera, Appalachians, and southern North America.

  12. Angular displacement measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seegmiller, H. Lee B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A system for measuring the angular displacement of a point of interest on a structure, such as aircraft model within a wind tunnel, includes a source of polarized light located at the point of interest. A remote detector arrangement detects the orientation of the plane of the polarized light received from the source and compares this orientation with the initial orientation to determine the amount or rate of angular displacement of the point of interest. The detector arrangement comprises a rotating polarizing filter and a dual filter and light detector unit. The latter unit comprises an inner aligned filter and photodetector assembly which is disposed relative to the periphery of the polarizer so as to receive polarized light passing the polarizing filter and an outer aligned filter and photodetector assembly which receives the polarized light directly, i.e., without passing through the polarizing filter. The purpose of the unit is to compensate for the effects of dust, fog and the like. A polarization preserving optical fiber conducts polarized light from a remote laser source to the point of interest.

  13. Visualization of a Large Set of Hydrogen Atomic Orbital Contours Using New and Expanded Sets of Parametric Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhile, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic orbitals are a theme throughout the undergraduate chemistry curriculum, and visualizing them has been a theme in this journal. Contour plots as isosurfaces or contour lines in a plane are the most familiar representations of the hydrogen wave functions. In these representations, a surface of a fixed value of the wave function ? is plotted

  14. Quantum dots - artificial atoms, large molecules, or small pieces of bulk? Insights from time-domain ab ignition studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezhdo, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Quantum dots (QD) are quasi-zero dimensional structures with a unique combination of solid-state and atom-like properties. Unlike bulk or atomic materials, QD properties can be modified continuously by changing QD shape and size. Often, the bulk and atomic viewpoints contradict each other. The atomic view suggests strong electron-hole and charge-phonon interactions, and slow energy relaxation due to mismatch between electronic energy gaps and phonon frequencies. The bulk view advocates that the kinetic energy of quantum confinement is greater than electron-hole interactions, that charge-phonon coupling is weak, and that the relaxation through quasi-continuous bands is rapid. QDs exhibit new physical phenomena. The phonon bottleneck to electron energy relaxation and generation of multiple excitons can improve efficiencies of photovoltaic devices. Our state-of-the-art non-adiabatic molecular dynamics techniques, implemented within time-dependent density-functional-theory, allow us to model QDs at the atomistic level and in time-domain, providing a unifying description of quantum dynamics on the nanoscale.

  15. Visualization of a Large Set of Hydrogen Atomic Orbital Contours Using New and Expanded Sets of Parametric Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhile, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic orbitals are a theme throughout the undergraduate chemistry curriculum, and visualizing them has been a theme in this journal. Contour plots as isosurfaces or contour lines in a plane are the most familiar representations of the hydrogen wave functions. In these representations, a surface of a fixed value of the wave function ? is plotted…

  16. Threshold displacement energy in GaN; Ab initio molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, H. Y.; Gao, Fei; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Weber, William J.

    2009-06-25

    Large-scale ab initio molecular dynamics method has been used to determine the threshold displacement energies, Ed, along five specific directions and to determine the defect configurations created during low energy events. The Ed shows a significant dependence on direction. The minimum Ed is determined to be 39 eV along the <-1010> direction for a gallium atom and 17.0 eV along the <-1010> direction for a nitrogen atom, which are in reasonable agreement with the experimental measurements. The average Ed values determined are 73.2 and 32.4 eV for gallium and nitrogen atoms, respectively. The N defects created at low energy events along different crystallographic directions have a similar configuration (a N-N dumbbell configuration), but various configurations for Ga defects are formed in GaN.

  17. Large-scale displacement along the Median Tectonic Line, Japan: evidence from SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dating of granites and gneisses from the South Kitakami and paleo-Ryoke belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakashima, Toshihiko; Terada, Kentaro; Takeshita, Toru; Sano, Yuji

    2003-07-01

    In this paper we present new U-Pb zircon ages determined with Sensitive High-Resolution Ion MicroProbe (SHRIMP) for nine plutonic rocks or orthogneisses and one paragneiss from the Higo and Maana belts (here referred to as the paleo-Ryoke belt) in southwest Japan, and the South Kitakami belt in northeast Japan. Both belts are Paleozoic-Mesozoic continental terranes discontinuously distributed along the Median Tectonic Line (MTL), and structurally lying on the Sambagawa belt in the Japanese Islands. Three groups of U-Pb zircon ages showing the timing of different magmatic events were determined for the plutonic rock or orthogneiss samples: ca. 500 Ma (Early Ordovician, two samples), a mean age of 292.0±12.4 Ma (Late Carboniferous-Early Permian, one sample) and ca. 110 Ma (Early Cretaceous, six samples). Furthermore, zircons with core-rim microstructures from a garnet-biotite-cordierite paragneiss in the Higo belt were also dated with SHRIMP. The cores yielded 2155-184 Ma inherited U-Pb ages (mostly varying between 330 and 184 Ma), while the rims yielded a mean age of 116.5±18.7 Ma (Early Cretaceous) U-Pb recrystallization ages comparable with the igneous ages, limiting the sedimentary age of the protolith to between Early-Middle Jurassic (ca. 180 Ma) and Early Cretaceous time. These SHRIMP U-Pb ages of plutonism, metamorphism and sedimentation, together with previously reported radiometric ages, have revealed a strong similarity in the tectonic histories of the paleo-Ryoke and South Kitakami and Abukuma belts, suggesting that these belts can be correlated. At present the paleo-Ryoke belt and the South Kitakami and Abukuma belts are separated by more than 1000 km. However, these belts may have originally comprised a continuous continental terrane that was later displaced and juxtaposed, together with the underlying Sambagawa belt, against the Ryoke belt by large-scale sinistral faulting along the MTL and associated major strike-slip faults during the Latest Cretaceous.

  18. Polyimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Polyimidazoles (PI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl) imidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N,N-dimethyl acetamide, sulfolane, N-methylpyrrolidinone, dimethylsulfoxide, or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl) imidazole monomers are prepared by reacting an aromatic aldehyde with a dimethoxybenzil or by reacting an aromatic dialdehyde with a methoxybenzil in the presence of ammonium acetate. The di(methoxyphenyl) imidazole is subsequently treated with aqueous hydrobromic acid to give the di(hydroxphenyl) imidazole monomer. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight PI of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the availability of a large variety of activated aromatic dihalides and dinitro compounds.

  19. Polyimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimidazoles (Pl) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N,N-dimethylacetamide, sulfolane, N-methylpyrroldinone, dimethylsulfoxide, or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperature under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomers are prepared by reacting an aromatic aldehyde with a dimethoxybenzil or by reacting an aromatic dialdehyde with a methoxybenzil in the presence of ammonium acetate. The di(methoxyphenyl)imidazole is subsequently treated with aqueous hydrobromic acid to give the di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomer. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight Pl of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the availability of a large variety of activated aromatic dihalides and dinitro compounds.

  20. Adapting to variable prismatic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Robert B.; Cohen, Malcolm M.

    1989-01-01

    In each of two studies, subjects were exposed to a continuously changing prismatic displacement with a mean value of 19 prism diopters (variable displacement) and to a fixed 19-diopter displacement (fixed displacement). In Experiment 1, significant adaptation (post-pre shifts in hand-eye coordination) was found for fixed, but not for variable, displacement. Experiment 2 demonstrated that adaptation was obtained for variable displacement, but it was very fragile and is lost if the measures of adaptation are preceded by even a very brief exposure of the hand to normal or near-normal vision. Contrary to the results of some previous studies, an increase in within-S dispersion was not found of target pointing responses as a result of exposure to variable displacement.

  1. Detection of a large fraction of atomic gas not associated with star-forming material in M17 SW⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Beaupuits, J. P.; Stutzki, J.; Ossenkopf, V.; Spaans, M.; Güsten, R.; Wiesemeyer, H.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The [C II] 158 μm line is one of the dominant coolants of the ISM, and an important probe with which to study the star formation process. Recent Herschel/HIFI and SOFIA/GREAT observations showed that assuming the total velocity-integrated intensity of this line is directly associated with the star-forming material is inadequate. Aims: We probe the column densities and masses traced by the ionized and neutral atomic carbon with spectrally resolved maps, and compare them to the diffuse and dense molecular gas traced by [C I] and low-J CO lines toward the star-forming region M17 SW. Methods: We mapped a 4.1 pc × 4.7 pc region in the [C I] 609 μm line using the APEX telescope, as well as the CO isotopologues with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Because of the velocity-resolved spectra, we analyze the data based on velocity channel maps that are 1 km s-1 wide. We correlate their spatial distribution with that of the [C II] map obtained with SOFIA/GREAT. Optically thin approximations were used to estimate the column densities of [C I] and [C II] in each velocity channel. Results: The distribution of the emission from the isotopologues 13CO, C17O, and C18O resembles more closely that of the [C I] emission than that of the 12CO emission. The spatial distribution of the [C I] and all CO isotopologues emission was found to be associated with that of [C II] in about 20%-80% of the mapped region, with the high correlation found in the central (15-23 km s-1) velocity channels. Conclusions: The excitation temperature of [C I] ranges between 40 K and 100 K in the inner molecular region of M17 SW. Excitation temperatures up to 200 K are found along the ridge. Column densities in 1 km s-1 channels between ~1015 cm-2 and ~1017 cm-2 were found for [C I]. Just ~20 % of the velocity range (~40 km s-1) that the [C II] line spans is associated with the star-forming material traced by [C I] and CO. The total (integrated over the 0-40 km s-1 velocity range) gas mass estimated from the [C II] emission gives a lower limit of ~4.4 × 103 M⊙. A very large fraction of at least 64% of this mass is not associated with the star-forming material in M17 SW. We also found that about 36%, 17%, and 47% of the [C II] emission is associated with the H II, H I, and H2 regimes, respectively. Comparisons with the H41α line shows an ionization region mixed with the neutral and part of the molecular gas, in agreement with the clumped structure and dynamical processes at play in M17 SW. These results are also relevant to extra-galactic studies in which [C II] is often used as a tracer of star-forming material. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe calibrated data cubes are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/575/A9

  2. Helium vs. Proton Induced Displacement Damage in Electronic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringo, Sawnese; Barghouty, A. F.

    2010-01-01

    In this project, the specific effects of displacement damage due to the passage of protons and helium nuclei on some typical electronic materials will be evaluated and contrasted. As the electronic material absorbs the energetic proton and helium momentum, degradation of performance occurs, eventually leading to overall failure. Helium nuclei traveling at the same speed as protons are expected to impart more to the material displacement damage; due to the larger mass, and thus momentum, of helium nuclei compared to protons. Damage due to displacement of atoms in their crystalline structure can change the physical properties and hence performance of the electronic materials.

  3. Global surface displacement data for assessing variability of displacement at a point on a fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hecker, Suzanne; Sickler, Robert; Feigelson, Leah; Abrahamson, Norman; Hassett, Will; Rosa, Carla; Sanquini, Ann

    2014-01-01

    This report presents a global dataset of site-specific surface-displacement data on faults. We have compiled estimates of successive displacements attributed to individual earthquakes, mainly paleoearthquakes, at sites where two or more events have been documented, as a basis for analyzing inter-event variability in surface displacement on continental faults. An earlier version of this composite dataset was used in a recent study relating the variability of surface displacement at a point to the magnitude-frequency distribution of earthquakes on faults, and to hazard from fault rupture (Hecker and others, 2013). The purpose of this follow-on report is to provide potential data users with an updated comprehensive dataset, largely complete through 2010 for studies in English-language publications, as well as in some unpublished reports and abstract volumes.

  4. Variable displacement blower

    DOEpatents

    Bookout, Charles C.; Stotts, Robert E.; Waring, Douglass R.; Folsom, Lawrence R.

    1986-01-01

    A blower having a stationary casing for rotatably supporting a rotor assembly having a series of open ended chambers arranged to close against the surrounding walls of the casing. Pistons are slidably mounted within each chamber with the center of rotation of the pistons being offset in regard to the center of rotation of the rotor assembly whereby the pistons reciprocate in the chambers as the rotor assembly turns. As inlet port communicates with the rotor assembly to deliver a working substance into the chamber as the pistons approach a top dead center position in the chamber while an outlet port also communicates with the rotor to exhaust the working substance as the pistons approach a bottom dead center position. The displacement of the blower is varied by adjusting the amount of eccentricity between the center of rotation of the pistons and the center of rotation of the rotor assembly.

  5. Strategies for displacing oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Vikram; Gupta, Raghubir

    2015-03-01

    Oil currently holds a monopoly on transportation fuels. Until recently biofuels were seen as the means to break this stranglehold. They will still have a part to play, but the lead role has been handed to natural gas, almost solely due to the increased availability of shale gas. The spread between oil and gas prices, unprecedented in its scale and duration, will cause a secular shift away from oil as a raw material. In the transport fuel sector, natural gas will gain traction first in the displacement of diesel fuel. Substantial innovation is occurring in the methods of producing liquid fuel from shale gas at the well site, in particular in the development of small scale distributed processes. In some cases, the financing of such small-scale plants may require new business models.

  6. Are large concentration of atomic H storable in tritium-impregnated solid in H2 below 0.10 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.; Webeler, R. W. H.

    1979-01-01

    The storage and release of atomic hydrogen produced by the beta decay of tritium contained in a crystalline solid H2 matrix at concentrations greater than 2% and temperatures below 0.80 K are investigated. The temperature of a sample chamber containing tritium-impregnated H2 and placed in the mixing chamber of a dilution refrigerator was measured as the chamber was heated and cooled in order to determine the rates of energy storage and release. It is found that for samples containing 1.2 wt.% tritium, after storage at 0.054 K for 40 h, an increase in sample temperature to a trigger point of 0.17 K leads to an energy release due to the destabilization of atomic H in H2 as predicted by the phenomenological rate process theory. For a tritium weight fraction of 2.5%, energy releases were triggered at 0.54 and 0.82 K after storage at 0.080 K, indicating the trapping of H atoms at the sites of T2 and HT molecules in the sample. The application of a 15 kG magnetic field is shown to increase the storage capacity of T2 traps while reducing that of HT traps, and to lower the trigger temperatures of both. Results suggest that the direct conversion of nuclear energy to chemical energy may become technically feasible in the future.

  7. Displacement parameter inversion for a novel electromagnetic underground displacement sensor.

    PubMed

    Shentu, Nanying; Li, Qing; Li, Xiong; Tong, Renyuan; Shentu, Nankai; Jiang, Guoqing; Qiu, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    Underground displacement monitoring is an effective method to explore deep into rock and soil masses for execution of subsurface displacement measurements. It is not only an important means of geological hazards prediction and forecasting, but also a forefront, hot and sophisticated subject in current geological disaster monitoring. In previous research, the authors had designed a novel electromagnetic underground horizontal displacement sensor (called the H-type sensor) by combining basic electromagnetic induction principles with modern sensing techniques and established a mutual voltage measurement theoretical model called the Equation-based Equivalent Loop Approach (EELA). Based on that work, this paper presents an underground displacement inversion approach named "EELA forward modeling-approximate inversion method". Combining the EELA forward simulation approach with the approximate optimization inversion theory, it can deduce the underground horizontal displacement through parameter inversion of the H-type sensor. Comprehensive and comparative studies have been conducted between the experimentally measured and theoretically inversed values of horizontal displacement under counterpart conditions. The results show when the measured horizontal displacements are in the 0-100 mm range, the horizontal displacement inversion discrepancy is generally tested to be less than 3 mm under varied tilt angles and initial axial distances conditions, which indicates that our proposed parameter inversion method can predict underground horizontal displacement measurements effectively and robustly for the H-type sensor and the technique is applicable for practical geo-engineering applications. PMID:24858960

  8. Displacement Parameter Inversion for a Novel Electromagnetic Underground Displacement Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Nanying; Li, Qing; Li, Xiong; Tong, Renyuan; Shentu, Nankai; Jiang, Guoqing; Qiu, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    Underground displacement monitoring is an effective method to explore deep into rock and soil masses for execution of subsurface displacement measurements. It is not only an important means of geological hazards prediction and forecasting, but also a forefront, hot and sophisticated subject in current geological disaster monitoring. In previous research, the authors had designed a novel electromagnetic underground horizontal displacement sensor (called the H-type sensor) by combining basic electromagnetic induction principles with modern sensing techniques and established a mutual voltage measurement theoretical model called the Equation-based Equivalent Loop Approach (EELA). Based on that work, this paper presents an underground displacement inversion approach named “EELA forward modeling-approximate inversion method”. Combining the EELA forward simulation approach with the approximate optimization inversion theory, it can deduce the underground horizontal displacement through parameter inversion of the H-type sensor. Comprehensive and comparative studies have been conducted between the experimentally measured and theoretically inversed values of horizontal displacement under counterpart conditions. The results show when the measured horizontal displacements are in the 0–100 mm range, the horizontal displacement inversion discrepancy is generally tested to be less than 3 mm under varied tilt angles and initial axial distances conditions, which indicates that our proposed parameter inversion method can predict underground horizontal displacement measurements effectively and robustly for the H-type sensor and the technique is applicable for practical geo-engineering applications. PMID:24858960

  9. The role of energetic displacement cascades in ion beam modifications of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Averback, R.S.; Kim, S.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1986-12-01

    The roles of energetic displacement cascades are ubiquitous in the fields of radiation damage and ion beam modifications of materials. These roles can be described on two time scales. For the first, which lasts approx. =10/sup -11/ s, small cascade volumes are characterized by large supersaturations of point defects and energy densities in excess of some tenths of eV's per atom. During this period, the system can be driven far from equilibrium with significant rearrangement of target atoms and the production of Frenkel pairs. Studies of ion beam mixing in conjunction with molecular dynamics computer simulations, have contributed largely toward understanding these dynamic cascade processes. At later times, the microstructure of the material evolves as cascades begin to overlap, or at elevated temperatures, point defects migrate away from their nascent cascades. It is shown how the primary state of damage in cascades influences this microstructural development. Examples involving radiation enhanced diffusion and ion-induced amorphization are discussed. 40 refs.

  10. Large area, 38 nm half-pitch grating fabrication by using atomic spacer lithography from aluminum wire grids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Deng, Xuegong; Sciortino, Paul; Buonanno, Mike; Walters, Frank; Varghese, Ron; Bacon, Joel; Chen, Lei; O'Brien, Nada; Wang, Jian Jim

    2006-12-01

    We wrapped 150 nm period aluminum wire grid polarizer (WGP) with AlSiOx by using atomic layer deposition at 250 degrees C. The nanometer precision coating defined the spacer to double the spatial frequency of the 100 mm diameter grating fabricated by using a legacy immersion holography setup at 351 nm wavelength. Half-pitch grating of approximately 38 nm was demonstrated with good pattern uniformity, excellent repeatability, and a wide processing window. We believe 10 nm half-pitch grating over even larger areas are viable, overcoming one major hurdle to commercialize nanoimprint. PMID:17163695

  11. Large-Scale Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Probe Tips For Atomic Force Microscopy Critical Dimension Imaging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, Qi Laura; Cassell, Alan M.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Liu, Hongbing; Chao, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) probe tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) offer several advantages over Si/Si3N4 probe tips, including improved resolution, shape, and mechanical properties. This viewgraph presentation discusses these advantages, and the drawbacks of existing methods for fabricating CNT probe tips for AFM. The presentation introduces a bottom up wafer scale fabrication method for CNT probe tips which integrates catalyst nanopatterning and nanomaterials synthesis with traditional silicon cantilever microfabrication technology. This method makes mass production of CNT AFM probe tips feasible, and can be applied to the fabrication of other nanodevices with CNT elements.

  12. Laser optical displacement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starritt, Larry W.; Matthews, Larryl K.

    1995-04-01

    The current quality of our nations bridges is on a decline. There are roughly half a million highway bridges in the United States and out of the half a million more than 200,000 are deficient. With catastrophic failure of bridges causing the loss of life and property, the need for bridge inspection and maintenance is evident. When the Silver Bridge that crossed the Ohio River collapsed in December 1967, 46 people were killed. The failure to prevent the disaster was attributed to the poor inspection techniques used by the bridge inspectors. Current inspection techniques depend on humans being able to recognize structural imperfections without the aid of instrumentation. The Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1968 mandated both national bridge inspection standards and training for bridge inspectors. This act has encouraged the development of instruments that would allow inspectors to perform more complete inspections of bridges. To improve the quality of inspection and data, there is a great need for proven methods and instruments used to acquire data. The Laser Optical Displacement System (L.O.D.S.) developed at New Mexico State University by the Optical and Materials Science Lab is such a device. The L.O.D.S. has been tested and proven in both laboratory situations and in the field. This paper describes some of the methods that are now being used to measure deflections in bridges. Then, a description of the development and application of the L.O.D.S. unit is given.

  13. First-principles studies on vacancy-modified interstitial diffusion mechanism of oxygen in nickel, associated with large-scale atomic simulation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, H. Z.; Shang, S. L.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. K.; Alfonso, D.; Alman, D. E.; Shin, Y. K.; Zou, C. Y.; Duin, A. C. T. van; Lei, Y. K.; Wang, G. F.

    2014-01-28

    This paper is concerned with the prediction of oxygen diffusivities in fcc nickel from first-principles calculations and large-scale atomic simulations. Considering only the interstitial octahedral to tetrahedral to octahedral minimum energy pathway for oxygen diffusion in fcc lattice, greatly underestimates the migration barrier and overestimates the diffusivities by several orders of magnitude. The results indicate that vacancies in the Ni-lattice significantly impact the migration barrier of oxygen in nickel. Incorporation of the effect of vacancies results in predicted diffusivities consistent with available experimental data. First-principles calculations show that at high temperatures the vacancy concentration is comparable to the oxygen solubility, and there is a strong binding energy and a redistribution of charge density between the oxygen atom and vacancy. Consequently, there is a strong attraction between the oxygen and vacancy in the Ni lattice, which impacts diffusion.

  14. Development of a high dynamic range spectroscopic system for observation of neutral hydrogen atom density distribution in Large Helical Device core plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K. Atsumi, S.; Watanabe, S.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.

    2014-02-15

    We report development of a high dynamic range spectroscopic system comprising a spectrometer with 30% throughput and a camera with a low-noise fast-readout complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor. The system achieves a 10{sup 6} dynamic range (∼20 bit resolution) and an instrumental function approximated by a Voigt profile with Gauss and Lorentz widths of 31 and 0.31 pm, respectively, for 656 nm light. The application of the system for line profile observations of the Balmer-α emissions from high temperature plasmas generated in the Large Helical Device is also presented. In the observed line profiles, emissions are detected in far wings more than 1.0 nm away from the line center, equivalent to neutral hydrogen atom kinetic energies above 1 keV. We evaluate atom density distributions in the core plasma by analyzing the line profiles.

  15. Large-scale analysis of high-speed atomic force microscopy data sets using adaptive image processing

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Blake W; Coquoz, Séverine; Adams, Jonathan D; Burns, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    Summary Modern high-speed atomic force microscopes generate significant quantities of data in a short amount of time. Each image in the sequence has to be processed quickly and accurately in order to obtain a true representation of the sample and its changes over time. This paper presents an automated, adaptive algorithm for the required processing of AFM images. The algorithm adaptively corrects for both common one-dimensional distortions as well as the most common two-dimensional distortions. This method uses an iterative thresholded processing algorithm for rapid and accurate separation of background and surface topography. This separation prevents artificial bias from topographic features and ensures the best possible coherence between the different images in a sequence. This method is equally applicable to all channels of AFM data, and can process images in seconds. PMID:23213638

  16. How large are post-CCSD(T) contributions to the total atomization energies of medium-sized alkanes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karton, Amir

    2016-02-01

    The CCSD(T) method is often considered as the gold standard in quantum chemistry for single-reference systems. Using W4 and W4lite theories, we calculate post-CCSD(T) contributions to the total atomization energies (TAEs) of n-alkanes and show that they reach up to 0.65 kcal/mol for n-hexane. Furthermore, we find that post-CCSD(T) contributions increase linearly with the size of the n-alkane, indicating that they will reach ∼1 kcal/mol for n-decane (C10H22) and ∼2 kcal/mol for n-icosane (C20H42). These results are significant since today CCSD(T)/CBS-type methods are being applied to hydrocarbons of increasing size and are assumed to give TAEs with chemical accuracy for these systems.

  17. Electron density and transport in top-gated graphene nanoribbon devices: First-principles Green function algorithms for systems containing a large number of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areshkin, Denis A.; Nikolić, Branislav K.

    2010-04-01

    The recent fabrication of graphene nanoribbon (GNR) field-effect transistors poses a challenge for first-principles modeling of carbon nanoelectronics due to many thousand atoms present in the device. The state of the art quantum transport algorithms, based on the nonequilibrium Green function formalism combined with the density-functional theory (NEGF-DFT), were originally developed to calculate self-consistent electron density in equilibrium and at finite bias voltage (as a prerequisite to obtain conductance or current-voltage characteristics, respectively) for small molecules attached to metallic electrodes where only a few hundred atoms are typically simulated. Here we introduce combination of two numerically efficient algorithms which make it possible to extend the NEGF-DFT framework to device simulations involving large number of atoms. Our first algorithm offers an alternative to the usual evaluation of the equilibrium part of electron density via numerical contour integration of the retarded Green function in the upper complex half-plane. It is based on the replacement of the Fermi function f(E) with an analytic function f˜(E) coinciding with f(E) inside the integration range along the real axis, but decaying exponentially in the upper complex half-plane. Although f˜(E) has infinite number of poles, whose positions and residues are determined analytically, only a finite number of those poles have non-negligible residues. We also discuss how this algorithm can be extended to compute the nonequilibrium contribution to electron density, thereby evading cumbersome real-axis integration (within the bias voltage window) of NEGFs which is very difficult to converge for systems with large number of atoms while maintaining current conservation. Our second algorithm combines the recursive formulas with the geometrical partitioning of an arbitrary multiterminal device into nonuniform segments in order to reduce the computational complexity of the retarded Green function evaluation by extracting only its submatrices required for electron density and transmission function. We illustrate fusion of these two algorithms into the NEGF-DFT-type code by computing charge transfer, charge redistribution and conductance in zigzag- GNR∣variable -width-armchair- GNR∣zigzag -GNR two-terminal device covered with a gate electrode made of graphene layer as well. The total number of carbon and edge-passivating hydrogen atoms within the simulated central region of this device is ≃7000 . Our self-consistent modeling of the gate voltage effect suggests that rather large gate voltage ≃3eV might be required to shift the band gap of the proposed AGNR interconnect and switch the transport from insulating into the regime of a single open conducting channel.

  18. Programming colloidal phase transitions with DNA strand displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, W. Benjamin; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    2015-02-01

    DNA-grafted nanoparticles have been called programmable atom-equivalents: Like atoms, they form three-dimensional crystals, but unlike atoms, the particles themselves carry information (the sequences of the grafted strands) that can be used to program the equilibrium crystal structures. We show that the programmability of these colloids can be generalized to the full temperature-dependent phase diagram, not just the crystal structures themselves. We add information to the buffer in the form of soluble DNA strands designed to compete with the grafted strands through strand displacement. Using only two displacement reactions, we program phase behavior not found in atomic systems or other DNA-grafted colloids, including arbitrarily wide gas-solid coexistence, reentrant melting, and even reversible transitions between distinct crystal phases.

  19. Displacement, Substitution, Sublimation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Sigmund Freund worked with the mechanisms of displacement, substitution, and sublimation. These mechanisms have many similarities and have been studied diagnostically and therapeutically. Displacement and substitution seem to fit in well with phobias, hysterias, somatiyations, prejudices, and scapegoating. Phobias, prejudices, and scapegoating…

  20. Site Change of Hydrogen in Niobium on Alloying with Oversized Ta Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Eiichi; Yoshii, Motoyasu; Okada, Yoshinori; Matsuba, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Kazuya; Koike, Shigetoshi; Sugawara, Takamasa; Shishido, Toetsu; Ogiwara, Kiyoshi

    2009-06-01

    In order to clarify a difference in hydrogen interaction with oversized solute atoms and with undersized solute atoms in bcc metals in the low solute concentration region, the site occupancy of hydrogen in Nb alloyed with 5 at. % of oversized Ta atoms has been studied at room temperature for hydrogen concentrations of 0.018 and 0.025 at the hydrogen-to-metal-atom ratio (CH=[H]/[M]) by the channelling method utilizing a nuclear reaction 1H(11B,α)αα with a 11B beam of an energy of 2.03 MeV. Clearly different from the result on hydrogen in Nb alloyed with undersized Mo atoms, in both specimens H atoms are distributed over tetrahedral (T) sites and the displaced-T sites (d-T sites) which are displaced from T sites by about 0.25 Å towards their nearest neighbour octahedral (O) sites. The T site is more favourable for hydrogen occupancy, but the number of available T sites is limited, and excess H atoms occupy the d-T sites. Therefore, in contrast to a strong attractive interaction between hydrogen and undersized Mo atoms (trapping), there exists no such a strong attractive interaction between hydrogen and oversized Ta atoms. It is considered that the trapping of hydrogen by undersized solute atoms is effective to the large enhancement of the terminal solubility of hydrogen (TSH) on alloying with undersized solute atoms, at least, in the low solute concentration region.

  1. Atomic resolution holography.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kouichi

    2014-11-01

    Atomic resolution holography, such as X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH)[1] and photoelectron holography (PH), has the attention of researcher as an informative local structure analysis, because it provides three dimensional atomic images around specific elements within a range of a few nanometers. It can determine atomic arrangements around a specific element without any prior knowledge of structures. It is considered that the atomic resolution holographic is a third method of structural analysis at the atomic level after X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). As known by many researchers, XRD and XAFS are established methods that are widespread use in various fields. XRD and XAFS provide information on long-range translational periodicities and very local environments, respectively, whereas the atomic resolution holography gives 3D information on the local order and can visualize surrounding atoms with a large range of coordination shells. We call this feature "3D medium-range local structure observation".In addition to this feature, the atomic resolution holography is very sensitive to the displacement of atoms from their ideal positions, and one can obtain quantitative information about local lattice distortions by analyzing reconstructed atomic images[2] When dopants with different atomic radii from the matrix elements are present, the lattices around the dopants are distorted. However, using the conventional methods of structural analysis, one cannot determine the extent to which the local lattice distortions are preserved from the dopants. XFH is a good tool for solving this problem.Figure 1 shows a recent achievement on a relaxor ferroelectric of Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN) using XFH. The structural studies of relaxor ferroelectrics have been carried out by X-ray or neutron diffractions, which suggested rhombohedral distortions of their lattices. However, their true pictures have not been obtained, yet. The Nb Kα holograms showed four separate Pb images, as shown in Fig.1. Using these images, we could obtain acute and obtuse rhombohedral structures of the crystal unit cells. Moreover, the Pb-Pb correlated images reconstructed from Pb Lα holograms showed a local structure of body center-like 2a0 ×2a0 × 2a0 superlattice, proving a rigid 3D network structural model combining the two kinds of rhombohedrons. This superstructure are believed to play an important role in the relaxor behaviour of PMN at atomic level[3].jmicro;63/suppl_1/i13/DFU047F1F1DFU047F1Fig. 1.3D images of the nearest Pb and O atoms around Nb in Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3. The cube represents 1/8 of the unit cell. PMID:25359802

  2. Insect Wing Displacement Measurement Using Digital Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, Daniel D.; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Torre I, Manuel H. de la; Caloca Mendez, Cristian I.

    2008-04-15

    Insects in flight have been studied with optical non destructive techniques with the purpose of using meaningful results in aerodynamics. With the availability of high resolution and large dynamic range CCD sensors the so called interferometric digital holographic technique was used to measure the surface displacement of in flight insect wings, such as butterflies. The wings were illuminated with a continuous wave Verdi laser at 532 nm, and observed with a CCD Pixelfly camera that acquire images at a rate of 11.5 frames per second at a resolution of 1392x1024 pixels and 12 Bit dynamic range. At this frame rate digital holograms of the wings were captured and processed in the usual manner, namely, each individual hologram is Fourier processed in order to find the amplitude and phase corresponding to the digital hologram. The wings displacement is obtained when subtraction between two digital holograms is performed for two different wings position, a feature applied to all consecutive frames recorded. The result of subtracting is seen as a wrapped phase fringe pattern directly related to the wing displacement. The experimental data for different butterfly flying conditions and exposure times are shown as wire mesh plots in a movie of the wings displacement.

  3. Large increase in the electron capture and excitation cross sections for Li+ colliding with atomic H under UV laser assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Gutiérrez, F. J.; Cabrera-Trujillo, R.

    2015-07-01

    Neutralization and ash products due to electron capture processes in plasmas reduce the efficiency of energy generation in fusion Tokamak reactors. Therefore, lithium ions have been used to improve the efficiency of energy generation where good control of the electron capture process is required. Here, we show that an intense (1.4× {{10}13} W cm-2), ultra-short (1 fs at full width half-maximum) Gaussian laser pulse in the UV region can enhance the electron capture process on L{{i}+}+H(1s) in the low collision keV energy region. We find a factor of 10 enhancement in electron capture cross-section at impact energies lower than 10 keV amu-1 for an 80 nm wavelength laser and a factor of 2 for the excitation process in the hydrogen atom as compared to the laser-free case. In contrast, for a 200 nm wavelength laser the increase of the electron capture cross-sections takes place around 1 keV amu-1 by a factor of 3 and no enhancement for the excitation process. Our results show that the UV assisted production of Li can be controlled, particularly for short UV wave-length for a specific collision energy range. We anticipate that our findings will facilitate UV laser control of the Li production in Tokamak reactors and encourage further experimental work in this system.

  4. Low-temperature in situ large strain plasticity of ceramic SiC nanowires and its atomic-scale mechanism.

    PubMed

    Han, X D; Zhang, Y F; Zheng, K; Zhang, X N; Zhang, Z; Hao, Y J; Guo, X Y; Yuan, J; Wang, Z L

    2007-02-01

    Large strain plasticity is phenomenologically defined as the ability of a material to exhibit an exceptionally large deformation rate during mechanical deformation. It is a property that is well established for metals and alloys but is rarely observed for ceramic materials especially at low temperature ( approximately 300 K). With the reduction in dimensionality, however, unusual mechanical properties are shown by ceramic nanomaterials. In this Letter, we demonstrated unusually large strain plasticity of ceramic SiC nanowires (NWs) at temperatures close to room temperature that was directly observed in situ by a novel high-resolution transmission electron microscopy technique. The continuous plasticity of the SiC NWs is accompanied by a process of increased dislocation density at an early stage, followed by an obvious lattice distortion, and finally reaches an entire structure amorphization at the most strained region of the NW. These unusual phenomena for the SiC NWs are fundamentally important for understanding the nanoscale fracture and strain-induced band structure variation for high-temperature semiconductors. Our result may also provide useful information for further studying of nanoscale elastic-plastic and brittle-ductile transitions of ceramic materials with superplasticity. PMID:17298014

  5. Regenerative rotary displacer Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Isshiki, Naotsugu; Watanabe, Hiroichi; Raggi, L.; Isshiki, Seita; Hirata, Koichi

    1996-12-31

    A few rotary displacer Stirling engines in which the displacer has one gas pocket space at one side and rotates in a main enclosed cylinder, which is heated from one side and cooled from opposite side without any regenerator, have been studied for some time by the authors. The authors tried to improve this engine by equipping it with a regenerator, because without a regenerator, pressure oscillation and efficiency are too small. Here, several types of regenerative rotary displacer piston Stirling engines are proposed. One is the contra-rotating tandem two disc type displacer engine using axial heat conduction through side walls or by heat pipes and another is a single disc type with circulating fluid regenerator or heat pipes. Stirling engines of this new rotary displacer type are thought to attain high speed. Here, experimental results of the original rotary displacer Stirling engine without a regenerator, and one contra-rotating tandem displacer engine with side wall regenerator by axial heat conduction are reported accompanied with a discussion of the results.

  6. Displacement based multilevel structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striz, Alfred G.

    1995-01-01

    Multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) is expected to play a major role in the competitive transportation industries of tomorrow, i.e., in the design of aircraft and spacecraft, of high speed trains, boats, and automobiles. All of these vehicles require maximum performance at minimum weight to keep fuel consumption low and conserve resources. Here, MDO can deliver mathematically based design tools to create systems with optimum performance subject to the constraints of disciplines such as structures, aerodynamics, controls, etc. Although some applications of MDO are beginning to surface, the key to a widespread use of this technology lies in the improvement of its efficiency. This aspect is investigated here for the MDO subset of structural optimization, i.e., for the weight minimization of a given structure under size, strength, and displacement constraints. Specifically, finite element based multilevel optimization of structures (here, statically indeterminate trusses and beams for proof of concept) is performed. In the system level optimization, the design variables are the coefficients of assumed displacement functions, and the load unbalance resulting from the solution of the stiffness equations is minimized. Constraints are placed on the deflection amplitudes and the weight of the structure. In the subsystems level optimizations, the weight of each element is minimized under the action of stress constraints, with the cross sectional dimensions as design variables. This approach is expected to prove very efficient, especially for complex structures, since the design task is broken down into a large number of small and efficiently handled subtasks, each with only a small number of variables. This partitioning will also allow for the use of parallel computing, first, by sending the system and subsystems level computations to two different processors, ultimately, by performing all subsystems level optimizations in a massively parallel manner on separate processors. It is expected that the subsystems level optimizations can be further improved through the use of controlled growth, a method which reduces an optimization to a more efficient analysis with only a slight degradation in accuracy. The efficiency of all proposed techniques is being evaluated relative to the performance of the standard single level optimization approach where the complete structure is weight minimized under the action of all given constraints by one processor and to the performance of simultaneous analysis and design which combines analysis and optimization into a single step. It is expected that the present approach can be expanded to include additional structural constraints (buckling, free and forced vibration, etc.) or other disciplines (passive and active controls, aerodynamics, etc.) for true MDO.

  7. Borehole optical lateral displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, R.E.

    1998-10-20

    There is provided by this invention an optical displacement sensor that utilizes a reflective target connected to a surface to be monitored to reflect light from a light source such that the reflected light is received by a photoelectric transducer. The electric signal from the photoelectric transducer is then imputed into electronic circuitry to generate an electronic image of the target. The target`s image is monitored to determine the quantity and direction of any lateral displacement in the target`s image which represents lateral displacement in the surface being monitored. 4 figs.

  8. Low frequency magnetic field suppression in an atomic spin co-magnetometer with a large electron magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiancheng; Chen, Yao; Zou, Sheng; Liu, Xuejing; Hu, Zhaohui; Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Ding, Ming

    2016-03-01

    In a K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer, the Rb electron magnetic field which is experienced by the nuclear spin is about 100 times larger than that of the K in a K-3He co-magnetometer. The large electron magnetic field which is neglected in the K-3He co-magnetometer coupled Bloch equations model is considered here in the K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer to study the low frequency magnetic field suppression effect. Theoretical analysis and experimental results shows that in the K-Rb-21Ne spin co-magnetometer, not only the nuclear spin but also the large electron spin magnetic field compensate the external magnetic field noise. By comparison, only the 3He nuclear spins mainly compensate the external magnetic field noise in a K-3He co-magnetometer. With this study, in addition to just increasing the magnetic field of the nuclear spins, we can suppress the magnetic field noise by increasing the density of the electron spin. We also studied how the magnetic field suppression effect relates to the scale factor of the K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer and we compared the scale factor with that of the K-3He co-magnetometer. Lastly, we show the sensitivity of our co-magnetometer. The magnetic field noise, the air density fluctuation noise and pumping power optimization are studied to improve the sensitivity of the co-magnetometer.

  9. Atomic Disorder in Tetrahedrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salasin, John Robert; Chakoumakos, Bryan; Rawn, Claudia; May, Andrew; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; McGuire, Michael; Cao, Huibo

    2015-03-01

    Thermoelectrics (TE) are materials which turn heat energy into electrical energy with applications spanning multiple disciplines including space exploration, Peltier cooling, and engine efficiency. Tetrahedrite is a copper sulfosalt with the general formula Cu12-xMx(Sb,As)4S13. Where M denotes a Cu2+ site frequently replaced in natural tetrahedrite with Zn, Fe, Hg, or Mn. It has a cubic structure with an I-43m symmetry, a = 10.4 Å, and only a handful of adjustable parameters. This structural study corroborates theoretical calculations on atomic disorder. Positional disorder of the trigonally coordinated Cu(2) site is suggested from the temperature dependence of the atomic displacement parameters determine from single-crystal x-ray and neutron diffraction. The displacements are extremely anisotropic for Cu(2) with a maximum rms static displacement of ~ 0.25 Å.

  10. Displacement sensing system and method

    DOEpatents

    VunKannon, Jr., Robert S

    2006-08-08

    A displacement sensing system and method addresses demanding requirements for high precision sensing of displacement of a shaft, for use typically in a linear electro-dynamic machine, having low failure rates over multi-year unattended operation in hostile environments. Applications include outer space travel by spacecraft having high-temperature, sealed environments without opportunity for servicing over many years of operation. The displacement sensing system uses a three coil sensor configuration, including a reference and sense coils, to provide a pair of ratio-metric signals, which are inputted into a synchronous comparison circuit, which is synchronously processed for a resultant displacement determination. The pair of ratio-metric signals are similarly affected by environmental conditions so that the comparison circuit is able to subtract or nullify environmental conditions that would otherwise cause changes in accuracy to occur.

  11. Polyimidazoles Via Aromatic Nucleophilic Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments show variety of polyimidazoles prepared by aromatic nucleophilic displacement, from reactions of bisphenol imidazoles with activated difluoro compounds. Polyimidazoles have good mechanical properties making them suitable for use as films, moldings, and adhesives.

  12. Atomic structure from large-area, low-dose exposures of materials: A new route to circumvent radiation damage☆

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, J.C.; Kotakoski, J.; Mangler, C.

    2014-01-01

    Beam-induced structural modifications are a major nuisance in the study of materials by high-resolution electron microscopy. Here, we introduce a new approach to circumvent the radiation damage problem by a statistical treatment of large, noisy, low-dose data sets of non-periodic configurations (e.g. defects) in the material. We distribute the dose over a mixture of different defect structures at random positions and with random orientations, and recover representative model images via a maximum likelihood search. We demonstrate reconstructions from simulated images at such low doses that the location of individual entities is not possible. The approach may open a route to study currently inaccessible beam-sensitive configurations. PMID:24315660

  13. Gamma rays from atomic and molecular gas in the large complex of clouds in Orion and Monoceros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemen, J. B. G. M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Hermsen, W.; Lebrun, F.; Maddalena, R. J.; Strong, A. W.; Thaddeus, P.

    1984-01-01

    A comparison of COS-B gamma-ray observations of the large complex of interstellar clouds in Orion and Monoceros with the Columbia CO and Berkeley H I surveys of this region reveals a good correlation between gamma-ray emission and total gas distribution. The observed gamma-ray emission is explainable in terms of interactions of cosmic rays that are uniformly distributed in this region with the interstellar gas. The correlation is used as the basis of a calibration of the ratio between H2 column density and the integrated CO line intensity; the value of (2.6 + or - 1.2) X 10 to the 20th mol/sq cm K km s thereby obtained is consistent with the value derived from a similar analysis for the inner galaxy.

  14. A novel linear displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ji-sen; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Xi-hou; Zhang, Tian-heng

    2011-12-01

    With development of time grating technology in the past 10 years, the theory of using time to measure spatial displacement has been completed greatly. In the study of time grating, one novel linear displacement sensor is proposed based on the measurement principles of time grating. The measurement principles of linear displacement are similar to that of angular displacement. Both of them need one endless coordinate with uniform velocity. The theory of linear AC motor is used, and the three-phase winding with equal division space of 120° and three-phase exciting signal with uniform time are utilized to generate the endless moving coordinate with uniform velocity. The magnetic traveling wave arises from the left endpoint and disappears in the right endpoint, and it travels pole pitch distance of W during the periodic time of T with the uniform velocity. When magnetic traveling wave passes by the static probe and the moving probe, the electric signals will be induced on the winding, respectively. Therefore, the linear displacement can be achieved by comparing the phase between the two output induced signals from he static probe and the moving probe. Furthermore, in order to improve the machining technique, four kinds of winding framework are designed to employ. The experimental results show that advantages and disadvantages both exist in the design methods and the precision of experiment results reaches +/-2µm. The next study plan is to choose the most excellent design method through further experiments and improve the precision of displacement sensor greatly.

  15. Self-compensating displacement sensor based on hydramatic structured transducer and fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shimeng; Liu, Yun; Liu, Xiuxin; Zhang, Yang; Peng, Wei

    2015-12-01

    An optical fiber displacement sensor with a large measuring range for simultaneous displacement and temperature measurement is presented in this paper. We developed a specific transducer based on the piston and hydraumatic structure to realize a large displacement measurement, which combined the large measuring range and high precision into a single sensor system. The spectrum showed two reflection peaks used to compensate for cross-sensitivity in the displacement detection. This displacement sensor can linearly work in a large measuring displacement range greater than 45 mm with a high sensitivity of 0.036 nm/mm. The sensor we reported can be developed for real-time displacement monitoring in many industrial environments such as the mechanical shape or liquid level monitoring.

  16. Early Science with the Large Millimeter Telescope: COOL BUDHIES I - a pilot study of molecular and atomic gas at z ≃ 0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cybulski, Ryan; Yun, Min S.; Erickson, Neal; De la Luz, Victor; Narayanan, Gopal; Montaña, Alfredo; Sánchez, David; Zavala, Jorge A.; Zeballos, Milagros; Chung, Aeree; Fernández, Ximena; van Gorkom, Jacqueline; Haines, Chris P.; Jaffé, Yara L.; Montero-Castaño, María; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Yoon, Hyein; Deshev, Boris Z.; Harrington, Kevin; Hughes, David H.; Morrison, Glenn E.; Schloerb, F. Peter; Velazquez, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    An understanding of the mass build-up in galaxies over time necessitates tracing the evolution of cold gas (molecular and atomic) in galaxies. To that end, we have conducted a pilot study called CO Observations with the LMT of the Blind Ultra-Deep H I Environment Survey (COOL BUDHIES). We have observed 23 galaxies in and around the two clusters Abell 2192 (z = 0.188) and Abell 963 (z = 0.206), where 12 are cluster members and 11 are slightly in the foreground or background, using about 28 total hours on the Redshift Search Receiver (RSR) on the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) to measure the 12CO J = 1 → 0 emission line and obtain molecular gas masses. These new observations provide a unique opportunity to probe both the molecular and atomic components of galaxies as a function of environment beyond the local Universe. For our sample of 23 galaxies, nine have reliable detections (S/N ≥ 3.6) of the 12CO line, and another six have marginal detections (2.0 < S/N < 3.6). For the remaining eight targets we can place upper limits on molecular gas masses roughly between 109 and 1010 M⊙. Comparing our results to other studies of molecular gas, we find that our sample is significantly more abundant in molecular gas overall, when compared to the stellar and the atomic gas component, and our median molecular gas fraction lies about 1σ above the upper limits of proposed redshift evolution in earlier studies. We discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy, with the most likely conclusion being target selection and Eddington bias.

  17. EMatch: an efficient method for aligning atomic resolution subunits into intermediate-resolution cryo-EM maps of large macromolecular assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Dror, Oranit; Lasker, Keren; Nussinov, Ruth; Wolfson, Haim

    2007-01-01

    Structural analysis of biological machines is essential for inferring their function and mechanism. Nevertheless, owing to their large size and instability, deciphering the atomic structure of macromolecular assemblies is still considered as a challenging task that cannot keep up with the rapid advances in the protein-identification process. In contrast, structural data at lower resolution is becoming more and more available owing to recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) techniques. Once a cryo-EM map is acquired, one of the basic questions asked is what are the folds of the components in the assembly and what is their configuration. Here, a novel knowledge-based computational method, named EMatch, towards tackling this task for cryo-EM maps at 610? resolution is presented. The method recognizes and locates possible atomic resolution structural homologues of protein domains in the assembly. The strengths of EMatch are demonstrated on a cryo-EM map of native GroEL at 6? resolution. PMID:17164525

  18. Ultra-precise measurement of the fine-structure constant by the means of atom interferometry and implementation of large-momentum-transfer beam-splitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andia, Manuel; Jannin, Raphael; Courvoisier, Clement; Clade, Pierre; Guellati-Khelifa, Saida; Biraben, Francois

    2015-05-01

    In our experiment in Paris, we use a Ramsey-Bordé atom interferometer with cold 87Rb atoms, in combination with the technique of Bloch oscillations in an accelerated optical lattice, to measure the recoil velocity vr in 87Rb. We can then deduce the value of the fine-structure constant α. Such an experimental scheme allows for many kinds of measurements, and in particular has led in 2013 to the proof-of-principle realization of a compact gravimeter based on Bloch oscillations, which can be used for on-board compact gravimeters or gradiometry applications. More recently, attention has been paid to the implementation of a new laser system, motivated by the need of greater laser power in order to reduce some systematic effects and to perform more Bloch oscillations, to further reduce uncertainty on α. Upcoming projects revolve around increasing the sensitivity of the interferometer, which will be done through the Large-Momentum-Transfer Beam-Splitter technique (LMTBS). The first step towards LMTBS will be the implementation of double-diffraction, which makes the interferometer symmetrical by splitting the initial wavepacket into two opposite velocity classes.

  19. Minimization of socioeconomic disruption for displaced populations following disasters.

    PubMed

    El-Anwar, Omar; El-Rayes, Khaled; Elnashai, Amr

    2010-07-01

    In the aftermath of catastrophic natural disasters such as hurricanes, tsunamis and earthquakes, emergency management agencies come under intense pressure to provide temporary housing to address the large-scale displacement of the vulnerable population. Temporary housing is essential to enable displaced families to reestablish their normal daily activities until permanent housing solutions can be provided. Temporary housing decisions, however, have often been criticized for their failure to fulfil the socioeconomic needs of the displaced families within acceptable budgets. This paper presents the development of (1) socioeconomic disruption metrics that are capable of quantifying the socioeconomic impacts of temporary housing decisions on displaced populations; and (2) a robust multi-objective optimization model for temporary housing that is capable of simultaneously minimizing socioeconomic disruptions and public expenditures in an effective and efficient manner. A large-scale application example is optimized to illustrate the use of the model and demonstrate its capabilities ingenerating optimal plans for realistic temporary housing problems. PMID:20345460

  20. Competitive adsorption, displacement, and transport of organic matter on iron oxide: II. Displacement and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B; Mehlhorn, T.L.; Liang, Liyuan

    1996-08-01

    The competitive interactions between organic matter compounds and mineral surfaces are poorly understood, yet these interactions may play a significant role in the stability and co-transport of mineral colloids and/or environmental contaminants. In this study, the processes of competitive adsorption, displacement, and transport of Suwannee River natural organic matter (SR-NOM) are investigated with several model organic compounds in packed beds of iron oxide-coated quartz columns. Results demonstrated that strongly-binding organic compounds are competitively adsorbed and displace those weakly-bound organic compounds along the flow path. Among the four organic compounds studied, polyacrylic acid (PAA) appeared to be the most competitive, whereas SR-NOM was more competitive than phthalic and salicylic acids. A diffuse adsorption and sharp desorption front (giving an appearance of irreversible adsorption) of the SR-NOM breakthrough curves are explained as being a result of the competitive time-dependent adsorption and displacement processes between different organic components within the SR-NOM. The stability and transport of iron oxide colloids varied as one organic component competitively displaces another. Relatively large quantities of iron oxide colloids are transported when the more strongly-binding PAA competitively displaces the weakly-binding SR-NOM or when SR-NOM competitively displaces phthalic and salicylic acids. Results of this study suggest that the chemical composition and hence the functional behavior of NOM (e.g., in stabilizing mineral colloids and in complexing contaminants) can change along its flow path as a result of the dynamic competitive interactions between heterogeneous NOM subcomponents. Further studies are needed to better define and quantify these NOM components as well as their roles in contaminant partitioning and transport. 37 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Measurement of axial injection displacement with trim coil current unbalance

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, Michel Kireeff

    2014-08-15

    The Dee probe used for measuring internal radial beam intensity shows large losses inside the radius of 20 cm of the 88 in. cyclotron. The current of the top and bottom innermost trim coil 1 is unbalanced to study effects of the axial injection displacement. A beam profile monitor images the ion beam bunches, turn by turn. The experimental bunch center of mass position is compared with calculations of the magnetic mirror effect displacement and shows good agreement.

  2. A Robust Ramsey Interferometer for Atomic Timekeeping in Dynamic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotru, Krish; Brown, Justin; Butts, David; Choy, Jennifer; Galfond, Marissa; Johnson, David M.; Kinast, Joseph; Timmons, Brian; Stoner, Richard

    2014-05-01

    We present a laser-based approach to atomic timekeeping, in which atomic phase information is extracted using modified Raman pulses in a Ramsey sequence. We overcome systematic effects associated with differential AC Stark shifts by employing atom optics derived from Raman adiabatic rapid passage (ARP). ARP drives coherent transfer between two hyperfine ground states by sweeping the frequency difference of two optical fields and maintaining a large single-photon detuning. Compared to resonant, pulsed Raman transitions, ARP atom optics afford a >150x reduction in sensitivity to differential AC Stark shifts in a Ramsey interferometer. We also demonstrate that ARP preserves fringe contrast in Ramsey interferometers for cloud displacements reaching the 1/e2 intensity radius of the laser beam. ARP can thus be expected to improve the robustness of clock interferometers operating in dynamic environments. Copyright 2014 by The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Capillary Displacement of Viscous Liquids.

    PubMed

    Walls, Peter L L; Dequidt, Grégoire; Bird, James C

    2016-04-01

    When a capillary tube is brought into contact with a wetting liquid, surface tension forces overcome gravity and the liquid spontaneously rises into the tube until an equilibrium height is reached. The early viscous dynamics of the rise typically follow the well-known Lucas-Washburn law, which is independent of gravity and neglects the displaced fluid. Here we explore the early viscous dynamics when the properties of displaced fluid are significant. Using a combination of experiments and theory, we show how the characteristic behavior of the Lucas-Washburn law is modified when the viscosity of the displaced fluid is comparable to or exceeds the wetting fluid. Additionally, we find that the effects of gravity reshape the dynamics of the capillary rise not only in the late viscous regime but also in the early viscous regime. PMID:26974014

  4. Perceived displacement explains wolfpack effect

    PubMed Central

    Šimkovic, Matúš; Träuble, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the influence of perceived displacement of moving agent-like stimuli on the performance in dynamic interactive tasks. In order to reliably measure perceived displacement we utilize multiple tasks with different task demands. The perceived center of an agent's body is displaced in the direction in which the agent is facing and this perceived displacement is larger than the theoretical position of the center of mass would predict. Furthermore, the displacement in the explicit judgment is dissociated from the displacement obtained by the implicit measures. By manipulating the location of the pivot point, we show that it is not necessary to postulate orientation as an additional cue utilized by perception, as has been suggested by earlier studies. These studies showed that the agent's orientation influences the detection of chasing motion and the detection-related performance in interactive tasks. This influence has been labeled wolfpack effect. In one of the demonstrations of the wolfpack effect participants control a green circle on a display with a computer mouse. It has been shown that participants avoid display areas with agents pointing toward the green circle. Participants do so in favor of areas where the agents point in the direction perpendicular to the circle. We show that this avoidance behavior arises because the agent's pivot point selected by the earlier studies is different from where people locate the center of agent's body. As a consequence, the nominal rotation confounds rotation and translation. We show that the avoidance behavior disappears once the pivot point is set to the center of agent's body. PMID:25566114

  5. Rotor component displacement measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Mercer, Gary D.; Li, Ming C.; Baum, Charles R.

    2003-05-27

    A measuring system for measuring axial displacement of a tube relative to an axially stationary component in a rotating rotor assembly includes at least one displacement sensor adapted to be located normal to a longitudinal axis of the tube; an insulated cable system adapted for passage through the rotor assembly; a rotatable proximitor module located axially beyond the rotor assembly to which the cables are connected; and a telemetry system operatively connected to the proximitor module for sampling signals from the proximitor module and forwarding data to a ground station.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Displacement Cascades in Single and Polycrystalline Zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Du Jincheng

    2009-03-10

    Displacement cascades in zirconia have been studied using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Polycrystalline zirconia with nano-meter grains were created using Voronoi polyhedra construction and studied in comparison with single crystalline zirconia. The results show that displacement cascades with similar kinetic energy generated larger number of displaced atoms in polycrystalline than in the single crystal structure. The fraction of atoms with coordination number change was also higher in polycrystalline zirconia that was explained to be due to the diffusion of oxygen and relaxation at grain boundaries.

  7. PROJECT-INDUCED DISPLACEMENT, SECONDARY STRESSORS, AND HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Hwang, Sean-Shong; Xi, Juan

    2012-01-01

    It has been estimated that about 15 million people are displaced by development projects around the world each year. Despite the magnitude of people affected, research on the health and other impacts of project-induced displacement is rare. This study extends existing knowledge by exploring the short-term health impact of a large scale population displacement resulting from China’s Three Gorges Dam Project. The study is theoretically guided by the stress process model, but we supplement it with Cernea’s Impoverishment Risks and Reconstruction (IRR) model widely used in displacement literature. Our panel analysis indicates that the displacement is associated positively with relocatees’ depression level, and negatively with their self-rated health measured against a control group. In addition, a path analysis suggests that displacement also affects depression and self-rated health indirectly by changing social integration, socioeconomic status, and community resources. The importance of social integration as a protective mechanism, a factor that has been overlooked in past studies of population displacement, is highlighted in this study. PMID:22341203

  8. Generation of displaced squeezed superpositions of coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Podoshvedov, S. A.

    2012-03-15

    We study the method of generation of states that approximate superpositions of large-amplitude coherent states (SCSs) with high fidelity in free-traveling fields. Our approach is based on the representation of an arbitrary single-mode pure state, and SCSs in particular, in terms of displaced number states with an arbitrary displacement amplitude. The proposed optical scheme is based on alternation of photon additions and displacement operators (in the general case, N photon additions and N - 1 displacements are required) with a seed coherent state to generate both even and odd displaced squeezed SCSs regardless of the parity of the used photon additions. It is shown that the optical scheme studied is sensitive to the seed coherent state if the other parameters are unchanged. Output states can approximate either even squeezed SCS or odd SCS shifted relative to each other by some value. This allows constructing a local rotation operator, in particular, the Hadamard gate, which is a mainframe element for quantum computation with coherent states. We also show that three-photon additions with two intermediate displacement operators are sufficient to generate even displaced squeezed SCS with the amplitude 1.7 and fidelity more than 0.99. The effects deteriorating the quality of output states are considered.

  9. Project-induced displacement, secondary stressors, and health.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yue; Hwang, Sean-Shong; Xi, Juan

    2012-04-01

    It has been estimated that about 15 million people are displaced by development projects around the world each year. Despite the magnitude of people affected, research on the health and other impacts of project-induced displacement is rare. This study extends existing knowledge by exploring the short-term health impact of a large scale population displacement resulting from China's Three Gorges Dam Project. The study is theoretically guided by the stress process model, but we supplement it with Cernea's impoverishment risks and reconstruction (IRR) model widely used in displacement literature. Our panel analysis indicates that the displacement is associated positively with relocatees' depression level, and negatively with their self-rated health measured against a control group. In addition, a path analysis suggests that displacement also affects depression and self-rated health indirectly by changing social integration, socioeconomic status, and community resources. The importance of social integration as a protective mechanism, a factor that has been overlooked in past studies of population displacement, is highlighted in this study. PMID:22341203

  10. DISPLACEMENT CASCADE SIMULATION IN TUNGSTEN AT 1025 K

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-09-30

    Molecular dynamics simulation was employed to investigate the irradiation damage properties of bulk tungsten at 1025 K (0.25 melting temperature). A comprehensive data set of primary cascade damage was generated up to primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies 100 keV. The dependence of the number of surviving Frenkel pairs (NFP) on the PKA energy (E) exhibits three different characteristic domains presumably related to the different cascade morphologies that form. The low-energy regime < 0.2 keV is characterized by a hit-or-miss type of Frenkel pair (FP) production near the displacement threshold energy of 128 eV. The middle regime 0.3 – 30 keV exhibits a sublinear dependence of log(NFP) vs log(E) associated with compact cascade morphology with a slope of 0.73. Above 30 keV, the cascade morphology consists of complex branches or interconnected damage regions. In this extended morphology, large interstitial clusters form from superposition of interstitials from nearby damage regions. Strong clustering above 30 keV results in a superlinear dependence of log(NFP) vs log(E) with a slope of 1.365. At 100 keV, an interstitial cluster of size 92 and a vacancy cluster of size 114 were observed.

  11. Retraining Displaced Workers. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaLonde, Robert; Sullivan, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Robert LaLonde of the University of Chicago and Daniel Sullivan of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago suggest that retraining through our nation's community colleges is a way to reduce the skills gaps of at least some of these displaced workers and increase their reemployment earnings. Although workers may still experience significant earnings…

  12. Knowledge Integration and Displaced Volume.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Marcia C.; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2000-01-01

    Contrasts spontaneous and reflective knowledge integration instruction delivered using a computer learning environment to enhance understanding of displaced volume. Distinguishes the impact of instruction on students who believed scientific phenomena are governed by principles (cohesive beliefs) versus students who believed that science is a

  13. Retraining Displaced Workers. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaLonde, Robert; Sullivan, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Robert LaLonde of the University of Chicago and Daniel Sullivan of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago suggest that retraining through our nation's community colleges is a way to reduce the skills gaps of at least some of these displaced workers and increase their reemployment earnings. Although workers may still experience significant earnings

  14. Interaction of displacement cascade with helium bubbles in alpha-iron: Computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Jin; Yang, Li; Gao, Fei; Heinisch, Howard L.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Zu, Xiaotao T.

    2008-09-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) method has been performed to study the interaction of displacement cascade with He bubbles with two sets of potentials. The results show that the stability of He bubbles depends much on the initial He-vacancy (He/V) ratio and the recoil energy. For an initial He/V ratio of 3, the cascade leads to the increase in the number of vacancies in the He bubble and the decrease in the He/V ratio. For an initial He/V ratio of 0.5, the interaction of a cascade with the He/V bubble results in the decrease in the number of vacancies and the increase in the He/V ratio. For an initial He/V ratio of 1, the stability of the bubbles slightly depends on the primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy. Furthermore, a large number of self-interstitial atom clusters are formed after cascade collision for the He/V ratio of 3, while large vacancy clusters are observed for the He/V ratio of 0.5. However, some differences of defect production and clustering between the two sets of potentials are observed, which may be associated the formation energies of He-V clusters, the binding energies of vacancies and He atoms to the clusters and the probability of subcascade formation.

  15. INFLUENCE OF MASS ON DISPLACEMENT THRESHOLD

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, A.; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-12-30

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the effect of mass on displacement threshold energy in Cr, Mo, Fe and W. For each interatomic potential, the mass of the atoms is varied among those metals for a total of 16 combinations. The average threshold energy over all crystal directions is calculated within the irreducible crystal directions using appropriate weighting factors. The weighting factors account for the different number of equivalent directions among the grid points and the different solid angle coverage of each grid point. The grid points are constructed with a Miller index increment of 1/24 for a total of 325 points. For each direction, 10 simulations each with a different primary-knock-on atom are performed. The results show that for each interatomic potential, the average threshold energy is insensitive to the mass; i.e., the values are the same within the standard error. In the future, the effect of mass on high-energy cascades for a given interatomic potential will be investigated.

  16. Some Considerations on Horizontal Displacement and Horizontal Displacement Coefficient B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajduś, Krzysztof; Tajduś, Antoni

    2015-12-01

    Mining-induced deformations of the ground surface and within the rock mass may pose danger not only for surface constructions but also for underground objects (e.g., tunnels, underground storages, garages), diverse types of pipelines, electric cables, etc. For a proper evaluation of hazard for surface and underground objects, such parameters as horizontal displacement and horizontal deformations, especially their maximum values, are of crucial importance. The paper is an attempt at a critical review of hitherto accomplished studies and state of the art of predicting horizontal displacement u, in particular the coefficient B, whose value allows determination of the value of maximum displacement if the value of maximum slope is known, or the value of maximum deformation if the value of maximum trough slope is recognized. Since the geodesic observations of fully developed subsidence troughs suggest that the value of the coefficient depends on the depth H, radius of main influences range r and properties of overburden rock, in particular the occurrence of sub-eras Paleogene and Neogene layers (old name: Quaternary and Tertiary) with low strength parameters, therefore a formula is provided in the present paper allowing for the estimation of the influence of those factors on the value of coefficient B.

  17. An Inexpensive Interferometric Setup for Measuring Microscopic Displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanís, Elvio; Romero, Graciela; Martínez, Carlos; Álvarez, Liliana; Salazar, Germán

    2004-04-01

    In an interesting article published in an issue of The Physics Teacher, Reichert gives some didactic examples about static friction force between a plastic block and a wooden plane on which it rests. To explain the experiments, he uses a simple model based on a microscopic "elastic band" that connects the atoms of both surfaces. Reichert remarks that "the block moves, albeit a microscopic distance," and that it would be helpful if the student could see these displacements. In another paragraph he states that "measuring it (displacement) requires delicate and expensive optical instruments." Effectively, a measurement of such small displacements generally requires interferometric devices. At our university, we teach basic physics and we are aware of the difficulties that beginners have grasping the concepts involved in static friction force. At the same time, as our research field is related to optics metrology, we could not ignore Reichert's statement. Could we design an experimental device to measure the microscopic displacement referred to by Reichert, keeping it inexpensive and easy to implement? Incidentally, in the same issue of The Physics Teacher, Sawicki2 gives an excellent example of how, with a few common elements, a simple experiment of interferometric measurement can be put within students' reach. In this paper, we suggest the use of a simple interferometric device, built with very common and inexpensive elements, and describe an experiment on static friction force in which the instrument is applied to measure microscopic displacements.

  18. Using NJOY99 and MCNP4B2 to Estimate the Radiation Damage Displacements per Atom per Second in Steel Within the Boiling Water Reactor Core Shroud and Vessel Wall from Reactor-Grade Mixed-Oxide/Uranium Oxide Fuel for the Nuclear Power Plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Vickers, Lisa

    2003-11-15

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest in utilizing the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18 to 30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons.There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased {sup 239}Pu wt%) would increase the radiation damage displacements per atom per second (dpa-s{sup -1}) in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation damage within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to personnel and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor.The primary uniqueness of this paper is the computation of radiation damage (dpa-s{sup -1}) using NJOY99-processed cross sections for steel within the core shroud and vessel wall. Specifically, the unique radiation damage results are several orders of magnitude greater than results of previous works. In addition, the conclusion of this paper was that the addition of the maximum fraction of one-third MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly increase the radiation damage in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall such that without mitigation of radiation damage by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as neutron fluence, core temperature, and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the personnel and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor.

  19. A high-resolution neutron powder diffraction investigation of galena (PbS) between 10 K and 350 K: no evidence for anomalies in the lattice parameters or atomic displacement parameters in galena or altaite (PbTe) at temperatures corresponding to the saturation of cation disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, K. S.

    2014-09-01

    The temperature dependences of the unit cell parameter and the atomic displacement parameters (adp) for galena (PbS) have been measured using high resolution neutron powder diffraction in the temperature interval 10-350 K. No evidence has been found for the anomalous behaviour recently reported in a total scattering study of galena, in which the temperature variation of both the unit cell and the adp for lead are reported to undergo a dramatic reduction at a temperature of ~250 K. The linear thermal expansion coefficient calculated from the powder diffraction study is found to be in excellent agreement with literature values over the entire temperature interval studied, and approximately 25% greater at room temperature than that determined by analysis of the pair distribution function (pdf) derived from the total scattering data. This discrepancy is shown to be attributable to a linear, temperature-dependent offset from the published temperatures in the total scattering study, and has arisen from the sample temperature being significantly lower than the experimental set point temperature. Applying this correction to the adps of the lead cation removes the anomalous temperature dependence and shows the pdf results are in agreement with the neutron powder diffraction results. Application of the identical temperature offsets to the results of the pdf analysis of data collected on altaite (PbTe) eliminates the anomalous behaviour in the unit cell and the adp for lead, bringing them in line with literature values. Contrary to the conclusions of the pdf analysis, adps for the lead cation in both galena and altaite can be described in terms of Debye-like behaviour and are consistent with the partial phonon density of states.

  20. A high-resolution neutron powder diffraction investigation of galena (PbS) between 10 K and 350 K: no evidence for anomalies in the lattice parameters or atomic displacement parameters in galena or altaite (PbTe) at temperatures corresponding to the saturation of cation disorder.

    PubMed

    Knight, K S

    2014-09-24

    The temperature dependences of the unit cell parameter and the atomic displacement parameters (adp) for galena (PbS) have been measured using high resolution neutron powder diffraction in the temperature interval 10-350 K. No evidence has been found for the anomalous behaviour recently reported in a total scattering study of galena, in which the temperature variation of both the unit cell and the adp for lead are reported to undergo a dramatic reduction at a temperature of ~250 K. The linear thermal expansion coefficient calculated from the powder diffraction study is found to be in excellent agreement with literature values over the entire temperature interval studied, and approximately 25% greater at room temperature than that determined by analysis of the pair distribution function (pdf) derived from the total scattering data. This discrepancy is shown to be attributable to a linear, temperature-dependent offset from the published temperatures in the total scattering study, and has arisen from the sample temperature being significantly lower than the experimental set point temperature. Applying this correction to the adps of the lead cation removes the anomalous temperature dependence and shows the pdf results are in agreement with the neutron powder diffraction results. Application of the identical temperature offsets to the results of the pdf analysis of data collected on altaite (PbTe) eliminates the anomalous behaviour in the unit cell and the adp for lead, bringing them in line with literature values. Contrary to the conclusions of the pdf analysis, adps for the lead cation in both galena and altaite can be described in terms of Debye-like behaviour and are consistent with the partial phonon density of states. PMID:25185952

  1. Method for quantitative determination and separation of trace amounts of chemical elements in the presence of large quantities of other elements having the same atomic mass

    DOEpatents

    Miller, C.M.; Nogar, N.S.

    1982-09-02

    Photoionization via autoionizing atomic levels combined with conventional mass spectroscopy provides a technique for quantitative analysis of trace quantities of chemical elements in the presence of much larger amounts of other elements with substantially the same atomic mass. Ytterbium samples smaller than 10 ng have been detected using an ArF* excimer laser which provides the atomic ions for a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Elemental selectivity of greater than 5:1 with respect to lutetium impurity has been obtained. Autoionization via a single photon process permits greater photon utilization efficiency because of its greater absorption cross section than bound-free transitions, while maintaining sufficient spectroscopic structure to allow significant photoionization selectivity between different atomic species. Separation of atomic species from others of substantially the same atomic mass is also described.

  2. Displacement cascades and defects annealing in tungsten, Part I: Defect database from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Wirth, Brian D.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2015-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to generate a comprehensive database of surviving defects due to displacement cascades in bulk tungsten. Twenty-one data points of primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies ranging from 100 eV (sub-threshold energy) to 100 keV (~780×Ed, where Ed = 128 eV is the average displacement threshold energy) have been completed at 300 K, 1025 K and 2050 K. Within this range of PKA energies, two regimes of power-law energy-dependence of the defect production are observed. A distinct power-law exponent characterizes the number of Frenkel pairs produced within each regime. The two regimes intersect at a transition energy which occurs at approximately 250×Ed. The transition energy also marks the onset of the formation of large self-interstitial atom (SIA) clusters (size 14 or more). The observed defect clustering behavior is asymmetric, with SIA clustering increasing with temperature, while the vacancy clustering decreases. This asymmetry increases with temperature such that at 2050 K (~0.5Tm) practically no large vacancy clusters are formed, meanwhile large SIA clusters appear in all simulations. The implication of such asymmetry on the long-term defect survival and damage accumulation is discussed. In addition, <100> {110} SIA loops are observed to form directly in the highest energy cascades, while vacancy <100> loops are observed to form at the lowest temperature and highest PKA energies, although the appearance of both the vacancy and SIA loops with Burgers vector of <100> type is relatively rare.

  3. Displacement cascades and defects annealing in tungsten, Part I: Defect database from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Wirth, Brian D.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2015-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to generate a comprehensive database of surviving defects due to displacement cascades in bulk tungsten. Twenty-one data points of primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies ranging from 100 eV (sub-threshold energy) to 100 keV (∼780 × Ed, where Ed = 128 eV is the average displacement threshold energy) have been completed at 300 K, 1025 K and 2050 K. Within this range of PKA energies, two regimes of power-law energy-dependence of the defect production are observed. A distinct power-law exponent characterizes the number of Frenkel pairs produced within each regime. The two regimes intersect at a transition energy which occurs at approximately 250 × Ed . The transition energy also marks the onset of the formation of large self-interstitial atom (SIA) clusters (size 14 or more). The observed defect clustering behavior is asymmetric, with SIA clustering increasing with temperature, while the vacancy clustering decreases. This asymmetry increases with temperature such that at 2050 K (∼0.5Tm) practically no large vacancy clusters are formed, meanwhile large SIA clusters appear in all simulations. The implication of such asymmetry on the long-term defect survival and damage accumulation is discussed. In addition, <1 0 0>{1 1 0} SIA loops are observed to form directly in the highest energy cascades, while vacancy <1 0 0> loops are observed to form at the lowest temperature and highest PKA energies, although the appearance of both the vacancy and SIA loops with Burgers vector of <1 0 0> type is relatively rare.

  4. The variability of the large genomic segment of Ťahyňa orthobunyavirus and an all-atom exploration of its anti-viral drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Patrik; Valdes, James J; Lecina-Casas, Daniel; Chrudimský, Tomáš; Růžek, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Ťahyňa virus (TAHV), a member of the Bunyaviridae family (California complex), is an important but neglected human mosquito-borne pathogen. The virus genome is composed of three segments, i.e., small (S), medium (M), and large (L). Previous studies on genetic variability of viruses within the California complex were focused on S and M segments, but the L segment remains relatively unstudied. To assess the genetic variation and the relation to virus phenotype we analyzed the L segment sequences of biologically diverse TAHV strains isolated in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Phylogenetic analysis covering all available sequences of the L segment of TAHV clearly revealed two distinguished lineages, tentatively named as "European" and "Asian". The L segment strains within the European lineage are highly conserved (identity 99.3%), whilst Asian strains are more genetically diverse (identity 97%). Based on sequence comparison with other bunyaviruses, several non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions unique for TAHV in the L segment were identified. We also identified specific residue substitutions in the endonuclease domain of TAHV compared with the La Crosse virus. Since the endonuclease domain of the La Crosse virus has been resolved, we employed an all energy landscape algorithm to analyze the ligand migration of a viral polymerase inhibitor. This allowed us to demonstrate, at the atomic level, that this viral polymerase inhibitor randomly explored the specific residue substitutions in the endonuclease domain of the TAHV L segment. PMID:24090866

  5. AAO-assisted synthesis of highly ordered, large-scale TiO2 nanowire arrays via sputtering and atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhao; Wang, Cong; Li, Yang; Kim, Nam-Young

    2015-04-01

    Highly ordered nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) thin films were fabricated in oxalic acid under a constant voltage via a two-step anodization process. To investigate the high-aspect-ratio (7.5:1) filling process, both sputtering and atomic layer deposition (ALD) were used to form TiO2 nanowires. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images indicated that mushroom-like TiO2 structures were sputtered onto the AAO template surface, and the ALD-coated TiO2 exhibited fine filling results and clear crystal grain boundaries. Large-scale and free-standing TiO2 nanowire arrays were liberated by selectively removing the aluminum substrate and AAO template via a wet etching process with no collapsing or agglomeration after the drying process. ALD-deposited TiO2 nanowire arrays that were 67 nm in diameter and 400 nm high were transferred from the AAO template. The ALD process enabled the rapid, simple synthesis of highly ordered TiO2 nanowire arrays with desired parameters such as diameter, density, and thickness determined using diverse AAO templates.

  6. AAO-assisted synthesis of highly ordered, large-scale TiO2 nanowire arrays via sputtering and atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhao; Wang, Cong; Li, Yang; Kim, Nam-Young

    2015-01-01

    Highly ordered nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) thin films were fabricated in oxalic acid under a constant voltage via a two-step anodization process. To investigate the high-aspect-ratio (7.5:1) filling process, both sputtering and atomic layer deposition (ALD) were used to form TiO2 nanowires. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images indicated that mushroom-like TiO2 structures were sputtered onto the AAO template surface, and the ALD-coated TiO2 exhibited fine filling results and clear crystal grain boundaries. Large-scale and free-standing TiO2 nanowire arrays were liberated by selectively removing the aluminum substrate and AAO template via a wet etching process with no collapsing or agglomeration after the drying process. ALD-deposited TiO2 nanowire arrays that were 67 nm in diameter and 400 nm high were transferred from the AAO template. The ALD process enabled the rapid, simple synthesis of highly ordered TiO2 nanowire arrays with desired parameters such as diameter, density, and thickness determined using diverse AAO templates. PMID:25897309

  7. Role of W and Mn for reliable 1X nanometer-node ultra-large-scale integration Cu interconnects proved by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, K.; Tu, Y.; Takamizawa, H.; Shimizu, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Momose, T.; Inoue, K.; Nagai, Y.; Shimogaki, Y.

    2014-09-01

    We used atom probe tomography (APT) to study the use of a Cu(Mn) as a seed layer of Cu, and a Co(W) single-layer as reliable Cu diffusion barriers for future interconnects in ultra-large-scale integration. The use of Co(W) layer enhances adhesion of Cu to prevent electromigration and stress-induced voiding failures. The use of Cu(Mn) as seed layer may enhance the diffusion barrier performance of Co(W) by stuffing the Cu diffusion pass with Mn. APT was used to visualize the distribution of W and Mn in three dimensions with sub-nanometer resolution. W was found to segregate at the grain boundaries of Co, which prevents diffusion of Cu via the grain boundaries. Mn was found to diffuse from the Cu(Mn) layer to Co(W) layer and selectively segregate at the Co(W) grain boundaries with W, reinforcing the barrier properties of Co(W) layer. Hence, a Co(W) barrier coupled with a Cu(Mn) seed layer can form a sufficient diffusion barrier with film that is less than 2.0-nm-thick. The diffusion barrier behavior was preserved following a 1-h annealing at 400 °C. The underlayer of the Cu interconnects requires a large adhesion strength with the Cu, as well as low electrical resistivity. The use of Co(W) has previously been shown to satisfy these requirements, and addition of Mn is not expected to deteriorate these properties.

  8. Role of W and Mn for reliable 1X nanometer-node ultra-large-scale integration Cu interconnects proved by atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, K.; Shimizu, H.; Momose, T.; Shimogaki, Y.; Tu, Y.; Takamizawa, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Inoue, K.; Nagai, Y.

    2014-09-29

    We used atom probe tomography (APT) to study the use of a Cu(Mn) as a seed layer of Cu, and a Co(W) single-layer as reliable Cu diffusion barriers for future interconnects in ultra-large-scale integration. The use of Co(W) layer enhances adhesion of Cu to prevent electromigration and stress-induced voiding failures. The use of Cu(Mn) as seed layer may enhance the diffusion barrier performance of Co(W) by stuffing the Cu diffusion pass with Mn. APT was used to visualize the distribution of W and Mn in three dimensions with sub-nanometer resolution. W was found to segregate at the grain boundaries of Co, which prevents diffusion of Cu via the grain boundaries. Mn was found to diffuse from the Cu(Mn) layer to Co(W) layer and selectively segregate at the Co(W) grain boundaries with W, reinforcing the barrier properties of Co(W) layer. Hence, a Co(W) barrier coupled with a Cu(Mn) seed layer can form a sufficient diffusion barrier with film that is less than 2.0-nm-thick. The diffusion barrier behavior was preserved following a 1-h annealing at 400 °C. The underlayer of the Cu interconnects requires a large adhesion strength with the Cu, as well as low electrical resistivity. The use of Co(W) has previously been shown to satisfy these requirements, and addition of Mn is not expected to deteriorate these properties.

  9. Experimental measurement of local displacement and chemical pair correlations in crystalline solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, C.L.; Ice, G.E.; Robertson, J.L.; Shaffer, L.B.

    1993-10-01

    Measurement of near-neighbor atomic arrangements in crystalline solid solutions is well established and provides meaningful values for chemical preference of atoms for their near neighbors to beyond the first ten neighboring shells. Static displacements (atomic size) between these atom pairs have mostly been either ignored in the recovery of the local pair preferences or removed by making use of the displacement scattering dependence on momentum transfer. With intense and energy tunable x-ray synchrotron sources, our ability to recover these static displacements between atoms has greatly improved. Data taken with multiple x-ray energies to obtain the contrast necessary to separate like from unlike neighbor pair distances are discussed for the two cases studied to date: A locally ordered Ni{sub 77.5}Fe{sub 22.5} crystal and a locally clustered Fe{sub 53}Cr{sub 47} crystal. Analysis of experimental parameters and data gives the systematic and statistical errors on the recovered parameters. Meaningful atomic displacements from the mean lattice can be measured and recovered. These displacements help us understand material properties and will provide theorists with tests for their calculations.

  10. Polybenzimidazole via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Di(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole monomers were prepared from phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate and aromatic bis(o-diamine)s. These monomers were used in the synthesis of soluble polybenzimidazoles. The reaction involved the aromatic nucleophilic displacement of various di(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds in the presence of an alkali metal base. These polymers exhibited lower glass transition temperatures, improved solubility, and better compression moldability over their commercial counterparts.

  11. Sample displacement batch chromatography of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kotasinska, Marta; Richter, Verena; Kwiatkowski, Marcel; Schlüter, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    In downstream processing large scale chromatography plays an important role. For its development screening experiments followed by pilot plant chromatography are mandatory steps. Here we describe fast, simple, and inexpensive methods for establishing a preparative chromatography for the separation of complex protein mixtures, based on sample displacement batch chromatography. The methods are demonstrated by anion-exchange chromatography of a human plasma protein fraction (Cohn IV-4), including the screening step and scaling up of the chromatography by a factor of 100. The results of the screening experiments and the preparative chromatography are monitored by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. In summary we provide a protocol which should be easily adaptable for the chromatographic large scale purification of other proteins, in the laboratory as well as in industry for commercial manufacturing. For the latter these protocols cover the initial piloting steps for establishing a sample batch chromatography based on packed columns rather than batch chromatography. PMID:24648085

  12. A Wireless Laser Displacement Sensor Node for Structural Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyo Seon; Kim, Jong Moon; Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Yousok

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a wireless laser displacement sensor node that measures displacement as a representative damage index for structural health monitoring (SHM). The proposed measurement system consists of a laser displacement sensor (LDS) and a customized wireless sensor node. Wireless communication is enabled by a sensor node that consists of a sensor module, a code division multiple access (CDMA) communication module, a processor, and a power module. An LDS with a long measurement distance is chosen to increase field applicability. For a wireless sensor node driven by a battery, we use a power control module with a low-power processor, which facilitates switching between the sleep and active modes, thus maximizing the power consumption efficiency during non-measurement and non-transfer periods. The CDMA mode is also used to overcome the limitation of communication distance, which is a challenge for wireless sensor networks and wireless communication. To evaluate the reliability and field applicability of the proposed wireless displacement measurement system, the system is tested onsite to obtain the required vertical displacement measurements during the construction of mega-trusses and an edge truss, which are the primary structural members in a large-scale irregular building currently under construction. The measurement values confirm the validity of the proposed wireless displacement measurement system and its potential for use in safety evaluations of structural elements. PMID:24084114

  13. A wireless laser displacement sensor node for structural health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyo Seon; Kim, Jong Moon; Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Yousok

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a wireless laser displacement sensor node that measures displacement as a representative damage index for structural health monitoring (SHM). The proposed measurement system consists of a laser displacement sensor (LDS) and a customized wireless sensor node. Wireless communication is enabled by a sensor node that consists of a sensor module, a code division multiple access (CDMA) communication module, a processor, and a power module. An LDS with a long measurement distance is chosen to increase field applicability. For a wireless sensor node driven by a battery, we use a power control module with a low-power processor, which facilitates switching between the sleep and active modes, thus maximizing the power consumption efficiency during non-measurement and non-transfer periods. The CDMA mode is also used to overcome the limitation of communication distance, which is a challenge for wireless sensor networks and wireless communication. To evaluate the reliability and field applicability of the proposed wireless displacement measurement system, the system is tested onsite to obtain the required vertical displacement measurements during the construction of mega-trusses and an edge truss, which are the primary structural members in a large-scale irregular building currently under construction. The measurement values confirm the validity of the proposed wireless displacement measurement system and its potential for use in safety evaluations of structural elements. PMID:24084114

  14. Additional longitudinal displacement for contaminant dispersion in wetland flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xudong; Gao, Ran; Wu, Zi

    2016-01-01

    When there is a sudden and uniform release of contaminant over the depth of wetland, the centroid of resulted solute cloud will travel downstream at the cross-sectional mean velocity of the flow. However, if the initial release is not uniform, there will be an additional longitudinal displacement of the centroid, which is important for predicting the concentration distribution but cannot be revealed by the classical one-dimensional Taylor dispersion model. For the most typical case of an initial point source release at the free-water-surface of the wetland, an idealized case modeling accidental leakage of toxic chemicals in waters, in the present paper we analytically deduce the longitudinal displacement by the method of concentration moment. The result is then incorporated in the analytical solutions of concentration distribution, which are further verified by our numerical simulations. The effects of the longitudinal displacement on the concentration distribution are analyzed in detail. It is shown that without considering the displacement, for vertical planes close to the edges of the contaminant cloud, the analytical solution can over- or under-estimate the vertical distribution of concentration for over 20% of the maximum concentration in the plane even at a large dimensionless time of t∗ = 5 . The longitudinal displacement is shown to decrease with the increase of the important damping factor α, which characterizes the effects of vegetation in wetlands. A simple application is given at the end of this paper to illustrate the evolution of the additional longitudinal displacement.

  15. Software for determining the true displacement of faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto-Fuentes, R.; Nieto-Samaniego, Á. F.; Xu, S.-S.; Alaniz-Álvarez, S. A.

    2014-03-01

    One of the most important parameters of faults is the true (or net) displacement, which is measured by restoring two originally adjacent points, called “piercing points”, to their original positions. This measurement is not typically applicable because it is rare to observe piercing points in natural outcrops. Much more common is the measurement of the apparent displacement of a marker. Methods to calculate the true displacement of faults using descriptive geometry, trigonometry or vector algebra are common in the literature, and most of them solve a specific situation from a large amount of possible combinations of the fault parameters. True displacements are not routinely calculated because it is a tedious and tiring task, despite their importance and the relatively simple methodology. We believe that the solution is to develop software capable of performing this work. In a previous publication, our research group proposed a method to calculate the true displacement of faults by solving most combinations of fault parameters using simple trigonometric equations. The purpose of this contribution is to present a computer program for calculating the true displacement of faults. The input data are the dip of the fault; the pitch angles of the markers, slickenlines and observation lines; and the marker separation. To prevent the common difficulties involved in switching between operative systems, the software is developed using the Java programing language. The computer program could be used as a tool in education and will also be useful for the calculation of the true fault displacement in geological and engineering works. The application resolves the cases with known direction of net slip, which commonly is assumed parallel to the slickenlines. This assumption is not always valid and must be used with caution, because the slickenlines are formed during a step of the incremental displacement on the fault surface, whereas the net slip is related to the finite slip.

  16. Damage inhomogeneity in the core region of displacement cascades in simplified nuclear glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaye, J.-M.; Ghaleb, D.

    2006-02-01

    Displacement cascades at energies ranging from 16 keV to 70 keV were simulated by classical molecular dynamics. Damage inhomogeneity was observed in each case: the atomic density was diminished by the incident projectile to a variable extent depending on the regions concerned. The regions near the initial projectile position are largely annealed, and regions near the end of the cascade are relatively unaffected because of the low residual projectile energy. However, maximum damage occurs in intermediate regions from collisions with incident projectiles at energies ranging from about 10 keV to 25 keV. This phenomenon illustrates the competition between structure annealing and projectile-induced damage: both increase with the local energy, but with different dynamics. At the highest energies, annealing wins out over damage, restoring the glass structure to its pristine state; hence the good structural behaviour in the zones closest to the initial projectile position, which are subjected to the greatest local temperature rise.

  17. Fiber-Optic Differential Displacement Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping

    1996-01-01

    Dual fiber-optic sensor measures small relative displacements of two proximate objects along common surface. Dual sensor comprises two fiber-optic sensors in differential configuration increasing sensitivity to displacement while decreasing sensitivity to thermal expansion and contraction.

  18. Investigations on the development of a mixed displacement-pressure formulation for an anelastic displacement-field finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusovici, Razvan

    2006-03-01

    Space and weapon delivery systems contain guidance components and payload that need to be protected from the extremely harsh acoustic excitation present during launch operations. The above example represents just one application where high-damping viscoelastic materials are used in the design of shock and vibration isolation components. The shock transients generally encountered are characterized by a broad frequency spectrum. Widely available finite element codes do not offer the proper tools to model the frequency- dependent mechanical properties of viscoelastic materials over the frequency domain of interest. An added difficulty is the large Poissson's ratio exhibited by some of these materials, which indicates that previously developed displacement-based finite element formulations should be complemented with mixed pressure-displacement finite element formulations. A pure displacement-based finite element generally predicts the displacements well, if the mesh used is fine enough, but the same thing may not be said about the values of the predicted stresses. The Anelastic Displacement Fields (ADF) method is employed herein to model frequency-dependence of material properties within a time-domain finite element framework and using a mixed displacement-pressure finite element formulation. Finite elements based on this new formulation are developed.

  19. Meridional displacement of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    PubMed Central

    Gille, Sarah T.

    2014-01-01

    Observed long-term warming trends in the Southern Ocean have been interpreted as a sign of increased poleward eddy heat transport or of a poleward displacement of the entire Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) frontal system. The two-decade-long record from satellite altimetry is an important source of information for evaluating the mechanisms governing these trends. While several recent studies have used sea surface height contours to index ACC frontal displacements, here altimeter data are instead used to track the latitude of mean ACC transport. Altimetric height contours indicate a poleward trend, regardless of whether they are associated with ACC fronts. The zonally averaged transport latitude index shows no long-term trend, implying that ACC meridional shifts determined from sea surface height might be associated with large-scale changes in sea surface height more than with localized shifts in frontal positions. The transport latitude index is weakly sensitive to the Southern Annular Mode, but is uncorrelated with El Nio/Southern Oscillation. PMID:24891396

  20. Meridional displacement of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

    PubMed

    Gille, Sarah T

    2014-07-13

    Observed long-term warming trends in the Southern Ocean have been interpreted as a sign of increased poleward eddy heat transport or of a poleward displacement of the entire Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) frontal system. The two-decade-long record from satellite altimetry is an important source of information for evaluating the mechanisms governing these trends. While several recent studies have used sea surface height contours to index ACC frontal displacements, here altimeter data are instead used to track the latitude of mean ACC transport. Altimetric height contours indicate a poleward trend, regardless of whether they are associated with ACC fronts. The zonally averaged transport latitude index shows no long-term trend, implying that ACC meridional shifts determined from sea surface height might be associated with large-scale changes in sea surface height more than with localized shifts in frontal positions. The transport latitude index is weakly sensitive to the Southern Annular Mode, but is uncorrelated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation. PMID:24891396

  1. Biologically based analysis of lung cancer incidence in a large Canadian occupational cohort with low-dose ionizing radiation exposure, and comparison with Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Hazelton, William D; Moolgavkar, Suresh H; Curtis, Stanley B; Zielinski, Jan M; Ashmore, J Patrick; Krewski, Daniel

    2006-06-01

    Lung cancer incidence is analyzed in a large Canadian National Dose Registry (CNDR) cohort with individual annual dosimetry for low-dose occupational exposure to gamma and tritium radiation using the two-stage clonal expansion model (TSCE) and extensions of the model with up to 10 initiation steps. Models with clonal expansion turned off provide very poor fits and are rejected. Characteristic and distinct temporal patterns of excess relative risk (ERR) are found for dose response affecting early, middle, or late stages of carcinogenesis, that is, initiation with one or more stages, clonal expansion, or malignant conversion. Both fixed lag and lag distributions are used to model time from first malignant cell to incidence. Background rates are adjusted for gender and birth cohort. Lacking individual smoking data, surrogate annual smoking doses based on U.S. annual per capita cigarette consumption appear to account for much of the birth cohort effect, leaving radiation dose response relatively unchanged. The mean cumulative exposure for males receiving nonzero cumulative doses of gamma and tritium radiation was 18.2 mSv. The males have a significant dose response with 33 out of a total of 322 lung cancer cases attributable to radiation. There were 78 incident lung cancer among females, (with mean cumulative exposure of 3.8 mSv among females with nonzero exposure). The dose response for females appears smaller than for males but does not differ significantly from zero or from the male dose response. Findings for males include significant dose-response relationships for promotion and malignant conversion, but not initiation, and a protraction effect (sometimes called an inverse-dose-rate effect, where risk increases with protraction of a given dose). The dose response predicted by our analysis appears consistent with the risk for lung cancer incidence in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors cohort, provided that proper adjustments are made for duration of exposure and differences in background rate parameters. PMID:16840251

  2. Advances in Charge Displacement Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bistoni, Giovanni; Belpassi, Leonardo; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    We define new general density-based descriptors for the quantification of charge transfer and polarization effects associated with the interaction between two fragments and the formation of a chemical bond. Our aim is to provide a simple yet accurate picture of a chemical interaction by condensing the information on the charge rearrangement accompanying it into a few chemically meaningful parameters. These charge displacement (CD) parameters quantify the total charge displaced upon bond formation and decompose it into a charge transfer component between the fragments and charge rearrangements taking place within the fragments. We then show how the new parameters can be easily calculated using the well-known CD function, which describes the charge flow along a chosen axis accompanying the formation of a bond. The approach presented here can be useful in a wide variety of contexts, ranging from weak interactions to electronic excitations to coordination chemistry. In particular, we discuss here how the scheme can be used for the characterization of the donation and back-donation components of metal-ligand bonds, in combination with the natural orbitals for chemical valence (NOCV) theory. In doing so, we discuss the interesting relationship between the proposed parameters and the corresponding NOCV eigenvalues, commonly used as a measure of the electron charge displacement associated with a given bonding contribution. As a prototype case study, we investigate the bond between a N-heterocyclic carbene and different metallic fragments. Finally, we show that our approach can be used in combination with the energy decomposition of the extended transition state method, providing an estimate of both charge transfer and polarization contributions to the interaction energy. PMID:26824715

  3. Displacement Compensation of Temperature Probe Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Christopher S.; Hubert, James A.; Barber, Patrick G.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of temperature data from a probe in a vertical Bridgman furnace growing germanium crystals revealed a displacement of the temperature profile due to conduction error. A theoretical analysis shows that the displacement compensation is independent of local temperature gradient. A displacement compensation value should become a standard characteristic of temperature probes used for temperature profile measurements.

  4. Technology and Structural Unemployment: Reemploying Displaced Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report concentrates on problems of displaced blue-collar and nonprofessional white-collar workers. Chapter 1 is a summary. Chapter 2 discusses policy issues and options focused on helping people prepare for worklife changes and helping workers to cope if displacement occurs. A definition and description of worker displacement are offered in…

  5. 40 CFR 205.153 - Engine displacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine displacement. 205.153 Section... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.153 Engine displacement. (a) Engine displacement must be calculated using nominal engine values and rounded to the nearest whole cubic...

  6. 40 CFR 205.153 - Engine displacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine displacement. 205.153 Section... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.153 Engine displacement. (a) Engine displacement must be calculated using nominal engine values and rounded to the nearest whole cubic...

  7. 25 CFR 700.59 - Displaced person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Displaced person. 700.59 Section 700.59 Indians THE... Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.59 Displaced person. Displaced person means a member of the... residing within the area partitioned to the Hopi Tribe who must be relocated pursuant to the Act. This...

  8. Displacement current and surface flashover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.; Caporaso, G. J.; Blackfield, D.; Chen, Y.-J.

    2007-09-01

    High-voltage vacuum insulator failure is generally due to surface flashover rather than insulator bulk breakdown. Vacuum surface flashover is widely believed to be initiated by a secondary electron emission avalanche along the vacuum-insulator interface. This process requires a physical mechanism to cause secondary electrons emitted from the insulator surface to return to that surface. Here, it is shown that when an insulator is subjected to a fast high-voltage pulse, the magnetic field due to displacement current through the insulator can provide this mechanism. This indicates the importance of the voltage pulse shape, especially the rise time, in the flashover initiation process.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in GaAs.

    SciTech Connect

    Foiles, Stephen Martin

    2010-04-01

    The quantification of the production of primary defects via displacement cascades is an important ingredient in the prediction of the influence of radiation on the performance of electronic components in radiation environments. Molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades are performed for GaAs The interatomic interactions are described using a recently proposed Bond Order Potential, and a simple model of electronic stopping is incorporated. The production of point defects is quantified as a function of recoil energy and recoil species. Correlations in the point defects are examined. There are a large number of anti-site defects nearest-neighbor pairs as well as di-vacancies and larger order vacancy clusters. Radiation damage and ion implantation in materials have been studied via molecular dynamics for many years. A significant challenge in these simulations is the detailed identification and quantification of the primary defect production. For the present case of a compound semiconductor, GaAs, there are a larger number of possible point defects compared to elemental materials; two types of vacancies, two types of interstitials and antisite defects. This is further complicated by the fact that, in addition to the formation of point defects, amorphous zones may also be created. The goal of the current work is to quantify the production of primary defects in GaAs due to radiation exposures. This information will be used as part of an effort to predict the influence of radiation environments on the performance of electronic components and circuits. The data provide the initial state for continuum-level analysis of the temporal evolution of defect populations. For this initial state, it is important to know both the number of the various point defects that may be produced as well as the initial spatial correlations between the primary defects. The molecular dynamics simulations employ a recently developed Bond Order Potential (BOP) for GaAs. The analysis of the resulting atomic configurations follows a generalization of methods presented previously for elemental Si. The number of point defects of various types, exclusive of the amorphous zones, is predicted as a function of recoil energy. It is also shown that certain primary point defects are initially formed in binary or larger clusters.

  10. Genetics of bovine abomasal displacement.

    PubMed

    Zerbin, Ina; Lehner, Stefanie; Distl, Ottmar

    2015-04-01

    Displacement of the abomasum (DA) is a common inherited condition in Holstein cows. This article reviews the genetics of DA including risk factors, genetic parameters and molecular genetic results. Breeds other than Holsteins affected by DA include Guernseys, Jerseys, Brown Swiss, Ayrshires and Simmental-Red Holsteins. In most DA cases, left displacements of the abomasum (LDA) are seen. Lactation incidence rates are higher for DA in first lactation Holsteins compared to later lactations. For Holstein cows, heritability estimates for DA are between 0.03 and 0.53. Genetic correlation estimates among DA and milk production traits range from positive to negative. Genome-wide significant genomic regions associated with LDA are located on bovine chromosomes (BTA) 1, 3, 11, 20 and 23. Motilin-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms on BTA23 exhibit a functional relationship with LDA. Pathways for deposition of calcium, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and synaptic transmission are significantly related to LDA in Holsteins. Deciphering the DA-associated genomic regions and genes may be an important step in the quest to understand the underlying disease-causing mechanisms and in unravelling mutations with a causal relationship to DA. PMID:25840863

  11. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Farah, John

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically.

  12. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Farah, John

    1999-01-01

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically.

  13. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Farah, J.

    1999-04-06

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically. 23 figs.

  14. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Farah, J.

    1995-05-30

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically. 29 figs.

  15. Atomic resolution studies of carbonic anhydrase II

    PubMed Central

    Behnke, Craig A.; Le Trong, Isolde; Godden, Jeff W.; Merritt, Ethan A.; Teller, David C.; Bajorath, Jrgen; Stenkamp, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase has been well studied structurally and functionally owing to its importance in respiration. A large number of X-ray crystallographic structures of carbonic anhydrase and its inhibitor complexes have been determined, some at atomic resolution. Structure determination of a sulfonamide-containing inhibitor complex has been carried out and the structure was refined at 0.9? resolution with anisotropic atomic displacement parameters to an R value of 0.141. The structure is similar to those of other carbonic anhydrase complexes, with the inhibitor providing a fourth nonprotein ligand to the active-site zinc. Comparison of this structure with 13 other atomic resolution (higher than 1.25?) isomorphous carbonic anhydrase structures provides a view of the structural similarity and variability in a series of crystal structures. At the center of the protein the structures superpose very well. The metal complexes superpose (with only two exceptions) with standard deviations of 0.01? in some zincprotein and zincligand bond lengths. In contrast, regions of structural variability are found on the protein surface, possibly owing to flexibility and disorder in the individual structures, differences in the chemical and crystalline environments or the different approaches used by different investigators to model weak or complicated electron-density maps. These findings suggest that care must be taken in interpreting structural details on protein surfaces on the basis of individual X-ray structures, even if atomic resolution data are available. PMID:20445237

  16. Icosahedral quasicrystals as twins of cubic crystals containing large icosahedral clusters of atoms: The 1012-atom primitive cubic structure of Al6CuLi3, the C-phase Al37Cu3Li21Mg3, and GaMg2Zn3

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus

    1988-01-01

    Single-grain precession x-ray diffraction photographs of Al6CuLi3 have been successfully indexed on the basis of icosahedral twinning of cubic crystals with a 1012-atom primitive cubic unit with edge 25.70 Å, giving support to the proposal that the so-called icosahedral quasicrystals are twins of crystals containing eight large icosahedral clusters in the β-W arrangement. In this compound two of the clusters consist of 104 atoms and six consist of 136 atoms, with 24 atoms shared. The same structure is assigned to the C-phase, Al37Cu3Li21Mg3, and to GaMg2Zn3. A theory of icosahedral quasicrystals and amorphous metals is described. PMID:16593929

  17. Displacement of squeezed propagating microwave states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Kirill G.; Zhong, Ling; Pogorzalek, Stefan; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Wulschner, Friedrich; Xie, Edwar; Menzel, Edwin; Deppe, Frank; Marx, Achim; Gross, Rudolf

    Displacement of propagating squeezed states is a fundamental operation for quantum communications. It can be applied to fundamental studies of macroscopic quantum coherence and has an important role in quantum teleportation protocols with propagating microwaves. We generate propagating squeezed states using a Josephson parametric amplifier and implement displacement using a cryogenic directional coupler. We study single- and two-mode displacement regimes. For the single-mode displacement we find that the squeezing level of the displaced squeezed state does not depend on the displacement amplitude. Also, we observe that quantum entanglement between two spatially separated channels stays constant across 4 orders of displacement power. We acknowledge support by the German Research Foundation through SFB 631 and FE 1564/1-1, the EU project PROMISCE, and Elite Network of Bavaria through the program ExQM.

  18. Heavy neutrino searches at the LHC with displaced vertices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helo, J. C.; Kovalenko, S. G.; Hirsch, M.

    2014-04-01

    Sterile neutrinos with masses in the range of 1-100 GeV have been searched for in a variety of experiments. Here, we discuss the prospects of searching for sterile neutrinos at the LHC using displaced vertices. Two different cases are discussed: (i) the standard model extended with sterile neutrinos, and (ii) right-handed neutrinos in a left-right symmetric extension of the standard model. A dedicated displaced vertex search will allow us to probe parts of the parameter space not accessible to other searches, but both cases will require a large luminosity.

  19. Two-dimensional particle displacement tracking in particle imaging velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    A new particle imaging velocimetry data acquisition and analysis system, which is an order of magnitude faster than any previously proposed system, has been constructed and tested. The new particle displacement tracking (PDT) system is an all electronic technique employing a video camera and a large memory buffer frame-grabber board. Using a simple encoding scheme, a time sequence of single exposure images is time-coded into a single image and then processed to track particle displacements and determine two-dimensional velocity vectors. Use of the PDT technique in a counterrotating vortex flow produced over 1100 velocity vectors in 110 s when processed on an 80386 PC.

  20. A theoretical model to predict both horizontal displacement and vertical displacement for electromagnetic induction-based deep displacement sensors.

    PubMed

    Shentu, Nanying; Zhang, Hongjian; Li, Qing; Zhou, Hongliang; Tong, Renyuan; Li, Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Deep displacement observation is one basic means of landslide dynamic study and early warning monitoring and a key part of engineering geological investigation. In our previous work, we proposed a novel electromagnetic induction-based deep displacement sensor (I-type) to predict deep horizontal displacement and a theoretical model called equation-based equivalent loop approach (EELA) to describe its sensing characters. However in many landslide and related geological engineering cases, both horizontal displacement and vertical displacement vary apparently and dynamically so both may require monitoring. In this study, a II-type deep displacement sensor is designed by revising our I-type sensor to simultaneously monitor the deep horizontal displacement and vertical displacement variations at different depths within a sliding mass. Meanwhile, a new theoretical modeling called the numerical integration-based equivalent loop approach (NIELA) has been proposed to quantitatively depict II-type sensors' mutual inductance properties with respect to predicted horizontal displacements and vertical displacements. After detailed examinations and comparative studies between measured mutual inductance voltage, NIELA-based mutual inductance and EELA-based mutual inductance, NIELA has verified to be an effective and quite accurate analytic model for characterization of II-type sensors. The NIELA model is widely applicable for II-type sensors' monitoring on all kinds of landslides and other related geohazards with satisfactory estimation accuracy and calculation efficiency. PMID:22368467

  1. A Theoretical Model to Predict Both Horizontal Displacement and Vertical Displacement for Electromagnetic Induction-Based Deep Displacement Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Nanying; Zhang, Hongjian; Li, Qing; Zhou, Hongliang; Tong, Renyuan; Li, Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Deep displacement observation is one basic means of landslide dynamic study and early warning monitoring and a key part of engineering geological investigation. In our previous work, we proposed a novel electromagnetic induction-based deep displacement sensor (I-type) to predict deep horizontal displacement and a theoretical model called equation-based equivalent loop approach (EELA) to describe its sensing characters. However in many landslide and related geological engineering cases, both horizontal displacement and vertical displacement vary apparently and dynamically so both may require monitoring. In this study, a II-type deep displacement sensor is designed by revising our I-type sensor to simultaneously monitor the deep horizontal displacement and vertical displacement variations at different depths within a sliding mass. Meanwhile, a new theoretical modeling called the numerical integration-based equivalent loop approach (NIELA) has been proposed to quantitatively depict II-type sensors’ mutual inductance properties with respect to predicted horizontal displacements and vertical displacements. After detailed examinations and comparative studies between measured mutual inductance voltage, NIELA-based mutual inductance and EELA-based mutual inductance, NIELA has verified to be an effective and quite accurate analytic model for characterization of II-type sensors. The NIELA model is widely applicable for II-type sensors’ monitoring on all kinds of landslides and other related geohazards with satisfactory estimation accuracy and calculation efficiency. PMID:22368467

  2. Defect-Enhanced Charge Transfer by Ion-Solid Interactions in SiC using Large-Scale Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Xiao, H. Y.; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Posselt, Matthias; Weber, William J.

    2009-07-10

    Large-scale ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of ion-solid interactions in SiC reveal that significant charge-transfer occurs between atoms and defects can enhance charge transfer to surrounding atoms. The results demonstrate that charge transfer to and from recoiling atoms can alter the energy barriers and dynamics for stable defect formation. The present simulations illustrate in detail the dynamic processes for charged defect formation. The averaged values of displacement threshold energies along four main crystallographic directions are smaller than those determined by empirical potentials due to charge transfer effects on recoil atoms.

  3. Defect-Enhanced Charge Transfer by Ion-Solid Interactions in SiC using Large-Scale Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Fei; Weber, William J.; Xiao Haiyan; Zu Xiaotao; Posselt, Matthias

    2009-07-10

    Large-scale ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of ion-solid interactions in SiC reveal that significant charge transfer occurs between atoms, and defects can enhance charge transfer to surrounding atoms. The results demonstrate that charge transfer to and from recoiling atoms can alter the energy barriers and dynamics for stable defect formation. The present simulations illustrate in detail the dynamic processes for charged defect formation. The averaged values of displacement threshold energies along four main crystallographic directions are smaller than those determined by empirical potentials due to charge-transfer effects on recoil atoms.

  4. On the calculation of line strengths, oscillator strengths and lifetimes for very large principal quantum numbers in hydrogenic atoms and ions by the McLean-Watson formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2014-08-01

    As a sequel to an earlier study (Hey 2009 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 125701), we consider further the application of the line strength formula derived by Watson (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 L291) to transitions arising from states of very high principal quantum number in hydrogenic atoms and ions (Rydberg-Rydberg transitions, n > 1000). It is shown how apparent difficulties associated with the use of recurrence relations, derived (Hey 2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 2641) by the ladder operator technique of Infeld and Hull (1951 Rev. Mod. Phys. 23 21), may be eliminated by a very simple numerical device, whereby this method may readily be applied up to n ≈ 10 000. Beyond this range, programming of the method may entail greater care and complexity. The use of the numerically efficient McLean-Watson formula for such cases is again illustrated by the determination of radiative lifetimes and comparison of present results with those from an asymptotic formula. The question of the influence on the results of the omission or inclusion of fine structure is considered by comparison with calculations based on the standard Condon-Shortley line strength formula. Interest in this work on the radial matrix elements for large n and n‧ is related to measurements of radio recombination lines from tenuous space plasmas, e.g. Stepkin et al (2007 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 374 852), Bell et al (2011 Astrophys. Space Sci. 333 377), to the calculation of electron impact broadening parameters for such spectra (Watson 2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 1889) and comparison with other theoretical methods (Peach 2014 Adv. Space Res. in press), to the modelling of physical processes in H II regions (Roshi et al 2012 Astrophys. J. 749 49), and the evaluation bound-bound transitions from states of high n during primordial cosmological recombination (Grin and Hirata 2010 Phys. Rev. D 81 083005, Ali-Haïmoud and Hirata 2010 Phys. Rev. D 82 063521, Ali-Haïmoud 2013 Phys. Rev. D 87 023526).

  5. Non-contact displacement estimation using Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaomeng; Singh, Aditya; Yavari, Ehsan; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Non-contact Doppler radar has been used extensively for detection of physiological motion. Most of the results published to date have been focused on estimation of the physiological rates, such as respiratory rate and heart rate, with CW and modulated waveforms in various settings. Accurate assessment of chest displacement may take this type of monitoring to the new level, by enabling the estimation of associated cardiopulmonary volumes, and possibly pulse pressure. To obtain absolute chest displacement with highest precision, full nonlinear phase demodulation of the quadrature radar outputs must be performed. The accuracy of this type of demodulation is limited by the drifting received RF power, varying dc offset, and channel quadrature imbalance. In this paper we demonstrate that if relatively large motion is used to calibrate the system, smaller motion displacement may be acquired with the accuracy on the order of 30 µm. PMID:23366212

  6. Polybenzimidazoles Via Aromatic Nucleophilic Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergerrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Novel molecular weight controlled and endcapped polybenzimidazoles (PBI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenylbenzimidazole) monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The PBI are endcapped with mono(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazoles. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N,N-dimethylacetamide using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. Mono(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazoles are synthesized by reacting phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with aromatic (o-diamine)s in diphenylsulfone. Molecular weight controlled and endcapped PBI of new chemical structures are prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties.

  7. Polybenzimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel molecular weight controlled and endcapped polybenzimidazoles (PBI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl benzimidazole) monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The PBI are endcapped with mono(hydroxyphenyl) benzimidazoles. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N,N-dimethylacetamide using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. Mono(hydroxyphenyl) benzimidazoles are synthesizedby reacting phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with aromatic (o-diamine)s in diphenylsulfone. Molecular weight controlled and endcapped PBI of new chemical structures are prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties.

  8. Displaceable Gear Torque Controlled Driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a displaceable gear to limit torque transfer to a fastener at a precisely controlled torque limit. A biasing assembly biases a first gear into engagement with a second gear for torque transfer between the first and second gear. The biasing assembly includes a pressurized cylinder controlled at a constant pressure that corresponds to a torque limit. A calibrated gage and valve is used to set the desired torque limit. One or more coiled output linkages connect the first gear with the fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. The torque limit is adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  9. Displaced electrode process for welding

    DOEpatents

    Heichel, L.J.

    1975-08-26

    A method is described for the butt-welding of a relatively heavy mass to a relatively small mass such as a thin-wall tube. In butt-welding heat is normally applied at the joint between the two pieces which are butt-welded together. The application of heat at the joint results in overheating the tube which causes thinning of the tube walls and porosity in the tube material. This is eliminated by displacing the welding electrode away from the seam toward the heavier mass so that heat is applied to the heavy mass and not at the butt seam. Examples of the parameters used in welding fuel rods are given. The cladding and end plugs were made of Zircalloy. The electrode used was of 2 percent thoriated tungsten. (auth)

  10. Limb displacement and brightness seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilio, Marcelo; Cunnyngham, Ian; Kuhn, Jeff; Mehret, Leandro; Bush, Rock; Scholl, Isabelle

    2015-08-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) abord the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has been used to obtain the most sensitive spectrally resolved observation of individual p-modes at the extreme solar limb. Such oscillation observations of the limb displacement and brightness for some spatial and temporal regimes are even competitive in signal-to-noise to full-disk doppler measurements of the p-mode spectrum. Limb measurements of 5-min p-modes, while having many similarities to full-disk doppler observations, have significantly different sensitivities to the solar rotation and the 5-min mode solar atmospheric structure. These may provide information about the solar structure which is complementary to full-disk measurements. In this work we present results from Individual spherical harmonic p-modes that were detected around solar limb with amplitudes at the micro-arcsecond level.

  11. Variable delivery, fixed displacement pump

    DOEpatents

    Sommars, Mark F.

    2001-01-01

    A variable delivery, fixed displacement pump comprises a plurality of pistons reciprocated within corresponding cylinders in a cylinder block. The pistons are reciprocated by rotation of a fixed angle swash plate connected to the pistons. The pistons and cylinders cooperate to define a plurality of fluid compression chambers each have a delivery outlet. A vent port is provided from each fluid compression chamber to vent fluid therefrom during at least a portion of the reciprocal stroke of the piston. Each piston and cylinder combination cooperates to close the associated vent port during another portion of the reciprocal stroke so that fluid is then pumped through the associated delivery outlet. The delivery rate of the pump is varied by adjusting the axial position of the swash plate relative to the cylinder block, which varies the duration of the piston stroke during which the vent port is closed.

  12. Study of the fragmentation of a displacement cascade in subcascades within the Binary Collision Approximation framework

    SciTech Connect

    Luneville, Laurence; Simone, David; Weber, William J

    2011-01-01

    When a material is subjected to irradiation, many primary defects are cre- ated at the atomic level by sequences of ballistic collision events to form highly disordered regions defined as displacement cascades. The long term evolution of materials under irradiation is dictated by the number and the spatial distribution of the surviving defects in the displacement cascade. The peculiar power law shape of collision cross sections is responsible for the frag- mentation of a displacement cascade into smaller subcascades. However, it remains difficult to define a subcascade. Within the fractal geometry frame- work, we demonstrate in this work that the set of atomic trajectories in a displacement cascade exhibit a fractal behavior. From this analysis, we present a new criterion to describe the fragmentation of a displacement cas- cade and to calculate the distribution and the number of defects from this fragmentation. Such an analysis provides the natural framework to estimate the number of defects created in a displacement cascade to integrate with results of MD simulations. From this defiintion of the fragmentation of a displacement cascade, this work gives some new insights to describe both the primary defects produced in a material under irradiation and then to compare different irradiations performed with different particles.

  13. The brain uses extrasomatic information to estimate limb displacement

    PubMed Central

    Terekhov, Alexander V.; Hayward, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental problem faced by the brain is to estimate whether a touched object is rigidly attached to a ground reference or is movable. A simple solution to this problem would be for the brain to test whether pushing on the object with a limb is accompanied by limb displacement. The mere act of pushing excites large populations of mechanoreceptors, generating a sensory response that is only weakly sensitive to limb displacement if the movements are small, and thus can hardly be used to determine the mobility of the object. In the mechanical world, displacement or deformation of objects frequently co-occurs with microscopic fluctuations associated with the frictional sliding of surfaces in contact or with micro-failures inside an object. In this study, we provide compelling evidence that the brain relies on these microscopic mechanical events to estimate the displacement of the limb in contact with an object, and hence the mobility of the touched object. We show that when pressing with a finger on a stiff surface, fluctuations that resemble the mechanical response of granular solids provoke a sensation of limb displacement. Our findings suggest that when acting on an external object, prior knowledge about the sensory consequences of interacting with the object contributes to proprioception. PMID:26311672

  14. Atomic-Resolution STEM Imaging of Graphene at Low Voltage of 30 kV with Resolution Enhancement by Using Large Convergence Angle.

    PubMed

    Sawada, H; Sasaki, T; Hosokawa, F; Suenaga, K

    2015-04-24

    Atomic resolution at a low accelerating voltage with aberration correction is required to reduce the electron irradiation damage in scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging. However, the reduction in resolution caused by the diffraction limit becomes severe with increasing electron wavelength at low accelerating voltages. The developed aberration corrector can compensate for higher-order aberration in scanning transmission electron microscopy to expand the uniform phase angle. The resolution for imaging graphene at 30 kV is evaluated by changing the convergence angle for a probe-forming system with a higher-order aberration corrector. A single-carbon atom on graphene is successfully imaged at atomic resolution with a cold-field emission gun by dark-field imaging at an accelerating voltage of 30 kV. PMID:25955058

  15. Atomic-orbital close-coupling calculations for collisions involving fusion relevant highly charged impurity ions using very large basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Igenbergs, Katharina; Wallerberger, Markus; Schweinzer, Josef; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2012-05-25

    The atomic-orbital close-coupling formalism is a well-known method for the semiclassical treatment of ion-atom collisions. Cross sections for these kinds of collisions are mainly needed in the analysis of certain spectroscopic data from nuclear fusion experiments as well as astrophysical data. We shall outline how the computational implementation can be improved in such a way that collisions involving heavy, highly charged impurity ions, such as Ar{sup 18+} can be treated. Furthermore we show and discuss exemplary results.

  16. Displaced Children in U.S. History: Stories of Courage and Survival

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    This article focuses on the experiences and survival of displaced children in four large migrations in U.S. history. The chaos and despair caused by Hurricane Katrina are reminders that the displacement and survival of children are timely and relevant topics for the social studies curriculum. Hurricane Katrina was the worst natural disaster in

  17. Recording Intramolecular Mechanics during the Manipulation of a Large Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresco, Francesca; Meyer, Gerhard; Rieder, Karl-Heinz; Tang, Hao; Gourdon, André; Joachim, Christian

    2001-08-01

    The technique of single atom manipulation by means of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) applies to the controlled displacement of large molecules. By a combined experimental and theoretical work, we show that in a constant height mode of manipulation the STM current intensity carries detailed information on the internal mechanics of the molecule when guided by the STM tip. Controlling and time following the intramolecular behavior of a large molecule on a surface is the first step towards the design of molecular tunnel-wired nanorobots.

  18. Recording intramolecular mechanics during the manipulation of a large molecule.

    PubMed

    Moresco, F; Meyer, G; Rieder, K H; Tang, H; Gourdon, A; Joachim, C

    2001-08-20

    The technique of single atom manipulation by means of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) applies to the controlled displacement of large molecules. By a combined experimental and theoretical work, we show that in a constant height mode of manipulation the STM current intensity carries detailed information on the internal mechanics of the molecule when guided by the STM tip. Controlling and time following the intramolecular behavior of a large molecule on a surface is the first step towards the design of molecular tunnel-wired nanorobots. PMID:11497988

  19. Juvenile Songbirds Compensate for Displacement to Oceanic Islands during Autumn Migration

    PubMed Central

    Thorup, Kasper; Ortvad, Troels Eske; Rabøl, Jørgen; Holland, Richard A.; Tøttrup, Anders P.; Wikelski, Martin

    2011-01-01

    To what degree juvenile migrant birds are able to correct for orientation errors or wind drift is still largely unknown. We studied the orientation of passerines on the Faroe Islands far off the normal migration routes of European migrants. The ability to compensate for displacement was tested in naturally occurring vagrants presumably displaced by wind and in birds experimentally displaced 1100 km from Denmark to the Faroes. The orientation was studied in orientation cages as well as in the free-flying birds after release by tracking departures using small radio transmitters. Both the naturally displaced and the experimentally displaced birds oriented in more easterly directions on the Faroes than was observed in Denmark prior to displacement. This pattern was even more pronounced in departure directions, perhaps because of wind influence. The clear directional compensation found even in experimentally displaced birds indicates that first-year birds can also possess the ability to correct for displacement in some circumstances, possibly involving either some primitive form of true navigation, or ‘sign posts’, but the cues used for this are highly speculative. We also found some indications of differences between species in the reaction to displacement. Such differences might be involved in the diversity of results reported in displacement studies so far. PMID:21464975

  20. Juvenile songbirds compensate for displacement to oceanic islands during autumn migration.

    PubMed

    Thorup, Kasper; Ortvad, Troels Eske; Rabøl, Jørgen; Holland, Richard A; Tøttrup, Anders P; Wikelski, Martin

    2011-01-01

    To what degree juvenile migrant birds are able to correct for orientation errors or wind drift is still largely unknown. We studied the orientation of passerines on the Faroe Islands far off the normal migration routes of European migrants. The ability to compensate for displacement was tested in naturally occurring vagrants presumably displaced by wind and in birds experimentally displaced 1100 km from Denmark to the Faroes. The orientation was studied in orientation cages as well as in the free-flying birds after release by tracking departures using small radio transmitters. Both the naturally displaced and the experimentally displaced birds oriented in more easterly directions on the Faroes than was observed in Denmark prior to displacement. This pattern was even more pronounced in departure directions, perhaps because of wind influence. The clear directional compensation found even in experimentally displaced birds indicates that first-year birds can also possess the ability to correct for displacement in some circumstances, possibly involving either some primitive form of true navigation, or 'sign posts', but the cues used for this are highly speculative. We also found some indications of differences between species in the reaction to displacement. Such differences might be involved in the diversity of results reported in displacement studies so far. PMID:21464975

  1. XAFS studies of the local environment of Pb impurity atoms in barium, strontium, and calcium titanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. I.; Sluchinskaya, I. A.; Erko, A.; Veligzhanin, A. A.; Chernyshov, A. A.

    2009-05-01

    The local environment of Pb impurity atoms in BaTiO3, SrTiO3, and CaTiO3 crystals was studied by XAFS technique. It is shown that, in both polar and nonpolar phases of BaTiO3 and in SrTiO3, the Pb atoms are displaced from the A lattice sites by ˜0.15 Å; in CaTiO3 this displacement is absent. Large values of Debye-Waller factors (0.05-0.10 Å2) for the atoms in the first shell of Pb observed in all the three crystals indicate the distortion of the oxygen environment of Pb atoms. The appearance of these features was explained by the fact that the Pb-O chemical bond has a noticeable covalent component and a Pb atom can form strong bonds only with four of the 12 surrounding oxygen atoms. The obtained data were used to determine the main factors responsible for the occurrence of ferroelectric phase transition in SrTiO3 and CaTiO3 and for the increase of the Curie temperature of BaTiO3 when it is doped with Pb.

  2. Approaching the Quantum Limits of Displacement Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teufel, John

    2013-03-01

    While high quality factor mechanical resonators (such as cantilevers and membranes) are routinely used as exquisite sensors, only recently are these engineered devices encountering the fundamental limits and opportunities afforded by quantum mechanics. The standard quantum limit of displacement detection requires a balance between the measurement imprecision and momentum imparted on the object of interest. One promising measurement scheme for achieving, and possibly surpassing, these quantum limits of measurement is that of cavity optomechanics--an architecture in which a mechanical resonator modulates the frequency of a high frequency electromagnetic resonance. Ideally, the quantized nature of the measurement photons will impart backaction in the form of radiation pressure shot noise, but observation of this quantum effect in macroscopic mechanical resonators has proven experimental difficult due to the relatively weak forces of the light. We realize a microwave cavity ``opto'' -mechanical system by incorporating a freely-suspended membrane in a superconducting microwave resonant circuit, which simultaneously exhibits high quality factor electrical and mechanical modes. The relatively large electomechanical coupling has led to experimental observation of the strong coupling regime as well as sideband cooling of the mechanical mode to its quantum ground state. I will present recent experiments of similar circuits in which the displacement sensitivity goes beyond that at the standard quantum limit by several orders of magnitude. These measurements also clearly show the fundamental trade-off between measurement imprecision and backaction. We observe the radiation pressure shot noise of the microwave photons and show that it can completely overwhelm the classical, thermal motion of the membrane.

  3. Modelling Toehold-Mediated RNA Strand Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Šulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P.K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics and kinetics of an RNA toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction with a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Strand displacement, during which a single strand displaces a different strand previously bound to a complementary substrate strand, is an essential mechanism in active nucleic acid nanotechnology and has also been hypothesized to occur in vivo. We study the rate of displacement reactions as a function of the length of the toehold and temperature and make two experimentally testable predictions: that the displacement is faster if the toehold is placed at the 5′ end of the substrate; and that the displacement slows down with increasing temperature for longer toeholds. PMID:25762335

  4. Design and analysis of displacement measurement system based on the four-quadrant detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zi-jun; Dong, Li-li; Xu, Wen-hai

    2013-09-01

    The four-quadrant detector is mainly used in high-precision displacement measurement and other related fields. With the emergence of displacement problem in a large number of projects, the displacement measurement accuracy, speed and reliability have become increasingly demanding. In this paper, the measurement principle of four-quadrant detector is analyzed theoretically, the displacement measurement system based on four-quadrant detector is designed, and the experimental platform is built to test and validate the stability, measurement accuracy and range of the displacement measurement system. Experimental results show that: the deviation of the same spot position on measurement system is less than 0.17μm. The measurement error of spot displacement is less than 3.7μm.

  5. Parental Displacement and Adolescent Suicidality: Exploring the Role of Failed Belonging

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Katherine A.; Selby, Edward A.; Lewinsohn, Peter M.; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated that events causing displacement from parentssuch as parental death, abandonment of the adolescent, or divorcerepresent a risk factor for adolescent suicide, but research to date has not established a theoretical model explaining the association between parental displacement and adolescent suicidal behavior. The current studies examined the construct of failed belonging proposed by the interpersonal theory of suicide as one factor that may link parental displacement with adolescent suicide. Study 1 found that low levels of belonging mediated the association between parental displacement and adolescent suicide attempts in a large urban community sample of older adolescents between the ages of 18 and 23. In Study 2, parental displacement interacted with low belonging to predict suicide attempts, such that adolescents (average age 16.6 years; (SD = 1.2) who experienced both displacement and low levels of belonging had the highest risk for suicide. PMID:22023272

  6. A two-dimensional displacement sensor and its application in profile measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xudong; Chen, Yurong; Xie, Tiebang

    2006-11-01

    The synthetic measurement of complex profile with high precision and large range is a difficulty among surface topography measuring techniques because the measuring range and the precision of traditional profilometers is limited. Moreover, the stylus of traditional profilometers cannot skim over the steep wall successfully. This paper presents a twodimension displacement sensor. Accompanied by the vertical scanning platform, the two-dimension displacement sensor can measure the complex profile with high precision and large range. The sensor is composed of two inductance displacement sensors. The vertical displacement sensor detects the vertical displacement and the horizontal displacement sensor detects the horizontal displacement. When the workpiece is measured, the vertical undulation of profile lead to the zero offset of the vertical displacement sensor. According to the zero offset, the piezoelectric actuator and the servo motor drive the vertical scanning platform to move vertically to ensure that the lever is always in balance position. When the stylus barges up against the steep wall, the horizontal resistance force results in the other zero offset of the horizontal displacement sensor. If the horizontal resistance force is too strong, the vertical scanning platform descends to make the stylus climb the steep wall successfully.

  7. Displacement speeds in turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Marcus S.; Shepherd, Ian G.; Bell, J.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    The theory of turbulent premixed flames is based on acharacterization of the flame as a discontinuous surface propagatingthrough the fluid. The displacement speed, defined as the local speed ofthe flame front normal to itself, relative to the unburned fluid,provides one characterization of the burning velocity. In this paper, weintroduce a geometric approach to computing displacement speed anddiscuss the efficacy of the displacement speed for characterizing aturbulent flame.

  8. Intrinsic Mean Square Displacement in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vural, Derya; Glyde, Henry R.

    2012-02-01

    The dynamics of biological molecules is investigated in neutron scattering experiments, in molecular dynamics simulations, and using analytical theory. Specifically, the mean square displacement (MSD), exp, of hydrogen in proteins is determined from measurements of the incoherent elastic neutron scattering intensity (ENSI). The MSD, exp, is usually obtained from the dependence of the ENSI on the scattering wave vector Q. The MSD increases with increasing temperature reaching large values at room temperature. Large MSD is often associated with and used as an indicator of protein function. The observed MSD, however, depends on the energy resolution of the neutron spectrometer employed. We present a method, a first attempt, to extract the intrinsic MSD of hydrogen in protein from measurements, one that is independent of the instrument resolution. The method consists of a model of the ENSI that contains (1) the intrinsic MSD, (2) the instrument resolution width and (3) a parameter describing the motional processes that contribute to the MSD. Several examples of intrinsic MSDs in proteins obtained from fitting to data in the existing literature will be presented.

  9. Polybenzoxazole via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Polybenzoxazoles (PBO) are heterocyclic macromolecules which were first synthesized in a two-step process by the initial formation of aromatic diacid chlorides with bis(o-aminophenol)s through solution condensation of aromatic diacid chlorides with bis(o-aminophenol)s followed by thermal cyclodehydration. Since then several methods were utilized in their synthesis. The most common synthetic method for PBO involves a polycondensation of bis(o-aminophenol)s with aromatic diacid diphenyl esters. Another preparative route involves the solution polycondensation of the hydrochloride salts of bis(o-amino phenol)s with aromatic diacids in polyphosphoric acid. Another synthetic method involves the initial formation of poly(o-hydroxy amide)s from silylated bis(o-aminophenol)s with aromatic diacid chlorides followed by thermal cyclodehydration to PBO. A recent preparative route involves the reaction of aromatic bisphenols with bis(fluorophenyl) benzoxazoles by the displacement reaction to form PBO. The novelty of the present invention is that high molecular weight PBO of new chemical structures are prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties.

  10. Cholesterol Displaces Palmitoylceramide from Its Tight Packing with Palmitoylsphingomyelin in the Absence of a Liquid-Disordered Phase

    PubMed Central

    Busto, Jon V.; Sot, Jess; Requejo-Isidro, Jos; Goi, Flix M.; Alonso, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    A set of different biophysical approaches has been used to explore the phase behavior of palmitoylsphingomyelin (pSM)/cholesterol (Chol) model membranes in the presence and absence of palmitoylceramide (pCer). Fluorescence spectroscopy of di-4-ANEPPDHQ-stained pSM/Chol vesicles and atomic force microscopy of supported planar bilayers show gel L?/liquid-ordered (Lo) phase coexistence within the range XChol = 00.25 at 22C. At the latter compositional point and beyond, a single LopSM/Chol phase is detected. In ternary pSM/Chol/pCer mixtures, differential scanning calorimetry of multilamellar vesicles and confocal fluorescence microscopy of giant unilamellar vesicles concur in showing immiscibility, but no displacement, between Lo cholesterol-enriched (pSM/Chol) and gel-like ceramide-enriched (pSM/pCer) phases at high pSM/(Chol + pCer) ratios. At higher cholesterol content, pCer is unable to displace cholesterol at any extent, even at XChol < 0.25. It is interesting that an opposite strong cholesterol-mediated pCer displacement from its tight packing with pSM is clearly detected, completely abolishing the pCer ability to generate large microdomains and giving rise instead to a single ternary phase. These observations in model membranes in the absence of the lipids commonly used to form a liquid-disordered phase support the role of cholesterol as the key determinant in controlling its own displacement from Lo domains by ceramide upon sphingomyelinase activity. PMID:20712995

  11. Estimating temperature-dependent anisotropic hydrogen displacements with the invariom database and a new segmented rigid-body analysis program

    PubMed Central

    Lübben, Jens; Bourhis, Luc J.; Dittrich, Birger

    2015-01-01

    Invariom partitioning and notation are used to estimate anisotropic hydrogen displacements for incorporation in crystallographic refinement models. Optimized structures of the generalized invariom database and their frequency computations provide the information required: frequencies are converted to internal atomic displacements and combined with the results of a TLS (translation–libration–screw) fit of experimental non-hydrogen anisotropic displacement parameters to estimate those of H atoms. Comparison with TLS+ONIOM and neutron diffraction results for four example structures where high-resolution X-ray and neutron data are available show that electron density transferability rules established in the invariom approach are also suitable for streamlining the transfer of atomic vibrations. A new segmented-body TLS analysis program called APD-Toolkit has been coded to overcome technical limitations of the established program THMA. The influence of incorporating hydrogen anisotropic displacement parameters on conventional refinement is assessed. PMID:26664341

  12. Atom-by-atom nucleation and growth of graphene nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Christopher J.; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Graphene is an ideal thin membrane substrate for creating molecule-scale devices. Here we demonstrate a scalable method for creating extremely small structures in graphene with atomic precision. It consists of inducing defect nucleation centers with energetic ions, followed by edge-selective electron recoil sputtering. As a first application, we create graphene nanopores with radii as small as 3 Å, which corresponds to 10 atoms removed. We observe carbon atom removal from the nanopore edge in situ using an aberration-corrected electron microscope, measure the cross-section for the process, and obtain a mean edge atom displacement energy of 14.1 ± 0.1 eV. This approach does not require focused beams and allows scalable production of single nanopores and arrays of monodisperse nanopores for atomic-scale selectively permeable membranes. PMID:22492975

  13. Displaced Homemakers: Vo-Tech Workshop Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, Wanda Jo

    Written for displaced homemaker programs in vocational-technical schools, this curriculum contains material designed so that instructors can prepare student manuals appropriate to almost any educational support situation for displaced homemakers. An overview provides information on special needs groups, curriculum use, and resources and sample…

  14. Biaxial laser-based displacement transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, W. N., Jr.; Payne, T. S.; Smith, M. K.

    1978-01-01

    A simple laser-based instrument is described which produces output voltages proportional to displacements in orthogonal directions. This instrument and the associated experimental techniques have been used to measure biaxial displacements across 400-micron slots at various angles in sheet specimens of various widths.

  15. 40 CFR 205.153 - Engine displacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Engine displacement. 205.153 Section 205.153 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.153 Engine displacement. (a)...

  16. 40 CFR 205.153 - Engine displacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Engine displacement. 205.153 Section 205.153 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.153 Engine displacement. (a)...

  17. 40 CFR 205.153 - Engine displacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine displacement. 205.153 Section 205.153 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.153 Engine displacement. (a)...

  18. Video Games, Adolescents, and the Displacement Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Carla Christine

    2012-01-01

    The displacement effect (the idea that time spent in one activity displaces time spent in other activities) was examined within the lens of adolescents' video game use and their time spent reading, doing homework, in physically active sports and activities, in creative play, and with parents and friends. Data were drawn from the Panel Study…

  19. Small displacement measurements with subatomic resolution by beat frequency measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cíp, O.; Petrů, F.; Buchta, Z.; Lazar, J.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper a novel method for high-resolution measurement of displacements with sub-atomic resolution is described. With this method, a length change of an optical resonator is directly transformed to a radio-frequency signal. A tunable He-Ne laser is locked to a mode of the resonator using a digital signal processing technique. Heterodyne mixing of this locked laser with an iodine-stabilized He-Ne laser converts the frequency of the laser locked to the cavity into the radio-frequency region. A HF counter measures the beat frequency from which the displacement can be derived directly. This method delivers inherent linearity and sub-nanometre resolution of the displacement over a range of several micrometres. An example of the capabilities of this system is given in this paper, where it is used for checking periodic deviations of a laser interferometer system. Emphasis is put on the construction of the optical resonator, on how its narrow resonance line-width is achieved, and how the required mechanical stability is achieved. The measurement range and the scale linearity are discussed in detail. Possible applications of this method are the calibration of nano-position systems based on PZT transducers, as well as inductive and capacitive sensors.

  20. Using a 2D displacement sensor to derive 3D displacement information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soares, Schubert F. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A 2D displacement sensor is used to measure displacement in three dimensions. For example, the sensor can be used in conjunction with a pulse-modulated or frequency-modulated laser beam to measure displacement caused by deformation of an antenna on which the sensor is mounted.

  1. Local Time Displacement of Substorm Expansion in Conjugate Hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Tung, Y.; Parks, G. K.; Mende, S. B.; Frey, H. U.; Immel, T. J.

    2003-12-01

    Because the Earth's magnetic field is largely dipolar and symmetric, many auroral features are conjugate between the northern and southern hemispheres. However, previous work has shown that the aurora can be nonconjugate. Most previous optical conjugacy studies have been limited to ground based observations or ground based and space based imager comparisons. In both cases at least one observation point is restricted to viewing only small scale features. Conjugate observations of the large scale behavior of the aurora have been confined to rare, serendipitous space based imager conjunctions and single spacecraft viewing of both hemispheres which is tempered by large oblique viewing angles. As the Polar spacecraft's apogee has descended in the the southern hemisphere, the Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) has spent an increasing amount of time viewing the southern aurora. Simultaneously, the Wideband Imaging Camera (WIC) onboard the IMAGE spacecraft has been observing the northern aurora. By using image data from both spacecraft, we are able to systematically analyze the degree of auroral conjugacy on synoptic scales and over a wide variety of geomagnetic conditions. In this work, we focus on the conjugacy of the region of intense auroral emission during substorm onset and expansion. We find a persistent displacement in local time of the region of active aurora during substorm expansion; features in the northern hemisphere are shifted westward (duskward) relative to the conjugate point of the southern hemisphere aurora by up to a few thousand kilometers. Often there is a shift in the opposite direction observed before and at substorm onset. The same sense of displacement has been reported in earlier work. The sense or magnitude of the displacement showns no obvious correlation with the interplanetary magnetic field orientation or strength as suggested in previous studies. Therefore, we suggest that the displacement in local time of the region of intense auroral emission is a result of the asymmetric distortion of the magnetic field by the large scale field-aligned currents associated with substorms.

  2. Defect structures induced by high-energy displacement cascades in γ uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yinbin; Beeler, Benjamin; Deo, Chaitanya; Baskes, Michael I.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Displacement cascade simulations were conducted for the γ uranium system based on molecular dynamics. A recently developed modified embedded atom method (MEAM) potential was employed to replicate the atomic interactions while an embedded atom method (EAM) potential was adopted to help characterize the defect structures induced by the displacement cascades. The atomic displacement process was studied by providing primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) with kinetic energies from 1 keV to 50 keV. The influence of the PKA incident direction was examined. The defect structures were analyzed after the systems were fully relaxed. The states of the self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) were categorized into various types of dumbbells, the crowdion, and the octahedral interstitial. The voids were determined to have a polyhedral shape with {1 1 0} facets. The size distribution of the voids was also obtained. The results of this study not only expand the knowledge of the microstructural evolution in irradiated γ uranium, but also provide valuable references for the radiation-induced defects in uranium alloy fuels.

  3. Defect structures induced by high-energy displacement cascades in γ uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinbin; Beeler, Benjamin; Deo, Chaitanya; Baskes, Michael I.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Displacement cascade simulations were conducted for the c uranium system based on molecular dynamics. A recently developed modified embedded atom method (MEAM) potential was employed to replicate the atomic interactions while an embedded atom method (EAM) potential was adopted to help characterize the defect structures induced by the displacement cascades. The atomic displacement process was studied by providing primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) with kinetic energies from 1 keV to 50 keV. The influence of the PKA incident direction was examined. The defect structures were analyzed after the systems were fully relaxed. The states of the self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) were categorized into various types of dumbbells, the crowdion, and the octahedral interstitial. The voids were determined to have a polyhedral shape with {110} facets. The size distribution of the voids was also obtained. The results of this study not only expand the knowledge of the microstructural evolution in irradiated c uranium, but also provide valuable references for the radiation-induced defects in uranium alloy fuels.

  4. Displacement thresholds in central and peripheral vision during tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of stimulus duration and angular velocity on a subject's judgment of displacement threshold are examined. Twenty-six male subjects between 17-45 years with uncorrected 20:20 distance acuity and normal color perception and stereopsis studied a series of forced choice, paired comparison trials in which a long, thin, collimated horizontally oriented line moved downward through 12 angles ranging from 0.6-60 arcmin and judged which stimulus moved in each pair. The displacements were produced by 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 sec stimulus duration and 2.5, 5, 10, and 15 deg/sec angular rates. Stimulus velocity, stimulus duration, mean threshold displacement, and mean confidence results are analyzed. It is observed that displacement judgment accuracy is increased with increasing stimulus duration. The data are compared with the results of Johnson and Leibowitz (1976) and Johnson and Scobey (1982), and good correlation with the Johnson and Leibowitz data is detected. The data reveal that threshold is based on a constant stimulus velocity over this range of durations and velocities. The data are applicable to the study of the final approach to landing of medium and large commercial jet aircraft.

  5. Effect of strain and temperature on the threshold displacement energy in body-centered cubic iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, Benjamin; Asta, Mark; Hosemann, Peter; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels

    2016-06-01

    The threshold displacement energy (TDE) is the minimum amount of kinetic energy required to displace an atom from its lattice site. The magnitude of the TDE displays significant variance as a function of the crystallographic direction, system temperature and applied strain, among a variety of other factors. It is critically important to determine an accurate value of the TDE in order to calculate the total number of displacements due to a given irradiation condition, and thus to understand the materials response to irradiation. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to calculate the threshold displacement energy in body-centered cubic iron as a function of strain and temperature. With applied strain, a decrease of the TDE of up to approximately 14 eV was observed. A temperature increase from 300 K to 500 K can result in an increase of the TDE of up to approximately 9 eV.

  6. Particle displacement tracking applied to air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic Particle Image Velocimeter (PIV) techniques offer many advantages over conventional photographic PIV methods such as fast turn around times and simplified data reduction. A new all electronic PIV technique was developed which can measure high speed gas velocities. The Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) technique employs a single cw laser, small seed particles (1 micron), and a single intensified, gated CCD array frame camera to provide a simple and fast method of obtaining two-dimensional velocity vector maps with unambiguous direction determination. Use of a single CCD camera eliminates registration difficulties encountered when multiple cameras are used to obtain velocity magnitude and direction information. An 80386 PC equipped with a large memory buffer frame-grabber board provides all of the data acquisition and data reduction operations. No array processors of other numerical processing hardware are required. Full video resolution (640x480 pixel) is maintained in the acquired images, providing high resolution video frames of the recorded particle images. The time between data acquisition to display of the velocity vector map is less than 40 sec. The new electronic PDT technique is demonstrated on an air nozzle flow with velocities less than 150 m/s.

  7. Particle displacement tracking applied to air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic Particle Image Velocimetric (PIV) techniques offer many advantages over conventional photographic PIV methods such as fast turn around times and simplified data reduction. A new all electronic PIV technique was developed which can measure high speed gas velocities. The Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) technique employs a single CW laser, small seed particles (1 micron), and a single intensified, gated CCD array frame camera to provide a simple and fast method of obtaining two-dimensional velocity vector maps with unambiguous direction determination. Use of a single CCD camera eliminates registration difficulties encountered when multiple cameras are used to obtain velocity magnitude and direction information. An 80386 PC equipped with a large memory buffer frame-grabber board provides all of the data acquisition and data reduction operations. No array processors of other numerical processing hardware are required. Full video resolution (640 x 480 pixel) is maintained in the acquired images, providing high resolution video frames of the recorded particle images. The time between data acquisition to display of the velocity vector map is less than 40 sec. The new electronic PDT technique is demonstrated on an air nozzle flow with velocities less than 150 m/s.

  8. Crustal Displacements Due to Continental Water Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanDam, T.; Wahr, J.; Milly, P. C. D.; Shmakin, A. B.; Blewitt, G.; Lavallee, D.; Larson, K. M.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of long-wavelength (> 100 km), seasonal variability in continental water storage on vertical crustal motions are assessed. The modeled vertical displacements (delta-r(sub M)) have root-mean-square (RMS) values for 1994-1998 as large as 8 mm with ranges up to 30 mm, and are predominantly annual in character. Regional strains are on the order of 20 nanostrain for tilt and 5 nanostrain for horizontal deformation. We compare delta-r(sub M) with observed Global Positioning System (GPS) heights (delta-r(sub O)) (which include adjustments to remove estimated effects of atmospheric pressure and annual tidal and non-tidal ocean loading) for 147 globally distributed sites. When the delta-r(sub O) time series are adjusted by delta-r(sub M), their variances are reduced, on average, by an amount equal to the variance of the delta-r(sub M). Of the delta-r(sub O) time series exhibiting a strong annual signal, more than half are found to have an annual harmonic that is in phase and of comparable amplitude with the annual harmonic in the delta-r(sub M). The delta-r(sub M) time series exhibit long-period variations that could be mistaken for secular tectonic trends or post-glacial rebound when observed over a time span of a few years.

  9. Motional displacements in proteins incorporating dynamical diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vural, Derya; Smith, Jeremy; Glyde, Henry

    The average mean square displacement (MSD), , of hydrogen H in proteins is measured using incoherent neutron scattering methods. The observed MSD shows a marked increase in magnitude at a temperature TD ~= 240 K. This is widely interpreted as a dynamical transition to large MSDs which make function possible in proteins. However, when the data is interpreted in terms of a single averaged MSD, the extracted depends on the neutron momentum transfer, ℏQ , used in the measurement. We have shown recently that this apparent dependence on Q arises because the dynamical diversity of the H in the protein is neglected[2]. We present models of the dynamical diversity of H in Lysosyme that when used in the analysis of simulated neutron data lead to consistent, Q independent values for the average MSD and for the diversity model.2. D. Vural and L. Hong, J. C. Smith and H. R. Glyde. Phys. Rev. E 91, 052705 (2015). Supported in part by Office of Basic Energy Sciences, USDOE, ER46680.

  10. Rotor Displacement of the Ultrasonic Motor Having an Angular Displacement Self-Correction Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoduo; Kusakabe, Chiharu; Tomikawa, Yoshiro; Takano, Takehiro

    1993-09-01

    This paper deals with the experimental investigation for confirmation of rotor displacement of the ultrasonic stepping motor having an angular displacement self-correction function. The experiment focused on the relationship between the rotor’s vibration displacement and its staying position for the self-correction. The result proved that the rotor always stays at the position where the displacement is smallest by cutting a slit into the rotor. Moreover, it has also been found that the stable self-correction of rotor angular displacement depends upon both the rotor driving frequency and rotor clamping force.

  11. Molecular-dynamics simulation of displacement cascades in Cu: analysis of replacement sequences

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.E.; Benedek, R.

    1981-01-01

    Molecular-dynamics computer simulations of displacement cascades in copper have been performed for recoil energies up to 450 eV. Statistical analyses of the atomic replacements are presented. Linear replacement sequence lengths are extremely short on the average. The effect of the cooling phase of the cascade is discussed.

  12. Dynamic atomic contributions to infrared intensities of fundamental bands.

    PubMed

    Silva, Arnaldo F; Richter, Wagner E; Bassi, Adalberto B M S; Bruns, Roy E

    2015-11-11

    Dynamic atomic intensity contributions to fundamental infrared intensities are defined as the scalar products of dipole moment derivative vectors for atomic displacements and the total dipole derivative vector of the normal mode. Intensities of functional group vibrations of the fluorochloromethanes can be estimated within 6.5 km mol(-1) by displacing only the functional group atoms rather than all the atoms in the molecules. The asymmetric CF2 stretching intensity, calculated to be 126.5 km mol(-1) higher than the symmetric one, is accounted for by an 81.7 km mol(-1) difference owing to the carbon atom displacement and 40.6 km mol(-1) for both fluorine displacements. Within the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) model differences in atomic polarizations are found to be the most important for explaining the difference in these carbon dynamic intensity contributions. Carbon atom displacements almost completely account for the differences in the symmetric and asymmetric CCl2 stretching intensities of dichloromethane, 103.9 of the total calculated value of 105.2 km mol(-1). Contrary to that found for the CF2 vibrations intramolecular charge transfer provoked by the carbon atom displacement almost exclusively explains this difference. The very similar intensity values of the symmetric and asymmetric CH2 stretching intensities in CH2F2 arise from nearly equal carbon and hydrogen atom contributions for these vibrations. All atomic contributions to the intensities for these vibrations in CH2Cl2 are very small. Sums of dynamic contributions of the individual intensities for all vibrational modes of the molecule are shown to be equal to mass weighted atomic effective charges that can be determined from atomic polar tensors evaluated from experimental infrared intensities and frequencies. Dynamic contributions for individual intensities can also be determined solely from experimental data. PMID:26508036

  13. PDT - PARTICLE DISPLACEMENT TRACKING SOFTWARE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, M. P.

    1994-01-01

    Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is a quantitative velocity measurement technique for measuring instantaneous planar cross sections of a flow field. The technique offers very high precision (1%) directionally resolved velocity vector estimates, but its use has been limited by high equipment costs and complexity of operation. Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) is an all-electronic PIV data acquisition and reduction procedure which is simple, fast, and easily implemented. The procedure uses a low power, continuous wave laser and a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) camera to electronically record the particle images. A frame grabber board in a PC is used for data acquisition and reduction processing. PDT eliminates the need for photographic processing, system costs are moderately low, and reduced data are available within seconds of acquisition. The technique results in velocity estimate accuracies on the order of 5%. The software is fully menu-driven from the acquisition to the reduction and analysis of the data. Options are available to acquire a single image or 5- or 25-field series of images separated in time by multiples of 1/60 second. The user may process each image, specifying its boundaries to remove unwanted glare from the periphery and adjusting its background level to clearly resolve the particle images. Data reduction routines determine the particle image centroids and create time history files. PDT then identifies the velocity vectors which describe the particle movement in the flow field. Graphical data analysis routines are included which allow the user to graph the time history files and display the velocity vector maps, interpolated velocity vector grids, iso-velocity vector contours, and flow streamlines. The PDT data processing software is written in FORTRAN 77 and the data acquisition routine is written in C-Language for 80386-based IBM PC compatibles running MS-DOS v3.0 or higher. Machine requirements include 4 MB RAM (3 MB Extended), a single or multiple frequency RGB monitor (EGA or better), a math co-processor, and a pointing device. The printers supported by the graphical analysis routines are the HP Laserjet+, Series II, and Series III with at least 1.5 MB memory. The data acquisition routines require the EPIX 4-MEG video board and optional 12.5MHz oscillator, and associated EPIX software. Data can be acquired from any CCD or RS-170 compatible video camera with pixel resolution of 600hX400v or better. PDT is distributed on one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. Due to the use of required proprietary software, executable code is not provided on the distribution media. Compiling the source code requires the Microsoft C v5.1 compiler, Microsoft QuickC v2.0, the Microsoft Mouse Library, EPIX Image Processing Libraries, the Microway NDP-Fortran-386 v2.1 compiler, and the Media Cybernetics HALO Professional Graphics Kernal System. Due to the complexities of the machine requirements, COSMIC strongly recommends the purchase and review of the documentation prior to the purchase of the program. The source code, and sample input and output files are provided in PKZIP format; the PKUNZIP utility is included. PDT was developed in 1990. All trade names used are the property of their respective corporate owners.

  14. Modeling averaged displacement fronts in heterogeneous media with multirate mass transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuweiler, Insa; Heiss, Veronica; Tecklenburg, Jan

    2013-04-01

    The morphology of fluid-fluid interfaces during immiscible displacement has been studied intensely on length scales where the pore space is resolved. Depending on the dimensionless numbers of the flow process, the front morphology can be different: compact or irregular with different cluster distributions of trapped displaced fluid. There are also flow regimes with a cross-over from a compact displacing fluid far away from the front and irregular fluid distribution at the front. If displacement is considered on larger length scales, the pore space and fluid-fluid interfaces can no longer be resolved. The front is in this case rather described by an isoline of the displacing fluid saturation. Displacement fronts on large length scales in heterogeneous media can also show complex front morphology: compact or irregular with fluid clusters of displaced fluid that are trapped behind the front. As displaced fluid may also be immobilized (meaning it is not trapped, but it is surrounded by displacing fluid, so that the surrounding material has a very low permeability) and is in this case displaced only very slowly, one also finds a cross-over regime with a compact region far away from the front and an irregular front. The morphology is influenced by the interplay of heterogeneous structure and the stability of the displacement process. We focus on displacement scenarios with crossover from irregular fluid distribution around the front due to immobilized fluid that is eventually displaced to compact far behind the front. To have a quantification of the front morphology is important, for example, to estimate mass transfer of given components between the fluids. We study the front morphology using numerical simulations of displacement processes in porous media composed of two different materials. We consider different heterogeneous structures. We consider flow scenarios with different capillary number and viscosity ratio of the fluids. It is demonstrated that the connectivity of the heterogeneous structure has a crucial influence on the front morphology. For these numerical simulations we compare the averaged fluid distribution to an upscaled one-dimensional model. In the upscaled model, the immobilization of displaced fluid behind the front is captured by a double continuum approach, where the immobilized fluid is considered an immobile continuum. The size of the immobile continuum changes with time. The flow is modeled in the mobile continuum with a multi-rate mass-transfer term to capture exchange with the immobile domain. The rate coefficients for the mass transfer have to be estimated from the size distribution of immobilized fluid clusters. It is demonstrated that such a simplified model can describe the displacement well, if the front morphology is not too complex.

  15. Optimization of legacy lidar data sets for measuring near-field earthquake displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glennie, Craig L.; Hinojosa-Corona, Alejandro; Nissen, Edwin; Kusari, Arpan; Oskin, Michael E.; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon; Borsa, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) topography, acquired before and after an earthquake, can provide an estimate of the coseismic surface displacement field by differencing the preevent and postevent lidar point clouds. However, estimated displacements can be contaminated by the presence of large systematic errors in either of the point clouds. We present three-dimensional displacements obtained by differencing airborne lidar point clouds collected before and after the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, a Mw 7.2 earthquake that occurred in 2010. The original surface displacement estimates contained large, periodic artifacts caused by systematic errors in the preevent lidar data. Reprocessing the preevent data, detailed herein, removed a majority of these systematic errors that were largely due to misalignment between the scanning mirror and the outgoing laser beam. The methodology presented can be applied to other legacy airborne laser scanning data sets in order to improve change estimates from temporally spaced lidar acquisitions.

  16. Patterns of fault displacement and strain at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Alan P.; Ferrill, David A.; Sims, Darrell W.; Franklin, Nathan; Waiting, Deborah J.

    2004-09-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is the sole candidate site for underground disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the United States. The mountain is composed of Tertiary (12.8-11.6 Ma) volcanic tuff, cut by west-dipping normal faults that divide the mountain into north-trending, east-dipping cuestas. Geologic characterization of Yucca Mountain by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has focused on mapping lithostratigraphic units, faults (including single plane, small-displacement surfaces of discontinuity, and large-displacement fault zones), and fractures (quasi-planar zones that have experienced loss of cohesion, including joints, partially mineralized joints, veins, and small-displacement faults). Faults and fractures are important to repository design because they affect seismic hazard, rockfall, and fluid transmissivity in the surrounding rock mass. Geologic maps and detailed studies of rock pavements and tunnel walls reveal that faults and fractures within Yucca Mountain are not uniform in orientation or intensity. We investigate two aspects of distributed deformation arising from fault displacement patterns at Yucca Mountain. First, fault-parallel strains (elongation parallel to cutoff lines where stratigraphic horizons intersect fault planes) develop as a result of lateral fault displacement gradients. Using existing data, we analyze the likely state of strain in fault blocks at Yucca Mountain. Second, fault-strike-perpendicular strains can develop where two normal faults propagate past each other. A component of the total strain is distributed into the surrounding rock to produce synthetic layer dip or a network of smaller faults and fractures. We find that small-scale faulting and fracturing at Yucca Mountain is variable and is strongly controlled by larger scale fault system architecture.

  17. Fault displacement hazard for strike-slip faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.D.; Dawson, T.E.; Chen, R.; Cao, T.; Wills, C.J.; Schwartz, D.P.; Frankel, A.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology, data, and regression equations for calculating the fault rupture hazard at sites near steeply dipping, strike-slip faults. We collected and digitized on-fault and off-fault displacement data for 9 global strikeslip earthquakes ranging from moment magnitude M 6.5 to M 7.6 and supplemented these with displacements from 13 global earthquakes compiled byWesnousky (2008), who considers events up to M 7.9. Displacements on the primary fault fall off at the rupture ends and are often measured in meters, while displacements on secondary (offfault) or distributed faults may measure a few centimeters up to more than a meter and decay with distance from the rupture. Probability of earthquake rupture is less than 15% for cells 200 m??200 m and is less than 2% for 25 m??25 m cells at distances greater than 200mfrom the primary-fault rupture. Therefore, the hazard for off-fault ruptures is much lower than the hazard near the fault. Our data indicate that rupture displacements up to 35cm can be triggered on adjacent faults at distances out to 10kmor more from the primary-fault rupture. An example calculation shows that, for an active fault which has repeated large earthquakes every few hundred years, fault rupture hazard analysis should be an important consideration in the design of structures or lifelines that are located near the principal fault, within about 150 m of well-mapped active faults with a simple trace and within 300 m of faults with poorly defined or complex traces.

  18. Probing baryogenesis with displaced vertices at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yanou; Shuve, Brian

    2015-02-01

    The generation of the asymmetric cosmic baryon abundance requires a departure from thermal equilibrium in the early universe. In a large class of baryogenesis models, the baryon asymmetry results from the out-of-equilibrium decay of a new, massive particle. We highlight that in the interesting scenario where this particle has a weak scale mass, this out-of-equilibrium condition requires a proper decay length larger than O(1) mm. Such new fields are within reach of the LHC, at which they can be pair produced leaving a distinctive, displaced-vertex signature. This scenario is realized in the recently proposed mechanism of baryogenesis where the baryon asymmetry is produced through the freeze-out and subsequent decay of a meta-stable weakly interacting massive particle ("WIMP baryogenesis"). In analogy to missing energy searches for WIMP dark matter, the LHC is an excellent probe of these new long-lived particles responsible for baryogenesis via the low-background displaced vertex channel. In our paper, we estimate the limits on simplified models inspired by WIMP baryogenesis from two of the most sensitive collider searches by CMS and ATLAS with 8 TeV LHC data. We also estimate the LHC reach at 13 TeV using current strategies, and demonstrate that up to a factor of 100 improvement in cross-section limits can be achieved by requiring two displaced vertices while lowering kinematic thresholds. For meta-stable WIMPs produced through electroweak interactions, the high luminosity LHC is sensitive to masses up to 2.5 TeV for lifetimes around 1 cm, while for singlets pair-produced through the off-shell-Higgs portal, the LHC is sensitive to production cross sections of O(10) ab for benchmark masses around 150 GeV. Our analysis and proposals also generally apply to displaced vertex signatures from other new physics such as hidden valley models, twin Higgs models and displaced supersymmetry.

  19. Efficiency Improvements to the Displacement Based Multilevel Structural Optimization Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plunkett, C. L.; Striz, A. G.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    2001-01-01

    Multilevel Structural Optimization (MSO) continues to be an area of research interest in engineering optimization. In the present project, the weight optimization of beams and trusses using Displacement based Multilevel Structural Optimization (DMSO), a member of the MSO set of methodologies, is investigated. In the DMSO approach, the optimization task is subdivided into a single system and multiple subsystems level optimizations. The system level optimization minimizes the load unbalance resulting from the use of displacement functions to approximate the structural displacements. The function coefficients are then the design variables. Alternately, the system level optimization can be solved using the displacements themselves as design variables, as was shown in previous research. Both approaches ensure that the calculated loads match the applied loads. In the subsystems level, the weight of the structure is minimized using the element dimensions as design variables. The approach is expected to be very efficient for large structures, since parallel computing can be utilized in the different levels of the problem. In this paper, the method is applied to a one-dimensional beam and a large three-dimensional truss. The beam was tested to study possible simplifications to the system level optimization. In previous research, polynomials were used to approximate the global nodal displacements. The number of coefficients of the polynomials equally matched the number of degrees of freedom of the problem. Here it was desired to see if it is possible to only match a subset of the degrees of freedom in the system level. This would lead to a simplification of the system level, with a resulting increase in overall efficiency. However, the methods tested for this type of system level simplification did not yield positive results. The large truss was utilized to test further improvements in the efficiency of DMSO. In previous work, parallel processing was applied to the subsystems level, where the derivative verification feature of the optimizer NPSOL had been utilized in the optimizations. This resulted in large runtimes. In this paper, the optimizations were repeated without using the derivative verification, and the results are compared to those from the previous work. Also, the optimizations were run on both, a network of SUN workstations using the MPICH implementation of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) and on the faster Beowulf cluster at ICASE, NASA Langley Research Center, using the LAM implementation of UP]. The results on both systems were consistent and showed that it is not necessary to verify the derivatives and that this gives a large increase in efficiency of the DMSO algorithm.

  20. Experimental verification of displacement-current conduits in metamaterials-inspired optical circuitry.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brian; Engheta, Nader

    2012-05-11

    Electric displacement current is present in capacitors and optical waveguides; however, unlike the conduction current in metallic wires, it is not confined. Analogous to the contrast in conductivity between a metallic wire and the surrounding air, displacement-current wires based on near-zero permittivity media contain a large contrast in effective permittivity. As a variation on this idea, in this Letter, we demonstrate at microwave frequencies two displacement-current cables based on effectively negative and effectively positive permittivity metastructures. Our experimental results clearly show cablelike behaviors that allow bending of the structure while still confining and maintaining the primarily longitudinal forward and reverse effective displacement currents within each conduit. The results presented here experimentally verify the notion of displacement-current wires and cables in metatronics as metamaterial-inspired circuitry. PMID:23003040

  1. Is Stereocilia Velocity or Displacement Feedback Used in the Cochlear Amplifier?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shan; Mountain, David; Hubbard, Allyn

    2009-02-01

    Outer hair cells (OHC) play an important role in cochlear amplification. The OHC senses stereocilia motion and creates a force feedback to the organ of Corti. It is largely accepted that the stereocilia displacement drives the OHC apical conductance change, which, in turn, drives somatic motility. Recent research shows that the tension gated OHC current exhibits fast adaptation in response to stereocilia displacement. Such an adaptation process resembles a high-pass filter or differentiator, at least for the inward current. Since velocity is the derivative of displacement, fast adaptation may indicate that it is the stereocilia velocity, rather than displacement is the more important driver of the OHC apical conductance. We changed our multi-compartment, piezo-electro-mechanical model to sense stereocilia velocity rather than displacement. This new model can well match measured basilar membrane velocity and our own cochlear microphonic data.

  2. Giant adrenal cyst displacing the right kidney

    PubMed Central

    Chodisetti, Subbarao; Boddepalli, Yogesh; Kota, Malakondareddy

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cysts are rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal cysts. We present a case of a huge adrenal cyst displacing the right kidney anteriorly toward the left side in a young female. PMID:26941503

  3. Microbial Adhesion in Flow Displacement Systems

    PubMed Central

    Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2006-01-01

    Flow displacement systems are superior to many other (static) systems for studying microbial adhesion to surfaces because mass transport and prevailing shear conditions can be adequately controlled and notoriously ill-defined slight rinsing steps to remove so-called “loosely adhering organisms” can be avoided. In this review, we present the basic background required to calculate mass transport and shear rates in flow displacement systems, focusing on the parallel plate flow chamber as an example. Critical features in the design of flow displacement systems are discussed, as well as different strategies for data analysis. Finally, selected examples of working with flow displacement systems are given for diverse biomedical applications. PMID:16418527

  4. A flexible sensor measuring displacement and bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, Takashi; Yamamoto, Akio; Higuchi, Toshiro

    2009-04-01

    This paper proposes a new sensor that is capable of measuring both linear displacement and bending. The sensor is designed to be used with an electrostatic film motor that features mechanical flexibility, but can also be used as an independent sensor. The sensor employs three-phase electrodes both in sliding and stationary parts and estimates displacement and bending from the change of the capacitance between the electrodes. The paper describes an equivalent capacitance-network model for the sensor. Based on the model, sensing principles for both displacement and bending are presented and analyzed. The analyses are experimentally verified using a prototype sensor. The experimental results show that the prototype sensor could measure both displacement and bending with little interference between them.

  5. Giant adrenal cyst displacing the right kidney.

    PubMed

    Chodisetti, Subbarao; Boddepalli, Yogesh; Kota, Malakondareddy

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cysts are rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal cysts. We present a case of a huge adrenal cyst displacing the right kidney anteriorly toward the left side in a young female. PMID:26941503

  6. Seismic transducer measures small horizontal displacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, T. L.

    1965-01-01

    Pendular seismic transducer mounted on base plate measures small horizontal displacements of structures subjected to vibration where no fixed reference point is available. Enclosure of transducer in transparent plastic case prevents air currents from disturbing the pendulum balance.

  7. Displacement field measurement in the nanometer range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrel, Yves; Fournier, Nicolas

    1996-09-01

    The grid method is a classical tool for displacement measurement, which provides field data. This method has benefited very much from the phase-shifting technique in recent years. Two examples of applications of this method in the nanometer range are presented. The first one concerns the materials science: it is shown that microgrids observed by SEM can provide displacement field data with an accuracy of a few nanometers. The second one concerns the measurement of a rigid-body displacement. In this case, displacement data can be averaged over the whole field, drastically increasing the sensitivity. It is shown that a sensitivity of 7 nm can be achieved by using a coarse grid with 8 lines per mm. This sensitivity corresponds to 1/18000 of the grid pitch.

  8. Probing neutrino mass with displaced vertices at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, F. de; Eboli, O.J.P.; Magro, M.B.; Porod, W.; Restrepo, D.; Valle, J.W.F.

    2005-04-01

    Supersymmetric extensions of the standard model exhibiting bilinear R-parity violation can generate naturally the observed neutrino mass spectrum as well as mixings. One interesting feature of these scenarios is that the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is unstable, with several of its decay properties predicted in terms of neutrino mixing angles. A smoking gun of this model in colliders is the presence of displaced vertices due to LSP decays in large parts of the parameter space. In this work we focus on the simplest model of this type that comes from minimal supergravity with universal R-parity conserving soft breaking of supersymmetry augmented with bilinear R-parity breaking terms at the electroweak scale (RmSUGRA). We evaluate the potential of the Fermilab Tevatron to probe the RmSUGRA parameters through the analysis of events possessing two displaced vertices stemming from LSP decays. We show that requiring two displaced vertices in the events leads to a reach in m{sub 1/2} twice the one in the usual multilepton signals in a large fraction of the parameter space.

  9. Probing neutrino mass with displaced vertices at the Fermilab Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Campos, F.; Éboli, O. J.; Magro, M. B.; Porod, W.; Restrepo, D.; Valle, J. W.

    2005-04-01

    Supersymmetric extensions of the standard model exhibiting bilinear R-parity violation can generate naturally the observed neutrino mass spectrum as well as mixings. One interesting feature of these scenarios is that the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is unstable, with several of its decay properties predicted in terms of neutrino mixing angles. A smoking gun of this model in colliders is the presence of displaced vertices due to LSP decays in large parts of the parameter space. In this work we focus on the simplest model of this type that comes from minimal supergravity with universal R-parity conserving soft breaking of supersymmetry augmented with bilinear R-parity breaking terms at the electroweak scale (RmSUGRA). We evaluate the potential of the Fermilab Tevatron to probe the RmSUGRA parameters through the analysis of events possessing two displaced vertices stemming from LSP decays. We show that requiring two displaced vertices in the events leads to a reach in m1/2 twice the one in the usual multilepton signals in a large fraction of the parameter space.

  10. Icosahedral quasicrystals of intermetallic compounds are icosahedral twins of cubic crystals of three kinds, consisting of large (about 5000 atoms) icosahedral complexes in either a cubic body-centered or a cubic face-centered arrangement or smaller (about 1350 atoms) icosahedral complexes in the β-tungsten arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus

    1989-01-01

    The twofold-axis electron-diffraction photographs of icosahedral quasicrystals are of three kinds, reflecting three different structures of the cubic crystals that by icosahedral twinning form the quasicrystals. The first kind, represented by Al13Cu4Fe3, contains two very large icosahedral complexes, each of about 4680 atoms, in the body-centered arrangement, with six smaller icosahedral complexes (104 atoms each) in the principal interstices. The second kind, represented by Al5Mn, contains four of the very large complexes in the face-centered arrangement (cubic close packing), with four of the smaller clusters in the interstices. The third kind, represented by Al6CuLi3, contains eight icosahedral complexes, each of about 1350 atoms, in the β-W arrangement. The supporting evidence for these cubic structures is discussed as well as other evidence showing that the simple quasicrystal theory, which states that quasicrystals do not involve any translational identity operations, has to be modified. Images PMID:16594078

  11. Analysis of Fraction Skill Score properties for a displaced rainy grid point in a rectangular domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skok, Gregor

    2016-03-01

    The Fraction Skill Score (FSS) is a recently developed and popular metric used for precipitation verification. A compact analytical expression for FSS is derived for a case with a single displaced rainy grid point in a rectangular domain. The existence of an analytical solution is used to determine some properties of FSS, which might also be applicable in other cases since the rain areas of any shape will asymptote towards this solution if the displacement is sufficiently large. The use of the simple square shape of the neighborhood causes the FSS value to be dependent on the direction of the displacements (not only on the displacement size). The effect is limited in scope but can increase or decrease the FSS value by 0.1. Moving a nearby border closer to the rainy points can either increase or decrease the FSS value, depending on the location of the border. The FSS value near a border can be at most 33% larger than the FSS value in the infinite domain, assuming the same neighborhood size and displacement. The effect of the nearby corner is similar to the effect of the nearby border but is stronger. The useful forecast criteria (FSSuseful) is defined as a value of FSS for a precipitation feature with a displacement half the neighborhood size. FSSuseful for a displaced rainy grid point depends on the orientation of the displacement being the largest for displacements that are parallel to the borders and the smallest for a diagonal displacement for which the value can be as low as 0.42. An analysis of a real dataset was also performed, which showed that the border effect is usually small, but in some cases the effect becomes large (an increase of FSS value up to 70% was identified). The likelihood of a strong border effect in real datasets increases significantly if the neighborhood size at FSS = 0.5 is comparable or larger than the domain size.

  12. Atomic polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  13. Earthquake-induced soil displacements and their impact on rehabilitations.

    PubMed

    Konagai, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    A large earthquake can trigger long lasting geotechnical problems, which pose serious issues on both rehabilitations and land conservations. Therefore one of what required of us is to deduce as much hidden signs as possible from observable changes of landforms. Though serious, damage caused by the October 23rd 2004, Mid-Niigata Prefecture Earthquake has given us a rare opportunity to study the landform changes in mountainous terrain hit by this earthquake. An attempt was made to convert changes in elevation in Eulerian description for images obtained from remote-sensing technologies to Lagrangian displacements, because Lagrangian displacements can directly describe behaviors of soils, which are typically history-dependent. This paper documents some big pictures of earthquake-inflicted landform changes obtained through this attempt. PMID:21986310

  14. Earthquake-induced soil displacements and their impact on rehabilitations

    PubMed Central

    KONAGAI, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    A large earthquake can trigger long lasting geotechnical problems, which pose serious issues on both rehabilitations and land conservations. Therefore one of what required of us is to deduce as much hidden signs as possible from observable changes of landforms. Though serious, damage caused by the October 23rd 2004, Mid-Niigata Prefecture Earthquake has given us a rare opportunity to study the landform changes in mountainous terrain hit by this earthquake. An attempt was made to convert changes in elevation in Eulerian description for images obtained from remote-sensing technologies to Lagrangian displacements, because Lagrangian displacements can directly describe behaviors of soils, which are typically history-dependent. This paper documents some big pictures of earthquake-inflicted landform changes obtained through this attempt. PMID:21986310

  15. Electrode system for electric-discharge generation of atomic iodine in a repetitively pulsed oxygen - iodine laser with a large active volume

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, I G; Podlesnykh, S V; Firsov, K N

    2010-08-03

    Possibilities for increasing the active medium volume of a chemical oxygen - iodine laser (CCOIL) with a pulsed electric-discharge generation of atomic iodine are studied. The reasons are analysed of the low stability of the transverse self-sustained volume discharge in electrode systems with metal cathodes under the conditions of the electric energy input into gas-discharge plasma that are typical for CCOILs: low pressure of mixtures containing a strongly electronegative component, low voltage of discharge burning, low specific energy depositions, and long duration of the current pulse. An efficient electrode system is elaborated with the cathode based on an anisotropically-resistive material, which resulted in a stable discharge in the mixtures of iodide (CH{sub 3}I, n-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}I, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}I) with oxygen and nitrogen at the specific energy depositions of {approx}5 J L{sup -1}, pressures of 10 - 25 Torr, and mixture volume of 2.5 L. (lasers)

  16. The evolution of fabric with displacement in natural brittle faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittempergher, S.; Di Toro, G.; Gratier, J.; Aretusini, S.; Boullier-Bertrand, A.

    2011-12-01

    In experiments performed at room temperature on gouges, a characteristic clast size distribution (CSD) is produced with increasing strain, and shear localization is documented to begin after few millimetres of sliding. But in natural faults active at depth in the crust, mechanical processes are associated with fluid-rock interactions, which might control the deformation and strength recovery. We aim to investigate the microstructural, geochemical and mineralogical evolution of low-displacement faults with increasing shear strain. The faults (cataclasite- and pseudotachylyte-bearing) are hosted in tonalite and were active at 9-11 km and 250-300°C. The samples were collected on a large glacier-polished outcrop, where major faults (accommodating up to 4300 mm of displacement) exploit pre-existing magmatic joints and are connected by a network of secondary fractures and faults (accommodating up to 500 mm of displacement) breaking intact tonalite. We performed optical and cathodoluminescence (CL) microscope, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Rietveld X-Ray Powder Diffraction and microprobe chemical analysis in deformation zones of secondary faults with various offsets in order to evaluate the transfer of chemical species between dissolution zones and protected zones. Image analysis techniques were applied on SEM-BSE and optical microscope images to compute the CSD in samples, which experienced an increasing amount of strain. The secondary fractures are up to 5 mm thick. Within the first 20 mm of displacement, shear localizes along Y and R1 surfaces and a cataclastic foliation develops. The CSD evolves from a fractal dimension D of 1.3 in fractures without visible displacement to values above 2 after the first 500 mm of displacement. Chemical maps and CL images indicate that the foliation in cataclasite results from the rotation and fragmentation of clasts, with dissolution of quartz and passive concentration of Ti oxides and titanite in the foliation planes. The cataclasites are cemented by pervasive precipitation of K-feldspar plagues and idiomorphic, randomly oriented, epidote and chlorite. We conclude that the textures of these small displacement (< 500 mm) faults are controlled by brittle processes (fracture propagation and cataclastic comminution) similar to those reproduced in friction experiments performed on granite gouge (e.g., Beeler et al., 1996; Logan, 2007). Then progressively, stress driven fluid-rock reactions develop as fracturing and grain size reduction allows the kinetics of these reactions to be more efficient and fracture interconnection allows fluid infiltration. Healing of microfractures and fault rock cementation caused a rapid posteismic recovery of fault strength. References Beeler, N.M., Tullis, T.E., Blanpied, L., Weeks, J.D., 1996. Frictional behaviour of large displacement experimental faults. Journal of Geophysical Research 101, B4, 8697-8715. Logan, J.M., 2007. The progression from damage to localization of displacement observed in laboratory testing of porous rocks, in Lewis, H., and Couples, G.D. (eds.) The relationship between damage and localization. Geological Society of London Special Publication 289, 75-87.

  17. Determination of the displacement energy of O, Si and Zr under electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D; Weber, William J; Namavar, Fereydoon; Zhang, Yanwen

    2012-01-01

    The response of nanocrystalline, stabilizer-free cubic zirconia thin films on a Si substrate to electron beam irradiation with energies of 4, 110 and 200 keV and fluences up to {approx}1.5 x 10{sup 22} e m{sup -2} has been studied to determine the displacement energies. The 110 and 200 keV irradiations were performed in situ using a transmission electron microscope; the 4 keV irradiations were performed ex situ using an electron gun. In all three irradiations, no structural modification of the zirconia was observed, despite the high fluxes and fluences. However the Si substrate on which the zirconia film was deposited was amorphized under the 200 keV electron irradiation. Examination of the electron-solid interactions reveals that the kinetic energy transfer from the 200 keV electrons to the silicon lattice is sufficient to cause atomic displacements, resulting in amorphization. The kinetic energy transfer from the 200 keV electrons to the oxygen sub-lattice of the zirconia may be sufficient to induce defect production, however, no evidence of defect production was observed. The displacement cross-section value of Zr was found to be {approx}400 times greater than that of O indicating that the O atoms are effectively screened from the electrons by the Zr atoms, and, therefore, the displacement of O is inefficient.

  18. Determination of the Displacement Energies of O, Si and Zr Under Electron Beam Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, P. D.; Weber, William J.; Namavar, Fereydoon; Zhang, Yanwen

    2012-03-01

    The response of nanocrystalline, stabilizer-free cubic zirconia thin films on a Si substrate to electron beam irradiation with energies of 4, 110 and 200 keV and fluences up to ~1.5 x 10²²e m² has been studied to determine the displacement energies. The 110 and 200 keV irradiations were performed in situ using a transmission electron microscope; the 4 keV irradiations were performed ex situ using an electron gun. In all three irradiations, no structural modification of the zirconia was observed, despite the high fluxes and fluences. However the Si substrate on which the zirconia film was deposited was amorphized under the 200 keV electron irradiation. Examination of the electron–solid interactions reveals that the kinetic energy transfer from the 200 keV electrons to the silicon lattice is sufficient to cause atomic displacements, resulting in amorphization. The kinetic energy transfer from the 200 keV electrons to the oxygen sub-lattice of the zirconia may be sufficient to induce defect production, however, no evidence of defect production was observed. The displacement cross-section value of Zr was found to be ~400 times greater than that of O indicating that the O atoms are effectively screened from the electrons by the Zr atoms, and, therefore, the displacement of O is inefficient.

  19. A Molecular dynamics study of helium bubble stability during high-energy displacement cascades in α-iron

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Jin; Yang, Li; Zu, Xiaotao; Gao, Fei

    2007-08-01

    The interactions of high-energy displacement cascades with helium bubbles in α-Fe are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Initial bubbles with the volumes of 212 and 636 Å3 are considered, and the helium-to-vacancy (He/V) ratio in the bubbles varies from 0.5 to 3. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy, Ep, is up to 40 keV. The results show that the change of nm-sized He bubbles due to displacement cascade does not depend much on the bubble size, but rather on the He/V ratio and the recoil energy. For the initial He/V ratio less than 1, the size of the bubbles decreases with increasing PKA energy, but the He/V ratio increases. However, for the initial He/V ratio of 3, the size of the bubbles increases, and the He/V ratio decreases with PKA energy. For the initial He/V ratio of 1, the ratio of the small bubble decreases slightly, but the ratio of the large bubble remains unchanged for lower PKA energy, and increases slightly for higher PKA energy. The reasons for these observed phenomena have been explained.

  20. Health issues of internally displaced persons in Pakistan: preparation for disasters in future.

    PubMed

    Wasay, Mohammad; Mushtaq, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Army action against terrorism in Pakistan led to the largest human migration in this century. About 3.4 million people (internally displaced persons, IDPs) were displaced. The authors visited all major camps and some houses in Mardan area and interviewed IDPs and doctors at these camps and areas to identify medical needs and current state of provision of medical care. This disaster largely represented displacement of millions of people (IDPs) including women and children to a new weather and environment in overcrowded refugee camps and houses. Influx of large number of displaced people created excessive burden for already deprived local health services. The medical issues and requirements for these IDPs living in camps were totally different from a disaster like earthquake. Global response to this disaster was slow and less effective. The need for a WHO coordination center for creating quick and urgent response for such kind of disasters in future is emphasized in this article. PMID:20496645

  1. Small-displacement measurements using high-order Hermite-Gauss modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hengxin; Liu, Kui; Liu, Zunlong; Guo, Pengliang; Zhang, Junxiang; Gao, Jiangrui

    2014-03-24

    We present a scheme for small-displacement measurements using high-order Hermite-Gauss modes and balanced homodyne detection. We demonstrate its use with experimental results of displacement measurements using fundamental transverse mode TEM{sub 00} and first order transverse mode TEM{sub 10} as signal modes. The results show a factor of 1.41 improvement in measurement precision with the TEM{sub 10} mode compared with that with the TEM{sub 00} mode. This scheme has potential applications in precision metrology, atomic force microscopy, and optical imaging.

  2. Bifurcation, chaos, and scan instability in dynamic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamical motion at any point on the cantilever of an atomic force microscope can be expressed quite generally as a superposition of simple harmonic oscillators corresponding to the vibrational modes allowed by the cantilever shape. Central to the dynamical equations is the representation of the cantilever-sample interaction force as a polynomial expansion with coefficients that account for the interaction force "stiffness," the cantilever-to-sample energy transfer, and the displacement amplitude of cantilever oscillation. Renormalization of the cantilever beam model shows that for a given cantilever drive frequency cantilever dynamics can be accurately represented by a single nonlinear mass-spring model with frequency-dependent stiffness and damping coefficients [S. A. Cantrell and J. H. Cantrell, J. Appl. Phys. 110, 094314 (2011)]. Application of the Melnikov method to the renormalized dynamical equation is shown to predict a cascade of period doubling bifurcations with increasing cantilever drive force that terminates in chaos. The threshold value of the drive force necessary to initiate bifurcation is shown to depend strongly on the cantilever setpoint and drive frequency, effective damping coefficient, nonlinearity of the cantilever-sample interaction force, and the displacement amplitude of cantilever oscillation. The model predicts the experimentally observed interruptions of the bifurcation cascade for cantilevers of sufficiently large stiffness. Operational factors leading to the loss of image quality in dynamic atomic force microscopy are addressed, and guidelines for optimizing scan stability are proposed using a quantitative analysis based on system dynamical parameters and choice of feedback loop parameter.

  3. Development and Evolution of Character Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Pfennig, David W.; Pfennig, Karin S.

    2012-01-01

    Character displacement occurs when competition for either resources or successful reproduction imposes divergent selection on interacting species, causing divergence in traits associated with resource use or reproduction. Here, we describe how character displacement can be mediated either by genetically canalized changes (i.e., changes that reflect allelic or genotype frequency changes) or by phenotypic plasticity. We also discuss how these two mechanisms influence the tempo of character displacement. Specifically, we suggest that, under some conditions, character displacement mediated by phenotypic plasticity might occur more rapidly than that mediated by genetically canalized changes. Finally, we describe how these two mechanisms may act together and determine character displacement’s mode, such that it proceeds through an initial phase in which trait divergence is environmentally induced to a later phase in which divergence becomes genetically canalized. This plasticity-first hypothesis predicts that character displacement should be generally mediated by ancestral plasticity and that it will arise similarly in multiple, independently evolving populations. We conclude by highlighting future directions for research that would test these predictions. PMID:22257002

  4. Polymorphism in Genes That Influence Sperm Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Prout, T.; Clark, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    Paternity of offspring of multiply inseminated females is in many organisms highly skewed, with an advantage generally going to the male that most recently mated. Variation in sperm competitive ability can result in strong natural selection, and one expects that a gene that offers an advantage in sperm displacement would, all else being equal, be rapidly fixed, leaving low equilibrium levels of variability in sperm competition. However, empirical studies have demonstrated genetic variation in sperm displacement, begging the question of how this variation can be maintained. Here we develop a population genetic model to find conditions that maintain polymorphism in alleles that influence sperm displacement. We consider a one-locus model in which allelic variants have pleiotropic effects on fecundity and mating ability in addition to sperm displacement. This model can admit more than one stable polymorphism, and we find conditions for protected polymorphism. Induced overdominance is not necessary for stable polymorphism. These results have direct bearing on the observed variation in the ability of resident sperm to defend against displacement. PMID:8878703

  5. Ultra-Sensitive Magnetoresistive Displacement Sensing Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivas, John D. (Inventor); Lairson, Bruce M. (Inventor); Ramesham, Rajeshuni (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An ultrasensitive displacement sensing device for use in accelerometers, pressure gauges, temperature transducers, and the like, comprises a sputter deposited, multilayer, magnetoresistive field sensor with a variable electrical resistance based on an imposed magnetic field. The device detects displacement by sensing changes in the local magnetic field about the magnetoresistive field sensor caused by the displacement of a hard magnetic film on a movable microstructure. The microstructure, which may be a cantilever, membrane, bridge, or other microelement, moves under the influence of an acceleration a known displacement predicted by the configuration and materials selected, and the resulting change in the electrical resistance of the MR sensor can be used to calculate the displacement. Using a micromachining approach, very thin silicon and silicon nitride membranes are fabricated in one preferred embodiment by means of anisotropic etching of silicon wafers. Other approaches include reactive ion etching of silicon on insulator (SOI), or Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of silicon nitride films over silicon substrates. The device is found to be improved with the use of giant magnetoresistive elements to detect changes in the local magnetic field.

  6. Conflict induced internal displacement in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sonal; Sharma, Sharan Prakash; Mills, Edward; Poudel, Krishna C; Jimba, Masamine

    2007-01-01

    Nepal has witnessed a humanitarian crisis since the Maoist conflict began ten years ago. The plight of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Nepal has received little international attention despite being rated one of the worst displacement scenarios in the world. An estimated 200,000 people have been displaced as a result of the conflict, with the far-western districts of Nepal being the worst affected. Internal displacement has stretched the carrying capacity of several cities with adverse physical and mental health consequences for the displaced. Vulnerable women and children have been the worst affected. The government has adopted a discriminatory approach and failed to fulfil its obligations towards IDPs. Non-governmental organisations and international agencies have provided inadequate services to IDPs in their programmes. Tackling the issues of IDPs requires co-operation between government and development agencies: acknowledging the burden of the problem of IDPs, adequate registration and needs assessment, along with health and nutritional surveys, and development of short-term emergency relief packages and long-term programmes for their assistance. PMID:17542185

  7. Quantification of the vocal folds’ dynamic displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Socorro Hernández-Montes, María; Muñoz, Silvino; De La Torre, Manuel; Flores, Mauricio; Pérez, Carlos; Mendoza-Santoyo, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    Fast dynamic data acquisition techniques are required to investigate the motional behavior of the vocal folds (VFs) when they are subjected to a steady air-flow through the trachea. High-speed digital holographic interferometry (DHI) is a non-invasive full-field-of-view technique that has proved its usefulness to study rapid and non-repetitive object movements. Hence it is an ideal technique used here to measure VF displacements and vibration patterns at 2000 fps. Analyses from a set of 200 displacement images showed that VFs’ vibration cycles are established along their width (y) and length (x). Furthermore, the maximum deformation for the right and left VFs’ area may be quantified from these images, which in itself represents an important result in the characterization of this structure. At a controlled air pressure, VF displacements fall within the range ~100-1740 nm, with a calculated precision and accuracy that yields a variation coefficient of 1.91%. High-speed acquisition of full-field images of VFs and their displacement quantification are on their own significant data in the study of their functional and physiological behavior since voice quality and production depend on how they vibrate, i.e. their displacement amplitude and frequency. Additionally, the use of high speed DHI avoids prolonged examinations and represents a significant scientific and technological alternative contribution in advancing the knowledge and working mechanisms of these tissues.

  8. Fingering phenomena during grain-grain displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Nathália M. P.; Paiva, Humberto A.; Combe, G.; Atman, A. P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous formation of fingered patterns during the displacement of dense granular assemblies was experimentally reported few years ago, in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. Here, by means of discrete element simulations, we have recovered the experimental findings and extended the original study to explore the control parameters space. In particular, using assemblies of grains with different geometries (monodisperse, bidisperse, or polydisperse), we measured the macroscopic stress tensor in the samples in order to confirm some conjectures proposed in analogy with Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering phenomena for immiscible fluids. Considering an axial setup which allows to control the discharge of grains and to follow the trajectory and the pressure gradient along the displacing interface, we have applied the Darcy law for laminar flow in fluids in order to measure an "effective viscosity" for each assembly combination, in an attempt to mimic variation of the viscosity ratio between the injected/displaced fluids in the Saffman-Taylor experiment. The results corroborate the analogy with the viscous fluids displacement, with the bidisperse assembly corresponding to the less viscous geometry. But, differently to fluid case, granular fingers only develop for a specific combination of displaced/injected geometries, and we have demonstrated that it is always related with the formation of a force chain network along the finger direction.

  9. A displacement spindle in a micro/nano level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Kuang-Chao; Lai, Zi-Fa; Wu, Peitsung; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chen, Yejin; Jger, Gerd

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents two micro/nano level displacement sensors, which consist of a mini LDGI (linear diffraction grating interferometer) and a focus probe. These two sensors are integrated into the spindle system of a micro/nano-CMM. This micro/nano spindle system is fixed on a rectangular granite bridge to achieve the z-axis function. The motion of the spindle is driven by an ultrasonic motor on a precision cross-roller slide. Its displacement is fed back by the LDGI. A DVD pick-up head is modified with its S-curve principle as the non-contact focus probe. Mounting the probe onto the spindle head, it is possible to achieve a large displacement and nanoresolution measuring spindle system with a feedback nanomotion control scheme. After accuracy calibration and error compensation, the spindle motion to 10 mm can perform 10 nm positioning accuracy and 30 nm measurement accuracy. Experiments on some ultraprecision profiles have shown the capability of this spindle system.

  10. Unstable displacement defects and hydrogen trapping in GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, H.J.; Barbour, J.C.

    1997-08-01

    Defects produced by implantation of hydrogen into GaAs at 80 K have been investigated. Upon implantation, a predominant absorption band at 2029 cm{sup {minus}1} for As-H centers is observed. A 10-cm{sup {minus}1} full width at half maximum at 80 K for the band, and strong dependence of the frequency and bandwidth on measurement temperature, are indicative of bonding of hydrogen at displacement defects within the lattice. Results from annealing show loss of As-H centers between 180 and 250 K with an activation energy of 0.5{plus_minus}0.5 eV. Characteristics for As-H center annealing are compared to those reported previously for atomic displacement disorder in irradiated GaAs. Release of hydrogen from As-H bonds within thermally unstable damage regions is suggested to explain the annealing loss of As-H centers. An increase in absorption by Ga-H centers upon loss of As-H centers is attributed to retrapping of hydrogen on Ga neighbors of V{sub As} or on V{sub As}-As{sub i} pair defects. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Traumatic testicular displacement in motorcycle drivers.

    PubMed

    Je?menica, Dragan S; Alempijevi?, Djordje M; Pavleki?, Sneana; Aleksandri?, Branimir V

    2011-03-01

    Testicular displacement is a rare clinical presentation of blunt scrotal injury that may take place in road traffic accidents involving motorcycle occupants. We are presenting two cases of motorcycle occupant fatalities, 21 and 24 years of age, where testicular displacement and other signs of groin trauma have been determined. In both cases, discrete external signs of scrotal trauma were noted on examination, while unilateral and bilateral traumatic testicular displacement, respectively, have been documented at autopsy. For motorcycle occupants involved in collision, it is necessary to perform a thorough analysis of injuries, in particular to look for specific trauma arising from fuel-tank impact to genitalia and/or groin. These injuries are of great medico-legal importance both at postmortem and in clinical cases involving motorcycle occupants involved in collision. PMID:21306375

  12. Well claims world record for horizontal displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Buitenkamp, R.; Fischer, S. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports that Maersk Oil and Gas A/S has been actively drilling horizontal wells in the North Sea, and as operator for the Danish Underground Consortium (Shell, Texaco and A. P. Moeller), recently set a world record for horizontal displacement with its Tyra West Bravo-11A (TWB-11A, a horizontal sidetrack out of TWB-11). The well achieved a horizontal displacement of 8,210 ft with an inclination of 86[degrees]. Classified as a horizontal oil producer, TWB-11 had three objectives: Appraise Maastrichtian oil rim production under the gas cap; Appraise the scope for horizontal well drainage on Tyra West; and Initiate oil production.

  13. Computing Displacements And Strains From Video Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel S.; Mcneill, Stephen R.; Lansing, Matthew D.

    1996-01-01

    Subpixel digital video image correlation (SDVIC) technique for measuring in-plane displacements on surfaces of objects under loads, without contact. Used for analyses of experimental research specimens or actual service structures of virtually any size or material. Only minimal preparation of test objects needed, and no need to isolate test objects from minor vibrations or fluctuating temperatures. Technique implemented by SDVIC software, producing color-graduated, full-field representations of in-plane displacements and partial derivatives with respect to position along both principal directions in each image plane. From representations, linear strains, shear strains, and rotation fields determined. Written in C language.

  14. Research on photoelectric displacement online measuring technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoman; Song, Lu; Yang, Jiandong

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes a photoelectric non-contact surface displacement measuring system using reflection light displacement differentiate method. In this system light source is semiconductor laser, photoelectric receiver is semiconductor position sensor device, using transverse photoelectromotive force effect in the PSD's p-n junction to detect irradiates position of incident light point. In has accurate, fast and harmless characteristics. In order to improve measurement accuracy, a microprocessor is added into this system to complete digital filter, linear correcting and statistic processing in the course of measurement. Especially, this paper introduces stabilizing electronically light, extracting PSD signals and processing data with computer, etc in detail.

  15. Long-lived staus and displaced leptons at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jared A.; Shelton, Jessie

    2016-04-01

    As the majority of LHC searches are focused on prompt signatures, specific long-lived particles have the potential to be overlooked by the otherwise systematic new physics programs at ATLAS and CMS. While in many cases long-lived superparticles are now stringently constrained by existing exotic searches, we point out that the highly motivated model of gauge mediation with staus as the next-to-lightest superparticle (NLSP) is relatively far less tested. We recast LHC searches for heavy stable charged particles, disappearing tracks, and opposite-flavor leptons with large impact parameters to assess current constraints on a variety of spectra that contain an NLSP stau, and find that portions of the parameter space motivated by naturalness are still experimentally unexplored. We additionally note a gap in the current experimental search program: same-flavor leptons with large impact parameters evade the suite of existing searches for long-lived objects. This gap is especially noteworthy as vetoes on displaced leptons in prompt new physics searches could be systematically discarding such events. We discuss several motivated models that can exhibit same-flavor displaced leptons: gauge mediation with co-NLSP sleptons, extended gauge mediation, R-parity violation, and lepton-flavored dark matter that freezes in during a matter-dominated era of the early universe. To address this gap, we propose a straightforward extension of the CMS search for leptons with large impact parameters, and project sensitivity to these scenarios at 13 TeV. Throughout this analysis, we highlight several methods whereby LHC searches for exotic long-lived objects could potentially improve their sensitivity to the displaced leptons originating from gauge mediation and beyond.

  16. Hirshfeld atom refinement

    PubMed Central

    Capelli, Silvia C.; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-01-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly–l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree–Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints – even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu’s), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu’s. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å2 as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements – an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å. PMID:25295177

  17. Graphite filter atomizer in atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-09-01

    Graphite filter atomizers (GFA) for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) show substantial advantages over commonly employed electrothermal vaporizers and atomizers, tube and platform furnaces, for direct determination of high and medium volatility elements in matrices associated with strong spectral and chemical interferences. Two factors provide lower limits of detection and shorter determination cycles with the GFA: the vaporization area in the GFA is separated from the absorption volume by a porous graphite partition; the sample is distributed over a large surface of a collector in the vaporization area. These factors convert the GFA into an efficient chemical reactor. The research concerning the GFA concept, technique and analytical methodology, carried out mainly in the author's laboratory in Russia and South Africa, is reviewed. Examples of analytical applications of the GFA in AAS for analysis of organic liquids and slurries, bio-samples and food products are given. Future prospects for the GFA are discussed in connection with analyses by fast multi-element AAS.

  18. Atomic supersymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostelecky, V. Alan

    1993-01-01

    Atomic supersymmetry is a quantum-mechanical supersymmetry connecting the properties of different atoms and ions. A short description of some established results in the subject are provided and a few recent developments are discussed including the extension to parabolic coordinates and the calculation of Stark maps using supersymmetry-based models.

  19. Approach-withdrawal response competition (AW-RC), displacement, and behavior modification.

    PubMed

    Heilizer, F

    1978-10-01

    This paper reviews displacement theory and animal research as derived from approach-withdrawal response competition (AW-RC), with a selected emphasis on clinical implications. AW-RC displacement is seen as part of the larger area of behavior modification while nevertheless distinguished from the larger area by a singular model and methodology. It is suggested that a lack of operational analysis of AW-RC displacement and behavior modification is responsible for some confusion about the two areas, has retarded developments and conclusions about behavior modification, and has contributed to, or produced, termination of research on AW-RC displacement. This review uncovers two major sets of results and one interesting observation. First, the displacement effect and the extinction effect of displacement are strongly supported, but the therapeutic effect of displacement is not supported. Second, time-delay that is characterized by eating under deprivation in an irrelevant situation does appear to produce true therapeutic effects of large magnitude. Berkun's observation, opening to other nondisplacement but AW-RC related observations and findings, suggests separable aspects of AW-RC behavior that are not correspondingly observable with other methodologies. PMID:722289

  20. An IPMC microgripper with integrated actuator and sensing for constant finger-tip displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Carlos; Lumia, Ron

    2015-05-01

    Ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) is a type of smart material that has gained the interest of many researchers due to its ability to achieve large displacements under small input voltages, usually less than 2.5 V. This has motivated the use of these materials in microsystems and systems in the millimeter scale, such as microgrippers. However, few of the control techniques developed thus far have considered the feasibility of using IPMCs in closed loop systems without the need of oversized external sensors. This paper presents a control scheme for a two-finger IPMC microgripper that accomplishes constant finger-tip displacements without external sensors. This scheme generates a displacement-dependent, time varying reference signal to obtain constant finger-tip displacements applied by a separate actuated IPMC. This actuator uses a PID controller tuned with a model-free approach, and is gain scheduled to span up to 1 mm finger-tip displacements. The microgripper achieves zero steady state error for finger-tip displacements on the tuned values of the PID controller. The gain scheduled PID controller is tested and results show zero steady state error to 0.25 mm displacements, and 15 and 20% steady state error when referenced to deflection of 0.45 and 0.75 mm, respectively. This shows that there is great confidence and validity of the control scheme, especially when tracking small reference deflections.

  1. Design and test of a micro-displacement actuator based on giant magnetostrictive material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Liang; Yang, Dehua; Yang, Bintang; Chen, Kunxin

    2009-07-01

    To meet the performance requirements of co-focusing and co-phasing of segmented mirror active optics (SMAO) in modern astronomical telescope, micro-displacement actuators with nanometer resolution and millimeter stroke are necessary. The design and test of a micro-displacement actuator based on giant magnetostrictive material is present in this paper. The actuator's main components, such as giant magnetostrictive drive core, displacement pantograph mechanism and output guide mechanism, are discussed in detailed. The giant magnetostrictive drive mechanism generally may offer nanometer resolution and micron stroke. A displacement/stroke pantograph mechanism is designed with absolutely sealed flexible hydraulic structure (ASFHS) to enlarge the stroke. In addition, a secondary giant magnetostrictive drive mechanism is integrated to serve final resolution of final displacement output. In view of flexure exhibiting excellent mechanical properties free of friction, clearance and lubrication, a flexure guide mechanism with the capacity of excellent lateral load is designed to fulfill linear displacement output steadily. The sub-systems like the giant magnetostrictive drive core and displacement pantograph mechanism have been tested before integration of the whole actuator. The final test of the actuator is carried out with dual frequency laser interferometer at lab. Besides, to meet technical requirements of future extremely large telescope, further development issues mainly related to application practice of the actuator is discussed at the end.

  2. Interspecific aggression and character displacement in the damselfly Calopteryx splendens.

    PubMed

    Tynkkynen, K; Rantala, M J; Suhonen, J

    2004-07-01

    Problems in species recognition are thought to affect the evolution of secondary sexual characters mainly through avoidance of maladaptive hybridization. Another, but much less studied avenue for the evolution of sexual characters due to species recognition problems is through interspecific aggression. In the damselfly, Calopteryx splendens, males have pigmented wing spots as a sexual character. Large-spotted males resemble males of another species, Calopteryx virgo, causing potential problems in species recognition. In this study, we investigate whether there is character displacement in wing spot size and whether interspecific aggression could cause this pattern. We found first that wing spot size of C. splendens in populations decreased with increasing relative abundance of C. virgo. Secondly, C. virgo males were more aggressive towards large- than small-spotted C. splendens males. Thirdly, in interspecific contests C. virgo males had better territory holding ability than C. splendens males. These results suggest that interspecific aggression may have caused character displacement in wing spot size of C. splendens, because the intensity of aggression towards large-spotted males is likely to increase with relative abundance of C. virgo males. Thus, interspecific aggression may be an evolutionarily significant force that is able to cause divergence in secondary sexual characters. PMID:15271075

  3. Neutron interactions and atomic recoil spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.

    1993-08-01

    This chapters presents a discussion of neutron interactions with materials that lead to activation, transmutation, and atomic displacements. The emphasis will be on current applications including neutron irradiation facilities, neutron dosimetry techniques, and computer codes for spectral adjustment and radiation damage calculations.

  4. Strain-displacement relations for strain engineering in single-layer 2d materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midtvedt, Daniel; Lewenkopf, Caio H.; Croy, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the electromechanical coupling in single-layer 2d materials. For non-Bravais lattices, we find important corrections to the standard macroscopic strain-microscopic atomic-displacement theory. We put forward a general and systematic approach to calculate strain-displacement relations for several classes of 2d materials. We apply our findings to graphene as a study case, by combining a tight binding and a valence force-field model to calculate electronic and mechanical properties of graphene nanoribbons under strain. The results show good agreement with the predictions of the Dirac equation coupled to continuum mechanics. For this long wave-limit effective theory, we find that the strain-displacement relations lead to a renormalization correction to the strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields. A similar renormalization is found for the strain-induced band-gap of black phosphorous. Implications for nanomechanical properties and electromechanical coupling in 2d materials are discussed.

  5. Britain's Redundancy Payments for Displaced Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Root, Lawrence S.

    1987-01-01

    The Redundancy Payments Act of 1965 established the idea that an employee has property rights to a job based on years of company service. It instituted an entitlement program for displaced workers sponsored by firms and the government. The British layoff situtation differs from that of the United States. (Author/CH)

  6. RECOVERY OF METALS USING ALUMINUM DISPLACEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of typical metals (Cu, Pb, Sn, Ni) from printed circuit and metal finishing waste streams was evaluated using displacement with aluminum. he metal is recovered as non-hazardous metal particles and can be recycled by smelting. n acceptable aluminum metal configuration ...

  7. Retraining Displaced Workers--Barriers and Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolansky, William D.

    Although plant closings and layoffs have been happening for a long time, today's recessions, major changes in the structure of the economy, and a tight job market have combined to make plant closings a more serious problem. Workers are faced with unemployment from both traditional labor-displacing changes, such as the increasing use of robotics;…

  8. Effect of aileron displacement on wing characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heald, R H

    1933-01-01

    The effect of aileron displacement on wing characteristics has been investigated for the Clark Y and the U.S.A. 27 wing sections equipped with rectangular ailerons. The airfoils, rectangular in plan, and having a 10 inch chord and 60 inch span, were mounted on a model fuselage.

  9. Variable-Displacement Hydraulic Drive Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, D. J.; Linton, D. J.; Markunas, A.

    1986-01-01

    Hydraulic power controlled through multiple feedback loops. In hydraulic drive unit, power closely matched to demand, thereby saving energy. Hydraulic flow to and from motor adjusted by motor-control valve connected to wobbler. Wobbler angle determines motor-control-valve position, which in turn determines motor displacement. Concept applicable to machine tools, aircraft controls, and marine controls.

  10. Fiber-optic couplers as displacement sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruch, Martin C.; Gerdt, David W.; Adkins, Charles M.

    2003-04-01

    We introduce the novel concept of using a fiber-optic coupler as a versatile displacement sensor. Comparatively long fiber-optic couplers, with a coupling region of approximately 10 mm, are manufactured using standard communication SM fiber and placed in a looped-back configuration. The result is a displacement sensor, which is robust and highly sensitive over a wide dynamic range. This displacement sensor resolves 1-2 μm over distances of 1-1.5 mm and is characterized by the essential absence of a 'spring constant' plaguing other strain gauge-type sensors. Consequently, it is possible to couple to extremely weak vibrations, such as the skin displacement affected by arterial heart beat pulsations. Used as a wrist-worn heartbeat monitor, the fidelity of the arterial pulse signal has been shown to be so high that it is possible to not only determine heartbeat and breathing rates, but to implement a new single-point blood pressure measurement scheme which does not squeeze the arm. In an application as a floor vibration sensor for the non-intrusive monitoring of independently living elderly, the sensor has been shown to resolve the distinct vibration spectra of different persons and different events.

  11. RECOVERY OF METAL USING ALUMINUM DISPLACEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of typical metals (Cu, Pb, Sn, Ni) from printed circuit and metal finishing waste streams was evaluated using displacement with aluminum. he metal is recovered as non-hazardous metal particles and can be recycled by smelting. n acceptable aluminum metal configuration ...

  12. A Personal Appearance Program for Displaced Homemakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiore, Ann Marie; De Long, Marilyn Revell

    1990-01-01

    A career counseling program evaluated the self-esteem of 28 displaced homemakers, then presented 3 sessions on the importance of personal appearance in hiring practices, wardrobe management, nonverbal communication, professional image, and self-concept. Analysis of participant evaluations indicated improved levels of control and confidence and…

  13. Displacement Damage in Bipolar Linear Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rax, B. G.; Johnston, A. H.; Miyahira, T.

    2000-01-01

    Although many different processes can be used to manufacture linear integrated circuits, the process that is used for most circuits is optimized for high voltage -- a total power supply voltage of about 40 V -- and low cost. This process, which has changed little during the last twenty years, uses lateral and substrate p-n-p transistors. These p-n-p transistors have very wide base regions, increasing their sensitivity to displacement damage from electrons and protons. Although displacement damage effects can be easily treated for individual transistors, the net effect on linear circuits can be far more complex because circuit operation often depends on the interaction of several internal transistors. Note also that some circuits are made with more advanced processes with much narrower base widths. Devices fabricated with these newer processes are not expected to be significantly affected by displacement damage for proton fluences below 1 x 10(exp 12) p/sq cm. This paper discusses displacement damage in linear integrated circuits with more complex failure modes than those exhibited by simpler devices, such as the LM111 comparator, where the dominant response mode is gain degradation of the input transistor. Some circuits fail catastrophically at much lower equivalent total dose levels compared to tests with gamma rays. The device works satisfactorily up to nearly 1 Mrad(Si) when it is irradiated with gamma rays, but fails catastrophically between 50 and 70 krad(Si) when it is irradiated with protons.

  14. Retraining Displaced Workers--Barriers and Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolansky, William D.

    Although plant closings and layoffs have been happening for a long time, today's recessions, major changes in the structure of the economy, and a tight job market have combined to make plant closings a more serious problem. Workers are faced with unemployment from both traditional labor-displacing changes, such as the increasing use of robotics;

  15. Cold Lithium Atom Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassella, Kayleigh; Copenhaver, Eric; Lai, Chen; Hamilton, Paul; Estey, Brian; Feng, Yanying; Mueller, Holger

    2015-05-01

    Atom interferometers often use heavy alkali atoms such as rubidium or cesium. In contrast, interferometry with light atoms offers a larger recoil velocity and recoil energy, yielding a larger interference signal. This would allow for sensitive measurements of the fine structure constant, gravity gradients and spatially varying potentials. We have built the first light-pulse cold-atom interferometer with lithium in a Mach-Zehnder geometry based on short (100 ns), intense (2.5 W/cm2) pulses. We initially capture approximately 107 lithium atoms at a temperature of about 300 ?K in a magneto-optical trap. To perform interferometry, we couple the F = 1 and F = 2 hyperfine levels of the ground state with a sequence of two-photon Raman transitions, red-detuned from lithium's unresolved 2P3/2 state. Cold lithium atoms offer a broad range of new possibilities for atom interferometry including a large recoil velocity and a fermionic and bosonic isotope. Lithium's isotopes also allow for independent measurements of gravity thus constraining the equivalence principle violations predicted by the Standard-Model Extension. In the near future, we plan to perform a recoil measurement using a Ramsey-Bord interferometer.

  16. The use of a displacement device negatively affects the performance of dogs (Canis familiaris) in visible object displacement tasks

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Corsin A.; Riemer, Stefanie; Range, Friederike; Huber, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    Visible and invisible displacement tasks have been used widely for comparative studies of animals’ understanding of object permanence, with evidence accumulating that some species can solve invisible displacement tasks and thus reach Piagetian stage 6 of object permanence. In contrast, dogs appear to rely on associative cues, such as the location of the displacement device, during invisible displacement tasks. It remains unclear, however, whether dogs, and other species that failed in invisible displacement tasks, do so due to their inability to form a mental representation of the target object, or simply due to the involvement of a more salient but potentially misleading associative cue, the displacement device. Here we show that the use of a displacement device impairs the performance of dogs also in visible displacement tasks: their search accuracy was significantly lower when a visible displacement was performed with a displacement device, and only two of initially 42 dogs passed the sham-baiting control conditions. The negative influence of the displacement device in visible displacement tasks may be explained by strong associative cues overriding explicit information about the target object’s location, reminiscent of an overshadowing effect, and/or object individuation errors as the target object is placed within the displacement device and moves along a spatiotemporally identical trajectory. Our data suggest that a comprehensive appraisal of a species’ performance in object permanence tasks should include visible displacement tasks with the same displacement device used in invisible displacements, which typically has not been done in the past. PMID:24611641

  17. Application of dynamic displacement current for diagnostics of subnanosecond breakdowns in an inhomogeneous electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Tao; Zhang Cheng; Yan Ping; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Burachenko, Alexandr G.; Rybka, Dmitry V.; Kostyrya, Igor' D.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Baksht, Evgeni Kh.

    2013-05-15

    The breakdown of different air gaps at high overvoltages in an inhomogeneous electric field was investigated with a time resolution of up to 100 ps. Dynamic displacement current was used for diagnostics of ionization processes between the ionization wave front and a plane anode. It is demonstrated that during the generation of a supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with amplitudes of {approx}10 A and more, conductivity in the air gaps at the breakdown stage is ensured by the ionization wave, whose front propagates from the electrode of small curvature radius, and by the dynamic displacement current between the ionization wave front and the plane electrode. The amplitude of the dynamic displacement current measured by a current shunt is 100 times greater than the SAEB. It is shown that with small gaps and with a large cathode diameter, the amplitude of the dynamic displacement current during a subnanosecond rise time of applied pulse voltage can be higher than 4 kA.

  18. Application of dynamic displacement current for diagnostics of subnanosecond breakdowns in an inhomogeneous electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Tao; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Zhang, Cheng; Burachenko, Alexandr G.; Rybka, Dmitry V.; Kostyrya, Igor'D.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Baksht, Evgeni Kh.; Yan, Ping

    2013-05-01

    The breakdown of different air gaps at high overvoltages in an inhomogeneous electric field was investigated with a time resolution of up to 100 ps. Dynamic displacement current was used for diagnostics of ionization processes between the ionization wave front and a plane anode. It is demonstrated that during the generation of a supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with amplitudes of ˜10 A and more, conductivity in the air gaps at the breakdown stage is ensured by the ionization wave, whose front propagates from the electrode of small curvature radius, and by the dynamic displacement current between the ionization wave front and the plane electrode. The amplitude of the dynamic displacement current measured by a current shunt is 100 times greater than the SAEB. It is shown that with small gaps and with a large cathode diameter, the amplitude of the dynamic displacement current during a subnanosecond rise time of applied pulse voltage can be higher than 4 kA.

  19. Earthquake magnitude calculation without saturation from the scaling of peak ground displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melgar, Diego; Crowell, Brendan W.; Geng, Jianghui; Allen, Richard M.; Bock, Yehuda; Riquelme, Sebastian; Hill, Emma M.; Protti, Marino; Ganas, Athanassios

    2015-07-01

    GPS instruments are noninertial and directly measure displacements with respect to a global reference frame, while inertial sensors are affected by systematic offsetsprimarily tiltingthat adversely impact integration to displacement. We study the magnitude scaling properties of peak ground displacement (PGD) from high-rate GPS networks at near-source to regional distances (~10-1000 km), from earthquakes between Mw6 and 9. We conclude that real-time GPS seismic waveforms can be used to rapidly determine magnitude, typically within the first minute of rupture initiation and in many cases before the rupture is complete. While slower than earthquake early warning methods that rely on the first few seconds of P wave arrival, our approach does not suffer from the saturation effects experienced with seismic sensors at large magnitudes. Rapid magnitude estimation is useful for generating rapid earthquake source models, tsunami prediction, and ground motion studies that require accurate information on long-period displacements.

  20. Neuropsychological functioning in posttraumatic stress disorder following forced displacement in older adults and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, Lena; Wittekind, Charlotte E; Moritz, Steffen; Kellner, Michael; Muhtz, Christoph

    2013-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate neuropsychological performance in an untried trauma sample of older adults displaced during childhood at the end of World War II (WWII) with and without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as transgenerational effects of trauma and PTSD on their offspring. Displaced older adults with (n=20) and without PTSD (n=24) and nondisplaced healthy individuals (n=11) as well as one of their respective offspring were assessed with a large battery of cognitive tests (primarily targeting memory functioning). No evidence for deficits in neuropsychological performance was found in the aging group of displaced people with PTSD. Moreover, no group difference emerged in the offspring groups. Findings may be interpreted as first evidence for a rather resilient PTSD group of older adults that is available for assessment 60 years after displacement. PMID:23896354

  1. Effect of Body Mass Index on Intrafraction Prostate Displacement Monitored by Real-Time Electromagnetic Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Wayne M.; Morris, Mallory N.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia ; Kurko, Brian S.; Murray, Brian C.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, using real-time monitoring of implanted radiofrequency transponders, the intrafraction prostate displacement of patients as a function of body mass index (BMI). Methods and Materials: The motions of Beacon radiofrequency transponders (Calypso Medical Technologies, Seattle, WA) implanted in the prostate glands of 66 men were monitored throughout the course of intensity modulated radiation therapy. Data were acquired at 10 Hz from setup to the end of treatment, but only the 1.7 million data points with a 'beam on' tag were used in the analysis. There were 21 obese patients, with BMI {>=}30 and 45 nonobese patients in the study. Results: Mean displacements were least in the left-right lateral direction (0.56 {+-} 0.24 mm) and approximately twice that magnitude in the superior-inferior and anterior-posterior directions. The net vector displacement was larger still, 1.95 {+-} 0.47 mm. Stratified by BMI cohort, the mean displacements per patient in the 3 Cartesian axes as well as the net vector for patients with BMI {>=}30 were slightly less (<0.2 mm) but not significantly different than the corresponding values for patients with lower BMIs. As a surrogate for the magnitude of oscillatory noise, the standard deviation for displacements in all measured planes showed no significant differences in the prostate positional variability between the lower and higher BMI groups. Histograms of prostate displacements showed a lower frequency of large displacements in obese patients, and there were no significant differences in short-term and long-term velocity distributions. Conclusions: After patients were positioned accurately using implanted radiofrequency transponders, the intrafractional displacements in the lateral, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions as well as the net vector displacements were smaller, but not significantly so, for obese men than for those with lower BMI.

  2. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  3. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  4. Microstrain in tetragonal lead-zirconate-titanate: The effect of pressure on the ionic displacements

    SciTech Connect

    Frantti, J. Fujioka, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhu, J.; Vogel, S. C.; Zhao, Y.

    2014-08-15

    Piezoelectric materials respond to external stimuli by adjusting atomic positions. In solid-solutions, the changes occurring in atomic scale are very complex since the short- and long-range order are different. Standard methods used in diffraction data analysis fail to model the short-range order accurately. Pressure-induced cation displacements in ferroelectric Pb(Zr{sub 0.45}Ti{sub 0.55})O{sub 3} perovskite oxide are modeled by starting from a short-range order. We show that the model gives the average structure correctly and properly describes the local structure. The origin of the microstrain in lead zirconate titanate is the spatially varying Zr and Ti concentration and atomic distances, which is taken into account in the simulation. High-pressure neutron powder diffraction and simulation techniques are applied for the determination of atomic positions and bond-valences as a function of pressure. Under hydrostatic pressure, the material loses its piezoelectric properties far before the transition to the cubic phase takes place. The total cation valence +6 is preserved up to 3.31 GPa by compensating the increasing B-cation valence by decreasing Pb-displacement from the high-symmetry position. At 3.31 GPa, Pb-displacement is zero and the material is no more ferroelectric. This is also the pressure at which the Pb-valence is minimized. The average structure is still tetragonal. The model for microstrain predicts that the transition occurs over a finite pressure range: Pb-displacements are spatially varying and follow the distribution of Zr and Ti ions.

  5. Simulation of neutron displacement damage in bipolar junction transistors using high-energy heavy ion beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Buller, Daniel L.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Fleming, Robert M; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2006-12-01

    Electronic components such as bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) are damaged when they are exposed to radiation and, as a result, their performance can significantly degrade. In certain environments the radiation consists of short, high flux pulses of neutrons. Electronics components have traditionally been tested against short neutron pulses in pulsed nuclear reactors. These reactors are becoming less and less available; many of them were shut down permanently in the past few years. Therefore, new methods using radiation sources other than pulsed nuclear reactors needed to be developed. Neutrons affect semiconductors such as Si by causing atomic displacements of Si atoms. The recoiled Si atom creates a collision cascade which leads to displacements in Si. Since heavy ions create similar cascades in Si we can use them to create similar damage to what neutrons create. This LDRD successfully developed a new technique using easily available particle accelerators to provide an alternative to pulsed nuclear reactors to study the displacement damage and subsequent transient annealing that occurs in various transistor devices and potentially qualify them against radiation effects caused by pulsed neutrons.

  6. Minimally displaced clavicle fracture after high-energy injury: Are they likely to displace?

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, John T.; Athans, Bill J.; Munro, Mark W.; Langford, Joshua R.; Kupiszewski, Stanley J.; Haidukewych, George J.; Koval, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nondisplaced or minimally displaced clavicle fractures are often considered to be benign injuries. These fractures in the trauma patient population, however, may deserve closer follow-up than their low-energy counterparts. We sought to determine the initial assessment performed on these patients and the rate of subsequent fracture displacement in patients sustaining high-energy trauma when a supine chest radiograph on initial trauma survey revealed a well-aligned clavicle fracture. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of trauma alert patients who sustained a midshaft clavicle fracture (AO/OTA type 15-B) with less than 100% displacement treated at a single level 1 trauma centre between 2005 and 2010. We compared fracture displacement on initial supine chest radiographs and follow-up radiographs. Orthopedic consultation and the type of imaging studies obtained were also recorded. Results Ninety-five patients with clavicle fractures met the inclusion criteria. On follow-up, 57 (60.0%) had displacement of 100% or more of the shaft width. Most patients (63.2%) in our study had an orthopedic consultation during their hospital admission, and 27.4% had clavicle radiographs taken on the day of admission. Conclusion Clavicle fractures in patients with a high-energy mechanism of injury are prone to fracture displacement, even when initial supine chest radiographs show nondisplacement. We recommend clavicle films as part of the initial evaluation for all patients with clavicle fractures and early follow-up within the first 2 weeks of injury. PMID:24869608

  7. Computing Fault Displacements from Surface Deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyzenga, Gregory; Parker, Jay; Donnellan, Andrea; Panero, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    Simplex is a computer program that calculates locations and displacements of subterranean faults from data on Earth-surface deformations. The calculation involves inversion of a forward model (given a point source representing a fault, a forward model calculates the surface deformations) for displacements, and strains caused by a fault located in isotropic, elastic half-space. The inversion involves the use of nonlinear, multiparameter estimation techniques. The input surface-deformation data can be in multiple formats, with absolute or differential positioning. The input data can be derived from multiple sources, including interferometric synthetic-aperture radar, the Global Positioning System, and strain meters. Parameters can be constrained or free. Estimates can be calculated for single or multiple faults. Estimates of parameters are accompanied by reports of their covariances and uncertainties. Simplex has been tested extensively against forward models and against other means of inverting geodetic data and seismic observations. This work

  8. Character displacement of Cercopithecini primate visual signals

    PubMed Central

    Allen, William L.; Stevens, Martin; Higham, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Animal visual signals have the potential to act as an isolating barrier to prevent interbreeding of populations through a role in species recognition. Within communities of competing species, species recognition signals are predicted to undergo character displacement, becoming more visually distinctive from each other, however this pattern has rarely been identified. Using computational face recognition algorithms to model primate face processing, we demonstrate that the face patterns of guenons (tribe: Cercopithecini) have evolved under selection to become more visually distinctive from those of other guenon species with whom they are sympatric. The relationship between the appearances of sympatric species suggests that distinguishing conspecifics from other guenon species has been a major driver of diversification in guenon face appearance. Visual signals that have undergone character displacement may have had an important role in the tribe’s radiation, keeping populations that became geographically separated reproductively isolated on secondary contact. PMID:24967517

  9. Charge-displacement analysis for excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Ronca, Enrico Tarantelli, Francesco; Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università degli Studi di Perugia, via Elce di Sotto 8, I-06123 Perugia ; Pastore, Mariachiara Belpassi, Leonardo; De Angelis, Filippo; Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo

    2014-02-07

    We extend the Charge-Displacement (CD) analysis, already successfully employed to describe the nature of intermolecular interactions [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 13046 (2010)] and various types of controversial chemical bonds [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 1048 (2008); N. Salvi et al., Chem. Eur. J. 16, 7231 (2010)], to study the charge fluxes accompanying electron excitations, and in particular the all-important charge-transfer (CT) phenomena. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new approach through applications to exemplary excitations in a series of molecules, encompassing various typical situations from valence, to Rydberg, to CT excitations. The CD functions defined along various spatial directions provide a detailed and insightful quantitative picture of the electron displacements taking place.

  10. Wirelessly Interrogated Position or Displacement Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2007-01-01

    Two simple position or displacement sensors based on inductance-capacitance resonant circuits have been conceived. These sensors are both powered and interrogated without use of wires and without making contact with other objects. Instead, excitation and interrogation are accomplished by means of a magnetic-field-response recorder. Both of the present position or displacement sensors consist essentially of variable rectangular parallel-plate capacitors electrically connected in series with fixed inductors. Simple inductance-capacitance circuits of the type used in these sensors are inherently robust; their basic mode of operation does not depend on maintenance of specific environmental conditions. Hence, these sensors can be used under such harsh conditions as cryogenic temperatures, high pressures, and radioactivity.

  11. Air displacement plethysmography: cradle to grave.

    PubMed

    Fields, David A; Gunatilake, Ravindu; Kalaitzoglou, Evangelia

    2015-04-01

    Differences in body composition are associated with increased disease risk in various stages of life. Despite numerous available methods in assessing body composition (air displacement plethysmography, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, bioelectrical impedance, hydrometry, and magnetic resonance imaging), due to innate technical limitations, the ability for one singular method to track body composition over the life span (ie, infancy to adulthood) is challenging and imperfect. The primary goal of this review is to determine if there are body composition methods that can accurately track body composition from infancy into adulthood. After careful consideration and taking into account the best available scientific evidence, we feel air displacement plethysmography is the best instrument at this time for tracking body composition, starting in infancy and forward into adulthood, partly because it is the only "practical" clinical tool currently available for use during infancy. PMID:25761768

  12. Internal Displacements in Cement during Ballistic Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grantham, S. G.; Proud, W. G.; Field, J. E.

    2004-07-01

    The technique of Digital Speckle Radiography (DSR) has been shown to be widely applicable to the field of ballistics through its ability to measure internal displacement fields to a high precision. In a DSR experiment, a flat plane, typically 500 μm thick, of X-ray opaque filings are introduced into the sample during manufacture. Flash X-rays can then be used to image the plane, both before and during an impact event, to produce random speckled images on an X-ray film. Small sub-regions of the images can be tracked relative to each other using a Digital Speckle Photography (DSP) correlation algorithm. This produces a displacement field within the specimen on the seeded plane. By repeating an experiment with identical specimens, but varying the delay of the X-ray exposure, a full time history of the impact event can be obtained.

  13. Crack border stress and displacement equations revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eftis, J.; Subramonian, N.; Liebowitz, H.

    1977-01-01

    It is more or less accepted in fracture mechanics that the elastic stress and displacements very near to the tip of a plane line crack can be approximated with sufficient accuracy, for all geometries and outer boundary loading conditions, by a one-parameter representation, i.e., strictly in terms of the stress intensity factors KI and/or KII. It is shown here that this presumption which appears to be reasonable on face value, quantitatively speaking, is nevertheless unacceptable as a general proposition. The reason lies with the quite arbitrary practice of omitting the second term of the series representation for the stresses, a contribution which is independent of distance from the crack tip. It is not difficult to show by way of specific examples how such omission can lead to error of serious qualitative nature in the prediction of stress and displacement related quantities of interest.

  14. Wireless Measurement of Rotation and Displacement Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2007-01-01

    A magnetic field response sensor is designed to measure displacement or rotation rate without a physical connection to a power source, microprocessor, data acquisition equipment, or electrical circuitry. The sensor works with the magnetic field response recorder, which was described in Magnetic-Field-Response Measurement-Acquisition System, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 6 (June 2006), page 28. These sensors are wirelessly powered and interrogated, and the measurement acquisition system and sensors are extremely lightweight.The response recorder uses oscillating magnetic fields to power the sensors. Once powered, the sensors respond with their own magnetic field. For displacement/ rotation measurements, the response recorder uses the sensor s response amplitude, which is dependent on the distance from the antenna. The recorder s antenna orientation and position are kept fixed, and the sampling period is constant.

  15. Localization for the Random Displacement Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loss, Michael; Stolz, Günter

    2011-04-01

    This is a summary of recent work, jointly with J. Baker, F. Klopp and S. Nakamura, concerning the random displacement model resulting in a proof of localization near the edge of the deterministic spectrum. Localization is meant in both senses, pure point spectrum with exponentially decaying eigenfunctions as well as dynamical localization. The proof relies on a well established multiscale analysis and the main problem is to verify the necessary ingredients, such as a Lifshitz tail estimate and a Wegner estimate.

  16. Displacement phenomena in lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Wonryeon

    2015-10-01

    The work described here examines displacement phenomena that play a role in lectin affinity chromatography and their potential to impact reproducibility. This was achieved using Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), a lectin widely used in monitoring cancer. Four small identical LEL columns were coupled in series to form a single affinity chromatography system with the last in the series connected to an absorbance detector. The serial affinity column set (SACS) was then loaded with human plasma proteins. At the completion of loading, the column set was disassembled, the four columns were eluted individually, the captured proteins were trypsin digested, the peptides were deglycosylated with PNGase F, and the parent proteins were identified through mass spectral analyses. Significantly different sets of glycoproteins were selected by each column, some proteins appearing to be exclusively bound to the first column while others were bound further along in the series. Clearly, sample displacement chromatography (SDC) occurs. Glycoproteins were bound at different places in the column train, identifying the presence of glycoforms with different affinity on a single glycoprotein. It is not possible to see these phenomena in the single column mode of chromatography. Moreover, low abundance proteins were enriched, which facilitates detection. The great advantage of this method is that it differentiates between glycoproteins on the basis of their binding affinity. Displacement phenomena are concluded to be a significant component of the separation mechanism in heavily loaded lectin affinity chromatography columns. This further suggests that care must be exercised in sample loading of lectin columns to prevent analyte displacement with nonretained proteins. PMID:26348026

  17. Simultaneous muscle force and displacement transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Culler, V. H. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A myocardial transducer for simultaneously measuring force and displacement within a very small area of myocardium is disclosed. The transducer comprised of an elongated body forked at one end to form an inverted Y shaped beam with each branch of the beam constituting a low compliant tine for penetrating the myocardium to a predetermined depth. Bonded to one of the low compliance tines is a small piezoresistive element for converting a force acting on the beam into an electrical signal. A third high compliant tine of the transducer, which measures displacement of the myocardium in a direction in line with the two low compliant tines, is of a length that just pierces the surface membrane. A small piezoresistive element is bonded to the third tine at its upper end where its bending is greatest. Displacement of the myocardium causes a deformation in curvature of the third tine, and the second small piezoresistive element bonded to the surface of its curved end converts its deformation into an electrical signal.

  18. Comparing Teaching Approaches About Maxwell's Displacement Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karam, Ricardo; Coimbra, Debora; Pietrocola, Maurício

    2014-08-01

    Due to its fundamental role for the consolidation of Maxwell's equations, the displacement current is one of the most important topics of any introductory course on electromagnetism. Moreover, this episode is widely used by historians and philosophers of science as a case study to investigate several issues (e.g. the theory-experiment relationship). Despite the consensus among physics educators concerning the relevance of the topic, there are many possible ways to interpret and justify the need for the displacement current term. With the goal of understanding the didactical transposition of this topic more deeply, we investigate three of its domains: (1) The historical development of Maxwell's reasoning; (2) Different approaches to justify the term insertion in physics textbooks; and (3) Four lectures devoted to introduce the topic in undergraduate level given by four different professors. By reflecting on the differences between these three domains, significant evidence for the knowledge transformation caused by the didactization of this episode is provided. The main purpose of this comparative analysis is to assist physics educators in developing an epistemological surveillance regarding the teaching and learning of the displacement current.

  19. Geosynthetic loads in landfill slopes: Displacement compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.H. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Gilbert, R.B. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Daly, J.J. )

    1994-11-01

    Soil and geosynthetic components are used together in lining and cover systems for waste-containment facilities to protect the environment by acting as a hydraulic barrier. Since the performance of the barrier depends on the components remaining intact, accurate predictions of tensile loads in the components are important. Lining and cover-system components must be designed to resist tensile loads anticipated. Four methods for determining tensile loads are examined in this paper. Two common design methods, called the limit equilibrium method (LEM) and the limit method (LM), that consider only force equilibrium to predict tensile loads are compared with two proposed methods that consider both force equilibrium and displacement compatibility. An example multiple-layered cover system is used to compare predictions from the four methods. The comparison indicates that displacement compatibility is an important consideration and can influence predictions significantly for tensile load. Estimates of tensile load in the geosynthetics using the state of practice may be too great (as for the LM) or too small (as for the LEM), compared with more rigorous displacement compatibility methods.

  20. International Monetary Fund and aid displacement.

    PubMed

    Stuckler, David; Basu, Sanjay; McKee, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Several recent papers find evidence that global health aid is being diverted to reserves, education, military, or other sectors, and is displacing government spending. This is suggested to occur because ministers of finance have competing, possibly corrupt, priorities and deprive the health sector of resources. Studies have found that development assistance for health routed to governments has a negative impact on health spending and that similar assistance routed to private nongovernmental organizations has a positive impact. An alternative hypothesis is that World Bank and IMF macro-economic policies, which specifically advise governments to divert aid to reserves to cope with aid volatility and keep government spending low, could be causing the displacement of health aid. This article evaluates whether aid displacement was greater when countries undertook a new borrowing program from the IMF between 1996 and 2006. As found in existing studies, for each $1 of development assistance for health, about $0.37 is added to the health system. However, evaluating IMF-borrowing versus non-IMF-borrowing countries reveals that non-borrowers add about $0.45 whereas borrowers add less than $0.01 to the health system. On average, health system spending grew at about half the speed when countries were exposed to the IMF than when they were not. It is important to take account of the political economy of global health finance when interpreting data on financial flows. PMID:21319721

  1. Hollow-beam atom tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yonho

    One of the more promising proposals for guiding and focusing neutral atoms involves dark hollow laser beams. When the frequency of the laser is detuned to the blue of resonance, the dipole force the atoms feel in the light confines them to the dark core where the atoms can be transported with minimal interaction with the light. The ability of the all-light atom guides to transport large number of ultracold atoms for long distances without physical walls leads to the possibility of a versatile tool for atom lithography, atom interferometry, atomic spectroscopy as well as for transporting and manipulating Bose-Einstein condensates. Furthermore since the atoms transported in all-light atom guides do not come into contact with matter, they can in principle be used to transport antimatter as well. In this work a hollow beam atom tunnel is demonstrated by guiding magneto-optically trapped ultracold cesium atoms with a hollow core laser beam. The 1mm diameter diffractionless hollow beam used to construct the atom tunnel was generated from a TEM00 mode diode laser at 852 nm using a series of axicons and simple lenses. The axicon generated hollow beam has a dark core extended for most of its diameter and steep walls suitable for an atom guide. Ultracold cesium atoms loaded into the tunnel from a MOT spend 90% of their time in the dark, scattering photons only when they collide with the light walls. We modeled the evolution of atoms using the interaction between the atoms and the light walls, which agreed well with experimental observations. The direction and speed of the atoms in the tunnel can be controlled by varying the detuning of the tunnel beam. The ability to vary the core size of the hollow beam makes the all-light atom guide potentially useful for focusing neutral atoms. The atoms could be focused as tight as the core size of the hollow beam at its waist. This new focusing scheme, called the atom funnel, would not show spherical and chromatic aberrations that conventional harmonic focusing suffers from.

  2. Actuated atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, Charles (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randall (Inventor); Appel, Philip (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuated atomizer is adapted for spray cooling or other applications wherein a well-developed, homogeneous and generally conical spray mist is required. The actuated atomizer includes an outer shell formed by an inner ring; an outer ring; an actuator insert and a cap. A nozzle framework is positioned within the actuator insert. A base of the nozzle framework defines swirl inlets, a swirl chamber and a swirl chamber. A nozzle insert defines a center inlet and feed ports. A spool is positioned within the coil housing, and carries the coil windings having a number of turns calculated to result in a magnetic field of sufficient strength to overcome the bias of the spring. A plunger moves in response to the magnetic field of the windings. A stop prevents the pintle from being withdrawn excessively. A pintle, positioned by the plunger, moves between first and second positions. In the first position, the head of the pintle blocks the discharge passage of the nozzle framework, thereby preventing the atomizer from discharging fluid. In the second position, the pintle is withdrawn from the swirl chamber, allowing the atomizer to release atomized fluid. A spring biases the pintle to block the discharge passage. The strength of the spring is overcome, however, by the magnetic field created by the windings positioned on the spool, which withdraws the plunger into the spool and further compresses the spring.

  3. Atomic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Connatser, Robert; Cothren, Bobby; Johnson, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's (UAH) Center for Applied Optics (CAO) entitled Atomic Research is documented. Atomic oxygen (AO) effects on materials have long been a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The objective of this research effort was to provide technical expertise in the design of instrumentation and experimental techniques for analyzing materials exposed to atomic oxygen in accelerated testing at NASA/MSFC. Such testing was required to answer fundamental questions concerning Space Station Freedom (SSF) candidate materials and materials exposed to atomic oxygen aboard the Long-Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The primary UAH task was to provide technical design, review, and analysis to MSFC in the development of a state-of-the-art 5eV atomic oxygen beam facility required to simulate the RAM-induced low earth orbit (LEO) AO environment. This development was to be accomplished primarily at NASA/MSFC. In support of this task, contamination effects and ultraviolet (UV) simulation testing was also to be carried out using NASA/MSFC facilities. Any materials analysis of LDEF samples was to be accomplished at UAH.

  4. Comparing psychological responses of internally displaced and non-displaced Turkish Cypriots.

    PubMed

    Ergun, Deniz; Cakici, Mehmet; Cakici, Ebru

    2008-01-01

    During the 1963-1964 ethnic conflict and 1974 war in Cyprus, many Turkish Cypriots were displaced by Greek Cypriot forces. The psychological condition of Turkish Cypriots after these conflicts has not been studied to the present day. At the time of the Annan Plan Referendum on April 24th 2004, when people on both sides were to decide whether to reunite or not, and when old traumatic events where being discussed in vivid detail, the psychological responses of the internally displaced and non-displaced Turkish Cypriots were investigated. The sample of the study derived from a sample of a larger household survey study conducted on 408 adult people taken randomly from three different districts. People who settled down in Cyprus after 1974 or who had never experienced a war in Cyprus were not included in the study. 129 Turkish Cypriots who experienced either 1963-64 conflict or the 1974 war were included in the present study. 86 of these had been displaced. The first part of the questionnaire that was administered to the subjects included demographic characteristics, war-related traumatic experiences, the level of seriousness, and traumatic incidents resulting from other circumstances. In the second part of the questionnaire, the Traumatic Stress Symptom Checklist (TSSC) and Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) were used to investigate the symptoms of the post-traumatic process. The outcomes indicates that the internally displaced persons (IDPs) where subjected to traumatic incidents at a higher degree due to killing, displacement, captivity, or killing of family members and relatives. The rate of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) of IDPs is 20%, and is significantly higher than for non-displaced persons. The comparison of BSI subscales show that IDPs had a higher level of depression scores than the non-displaced persons. The somatization subscale scores are higher in non-displaced persons. The study reveals a higher frequency of war-related traumatic events in IDPs than in non-displaced people, greater suffering from posttraumatic stress and more negative beliefs about future reunion. PMID:19289879

  5. Atom laser based on Raman transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, G. M.; Hope, J. J.; Savage, C. M.

    1997-05-01

    In this paper we present an atom laser scheme using a Raman transition for the output coupling of atoms. A beam of thermal atoms (bosons) in a metastable atomic state is pumped into a multimode atomic cavity. This cavity is coupled through spontaneous emission to another cavity for the atomic ground state. Above a certain threshold pumping rate a large number of atoms build up in the lowest energy state of the second cavity, while the higher energy states remain unpopulated. Atoms are then coupled to the outside of the cavity with a Raman transition. This changes the internal level of the atom and imparts a momentum kick, allowing the atoms to leave the system. We propose an implementation of our scheme using hollow optical-fiber atom waveguides.

  6. Uncovering deformation processes from surface displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramondo, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this talk is to provide an overview about the most recent outcomes in Earth Sciences, describe the role of satellite remote sensing, together with GPS, ground measurement and further data, for geophysical parameter retrieval in well known case studies where the combined approach dealing with the use of two or more techniques/datasets have demonstrated their effectiveness. The Earth Sciences have today a wide availability of instruments and sensors able to provide scientists with an unprecedented capability to study the physical processes driving earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and other dynamic Earth systems. Indeed measurements from satellites allow systematic observation of the Earth surface covering large areas, over a long time period and characterized by growing sample intervals. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique has demonstrated its effectiveness to investigate processes responsible for crustal faulting stemming from the detection of surface deformation patterns. Indeed using satellite data along ascending and descending orbits, as well as different incident angles, it is possible in principle to retrieve the full 3D character of the ground motion. To such aim the use of GPS stations providing 3D displacement components is a reliable complementary instrument. Finally, offset tracking techniques and Multiple Aperture Interferometry (MAI) may provide a contribution to the analysis of horizontal and NS deformation vectors. The estimation of geophysical parameters using InSAR has been widely discussed in seismology and volcanology, and also applied to deformation associated with groundwater and other subsurface fluids. These applications often involve the solution of an inverse problem, which means the retrieval of optimal source parameters at depth for volcanoes and earthquakes, from the knowledge of surface deformation from InSAR. In recent years, InSAR measurements combined with traditional seismological and geophysical data, such as teleseismic waveforms, strong motion records and GPS, have also been used by geophysicists for improved rupture models. Many models use equations for a uniform elastic half space stemming from the Okada formulation, but improved data constraints and the use of increasingly sophisticated modeling and inverse methods allowed for the exploration of models with variation of elastic properties in layers or more complex representation of fault and lithosphere structure and rheology. In volcanic studies the role of GPS and InSAR lies in the measurement of pre-eruptive inflation, co-eruptive deflation and the post-eruptive response. The spatio-temporal evolution of volcanic processes, the "breathing" of a volcano, can be monitored with temporal series of InSAR interferograms using multitemporal InSAR techniques. The measured deformation can be used as constraints for the formulation of the inverse problem, to retrieve information concerning the depth, size, shape of the magma chamber (and pressure change) and magma supply dynamics. Deformation modeling commonly relies on simple point sources, dikes and sills; or more complex volume-change sources to produce the different surface deformation patterns caused by magma intrusion.

  7. How to avoid simulation sickness in virtual environments during user displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemeny, A.; Colombet, F.; Denoual, T.

    2015-03-01

    Driving simulation (DS) and Virtual Reality (VR) share the same technologies for visualization and 3D vision and may use the same technics for head movement tracking. They experience also similar difficulties when rendering the displacements of the observer in virtual environments, especially when these displacements are carried out using driver commands, including steering wheels, joysticks and nomad devices. High values for transport delay, the time lag between the action and the corresponding rendering cues and/or visual-vestibular conflict, due to the discrepancies perceived by the human visual and vestibular systems when driving or displacing using a control device, induces the so-called simulation sickness. While the visual transport delay can be efficiently reduced using high frequency frame rate, the visual-vestibular conflict is inherent to VR, when not using motion platforms. In order to study the impact of displacements on simulation sickness, we have tested various driving scenarios in Renault's 5-sided ultra-high resolution CAVE. First results indicate that low speed displacements with longitudinal and lateral accelerations under a given perception thresholds are well accepted by a large number of users and relatively high values are only accepted by experienced users and induce VR induced symptoms and effects (VRISE) for novice users, with a worst case scenario corresponding to rotational displacements. These results will be used for optimization technics at Arts et Métiers ParisTech for motion sickness reduction in virtual environments for industrial, research, educational or gaming applications.

  8. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasevich, Mark

    2008-05-08

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton's constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gyroscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be used to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  9. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Kasevich

    2008-05-07

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  10. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema

    Mark Kasevich

    2010-01-08

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton?s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  11. A Robust Ramsey Interferometer for Atomic Timekeeping in Dynamic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotru, Krish; Brown, Justin; Butts, David; Choy, Jennifer; Galfond, Marissa; Johnson, David M.; Kinast, Joseph; Timmons, Brian; Stoner, Richard

    2014-05-01

    We present a laser-based approach to atomic timekeeping, in which atomic phase information is extracted using modified Raman pulses in a Ramsey sequence. We overcome systematic effects associated with differential AC Stark shifts and variations in laser beam intensity by employing atom optics derived from Raman adiabatic rapid passage (ARP). This technique drives coherent transfer between two hyperfine ground states by sweeping the frequency difference of two optical fields and maintaining a large single-photon detuning. Compared to a Raman-pulse Ramsey interferometer, we show a >150x reduction in sensitivity to differential AC Stark shifts. We also demonstrate that ARP preserves fringe contrast in Ramsey interferometers for cloud displacements reaching the 1/e2 intensity radius of the laser beam. Deviations of the phase in response to changes in duration, rate, and range of the ARP frequency sweep are bounded to <7 mrad, implying a per-shot fractional frequency uncertainty of 1e-11 for an interrogation time of 10 ms. These characteristics are expected to improve the robustness of clock interferometers operating in dynamic environments. Copyright 2014 by The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Atomic photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, J. A. R.

    After a brief historical review, this work discusses in detail the experimental techniques available for the investigation of photoionization processes, presents results on typical atoms, and examines some of the problems yet unsolved; in general, the discussion is concerned primarily with the photoionization of atoms in the spectral range from ionization threshold to about 100 A. The examination of experimental techniques treats such topics as light sources, monochromators and spectrographs, absorption and photoionization cells, branching-ratio studies, and electron-impact 'photoionization'. Photoionization measurements are discussed with reference to total and partial photoionization cross sections.

  13. Reach height and jump displacement: implications for standardization of reach determination.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lucas C; Schilling, Brian K; Weiss, Lawrence W; Fry, Andrew C; Chiu, Loren Z F

    2010-06-01

    Vertical jump performance is often assessed using jump-and-reach tests. The exact procedure used for determining standing reach height and jump height has a large effect on the resultant displacement. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of 4 methods of standing reach height measurement and Vertec jump height measurement against 2 force plate methods of jump displacement determination (impulse and flight-time methods). Fifteen men with various training backgrounds performed 2 each of countermovement, restricted (no arm swing) and static start vertical jumps. Reach height was determined using 4 methods; either a 1- or overlapped 2-hand reach, flat footed or with plantar flexion. All jumps were performed on a force platform. The best jump of each type based on Vertec displacement was used for analysis. Repeated-measures of analysis of variance for each jump type was used for analysis with Bonferroni post hoc for pairwise comparisons of jump measurement style. All jump displacements for similar types were significantly intercorrelated with a minimum r-value of 0.84. Impulse vs. flight time was the only pairwise comparison of measurement type for which similar values were noted. The one-hand reach with plantar flexion was the method of reach that was closest to the impulse and flight-time methods, and thus should be the preferred choice when using jump-and-reach tests to determine jump displacement. In all cases, the Vertec overestimates the displacement of the COM based on force plate methods. When comparing groups of individuals from different data sets, one must consider both the method of reach height (if performed) and jump displacement to make valid comparisons. If plantar flexion with a 1-hand reach is not used during reach measurement, jump displacement will be erroneously high. PMID:20508464

  14. A beak size locus in Darwin's finches facilitated character displacement during a drought.

    PubMed

    Lamichhaney, Sangeet; Han, Fan; Berglund, Jonas; Wang, Chao; Almén, Markus Sällman; Webster, Matthew T; Grant, B Rosemary; Grant, Peter R; Andersson, Leif

    2016-04-22

    Ecological character displacement is a process of morphological divergence that reduces competition for limited resources. We used genomic analysis to investigate the genetic basis of a documented character displacement event in Darwin's finches on Daphne Major in the Galápagos Islands: The medium ground finch diverged from its competitor, the large ground finch, during a severe drought. We discovered a genomic region containing the HMGA2 gene that varies systematically among Darwin's finch species with different beak sizes. Two haplotypes that diverged early in the radiation were involved in the character displacement event: Genotypes associated with large beak size were at a strong selective disadvantage in medium ground finches (selection coefficient s = 0.59). Thus, a major locus has apparently facilitated a rapid ecological diversification in the adaptive radiation of Darwin's finches. PMID:27102486

  15. Worker Displacement Still Common in the Late 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herz, Diane E.

    1991-01-01

    Even during a period of rapid employment growth, over four million people were displaced from their jobs in the 1980s. Workers displaced during the latter half of the decade had a much easier time finding new jobs. (Author)

  16. Embedded-atom-method effective-pair-interaction study of the structural and thermodynamic properties of Cu-Ni, Cu-Ag, and Au-Ni solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Asta, M.; Foiles, S.M.

    1996-02-01

    The structural and thermodynamic properties of Cu-Ni, Cu-Ag, and Au-Ni solid solutions have been studied using a computational approach which combines an embedded-atom-method (EAM) description of alloy energetics with a second-order-expansion (SOE) treatment of compositional and displacive disorder. It is discussed in detail how the SOE approach allows the EAM expression for the energy of a substitutional alloy to be cast in the form of a generalized lattice-gas Hamiltonian containing effective pair interactions with arbitrary range. Furthermore, we show how the SOE-EAM method can be combined with either mean-field or Monte Carlo statistical mechanics techniques in order to calculate short-range-order (SRO) parameters, average nearest-neighbor bond lengths, and alloy thermodynamic properties which include contributions from static displacive relaxations and dynamic atomic vibrations. We demonstrate that the contributions to alloy heats of mixing arising from displacive relaxations can be sizeable, and that the neglect of these terms can lead to large overestimations of calculated phase-transition temperatures. The effects of vibrational free-energy contributions on the results of composition-temperature phase diagram calculations are estimated to be relatively small for the phase-separating alloy systems considered in this study. It is shown that within the SOE approach displacive effects can act only to displace the peak in the Fourier-transformed SRO parameter away from Brillouin-zone-boundary special points and towards the origin. Consistent with this result, we show that the unusual SRO observed in diffuse scattering experiments for Au-Ni solid solutions can be understood as arising from a competition between chemical and displacive driving forces which favor ordering and clustering, respectively. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. Is competition needed for ecological character displacement? Does displacement decrease competition?

    PubMed

    Abrams, Peter A; Cortez, Michael H

    2015-12-01

    Interspecific competition for resources is generally considered to be the selective force driving ecological character displacement, and displacement is assumed to reduce competition. Skeptics of the prevalence of character displacement often cite lack of evidence of competition. The present article uses a simple model to examine whether competition is needed for character displacement and whether displacement reduces competition. It treats systems with competing resources, and considers cases when only one consumer evolves. It quantifies competition using several different measures. The analysis shows that selection for divergence of consumers occurs regardless of the level of between-resource competition or whether the indirect interaction between the consumers is competition (-,-), mutualism (+,+), or contramensalism (+,-). Also, divergent evolution always decreases the equilibrium population size of the evolving consumer. Whether divergence of one consumer reduces or increases the impact of a subsequent perturbation of the other consumer depends on the parameters and the method chosen for measuring competition. Divergence in mutualistic interactions may reduce beneficial effects of subsequent increases in the other consumer's population. The evolutionary response is driven by an increase in the relative abundance of the resource the consumer catches more rapidly. Such an increase can occur under several types of interaction. PMID:26548922

  18. Mapping Out Atom-Wall Interaction with Atomic Clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, A.; Obreshkov, B.; Dzuba, V. A.

    2009-09-25

    We explore the feasibility of probing atom-wall interaction with atomic clocks based on atoms trapped in engineered optical lattices. Optical lattice is normal to the wall. By monitoring the wall-induced clock shift at individual wells of the lattice, one would measure the dependence of the atom-wall interaction on the atom-wall separation. We find that the induced clock shifts are large and observable at already experimentally demonstrated levels of accuracy. We show that this scheme may uniquely probe the long-range atom-wall interaction in all three qualitatively distinct regimes of the interaction: van der Waals (image-charge interaction), Casimir-Polder (QED vacuum fluctuations), and Lifshitz (thermal-bath fluctuations) regimes.

  19. Carbon nanotube field emission cathodes fabricated with chemical displacement plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y. C.; Liu, Y. M.; Chen, Y. C.; Sung, Y.; Ger, M. D.

    2009-06-01

    A new approach for making field emission cathodes consisting of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is discussed. The authors used a chemical displacement technique to fabricate field emission cathodes by co-depositing CNTs/nickel composite onto the surface of a zinc-coated soda-lime glass. There are several advantages of this displacement method for preparing field emission cathodes such as the uniform distribution of CNTs in the composite cathodes, low cost of consumed CNTs, low cost of instrument and equipment, feasibility of large-area mass production, and stability of plating solution, which can be used for many times and still remain useful after a long-time storage. The results show that, after the CNT purification and dispersion processes, a CNT content of 1.0 g/L, a pH value of 7.0, and a temperature of 50 ± 3 °C are the optimal process conditions which give better CNT distribution in the CNTs/Ni composite emitter and better field emission performance. The CNTs/Ni composite deposited with a plating solution which has been used for tens of times has an emission effect similar to those deposited with a new solution.

  20. Simulation of nonlinear viscous fingering in miscible displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C. T.; Homsy, G. M.

    1988-06-01

    The nonlinear behavior of viscous fingering in miscible displacements is studied. A Fourier spectral method is used as the basic scheme for numerical simulation. In its simplest formulation, the problem can be reduced to two algebraic equations for flow quantities and a first-order ordinary differential equation in time for the concentration. There are two parameters, the Peclet number (Pe) and mobility ratio (M), that determine the stability characteristics. The result shows that at short times, both the growth rate and the wavelength of fingers are in good agreement with predictions from our previous linear stability theory. However, as the time goes on, the nonlinear behavior of fingers becomes important. There are always a few dominant fingers that spread and shield the growth of other fingers. The spreading and shielding effects are caused by a spanwise secondary instability, and are aided by the transverse dispersion. It is shown that once a finger becomes large enough, the concentration gradient of its front becomes steep as a result of stretching caused by the cross-flow, in turn causing the tip of the finger to become unstable and split. The splitting phenomenon in miscible displacement is studied by the authors for the first time. A study of the averaged one-dimensional axial concentration profile is also presented, which indicates that the mixing length grows linearly in time, and that effective one-dimensional models cannot describe the nonlinear fingering.