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1

Calibrated Peer Review: A New Tool for Integrating Information Literacy Skills in Writing-Intensive Large Classroom Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Calibrated Peer Review[TM] (CPR) is a program that can significantly enhance the ability to integrate intensive information literacy exercises into large classroom settings. CPR is founded on a solid pedagogic base for learning, and it is formulated in such a way that information skills can easily be inserted. However, there is no mention of its…

Fosmire, Michael

2010-01-01

2

A Classroom Tariff-Setting Game  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author outlines a classroom tariff-setting game that allows students to explore the consequences of import tariffs imposed by large countries (countries able to influence world prices). Groups of students represent countries, which are organized into trading pairs. Each group's objective is to maximize welfare by choosing an appropriate ad…

Winchester, Niven

2006-01-01

3

Improvement in Generic Problem-Solving Abilities of Students by Use of Tutor-Less Problem-Based Learning in a Large Classroom Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Problem-based learning (PBL) was originally introduced in medical education programs as a form of small-group learning, but its use has now spread to large undergraduate classrooms in various other disciplines. Introduction of new teaching techniques, including PBL-based methods, needs to be justified by demonstrating the benefits of such…

Klegeris, Andis; Bahniwal, Manpreet; Hurren, Heather

2013-01-01

4

Classroom Management: Setting Up the Classroom for Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student learning is directly related to classroom control established the first week of school (Wong and Wong 2001)--what you do the first day counts, and what you do the first 10 minutes counts even more. This article shares the advanced planning aspects of classroom management that should be in place before students enter the classroom for the…

Sterling, Donna R.

2009-01-01

5

Using Microcomputers Interactively in Large Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1980, Wichita State University received a grant to introduce microcomputers as interactive teaching tools in large science classrooms. Through this grant, 18 faculty in 11 departments developed software modules illustrating concepts that are often difficult to teach by usual lecture methods. To determine whether the use of microcomputers in…

Bowman, Barbara E.; Ellsworth, Randy

6

Student Engagement and Success in the Large Astronomy 101 Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The large auditorium classroom presents unique challenges to maintaining student engagement. During the fall 2012 semester, I adopted several specific strategies for increasing student engagement and reducing anonymity with the goal of maximizing student success in the large class. I measured attendance and student success in two classes, one with 300 students and one with 42, but otherwise taught as similarly as possible. While the students in the large class probably did better than they would have in a traditional lecture setting, attendance was still significantly lower in the large class, resulting in lower student success than in the small control class by all measures. I will discuss these results and compare to classes in previous semesters, including other small classes and large Distance Education classes conducted live over remote television link.

Jensen, J. B.

2014-07-01

7

Identifying Learning Preferences in Vocational Education and Training Classroom Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research was designed to assess whether teachers and trainers of vocational learners noted and valued differences in individual learning preferences and, if so, how those differences were observed in natural classroom, workshop or other formal learning settings. Data were collected from six vocational education and training (VET) learning…

Smith, Peter J.

2006-01-01

8

Observation instrument of play behaviour in a classroom setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to develop an instrument to observe the play behaviour of a whole group of children from four to six years of age in a classroom setting on the basis of video recording. The instrument was developed in collaboration with experienced teachers and experts on play. Categories of play were derived from the literature and

Louise Berkhout; Joop Hoekman; Sieneke M. Goorhuis-Brouwer

2011-01-01

9

Observation Instrument of Play Behaviour in a Classroom Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this study was to develop an instrument to observe the play behaviour of a whole group of children from four to six years of age in a classroom setting on the basis of video recording. The instrument was developed in collaboration with experienced teachers and experts on play. Categories of play were derived from the literature…

Berkhout, Louise; Hoekman, Joop; Goorhuis-Brouwer, Sieneke M.

2012-01-01

10

Observation instrument of play behaviour in a classroom setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to develop an instrument to observe the play behaviour of a whole group of children from four to six years of age in a classroom setting on the basis of video recording. The instrument was developed in collaboration with experienced teachers and experts on play. Categories of play were derived from the literature and

Louise Berkhout; Joop Hoekman; Sieneke M. Goorhuis-Brouwer

2012-01-01

11

Setting Variables, Classroom Interaction, and Multiple Pupil Outcomes. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four general problems (two substantive, two methodological) were addressed in a research project: (1) Does the nature of the pupil or the setting make a difference in the teaching style which is most effective? (2) Does the cognitive level of the learning objective make a difference? (3) How can relationships within the classroom be analyzed? and…

Soar, Robert S.; Soar, Ruth, M.

12

Physics Classroom: Newton's Laws of Motion - Problem Set  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This set of 30 interactive problems, developed for high school physics, addresses the learners' ability to distinguish between mass and weight, determine net force, construct free-body diagrams, relate acceleration to net force and mass, and combine Newton's Second Law analysis with kinematics to solve for unknown quantities. Editor's Note: Of special note for students with disabilities: audio-guided solutions are available for each problem. The Physics Classroom is a set of resources created for learners and teachers of high school physics. It includes comprehensive tutorials, problem sets with solutions, extra help for struggling learners, Shockwave animations, multimedia learning modules, labs, and photo gallery.

Henderson, Tom

2011-10-03

13

Experiences with Large Planetary Hyperspectral Data Sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The authors report on their experiences from implementing data analysis algorithms on large planetary data sets, mainly hyperspectral data sets from the Mars Express mission. A data preparation, calibration and organisation pipeline has to be set up before meaningful information can be extracted from the data algorithmically. Often, this represents a significant factor in overall time and cost. Especially when dealing with novel approaches this pipeline has to be particularly flexible to accommodate changes in data layout and semantics. The authors gathered their experiences in the field of implementation of non-negative matrix approximation (NNMA) algorithms, which in recent years have reached a level of maturity that makes them suitable for application on large planetary datasets. This implies that these algorithms can be used effectively to factor large collections of hyperspectral measurements into sources and abundances under linearity and non-negativity constraints with reasonable computational resources. The results include (semi-)automatic large-scale analysis of hyperspectral data sets with the focus on spectral and geographical summarisation. The method uses randomised algorithms to extract source spectra; these are then distributed on a virtual sphere and classified according to similarity and proximity; for each class of source, an abundance map is generated and presented to the user for interpretation. Results can be obtained with reasonable resources in minutes to hours, depending on the size of the dataset and the accuracy required.

Schmidt, Albrecht; Schmidt, Frederic; Moussaoui, Sa

14

Concept Formation From Very Large Training Sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract This,paper ,proposes ,an alternative ,to Quinlan's,algorithm ,for ,forming ,classification trees,from ,large ,sets,of examples. ,My algorithm is guaranteed,to terminate. ,Quinlan's ,algorithm isusually,faster. I.The,Nature,of the ,Problem.

Richard A. O'keefe

1983-01-01

15

Multiple experiences in moving from a traditional classroom setting to an on-line teaching environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

When transitioning traditional classroom courses to an on-line teaching environment, there are a variety of ways to accomplish the task. One approach is to combine classroom and on-line activities, by migrating a significant portion of the course material to an on-line environment while maintaining the remaining material in a more traditional classroom setting. This scenario requires the class to meet

Pete Hylton; Wendy Otoupal

2007-01-01

16

Clickers in the Large Classroom: Current Research and Best-Practice Tips  

PubMed Central

Audience response systems (ARS) or clickers, as they are commonly called, offer a management tool for engaging students in the large classroom. Basic elements of the technology are discussed. These systems have been used in a variety of fields and at all levels of education. Typical goals of ARS questions are discussed, as well as methods of compensating for the reduction in lecture time that typically results from their use. Examples of ARS use occur throughout the literature and often detail positive attitudes from both students and instructors, although exceptions do exist. When used in classes, ARS clickers typically have either a benign or positive effect on student performance on exams, depending on the method and extent of their use, and create a more positive and active atmosphere in the large classroom. These systems are especially valuable as a means of introducing and monitoring peer learning methods in the large lecture classroom. So that the reader may use clickers effectively in his or her own classroom, a set of guidelines for writing good questions and a list of best-practice tips have been culled from the literature and experienced users. PMID:17339389

2007-01-01

17

Classroom Climate in Regular Primary School Settings with Children with Special Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the classroom climate in two settings of the 6th-grade class (a setting of children with special needs and a setting without children with special needs), focusing on aspects of satisfaction and cohesiveness on one side and friction, competitiveness and difficulties on the other. The study results indicate the existence of…

Schmidt, Majda; Cagran, Branka

2006-01-01

18

Activity Settings and Daily Routines in Preschool Classrooms: Diverse Experiences in Early Learning Settings for Low-Income Children  

PubMed Central

This paper examines activity settings and daily classroom routines experienced by 3- and 4-year-old low-income children in public center-based preschool programs, private center-based programs, and family child care homes. Two daily routine profiles were identified using a time-sampling coding procedure: a High Free-Choice pattern in which children spent a majority of their day engaged in child-directed free-choice activity settings combined with relatively low amounts of teacher-directed activity, and a Structured-Balanced pattern in which children spent relatively equal proportions of their day engaged in child-directed free-choice activity settings and teacher-directed small- and whole-group activities. Daily routine profiles were associated with program type and curriculum use but not with measures of process quality. Children in Structured-Balanced classrooms had more opportunities to engage in language and literacy and math activities, whereas children in High Free-Choice classrooms had more opportunities for gross motor and fantasy play. Being in a Structured-Balanced classroom was associated with children’s language scores but profiles were not associated with measures of children’s math reasoning or socio-emotional behavior. Consideration of teachers’ structuring of daily routines represents a valuable way to understand nuances in the provision of learning experiences for young children in the context of current views about developmentally appropriate practice and school readiness. PMID:22665945

Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Howes, Carollee; Huang, Yiching; Hong, Sandra Soliday; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

2011-01-01

19

Compact, Convex, and Symmetric Sets Are Discs. Classroom Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Define the centre of a parallelogram to be the intersection of its diagonals. It was shown in an earlier paper that the intersection of arbitrarily many parallelograms with the same centre is the unit disc about that centre in a metric defined using ideas from Linear Algebra. In this note, it is shown that this characterizes compact, convex sets,…

Lynch, Mark

2004-01-01

20

Preschoolers' Play Behaviors With Peers in Classroom and Playground Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between different settings for young children's play behaviors with peers. Forty-one children from 2 to 5 years of age (twenty-one 2- and 3-year-olds and twenty 4- and 5-year-olds) enrolled in three child care programs participated in this study. The children were videotaped for five minutes each on four different days,

Sook-Young Shim; Joan E. Herwig; Mack Shelley

2001-01-01

21

Knowledge Discovery in Large Data Sets  

SciTech Connect

In this work we briefly address the problem of unsupervised classification on large datasets, magnitude around 100,000,000 objects. The objects are variable objects, which are around 10% of the 1,000,000,000 astronomical objects that will be collected by GAIA/ESA mission. We tested unsupervised classification algorithms on known datasets such as OGLE and Hipparcos catalogs. Moreover, we are building several templates to represent the main classes of variable objects as well as new classes to build a synthetic dataset of this dimension. In the future we will run the GAIA satellite scanning law on these templates to obtain a testable large dataset.

Simas, Tiago; Silva, Gabriel; Miranda, Bruno; Ribeiro, Rita [Uninova/CA3, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal); Moitinho, Andre [SIM, Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal)

2008-12-05

22

The Relationship Between Interpersonal Relations Orientations and Preferred Classroom Physical Settings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reports relationships found between FIRO-B (Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation) scores and preference for classroom spatial settings. It was hypothesized that differences in interpersonal needs would be reflected in preferences for particular physical environments in which to teach. The sample consisted of 276 graduates and…

Feitler, Fred C.; And Others

23

Performance in an Online Introductory Course in a Hybrid Classroom Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared the academic achievement between undergraduate students taking an introductory managerial accounting course online (N = 104) and students who took the same course in a hybrid classroom setting (N = 203). Student achievement was measured using scores from twelve weekly online assignments, two major online assignments, a final…

Aly, Ibrahim

2013-01-01

24

Mobile-IT Education (MIT.EDU): M-Learning Applications for Classroom Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, we describe the Mobile-IT Education (MIT.EDU) system, which demonstrates the potential of using a distributed mobile device architecture for rapid prototyping of wireless mobile multi-user applications for use in classroom settings. MIT.EDU is a stable, accessible system that combines inexpensive, commodity hardware, a flexible…

Sung, M.; Gips, J.; Eagle, N.; Madan, A.; Caneel, R.; DeVaul, R.; Bonsen, J.; Pentland, A.

2005-01-01

25

A Collaborative Model for Developing Classroom Management Skills in Urban Professional Development School Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a school-university partnership that focuses on the development of classroom management skills for preservice teachers in an urban setting, through collaboration between mentors, principals, and a university supervisor. To prepare preservice teachers for the unique challenges of urban schools, three key elements were…

Dobler, Elizabeth; Kesner, Cathy; Kramer, Rebecca; Resnik, Marilyn; Devin, Libby

2009-01-01

26

Use of big-screen films in multiple childbirth education classroom settings.  

PubMed

Although two recent films, Orgasmic Birth and Pregnant in America, were intended for the big screen, they can also serve as valuable teaching resources in multiple childbirth education settings. Each film conveys powerful messages about birth and today's birthing culture. Depending on a childbirth educator's classroom setting (hospital, birthing center, or home birth environment), particular portions in each film, along with extra clips featured on the films' DVDs, can enhance an educator's curriculum and spark compelling discussions with class participants. PMID:21358831

Kaufman, Tamara

2010-01-01

27

[The BASYS observation system for the analysis of aggressive behavior in classroom-settings].  

PubMed

Educational or therapeutic measures of aggressive student behavior are often based on the judgments of teachers. However, empirical studies show that the objectivity of these judgments is generally low. In order to assess aggressive behavior in classroom settings, we developed a context-sensitive observational system. The observation system exists in a version for teachers in action as well as a version for the uninvolved observer. The teacher version allows categorizing aggressive behavior while teaching. The aim is to differentiate the perception and the judgments of teachers, so that the judgments can serve as trustable diagnostic information. The version for an independent observer, in addition, contains categories to collect information about the context in which aggressions take place. The behavior observation system was tested in four field-studies in regular and special classes. The empirical results show that, after training, teachers were able to make objective observations, and that aggressive behavior depends to a large extent on situational factors. The system allows identification of problematic people-environment relationships and the derivation of intervention measures. PMID:22748725

Wettstein, Alexander

2012-01-01

28

Generalizability and decision studies to inform observational and experimental research in classroom settings.  

PubMed

Attaining reliable estimates of observational measures can be challenging in school and classroom settings, as behavior can be influenced by multiple contextual factors. Generalizability (G) studies can enable researchers to estimate the reliability of observational data, and decision (D) studies can inform how many observation sessions are necessary to achieve a criterion level of reliability. We conducted G and D studies using observational data from a randomized control trial focusing on social and academic participation of students with severe disabilities in inclusive secondary classrooms. Results highlight the importance of anchoring observational decisions to reliability estimates from existing or pilot data sets. We outline steps for conducting G and D studies and address options when reliability estimates are lower than desired. PMID:25354126

Bottema-Beutel, Kristen; Lloyd, Blair; Carter, Erik W; Asmus, Jennifer M

2014-11-01

29

Mobile-IT Education (MIT. EDU): m-learning applications for classroom settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we describe the Mobile-IT Education (MIT.EDU) system, which demonstrates the potential of using a distributed mobile device architecture for rapid prototyping of wireless mobile multi-user applications for use in classroom settings. MIT.EDU is a stable, accessible system that combines inexpensive, commodity hardware, a flexible sensor\\/ peripheral interconnection bus, and a powerful, light-weight distributed sensing, classifica- tion, and

M. Sung; Jonathan Gips; Nathan Eagle; Anmol Madan; Ron Caneel; Richard W. DeVaul; J. Bonsen; Alex Pentland

2005-01-01

30

An investigation into the factors that encourage learner participation in a large group medical classroom  

PubMed Central

Background Effective lectures often incorporate activities that encourage learner participation. A challenge for educators is how to facilitate this in the large group lecture setting. This study investigates the individual student characteristics involved in encouraging (or dissuading) learners to interact, ask questions, and make comments in class. Methods Students enrolled in a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program at Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, St Kitts, were invited to complete a questionnaire canvassing their participation in the large group classroom. Data from the questionnaire were analyzed using Excel (Microsoft, Redmond, WA, USA) and the R software environment (http://www.r-project.org/). Results One hundred and ninety-two students completed the questionnaire (response rate, 85.7%). The results showed statistically significant differences between male and female students when asked to self-report their level of participation (P=0.011) and their confidence to participate (P<0.001) in class. No statistically significant difference was identified between different age groups of students (P=0.594). Student responses reflected that an “aversion to public speaking” acted as the main deterrent to participating during a lecture. Female participants were 3.56 times more likely to report a fear of public speaking than male participants (odds ratio 3.56, 95% confidence interval 1.28–12.33, P=0.01). Students also reported “smaller sizes of class and small group activities” and “other students participating” as factors that made it easier for them to participate during a lecture. Conclusion In this study, sex likely played a role in learner participation in the large group veterinary classroom. Male students were more likely to participate in class and reported feeling more confident to participate than female students. Female students in this study commonly identified aversion to public speaking as a factor which held them back from participating in the large group lecture setting. These are important findings for veterinary and medical educators aiming to improve learner participation in the classroom. Potential ways of addressing this challenge include addition of small group activities and audience response systems during lectures, and inclusion of training interventions in public speaking at an early stage of veterinary and medical curricula. PMID:24648783

Moffett, Jennifer; Berezowski, John; Spencer, Dustine; Lanning, Shari

2014-01-01

31

Ready, Set, SCIENCE!: Putting Research to Work in K-8 Science Classrooms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What types of instructional experiences help K-8 students learn science with understanding? What do science educators teachers, teacher leaders, science specialists, professional development staff, curriculum designers, school administrators need to know to create and support such experiences? Ready, Set, Science! guides the way with an account of the groundbreaking and comprehensive synthesis of research into teaching and learning science in kindergarten through eighth grade. Based on the recently released National Research Council report Taking Science to School: Learning and Teaching Science in Grades K-8, this book summarizes a rich body of findings from the learning sciences and builds detailed cases of science educators at work to make the implications of research clear, accessible, and stimulating for a broad range of science educators. Ready, Set, Science! is filled with classroom case studies that bring to life the research findings and help readers to replicate success. Most of these stories are based on real classroom experiences that illustrate the complexities that teachers grapple with every day. They show how teachers work to select and design rigorous and engaging instructional tasks, manage classrooms, orchestrate productive discussions with culturally and linguistically diverse groups of students, and help students make their thinking visible using a variety of representational tools. This book is the winner of the Association of Educational Publishers 2008 Distinguished Achievement Award and is an essential resource for science education practitioners and contains information that will be extremely useful to everyone including parents directly or indirectly involved in the teaching of science.

Michaels, Sarah; Shouse, Andrew W.; Schweingruber, Heidi A.

2007-01-01

32

Recognition for Large Sets of Handwritten Mathematical Symbols  

Microsoft Academic Search

Natural and convenient mathematical handwriting recogni- tion requires recognizers for large sets of handwritten sym- bols. This paper presents a recognition system for such handwritten mathematical symbols. We use a pre-classification strategy, in combination with elastic matching, to improve recognition speed. Elastic matching is a model-based method that involves computation proportional to the set of candi- date models. To solve

Stephen M. Watt; Xiaofang Xie

2005-01-01

33

Using Large Shared Displays to Create a Collaborative Classroom Learning Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our goal in this work is to create a more collaborative learning environment in the classroom, by designing and implementing a system infrastructure to support easy use and management of a large shared (tiled) display. Through this shared display space, instructor and student interaction is facilitated. This large display space provides the primary means of presentation of lecture material, allowing

Patrick E. Mantey; Jeremy Richards

34

Science Teacher Beliefs and Classroom Practice Related to Constructivism in Different School Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Science teacher beliefs and classroom practice related to constructivism and factors that may influence classroom practice were examined in this cross-case study. Data from four science teachers in two schools included interviews, demographic questionnaire, Classroom Learning Environment Survey (preferred/perceived), and classroom observations and…

Savasci, Funda; Berlin, Donna F.

2012-01-01

35

Large Classroom Experience with an Interactive Tiled Display Mural  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents work on an advanced multimedia lecture hall exploiting large tiled displays and student laptops, the software supporting their combined use, and the initial validation of this environment in enhancing learning and student-instructor interaction. Large resolution tiled displays allow multiple students with laptops or tablet PC's to present their work and collaborate with the instructor and other students

Jeremy Richards; Patrick E. Mantey

2006-01-01

36

Comparing Outcomes from Field and Classroom Based Settings for Undergraduate Geoscience Courses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field based learning can be found in nearly every course offered in Geology at Brigham Young University. For example, in our Structural Geology course field studies substitute for labs. Students collect data their own data from several different structural settings of the Wasatch Range. Our curriculum also includes a two-week, sophomore-level field course that introduces students to interpreting field relations themselves and sets the stage for much of what they learn in their upper-division courses. Our senior-level six-week field geology course includes classical field mapping with exercises in petroleum and mineral exploration, environmental geology and geological hazards. Experiments with substituting field-based general education courses for those in traditional classroom settings indicate that student cognition, course enjoyment and recruiting of majors significantly increase in a field-based course. We offer a field-based introductory geology course (Geo 102) that is taught in seven, six-hour field trips during which students travel to localities of geologic interest to investigate a variety of fundamental geological problems. We compare the outcomes of Geo 102 with a traditional classroom-based geology course (Geo 101). For the comparison both courses are taught by the same instructor, use the same text and supplementary materials and take the same exams. The results of 7 years of reporting indicate that test scores and final grades are one-half grade point higher for Geo 102 students versus those in traditional introductory courses. Student evaluations of the course are also 0.8-1.4 points higher on a scale of 1-8, and are consistently the highest in the Department and College. Other observations include increased attendance, attention and curiosity. The later two are measured by the number of students asking questions of other students as well as the instructors, and the total number of questions asked during class time in the field versus the classroom. Normal classroom involvement includes two or three students asking nearly all of the questions, while in Geo 102 it is closer to half the class, and not the same students each time. Not only do more individuals participate in asking questions in Geo 102, but each participant asks more questions as well. Questions asked in class are generally specific to the discussion, while field questions are commonly multidisciplinary in nature. Field-based courses also encourage more students to collaborate with each other and to integrate shared observations due to the many different aspects of the geosciences present at each site. One of the most important pay-offs is the 50% increase in the number of students changing their major to geology in the field-based versus classroom-based courses. Field-based learning increases the depth of student understanding of the subjects they investigate as well as student involvement and enthusiasm in the class. The tradeoff we make for realizing significant individual and group discovery in the field is that more responsibility is placed on the student to understand the broad based geologic concepts found in the text. The field based approach allows the students to immediately apply their learning in real world applications.

Skinner, M. R.; Harris, R. A.; Flores, J.

2011-12-01

37

The Design and Synthesis of a Large Interactive Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of group learning techniques in large classes has been used to effectively convey the central concepts of SN1 and SN2 reactions in an introductory organic chemistry class. The activities described are best used as an introduction to these mechanisms. The class begins with the instructor relaying the key points of the reaction pathways. Following this synopsis, the class

Laurel L. Clouston; Mark H. Kleinman

1999-01-01

38

Implementing Concept-Based Learning in a Large Undergraduate Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experiment explicitly introducing learning strategies to a large, first-year undergraduate cell biology course was undertaken to see whether awareness and use of strategies had a measurable impact on student performance. The construction of concept maps was selected as the strategy to be introduced because of an inherent coherence with a course…

Morse, David; Jutras, France

2008-01-01

39

Gaussian predictive process models for large spatial data sets.  

PubMed

With scientific data available at geocoded locations, investigators are increasingly turning to spatial process models for carrying out statistical inference. Over the last decade, hierarchical models implemented through Markov chain Monte Carlo methods have become especially popular for spatial modelling, given their flexibility and power to fit models that would be infeasible with classical methods as well as their avoidance of possibly inappropriate asymptotics. However, fitting hierarchical spatial models often involves expensive matrix decompositions whose computational complexity increases in cubic order with the number of spatial locations, rendering such models infeasible for large spatial data sets. This computational burden is exacerbated in multivariate settings with several spatially dependent response variables. It is also aggravated when data are collected at frequent time points and spatiotemporal process models are used. With regard to this challenge, our contribution is to work with what we call predictive process models for spatial and spatiotemporal data. Every spatial (or spatiotemporal) process induces a predictive process model (in fact, arbitrarily many of them). The latter models project process realizations of the former to a lower dimensional subspace, thereby reducing the computational burden. Hence, we achieve the flexibility to accommodate non-stationary, non-Gaussian, possibly multivariate, possibly spatiotemporal processes in the context of large data sets. We discuss attractive theoretical properties of these predictive processes. We also provide a computational template encompassing these diverse settings. Finally, we illustrate the approach with simulated and real data sets. PMID:19750209

Banerjee, Sudipto; Gelfand, Alan E; Finley, Andrew O; Sang, Huiyan

2008-09-01

40

Ready, Set, Science! Putting Research To Work In K-8 Classrooms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

What types of instructional experiences help students learn and understand science? What do professional development providers and curriculum designers need to know to create and support such experiences? Ready, Set, Science! is a book that provides a practical and accessible account of current research about teaching and learning science. Based on the groundbreaking National Research Council report "Taking Science to School: Learning and Teaching Science in Grades K-8” (2006), the book reviews principles derived from the latest educational research and applies them to effective teaching practice. Ready, Set, Science! is a MUST READ for everyone involved in K-12 education, or creating products intended for K-12 use. We will review Ready, Set, Science!'s new vision of science in education, its most important recommendations, and its implications for the place of astronomy in K-12 classrooms. We will review some useful suggestions on how to make student thinking visible and report on how we have put this into practice with teachers. We will engage the audience in a brief interactive demonstration of specific questioning techniques described in the book that help to make student thinking visible.

van der Veen, Wil E.; Moody, T.

2008-05-01

41

The Design and Synthesis of a Large Interactive Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of group learning techniques in large classes has been used to effectively convey the central concepts of SN1 and SN2 reactions in an introductory organic chemistry class. The activities described are best used as an introduction to these mechanisms. The class begins with the instructor relaying the key points of the reaction pathways. Following this synopsis, the class is divided through the use of assignment sheets that are distributed to the students upon arrival. The use of markers and poster boards, model kits, and role playing help to explain the intricacies of the mechanisms to learners, thereby accommodating a variety of different learning styles. After a guided discussion, each group presents their results to another collection of students who used a different learning technique to understand the alternate reaction. In this manner, each student encounters two learning styles and benefits from the repetitious nature of the exercise. After the groups break up into even smaller groups, higher-order questions are posed for further discussion. The class is terminated by the presentation of a summary slide that contains all the important facts covered during the lecture.

Clouston, Laurel L.; Kleinman, Mark H.

1999-01-01

42

Implementing Concept-based Learning in a Large Undergraduate Classroom  

PubMed Central

An experiment explicitly introducing learning strategies to a large, first-year undergraduate cell biology course was undertaken to see whether awareness and use of strategies had a measurable impact on student performance. The construction of concept maps was selected as the strategy to be introduced because of an inherent coherence with a course structured by concepts. Data were collected over three different semesters of an introductory cell biology course, all teaching similar course material with the same professor and all evaluated using similar examinations. The first group, used as a control, did not construct concept maps, the second group constructed individual concept maps, and the third group first constructed individual maps then validated their maps in small teams to provide peer feedback about the individual maps. Assessment of the experiment involved student performance on the final exam, anonymous polls of student perceptions, failure rate, and retention of information at the start of the following year. The main conclusion drawn is that concept maps without feedback have no significant effect on student performance, whereas concept maps with feedback produced a measurable increase in student problem-solving performance and a decrease in failure rates. PMID:18519616

Jutras, France

2008-01-01

43

Science Teacher Beliefs and Classroom Practice Related to Constructivism in Different School Settings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Science teacher beliefs and classroom practice related to constructivism and factors that may influence classroom practice were examined in this cross-case study. Data from four science teachers in two schools included interviews, demographic questionnaire, Classroom Learning Environment Survey (preferred/perceived), and classroom observations and documents. Using an inductive analytic approach, results suggested that the teachers embraced constructivism, but classroom observations did not confirm implementation of these beliefs for three of the four teachers. The most preferred constructivist components were personal relevance and student negotiation; the most perceived component was critical voice. Shared control was the least preferred, least perceived, and least observed constructivist component. School type, grade, student behavior/ability, curriculum/standardized testing, and parental involvement may influence classroom practice.

Savasci, Funda; Berlin, Donna F.

2012-02-01

44

STEME: A Robust, Accurate Motif Finder for Large Data Sets  

PubMed Central

Motif finding is a difficult problem that has been studied for over 20 years. Some older popular motif finders are not suitable for analysis of the large data sets generated by next-generation sequencing. We recently published an efficient approximation (STEME) to the EM algorithm that is at the core of many motif finders such as MEME. This approximation allows the EM algorithm to be applied to large data sets. In this work we describe several efficient extensions to STEME that are based on the MEME algorithm. Together with the original STEME EM approximation, these extensions make STEME a fully-fledged motif finder with similar properties to MEME. We discuss the difficulty of objectively comparing motif finders. We show that STEME performs comparably to existing prominent discriminative motif finders, DREME and Trawler, on 13 sets of transcription factor binding data in mouse ES cells. We demonstrate the ability of STEME to find long degenerate motifs which these discriminative motif finders do not find. As part of our method, we extend an earlier method due to Nagarajan et al. for the efficient calculation of motif E-values. STEME's source code is available under an open source license and STEME is available via a web interface. PMID:24625410

Reid, John E.; Wernisch, Lorenz

2014-01-01

45

Teacher Beliefs about the Cognitive Diagnostic Information of Classroom- versus Large-Scale Tests: Implications for Assessment Literacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom teachers are in the front line of introducing students to formal learning, including assessments, which can be assumed to continue for students should they extend their schooling past the expected mandatory 12 years. The purpose of the present investigation was to survey secondary teachers' beliefs of classroom and large-scale tests for…

Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Gokiert, Rebecca J.; Cor, M. Ken; Heffernan, Colleen

2010-01-01

46

An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Electronic Classroom Communication Systems in Large Lecture Classes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Since 2002 we have been investigating the use of an electronic classroom communication system in large first year lecture classes. Handheld keypads were distributed to teams of students during a lecture class. Students used the keypads to answer two step multiple choice problems after a discussion within their group. The questions were generated using students answers from previous exams. We have evaluated our use of the classroom communication system using a survey about how comfortable students are with this type of interaction. In addition, we have tried to determine if the use of the classroom communication system can be linked to student performance on exams. Our results show that students are comfortable with this technology and feel that, on the whole, interactive lectures are useful. At a first glance, there is an improvement in students' exam performance, but there are too many competing factors to clearly say that this improvement is solely due to the use of the classroom communication system. Even though this paper is based in physics and a physics example is used to illustrate points, the technique can be applied to other discipline areas.

2010-06-29

47

Robust Coordination for Large Sets of Simple Rovers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ability to coordinate sets of rovers in an unknown environment is critical to the long-term success of many of NASA;s exploration missions. Such coordination policies must have the ability to adapt in unmodeled or partially modeled domains and must be robust against environmental noise and rover failures. In addition such coordination policies must accommodate a large number of rovers, without excessive and burdensome hand-tuning. In this paper we present a distributed coordination method that addresses these issues in the domain of controlling a set of simple rovers. The application of these methods allows reliable and efficient robotic exploration in dangerous, dynamic, and previously unexplored domains. Most control policies for space missions are directly programmed by engineers or created through the use of planning tools, and are appropriate for single rover missions or missions requiring the coordination of a small number of rovers. Such methods typically require significant amounts of domain knowledge, and are difficult to scale to large numbers of rovers. The method described in this article aims to address cases where a large number of rovers need to coordinate to solve a complex time dependent problem in a noisy environment. In this approach, each rover decomposes a global utility, representing the overall goal of the system, into rover-specific utilities that properly assign credit to the rover s actions. Each rover then has the responsibility to create a control policy that maximizes its own rover-specific utility. We show a method of creating rover-utilities that are "aligned" with the global utility, such that when the rovers maximize their own utility, they also maximize the global utility. In addition we show that our method creates rover-utilities that allow the rovers to create their control policies quickly and reliably. Our distributed learning method allows large sets rovers be used unmodeled domains, while providing robustness against rover failures and changing environments. In experimental simulations we show that our method scales well with large numbers of rovers in addition to being robust against noisy sensor inputs and noisy servo control. The results show that our method is able to scale to large numbers of rovers and achieves up to 400% performance improvement over standard machine learning methods.

Tumer, Kagan; Agogino, Adrian

2006-01-01

48

Examining Play among Young Children in Single-Age and Multi-Age Preschool Classroom Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advocates for multi-age classrooms claim multi-age groupings benefit children (Brynes, Shuster, & Jones, 1994). Currently, there is a lack of research examining play among students in multi-age classrooms. If indeed there is a positive benefit of play among children, research is needed to examine these behaviors among and between young children in…

Youhne, Mia Song

2009-01-01

49

Who's Doing the Pointing? Investigating Facilitated Communication in a Classroom Setting with Students with Autism  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first author, a certified speech-language pathologist (SLP), served as the facilitator for two students with autism to assess pointing control during facilitated communication. The teacher instructed the students during typical classroom activities, and two classroom assistants collected data. We used a counterbalanced alternating treatments design with the SLP\\/facilitator being either blind or sighted. She wore sunglasses throughout the investigation

Rosemary G. Kerrin; Jane Y. Murdock; William R. Sharpton; Nichelle Jones

1998-01-01

50

The Interests of Full Disclosure: Agenda-Setting and the Practical Initiation of the Feminist Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several theoretical and pragmatic questions arise when one attempts to employ feminist pedagogy in the classroom (or to study it), such as how to strike a balance between classroom order and instructor de-centering and how to productively address student resistance. In this article, the author describes how she took on her final project for a…

Seymour, Nicole

2007-01-01

51

Support vector machine classifiers for large data sets.  

SciTech Connect

This report concerns the generation of support vector machine classifiers for solving the pattern recognition problem in machine learning. Several methods are proposed based on interior point methods for convex quadratic programming. Software implementations are developed by adapting the object-oriented packaging OOQP to the problem structure and by using the software package PETSc to perform time-intensive computations in a distributed setting. Linear systems arising from classification problems with moderately large numbers of features are solved by using two techniques--one a parallel direct solver, the other a Krylov-subspace method incorporating novel preconditioning strategies. Numerical results are provided, and computational experience is discussed.

Gertz, E. M.; Griffin, J. D.

2006-01-31

52

JHelioviewer - Visualizing large sets of solar images using JPEG 2000  

E-print Network

Across all disciplines that work with image data - from astrophysics to medical research and historic preservation - there is a growing need for efficient ways to browse and inspect large sets of high-resolution images. We present the development of a visualization software for solar physics data based on the JPEG 2000 image compression standard. Our implementation consists of the JHelioviewer client application that enables users to browse petabyte-scale image archives and the JHelioviewer server, which integrates a JPIP server, metadata catalog and an event server. JPEG 2000 offers many useful new features and has the potential to revolutionize the way high-resolution image data are disseminated and analyzed. This is especially relevant for solar physics, a research field in which upcoming space missions will provide more than a terabyte of image data per day. Providing efficient access to such large data volumes at both high spatial and high time resolution is of paramount importance to support scientific ...

Mueller, Daniel; Caplins, Benjamin; Ortiz, Juan Pablo Garcia; Wamsler, Benjamin; Hughitt, Keith; Alexanderian, Alen; Ireland, Jack; Amadigwe, Desmond; Fleck, Bernhard

2009-01-01

53

A Comparative Analysis of Learning Experience in a Traditional vs. Virtual Classroom Setting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the impact of a computer-mediated versus traditional classroom on students' learning, performance, and interactivity in a graduate finance class. Questionnaire responses revealed no significant differences between groups in terms of learning experience or satisfaction. (EV)

Ashkeboussi, Rahim

2001-01-01

54

Design Experiments: Theoretical and Methodological Challenges in Creating Complex Interventions in Classroom Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ann L. Brown University of California—Berkeley The lion's share of my current research program is devoted to the study of learning in the blooming, buzzing confusion of inner-city classrooms. My high-level goal is to transform grade-school classrooms from work sites where students perform assigned tasks under the management of teachers into communities of learning (Bereiter & Scardamalia, 1989; Brown &

L. Brown

1992-01-01

55

Visualizing large data sets in the earth sciences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The authors describe the capabilities of McIDAS, an interactive visualization system that is vastly increasing the ability of earth scientists to manage and analyze data from remote sensing instruments and numerical simulation models. McIDAS provides animated three-dimensionsal images and highly interactive displays. The software can manage, analyze, and visualize large data sets that span many physical variables (such as temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind speed), as well as time and three spatial dimensions. The McIDAS system manages data from at least 100 different sources. The data management tools consist of data structures for storing different data types in files, libraries of routines for accessing these data structures, system commands for performing housekeeping functions on the data files, and reformatting programs for converting external data to the system's data structures. The McIDAS tools for three-dimensional visualization of meteorological data run on an IBM mainframe and can load up to 128-frame animation sequences into the workstations. A highly interactive version of the system can provide an interactive window into data sets containing tens of millions of points produced by numerical models and remote sensing instruments. The visualizations are being used for teaching as well as by scientists.

Hibbard, William; Santek, David

1989-01-01

56

An effective filter for IBD detection in large data sets.  

PubMed

Identity by descent (IBD) inference is the task of computationally detecting genomic segments that are shared between individuals by means of common familial descent. Accurate IBD detection plays an important role in various genomic studies, ranging from mapping disease genes to exploring ancient population histories. The majority of recent work in the field has focused on improving the accuracy of inference, targeting shorter genomic segments that originate from a more ancient common ancestor. The accuracy of these methods, however, is achieved at the expense of high computational cost, resulting in a prohibitively long running time when applied to large cohorts. To enable the study of large cohorts, we introduce SpeeDB, a method that facilitates fast IBD detection in large unphased genotype data sets. Given a target individual and a database of individuals that potentially share IBD segments with the target, SpeeDB applies an efficient opposite-homozygous filter, which excludes chromosomal segments from the database that are highly unlikely to be IBD with the corresponding segments from the target individual. The remaining segments can then be evaluated by any IBD detection method of choice. When examining simulated individuals sharing 4 cM IBD regions, SpeeDB filtered out 99.5% of genomic regions from consideration while retaining 99% of the true IBD segments. Applying the SpeeDB filter prior to detecting IBD in simulated fourth cousins resulted in an overall running time that was 10,000x faster than inferring IBD without the filter and retained 99% of the true IBD segments in the output. PMID:24667521

Huang, Lin; Bercovici, Sivan; Rodriguez, Jesse M; Batzoglou, Serafim

2014-01-01

57

Evaluation of Supermarket Tour Vs. Traditional Classroom Setting for Delivering Nutrition Education to Family Day Care Providers  

Microsoft Academic Search

A pre- and post-test was used to asses knowledge, attitudes and behavior of 40 family day care providers enrolled in a nutrition education program delivered either as a supermarket tour (N=20) or in a classroom setting (N=20). 9 knowledge questions covered label reading, unit cost, lean meat selection, saving money and protein\\/calcium content of cheese. 7 attitude questions examined taste

D. J. Marano; C. K. Manning

1999-01-01

58

The Single and Combined Effects of Multiple Intensities of Behavior Modification and Methylphenidate for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in a Classroom Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Currently behavior modification, stimulant medication, and combined treatments are supported as evidence-based interventions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in classroom settings. However, there has been little study of the relative effects of these two modalities and their combination in classrooms. Using a within-subject design, the…

Fabiano, Gregory A.; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Burrows-MacLean, Lisa; Coles, Erika K.; Chacko, Anil; Wymbs, Brian T.; Walker, Kathryn S.; Arnold, Fran; Garefino, Allison; Keenan, Jenna K.; Onyango, Adia N.; Hoffman, Martin T.; Massetti, Greta M.; Robb, Jessica A.

2007-01-01

59

Students’ Management of Goals in the Natural Classroom Setting: Methodological Implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

The conceptualization of goals as projects of person-environment relationships emphasizes the mutual influences of individuals and situations. This interactionistic view leads to a focus goal research on current behavior in proximal contexts. Moreover, within the real classroom context, as students encounter situations implying new demands and new opportunities, diverse and multiple goals are potentially elicited. Exploring these assumptions, the present

Marina Serra de Lemos; Teresa Gonçalves

2004-01-01

60

Classroom Management Strategies for Young Children with Challenging Behavior within Early Childhood Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many preschool, Head Start, and kindergarten educators of young children express concern about the number of children who exhibit frequent challenging behaviors and report that managing these behaviors is difficult within these classrooms. This article describes research-based strategies with practical applications that can be used as part of…

Jolivette, Kristine; Steed, Elizabeth A.

2010-01-01

61

By What Token Economy? A Classroom Learning Tool for Inclusive Settings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a token economy that used tokens styled as license plates to elicit appropriate behavior in an inclusive fifth-grade class in which four students with behavior disorders were enrolled. Student involvement in establishing the "driving rules" of the classroom is explained, the components of a token economy are outlined, and steps for group…

Anderson, Carol; Katsiyannis, Antonis

1997-01-01

62

Sizable Sharks Swim Swiftly: Learning Correlations through Inference in a Classroom Setting  

E-print Network

Sakamoto (yasu@psy.utexas.edu) Bradley C. Love (love@psy.utexas.edu) Department of Psychology on classification learning has advanced the development of theories that predict how people classify stimulus items and inference learning are extended to fifth-grade children with class re- lated materials. Many classroom

Love, Bradley C.

63

Perceiving Classroom Aggression: The Influence of Setting, Intervention Style and Group Perceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Violence and aggression in the classroom are often cited as a major concern within the teaching community. Teachers' perceptions of the appropriateness of intervention behaviours during aggressive incidents, however, are less often examined (Meyer, Astor, & Behre, 2002), nor how they compare to the perceptions of training teachers…

Lawrence, Claire; Green, Karen

2005-01-01

64

Social and Emotional Processes in the Classroom Setting: A Goal Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goals can be defined as cognitive- and as value-related motivational constructs. Consequently, both goal elaboration and personal valuing of goals are emphasized as critical determinants of motivated action. From this perspective, it is argued that goals play an influential role in students' cognitions, and in their social and emotional processes. I explore students' strategies for dealing with potentially stressful classroom

Marina S. Lemos

2002-01-01

65

STABLE INTERSECTIONS OF REGULAR CANTOR SETS WITH LARGE HAUSDORFF DIMENSIONS  

E-print Network

the concept of thickness of a regular Cantor set. This allowed him to exhibit examples of pairs of Cantor sets are [S], [BPV], [BPMV], [L], [MO] and [PY]. An earlier and totally independent development had taken place in number theory. In 1947, M. Hall ([H]) proved that any real number can be written as the sum

Moreira, Carlos Gustavo

66

Managing Large Data Sets Using Support Vector Machines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hundreds of Terabytes of CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) data are being accumulated for storage day by day at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, which is one of the eight US CMS Tier-2 sites. Managing this data includes retaining useful CMS data sets and clearing storage space for newly arriving data by deleting less useful data sets. This is an important task

Ranjini Srinivas

2010-01-01

67

A Social StoriesTm Intervention Package for Students with Autism in Inclusive Classroom Settings  

PubMed Central

A Social StoriesTM intervention package was used to teach 2 students with autism to read Social Stories, answer comprehension questions, and engage in role plays. Appropriate social behaviors increased and inappropriate behaviors decreased for both participants, and the effects were maintained for up to 10 months. This intervention package appears to be useful in inclusive classroom environments and does not require intensive supervision of the child's behavior. PMID:18816978

Chan, Jeffrey M; O'Reilly, Mark F

2008-01-01

68

DSI: A Method for Indexing Large Graphs Using Distance Set  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Recent years we have witnessed a great increase in modeling data as large graphs in multiple domains, such as XML, the semantic\\u000a web, social network. In these circumstances, researchers are interested in querying the large graph like that: Given a large\\u000a graph G, and a query Q, we report all the matches of Q in G. Since subgraph isomorphism checking

Yubo Kou; Yukun Li; Xiaofeng Meng

2010-01-01

69

Fast distributed dominating set based routing in large scale MANETs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hierarchical routing techniques have long been known to increase network scalability by constructing a virtual backbone. Even though MANETs have no physical backbone, a virtual backbone can be constructed by finding a connected dominating set (CDS) in the network graph. Many centralized as well as distributed algorithms have been designed to find a CDS in a graph (network). Theo- retically,

Wassim El-Hajj; Zouheir Trabelsi; Dionysios Kountanis

2007-01-01

70

Computational derivation of structural alerts from large toxicology data sets.  

PubMed

Structural alerts have been one of the backbones of computational toxicology and have applications in many areas including cosmetic, environmental, and pharmaceutical toxicology. The development of structural alerts has always involved a manual analysis of existing data related to a relevant end point followed by the determination of substructures that appear to be related to a specific outcome. The substructures are then analyzed for their utility in posterior validation studies, which at times have stretched over years or even decades. With higher throughput methods now being employed in many areas of toxicology, data sets are growing at an unprecedented rate. This growth has made manual analysis of data sets impractical in many cases. This report outlines a fully automatic method that highlights significant substructures for toxicologically important data sets. The method identifies important substructures by computationally breaking chemical structures into fragments and analyzing those fragments for their contribution to the given activity by the calculation of a p-value and a substructure accuracy. The method is intended to aid the expert in locating and analyzing alerts by automatic retrieval of alerts or by enhancing existing alerts. The method has been applied to a data set of AMES mutagenicity results and compared to the substructures generated by manual curation of this same data set as well as another computationally based substructure identification method. The results show that this method can retrieve significant substructures quickly, that the substructures are comparable and in some cases superior to those derived from manual curation, that the substructures found covers all previously known substructures, and that they can be used to make reasonably accurate predictions of AMES activity. PMID:25275755

Ahlberg, Ernst; Carlsson, Lars; Boyer, Scott

2014-10-27

71

Engaging millennial learners: Effectiveness of personal response system technology with nursing students in small and large classrooms.  

PubMed

Nurse educators must explore innovative technologies that make the most of the characteristics and learning styles of millennial learners. These students are comfortable with technology and prefer interactive classrooms with individual feedback and peer collaboration. This study evaluated the perceived effectiveness of personal response system (PRS) technology in enhancing student learning in small and large classrooms. PRS technology was integrated into two undergraduate courses, nursing research (n = 33) and junior medical-surgical nursing (n = 116). Multiple-choice, true-false, NCLEX-RN alternate format, and reading quiz questions were incorporated within didactic PowerPoint presentations. Data analysis of Likert-type and open-response questions supported the use of PRS technology as an effective strategy for educating millennial learners in both small and large classrooms. PRS technology promotes active learning, increases participation, and provides students and faculty with immediate feedback that reflects comprehension of content and increases faculty-student interaction. PMID:20055325

Revell, Susan M Hunter; McCurry, Mary K

2010-05-01

72

Mining association rules between sets of items in large databases  

Microsoft Academic Search

We are given a large database of customer transactions.Each transaction consists of items purchased by a customer in a visit. We present an efficient algorithm that generates all significant association rules between items in the database.The algorithm incorporates buffer management and novel estimation and pruning techniques. We also present results of applying this algorithm to sales data obtained from a

Rakesh Agrawal; Tomasz Imieli?ski; Arun N. Swami

1993-01-01

73

Mobile-Phone-Based Classroom Response Systems: Students' Perceptions of Engagement and Learning in a Large Undergraduate Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a Classroom Response System (CRS) has been associated with positive educational outcomes, by fostering student engagement and by allowing immediate feedback to both students and instructors. This study examined a low-cost CRS (VotApedia) in a large first-year class, where students responded to questions using their mobile phones. This study…

Dunn, Peter K.; Richardson, Alice; Oprescu, Florin; McDonald, Christine

2013-01-01

74

Silent and Vocal Students in a Large Active Learning Chemistry Classroom: Comparison of Performance and Motivational Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Active learning is becoming more prevalent in large science classrooms, and this study shows the impact on performance of being vocal during Socratic questioning in a General Chemistry course. 800 college students over a two year period were given a pre and post-test using the Chemistry Concept Reasoning Test. The pre-test results showed that…

Obenland, Carrie A.; Munson, Ashlyn H.; Hutchinson, John S.

2013-01-01

75

Observing physical education teachers' need-supportive interactions in classroom settings.  

PubMed

According to self-determination theory, teachers can motivate students by supporting their psychological needs for relatedness, competence, and autonomy. The present study complements extant research (most of which relied on self-report measures) by relying on observations of need-supportive teaching in the domain of physical education (PE), which allows for the identification of concrete, real-life examples of how teacher need support manifests in the classroom. Seventy-four different PE lessons were coded for 5-min intervals to assess the occurrence of 21 need-supportive teaching behaviors. Factor analyses provided evidence for four interpretable factors, namely, relatedness support, autonomy support, and two components of structure (structure before and during the activity). Reasonable evidence was obtained for convergence between observed and student perceived need support. Yet, the low interrater reliability for two of the four scales indicates that these scales need further improvement. PMID:23404876

Haerens, Leen; Aelterman, Nathalie; Van den Berghe, Lynn; De Meyer, Jotie; Soenens, Bart; Vansteenkiste, Maarten

2013-02-01

76

Safety and science at sea: connecting science research settings to the classroom through live video  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many science teachers start the year off with classroom safety topics. Annual repetition helps with mastery of this important and basic knowledge, while helping schools to meet their legal obligations for safe lab science. Although these lessons are necessary, they are often topical, rarely authentic and relatively dull. Interesting connections can, however, be drawn between the importance of safety in science classrooms and the importance of safety in academic laboratories, fieldwork, shipboard research, and commercial research. Teachers can leverage these connections through live video interactions with scientists in the field, thereby creating an authentic learning environment. During the School of Rock 2009, a professional teacher research experience aboard the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's research vessel JOIDES Resolution, safety and nature-of-science curricula were created to help address this need. By experimenting with various topics and locations on the ship that were accessible and applicable to middle school learning, 43 highly visual "safety signs" and activities were identified and presented "live" by graduate students, teachers, scientists; the ship's mates, doctor and technical staff. Students were exposed to realistic science process skills along with safety content from the world's only riserless, deep-sea drilling research vessel. The once-in-a-lifetime experience caused the students' eyes to brighten behind their safety glasses, especially as they recognized the same eye wash station and safety gear they have to wear and attended a ship's fire and safety drill along side scientists in hard hats and personal floatation devices. This collaborative and replicable live vide approach will connect basic safety content and nature-of-science process skills for a memorable and authentic learning experience for students.

Cohen, E.; Peart, L. W.

2011-12-01

77

An Examination of the Applications of Constitutional Concepts as an Approach to Classroom Management: Four Studies of Judicious Discipline in Various Classroom Settings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a composite of four separate research studies conducted to assess the impact of constitutional language on classroom environments. The studies were designed to examine the uses of "Judicious Discipline" in a variety of classrooms and how the use of a common language based on rights and responsibilities affected the behavior of…

McEwan, Barbara; Gathercoal, Paul; Nimmo, Virginia

78

Processing large remote sensing image data sets on Beowulf clusters  

USGS Publications Warehouse

High-performance computing is often concerned with the speed at which floating- point calculations can be performed. The architectures of many parallel computers and/or their network topologies are based on these investigations. Often, benchmarks resulting from these investigations are compiled with little regard to how a large dataset would move about in these systems. This part of the Beowulf study addresses that concern by looking at specific applications software and system-level modifications. Applications include an implementation of a smoothing filter for time-series data, a parallel implementation of the decision tree algorithm used in the Landcover Characterization project, a parallel Kriging algorithm used to fit point data collected in the field on invasive species to a regular grid, and modifications to the Beowulf project's resampling algorithm to handle larger, higher resolution datasets at a national scale. Systems-level investigations include a feasibility study on Flat Neighborhood Networks and modifications of that concept with Parallel File Systems.

Steinwand, Daniel R.; Maddox, Brian; Beckmann, Tim; Schmidt, Gail

2003-01-01

79

Value-based customer grouping from large retail data sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we propose OPOSSUM, a novel similarity-based clustering algorithm using constrained, weighted graph- partitioning. Instead of binary presence or absence of products in a market-basket, we use an extended 'revenue per product' measure to better account for management objectives. Typically the number of clusters desired in a database marketing application is only in the teens or less. OPOSSUM proceeds top-down, which is more efficient and takes a small number of steps to attain the desired number of clusters as compared to bottom-up agglomerative clustering approaches. OPOSSUM delivers clusters that are balanced in terms of either customers (samples) or revenue (value). To facilitate data exploration and validation of results we introduce CLUSION, a visualization toolkit for high-dimensional clustering problems. To enable closed loop deployment of the algorithm, OPOSSUM has no user-specified parameters. Thresholding heuristics are avoided and the optimal number of clusters is automatically determined by a search for maximum performance. Results are presented on a real retail industry data-set of several thousand customers and products, to demonstrate the power of the proposed technique.

Strehl, Alexander; Ghosh, Joydeep

2000-04-01

80

Effective Extensive Reading outside the Classroom: A Large-Scale Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We report on a large-scale implementation of extensive reading (ER) in a university setting in Japan where all students were required to read outside class time as part of their course requirement. A pre/posttest comparison between the 2009 cohort of students who read outside of class and the 2008 cohort who did no outside reading shows that the…

Robb, Thomas; Kano, Makimi

2013-01-01

81

E-Classroom. Electronic Card Catalog, Real-Life Sets, and Estimating.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents standards-based activities that include learning about an electronic card catalog by playing card games; learning to count and to recognize numerical sets by identifying real-life sets (e.g., items in the building or on the playground); and learning about estimation and spatial sense using students and a digital camera. (SM)

Cavanaugh, Betty; McArdle, Donna

2000-01-01

82

The Distracting Effects of a Ringing Cell Phone: An Investigation of the Laboratory and the Classroom Setting  

PubMed Central

The detrimental effects of a ringing phone on cognitive performance were investigated in four experiments. In Experiments 1 and 2, the effects of different types of sounds (a standard cell phone ring, irrelevant tones and an instrumental song commonly encountered by participants) on performance were examined. In Experiment 1, slower responses were observed in all auditory groups relative to a silence condition, but participants in the ring and song conditions recovered more slowly. In Experiment 2, participants who were warned about the potential for distraction recovered more quickly, suggesting a benefit of this prior knowledge. This investigation continued in a college classroom setting (Experiments 3a and 3b); students were exposed to a ringing cell phone during the lecture. Performance on a surprise quiz revealed low accuracy rates on material presented while the phone was ringing. These findings offer insight into top-down cognitive processes that moderate involuntary orienting responses associated with a common stimulus encountered in the environment. PMID:21234286

Shelton, Jill T.; Elliott, Emily M.; Lynn, Sharon D.; Exner, Amanda L.

2010-01-01

83

Using Mobile Phones to Increase Classroom Interaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the possible benefits of using mobile phones to increase interaction and promote active learning in large classroom settings. First year undergraduate students studying Cellular Processes at the University of East London took part in a trial of a new text-based classroom interaction system and evaluated their experience by…

Cobb, Stephanie; Heaney, Rose; Corcoran, Olivia; Henderson-Begg, Stephanie

2010-01-01

84

When the globe is your classroom: teaching and learning about large-scale environmental change online  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding environmental problems that cross physical and disciplinary boundaries requires a more holistic view of the world - a "systems" approach. Yet it is a challenge for many learners to start thinking this way, particularly when the problems are large in scale and not easily visible. We will describe our online university course, "Humans and the Changing Biosphere," which takes a whole-systems perspective for teaching regional to global-scale environmental science concepts, including climate, hydrology, ecology, and human demographics. We will share our syllabus and learning objectives and summarize our efforts to incorporate "best" practices for online teaching. We will describe challenges we have faced, and our efforts to reach different learner types. Our goals for this presentation are: (1) to communicate how a systems approach ties together environmental sciences (including climate, hydrology, ecology, biogeochemistry, and demography) that are often taught as separate disciplines; (2) to generate discussion about challenges of teaching large-scale environmental processes; (3) to share our experiences in teaching these topics online; (4) to receive ideas and feedback on future teaching strategies. We will explain why we developed this course online, and share our experiences about benefits and challenges of teaching over the web - including some suggestions about how to use technology to supplement face-to-face learning experiences (and vice versa). We will summarize assessment data about what students learned during the course, and discuss key misconceptions and barriers to learning. We will highlight the role of an online discussion board in creating classroom community, identifying misconceptions, and engaging different types of learners.

Howard, E. A.; Coleman, K. J.; Barford, C. L.; Kucharik, C.; Foley, J. A.

2005-12-01

85

Best in Class: A Classroom-Based Model for Ameliorating Problem Behavior in Early Childhood Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As more young children enter school settings to attend early childhood programs, early childhood teachers and school psychologists have been charged with supporting a growing number of young children with chronic problem behaviors that put them at risk for the development of emotional/behavioral disorders (EBDs). There is a need for effective,…

Vo, Abigail K.; Sutherland, Kevin S.; Conroy, Maureen A.

2012-01-01

86

A Classroom Exercise in Spatial Analysis Using an Imaginary Data Set.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One skill that elementary students need to acquire is the ability to analyze spatially distributed data. In this activity students are asked to complete the following tasks: (1) plot a set of data (related to "mud-sharks"--an imaginary fish) on a map of the state of Alabama, (2) identify trends in the data, (3) make graphs using the data…

Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

87

An Academic Approach to Stress Management for College Students in a Conventional Classroom Setting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the identification of stress and the relationship of individual stress responses to physical and mental health, medical and behavioral professionals have been training individuals in coping strategies. To investigate the possibility of teaching cognitive coping skills to a nonclinical population in an academic setting, 41 college students…

Carnahan, Robert E.; And Others

88

Cooperative Theme and Tool Competence For Learning in Large Classroom Settings  

E-print Network

learning and teaching. Due to the lack of models and experience we started a comprehensive research new class "Operating Systems and Networking". Clearly we meant to contribute to questions 3 and 4 between objects and operational structures in the theme area and the learning process. To this end

Wedde, Horst F.

89

Assessing the Effectiveness of Inquiry-based Learning Techniques Implemented in Large Classroom Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geoscience and education faculty at The University of Akron jointly developed a series of inquiry-based learning modules aimed at both non-major and major student populations enrolled in introductory geology courses. These courses typically serve 2500 students per year in four to six classes of 40-160 students each per section. Twelve modules were developed that contained common topics and assessments appropriate

D. N. Steer; D. A. McConnell; K. Owens

2001-01-01

90

Interdependent Learning in an Open Classroom Setting: Dean Rusk Elementary School, 1972-73. Research and Development Report, Volume 7, Number 7, August 1973.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

All special programs at Dean Rusk Elementary School, funded in part under Title I of the 1965 Elementary Secondary Education Act, combined to facilitate individualized instruction in the nongraded, open classroom setting of the school. To better meet the needs of the pupils during the 1972-73 school year, the Follow Through Program included, for…

Goettee, Margaret

91

Intelligent Simulation Tools for Mining Large Scienti c Data Sets 1 Intelligent Simulation Tools for Mining  

E-print Network

Intelligent Simulation Tools for Mining Large Scienti#12;c Data Sets 1 Intelligent Simulation Tools for Mining Large Scienti#12;c Data Sets Feng ZHAO Xerox Palo Alto Research Center 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo. Keywords Intelligent simulation, Scienti#12;c data mining, Qualitative reasoning, Reasoning about physical

Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

92

Prekindergarten Teachers' Verbal References to Print during Classroom-Based, Large-Group Shared Reading  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The frequency with which adults reference print when reading with preschool-age children is associated with growth in children's print knowledge (e.g., L.M. Justice & H.K. Ezell, 2000, 2002). This study examined whether prekindergarten (pre-K) teachers naturally reference print during classroom shared reading and if verbal print…

Zucker, Tricia A.; Justice, Laura M.; Piasta, Shayne B.

2009-01-01

93

The Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (COSMIC): An Observational Measure of the Intentional Communication of Children with Autism in an Unstructured Classroom Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (COSMIC) was devised to provide ecologically valid\\u000a outcome measures for a communication-focused intervention trial. Ninety-one children with autism spectrum disorder aged 6 years\\u000a 10 months (SD 16 months) were videoed during their everyday snack, teaching and free play activities. Inter-rater reliability\\u000a was high and relevant items showed significant associations with comparable items from concurrent Autism

Greg Pasco; Rosanna K. Gordon; Patricia Howlin; Tony Charman

2008-01-01

94

Approximate state estimation in multiagent settings with continuous or large discrete state spaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a new method for carrying out state estimation in multi-agent settings that are characterized by continuous or large discrete state spaces. State estimation in multiagent settings involves updating an agent's belief over the physical states and the space of other agents' models. We factor out the models of the other agents and update the agent's belief over these

Prashant Doshi

2007-01-01

95

Introduction to Statistical Methods to Analyze Large Data Sets: Principal Components Analysis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes, slides, and a problem set for a series of lectures from a course entitled “Systems Biology: Biomedical Modeling.” The materials are a lecture introducing the mathematical concepts behind principal components analysis (PCA). The lecture describes how to handle large data sets with correlation methods and unsupervised clustering with this popular method of analysis, PCA.

Neil R. Clark (New York;Mount Sinai School of Medicine REV); Avi Ma'ayan (New York;Mount Sinai School of Medicine REV)

2011-09-13

96

Graphical Methods for Reducing, Visualizing and Analyzing Large Data Sets Using Hierarchical Terminologies  

PubMed Central

Objective: To explore new graphical methods for reducing and analyzing large data sets in which the data are coded with a hierarchical terminology. Methods: We use a hierarchical terminology to organize a data set and display it in a graph. We reduce the size and complexity of the data set by considering the terminological structure and the data set itself (using a variety of thresholds) as well as contributions of child level nodes to parent level nodes. Results: We found that our methods can reduce large data sets to manageable size and highlight the differences among graphs. The thresholds used as filters to reduce the data set can be used alone or in combination. We applied our methods to two data sets containing information about how nurses and physicians query online knowledge resources. The reduced graphs make the differences between the two groups readily apparent. Conclusions: This is a new approach to reduce size and complexity of large data sets and to simplify visualization. This approach can be applied to any data sets that are coded with hierarchical terminologies. PMID:22195119

Jing, Xia; Cimino, James J.

2011-01-01

97

Teachers' perceptions of their experiences with including students with special needs in the general education classroom setting throughout public and private schools in Texas  

E-print Network

TEACHERS? PERCEPTIONS OF THEIR EXPERIENCES WITH INCLUDING STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS IN THE GENERAL EDUCATION CLASSROOM SETTING THROUGHOUT PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS IN TEXAS A Dissertation by JANE ELIZABETH FINEGAN Submitted to the Office... of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2004 Major Subject: Educational Psychology TEACHERS? PERCEPTIONS OF THEIR EXPERIENCES WITH INCLUDING STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL...

Finegan, Jane Elizabeth

2005-02-17

98

Coffee Shops, Classrooms and Conversations: public engagement and outreach in a large interdisciplinary research Hub  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Public engagement and outreach activities are increasingly using specialist staff for co-ordination, training and support for researchers, they are also becoming expected for large investments. Here, the experience of public engagement and outreach a large, interdisciplinary Research Hub is described. dot.rural, based at the University of Aberdeen UK, is a £11.8 million Research Councils UK Rural Digital Economy Hub, funded as part of the RCUK Digital Economy Theme (2009-2015). Digital Economy research aims to realise the transformational impact of digital technologies on aspects of the environment, community life, cultural experiences, future society, and the economy. The dot.rural Hub involves 92 researchers from 12 different disciplines, including Geography, Hydrology and Ecology. Public Engagement and Outreach is embedded in the dot.rural Digital Economy Hub via an Outreach Officer. Alongside this position, public engagement and outreach activities are compulsory part of PhD student contracts. Public Engagement and Outreach activities at the dot.rural Hub involve individuals and groups in both formal and informal settings organised by dot.rural and other organisations. Activities in the realms of Education, Public Engagement, Traditional and Social Media are determined by a set of Underlying Principles designed for the Hub by the Outreach Officer. The underlying Engagement and Outreach principles match funding agency requirements and expectations alongside researcher demands and the user-led nature of Digital Economy Research. All activities include researchers alongside the Outreach Officer are research informed and embedded into specific projects that form the Hub. Successful public engagement activities have included participation in Café Scientifique series, workshops in primary and secondary schools, and online activities such as I'm a Scientist Get Me Out of Here. From how to engage 8 year olds with making hydrographs more understandable to members of the public to blogging birds and engaging with remote, rural communities to Spiegeltents. This presentation will share successful public engagement and outreach events alongside some less successful experiences and lessons learnt along the way.

Holden, Jennifer A.

2014-05-01

99

Confirming the Phylogeny of Mammals by Use of Large Comparative Sequence Data Sets  

PubMed Central

The ongoing generation of prodigious amounts of genomic sequence data from myriad vertebrates is providing unparalleled opportunities for establishing definitive phylogenetic relationships among species. The size and complexities of such comparative sequence data sets not only allow smaller and more difficult branches to be resolved but also present unique challenges, including large computational requirements and the negative consequences of systematic biases. To explore these issues and to clarify the phylogenetic relationships among mammals, we have analyzed a large data set of over 60 megabase pairs (Mb) of high-quality genomic sequence, which we generated from 41 mammals and 3 other vertebrates. All sequences are orthologous to a 1.9-Mb region of the human genome that encompasses the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR). To understand the characteristics and challenges associated with phylogenetic analyses of such a large data set, we partitioned the sequence data in several ways and utilized maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Neighbor-Joining algorithms, implemented in parallel on Linux clusters. These studies yielded well-supported phylogenetic trees, largely confirming other recent molecular phylogenetic analyses. Our results provide support for rooting the placental mammal tree between Atlantogenata (Xenarthra and Afrotheria) and Boreoeutheria (Euarchontoglires and Laurasiatheria), illustrate the difficulty in resolving some branches even with large amounts of data (e.g., in the case of Laurasiatheria), and demonstrate the valuable role that very large comparative sequence data sets can play in refining our understanding of the evolutionary relationships of vertebrates. PMID:18453548

Prasad, Arjun B.; Allard, Marc W.

2008-01-01

100

Analogies as Tools for Meaning Making in Elementary Science Education: How Do They Work in Classroom Settings?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper there is a critical overview of the role of analogies as tools for meaning making in science education, their advantages and disadvantages. Two empirical studies on the use of analogies in primary classrooms are discussed and analysed. In the first study, the "string circuit" analogy was used in the teaching of electric circuits with…

Guerra-Ramos, Maria Teresa

2011-01-01

101

Querying XML Data Sources that Export Very Large Sets of Views  

E-print Network

Querying XML Data Sources that Export Very Large Sets of Views BOGDAN CAUTIS Télécom Paris: Bogdan Cautis, Télécom ParisTech, Computer Science Department, 46 rue Barrault, 75013 Paris, France; email: cautis@telecom-paristech.fr; Alin Deutsch, Department of Computer Science and Engi- neering

Cautis, Bogdan

102

Promoting a Culture of Reflection in Teacher Education: The Challenge of Large Lecture Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The promotion of reflective practice, while widely advocated in higher education settings, nonetheless presents numerous challenges. This is an under-researched aspect of the discourse on reflective practice. A key challenge for those working in the field of teacher education within higher education is to promote a culture of refection in large

Clarke, Marie

2011-01-01

103

Application of Affinity Propagation on a large breast cancer data set 1  

E-print Network

Application of Affinity Propagation on a large breast cancer data set 1 D. Soriaa , F. Ambrogib , P Milano, Milano, Italy Abstract: The Affinity Propagation (AP) algorithm is applied to a breast cancer a procedure to determine the number of profiles to be considered. Results from Affinity Propagation

Aickelin, Uwe

104

A Comparative Evaluation of Meta-Learning Strategies over Large and Distributed Data Sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been considerable interest recently in various approaches to scaling up machine learning systems to large and distributed data sets. We have been studying approaches based upon the parallel ap- plication of multiple learning programs at distributed sites, followed by a meta-learning stage to combine the multiple models in a princi- pled fashion. In this paper, we empirically determine

Andreas L. Prodromidis; Salvatore J. Stolfo

1999-01-01

105

Preschoolers' Nonsymbolic Arithmetic with Large Sets: Is Addition More Accurate than Subtraction?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adult and developing humans share with other animals analog magnitude representations of number that support nonsymbolic arithmetic with large sets. This experiment tested the hypothesis that such representations may be more accurate for addition than for subtraction in children as young as 3 1/2 years of age. In these tasks, the experimenter hid…

Shinskey, Jeanne L.; Chan, Cindy Ho-man; Coleman, Rhea; Moxom, Lauren; Yamamoto, Eri

2009-01-01

106

Small Group Collaboration in the Large Lecture Setting: Collaborative Process, Pedagogical Paradigms, and Institutional Constraints.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper focuses on some of the key issues involved in implementing a collaborative design project in the setting of the large undergraduate lecture course at a major research university, offering a preliminary analysis of the assignment mainly as a function of how students managed and interpreted it. The collaborative design project was…

Michalchik, Vera; Schaeffer, Evonne; Tovar, Lawrence; Steinbeck, Reinhold; Bhargava, Tina; Kerns, Charles; Engel, Claudia; Levtov, Ruti

107

FAST DETECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF VESSELS IN VERY LARGE 3-D DATA SETS USING GEOMETRICAL MOMENTS  

E-print Network

FAST DETECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF VESSELS IN VERY LARGE 3-D DATA SETS USING GEOMETRICAL, 35042 Rennes cedex Abstract An improved and very fast algorithm dealing with the extraction of vessels cylindrical approximation. A robust estimation of vessel and background intensity levels, position

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

108

Hydrogen-bond strengths in large complexes: Efficient calculations using locally dense basis sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

The calculation of hydrogen bond strengths for large systems remains a computationally costly task. Here we show that the appropriate assignment of locally dense basis sets (LDBS) can greatly reduce the cost of such calculations with little or no reduction in accuracy. The use and performance of the LDBS approach with the B971 density functional and the MP2 method are

Erin R. Johnson; Daniel J. J. McKay; Gino A. DiLabio

2007-01-01

109

A Genetic Algorithm Based Modification on the LTS Algorithm for Large Data Sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors introduce an algorithm for estimating the least trimmed squares (LTS) parameters in large data sets. The algorithm performs a genetic algorithm search to form a basic subset that is unlikely to contain outliers. Rousseeuw and van Driessen (2006) suggested drawing independent basic subsets and iterating C-steps many times to minimize LTS criterion. The authors 'algorithm constructs a genetic

M. Hakan Satman

2012-01-01

110

WEB-BASED VISUAL EXPLORATION AND ERROR DETECTION IN LARGE DATA SETS  

E-print Network

WEB-BASED VISUAL EXPLORATION AND ERROR DETECTION IN LARGE DATA SETS: ANTARCTIC ICEBERG TRACKING The Netherlands blok@itc.nl; turdukulov@itc.nl Abstract Polar iceberg data are ­ amongst others ­ used that need to take iceberg positions and behaviour into account for their activities. Iceberg positions

Köbben, Barend

111

A Wavelet Toolkit for Visualization and Analysis of Large Data Sets In Earthquake Research  

E-print Network

, visualization, grid computing, collaboration, web-based maps, earthquakes 1 Introduction As in many other fieldsA Wavelet Toolkit for Visualization and Analysis of Large Data Sets In Earthquake Research G in earthquake physics and other nonlinear problems in the solid earth geosciences. Keywords: wavelets

Erlebacher, Gordon

112

A scalable method for identifying frequent subtrees in sets of large phylogenetic trees  

PubMed Central

Background We consider the problem of finding the maximum frequent agreement subtrees (MFASTs) in a collection of phylogenetic trees. Existing methods for this problem often do not scale beyond datasets with around 100 taxa. Our goal is to address this problem for datasets with over a thousand taxa and hundreds of trees. Results We develop a heuristic solution that aims to find MFASTs in sets of many, large phylogenetic trees. Our method works in multiple phases. In the first phase, it identifies small candidate subtrees from the set of input trees which serve as the seeds of larger subtrees. In the second phase, it combines these small seeds to build larger candidate MFASTs. In the final phase, it performs a post-processing step that ensures that we find a frequent agreement subtree that is not contained in a larger frequent agreement subtree. We demonstrate that this heuristic can easily handle data sets with 1000 taxa, greatly extending the estimation of MFASTs beyond current methods. Conclusions Although this heuristic does not guarantee to find all MFASTs or the largest MFAST, it found the MFAST in all of our synthetic datasets where we could verify the correctness of the result. It also performed well on large empirical data sets. Its performance is robust to the number and size of the input trees. Overall, this method provides a simple and fast way to identify strongly supported subtrees within large phylogenetic hypotheses. PMID:23033843

2012-01-01

113

Strategies for MCR image analysis of large hyperspectral data-sets  

PubMed Central

Polymer microarrays are a key enabling technology for high throughput materials discovery. In this study, multivariate image analysis, specifically multivariate curve resolution (MCR), is applied to the hyperspectral time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) data from eight individual microarray spots. Rather than analysing the data individually, the data-sets are collated and analysed as a single large data-set. Desktop computing is not a practical method for undertaking MCR analysis of such large data-sets due to the constraints of memory and computational overhead. Here, a distributed memory High-Performance Computing facility (HPC) is used. Similar to what is achieved using MCR analysis of individual samples, the results from this consolidated data-set allow clear identification of the substrate material; furthermore, specific chemistries common to different spots are also identified. The application of the HPC facility to the MCR analysis of ToF-SIMS hyperspectral data-sets demonstrates a potential methodology for the analysis of macro-scale data without compromising spatial resolution (data ‘binning’). Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23450109

Scurr, David J; Hook, Andrew L; Burley, Jonathan A; Williams, Philip M; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert C; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R

2013-01-01

114

Socrates in the Modern Classroom: How Are Large Classes in Criminal Justice Being Taught?  

Microsoft Academic Search

As education budgets shrink and interest in criminal justice at the collegiate level expands, large classes are being implemented in colleges and universities that traditionally have offered only small ones. If increasing criminal justice class sizes are inevitable, it is crucial that we gain an understanding of how large classes are currently taught and the extent to which these teaching

Melissa Schaefer Morabito; Richard R. Bennett

2006-01-01

115

An Analysis Framework Addressing the Scale and Legibility of Large Scientific Data Sets  

SciTech Connect

Much of the previous work in the large data visualization area has solely focused on handling the scale of the data. This task is clearly a great challenge and necessary, but it is not sufficient. Applying standard visualization techniques to large scale data sets often creates complicated pictures where meaningful trends are lost. A second challenge, then, is to also provide algorithms that simplify what an analyst must understand, using either visual or quantitative means. This challenge can be summarized as improving the legibility or reducing the complexity of massive data sets. Fully meeting both of these challenges is the work of many, many PhD dissertations. In this dissertation, we describe some new techniques to address both the scale and legibility challenges, in hope of contributing to the larger solution. In addition to our assumption of simultaneously addressing both scale and legibility, we add an additional requirement that the solutions considered fit well within an interoperable framework for diverse algorithms, because a large suite of algorithms is often necessary to fully understand complex data sets. For scale, we present a general architecture for handling large data, as well as details of a contract-based system for integrating advanced optimizations into a data flow network design. We also describe techniques for volume rendering and performing comparisons at the extreme scale. For legibility, we present several techniques. Most noteworthy are equivalence class functions, a technique to drive visualizations using statistical methods, and line-scan based techniques for characterizing shape.

Childs, H R

2006-11-20

116

A Complementary Graphical Method for Reducing and Analyzing Large Data Sets*  

PubMed Central

Summary Objectives Graphical displays can make data more understandable; however, large graphs can challenge human comprehension. We have previously described a filtering method to provide high-level summary views of large data sets. In this paper we demonstrate our method for setting and selecting thresholds to limit graph size while retaining important information by applying it to large single and paired data sets, taken from patient and bibliographic databases. Methods Four case studies are used to illustrate our method. The data are either patient discharge diagnoses (coded using the International Classification of Diseases, Clinical Modifications [ICD9-CM]) or Medline citations (coded using the Medical Subject Headings [MeSH]). We use combinations of different thresholds to obtain filtered graphs for detailed analysis. The thresholds setting and selection, such as thresholds for node counts, class counts, ratio values, p values (for diff data sets), and percentiles of selected class count thresholds, are demonstrated with details in case studies. The main steps include: data preparation, data manipulation, computation, and threshold selection and visualization. We also describe the data models for different types of thresholds and the considerations for thresholds selection. Results The filtered graphs are 1%-3% of the size of the original graphs. For our case studies, the graphs provide 1) the most heavily used ICD9-CM codes, 2) the codes with most patients in a research hospital in 2011, 3) a profile of publications on “heavily represented topics” in MEDLINE in 2011, and 4) validated knowledge about adverse effects of the medication of rosiglitazone and new interesting areas in the ICD9-CM hierarchy associated with patients taking the medication of pioglitazone. Conclusions Our filtering method reduces large graphs to a manageable size by removing relatively unimportant nodes. The graphical method provides summary views based on computation of usage frequency and semantic context of hierarchical terminology. The method is applicable to large data sets (such as a hundred thousand records or more) and can be used to generate new hypotheses from data sets coded with hierarchical terminologies. PMID:24727931

Jing, X.; Cimino, J. J.

2014-01-01

117

Classroom Cinema.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Films can be an effective method of teaching English, the humanities, and social studies to students from the junior high school through the community college level. This book in part a guide and in part a teacher's memoir, sets forth a rationale for using films in the classroom to encourage reading, writing, thoughtful discussion, and an…

Maynard, Richard A.

118

Every Large Point Set contains Many Collinear Points or an Empty Pentagon  

E-print Network

We prove the following generalised empty pentagon theorem: for every integer $\\ell \\geq 2$, every sufficiently large set of points in the plane contains $\\ell$ collinear points or an empty pentagon. As an application, we settle the next open case of the Big Line or Big Clique Conjecture of K\\'ara, P\\'or, and Wood [\\emph{Discrete Comput. Geom.} 34(3):497--506, 2005]. En route to our main result, we prove a generalised Erd\\H{o}s-Szekeres Theorem: for all integers $k\\geq3$ and $\\ell \\geq 2$, every sufficiently large set of points in the plane contains $\\ell$ collinear points or $k$ points in strictly convex position.

Abel, Zachary; Bose, Prosenjit; Collette, Sébastien; Dujmovi?, Vida; Hurtado, Ferran; Kominers, Scott D; Langerman, Stefan; Pór, Attila; Wood, David R

2009-01-01

119

Validating a large geophysical data set: Experiences with satellite-derived cloud parameters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We are validating the global cloud parameters derived from the satellite-borne HIRS2 and MSU atmospheric sounding instrument measurements, and are using the analysis of these data as one prototype for studying large geophysical data sets in general. The HIRS2/MSU data set contains a total of 40 physical parameters, filling 25 MB/day; raw HIRS2/MSU data are available for a period exceeding 10 years. Validation involves developing a quantitative sense for the physical meaning of the derived parameters over the range of environmental conditions sampled. This is accomplished by comparing the spatial and temporal distributions of the derived quantities with similar measurements made using other techniques, and with model results. The data handling needed for this work is possible only with the help of a suite of interactive graphical and numerical analysis tools. Level 3 (gridded) data is the common form in which large data sets of this type are distributed for scientific analysis. We find that Level 3 data is inadequate for the data comparisons required for validation. Level 2 data (individual measurements in geophysical units) is needed. A sampling problem arises when individual measurements, which are not uniformly distributed in space or time, are used for the comparisons. Standard 'interpolation' methods involve fitting the measurements for each data set to surfaces, which are then compared. We are experimenting with formal criteria for selecting geographical regions, based upon the spatial frequency and variability of measurements, that allow us to quantify the uncertainty due to sampling. As part of this project, we are also dealing with ways to keep track of constraints placed on the output by assumptions made in the computer code. The need to work with Level 2 data introduces a number of other data handling issues, such as accessing data files across machine types, meeting large data storage requirements, accessing other validated data sets, processing speed and throughput for interactive graphical work, and problems relating to graphical interfaces.

Kahn, Ralph; Haskins, Robert D.; Knighton, James E.; Pursch, Andrew; Granger-Gallegos, Stephanie

1992-01-01

120

Moving Large Data Sets Over High-Performance Long Distance Networks  

SciTech Connect

In this project we look at the performance characteristics of three tools used to move large data sets over dedicated long distance networking infrastructure. Although performance studies of wide area networks have been a frequent topic of interest, performance analyses have tended to focus on network latency characteristics and peak throughput using network traffic generators. In this study we instead perform an end-to-end long distance networking analysis that includes reading large data sets from a source file system and committing large data sets to a destination file system. An evaluation of end-to-end data movement is also an evaluation of the system configurations employed and the tools used to move the data. For this paper, we have built several storage platforms and connected them with a high performance long distance network configuration. We use these systems to analyze the capabilities of three data movement tools: BBcp, GridFTP, and XDD. Our studies demonstrate that existing data movement tools do not provide efficient performance levels or exercise the storage devices in their highest performance modes. We describe the device information required to achieve high levels of I/O performance and discuss how this data is applicable in use cases beyond data movement performance.

Hodson, Stephen W [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL; Ruwart, Thomas [ORNL; Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL

2011-04-01

121

Issues in Estimating Program Effects and Studying Implementation in Large-Scale Educational Experiments: The Case of a Connected Classroom Technology Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from a nationwide, large-scale experimental study of the effects of a connected classroom technology on student learning in algebra (Owens et al., 2004), this dissertation focuses on challenges that can arise in estimating treatment effects in educational field experiments when samples are highly heterogeneous in terms of various…

Shin, Hye Sook

2009-01-01

122

Non-rigid Registration for Large Sets of Microscopic Images on Graphics Processors  

PubMed Central

Microscopic imaging is an important tool for characterizing tissue morphology and pathology. 3D reconstruction and visualization of large sample tissue structure requires registration of large sets of high-resolution images. However, the scale of this problem presents a challenge for automatic registration methods. In this paper we present a novel method for efficient automatic registration using graphics processing units (GPUs) and parallel programming. Comparing a C++ CPU implementation with Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) libraries and pthreads running on GPU we achieve a speed-up factor of up to 4.11× with a single GPU and 6.68× with a GPU pair. We present execution times for a benchmark composed of two sets of large-scale images: mouse placenta (16K × 16K pixels) and breast cancer tumors (23K × 62K pixels). It takes more than 12 hours for the genetic case in C++ to register a typical sample composed of 500 consecutive slides, which was reduced to less than 2 hours using two GPUs, in addition to a very promising scalability for extending those gains easily on a large number of GPUs in a distributed system.

Ruiz, Antonio; Ujaldon, Manuel; Cooper, Lee

2014-01-01

123

Redefining the Ojibwe Classroom: Indigenous Language Programs within Large Research Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Indigenous languages are powerful symbols of self-determination and sovereignty for tribal communities in the United States, and many community-based programs have been developed to support and maintain them. The successes of these programs, however, have been difficult to replicate at large research institutions. This article examines the issues…

Morgan, Mindy J.

2005-01-01

124

Improving learning outcomes in large environmental science classrooms through short-term service-learning projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted an investigation on the efficacy of service-learning in large environmental biology classes. We were interested\\u000a in whether or not service-learning in classes with over 200 students has an impact on content learning, and attitudes\\/behaviors\\u000a related to the content. Students completed a pre-survey, a service project, and reflection paper (experimental group), and\\u000a a post-survey. Comparing pre- and post-surveys, student

Michelle Cawthorn; Lissa Leege; Elizabeth Congdon

2011-01-01

125

Quality in Inclusive Preschool Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Quality of care for preschool children in inclusive and noninclusive classrooms was examined in two studies. In Study 1, comparisons across a large sample of classrooms (N = 1, 313) showed that inclusive classrooms were higher than noninclusive classrooms in global quality as well as on two dimensions of quality…

Hestenes, Linda L.; Cassidy, Deborah J.; Shim, Jonghee; Hegde, Archana V.

2008-01-01

126

Main large data set features detection by a linear predictor model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of the present paper is to explore and obtain a simple method capable to detect the most important variables (features) from a large set of variables. To verify the performance of the approach described in the following sections, we used a set of news. Text sources are considered high-dimensional data, where each word is treated as a single variable. In our work, a linear predictor model has been used to uncover the most influential variables, reducing strongly the dimension of the data set. Input data is classified in two categories; arranged as a collection of plain text data, pre-processed and transformed into a numerical matrix containing around 10,000 different variables. We adjust the linear model's parameters based on its prediction results, the variables with strongest effect on output survive, while those with negligible effect are removed. In order to collect, automatically, a summarized set of features, we sacrifice some details and accuracy of the prediction model, although we try to balance the squared error with the subset obtained.

Gutierrez, Carlos Enrique; Alsharif, Mohamad Reza, Prof.; Khosravy, Mahdi; Yamashita, Katsumi, Prof.; Miyagi, Hayao, Prof.; Villa, Rafael

2014-10-01

127

Setting the Stage for Developing Pre-service Teachers' Conceptions of Good Science Teaching: The role of classroom videos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports findings about a curriculum innovation conducted at The University of Hong Kong. A CD-ROM consisting of videos of two lessons by different teachers demonstrating exemplary science teaching was used to elicit conceptions of good science teaching of student-teachers enrolled for the 1-year Postgraduate Diploma in Education at several stages during the programme. It was found that the videos elicited student-teachers’ conceptions and had impact on those conceptions prior to the commencement of formal instruction. It has extended student-teachers’ awareness of alternative teaching methods and approaches not experienced in their own schooling, broadened their awareness of different classroom situations, provided proof of existence of good practices, and prompted them to reflect on their current preconceptions of good science teaching. In several ways, the videos acted as a catalyst in socializing the transition of student-teachers from the role of student to the role of teacher.

Wong, Siu Ling; Yung, Benny Hin Wai; Cheng, Man Wai; Lam, Kwok Leung; Hodson, Derek

2006-01-01

128

Hydrogen-bond strengths in large complexes: Efficient calculations using locally dense basis sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The calculation of hydrogen bond strengths for large systems remains a computationally costly task. Here we show that the appropriate assignment of locally dense basis sets (LDBS) can greatly reduce the cost of such calculations with little or no reduction in accuracy. The use and performance of the LDBS approach with the B971 density functional and the MP2 method are demonstrated on eight small hydrogen bonded systems. Application of the LDBS approach to the adenine-thymine and cytosine-guanine nucleobase complexes shows that results of comparable accuracy to those obtained with balanced basis sets can be achieved with one to two orders of magnitude lower compute times. Similar results are obtained for complexes of tert-butylmethyl ether with five substituted phenols.

Johnson, Erin R.; McKay, Daniel J. J.; DiLabio, Gino A.

2007-02-01

129

Active Learning in a Large Classroom for Teaching Physiology: Acid-Base Cases  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Active Learning exercise described here has been used to replace some lecture hours in the renal portion of an integrated, organ-system based curriculum for First Year Medical Students. The exercise takes place in a large auditorium with approximately 150 students. Two Faculty, Drs. Dietz (a Physiology) and Dr. Panzarino (a Nephrologist) lead the discussions which are based on two clinical cases developed from actual patient data. The cases have already been published in the APS Teaching Archive previously (Objects 197 & 192). The Students are pre-assigned to groups of 5 or 6 and designated to sit in clusters to facilitate their individual group discussions. Each of the Faculty wears a lapel microphone and each carries a handheld microphone to pass between the student groups.

PhD John R. Dietz (University of South Florida Department of Physiology and Biophysics)

2011-08-03

130

Unusually large shear wave anisotropy for chlorite in subduction zone settings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

first principle simulations we calculated the elasticity of chlorite. At a density ?~ 2.60 g cm-3, the elastic constant tensor reveals significant elastic anisotropy: VP ~27%, VS1 ~56%, and VS2 ~43%. The shear anisotropy is exceptionally large for chlorite and enhances upon compression. Upon compression, the shear elastic constant component C44 and C55 decreases, whereas C66 shear component stiffens. The softening in C44 and C55 is reflected in shear modulus, G, and the shear wave velocity, VS. Our results on elastic anisotropy at conditions relevant to the mantle wedge indicates that a 10-20 km layer of hydrated peridotite with serpentine and chlorite could account for the observed shear polarization anisotropy and associated large delay times of 1-2 s observed in some subduction zone settings. In addition, chlorite could also explain the low VP/VS ratios that have been observed in recent high-resolution seismological studies.

Mookherjee, Mainak; Mainprice, David

2014-03-01

131

A practical, bioinformatic workflow system for large data sets generated by next-generation sequencing.  

PubMed

Transcriptomics (at the level of single cells, tissues and/or whole organisms) underpins many fields of biomedical science, from understanding the basic cellular function in model organisms, to the elucidation of the biological events that govern the development and progression of human diseases, and the exploration of the mechanisms of survival, drug-resistance and virulence of pathogens. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are contributing to a massive expansion of transcriptomics in all fields and are reducing the cost, time and performance barriers presented by conventional approaches. However, bioinformatic tools for the analysis of the sequence data sets produced by these technologies can be daunting to researchers with limited or no expertise in bioinformatics. Here, we constructed a semi-automated, bioinformatic workflow system, and critically evaluated it for the analysis and annotation of large-scale sequence data sets generated by NGS. We demonstrated its utility for the exploration of differences in the transcriptomes among various stages and both sexes of an economically important parasitic worm (Oesophagostomum dentatum) as well as the prediction and prioritization of essential molecules (including GTPases, protein kinases and phosphatases) as novel drug target candidates. This workflow system provides a practical tool for the assembly, annotation and analysis of NGS data sets, also to researchers with a limited bioinformatic expertise. The custom-written Perl, Python and Unix shell computer scripts used can be readily modified or adapted to suit many different applications. This system is now utilized routinely for the analysis of data sets from pathogens of major socio-economic importance and can, in principle, be applied to transcriptomics data sets from any organism. PMID:20682560

Cantacessi, Cinzia; Jex, Aaron R; Hall, Ross S; Young, Neil D; Campbell, Bronwyn E; Joachim, Anja; Nolan, Matthew J; Abubucker, Sahar; Sternberg, Paul W; Ranganathan, Shoba; Mitreva, Makedonka; Gasser, Robin B

2010-09-01

132

Approaching the exa-scale: a real-world evaluation of rendering extremely large data sets  

SciTech Connect

Extremely large scale analysis is becoming increasingly important as supercomputers and their simulations move from petascale to exascale. The lack of dedicated hardware acceleration for rendering on today's supercomputing platforms motivates our detailed evaluation of the possibility of interactive rendering on the supercomputer. In order to facilitate our understanding of rendering on the supercomputing platform, we focus on scalability of rendering algorithms and architecture envisioned for exascale datasets. To understand tradeoffs for dealing with extremely large datasets, we compare three different rendering algorithms for large polygonal data: software based ray tracing, software based rasterization and hardware accelerated rasterization. We present a case study of strong and weak scaling of rendering extremely large data on both GPU and CPU based parallel supercomputers using Para View, a parallel visualization tool. Wc use three different data sets: two synthetic and one from a scientific application. At an extreme scale, algorithmic rendering choices make a difference and should be considered while approaching exascale computing, visualization, and analysis. We find software based ray-tracing offers a viable approach for scalable rendering of the projected future massive data sizes.

Patchett, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lo, Li - Ta [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Browniee, Carson S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Christopher J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hansen, Chuck [UNIV OF UTAH

2010-10-15

133

A Technique for Moving Large Data Sets over High-Performance Long Distance Networks  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we look at the performance characteristics of three tools used to move large data sets over dedicated long distance networking infrastructure. Although performance studies of wide area networks have been a frequent topic of interest, performance analyses have tended to focus on network latency characteristics and peak throughput using network traffic generators. In this study we instead perform an end-to-end long distance networking analysis that includes reading large data sets from a source file system and committing the data to a remote destination file system. An evaluation of end-to-end data movement is also an evaluation of the system configurations employed and the tools used to move the data. For this paper, we have built several storage platforms and connected them with a high performance long distance network configuration. We use these systems to analyze the capabilities of three data movement tools: BBcp, GridFTP, and XDD. Our studies demonstrate that existing data movement tools do not provide efficient performance levels or exercise the storage devices in their highest performance modes.

Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL] [ORNL; Dobson, Jonathan D [ORNL] [ORNL; Hodson, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL] [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL; Ruwart, Thomas [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01

134

Developing consistent Landsat data sets for large area applications: the MRLC 2001 protocol  

USGS Publications Warehouse

One of the major efforts in large area land cover mapping over the last two decades was the completion of two U.S. National Land Cover Data sets (NLCD), developed with nominal 1992 and 2001 Landsat imagery under the auspices of the MultiResolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium. Following the successful generation of NLCD 1992, a second generation MRLC initiative was launched with two primary goals: (1) to develop a consistent Landsat imagery data set for the U.S. and (2) to develop a second generation National Land Cover Database (NLCD 2001). One of the key enhancements was the formulation of an image preprocessing protocol and implementation of a consistent image processing method. The core data set of the NLCD 2001 database consists of Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) images. This letter details the procedures for processing the original ETM+ images and more recent scenes added to the database. NLCD 2001 products include Anderson Level II land cover classes, percent tree canopy, and percent urban imperviousness at 30-m resolution derived from Landsat imagery. The products are freely available for download to the general public from the MRLC Consortium Web site at http://www.mrlc.gov.

Chander, G.; Huang, C.; Yang, L.; Homer, C.; Larson, C.

2009-01-01

135

Contextual settings, science stories, and large context problems: Toward a more humanistic science education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article addresses the need for and the problem of organizing a science curriculum around contextual settings and science stories that serve to involve and motivate students to develop an understanding of the world that is rooted in the scientific and the humanistic traditions. A program of activities placed around contextual settings, science stories, and contemporary issues of interest is recommended in an attempt to move toward a slow and secure abolition of the gulf between scientific knowledge and common sense beliefs. A conceptual development model is described to guide the connection between theory and evidence on a level appropriate for children, from early years to senior years. For the senior years it is also important to connect the activity of teaching to a sound theoretical structure. The theoretical structure must illuminate the status of theory in science, establish what counts as evidence, clarify the relationship between experiment and explanation, and make connections to the history of science. The article concludes with a proposed program of activities in terms of a sequence of theoretical and empirical experiences that involve contextual settings, science stories, large context problems, thematic teaching, and popular science literature teaching.

Stinner, Arthur

136

Innovation from within the Box: Evaluation of Online Problem Sets in a Series of Large Lecture Undergraduate Science Courses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A technology-mediated solution to enhance the learning experience for students in a large lecture setting was evaluated. Online problem sets were developed to engage students in the content of a human biology course and implemented in the classes of eight faculty coordinators. The weekly problem sets contained several multiple choice problems,…

Schaeffer, Evonne; Bhargava, Tina; Nash, John; Kerns, Charles; Stocker, Scott

137

Caught you: threats to confidentiality due to the public release of large-scale genetic data sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Large-scale genetic data sets are frequently shared with other research groups and even released on the Internet to allow for secondary analysis. Study participants are usually not informed about such data sharing because data sets are assumed to be anonymous after stripping off personal identifiers. DISCUSSION: The assumption of anonymity of genetic data sets, however, is tenuous because genetic

Matthias Wjst

2010-01-01

138

Probing Fast X-ray Variability of Blazars with a Large Data Set from Swift  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Swift X-ray Telescope has obtained 0.2-10 keV x-ray data on numerous blazars over timescales ranging from seconds to more than 8 years. Much of these data come from intense target of opportunity observations that can be analyzed in a multiwavelength context and used to model jet parameters, particularly during flare states. Another large component of these data comes from monitoring that was obtained during a variety of flux states. By looking at this broad data set, one can evaluate variability timescales and limit the emission mechanisms and associated parameters. Some of these blazars are known to exhibit variability timescales on the order of minutes in the gamma-ray band and tens of minutes in the x-ray band. We report on our search for short timescale x-ray variability that could limit the size and nature of the emission region/s in blazar jets.

Falcone, Abraham; Pryal, Matthew; Stroh, Michael

2014-08-01

139

SkyMapper Filter Set: Design and Fabrication of Large Scale Optical Filters  

E-print Network

The SkyMapper Southern Sky Survey will be conducted from Siding Spring Observatory with u, v, g, r, i and z filters that comprise glued glass combination filters of dimension 309x309x15 mm. In this paper we discuss the rationale for our bandpasses and physical characteristics of the filter set. The u, v, g and z filters are entirely glass filters which provide highly uniform band passes across the complete filter aperture. The i filter uses glass with a short-wave pass coating, and the r filter is a complete dielectric filter. We describe the process by which the filters were constructed, including the processes used to obtain uniform dielectric coatings and optimized narrow band anti-reflection coatings, as well as the technique of gluing the large glass pieces together after coating using UV transparent epoxy cement. The measured passbands including extinction and CCD QE are presented.

Bessell, Michael; Schmidt, Brian; Keller, Stefan; Tisserand, Patrick; Francis, Paul

2011-01-01

140

FONZIE: An optimized pipeline for minisatellite marker discovery and primer design from large sequence data sets  

PubMed Central

Background Micro-and minisatellites are among the most powerful genetic markers known to date. They have been used as tools for a large number of applications ranging from gene mapping to phylogenetic studies and isolate typing. However, identifying micro-and minisatellite markers on large sequence data sets is often a laborious process. Results FONZIE was designed to successively 1) perform a search for markers via the external software Tandem Repeat Finder, 2) exclude user-defined specific genomic regions, 3) screen for the size and the percent matches of each relevant marker found by Tandem Repeat Finder, 4) evaluate marker specificity (i.e., occurrence of the marker as a single copy in the genome) using BLAST2.0, 5) design minisatellite primer pairs via the external software Primer3, and 6) check the specificity of each final PCR product by BLAST. A final file returns to users all the results required to amplify markers. A biological validation of the approach was performed using the whole genome sequence of the phytopathogenic fungus Leptosphaeria maculans, showing that more than 90% of the minisatellite primer pairs generated by the pipeline amplified a PCR product, 44.8% of which showed agarose-gel resolvable polymorphism between isolates. Segregation analyses confirmed that the polymorphic minisatellites corresponded to single-locus markers. Conclusion FONZIE is a stand-alone and user-friendly application developed to minimize tedious manual operations, reduce errors, and speed up the search for efficient minisatellite and microsatellite markers departing from whole-genome sequence data. This pipeline facilitates the integration of data and provides a set of specific primer sequences for PCR amplification of single-locus markers. FONZIE is freely downloadable at: http://www.versailles-grignon.inra.fr/bioger/equipes/leptosphaeria_maculans/outils_d_analyses/fonzie PMID:21114810

2010-01-01

141

Motif-based analysis of large nucleotide data sets using MEME-ChIP  

PubMed Central

MEME-ChIP is a web-based tool for analyzing motifs in large DNA or RNA data sets. It can analyze peak regions identified by ChIP-seq, cross-linking sites identified by cLIP-seq and related assays, as well as sets of genomic regions selected using other criteria. MEME-ChIP performs de novo motif discovery, motif enrichment analysis, motif location analysis and motif clustering, providing a comprehensive picture of the DNA or RNA motifs that are enriched in the input sequences. MEME-ChIP performs two complementary types of de novo motif discovery: weight matrix–based discovery for high accuracy; and word-based discovery for high sensitivity. Motif enrichment analysis using DNA or RNA motifs from human, mouse, worm, fly and other model organisms provides even greater sensitivity. MEME-ChIP’s interactive HTML output groups and aligns significant motifs to ease interpretation. this protocol takes less than 3 h, and it provides motif discovery approaches that are distinct and complementary to other online methods. PMID:24853928

Ma, Wenxiu; Noble, William S; Bailey, Timothy L

2014-01-01

142

fastSTRUCTURE: Variational Inference of Population Structure in Large SNP Data Sets  

PubMed Central

Tools for estimating population structure from genetic data are now used in a wide variety of applications in population genetics. However, inferring population structure in large modern data sets imposes severe computational challenges. Here, we develop efficient algorithms for approximate inference of the model underlying the STRUCTURE program using a variational Bayesian framework. Variational methods pose the problem of computing relevant posterior distributions as an optimization problem, allowing us to build on recent advances in optimization theory to develop fast inference tools. In addition, we propose useful heuristic scores to identify the number of populations represented in a data set and a new hierarchical prior to detect weak population structure in the data. We test the variational algorithms on simulated data and illustrate using genotype data from the CEPH–Human Genome Diversity Panel. The variational algorithms are almost two orders of magnitude faster than STRUCTURE and achieve accuracies comparable to those of ADMIXTURE. Furthermore, our results show that the heuristic scores for choosing model complexity provide a reasonable range of values for the number of populations represented in the data, with minimal bias toward detecting structure when it is very weak. Our algorithm, fastSTRUCTURE, is freely available online at http://pritchardlab.stanford.edu/structure.html. PMID:24700103

Raj, Anil; Stephens, Matthew; Pritchard, Jonathan K.

2014-01-01

143

Validating a large geophysical data set - Experiences with satellite-derived cloud parameters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of this study is to validate the global cloud parameters derived from the satellite-borne HIRS2 and MSU atmospheric sounding instrument measurements, and to use the analysis of these data as one prototype for studying large geophysical data sets in general. The HIRS2/MSU data set contains a total of 40 physical parameters, filling 25 MB/day; raw HIRS2/MSU data are available for a period exceeding 10 years. Validation involves developing a quantitative sense for the physical meaning of the derived parameters over the range of environmental conditions sampled. This is accomplished by comparing the spatial and temporal distributions of the derived quantities with similar measurements made using other techniques, and with model results. The need to work with Level 2 (point) data, rather than Level 3 (gridded) data for validation purposes is discussed, and some techniques developed for charting the assumptions made in deriving an algorithm and generating a code to produce geophysical quantities from measured radiances are presented.

Kahn, Ralph; Haskins, Robert D.; Knighton, James E.; Pursch, Andrew; Granger-Gallegos, Stephanie

1991-01-01

144

Adaptation of Bharatanatyam Dance Pedagogy for Multicultural Classrooms: Questions and Relevance in a North American University Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article opens up questions around introducing Bharatanatyam, a form of Indian classical dance, to undergraduate learners within a North American university setting. The aim is to observe how the learners understood and received a particular cultural practice and to explore issues related to learning goals, curriculum content, approaches to…

Banerjee, Suparna

2013-01-01

145

Evaluation of flow resistance in gravel-bed rivers through a large field data set  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A data set of 2890 field measurements was used to test the ability of several conventional flow resistance equations to predict mean flow velocity in gravel bed rivers when used with no calibration. The tests were performed using both flow depth and discharge as input since discharge may be a more reliable measure of flow conditions in shallow flows. Generally better predictions are obtained when using flow discharge as input. The results indicate that the Manning-Strickler and the Keulegan equations show considerable disagreement with observed flow velocities for flow depths smaller than 10 times the characteristic grain diameter. Most equations show some systematic deviation for small relative flow depth. The use of new definitions for dimensionless variables in terms of nondimensional hydraulic geometry equations allows the development of a new flow resistance equation. The best overall performance is obtained by the Ferguson approach, which combines two power law flow resistance equations that are different for deep and shallow flows. To use this approach with flow discharge as input, a logarithmic matching equation in terms of the new dimensionless variables is proposed. For the domains of intermediate and large-scale roughness, the field data indicate a considerable increase in flow resistance as compared with the domain of small-scale roughness. The Ferguson approach is used to discuss the importance of flow resistance partitioning for bed load transport calculations at flow conditions with intermediate- and large-scale roughness in natural gravel, cobble, and boulder bed streams.

Rickenmann, Dieter; Recking, Alain

2011-07-01

146

Galaxy Evolution Insights from Spectral Modeling of Large Data Sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

SciTech Connect

This thesis centers on the use of spectral modeling techniques on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to gain new insights into current questions in galaxy evolution. The SDSS provides a large, uniform, high quality data set which can be exploited in a number of ways. One avenue pursued here is to use the large sample size to measure precisely the mean properties of galaxies of increasingly narrow parameter ranges. The other route taken is to look for rare objects which open up for exploration new areas in galaxy parameter space. The crux of this thesis is revisiting the classical Kennicutt method for inferring the stellar initial mass function (IMF) from the integrated light properties of galaxies. A large data set ({approx} 10{sup 5} galaxies) from the SDSS DR4 is combined with more in-depth modeling and quantitative statistical analysis to search for systematic IMF variations as a function of galaxy luminosity. Galaxy H{alpha} equivalent widths are compared to a broadband color index to constrain the IMF. It is found that for the sample as a whole the best fitting IMF power law slope above 0.5 M{sub {circle_dot}} is {Lambda} = 1.5 {+-} 0.1 with the error dominated by systematics. Galaxies brighter than around M{sub r,0.1} = -20 (including galaxies like the Milky Way which has M{sub r,0.1} {approx} -21) are well fit by a universal {Lambda} {approx} 1.4 IMF, similar to the classical Salpeter slope, and smooth, exponential star formation histories (SFH). Fainter galaxies prefer steeper IMFs and the quality of the fits reveal that for these galaxies a universal IMF with smooth SFHs is actually a poor assumption. Related projects are also pursued. A targeted photometric search is conducted for strongly lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBG) similar to MS1512-cB58. The evolution of the photometric selection technique is described as are the results of spectroscopic follow-up of the best targets. The serendipitous discovery of two interesting blue compact dwarf galaxies is reported. These galaxies were identified by their extremely weak (< 150) [N {pi}] {lambda}6584 to H{alpha} emission line ratios. Abundance analysis from emission line fluxes reveals that these galaxies have gas phase oxygen abundances 12 + log(O/H) {approx} 7.7 to 7.9, not remarkably low, and near infrared imaging detects an old stellar population. However, the measured nitrogen to oxygen ratios log(N/O) < 1.7 are anomalously low for blue compact dwarf galaxies. These objects may be useful for understanding the chemical evolution of nitrogen.

Hoversten, Erik A.; /Johns Hopkins U.

2007-10-01

147

Efficient Implementation of an Optimal Interpolator for Large Spatial Data Sets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Scattered data interpolation is a problem of interest in numerous areas such as electronic imaging, smooth surface modeling, and computational geometry. Our motivation arises from applications in geology and mining, which often involve large scattered data sets and a demand for high accuracy. The method of choice is ordinary kriging. This is because it is a best unbiased estimator. Unfortunately, this interpolant is computationally very expensive to compute exactly. For n scattered data points, computing the value of a single interpolant involves solving a dense linear system of size roughly n x n. This is infeasible for large n. In practice, kriging is solved approximately by local approaches that are based on considering only a relatively small'number of points that lie close to the query point. There are many problems with this local approach, however. The first is that determining the proper neighborhood size is tricky, and is usually solved by ad hoc methods such as selecting a fixed number of nearest neighbors or all the points lying within a fixed radius. Such fixed neighborhood sizes may not work well for all query points, depending on local density of the point distribution. Local methods also suffer from the problem that the resulting interpolant is not continuous. Meyer showed that while kriging produces smooth continues surfaces, it has zero order continuity along its borders. Thus, at interface boundaries where the neighborhood changes, the interpolant behaves discontinuously. Therefore, it is important to consider and solve the global system for each interpolant. However, solving such large dense systems for each query point is impractical. Recently a more principled approach to approximating kriging has been proposed based on a technique called covariance tapering. The problems arise from the fact that the covariance functions that are used in kriging have global support. Our implementations combine, utilize, and enhance a number of different approaches that have been introduced in literature for solving large linear systems for interpolation of scattered data points. For very large systems, exact methods such as Gaussian elimination are impractical since they require 0(n(exp 3)) time and 0(n(exp 2)) storage. As Billings et al. suggested, we use an iterative approach. In particular, we use the SYMMLQ method, for solving the large but sparse ordinary kriging systems that result from tapering. The main technical issue that need to be overcome in our algorithmic solution is that the points' covariance matrix for kriging should be symmetric positive definite. The goal of tapering is to obtain a sparse approximate representation of the covariance matrix while maintaining its positive definiteness. Furrer et al. used tapering to obtain a sparse linear system of the form Ax = b, where A is the tapered symmetric positive definite covariance matrix. Thus, Cholesky factorization could be used to solve their linear systems. They implemented an efficient sparse Cholesky decomposition method. They also showed if these tapers are used for a limited class of covariance models, the solution of the system converges to the solution of the original system. Matrix A in the ordinary kriging system, while symmetric, is not positive definite. Thus, their approach is not applicable to the ordinary kriging system. Therefore, we use tapering only to obtain a sparse linear system. Then, we use SYMMLQ to solve the ordinary kriging system. We show that solving large kriging systems becomes practical via tapering and iterative methods, and results in lower estimation errors compared to traditional local approaches, and significant memory savings compared to the original global system. We also developed a more efficient variant of the sparse SYMMLQ method for large ordinary kriging systems. This approach adaptively finds the correct local neighborhood for each query point in the interpolation process.

Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Mount, David M.

2007-01-01

148

Engaged: Making Large Classes Feel Small through Blended Learning Instructional Strategies that Promote Increased Student Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is not enough to be great at sharing information in a large classroom setting. To be an effective teacher you must be able to meaningfully engage your students with their peers and with the content. And you must do this regardless of class size or content. The issues of teaching effectively in large classroom settings have presented ongoing…

Francis, Raymond W.

2012-01-01

149

An Examination of Classroom Social Environment on Motivation and Engagement of College Early Entrant Honors Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study set out to examine the relationships between the classroom social environment, motivation, engagement and achievement of a group of early entrant Honors students at a large urban university. Prior research on the classroom environment, motivation, engagement and high ability students was examined, leading to the assumption that the…

Maddox, Richard S.

2010-01-01

150

Analyzing large data sets acquired through telemetry from rats exposed to organophosphorous compounds: an EEG study.  

PubMed

The organophosphorous compound soman is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor that causes damage to the brain. Exposure to soman causes neuropathology as a result of prolonged and recurrent seizures. In the present study, long-term recordings of cortical EEG were used to develop an unbiased means to quantify measures of seizure activity in a large data set while excluding other signal types. Rats were implanted with telemetry transmitters and exposed to soman followed by treatment with therapeutics similar to those administered in the field after nerve agent exposure. EEG, activity and temperature were recorded continuously for a minimum of 2 days pre-exposure and 15 days post-exposure. A set of automatic MATLAB algorithms have been developed to remove artifacts and measure the characteristics of long-term EEG recordings. The algorithms use short-time Fourier transforms to compute the power spectrum of the signal for 2-s intervals. The spectrum is then divided into the delta, theta, alpha, and beta frequency bands. A linear fit to the power spectrum is used to distinguish normal EEG activity from artifacts and high amplitude spike wave activity. Changes in time spent in seizure over a prolonged period are a powerful indicator of the effects of novel therapeutics against seizures. A graphical user interface has been created that simultaneously plots the raw EEG in the time domain, the power spectrum, and the wavelet transform. Motor activity and temperature are associated with EEG changes. The accuracy of this algorithm is also verified against visual inspection of video recordings up to 3 days after exposure. PMID:19632275

de Araujo Furtado, Marcio; Zheng, Andy; Sedigh-Sarvestani, Madineh; Lumley, Lucille; Lichtenstein, Spencer; Yourick, Debra

2009-10-30

151

Visualization of large medical data sets using memory-optimized CPU and GPU algorithms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the evolution of medical scanners towards higher spatial resolutions, the sizes of image data sets are increasing rapidly. To profit from the higher resolution in medical applications such as 3D-angiography for a more efficient and precise diagnosis, high-performance visualization is essential. However, to make sure that the performance of a volume rendering algorithm scales with the performance of future computer architectures, technology trends need to be considered. The design of such scalable volume rendering algorithms remains challenging. One of the major trends in the development of computer architectures is the wider use of cache memory hierarchies to bridge the growing gap between the faster evolving processing power and the slower evolving memory access speed. In this paper we propose ways to exploit the standard PC"s cache memories supporting the main processors (CPU"s) and the graphics hardware (graphics processing unit, GPU), respectively, for computing Maximum Intensity Projections (MIPs). To this end, we describe a generic and flexible way to improve the cache efficiency of software ray casting algorithms and show by means of cache simulations, that it enables cache miss rates close to the theoretical optimum. For GPU-based rendering we propose a similar, brick-based technique to optimize the utilization of onboard caches and the transfer of data to the GPU on-board memory. All algorithms produce images of identical quality, which enables us to compare the performance of their implementations in a fair way without eventually trading quality for speed. Our comparison indicates that the proposed methods perform superior, in particular for large data sets.

Kiefer, Gundolf; Lehmann, Helko; Weese, Juergen

2005-04-01

152

BACHSCORE. A tool for evaluating efficiently and reliably the quality of large sets of protein structures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In protein structure prediction it is of crucial importance, especially at the refinement stage, to score efficiently large sets of models by selecting the ones that are closest to the native state. We here present a new computational tool, BACHSCORE, that allows its users to rank different structural models of the same protein according to their quality, evaluated by using the BACH++ (Bayesian Analysis Conformation Hunt) scoring function. The original BACH statistical potential was already shown to discriminate with very good reliability the protein native state in large sets of misfolded models of the same protein. BACH++ features a novel upgrade in the solvation potential of the scoring function, now computed by adapting the LCPO (Linear Combination of Pairwise Orbitals) algorithm. This change further enhances the already good performance of the scoring function. BACHSCORE can be accessed directly through the web server: bachserver.pd.infn.it. Catalogue identifier: AEQD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEQD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 130159 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 24 687 455 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Any computer capable of running an executable produced by a g++ compiler (4.6.3 version). Operating system: Linux, Unix OS-es. RAM: 1 073 741 824 bytes Classification: 3. Nature of problem: Evaluate the quality of a protein structural model, taking into account the possible “a priori” knowledge of a reference primary sequence that may be different from the amino-acid sequence of the model; the native protein structure should be recognized as the best model. Solution method: The contact potential scores the occurrence of any given type of residue pair in 5 possible contact classes (?-helical contact, parallel ?-sheet contact, anti-parallel ?-sheet contact, side-chain contact, no contact). The solvation potential scores the occurrence of any residue type in 2 possible environments: buried and solvent exposed. Residue environment is assigned by adapting the LCPO algorithm. Residues present in the reference primary sequence and not present in the model structure contribute to the model score as solvent exposed and as non contacting all other residues. Restrictions: Input format file according to the Protein Data Bank standard Additional comments: Parameter values used in the scoring function can be found in the file /folder-to-bachscore/BACH/examples/bach_std.par. Running time: Roughly one minute to score one hundred structures on a desktop PC, depending on their size.

Sarti, E.; Zamuner, S.; Cossio, P.; Laio, A.; Seno, F.; Trovato, A.

2013-12-01

153

Considerations for observational research using large data sets in radiation oncology.  

PubMed

The radiation oncology community has witnessed growing interest in observational research conducted using large-scale data sources such as registries and claims-based data sets. With the growing emphasis on observational analyses in health care, the radiation oncology community must possess a sophisticated understanding of the methodological considerations of such studies in order to evaluate evidence appropriately to guide practice and policy. Because observational research has unique features that distinguish it from clinical trials and other forms of traditional radiation oncology research, the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics assembled a panel of experts in health services research to provide a concise and well-referenced review, intended to be informative for the lay reader, as well as for scholars who wish to embark on such research without prior experience. This review begins by discussing the types of research questions relevant to radiation oncology that large-scale databases may help illuminate. It then describes major potential data sources for such endeavors, including information regarding access and insights regarding the strengths and limitations of each. Finally, it provides guidance regarding the analytical challenges that observational studies must confront, along with discussion of the techniques that have been developed to help minimize the impact of certain common analytical issues in observational analysis. Features characterizing a well-designed observational study include clearly defined research questions, careful selection of an appropriate data source, consultation with investigators with relevant methodological expertise, inclusion of sensitivity analyses, caution not to overinterpret small but significant differences, and recognition of limitations when trying to evaluate causality. This review concludes that carefully designed and executed studies using observational data that possess these qualities hold substantial promise for advancing our understanding of many unanswered questions of importance to the field of radiation oncology. PMID:25195986

Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E; Chen, Aileen; Chen, Ronald C; Hoffman, Karen; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Smith, Benjamin D; Yu, James B

2014-09-01

154

Impact of problem-based learning in a large classroom setting: student perception and problem-solving skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes a problem-based learning (PBL) approach (using tutorless groups) that was introduced as a supplement to standard didactic lectures in University of British Columbia Okanagan undergraduate biochemistry classes consisting of 45ÃÂ85 students. PBL was chosen as an effective method to assist students in learning biochemical and physiological processes. By monitoring student attendance and using informal and formal surveys, we demonstrated that PBL has a significant positive impact on student motivation to attend and participate in the course work.

Andis Klegeris (University of British Columbia); Heather Hurren (University of British Columbia)

2011-12-01

155

Public-private partnerships with large corporations: setting the ground rules for better health.  

PubMed

Public-private partnerships with large corporations offer potential benefits to the health sector but many concerns have been raised, highlighting the need for appropriate safeguards. In this paper we propose five tests that public policy makers may wish to apply when considering engaging in such a public-private partnership. First, are the core products and services provided by the corporation health enhancing or health damaging? In some cases, such as tobacco, the answer is obvious but others, such as food and alcohol, are contested. In such cases, the burden of proof is on the potential partners to show that their activities are health enhancing. Second, do potential partners put their policies into practice in the settings where they can do so, their own workplaces? Third, are the corporate social responsibility activities of potential partners independently audited? Fourth, do potential partners make contributions to the commons rather than to narrow programmes of their choosing? Fifth, is the role of the partner confined to policy implementation rather than policy development, which is ultimately the responsibility of government alone? PMID:24581699

Galea, Gauden; McKee, Martin

2014-04-01

156

Selection Sampling from Large Data Sets for Targeted Inference in Mixture Modeling  

PubMed Central

One of the challenges in using Markov chain Monte Carlo for model analysis in studies with very large datasets is the need to scan through the whole data at each iteration of the sampler, which can be computationally prohibitive. Several approaches have been developed to address this, typically drawing computationally manageable subsamples of the data. Here we consider the specific case where most of the data from a mixture model provides little or no information about the parameters of interest, and we aim to select subsamples such that the information extracted is most relevant. The motivating application arises in flow cytometry, where several measurements from a vast number of cells are available. Interest lies in identifying specific rare cell subtypes and characterizing them according to their corresponding markers. We present a Markov chain Monte Carlo approach where an initial subsample of the full dataset is used to guide selection sampling of a further set of observations targeted at a scientifically interesting, low probability region. We define a Sequential Monte Carlo strategy in which the targeted subsample is augmented sequentially as estimates improve, and introduce a stopping rule for determining the size of the targeted subsample. An example from flow cytometry illustrates the ability of the approach to increase the resolution of inferences for rare cell subtypes. PMID:20865145

Manolopoulou, Ioanna; Chan, Cliburn; West, Mike

2010-01-01

157

Long DNA sequences and large data sets: investigating the Quaternary via ancient DNA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Progress in technical development has allowed piecing together increasingly long DNA sequences from subfossil remains of both extinct and extant species. At the same time, more and more species are analyzed on the population level, leading to a better understanding of population dynamics over time. Finally, new sequencing techniques have allowed targeting complete nuclear genomes of extinct species. The sequences obtained yield insights into a variety of research fields. First, phylogenetic relationships can be resolved with much greater accuracy and it becomes possible to date divergence events of species during and before the Quaternary. Second, large data sets in population genetics facilitate the assessment of changes in genetic diversity over time, an approach that has substantially revised our views about phylogeographic patterns and population dynamics. In the future, the combination of population genetics with long DNA sequences, e.g. complete mitochondrial (mt) DNA genomes, should lead to much more precise estimates of population size changes to be made. This will enable us to make inferences about - and hopefully understand - the causes for faunal turnover and extinctions during the Quaternary. Third, with regard to the nuclear genome, complete genes and genomes can now be sequenced and studied with regard to their function, revealing insights about the numerous traits of extinct species that are not preserved in the fossil record.

Hofreiter, Michael

2008-12-01

158

Anomaly Detection in Large Sets of High-Dimensional Symbol Sequences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper addresses the problem of detecting and describing anomalies in large sets of high-dimensional symbol sequences. The approach taken uses unsupervised clustering of sequences using the normalized longest common subsequence (LCS) as a similarity measure, followed by detailed analysis of outliers to detect anomalies. As the LCS measure is expensive to compute, the first part of the paper discusses existing algorithms, such as the Hunt-Szymanski algorithm, that have low time-complexity. We then discuss why these algorithms often do not work well in practice and present a new hybrid algorithm for computing the LCS that, in our tests, outperforms the Hunt-Szymanski algorithm by a factor of five. The second part of the paper presents new algorithms for outlier analysis that provide comprehensible indicators as to why a particular sequence was deemed to be an outlier. The algorithms provide a coherent description to an analyst of the anomalies in the sequence, compared to more normal sequences. The algorithms we present are general and domain-independent, so we discuss applications in related areas such as anomaly detection.

Budalakoti, Suratna; Srivastava, Ashok N.; Akella, Ram; Turkov, Eugene

2006-01-01

159

Fitting parametric random effects models in very large data sets with application to VHA national data  

PubMed Central

Background With the current focus on personalized medicine, patient/subject level inference is often of key interest in translational research. As a result, random effects models (REM) are becoming popular for patient level inference. However, for very large data sets that are characterized by large sample size, it can be difficult to fit REM using commonly available statistical software such as SAS since they require inordinate amounts of computer time and memory allocations beyond what are available preventing model convergence. For example, in a retrospective cohort study of over 800,000 Veterans with type 2 diabetes with longitudinal data over 5 years, fitting REM via generalized linear mixed modeling using currently available standard procedures in SAS (e.g. PROC GLIMMIX) was very difficult and same problems exist in Stata’s gllamm or R’s lme packages. Thus, this study proposes and assesses the performance of a meta regression approach and makes comparison with methods based on sampling of the full data. Data We use both simulated and real data from a national cohort of Veterans with type 2 diabetes (n=890,394) which was created by linking multiple patient and administrative files resulting in a cohort with longitudinal data collected over 5 years. Methods and results The outcome of interest was mean annual HbA1c measured over a 5 years period. Using this outcome, we compared parameter estimates from the proposed random effects meta regression (REMR) with estimates based on simple random sampling and VISN (Veterans Integrated Service Networks) based stratified sampling of the full data. Our results indicate that REMR provides parameter estimates that are less likely to be biased with tighter confidence intervals when the VISN level estimates are homogenous. Conclusion When the interest is to fit REM in repeated measures data with very large sample size, REMR can be used as a good alternative. It leads to reasonable inference for both Gaussian and non-Gaussian responses if parameter estimates are homogeneous across VISNs. PMID:23095325

2012-01-01

160

The Differentiated Classroom Observation Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a new classroom observation scale that was developed to examine the differential learning activities and experiences of gifted children educated in regular classroom settings. The Differentiated Classroom Observation Scale (DCOS) is presented in total, with clarification of the coding practices and strategies. Although the…

Cassady, Jerrell C.; Neumeister, Kristie L. Speirs; Adams, Cheryll M.; Cross, Tracy L.; Dixon, Felicia A.; Pierce, Rebecca L.

2004-01-01

161

Validation and evaluation of common large-area display set (CLADS) performance specification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Battelle is under contract with Warner Robins Air Logistics Center to design a Common Large Area Display Set (CLADS) for use in multiple Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence (C4I) applications that currently use 19- inch Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs). Battelle engineers have built and fully tested pre-production prototypes of the CLADS design for AWACS, and are completing pre-production prototype displays for three other platforms simultaneously. With the CLADS design, any display technology that can be packaged to meet the form, fit, and function requirements defined by the Common Large Area Display Head Assembly (CLADHA) performance specification is a candidate for CLADS applications. This technology independent feature reduced the risk of CLADS development, permits life long technology insertion upgrades without unnecessary redesign, and addresses many of the obsolescence problems associated with COTS technology-based acquisition. Performance and environmental testing were performed on the AWACS CLADS and continues on other platforms as a part of the performance specification validation process. A simulator assessment and flight assessment were successfully completed for the AWACS CLADS, and lessons learned from these assessments are being incorporated into the performance specifications. Draft CLADS specifications were released to potential display integrators and manufacturers for review in 1997, and the final version of the performance specifications are scheduled to be released to display integrators and manufacturers in May, 1998. Initial USAF applications include replacements for the E-3 AWACS color monitor assembly, E-8 Joint STARS graphics display unit, and ABCCC airborne color display. Initial U.S. Navy applications include the E-2C ACIS display. For these applications, reliability and maintainability are key objectives. The common design will reduce the cost of operation and maintenance by an estimated 3.3M per year on E-3 AWACS alone. It is realistic to anticipate savings of over 30M per year as CLADS is implemented widely across DoD applications. As commonality and open systems interfaces begin to surface in DoD applications, the CLADS architecture can easily and cost effectively absorb the changes, and avoid COTS obsolescence issues.

Hermann, David J.; Gorenflo, Ronald L.

1998-09-01

162

Supporting Classroom Activities with the BSUL System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the integration of ubiquitous computing systems into classroom settings, in order to provide basic support for classrooms and field activities. We have developed web application components using Java technology and configured a classroom with wireless network access and a web camera for our purposes. In this classroom, the…

Ogata, Hiroaki; Saito, Nobuji A.; Paredes J., Rosa G.; San Martin, Gerardo Ayala; Yano, Yoneo

2008-01-01

163

Second Language Classroom Research. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of second (or foreign) language classroom research is to answer important questions about the learning and teaching of foreign languages. This kind of research collects data from genuine language classrooms or from experimental settings sometimes established to replicate what takes place in the classroom. Classroom research can focus…

Nunan, David

164

Contextual settings, science stories, and large context problems: Toward a more humanistic science education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article addresses the need for and the problem of organizing a science curriculum around contextual settings and science stories that serve to involve and motivate students to develop an understanding of the world that is rooted in the scientific and the humanistic traditions. A program of activities placed around contextual settings, science stories, and contemporary issues of interest is

Arthur Stinner

1995-01-01

165

c Copyright by YOJI YAMADA, 1995 DATA RELOCATION AND PREFETCHING FOR PROGRAMS WITH LARGE DATA SETS  

E-print Network

SETS BY YOJI YAMADA B.Engr., Tokyo Institute of Technology, 1980 M.Engr., Tokyo Institute of Technology the nancial support of Mazda Motor Corporation for my graduate study. Lastly, I would like to acknowledge

Hwu, Wen-mei W.

166

Large Carnivore Management in a MultiLevel Institutional Setting: Problems and Prospects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of the large carnivore policies in Finland, Norway and Sweden (Fennoscandia) is to establish sustainable management of the four large (mammal) carnivores; bear ( ursus arctos ), wolf ( canis lupus ), lynx ( lynx lynx ) wolverine ( gulo gulo ) but also the golden eagle ( aquila chrysaetos ). Since this is clearly in conflict with

Camilla Sandström; Jani Pellikka

167

On the performance of large Gaussian basis sets for the computation of total atomization energies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The total atomization energies of a number of molecules have been computed using an augmented coupled-cluster method and (5s4p3d2f1g) and 4s3p2d1f) atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as well as the correlation consistent valence triple zeta plus polarization (cc-pVTZ) correlation consistent valence quadrupole zeta plus polarization (cc-pVQZ) basis sets. The performance of ANO and correlation consistent basis sets is comparable throughout, although the latter can result in significant CPU time savings. Whereas the inclusion of g functions has significant effects on the computed Sigma D(e) values, chemical accuracy is still not reached for molecules involving multiple bonds. A Gaussian-1 (G) type correction lowers the error, but not much beyond the accuracy of the G1 model itself. Using separate corrections for sigma bonds, pi bonds, and valence pairs brings down the mean absolute error to less than 1 kcal/mol for the spdf basis sets, and about 0.5 kcal/mol for the spdfg basis sets. Some conclusions on the success of the Gaussian-1 and Gaussian-2 models are drawn.

Martin, J. M. L.

1992-01-01

168

Culture in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

2014-01-01

169

Spatio-temporal Knowledge Discovery in Very Large METOC Data Sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

A system allowing for the efficient processing and viewing of dense METOC data sets stored in Network Common Data Format (netted) files is developed using advanced bitmap indexing. A method for netted data extraction and bitmap index creation is presented. Efficient geospatial range and pseudo-KNN queries are implemented. A two step filtering algorithm is shown to greatly enhance the speed

D. Marks; E. Ioup; J. Sample; M. Abdelguerfi; F. Qaddoura

2010-01-01

170

Caught you: threats to confidentiality due to the public release of large-scale genetic data sets  

PubMed Central

Background Large-scale genetic data sets are frequently shared with other research groups and even released on the Internet to allow for secondary analysis. Study participants are usually not informed about such data sharing because data sets are assumed to be anonymous after stripping off personal identifiers. Discussion The assumption of anonymity of genetic data sets, however, is tenuous because genetic data are intrinsically self-identifying. Two types of re-identification are possible: the "Netflix" type and the "profiling" type. The "Netflix" type needs another small genetic data set, usually with less than 100 SNPs but including a personal identifier. This second data set might originate from another clinical examination, a study of leftover samples or forensic testing. When merged to the primary, unidentified set it will re-identify all samples of that individual. Even with no second data set at hand, a "profiling" strategy can be developed to extract as much information as possible from a sample collection. Starting with the identification of ethnic subgroups along with predictions of body characteristics and diseases, the asthma kids case as a real-life example is used to illustrate that approach. Summary Depending on the degree of supplemental information, there is a good chance that at least a few individuals can be identified from an anonymized data set. Any re-identification, however, may potentially harm study participants because it will release individual genetic disease risks to the public. PMID:21190545

2010-01-01

171

Querying XML Data Sources That Export Very Large Sets of Views BOGDAN CAUTIS, Tlcom ParisTech, CNRS LTCI  

E-print Network

5 Querying XML Data Sources That Export Very Large Sets of Views BOGDAN CAUTIS, Télécom Paris Reference Format: Cautis, B., Deutsch, A., Onose, N., and Vassalos, V. 2011. Querying XML data sources. Authors' addresses: B. Cautis, Telecom ParisTech, Computer Science Department, 46 rue Barrault, 75013

Zhou, Yuanyuan

172

Ssecrett and NeuroTrace: Interactive Visualization and Analysis Tools for Large-Scale Neuroscience Data Sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data sets imaged with modern electron microscopes can range from tens of terabytes to about one petabyte. Two new tools, Ssecrett and NeuroTrace, support interactive exploration and analysis of large-scale optical-and electron-microscopy images to help scientists reconstruct complex neural circuits of the mammalian nervous system.

Won-Ki Jeong; Johanna Beyer; Markus Hadwiger; Rusty Blue; Charles Law; Amelio Vázquez Reina; R. Clay Reid; Jeff Lichtman; Hanspeter Pfister

2010-01-01

173

Creation of libraries of recurring mass spectra from large data sets assisted by a dual-column workflow.  

PubMed

An analytical methodology has been developed for extracting recurrent unidentified spectra (RUS) from large GC/MS data sets. Spectra were first extracted from original data files by the Automated Mass Spectral Deconvolution and Identification System (AMDIS; Stein, S. E. J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 1999 , 10 , 770 - 781 ) using settings designed to minimize spurious spectra, followed by searching the NIST library with all unidentified spectra. The spectra that could not be identified were then filtered to remove poorly deconvoluted data and clustered. The results were assumed to be unidentified components. This was tested by requiring each unidentified spectrum to be found in two chromatographic columns with slightly different stationary phases. This methodology has been applied to a large set of pediatric urine samples. A library of spectra and retention indices for derivatized urine components, both identified and recurrent unidentified, has been created and is available for download. PMID:25233296

Mallard, W Gary; Andriamaharavo, N Rabe; Mirokhin, Yuri A; Halket, John M; Stein, Stephen E

2014-10-21

174

Prediction of the adsorption capability onto activated carbon of a large data set of chemicals by local lazy regression method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models based on a large data set containing a total of 3483 organic compounds were developed to predict chemicals' adsorption capability onto activated carbon in gas phrase. Both global multiple linear regression (MLR) method and local lazy regression (LLR) method were used to develop QSPR models. The results proved that LLR has prediction accuracy 10% higher than that of MLR model. By applying LLR method we can predict the test set (787 compounds) with Q2ext of 0.900 and root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.129. The accurate model based on this large data set could be useful to predict adsorption property of new compounds since such model covers a highly diverse structural space.

Lei, Beilei; Ma, Yimeng; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun; Gramatica, Paola

2010-08-01

175

K-groups: Tractable Group Detection on Large Link Data Sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Discovering underlying structure from co-occurrence data is an important task in many fields, including: insurance, intelligence, criminal investigation, epidemiology, human resources, and marketing. For example a store may wish to identify underlying sets of items purchased together or a human,resources department may wish to identify groups of employees,that collaborate with each other. Previously Kubica et. al. presented the group

Jeremy Kubica; Andrew Moore; Jeff Schneider

176

Classroom Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Perhaps the most important skill a good teacher should possess is the ability to control students. A teacher who can devise fascinating and unique lesson plans for her classroom is useless if she can't get the kids to sit down and listen to her instructions. Unfortunately, many beginning teachers simply are not prepared to manage their classrooms effectively. Managing a classroom means you must teach your students behavior expectations, not just post your rules on the classroom wall. Classroom management becomes even more of an issue when it applies to the active nature of the science classroom.

Swango, C. J.; Steward, Sally B.

2003-01-01

177

My Classroom Physical Activity Pyramid: A Tool for Integrating Movement into the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The classroom teacher is a critical team member of a comprehensive school physical activity program and an activity-friendly school environment. Students spend more time in the classroom than in any other school setting or environment. Classrooms are busy places, and classroom teachers must make decisions about how to make the best use of their…

Orlowski, Marietta; Lorson, Kevin; Lyon, Anna; Minoughan, Susan

2013-01-01

178

A multi-threaded streaming pipeline architecture for large structured data sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer simulation and digital measuring systems are now generating data of unprecedented size. The size of data is becoming so large that conventional visualization tools are incapable of processing it, which is in turn is impacting the effectiveness of computational tools. In this paper we describe an object-oriented architecture that addresses this problem by automatically breaking data into pieces, and

C. Charles Law; William J. Schroeder; Kenneth M. Martin; Joshua Temkin

1999-01-01

179

Alternative Paths to Competitive Advantage: A Fuzzy-Set Analysis of the Origins of Large Firms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scholars have documented the importance of national-level factors for the competitive success of firms on a global scale. These studies typically identify multiple factors that are behind the emergence of large and successful firms in particular national clusters. However, there has been relatively little research identifying whether such factors are all collectively necessary to produce the outcome, or whether only

Joonas Järvinen; Juha-Antti Lamberg; Johan-Peter Murmann; Jari Ojala

2009-01-01

180

Reduction of large frequency response function data sets using a robust singular value decomposition  

Microsoft Academic Search

In several mechanical engineering applications high spatial resolution frequency response function (FRF) measurements are required. Adapted optical measurement instruments like the laser scanning Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) exist to perform this task. The result of this high spatial resolution measurement is that a large amount of data is available. The processing of this data – i.e. extracting modal parameters from the

S. Vanlanduit; B. Cauberghe; P. Guillaume; P. Verboven; E. Parloo

2006-01-01

181

Early Childhood Experiences and Kindergarten Success: A Population-Based Study of a Large Urban Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the unique protective influence of center-based early care and education experiences on kindergarten outcomes for children entering public school kindergarten. The 3,969 participants were geographically and de- mographically representative of an entire kindergarten cohort in a large urban school district. Child age, gender, ethnicity, family poverty, low maternal education, and neighborhood were found to be risks for

John W. Fantuzzo; Heather L. Rouse; Paul A. McDermott; Yumiko Sekino; Stephanie Childs; Andrea Weiss

2005-01-01

182

Data for the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Data for the Classroom collection gathers datasets that have accompanying instructional materials or other pertinent information for using the dataset in a classroom setting for grades K-16. The data may be numerical, visual, maps, charts, tables or images. The data may be observational, remotely sensed or model data. The primary component is that there are materials supporting the use and understanding of the data either by educators or directly by students. Additionally, the dataset itself is desribed.

183

Modeling the kinetics of large sets of reactions on metal surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

We are concerned with constructing and solving kinetic models for large-scale catalytic mechanisms involving hundreds of reactions.\\u000a We need reliable estimates for hundreds of rate constants for each project we undertake. In order to obtain reliable estimates\\u000a of activation barriers with co-adsorbate effects, we employ the UBI-QEP method whenever applicable. We also bring quantum\\u000a mechanical electronic structure methods to bear

H. Sellers

2007-01-01

184

Parallel k-Means Clustering for Quantitative Ecoregion Delineation Using Large Data Sets  

SciTech Connect

Identification of geographic ecoregions has long been of interest to environmental scientists and ecologists for identifying regions of similar ecological and environmental conditions. Such classifications are important for predicting suitable species ranges, for stratification of ecological samples, and to help prioritize habitat preservation and remediation efforts. Hargrove and Hoffman (1999, 2009) have developed geographical spatio-temporal clustering algorithms and codes and have successfully applied them to a variety of environmental science domains, including ecological regionalization; environmental monitoring network design; analysis of satellite-, airborne-, and ground-based remote sensing, and climate model-model and model-measurement intercomparison. With the advances in state-of-the-art satellite remote sensing and climate models, observations and model outputs are available at increasingly high spatial and temporal resolutions. Long time series of these high resolution datasets are extremely large in size and growing. Analysis and knowledge extraction from these large datasets are not just algorithmic and ecological problems, but also pose a complex computational problem. This paper focuses on the development of a massively parallel multivariate geographical spatio-temporal clustering code for analysis of very large datasets using tens of thousands processors on one of the fastest supercomputers in the world.

Kumar, Jitendra [ORNL] [ORNL; Mills, Richard T [ORNL] [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL] [ORNL; HargroveJr., William Walter [USDA Forest Service

2011-01-01

185

Latest developments in the display of large-scale ionospheric and thermospheric data sets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Over the past decade, data base sizes have continually increased and will continue to do so in the future. This problem of size is further compounded because the trend in present-day studies is to use data from many different locations and different instruments and then compare it with data from global scale physical models. The latter produce data bases of comparable if not even larger size. Much of the data can be viewed as 'image' time sequences and is most readily viewed on color display terminals. These data sets reside in national or owner-generated data bases linked together by computer networks. As the size increases, just moving this data around, taking 'quick-looks' at the data, or even storing it locally become severe problems compromising the scientific return from the data. Is the present-day technology with these analysis techniques being used in the best way? What are the prospects for reducing the storage and transmission size of the data sets? Examples of such problems and potential solutions are described in this paper.

Sojka, J. J.

1992-01-01

186

Large-Eddy Simulation of Premixed and Partially Premixed Turbulent Combustion Using a Level Set Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Level-set methods (G-equation) have been recently used in the context of RANS to model turbulent premixed (Hermann 2000) or partially premixed (Chen 1999) combustion. By directly taking into account unsteady effects, LES can be expected to improve predictions over RANS. Since the reaction zone thickness of premixed flames in technical devices is usually much smaller than the LES grid spacing, chemical reactions completely occur on the sub-grid scales and hence have to be modeled entirely. In the level-set methodology, the flame front is represented by an arbitrary iso-surface G0 of a scalar field G whose evolution is described by the so-called G-equation. This equation is only valid at G=G_0, and hence decoupled from other G levels. Heat release is then modeled using a flamelet approach in which temperature is determined as a function of G and the mixture-fraction Z. In the present study, the proposed approach has been formulated for LES and validated using data from a turbulent Bunsen burner experiment (Chen, Peters 1996). Simulation of an experimental Lean Premixed Prevapourised (LPP) dump combustor (Besson, Bruel 1999, 2000) under different premixed or partially premixed conditions will also be presented.

Duchamp de Lageneste, Laurent; Pitsch, Heinz

2001-11-01

187

Using large clinical data sets to infer pathogenicity for rare copy number variants in autism cohorts.  

PubMed

Copy number variants (CNVs) have a major role in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and several of these have reached statistical significance in case-control analyses. Nevertheless, current ASD cohorts are not large enough to detect very rare CNVs that may be causative or contributory (that is, risk alleles). Here, we use a tiered approach, in which clinically significant CNVs are first identified in large clinical cohorts of neurodevelopmental disorders (including but not specific to ASD), after which these CNVs are then systematically identified within well-characterized ASD cohorts. We focused our initial analysis on 48 recurrent CNVs (segmental duplication-mediated 'hotspots') from 24 loci in 31?516 published clinical cases with neurodevelopmental disorders and 13?696 published controls, which yielded a total of 19 deletion CNVs and 11 duplication CNVs that reached statistical significance. We then investigated the overlap of these 30 CNVs in a combined sample of 3955 well-characterized ASD cases from three published studies. We identified 73 deleterious recurrent CNVs, including 36 deletions from 11 loci and 37 duplications from seven loci, for a frequency of 1 in 54; had we considered the ASD cohorts alone, only 58 CNVs from eight loci (24 deletions from three loci and 34 duplications from five loci) would have reached statistical significance. In conclusion, until there are sufficiently large ASD research cohorts with enough power to detect very rare causative or contributory CNVs, data from larger clinical cohorts can be used to infer the likely clinical significance of CNVs in ASD. PMID:23044707

Moreno-De-Luca, D; Sanders, S J; Willsey, A J; Mulle, J G; Lowe, J K; Geschwind, D H; State, M W; Martin, C L; Ledbetter, D H

2013-10-01

188

Independent Principal Component Analysis for biologically meaningful dimension reduction of large biological data sets  

PubMed Central

Background A key question when analyzing high throughput data is whether the information provided by the measured biological entities (gene, metabolite expression for example) is related to the experimental conditions, or, rather, to some interfering signals, such as experimental bias or artefacts. Visualization tools are therefore useful to better understand the underlying structure of the data in a 'blind' (unsupervised) way. A well-established technique to do so is Principal Component Analysis (PCA). PCA is particularly powerful if the biological question is related to the highest variance. Independent Component Analysis (ICA) has been proposed as an alternative to PCA as it optimizes an independence condition to give more meaningful components. However, neither PCA nor ICA can overcome both the high dimensionality and noisy characteristics of biological data. Results We propose Independent Principal Component Analysis (IPCA) that combines the advantages of both PCA and ICA. It uses ICA as a denoising process of the loading vectors produced by PCA to better highlight the important biological entities and reveal insightful patterns in the data. The result is a better clustering of the biological samples on graphical representations. In addition, a sparse version is proposed that performs an internal variable selection to identify biologically relevant features (sIPCA). Conclusions On simulation studies and real data sets, we showed that IPCA offers a better visualization of the data than ICA and with a smaller number of components than PCA. Furthermore, a preliminary investigation of the list of genes selected with sIPCA demonstrate that the approach is well able to highlight relevant genes in the data with respect to the biological experiment. IPCA and sIPCA are both implemented in the R package mixomics dedicated to the analysis and exploration of high dimensional biological data sets, and on mixomics' web-interface. PMID:22305354

2012-01-01

189

Using Large-Scale Classroom Research to Study Student Conceptual Learning in Mechanics and to Develop New Approaches to Learning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) tools and guided discovery curricula have been developed as an aid to all students, including the underprepared and underserved, in learning physical concepts. To guide this development, extensive work has been done to find useful measures of students' conceptual understanding that can be used in widely varying contexts. This paper focuses primarily on the evaluation of student conceptual understanding of mechanics (kinematics and dynamics) with an emphasis on Newton's 1st and 2nd laws in introductory courses in the university. Student understanding of mechanics is looked at before and after traditional instruction. It is examined before and after MBL curricula that are consciously designed to promote active and collaborative learning by students. The results show that the majority of students have difficulty learning essential physical concepts in the best of our traditional courses where students read textbooks, solve textbook problems, listen to well-prepared lectures, and do traditional laboratory activities. Students can, however, learn these fundamental concepts using MBL curricula and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations which have been based on extensive classroom research. Substantial evidence is given that student answers to the short answer questions in the Tools for Scientific Thinking Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation provide a useful statistical means of evaluating students' beliefs and understandings about mechanics. Evidence for the hierarchical learning of velocity, acceleration, and force concepts is presented.

Thornton, Ronald K.

2006-12-07

190

The Impact of Brief Teacher Training on Classroom Management and Child Behavior in At-Risk Preschool Settings: Mediators and Treatment Utility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers from fourteen classrooms were randomly assigned to an adaptation of Incredible Years (IY) teacher training or to teacher training-as-usual. Observations were made of the behavior of 136 target preschool boys and girls nominated by teachers as having many or few conduct problems. Peer and teacher behavior were observed at baseline and post…

Snyder, James; Low, Sabina; Schultz, Tara; Barner, Stacy; Moreno, Desirae; Garst, Meladee; Leiker, Ryan; Swink, Nathan; Schrepferman, Lynn

2011-01-01

191

Setting up a Rayleigh Scattering Based Flow Measuring System in a Large Nozzle Testing Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A molecular Rayleigh scattering based air density measurement system has been built in a large nozzle testing facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The technique depends on the light scattering by gas molecules present in air; no artificial seeding is required. Light from a single mode, continuous wave laser was transmitted to the nozzle facility by optical fiber, and light scattered by gas molecules, at various points along the laser beam, is collected and measured by photon-counting electronics. By placing the laser beam and collection optics on synchronized traversing units, the point measurement technique is made effective for surveying density variation over a cross-section of the nozzle plume. Various difficulties associated with dust particles, stray light, high noise level and vibration are discussed. Finally, a limited amount of data from an underexpanded jet are presented and compared with expected variations to validate the technique.

Panda, Jayanta; Gomez, Carlos R.

2002-01-01

192

SeqPig: simple and scalable scripting for large sequencing data sets in Hadoop  

PubMed Central

Summary: Hadoop MapReduce-based approaches have become increasingly popular due to their scalability in processing large sequencing datasets. However, as these methods typically require in-depth expertise in Hadoop and Java, they are still out of reach of many bioinformaticians. To solve this problem, we have created SeqPig, a library and a collection of tools to manipulate, analyze and query sequencing datasets in a scalable and simple manner. SeqPigscripts use the Hadoop-based distributed scripting engine Apache Pig, which automatically parallelizes and distributes data processing tasks. We demonstrate SeqPig’s scalability over many computing nodes and illustrate its use with example scripts. Availability and Implementation: Available under the open source MIT license at http://sourceforge.net/projects/seqpig/ Contact: andre.schumacher@yahoo.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24149054

Schumacher, Andre; Pireddu, Luca; Niemenmaa, Matti; Kallio, Aleksi; Korpelainen, Eija; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Heljanko, Keijo

2014-01-01

193

Broad-Enrich: functional interpretation of large sets of broad genomic regions  

PubMed Central

Motivation: Functional enrichment testing facilitates the interpretation of Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) data in terms of pathways and other biological contexts. Previous methods developed and used to test for key gene sets affected in ChIP-seq experiments treat peaks as points, and are based on the number of peaks associated with a gene or a binary score for each gene. These approaches work well for transcription factors, but histone modifications often occur over broad domains, and across multiple genes. Results: To incorporate the unique properties of broad domains into functional enrichment testing, we developed Broad-Enrich, a method that uses the proportion of each gene’s locus covered by a peak. We show that our method has a well-calibrated false-positive rate, performing well with ChIP-seq data having broad domains compared with alternative approaches. We illustrate Broad-Enrich with 55 ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets using different methods to define gene loci. Broad-Enrich can also be applied to other datasets consisting of broad genomic domains such as copy number variations. Availability and implementation: http://broad-enrich.med.umich.edu for Web version and R package. Contact: sartorma@umich.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25161225

Cavalcante, Raymond G.; Lee, Chee; Welch, Ryan P.; Patil, Snehal; Weymouth, Terry; Scott, Laura J.; Sartor, Maureen A.

2014-01-01

194

New large solar photocatalytic plant: set-up and preliminary results.  

PubMed

A European industrial consortium called SOLARDETOX has been created as the result of an EC-DGXII BRITE-EURAM-III-financed project on solar photocatalytic detoxification of water. The project objective was to develop a simple, efficient and commercially competitive water-treatment technology, based on compound parabolic collectors (CPCs) solar collectors and TiO2 photocatalysis, to make possible easy design and installation. The design, set-up and preliminary results of the main project deliverable, the first European industrial solar detoxification treatment plant, is presented. This plant has been designed for the batch treatment of 2 m3 of water with a 100 m2 collector-aperture area and aqueous aerated suspensions of polycrystalline TiO2 irradiated by sunlight. Fully automatic control reduces operation and maintenance manpower. Plant behaviour has been compared (using dichloroacetic acid and cyanide at 50 mg l(-1) initial concentration as model compounds) with the small CPC pilot plants installed at the Plataforma Solar de Almería several years ago. The first results with high-content cyanide (1 g l(-1)) waste water are presented and plant treatment capacity is calculated. PMID:11996143

Malato, S; Blanco, J; Vidal, A; Fernández, P; Cáceres, J; Trincado, P; Oliveira, J C; Vincent, M

2002-04-01

195

Medium and Long-term Participation in Micro…nance: An Evaluation Using a Large Panel Data Set from Bangladesh  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this paper is to estimate the impact of dierent lengths of par- ticipation in micro…nance, and to distinguish the short-term participation eects from the medium- and long-term ones. It utilises a new, large and unique panel data set with detailed information on micro…nance participation in Bangladesh. The three waves of data enable us to identify continuing participants,

Asadul Islam; Mark N. Harris

196

MUSI: an integrated system for identifying multiple specificity from very large peptide or nucleic acid data sets.  

PubMed

Peptide recognition domains and transcription factors play crucial roles in cellular signaling. They bind linear stretches of amino acids or nucleotides, respectively, with high specificity. Experimental techniques that assess the binding specificity of these domains, such as microarrays or phage display, can retrieve thousands of distinct ligands, providing detailed insight into binding specificity. In particular, the advent of next-generation sequencing has recently increased the throughput of such methods by several orders of magnitude. These advances have helped reveal the presence of distinct binding specificity classes that co-exist within a set of ligands interacting with the same target. Here, we introduce a software system called MUSI that can rapidly analyze very large data sets of binding sequences to determine the relevant binding specificity patterns. Our pipeline provides two major advances. First, it can detect previously unrecognized multiple specificity patterns in any data set. Second, it offers integrated processing of very large data sets from next-generation sequencing machines. The results are visualized as multiple sequence logos describing the different binding preferences of the protein under investigation. We demonstrate the performance of MUSI by analyzing recent phage display data for human SH3 domains as well as microarray data for mouse transcription factors. PMID:22210894

Kim, Taehyung; Tyndel, Marc S; Huang, Haiming; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Bader, Gary D; Gfeller, David; Kim, Philip M

2012-03-01

197

Making sense of large-scale kinase inhibitor bioactivity data sets: a comparative and integrative analysis.  

PubMed

We carried out a systematic evaluation of target selectivity profiles across three recent large-scale biochemical assays of kinase inhibitors and further compared these standardized bioactivity assays with data reported in the widely used databases ChEMBL and STITCH. Our comparative evaluation revealed relative benefits and potential limitations among the bioactivity types, as well as pinpointed biases in the database curation processes. Ignoring such issues in data heterogeneity and representation may lead to biased modeling of drugs' polypharmacological effects as well as to unrealistic evaluation of computational strategies for the prediction of drug-target interaction networks. Toward making use of the complementary information captured by the various bioactivity types, including IC50, K(i), and K(d), we also introduce a model-based integration approach, termed KIBA, and demonstrate here how it can be used to classify kinase inhibitor targets and to pinpoint potential errors in database-reported drug-target interactions. An integrated drug-target bioactivity matrix across 52,498 chemical compounds and 467 kinase targets, including a total of 246,088 KIBA scores, has been made freely available. PMID:24521231

Tang, Jing; Szwajda, Agnieszka; Shakyawar, Sushil; Xu, Tao; Hintsanen, Petteri; Wennerberg, Krister; Aittokallio, Tero

2014-03-24

198

Classroom Management in Diverse Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom management continues to be a serious concern for teachers and especially in urban and diverse learning environments. The authors present the culturally responsive classroom management practices of two teachers from an urban and diverse middle school to extend the construct, culturally responsive classroom management. The principles that…

Milner, H. Richard, IV; Tenore, F. Blake

2010-01-01

199

Goal Setting and Student Achievement: A Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The connection between goals and student motivation has been widely investigated in the research literature, but the relationship of goal setting and student achievement at the classroom level has remained largely unexplored. This article reports the findings of a 5-year quasi-experimental study examining goal setting and student achievement in…

Moeller, Aleidine J.; Theiler, Janine M.; Wu, Chaorong

2012-01-01

200

A heuristic algorithm for pattern identification in large multivariate analysis of geophysical data sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper aims to present a heuristic algorithm with factor analysis and a local search optimization system for pattern identification problems as applied to large and multivariate aero-geophysical data. The algorithm was developed in MATLAB code using both multivariate and univariate methodologies. Two main analysis steps are detailed in the MATLAB code: the first deals with multivariate factor analysis to reduce the problem of dimension, and to orient the variables in an independent and orthogonal structure; and the second with the application of a novel local research optimization system based on univariate structure. The process of local search is simple and consistent because it solves a multivariate problem by summing up univariate and independent problems. Thus, it can reduce computational time and render the efficiency of estimates independent of the data bank. The aero-geophysical data include the results of the magnetometric and gammaspectrometric (TC, K, Th, and U channels) surveys for the Santa Maria region (RS, Brazil). After the classification, when the observations are superimposed on the regional map, one can see that data belonging to the same subspace appear closer to each other revealing some physical law governing area pattern distribution. The analysis of variance for the original variables as functions of the subspaces obtained results in different mean behaviors for all the variables. This result shows that the use of factor transformation captures the discriminative capacity of the original variables. The proposed algorithm for multivariate factor analysis and the local search system open up new challenges in aero-geophysical data handling and processing techniques.

da Silva Pereira, João Eduardo; Strieder, Adelir José; Amador, Janete Pereira; da Silva, José Luiz Silvério; Volcato Descovi Filho, Leônidas Luiz

2010-01-01

201

Designing Websites for Displaying Large Data Sets and Images on Multiple Platforms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The desire to build websites to analyze and display ever increasing amounts of scientific data and images pushes for web site designs which utilize large displays, and to use the display area as efficiently as possible. Yet, scientists and users of their data are increasingly wishing to access these websites in the field and on mobile devices. This results in the need to develop websites that can support a wide range of devices and screen sizes, and to optimally use whatever display area is available. Historically, designers have addressed this issue by building two websites; one for mobile devices, and one for desktop environments, resulting in increased cost, duplicity of work, and longer development times. Recent advancements in web design technology and techniques have evolved which allow for the development of a single website that dynamically adjusts to the type of device being used to browse the website (smartphone, tablet, desktop). In addition they provide the opportunity to truly optimize whatever display area is available. HTML5 and CSS3 give web designers media query statements which allow design style sheets to be aware of the size of the display being used, and to format web content differently based upon the queried response. Web elements can be rendered in a different size, position, or even removed from the display entirely, based upon the size of the display area. Using HTML5/CSS3 media queries in this manner is referred to as "Responsive Web Design" (RWD). RWD in combination with technologies such as LESS and Twitter Bootstrap allow the web designer to build web sites which not only dynamically respond to the browser display size being used, but to do so in very controlled and intelligent ways, ensuring that good layout and graphic design principles are followed while doing so. At the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Alaska Satellite Facility SAR Data Center (ASF) recently redesigned their popular Vertex application and converted it from a traditional, fixed-layout website into a RWD site built on HTML5, LESS and Twitter Bootstrap. Vertex is a data portal for remotely sensed imagery of the earth, offering Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data products from the global ASF archive. By using Responsive Web Design, ASF is able to provide access to a massive collection of SAR imagery and allow the user to use mobile devices and desktops to maximum advantage. ASF's Vertex web site demonstrates that with increased interface flexibility, scientists, managers and users can increase their personal effectiveness by accessing data portals from their preferred device as their science dictates.

Anderson, A.; Wolf, V. G.; Garron, J.; Kirschner, M.

2012-12-01

202

The Viking viewer for connectomics: scalable multi-user annotation and summarization of large volume data sets  

PubMed Central

Modern microscope automation permits the collection of vast amounts of continuous anatomical imagery in both two and three dimensions. These large data sets present significant challenges for data storage, access, viewing, annotation and analysis. The cost and overhead of collecting and storing the data can be extremely high. Large data sets quickly exceed an individual's capability for timely analysis and present challenges in efficiently applying transforms, if needed. Finally annotated anatomical data sets can represent a significant investment of resources and should be easily accessible to the scientific community. The Viking application was our solution created to view and annotate a 16.5 TB ultrastructural retinal connectome volume and we demonstrate its utility in reconstructing neural networks for a distinctive retinal amacrine cell class. Viking has several key features. (1) It works over the internet using HTTP and supports many concurrent users limited only by hardware. (2) It supports a multi-user, collaborative annotation strategy. (3) It cleanly demarcates viewing and analysis from data collection and hosting. (4) It is capable of applying transformations in real-time. (5) It has an easily extensible user interface, allowing addition of specialized modules without rewriting the viewer. PMID:21118201

ANDERSON, JR; MOHAMMED, S; GRIMM, B; JONES, BW; KOSHEVOY, P; TASDIZEN, T; WHITAKER, R; MARC, RE

2011-01-01

203

The Viking viewer for connectomics: scalable multi-user annotation and summarization of large volume data sets.  

PubMed

Modern microscope automation permits the collection of vast amounts of continuous anatomical imagery in both two and three dimensions. These large data sets present significant challenges for data storage, access, viewing, annotation and analysis. The cost and overhead of collecting and storing the data can be extremely high. Large data sets quickly exceed an individual's capability for timely analysis and present challenges in efficiently applying transforms, if needed. Finally annotated anatomical data sets can represent a significant investment of resources and should be easily accessible to the scientific community. The Viking application was our solution created to view and annotate a 16.5 TB ultrastructural retinal connectome volume and we demonstrate its utility in reconstructing neural networks for a distinctive retinal amacrine cell class. Viking has several key features. (1) It works over the internet using HTTP and supports many concurrent users limited only by hardware. (2) It supports a multi-user, collaborative annotation strategy. (3) It cleanly demarcates viewing and analysis from data collection and hosting. (4) It is capable of applying transformations in real-time. (5) It has an easily extensible user interface, allowing addition of specialized modules without rewriting the viewer. PMID:21118201

Anderson, J R; Mohammed, S; Grimm, B; Jones, B W; Koshevoy, P; Tasdizen, T; Whitaker, R; Marc, R E

2011-01-01

204

Effective Communication in Multicultural Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research tries to determine effective intercultural classroom communication in the American higher education setting. Theories on classroom communication and intercultural communication (Uncertainty Reduction and Communication Accommodation) are used to build the framework. Subjects were four professors from three different academic…

Liao, Xiaofan

205

The Nonsexist Classroom. Primary Place.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents strategies to help teachers keep elementary classrooms free of sex-role stereotyping. The article explains how to set the tone, observe classroom behavior, share nonsexist lessons, provide role models, modify sexist statements, connect with parents, discuss female heroes, reverse traditional roles, use nonsexist photo files, and make role…

Taus, Kay; Spann, Mary Beth

1992-01-01

206

Knowledge and theme discovery across very large biological data sets using distributed queries: a prototype combining unstructured and structured data.  

PubMed

As the discipline of biomedical science continues to apply new technologies capable of producing unprecedented volumes of noisy and complex biological data, it has become evident that available methods for deriving meaningful information from such data are simply not keeping pace. In order to achieve useful results, researchers require methods that consolidate, store and query combinations of structured and unstructured data sets efficiently and effectively. As we move towards personalized medicine, the need to combine unstructured data, such as medical literature, with large amounts of highly structured and high-throughput data such as human variation or expression data from very large cohorts, is especially urgent. For our study, we investigated a likely biomedical query using the Hadoop framework. We ran queries using native MapReduce tools we developed as well as other open source and proprietary tools. Our results suggest that the available technologies within the Big Data domain can reduce the time and effort needed to utilize and apply distributed queries over large datasets in practical clinical applications in the life sciences domain. The methodologies and technologies discussed in this paper set the stage for a more detailed evaluation that investigates how various data structures and data models are best mapped to the proper computational framework. PMID:24312478

Mudunuri, Uma S; Khouja, Mohamad; Repetski, Stephen; Venkataraman, Girish; Che, Anney; Luke, Brian T; Girard, F Pascal; Stephens, Robert M

2013-01-01

207

Use of the Classroom Management Link System (CMLS) Across Multiple Classrooms  

E-print Network

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the Classroom Management Link System (CMLS) across classrooms using a multiple baseline design. CMLS is a preventive system that uses rule development, self-monitoring, goal setting...

Lee, Steven W.; Shepard, Courtney

2013-08-01

208

Teaching Cell Biology in the Large-Enrollment Classroom: Methods to Promote Analytical Thinking and Assessment of Their Effectiveness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A large-enrollment, undergraduate cellular biology lecture course is described whose primary goal is to help students acquire skill in the interpretation of experimental data. The premise is that this kind of analytical reasoning is not intuitive for most people and, in the absence of hands-on laboratory experience, will not readily develop unless…

Kitchen, Elizabeth; Bell, John D.; Reeve, Suzanne; Sudweeks, Richard R.; Bradshaw, William S.

2003-01-01

209

Teaching Cell Biology in the Large-Enrollment Classroom: Methods to Promote Analytical Thinking and Assessment of Their Effectiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large-enrollment, undergraduate cellular biology lecture course is described whose primary goal is to help students acquire skill in the interpretation of experimental data. The premise is that this kind of analytical reasoning is not intuitive for most people and, in the absence of hands-on laboratory experience, will not readily develop unless instructional methods and examinations specifically designed to foster

Elizabeth Kitchen; John D. Bell; Suzanne Reeve; Richard R. Sudweeks; William S. Bradshaw

2003-01-01

210

Smart Classrooms: Architectural Requirements and Deployment Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides an architectural classification of smart classrooms and discusses the types of technologies used in their implementation. It examines the methodologies being used to make distance learning an exciting experience and as effective as the traditional classroom type education. Furthermore, the paper shows how commonly used smart classroom settings can be extended to a model where a single

G. G. D. Nishantha; D. Pishva; Y. Hayashida

2008-01-01

211

Is Our Classroom an Ecological Place?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The essence of ecology is life and its diversity, integrity, openness and coexistence. When one contemplates and analyzes classroom from the perspective of ecology, classroom should contain open-ended and multiple goals instead of a single and pre-set goal; classroom is more flexible, allowing great diversity instead of being narrow-minded,…

Xia, Wang

2006-01-01

212

Taming awfully large data sets: Using self-organizing maps for analyzing spatial and temporal trends of water quality data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The European Water Framework directive requires monitoring and evaluating surface and subsurface water quality. However, few methods exist to assess comprehensive and multi-dimensional data sets that are likely to reflect a variety of hydrological and biogeochemical processes. Self-organizing maps are now increasingly used as data-mining tools. They turned out to be a powerful tool to visualize this type of data sets, and to investigate spatial patterns and temporal trends in a very effective way. This type of artificial neural networks projects high-dimensional data into a low-dimensional (usually 2-dimensional) space in a non-linear way, aiming at preserving the similarity between different vectors. This technique has been used to analyse the complete groundwater quality data set of the Bavarian Geological Survey as well as a comprehensive data set of an intensively monitored watershed in North Bavaria. Here, 3600 samples from 7 streams and 31 wells, covering the 1987 2002 period, and comprising 13 parameters, were analysed. The self-organizing map clearly distinguished between three groups of sampling sites, i.e., upland sites close to the watershed boundary, upland sites in the central part of the watershed, and wetland sites. Moreover, long-term trends at some streams and groundwater wells could be clearly identified in the same graph and could clearly be discriminated from short-term fluctuations that are due to discharge or groundwater level fluctuations. This provided substantial insight into long-term changes of the dynamics that determine stream water quality, including the impact of wetlands. In addition, contamination of one of the groundwater wells could be clearly traced through space and time. These highly encouraging results suggest to used self-organizing maps as very efficient tools to handle large monitoring data sets.

Lischeid, G.

2003-04-01

213

A Study of Classroom Response System Clickers: Increasing Student Engagement and Performance in a Large Undergraduate Lecture Class on Architectural Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the effectiveness of a classroom response system (CRS) and architecture students' perceptions of real-time feedback. CRS is designed to increase active engagement of students by their responses to a question or prompt via wireless keypads. Feedback is immediately portrayed on a classroom projector for discussion. The authors…

Bachman, Leonard; Bachman, Christine

2011-01-01

214

Achieving the Complete-Basis Limit in Large Molecular Clusters: Computationally Efficient Procedures to Eliminate Basis-Set Superposition Error  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous electronic structure studies that have relied on fragmentation have been primarily interested in those methods' abilities to replicate the supersystem energy (or a related energy difference) without recourse to the ability of those supersystem results to replicate experiment or high accuracy benchmarks. Here we focus on replicating accurate ab initio benchmarks, that are suitable for comparison to experimental data. In doing this it becomes imperative that we correct our methods for basis-set superposition errors (BSSE) in a computationally feasible way. This criterion leads us to develop a new method for BSSE correction, which we term the many-body counterpoise correction, or MBn for short. MBn is truncated at order n, in much the same manner as a normal many-body expansion leading to a decrease in computational time. Furthermore, its formulation in terms of fragments makes it especially suitable for use with pre-existing fragment codes. A secondary focus of this study is directed at assessing fragment methods' abilities to extrapolate to the complete basis set (CBS) limit as well as compute approximate triples corrections. Ultimately, by analysis of (H_2O)_6 and (H_2O)_{10}F^- systems, it is concluded that with large enough basis-sets (triple or quad zeta) fragment based methods can replicate high level benchmarks in a fraction of the time.

Richard, Ryan M.; Herbert, John M.

2013-06-01

215

Classroom Tour  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this 5-minute video a mathematics teacher demonstrates how she incorporates accessibility strategies into her physical classroom environment. Several details are shown about the organization and management of a math classroom with a view toward accessibility, expectations, kinesthetic involvement, and a positive environment.

Teacherline

2012-01-01

216

Teaching Cell Biology in the Large-Enrollment Classroom: Methods to Promote Analytical Thinking and Assessment of Their Effectiveness  

PubMed Central

A large-enrollment, undergraduate cellular biology lecture course is described whose primary goal is to help students acquire skill in the interpretation of experimental data. The premise is that this kind of analytical reasoning is not intuitive for most people and, in the absence of hands-on laboratory experience, will not readily develop unless instructional methods and examinations specifically designed to foster it are employed. Promoting scientific thinking forces changes in the roles of both teacher and student. We describe didactic strategies that include directed practice of data analysis in a workshop format, active learning through verbal and written communication, visualization of abstractions diagrammatically, and the use of ancillary small-group mentoring sessions with faculty. The implications for a teacher in reducing the breadth and depth of coverage, becoming coach instead of lecturer, and helping students to diagnose cognitive weaknesses are discussed. In order to determine the efficacy of these strategies, we have carefully monitored student performance and have demonstrated a large gain in a pre- and posttest comparison of scores on identical problems, improved test scores on several successive midterm examinations when the statistical analysis accounts for the relative difficulty of the problems, and higher scores in comparison to students in a control course whose objective was information transfer, not acquisition of reasoning skills. A novel analytical index (student mobility profile) is described that demonstrates that this improvement was not random, but a systematic outcome of the teaching/learning strategies employed. An assessment of attitudes showed that, in spite of finding it difficult, students endorse this approach to learning, but also favor curricular changes that would introduce an analytical emphasis earlier in their training. PMID:14506506

Kitchen, Elizabeth; Bell, John D.; Reeve, Suzanne; Sudweeks, Richard R.; Bradshaw, William S.

2003-01-01

217

Investigation of anticlines using field measurements and remote methods: Influence and impact of tectonic settings on large rock slope failures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Structural and rock mass quality characterization of rock slopes using remote methods has greatly improved over the last years. In particular, the use of GB-LiDAR and High Resolution Digital Elevation Models allows identifying geometry and characteristics of ductile and brittle structures with the possibility to extend the investigations to other inaccessible areas. This study proposes to combine field mapping, Aerial and Terrestrial Laser scanning (ALS, TLS) to investigate the structural features and characteristics of folded layers (fold shape and geometrical evolution, fractures associated to folding) and to interpret the role of these tectonic features in terms of predisposing factors to large rock slope instabilities. Two study sites were investigated; both affected by décollement folds (thin-skinned tectonics) and large rock slope deformations (Graitery anticline in the Swiss Jura Mountains and Livingstone anticline in the Canadian Foothills). The results show the impact and influence of large scale tectonic structures (here regional scale anticlines) on the distribution and the geometrical characteristics of the different discontinuity sets. The spatial variability of the fracturing orientation and of the blocks volumes allows separating the different sectors of the anticlines in distinct areas. Morphological indicators of large scale gravitational movements (mainly large gravitational cracks) present in the anticlines are used to determine the extent of the unstable rock compartments. In addition to field and remote sensing evidences, geomechanical modelling is performed to evaluate the contribution of the tectonic structural features (mainly orientation, spacing and persistence) on the unstable compartments' failure mechanisms and volumes. This study also shows the usefulness and power of remote sensing data for structural geology interpretations as it allows dealing with information in 3D and proposing multi-scale approaches (from outcrop-scale to anticline-scale structures). Eventually, the results from both field sites along with the interpretations from other comparable sites open new perspectives in the understanding of fold related brittle structures development, as well as their significance for mechanisms and location prediction of large rockslides affecting folded sedimentary strata.

Humair, Florian; Epard, Jean-Luc; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Pana, Dinu; Froese, Corey

2013-04-01

218

WebViz:A Web-based Collaborative Interactive Visualization System for large-Scale Data Sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

WebViz is a web-based application designed to conduct collaborative, interactive visualizations of large data sets for multiple users, allowing researchers situated all over the world to utilize the visualization services offered by the University of Minnesota’s Laboratory for Computational Sciences and Engineering (LCSE). This ongoing project has been built upon over the last 3 1/2 years .The motivation behind WebViz lies primarily with the need to parse through an increasing amount of data produced by the scientific community as a result of larger and faster multicore and massively parallel computers coming to the market, including the use of general purpose GPU computing. WebViz allows these large data sets to be visualized online by anyone with an account. The application allows users to save time and resources by visualizing data ‘on the fly’, wherever he or she may be located. By leveraging AJAX via the Google Web Toolkit (http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/), we are able to provide users with a remote, web portal to LCSE's (http://www.lcse.umn.edu) large-scale interactive visualization system already in place at the University of Minnesota. LCSE’s custom hierarchical volume rendering software provides high resolution visualizations on the order of 15 million pixels and has been employed for visualizing data primarily from simulations in astrophysics to geophysical fluid dynamics . In the current version of WebViz, we have implemented a highly extensible back-end framework built around HTTP "server push" technology. The web application is accessible via a variety of devices including netbooks, iPhones, and other web and javascript-enabled cell phones. Features in the current version include the ability for users to (1) securely login (2) launch multiple visualizations (3) conduct collaborative visualization sessions (4) delegate control aspects of a visualization to others and (5) engage in collaborative chats with other users within the user interface of the web application. These features are all in addition to a full range of essential visualization functions including 3-D camera and object orientation, position manipulation, time-stepping control, and custom color/alpha mapping.

Yuen, D. A.; McArthur, E.; Weiss, R. M.; Zhou, J.; Yao, B.

2010-12-01

219

Tips from the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four short articles are combined: "Adding Discourse-Level Practice to Sentence-Level Exercises" (Eric S. Nelson); "Presenting Picture Books in the ESL Classroom" (Lijun Shen); "Role Playing in a Large Class" (Ellen Rosen); and "Calvin and Hobbes and Other Icons of Americana" (Daniel J. Conrad). (Contains seven references.) (LB)

TESOL Journal, 1993

1993-01-01

220

Flexible Classroom Furniture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom design for the 21st-century learning environment should accommodate a variety of learning skills and needs. The space should be large enough so it can be configured to accommodate a number of learning activities. This also includes furniture that provides flexibility and accommodates collaboration and interactive work among students and…

Kim Hassell,

2011-01-01

221

Strategies in Classroom Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Teaching—always a challenging profession —has, in today's complex society, become even more difficult. Large classes, sophisticated students, legal constraints, all compound the problems of dealing with student misbehavior. Today's teacher must be well-prepared to deal with problems, this author believes. He outlines six strategies that constitute a basic plan for classroom management.

Robert L. Shrigley

1979-01-01

222

Classroom interactions and science inquiry: A comparative study examining differential implementation of a science program in two middle school classrooms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation explores two classroom communities during the implementation of a new environmental science curriculum. The classrooms are similar in that both are located in the same middle school and led by experienced classroom teachers. Despite these similarities, differences among learning outcomes are found in analyses of student pre- and post-science tests in the two rooms. Through videotape analysis of classroom interaction within parallel curricular activities, learning opportunities are contrasted in terms of the social and cognitive organization of science activities and the roles played by teachers, students, and scientists as manifested in their discourse. In one classroom, tasks flow between whole class discussions and small group work. Curricular activities are interwoven with transitions eased as goals are shared with students. Scientific concepts are connected through various activities and related to ideas outside of the classroom. Furthermore, the classroom community is united, established largely through the teacher's discourse patterns, such as deictics (specifically, inclusive personal pronouns). Moreover, the teacher emphasizes that she is learning alongside the students. In the other classroom, the focus of their science period is typically centered around whole class instruction or small group work depending on the particular lesson. This organization accompanied by a heavy use of directives leads to an implicit goal of completing the assigned task. Curricular activities are isolated, with an emphasis on following protocol instructions. Through discursive patterns, such as endearing address terms and exclusive pronouns, a dichotomy is created between the teacher and student. As the designated expert, this teacher imparts her knowledge of science to the students. Several implications emerge from this study. Although pre-packaged, curricular lessons appear identical on paper, the enacted curriculum differs, even in similar settings. Without doubt, science curricula can be useful in providing suggested guidelines and much needed materials for the classroom, but such curricula do not necessarily translate into student inquiry. As researchers and educators, we need to look beyond the curricula into the classrooms themselves. Indeed, this research has convinced me that a better understanding of classroom communities can be gleaned through the study of lesson organization and the classroom roles.

Goldberg, Jennifer Sarah

223

Evaluation of the Paperless Classroom.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Paperless Classroom project explored the use of advanced technology to develop and demonstrate an interface to the large amounts of technical information available in electronic form. A prototype system was developed and field-tested at the AEGIS Trai...

B. A. Morris

1995-01-01

224

Classroom Catapults  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"Wow, our plastic load flew 540 centimeters! This is so cool!" An interdisciplinary unit on catapults was responsible for the excitement and enthusiasm generated in the author's classroom. In their social studies class, students learned about the Middle A

Villano, Diane D.

2001-02-01

225

Inclusive Classrooms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Five Standards-based strategies for successful inclusion of special-needs students in the secondary science classroom are described in this article. Use a multisensory approach; encourage collaboration among students; provide specific expectations and ass

Alexakos, Konstantinos

2001-03-01

226

Classroom Wildlife.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A game is used to study population control factors on a wolf pack and to explore human competition with these animals. A game board and chance cards to be photocopied for use in the classroom are provided. (DH)

Fleer, Daryl

1984-01-01

227

Classroom Triangles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students will use bearing measurements to triangulate and determine objects' locations. Working in teams of two or three, students must put on their investigative hats as they take bearing measurements to specified landmarks in their classroom (or other rooms in the school) from a mystery location. With the extension activity, students are challenged with creating their own map of the classroom or other school location and comparing it with their classmates' efforts.

Lippis, Matt; Axelrad, Penny; Yowell, Janet; Zarske, Malinda S.

2006-01-01

228

Classroom Triangles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students use bearing measurements to triangulate and determine objects' locations. Working in teams of two or three, they must put on their investigative hats as they take bearing measurements to specified landmarks in their classroom (or other rooms in the school) from a "mystery location." With the extension activity, students are challenged with creating their own maps of the classroom or other school location and comparing them with their classmates' efforts.

Institute Of Navigation And Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

229

Simulation Studies as Designed Experiments: The Comparison of Penalized Regression Models in the "Large p, Small n" Setting  

PubMed Central

New algorithms are continuously proposed in computational biology. Performance evaluation of novel methods is important in practice. Nonetheless, the field experiences a lack of rigorous methodology aimed to systematically and objectively evaluate competing approaches. Simulation studies are frequently used to show that a particular method outperforms another. Often times, however, simulation studies are not well designed, and it is hard to characterize the particular conditions under which different methods perform better. In this paper we propose the adoption of well established techniques in the design of computer and physical experiments for developing effective simulation studies. By following best practices in planning of experiments we are better able to understand the strengths and weaknesses of competing algorithms leading to more informed decisions about which method to use for a particular task. We illustrate the application of our proposed simulation framework with a detailed comparison of the ridge-regression, lasso and elastic-net algorithms in a large scale study investigating the effects on predictive performance of sample size, number of features, true model sparsity, signal-to-noise ratio, and feature correlation, in situations where the number of covariates is usually much larger than sample size. Analysis of data sets containing tens of thousands of features but only a few hundred samples is nowadays routine in computational biology, where “omics” features such as gene expression, copy number variation and sequence data are frequently used in the predictive modeling of complex phenotypes such as anticancer drug response. The penalized regression approaches investigated in this study are popular choices in this setting and our simulations corroborate well established results concerning the conditions under which each one of these methods is expected to perform best while providing several novel insights. PMID:25289666

Chaibub Neto, Elias; Bare, J. Christopher; Margolin, Adam A.

2014-01-01

230

RelMon: A General Approach to QA, Validation and Physics Analysis through Comparison of large Sets of Histograms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The estimation of the compatibility of large amounts of histogram pairs is a recurrent problem in high energy physics. The issue is common to several different areas, from software quality monitoring to data certification, preservation and analysis. Given two sets of histograms, it is very important to be able to scrutinize the outcome of several goodness of fit tests, obtain a clear answer about the overall compatibility, easily spot the single anomalies and directly access the concerned histogram pairs. This procedure must be automated in order to reduce the human workload, therefore improving the process of identification of differences which is usually carried out by a trained human mind. Some solutions to this problem have been proposed, but they are experiment specific. RelMon depends only on ROOT and offers several goodness of fit tests (e.g. chi-squared or Kolmogorov-Smirnov). It produces highly readable web reports, in which aggregations of the comparisons rankings are available as well as all the plots of the single histogram overlays. The comparison procedure is fully automatic and scales smoothly towards ensembles of millions of histograms. Examples of RelMon utilisation within the regular workflows of the CMS collaboration and the advantages therewith obtained are described. Its interplay with the data quality monitoring infrastructure is illustrated as well as its role in the QA of the event reconstruction code, its integration in the CMS software release cycle process, CMS user data analysis and dataset validation.

Piparo, Danilo

2012-12-01

231

Wide-range photoabsorption cross-sections of simple metals: large basis-set OPW calculations for sodium.  

PubMed

Photoabsorption cross-sections of simple metals are formulated through a solid-state band theory based on the orthogonalized-plane-wave (OPW) method in Slater's local-exchange approximation, where interband transitions of core and conduction electrons are evaluated up to the soft x-ray regime by using large basis sets. The photoabsorption cross-sections of a sodium crystal are computed for a wide photon energy range from 3 to 1800 eV. It is found that the numerical results reproduce the existing x-ray databases fairly well for energies above the L(2,3)-edge (31 eV), verifying a consistency between solid-state and atomic models for inner-shell photoabsorption; additional oscillatory structures in the present spectra manifest solid-state effects. Our computed results in the vacuum ultraviolet regime (6-30 eV) are also in better agreement with experimental data compared to earlier theories, although some discrepancies remain in the range of 20-30 eV. The influence of the core eigenvalues on the absorption spectra is examined. PMID:23334229

Kitamura, Hikaru

2013-02-13

232

Wide-range photoabsorption cross-sections of simple metals: large basis-set OPW calculations for sodium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Photoabsorption cross-sections of simple metals are formulated through a solid-state band theory based on the orthogonalized-plane-wave (OPW) method in Slater’s local-exchange approximation, where interband transitions of core and conduction electrons are evaluated up to the soft x-ray regime by using large basis sets. The photoabsorption cross-sections of a sodium crystal are computed for a wide photon energy range from 3 to 1800 eV. It is found that the numerical results reproduce the existing x-ray databases fairly well for energies above the L2,3-edge (31 eV), verifying a consistency between solid-state and atomic models for inner-shell photoabsorption; additional oscillatory structures in the present spectra manifest solid-state effects. Our computed results in the vacuum ultraviolet regime (6-30 eV) are also in better agreement with experimental data compared to earlier theories, although some discrepancies remain in the range of 20-30 eV. The influence of the core eigenvalues on the absorption spectra is examined.

Kitamura, Hikaru

2013-02-01

233

Early Miocene Kirka-Phrigian caldera, western Anatolia - an example of large volume silicic magma generation in extensional setting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large rhyolitic ignimbrite occurrences are close connected to the Early Miocene initiation of extensional processes in the central-west Anatolia along Ta?vanl?-Afyon zones. Field correlations, petrographical, geochemical and geochronological data lead to a substantial reinterpretation of the ignimbrite surrounding K?rka area, known from its world-class borate deposits, as representing the climatic event of a caldera collapse, unknown up to now and newly named "K?rka-Phrigian caldera". The caldera, which is roughly oval (24 km x 15km) in shape, one of the largest in Turkey, is supposed to have been formed in a single stage collapse event, at ~19 Ma that generated huge volume extracaldera outflow ignimbrites. Transtensive/distensive tectonic stresses since 25 Ma ago resulted in the NNW-SSE elongation of the magma chamber and influenced the roughly elliptical shape of the subsided block (caldera floor) belonging to the apex of Eski?ehir-Afyon-Isparta volcanic area. Intracaldera post-collapse sedimentation and volcanism (at ~ 18 Ma) was controlled through subsidence-related faults with generation of a series of volcanic structures (mainly domes) showing a large compositional range from saturated silicic rhyolites and crystal-rich trachytes to undersaturated lamproites. Such volcanic rock association is typical for lithospheric extension. In this scenario, enriched mantle components within the subcontinental lithospheric mantle will begin to melt via decompression melting during the initiation of extension. Interaction of these melts with crustal rocks, fractionation processes and crustal anatexis driven by the heat contained in the ascending mantle melts produced the silicic compositions in a large crustal reservoir. Such silicic melts generated the initial eruptions of K?rka-Phrigian caldera ignimbrites. The rock volume and geochemical evidence suggests that silicic volcanic rocks come from a long-lived magma chamber that evolved episodically; after caldera generation there is a shift to small volume episodic rhyolitic, trachytic and lamproitic volcanism, the last ones indicating a more primitive magma input with evident origin in an enriched mantle lithosphere. The volcanic rock succession provides a direct picture of the state of the magmatic system at the time of eruptions that generated caldera and post-caldera structures and offer an excellent example for silicic magma generation and associated potassic and ultrapotassic intermediate-mafic rocks in post-collisional extensional setting.

Seghedi, Ioan; Helvac?, Cahit

2014-05-01

234

The Physics Classroom: Ohm's Law  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive tutorial on Ohm's Law, part of The Physics Classroom tutorial collection, provides a conceptual foundation for understanding one of the most powerful formulas in physics. Multiple circuit diagrams and tables illustrate the relationships among voltage, current, and resistance before users explore the mathematics. The author includes two quizzes for users to gauge their own understanding and perform simple calculations related to resistance. This page is part of The Physics Classroom, a comprehensive set of interactive tutorials, labs, and simulations for students of introductory physics. The Physics Classroom is one of the ComPADRE digital library collections.

Henderson, Tom

2010-06-22

235

Dealing with Large Classes: A Real Challenge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dealing with large classes constitutes a real challenge to every teacher: diversity of students, lack of flexibility, class climate management, difficulty of setting and enforcing classroom behaviour (crowd control), minimum attention to students, limited monitoring of students’ learning and difficulty in engaging students to activities. The major hypothesis is that effective teaching and producing learning is critically constrained by the

Pauline Carolyne Fortes; Abdellatif Tchantchane

2010-01-01

236

Empirical Mining of Large Data Sets Already Helps to Solve Practical Ecological Problems; A Panoply of Working Examples (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here we present diverse examples where empirical mining and statistical analysis of large data sets have already been shown to be useful for a wide variety of practical decision-making problems within the realm of large-scale ecology. Because a full understanding and appreciation of particular ecological phenomena are possible only after hypothesis-directed research regarding the existence and nature of that process, some ecologists may feel that purely empirical data harvesting may represent a less-than-satisfactory approach. Restricting ourselves exclusively to process-driven approaches, however, may actually slow progress, particularly for more complex or subtle ecological processes. We may not be able to afford the delays caused by such directed approaches. Rather than attempting to formulate and ask every relevant question correctly, empirical methods allow trends, relationships and associations to emerge freely from the data themselves, unencumbered by a priori theories, ideas and prejudices that have been imposed upon them. Although they cannot directly demonstrate causality, empirical methods can be extremely efficient at uncovering strong correlations with intermediate "linking" variables. In practice, these correlative structures and linking variables, once identified, may provide sufficient predictive power to be useful themselves. Such correlation "shadows" of causation can be harnessed by, e.g., Bayesian Belief Nets, which bias ecological management decisions, made with incomplete information, toward favorable outcomes. Empirical data-harvesting also generates a myriad of testable hypotheses regarding processes, some of which may even be correct. Quantitative statistical regionalizations based on quantitative multivariate similarity have lended insights into carbon eddy-flux direction and magnitude, wildfire biophysical conditions, phenological ecoregions useful for vegetation type mapping and monitoring, forest disease risk maps (e.g., sudden oak death), global aquatic ecoregion risk maps for aquatic invasives, and forest vertical structure ecoregions (e.g., using extensive LiDAR data sets). Multivariate Spatio-Temporal Clustering, which quantitatively places alternative future conditions on a common footing with present conditions, allows prediction of present and future shifts in tree species ranges, given alternative climatic change forecasts. ForWarn, a forest disturbance detection and monitoring system mining 12 years of national 8-day MODIS phenology data, has been operating since 2010, producing national maps every 8 days showing many kinds of potential forest disturbances. Forest resource managers can view disturbance maps via a web-based viewer, and alerts are issued when particular forest disturbances are seen. Regression-based decadal trend analysis showing long-term forest thrive and decline areas, and individual-based, brute-force supercomputing to map potential movement corridors and migration routes across landscapes will also be discussed. As significant ecological changes occur with increasing rapidity, such empirical data-mining approaches may be the most efficient means to help land managers find the best, most-actionable policies and decision strategies.

Hargrove, W. W.; Hoffman, F. M.; Kumar, J.; Spruce, J.; Norman, S. P.

2013-12-01

237

Rates and Mechanisms of Solidification in Large Magma Bodies: Implications for Melt Extraction in all Tectonic Settings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As is observed in both experiment and theory, in the absence of hydrothermal convection, the majority of magma chamber heat loss occurs via conduction through the roof of the intrusion and into the cold country rock above. The formation of an upper solidification front (or Upper Border Series, UBS), recorded in the rocks both geochemically and texturally, is a natural outcome of the progression of the solidification front from the cold roof to the hot center of the magma chamber. There are, however, a few unique layered mafic intrusions for which little or no UBS exists. In this study, I examine the thermal evolution and crystallization rates of several classic layered intrusions as it is recorded in the extent of the preserved UBS. For those intrusions that have experienced crystallization at the roof, such as the Skaergaard Intrusion, the development of a UBS reduces the temperature gradient at the roof and effectively slows the rate of heat loss from the main magma body. However, for those intrusions that do not have an UBS, such as the Bushveld Complex, the cooling rate is controlled only by the maximum rate of conductive heat loss through the overlying roof rocks, which decreases with time. The implications are two-fold: (1) The relative thickness of the UBS in large intrusions may be the key to quantifying their cooling and solidification rates; and (2) The nature of the magma mush zone near the roof of an intrusion may depend principally on the long-term thermal evolution of the magma body. Particularly at the end stages of crystallization, when the liquids are likely to be highly evolved and high viscosities may inhibit convection, intrusions lacking a well-defined UBS may provide important insights into the mechanics of crystal-liquid separation, melt extraction, and compaction in felsic plutons as well as mafic intrusions. These results are important for long-lived (>500 kyr) or repeatedly replenished magma chambers in all tectonic settings.

VanTongeren, J. A.

2013-12-01

238

Patterns of Limnohabitans microdiversity across a large set of freshwater habitats as revealed by Reverse Line Blot Hybridization.  

PubMed

Among abundant freshwater Betaproteobacteria, only few groups are considered to be of central ecological importance. One of them is the well-studied genus Limnohabitans and mainly its R-BT subcluster, investigated previously mainly by fluorescence in situ hybridization methods. We designed, based on sequences from a large Limnohabitans culture collection, 18 RLBH (Reverse Line Blot Hybridization) probes specific for different groups within the genus Limnohabitans by targeting diagnostic sequences on their 16 S-23 S rRNA ITS regions. The developed probes covered in sum 92% of the available isolates. This set of probes was applied to environmental DNA originating from 161 different European standing freshwater habitats to reveal the microdiversity (intra-genus) patterns of the Limnohabitans genus along a pH gradient. Investigated habitats differed in various physicochemical parameters, and represented a very broad range of standing freshwater habitats. The Limnohabitans microdiversity, assessed as number of RLBH-defined groups detected, increased significantly along the gradient of rising pH of habitats. 14 out of 18 probes returned detection signals that allowed predictions on the distribution of distinct Limnohabitans groups. Most probe-defined Limnohabitans groups showed preferences for alkaline habitats, one for acidic, and some seemed to lack preferences. Complete niche-separation was indicated for some of the probe-targeted groups. Moreover, bimodal distributions observed for some groups of Limnohabitans, suggested further niche separation between genotypes within the same probe-defined group. Statistical analyses suggested that different environmental parameters such as pH, conductivity, oxygen and altitude influenced the distribution of distinct groups. The results of our study do not support the hypothesis that the wide ecological distribution of Limnohabitans bacteria in standing freshwater habitats results from generalist adaptations of these bacteria. Instead, our observations suggest that the genus Limnohabitans, as well as its R-BT subgroup, represent ecologically heterogeneous taxa, which underwent pronounced ecological diversification. PMID:23554898

Jezbera, Jan; Jezberová, Jitka; Kasalický, Vojt?ch; Šimek, Karel; Hahn, Martin W

2013-01-01

239

The Influence of Students with Special Needs Included in Grade-3 Classrooms on the Large-Scale Achievement Scores of Students without Special Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the relationship between the number of students with special needs (designated as exceptional or receiving special education services) in grade-3 classrooms in 1997-1998 and their achievement scores in reading, writing, and mathematics on Ontario's provincial assessment with their peers without special needs. When the…

Demeris, Henk; Childs, Ruth A.; Jordan, Anne

2007-01-01

240

Effects of Methylphenidate and Expectancy on Children With ADHD: Behavior, Academic Performance, and Attributions in a Summer Treatment Program and Regular Classroom Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pharmacological and expectancy effects of 0.3 mg\\/kg methylphenidate on the behavior and attributions of boys with attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder were evaluated. In a within-subject, balanced-placebo design, 136 boys received 4 medication–expectancy conditions. Attributions for success and failure on a daily report card were gathered. Assessments took place within the setting of a summer treatment program and were repeated in boys' regular

William E. Pelham; Betsy Hoza; David R. Pillow; Elizabeth M. Gnagy; Heidi L. Kipp; Andrew R. Greiner; Daniel A. Waschbusch; Sarah T. Trane; Joel Greenhouse; Lara Wolfson; Erin Fitzpatrick

2002-01-01

241

Language Learning in Context: Teacher and Toddler Speech in Three Classroom Play Areas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Patterns of teacher language used with at-risk toddlers in three different play contexts (doll/house, block/truck, and large motor) were studied within a naturally occurring classroom setting. Significantly different language-use patterns by teachers were found in each area, and these were associated with differences in the rate and nature of…

O'Brien, Marion; Bi, Xiufen

1995-01-01

242

Classroom Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are described: (1) "Sequences of Definite Integrals" by T. Dana-Picard; (2) "Structural Analysis of Pythagorean Monoids" by M.-Q Zhan and J. Tong; (3) "A Random Walk Phenomenon under an Interesting Stopping Rule" by S. Chakraborty; (4) "On Some Confidence Intervals for Estimating the…

International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

2007-01-01

243

Caring Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Strategies for creating caring, positive classroom environments from the start include hanging pictures of people from around the world with mirrors to promote reflection, making signs that present concepts about rights, and creating name cards for saving work in progress. Questions for teachers to ask before school begins are included. (SM)

Kreidler, William J.

1996-01-01

244

Classroom Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper investigates the determinants and malleability of noncognitive skills. Using data on boys from the National Education Longitudinal Survey, I focus on youth behavior in the classroom as a measure of noncognitive skills. I find that student behavior during adolescence is persistent. The variation in behavior can be attributed to…

Segal, Carmit

2008-01-01

245

Classroom aggression  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complicated interaction between individual pupils and class groups is highlighted in cases of classroom agression. The author's diagnostic-treatment model aims at examining individual aggressors partly through the use of teachers' assessments of them as members of the class group, at assessing the group's emotional climate, and at identifying the triggering-off stimuli within the group which provoke aggression. The aggressive

Brede Foy

1977-01-01

246

Jigsaw Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Jigsaw Classroom is a website for the jigsaw cooperative learning technique that strives to reduce racial conflict, promote better learning, improve motivation, and increase the enjoyment of the learning experience among school children. The website includes an overview of jigsaw techniques, jigsaw history, implementing tips, related books and articles, and links on cooperative learning, school violence, and jigsaw developer Elliot Aronson.

Aronson, Elliot; Network, Social P.

247

A review of sea spray aerosol source functions using a large global set of sea salt aerosol concentration measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sea spray aerosols (SSA) are an important part of the climate system through their effects on the global radiative budget both directly as scatterers and absorbers of solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) influencing cloud formation, lifetime and precipitation. In terms of their global mass, SSA have the largest uncertainty of all aerosols. In this study we review 21 SSA source functions from the literature, several of which are used in current climate models, and we also propose a new function. Even excluding outliers, the global annual SSA mass produced by these source functions spans roughly 3-70 Pg yr-1 for the different source functions, with relatively little interannual variability for a given function. The FLEXPART Lagrangian model was run in backward mode for a large global set of observed SSA concentrations, comprised of several station networks and ship cruise measurement campaigns. FLEXPART backward calculations produce gridded emission sensitivity fields, which can subsequently be multiplied with gridded SSA production fluxes to obtain modeled SSA concentrations. This allowed to efficiently evaluate all 21source functions at the same time against the measurements. Another advantage of this method is that source-region information on wind speed and sea surface temperatures (SSTs) could be stored and used for improving the SSA source function parameterizations. The best source functions reproduced as much as 70% of the observed SSA concentration variability at several stations, which is comparable with "state of the art" aerosol models. The main driver of SSA production is wind, and we found that the best fit to the observation data could be obtained when the SSA production is proportional to U103.5 where U10 is the source region averaged 10 m wind speed, to the power of 3.5. A strong influence of SST on SSA production could be detected as well, although the underlying physical mechanisms of the SST influence remains unclear. Our new source function gives a global SSA production for particles smaller than 10 ?m of 9 Pg yr-1 and is the best fit to the observed concentrations.

Grythe, H.; Ström, J.; Krejci, R.; Quinn, P.; Stohl, A.

2013-08-01

248

Spectral analysis and cross-correlation of very large seismic data-sets at the persistently restless Telica Volcano, Nicaragua.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Telica Volcano, Nicaragua, is a persistently restless volcano (PRV) with daily seismicity rates that can vary from less than ten events per day to over a thousand events per day. Seismicity rates show little clear correlation with eruptive episodes. This presents a challenge for volcano monitoring and highlights the need for a greater understanding of the patterns of seismicity surrounding eruptive activity at Telica and other PRVs. Multi-parameter seismic investigations, including spectral and multiplet analysis, may provide important precursory information, but are challenging given such high rates of seismicity. We present a program 'peakmatch' that can effectively handle the cross-correlation of hundreds of thousands of events and identify multiplets. In addition, frequency ratios, basic spectral information, and amplitudes can be rapidly calculated for very large seismic data sets. An investigation of the seismic characteristics surrounding the 2011 phreatic eruption at Telica shows an unusual pattern of seismicity. Rather than a precursory increase in seismicity, as is observed prior to many volcanic eruptions, we observe a decrease in seismicity many months before the eruption. Spectral analysis indicates that during periods with high seismicity there are events with a broad range of frequencies, and that during periods of low seismicity there is a progressive loss of events with lower frequency energy (< 3 Hz). Multiplet analysis indicates that during periods with high seismicity there is a high degree of waveform correlation, and that during periods with low seismicity there is a low degree of waveform correlation. We suggest that these patterns of seismicity relate to a cyclic transition between open-system and closed-system degassing. Open-system degassing is observed seismically as periods with high event rates, a broad range of frequency content and high waveform correlation. A transition to closed-system degassing could be via sealing of fluid pathways in the magmatic and/or hydrothermal system, and periods of closed-system degassing are observed seismically as low event rates, higher frequency content and low waveform correlation. The eruption may then represent a transition back from closed-system degassing to open-system degassing.

Rodgers, Mel; Roman, Diana; Geirsson, Halldor; LaFemina, Peter; Munoz, Angelica; Tenorio, Virginia

2014-05-01

249

Appropriate and inappropriate uses of classroom amplification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Currently, classroom amplifiers are being aggressively advocated as substitutes for good acoustics in small mainstream classrooms. Amplifiers are routinely installed without regard to unoccupied classroom noise levels and reverberation times. Amplifiers are being specified by some school districts as a money-saving alternative to mandating compliance with the ANSI standard on classroom acoustics, S12.60-2002. Manufacturers of portable classrooms and noisy wall mounted HVAC systems have joined in supporting the use of classroom amplifiers, claiming that low (35 dBA) classroom noise levels specified by the ANSI standard are unaffordable and unnecessary given amplifiers. The authors believe that the routine use of classroom amplification is appropriate in very large lecture rooms, in special education classrooms for hearing impaired students, for voice-impaired occupants, and perhaps in certain other limited circumstances. The authors explain why they believe the routine use of amplifiers in small mainstream classrooms is an inappropriate substitute for the good classroom acoustics specified in the ANSI standard.

Lubman, David; Sutherland, Louis C.

2005-09-01

250

Photometric selection of quasars in large astronomical data sets with a fast and accurate machine learning algorithm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Future astronomical surveys will produce data on ˜108 objects per night. In order to characterize and classify these sources, we will require algorithms that scale linearly with the size of the data, that can be easily parallelized and where the speedup of the parallel algorithm will be linear in the number of processing cores. In this paper, we present such an algorithm and apply it to the question of colour selection of quasars. We use non-parametric Bayesian classification and a binning algorithm implemented with hash tables (BASH tables). We show that this algorithm's run time scales linearly with the number of test set objects and is independent of the number of training set objects. We also show that it has the same classification accuracy as other algorithms. For current data set sizes, it is up to three orders of magnitude faster than commonly used naive kernel-density-estimation techniques and it is estimated to be about eight times faster than the current fastest algorithm using dual kd-trees for kernel density estimation. The BASH table algorithm scales linearly with the size of the test set data only, and so for future larger data sets, it will be even faster compared to other algorithms which all depend on the size of the test set and the size of the training set. Since it uses linear data structures, it is easier to parallelize compared to tree-based algorithms and its speedup is linear in the number of cores unlike tree-based algorithms whose speedup plateaus after a certain number of cores. Moreover, due to the use of hash tables to implement the binning, the memory usage is very small. While our analysis is for the specific problem of selection of quasars, the ideas are general and the BASH table algorithm can be applied to any density-estimation problem involving sparse high-dimensional data sets. Since sparse high-dimensional data sets are a common type of scientific data set, this method has the potential to be useful in a broad range of machine-learning applications in astrophysics.

Gupta, Pramod; Connolly, Andrew J.; Gardner, Jeffrey P.

2014-03-01

251

Novel method to construct large-scale design space in lubrication process utilizing Bayesian estimation based on a small-scale design-of-experiment and small sets of large-scale manufacturing data.  

PubMed

A large-scale design space was constructed using a Bayesian estimation method with a small-scale design of experiments (DoE) and small sets of large-scale manufacturing data without enforcing a large-scale DoE. The small-scale DoE was conducted using various Froude numbers (X(1)) and blending times (X(2)) in the lubricant blending process for theophylline tablets. The response surfaces, design space, and their reliability of the compression rate of the powder mixture (Y(1)), tablet hardness (Y(2)), and dissolution rate (Y(3)) on a small scale were calculated using multivariate spline interpolation, a bootstrap resampling technique, and self-organizing map clustering. The constant Froude number was applied as a scale-up rule. Three experiments under an optimal condition and two experiments under other conditions were performed on a large scale. The response surfaces on the small scale were corrected to those on a large scale by Bayesian estimation using the large-scale results. Large-scale experiments under three additional sets of conditions showed that the corrected design space was more reliable than that on the small scale, even if there was some discrepancy in the pharmaceutical quality between the manufacturing scales. This approach is useful for setting up a design space in pharmaceutical development when a DoE cannot be performed at a commercial large manufacturing scale. PMID:22356256

Maeda, Jin; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Takayama, Kozo

2012-12-01

252

Classroom Assessment Techniques: Interviews  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page describes the technique of using interviews to assess student understanding. The assessment tool is one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. Interviews enable instructors to judge the extent of understanding students have developed with respect to a series of well-focused, conceptually-related scientific ideas. This site provides an overview of this assessment instrument including information about how to use classroom interviews to their maximum benefit. The site is also linked to a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use, as well as supplementary links and sources to further explore this assessment tool.

Smith, Mike U.; Southerland, Sherry A.; The National Institute for Science Education; College Level One Team

253

Multilevel and Diverse Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The benefits and advantages of classroom practices incorporating unity-in-diversity and diversity-in-unity are what "Multilevel and Diverse Classrooms" is all about. Multilevel classrooms--also known as mixed-ability or heterogeneous classrooms--are a fact of life in ESOL programs around the world. These classrooms are often not only multilevel…

Baurain, Bradley, Ed.; Ha, Phan Le, Ed.

2010-01-01

254

Promoting Active Involvement in Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a rationale for using active involvement techniques, describes large- and small-group methods based on their documented effectiveness and applicability to K-12 classrooms, and illustrates their use. These approaches include ways of engaging students in large groups (e.g., unison responses, response cards, dry-erase boards,…

Conderman, Greg; Bresnahan, Val; Hedin, Laura

2012-01-01

255

Efcient clustering of large EST data sets on parallel Anantharaman Kalyanaraman, Srinivas Aluru1,*, Suresh Kothari1  

E-print Network

®cing the quality of clustering, and (iii) use of parallel processing to reduce run-time and facilitate clustering with current software. Because of its speed, it also facilitates multiple runs with different parameters gene indexing databases see Bouck et al. (1). The ®rst step in deriving a gene index from an EST set

Brendel, Volker

256

Improving the Teacher's Awareness of Nonverbal Communication in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The emphasis in this paper is on developing teacher awareness of how nonverbal communication fits into the classroom setting. Various positive and negative aspects of this phase of communication in the classroom are explored. A classroom teacher is observed closely by students every day, and her/his attitude, feelings, mood or state of mind,…

Kachur, Donald; And Others

257

Practical Classroom Applications of Language Experience: Looking Back, Looking Forward.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 38 essays in this book look back at language experience as an educational approach, provide practical classroom applications, and reconceptualize language experience as an overarching education process. Classroom teachers and reading specialists describe strategies in use in a variety of classroom settings and describe ways to integrate…

Nelson, Olga G., Ed.; Linek, Wayne M., Ed.

258

Systemize Classroom Management to Enhance Teaching and Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Good classroom management is one of the most important goals teachers strive to establish from the first day of class. The rules, procedures, activities, and behaviors set the classroom tone throughout the school year. By revising, updating, and systemizing classroom management activities, teachers can eliminate many problems created by students…

Delman, Douglas J.

2011-01-01

259

Individual sequences in large sets of gene sequences may be distinguished efficiently by combinations of shared sub-sequences  

PubMed Central

Background Most current DNA diagnostic tests for identifying organisms use specific oligonucleotide probes that are complementary in sequence to, and hence only hybridise with the DNA of one target species. By contrast, in traditional taxonomy, specimens are usually identified by 'dichotomous keys' that use combinations of characters shared by different members of the target set. Using one specific character for each target is the least efficient strategy for identification. Using combinations of shared bisectionally-distributed characters is much more efficient, and this strategy is most efficient when they separate the targets in a progressively binary way. Results We have developed a practical method for finding minimal sets of sub-sequences that identify individual sequences, and could be targeted by combinations of probes, so that the efficient strategy of traditional taxonomic identification could be used in DNA diagnosis. The sizes of minimal sub-sequence sets depended mostly on sequence diversity and sub-sequence length and interactions between these parameters. We found that 201 distinct cytochrome oxidase subunit-1 (CO1) genes from moths (Lepidoptera) were distinguished using only 15 sub-sequences 20 nucleotides long, whereas only 8–10 sub-sequences 6–10 nucleotides long were required to distinguish the CO1 genes of 92 species from the 9 largest orders of insects. Conclusion The presence/absence of sub-sequences in a set of gene sequences can be used like the questions in a traditional dichotomous taxonomic key; hybridisation probes complementary to such sub-sequences should provide a very efficient means for identifying individual species, subtypes or genotypes. Sequence diversity and sub-sequence length are the major factors that determine the numbers of distinguishing sub-sequences in any set of sequences. PMID:15817134

Gibbs, Mark J; Armstrong, John S; Gibbs, Adrian J

2005-01-01

260

Developing a "Semi-Systematic" Approach to Using Large-Scale Data-Sets for Small-Scale Interventions: The "Baby Matterz" Initiative as a Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The appropriateness of using statistical data to inform the design of any given service development or initiative often depends upon judgements regarding scale. Large-scale data sets, perhaps national in scope, whilst potentially important in informing the design, implementation and roll-out of experimental initiatives, will often remain unused…

O'Brien, Mark

2011-01-01

261

Energy spectra of high-energy SEP event protons derived from statistical analysis of experimental data on a large set of events  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper contains the analysis of the energy spectra of solar energetic protons, which differs from the earlier analyses in that not only a broader energy range is analyzed, but also the method of simultaneous statistical analysis of a large data set is used. The SEP events supported by the proton peak flux data in a very broad energy range

D. A. Mottl; R. A. Nymmik; A. I. Sladkova

2001-01-01

262

DISPOSITION OF ANTHRACENE IN THE WATER AND AUFWUCHS MATRICES OF A LARGE OUTDOOR CHANNEL MICROCOSM: A DATA SET FOR MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION MODELS  

EPA Science Inventory

Large-scale, outdoor microcosms were used to study the fate of anthracene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, in the aquatic environment. The study provides a data set for describing the disposition of anthracene in the water and aufwuchs of the microcosms for the purpose of comp...

263

A PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF COMPUTER-BASED TRAINING TO TEACH CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES  

E-print Network

, classroom behavior management refers to the manipulation of antecedents and consequences in the classroom setting to increase appropriate academic and social behavior and decrease inappropriate academic and social behavior. Providing choices of activities... that teachers can be trained to effectively manage classroom behavior through the manipulation of antecedents and consequences in the classroom setting. Researchers have investigated a variety of classroom behavior management 7 programs, for example...

Rusinko, Elizabeth C

2008-01-01

264

Identifying Cognate Binding Pairs among a Large Set of Paralogs: The Case of PE\\/PPE Proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider the problem of how to detect cognate pairs of proteins that bind when each belongs to a large family of paralogs. To illustrate the problem, we have undertaken a genomewide analysis of interactions of members of the PE and PPE protein families of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our computational method uses structural information, operon organization, and protein coevolution to infer

Robert Riley; Matteo Pellegrini; David Eisenberg

2008-01-01

265

The Classroom Animal: Crickets.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests using crickets for classroom activities, providing background information on their anatomy and reproduction and tips on keeping individual organisms or a breeding colony in the classroom. (JN)

Kramer, David C.

1985-01-01

266

pXRF quantitative analysis of the Otowi Member of the Bandelier Tuff: Generating large, robust data sets to decipher trace element zonation in large silicic magma chambers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advances in portable X-Ray fluorescence (pXRF) analytical technology have made it possible for high-quality, quantitative data to be collected in a fraction of the time required by standard, non-portable analytical techniques. Not only do these advances reduce analysis time, but data may also be collected in the field in conjunction with sampling. Rhyolitic pumice, being primarily glass, is an excellent material to be analyzed with this technology. High-quality, quantitative data for elements that are tracers of magmatic differentiation (e.g. Rb, Sr, Y, Nb) can be collected for whole, individual pumices and subsamples of larger pumices in 4 minutes. We have developed a calibration for powdered rhyolite pumice from the Otowi Member of the Bandelier Tuff analyzed with the Bruker Tracer IV pXRF using Bruker software and influence coefficients for pumice, which measures the following 19 oxides and elements: SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, FeO*, MnO, CaO, K2O, P2O5, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba, Ce, Pb, and Th. With this calibration for the pXRF and thousands of individual powdered pumice samples, we have generated an unparalleled data set for any single eruptive unit with known trace element zonation. The Bandelier Tuff of the Valles-Toledo Caldera Complex, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, is divided into three main eruptive events. For this study, we have chosen the 1.61 Ma, 450 km3 Otowi Member as it is primarily unwelded and pumice samples are easily accessible. The eruption began with a plinian phase from a single source located near center of the current caldera and deposited the Guaje Pumice Bed. The initial Unit A of the Guaje is geochemically monotonous, but Units B through E, co-deposited with ignimbrite show very strong chemical zonation in trace elements, progressing upwards through the deposits from highly differentiated compositions (Rb ~350 ppm, Nb ~200 ppm) to less differentiated (Rb ~100 ppm, Nb ~50 ppm). Co-erupted ignimbrites emplaced during column collapse show similar trace element zonation. The eruption culminated in caldera collapse after transitioning from a single central vent to ring fracture vents. Ignimbrites deposited at this time have lithic breccias and chaotic geochemical profiles. The geochemical discrepancy between early and late deposits warrants detailed, high-resolution sampling and analysis in order to fully understand the dynamics behind zonation processes. Samples were collected from locations that circumvent the caldera and prepared and analyzed in the field and the laboratory with the pXRF. Approximately 2,000 pumice samples will complete this unprecedented data set, allowing detailed reconstruction of trace element zonation around all sides of the Valles Caldera. These data are then used to constrain models of magma chamber processes that produce trace element zonation and how it is preserved in the deposits after a catastrophic, caldera-forming eruption.

Van Hoose, A. E.; Wolff, J.; Conrey, R.

2013-12-01

267

Learning the Three C's: Classroom Communication Climate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study examined the communication climate of a graduate teaching assistant's (GTA) college classroom. Because the teaching role is often new to the GTA, establishing a communication climate may be a significant factor in classroom management. One section of a public speaking class taught by a new graduate teaching assistant at a large midwestern…

Myers, Scott A.

268

Creating Learning Communities in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are many ways to construct classroom-based learning communities. Nevertheless, the emphasis is always on cooperative learning. In this article, the authors focus on three teaching methods--interteaching, team-based learning, and cooperative learning in large, lecture-based courses--that they have used successfully to create classroom-based…

Saville, Bryan K.; Lawrence, Natalie Kerr; Jakobsen, Krisztina V.

2012-01-01

269

Statistical Analysis of a Large Sample Size Pyroshock Test Data Set Including Post Flight Data Assessment. Revision 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra spacecraft was launched on an Atlas IIAS launch vehicle on its mission to observe planet Earth in late 1999. Prior to launch, the new design of the spacecraft's pyroshock separation system was characterized by a series of 13 separation ground tests. The analysis methods used to evaluate this unusually large amount of shock data will be discussed in this paper, with particular emphasis on population distributions and finding statistically significant families of data, leading to an overall shock separation interface level. The wealth of ground test data also allowed a derivation of a Mission Assurance level for the flight. All of the flight shock measurements were below the EOS Terra Mission Assurance level thus contributing to the overall success of the EOS Terra mission. The effectiveness of the statistical methodology for characterizing the shock interface level and for developing a flight Mission Assurance level from a large sample size of shock data is demonstrated in this paper.

Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

2010-01-01

270

Thursday's Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Every Thursday, this NASA-created learning resource presents a new topic with the aim of providing "a lasting connection between NASA's latest research and the classroom environment." Prior lesson topics have included the recent solar eclipse, the Mars Polar Lander, and organisms that survive in extreme conditions and their implications for the possibility of extraterrestrial life. For each lesson, there are links to news reports and a range of lesson plans and activity sheets designed for different age groups. The site also contains an archive/ schedule of prior and future lessons.

271

Strong linkages between dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) and phytoplankton community physiology in a large subtropical and tropical Atlantic Ocean data set  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an extensive data set of dimethylsulphide (DMS, n = 651) and dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP, n = 590) from the Atlantic Meridional Transect program. These data are used to derive representative depth profiles that illustrate observed natural variations and can be used for DMS and DMSP model-validation in oligotrophic waters. To further understand our data set, we interpret the data with a wide range of accompanying parameters that characterize the prevailing biogeochemical conditions and phytoplankton community physiology, activity, taxonomic composition, and capacity to cope with light stress. No correlations were observed with typical biomarker pigments for DMSP-producing species. However, strong correlations were found between DMSP and primary production by cells >2 ?m in diameter and between DMSP and some photo-protective pigments. These parameters are measures of mixed phytoplankton communities, so we infer that such associations are likely to be stronger in DMSP-producing organisms. Further work is warranted to develop links between community parameters, DMS, and DMSP at the global scale.

Bell, Thomas G.; Poulton, Alex J.; Malin, Gill

2010-09-01

272

Classroom Meetings: A Program Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a model for classroom meetings in an elementary school setting. Focuses on enhancing children's communication and problem-solving skills for typical students and those identified through special education. The purpose of the meetings is to provide a nurturing climate for the learning of social skills that the children can use in the…

Frey, Andy; Doyle, Hallie Davis

2001-01-01

273

Getting Started in Classroom Computing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Written for secondary students, this booklet provides an introduction to several computer-related concepts through a set of six classroom games, most of which can be played with little more than a sheet of paper and a pencil. The games are: 1) SECRET CODES--introduction to binary coding, punched cards, and paper tape; 2) GUESS--efficient methods…

Ahl, David H.

274

Classroom Culture Promotes Academic Resiliency  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Resiliency is what propels many students to continue moving forward under difficult learning and life conditions. We intuitively think that such resilience is a character quality that cannot be taught. On the contrary, when a teacher sets the right conditions and culture for it in the classroom by teaching collaboration and communication skills,…

DiTullio, Gina

2014-01-01

275

Classroom Standard Setting and Grading Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The assignment of grades to students is discussed, and a grading process is recommended. The process begins with the separation of minimal and developmental objectives. Minimal objectives represent course outcomes that all students are expected to achieve; developmental objectives are more complex goals toward which students strive, but which few…

Terwilliger, James S.

276

Classroom Standard Setting and Grading Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The process of assigning grades to students is analyzed, and a specific approach to grading is recommended that distinguishes between minimal and developmental objectives. Criterion-referenced and norm-referenced concepts are used in the approach, which is best suited for secondary school or college. (SLD)

Terwilliger, James S.

1989-01-01

277

Resistance to Disruption in a Classroom Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Substantial experimental evidence indicates that behavior reinforced on a denser schedule is more resistant to disruption than is behavior reinforced on a thinner schedule. The present experiment studied resistance to disruption in a natural educational environment. Responding during familiar activities was reinforced on a multiple…

Parry-Cruwys, Diana E.; Neal, Carrie M.; Ahearn, William H.; Wheeler, Emily E.; Premchander, Raseeka; Loeb, Melissa B.; Dube, William V.

2011-01-01

278

Student Perceptions of Classroom Achievement Goals as Predictors of Belonging and Content Instrumentality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of the current study was to examine the predictive relationships among a set of cognitive-motivational variables that have been found in previous studies to support academic achievement. Student perception of a classroom's achievement goal structure (classroom mastery, classroom performance-approach, classroom performance-avoidance) was…

Walker, Christopher O.

2012-01-01

279

The Electronic Classroom. New Classrooms without Walls.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains how teachers can take advantage of the Internet to create classroom projects. The process involves locating collaborating partners via the World Wide Web, then determining which projects would be worthwhile to students. Presents guidelines for organizing a classroom project, discusses classroom considerations, examines teacher…

Barron, Ann E.; Ivers, Karen S.

1998-01-01

280

Deep sequencing of large library selections allows computational discovery of diverse sets of zinc fingers that bind common targets  

PubMed Central

The Cys2His2 zinc finger (ZF) is the most frequently found sequence-specific DNA-binding domain in eukaryotic proteins. The ZF’s modular protein–DNA interface has also served as a platform for genome engineering applications. Despite decades of intense study, a predictive understanding of the DNA-binding specificities of either natural or engineered ZF domains remains elusive. To help fill this gap, we developed an integrated experimental-computational approach to enrich and recover distinct groups of ZFs that bind common targets. To showcase the power of our approach, we built several large ZF libraries and demonstrated their excellent diversity. As proof of principle, we used one of these ZF libraries to select and recover thousands of ZFs that bind several 3-nt targets of interest. We were then able to computationally cluster these recovered ZFs to reveal several distinct classes of proteins, all recovered from a single selection, to bind the same target. Finally, for each target studied, we confirmed that one or more representative ZFs yield the desired specificity. In sum, the described approach enables comprehensive large-scale selection and characterization of ZF specificities and should be a great aid in furthering our understanding of the ZF domain. PMID:24214968

Persikov, Anton V.; Rowland, Elizabeth F.; Oakes, Benjamin L.; Singh, Mona; Noyes, Marcus B.

2014-01-01

281

Neurosharing: large-scale data sets (spike, LFP) recorded from the hippocampal-entorhinal system in behaving rats.  

PubMed

Using silicon-based recording electrodes, we recorded neuronal activity of the dorsal hippocampus and dorsomedial entorhinal cortex from behaving rats. The entorhinal neurons were classified as principal neurons and interneurons based on monosynaptic interactions and wave-shapes. The hippocampal neurons were classified as principal neurons and interneurons based on monosynaptic interactions, wave-shapes and burstiness. The data set contains recordings from 7,736 neurons (6,100 classified as principal neurons, 1,132 as interneurons, and 504 cells that did not clearly fit into either category) obtained during 442 recording sessions from 11 rats (a total of 204.5 hours) while they were engaged in one of eight different behaviours/tasks. Both original and processed data (time stamp of spikes, spike waveforms, result of spike sorting and local field potential) are included, along with metadata of behavioural markers. Community-driven data sharing may offer cross-validation of findings, refinement of interpretations and facilitate discoveries. PMID:25075302

Mizuseki, Kenji; Diba, Kamran; Pastalkova, Eva; Teeters, Jeff; Sirota, Anton; Buzsáki, György

2014-01-01

282

Interactive GPU-based maximum intensity projection of large medical data sets using visibility culling based on the initial occluder and the visible block classification.  

PubMed

Maximum intensity projection (MIP) is an important visualization method that has been widely used for the diagnosis of enhanced vessels or bones by rotating or zooming MIP images. With the rapid spread of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) scanners, MDCT scans of a patient generate a large data set. However, previous acceleration methods for MIP rendering of such a data set failed to generate MIP images at interactive rates. In this paper, we propose novel culling methods in both object and image space for interactive MIP rendering of large medical data sets. In object space, for the visibility test of a block, we propose the initial occluder resulting from a preceding image to utilize temporal coherence and increase the block culling ratio a lot. In addition, we propose the hole filling method using the mesh generation and rendering to improve the culling performance during the generation of the initial occluder. In image space, we find out that there is a trade-off between the block culling ratio in object space and the culling efficiency in image space. In this paper, we classify the visible blocks into two types by their visibility. And we propose a balanced culling method by applying a different culling algorithm in image space for each type to utilize the trade-off and improve the rendering speed. Experimental results on twenty CT data sets showed that our method achieved 3.85 times speed up in average without any loss of image quality comparing with conventional bricking method. Using our visibility culling method, we achieved interactive GPU-based MIP rendering of large medical data sets. PMID:22564547

Kye, Heewon; Sohn, Bong-Soo; Lee, Jeongjin

2012-07-01

283

Sharp Interface Immersed-Boundary\\/Level-Set Cartesian Grid Method for Large-Eddy Simulation of Two-Phase Flows with SurfacePiercing Moving Bodies  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sharp interface Cartesian grid method for the large-eddy simulation of two-phase flows interacting with surface-piercing moving bodies is presented. The method is based on a sharp interface immersed boundary formulation for fluid flows with moving boundaries and a level set based ghost fluid method for two-phase interface treatment. A four-step fractional step method is adopted and a Lagrangian dynamic

Jianming Yang; Frederick Stern

2007-01-01

284

Control of tectonic setting and large-scale faults on the basin-scale distribution of deformation bands in porous sandstone (Provence, France)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From outcrops located in Provence (South-East France), we describe the distribution, the microstructures, and the petrophysical properties of deformation bands networks related to different tectonic events. In contractional setting, pervasively distributed networks of reverse-sense compactional-shear bands are observed in all the folded-sand units of the foreland, whereas localized networks of clustered reverse-sense shear bands are only observed close to a large-scale thrust. In extensional setting, networks of clustered normal-sense shear bands are generally observed adjacent to large-scale faults, although few and randomly distributed bands are also observed between these faults. Normal-sense cataclastic faults are also observed restricted to sand units, suggesting that faults can initiate in the sands in extension, which is not observed in contraction. Shear bands and faults show cataclastic microstructures of low-permeability whereas compactional-shear bands show crush microbreccia or protocataclastic microstructures of moderate permeability. This basin-scale analysis underlines the major role of tectonic settings (thrust-fault versus normal-fault andersonian-stress regime) and the influence of inherited large-scale faults on the formation of low-permeability shear bands. We also provide a geometrical analysis of the band network properties (spacing, thickness, shear/compaction ratio, degree of cataclasis, petrophysical properties) with respect to the host sand granulometry. This analysis suggests that granulometry, although less important than tectonic setting and the presence of large-scale faults, has however a non-negligible effect on the band networks geometry.

Ballas, G.; Soliva, R.; Benedicto, A.; Sizun, J.

2013-12-01

285

Classroom Management and Teachers' Coping Strategies: Inside Classrooms in Australia, China and Israel  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the degree to which recently reported relationships between the classroom management techniques and coping styles of Australian teachers apply in two other national settings: China and Israel. Little is known about which teacher characteristics relate to their approach to classroom management, although researchers in Australia…

Romi, Shlomo; Lewis, Ramon; Roache, Joel

2013-01-01

286

Measuring Quality in Inclusive Preschool Classrooms: Development and Validation of the Inclusive Classroom Profile (ICP)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an observation measure designed to assess classroom quality in inclusive preschool programs, the Inclusive Classroom Profile (ICP). Developing the rating scale entailed systematic fieldwork in inclusive settings and review of the literature on preschool inclusion. Results from the validation…

Soukakou, Elena P.

2012-01-01

287

Hyperactive boys in their classroom: Assessment of teacher and peer perceptions, interactions, and classroom behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Teacher ratings, peer perceptions, peer interactions, and classroom behaviors of 17 hyperactive and 17 active elementary school-age boys, nominated by their teachers, were compared using multivariate analyses and planned comparisons in order to better describe and assess hyperactivity in its most probable setting —the classroom. Hyperactive boys were found to be significantly different from actives on measures from all data

Andrea Rubinstein Klein; Richard David Young

1979-01-01

288

Classroom Discipline. Research Roundup.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent research in classroom discipline tends to show that discipline is a by-product of effective instruction and classroom management. The five publications reviewed in this annotated bibliography explore aspects of the complex classroom environment that relate to student discipline. Walter Doyle's chapter on "Classroom Organization and…

Bielefeldt, Talbot

1989-01-01

289

Assessment of radiation forcing data sets for large-scale sea ice models in the Southern Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Little is known about errors in the atmospheric forcings of large-scale sea ice-ocean models around Antarctica. These forcings involve atmospheric reanalyses, typically those from the National Center for Environmental Prediction and National Center from Atmospheric Research (NCEP-NCAR), climatologies, and empirical parameterizations of atmosphere-ice heat and radiation fluxes. In the present paper, we evaluate the atmospheric forcing fields of sea ice models in the Southern Ocean using meteorological and radiation observations from two drifting station experiments over Antarctic sea ice. These are Sea Ice Mass Balance in the Antarctic (SIMBA, Bellingshausen Sea, October 2007) and ISPOL (Ice Station POLarstern, Weddell Sea, December 2004). For the comparison, it is assumed that those point measurements are representative of the whole model grid cell they were collected in. Analysis suggests that the NCEP-NCAR reanalyses have relatively low biases for variables that are assimilated by the system (temperature, winds and humidity) and are less accurate for those which are not (cloud fraction and radiation fluxes). The main deficiencies are significant day-to-day errors in air temperature (root-mean-square error 1.4-3.8 °C) and a 0.2-0.6 g/kg mean overestimation in NCEP-NCAR specific humidity. In addition, associated with an underestimation of cloud fraction, NCEP-NCAR shortwave radiation features a large positive bias (43-109 W/m 2), partly compensated by a 20-45 W/m 2 negative bias in longwave radiation. Those biases can be drastically reduced by using empirical formulae of radiation fluxes and climatologies of relative humidity and cloud cover. However, this procedure leads to a loss of day-to-day and interannual variability in the radiation fields. We provide technical recommendations on how the radiation forcing should be handled to reduce sea ice model forcing errors. The various errors in forcing fields found here should not hide the great value of atmospheric reanalyses for the simulation of the ice-ocean system.

Vancoppenolle, Martin; Timmermann, Ralph; Ackley, Stephen F.; Fichefet, Thierry; Goosse, Hugues; Heil, Petra; Leonard, Katherine C.; Lieser, Jan; Nicolaus, Marcel; Papakyriakou, Tim; Tison, Jean-Louis

2011-05-01

290

Setting Up the Mathematical Community  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage about setting up a mathematical community is designed as a companion to the Investigations curriculum; however the ideas are transferable to any math classroom. The webpage includes a brief description of the components of the Investigations classroom: Math Workshop, whole-group instruction, and math games. There are also six PDF documents linked from this page that give a detailed example of how teachers set up a math community in the beginning of the year for each grade level. The documents focus on the discussions that take place in the first few days of school and how they can promote a respectful and productive classroom culture.

2012-01-01

291

Physics Classroom Photo Gallery: Newton's Laws  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This image gallery on Newton's Laws was compiled by the author of The Physics Classroom collection. It features photos that depict inertia in motion, interacting forces, balanced and unbalanced force, and action/reaction. The images are organized by specific sub-concept, and all are aligned with the corresponding section of The Physics Classroom online tutorial. Editor's Note: This image set provides teachers with a way to connect physics with real world applications. It's appropriate for use in both middle school and high school physical science classrooms. The accompanying tutorial is intended for secondary teachers and high school physics students. The Physics Classroom is a set of resources created for learners and teachers of high school physics. It includes comprehensive tutorials, problem sets with solutions, extra help for struggling learners, Shockwave animations, multimedia learning modules, labs, and an annotated photo gallery.

Henderson, Tom

2011-10-04

292

LINC-NIRVANA for the large binocular telescope: setting up the world's largest near infrared binoculars for astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

LINC-NIRVANA (LN) is the near-infrared, Fizeau-type imaging interferometer for the large binocular telescope (LBT) on Mt. Graham, Arizona (elevation of 3267 m). The instrument is currently being built by a consortium of German and Italian institutes under the leadership of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany. It will combine the radiation from both 8.4 m primary mirrors of LBT in such a way that the sensitivity of a 11.9 m telescope and the spatial resolution of a 22.8 m telescope will be obtained within a 10.5×10.5 arcsec scientific field of view. Interferometric fringes of the combined beams are tracked in an oval field with diameters of 1 and 1.5 arcmin. In addition, both incoming beams are individually corrected by LN's multiconjugate adaptive optics system to reduce atmospheric image distortion over a circular field of up to 6 arcmin in diameter. A comprehensive technical overview of the instrument is presented, comprising the detailed design of LN's four major systems for interferometric imaging and fringe tracking, both in the near infrared range of 1 to 2.4 ?m, as well as atmospheric turbulence correction at two altitudes, both in the visible range of 0.6 to 0.9 ?m. The resulting performance capabilities and a short outlook of some of the major science goals will be presented. In addition, the roadmap for the related assembly, integration, and verification process are discussed. To avoid late interface-related risks, strategies for early hardware as well as software interactions with the telescope have been elaborated. The goal is to ship LN to the LBT in 2014.

Hofferbert, Ralph; Baumeister, Harald; Bertram, Thomas; Berwein, Jürgen; Bizenberger, Peter; Böhm, Armin; Böhm, Michael; Borelli, José Luis; Brangier, Matthieu; Briegel, Florian; Conrad, Albert; De Bonis, Fulvio; Follert, Roman; Herbst, Tom; Huber, Armin; Kittmann, Frank; Kürster, Martin; Laun, Werner; Mall, Ulrich; Meschke, Daniel; Mohr, Lars; Naranjo, Vianak; Pavlov, Aleksei; Pott, Jörg-Uwe; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer; Schinnerer, Eva; Storz, Clemens; Trowitzsch, Jan; Yan, Zhaojun; Zhang, Xianyu; Eckart, Andreas; Horrobin, Matthew; Rost, Steffen; Straubmeier, Christian; Wank, Imke; Zuther, Jens; Beckmann, Udo; Connot, Claus; Heininger, Matthias; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Kröner, Tim; Nussbaum, Eddy; Schertl, Dieter; Weigelt, Gerd; Bergomi, Maria; Brunelli, Alessandro; Dima, Marco; Farinato, Jacopo; Magrin, Demetrio; Marafatto, Luca; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Viotto, Valentina; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Bregoli, Giovanni; Ciliegi, Paolo; Cosentino, Guiseppe; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Foppiani, Italo; Lombini, Matteo; Schreiber, Laura; D'Alessio, Francesco; Li Causi, Gianluca; Lorenzetti, Dario; Vitali, Fabrizio; Bertero, Mario; Boccacci, Patrizia; La Camera, Andrea

2013-08-01

293

Outcomes of a Behavioral Education Model for Children With Autism in a Mainstream School Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors report 1-year outcomes for 11 children (3-7 years) with autism who attended an “Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) classroom” educational intervention in a mainstream school setting. The children learned new skills by the end of 1 year and learned additional skills during a 2nd year. Group analysis of standardized test outcomes (IQ and adaptive behavior) showed moderate to large

Corinna F. Grindle; Richard P. Hastings; Maria Saville; J. Carl Hughes; Kathleen Huxley; Hanna Kovshoff; Gemma M. Griffith; Elin Walker-Jones; Katherine Devonshire; Bob Remington

2012-01-01

294

Francophone Films in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the use of francophone films produced in French-speaking areas outside France in the second-language classroom, using several films from African countries and Canada as examples. The idea is that such films give students more than an abstract idea of a francophone region outside France, and represent large views of language…

Rose, Russell G.

295

Revoicing Classrooms: A Spatial Manifesto  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Why is the physical learning environment in schools largely ignored by teachers within pedagogical practice? The cellular classroom has remained seemingly immutable since the Industrial Revolution, with spatiality playing a silent and subconscious role in schooling other than related to concerns around surveillance. Previous studies have shown…

Fisher, Kenn

2004-01-01

296

Social epidemiology of a large outbreak of chickenpox in the Colombian sugar cane producer region: a set theory-based analysis.  

PubMed

There are few social epidemiologic studies on chickenpox outbreaks, although previous findings suggested the important role of social determinants. This study describes the context of a large outbreak of chickenpox in the Cauca Valley region, Colombia (2003 to 2007), with an emphasis on macro-determinants. We explored the temporal trends in chickenpox incidence in 42 municipalities to identify the places with higher occurrences. We analyzed municipal characteristics (education quality, vaccination coverage, performance of health care services, violence-related immigration, and area size of planted sugar cane) through analyses based on set theory. Edwards-Venn diagrams were used to present the main findings. The results indicated that three municipalities had higher incidences and that poor quality education was the attribute most prone to a higher incidence. Potential use of set theory for exploratory outbreak analyses is discussed. It is a tool potentially useful to contrast units when only small sample sizes are available. PMID:21808823

Idrovo, Alvaro J; Albavera-Hernández, Cidronio; Rodríguez-Hernández, Jorge Martín

2011-07-01

297

Traveling Tags: The Informal Literacies of Mexican Newcomers in and out of the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article documents tagging as one of several informal literacy practices used by newcomer Mexican youth in a Midwest school and classroom setting. Specifically, it details how tagging travels into the classroom. Using the tool of interactional ethnography to analyze videotaped classroom observation data of an English Learner Science setting, I…

Bruna, Katherine Richardson

2007-01-01

298

Photonics Explorer: revolutionizing photonics in the classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The `Photonics Explorer' is a unique intra-curricular optics kit designed to engage, excite and educate secondary school students about the fascination of working with light - hands-on, in their own classrooms. Developed with a pan European collaboration of experts, the kit equips teachers with class sets of experimental material provided within a supporting didactic framework, distributed in conjunction with teacher training courses. The material has been specifically designed to integrate into European science curricula. Each kit contains robust and versatile components sufficient for a class of 25-30 students to work in groups of 2-3. The didactic content is based on guided inquiry-based learning (IBL) techniques with a strong emphasis on hands-on experiments, team work and relating abstract concepts to real world applications. The content has been developed in conjunction with over 30 teachers and experts in pedagogy to ensure high quality and ease of integration. It is currently available in 7 European languages. The Photonics Explorer allows students not only to hone their essential scientific skills but also to really work as scientists and engineers in the classroom. Thus, it aims to encourage more young people to pursue scientific careers and avert the imminent lack of scientific workforce in Europe. 50 Photonics Explorer kits have been successfully tested in 7 European countries with over 1500 secondary school students. The positive impact of the kit in the classroom has been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated. A non-profit organisation, EYESTvzw [Excite Youth for Engineering Science and Technology], is responsible for the large scale distribution of the Photonics Explorer.

Prasad, Amrita; Debaes, Nathalie; Cords, Nina; Fischer, Robert; Vlekken, Johan; Euler, Manfred; Thienpont, Hugo

2012-10-01

299

Tectonic stress inversion of large multi-phase fracture data sets: application of Win-Tensor to reveal the brittle tectonic history of the Lufilan Arc, DRC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large fault-slip data sets from multiphase orogenic regions present a particular challenge in paleostress reconstructions. The Lufilian Arc is an arcuate fold-and-thrust belt that formed during the late Pan-African times as the result of combined N-S and E-W amalgamation of Gondwana in SE-DRCongo and N-Zambia. We studied more than 22 sites in the Lufilian Arc, and its foreland and correlated the results obtained with existing result in the Ubende belt of W-Tanzania. Most studied sites are characterized by multiphase brittle deformation in which the observed brittle structures are the result of progressive saturation of the host rock by neoformed fractures and the reactivation of early formed fractures. They correspond to large mining exploitations with multiple large and continuous outcrops that allow obtaining datasets sufficiently large to be of statistical significance and often corresponding to several successive brittle events. In this context, the reconstruction of tectonic stress necessitates an initial field-base separation of data, completed by a dynamic separation of the original data set into subsets. In the largest sites, several parts of the deposits have been measured independently and are considered as sub-sites that are be processed separately in an initial stage. The procedure used for interactive fault-slip data separation and stress inversion will be illustrated by field examples (Luiswishi and Manono mining sites). This principle has been applied to all result in the reconstruction of the brittle tectonic history of the region, starting with two major phases of orogenic compression, followed by late orogenic extension and extensional collapse. A regional tectonic inversion during the early Mesozoic, as a result of far- field stresses mark the transition towards rift-related extension. More details in Kipata, Delvaux et al.(2013), Geologica Belgica 16/1-2: 001-017 Win-Tensor can be downloaded at: http://users.skynet.be/damien.delvaux/Tensor/tensor-index.html

Delvaux, Damien; Kipata, Louis; Sintubin, Manuel

2013-04-01

300

Connecting classrooms to the Milky Way  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

'Connecting Classrooms to the Milky Way' is a project of the EU-HOU Consortium (Hands-On-Universe, Europe), involving 11 European countries. It is supported by the lifelong Learning Programme of the European Community. The main goal of this project was to set up the first network of small radio-telescopes dedicated to education all around Europe and directly accessible from a simple Web interface. Any classroom connected to Internet via any Web-browser can now remotely control one of the radio-telescopes and observe the HI emission coming from our Galaxy. The interface also provides the users with simple tools to analyse the data: (i) derive the Milky-Way rotation curve and (ii) map the spiral arms HI distribution. A special emphasis has been made to enable the young generation to understand the challenges of these wavelengths, which are currently at the frontline of the new instruments with the development of the ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array) and SKA (Square Kilometer Array) projects.

Salomé, P.; Radiguet, A.; Albert, B.; Batrung, M.; Caillat, M.; Gheudin, M.; Libert, Y.; Ferlet, R.; Maestrini, A.; Melchior, A.-L.; Munier, J.-M.; Rudolph, A.

2012-12-01

301

Classroom Creature Culture: Algae to Anoles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Living organisms are important classroom resources and require appropriate, responsible care. This anthology of articles from NSTA's award-winning journal Science and Children provides the basics about collecting, investigating, and caring for plants and animals in classroom settings. From daddy longlegs to box turtles, from duckweed to butterflies, emphasis is placed on responsible observation, respect for living beings, and the individual needs of nature's many creatures. Also makes an excellent complement to ecological studies.

1994-01-01

302

A geometrical correction for the inter- and intra-molecular basis set superposition error in Hartree-Fock and density functional theory calculations for large systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A semi-empirical counterpoise-type correction for basis set superposition error (BSSE) in molecular systems is presented. An atom pair-wise potential corrects for the inter- and intra-molecular BSSE in supermolecular Hartree-Fock (HF) or density functional theory (DFT) calculations. This geometrical counterpoise (gCP) denoted scheme depends only on the molecular geometry, i.e., no input from the electronic wave-function is required and hence is applicable to molecules with ten thousands of atoms. The four necessary parameters have been determined by a fit to standard Boys and Bernadi counterpoise corrections for Hobza's S66×8 set of non-covalently bound complexes (528 data points). The method's target are small basis sets (e.g., minimal, split-valence, 6-31G*), but reliable results are also obtained for larger triple-? sets. The intermolecular BSSE is calculated by gCP within a typical error of 10%-30% that proves sufficient in many practical applications. The approach is suggested as a quantitative correction in production work and can also be routinely applied to estimate the magnitude of the BSSE beforehand. The applicability for biomolecules as the primary target is tested for the crambin protein, where gCP removes intramolecular BSSE effectively and yields conformational energies comparable to def2-TZVP basis results. Good mutual agreement is also found with Jensen's ACP(4) scheme, estimating the intramolecular BSSE in the phenylalanine-glycine-phenylalanine tripeptide, for which also a relaxed rotational energy profile is presented. A variety of minimal and double-? basis sets combined with gCP and the dispersion corrections DFT-D3 and DFT-NL are successfully benchmarked on the S22 and S66 sets of non-covalent interactions. Outstanding performance with a mean absolute deviation (MAD) of 0.51 kcal/mol (0.38 kcal/mol after D3-refit) is obtained at the gCP-corrected HF-D3/(minimal basis) level for the S66 benchmark. The gCP-corrected B3LYP-D3/6-31G* model chemistry yields MAD=0.68 kcal/mol, which represents a huge improvement over plain B3LYP/6-31G* (MAD=2.3 kcal/mol). Application of gCP-corrected B97-D3 and HF-D3 on a set of large protein-ligand complexes prove the robustness of the method. Analytical gCP gradients make optimizations of large systems feasible with small basis sets, as demonstrated for the inter-ring distances of 9-helicene and most of the complexes in Hobza's S22 test set. The method is implemented in a freely available FORTRAN program obtainable from the author's website.

Kruse, Holger; Grimme, Stefan

2012-04-01

303

Methodologic implications of social inequalities for analyzing health disparities in large spatiotemporal data sets: An example using breast cancer incidence data (Northern and Southern California, 1988-2002)  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Efforts to monitor, investigate, and ultimately eliminate health disparities across racial/ethnic and socioeconomic groups can benefit greatly from spatiotemporal models that enable exploration of spatial and temporal variation in health. Hierarchical Bayes methods are well-established tools in the statistical literature for fitting such models, as they permit smoothing of unstable small-area rates. However, issues presented by ‘real-life’ surveillance data can be a barrier to routine use of these models by epidemiologists. These include (1) shifting of regional boundaries over time, (2) social inequalities in racial/ethnic residential segregation, which imply differential spatial structuring across different racial/ethnic groups, and (3) heavy computational burdens for large spatiotemporal data sets. Using data from a study of changing socioeconomic gradients in female breast cancer incidence in two population-based cancer registries covering the San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles County, CA (1988–2002), we illustrate a two-stage approach to modeling health disparities and census tract (CT) variation in incidence over time. In the first stage, we fit race- and year-specific spatial models using CT boundaries normalized to the U.S. Census 2000. In stage 2, temporal patterns in the race- and year-specific estimates of racial/ethnic and socioeconomic effects are explored using a variety of methods. Our approach provides a straightforward means of fitting spatiotemporal models in large data sets, while highlighting differences in spatial patterning across racial/ethnic population and across time. PMID:18551507

Chen, Jarvis T; Coull, Brent A.; Waterman, Pamela D.; Schwartz, Joel; Krieger, Nancy

2008-01-01

304

Tips from the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Six classroom tips for language teachers focus on creating a congenial classroom environment, integrating listening and reading skills, teaching idioms from tabloid newspapers, cooperative learning in honors courses, grammar games, and teaching culture through personalized automobile license plate messages. (MDM)

Hess, Natalie; And Others

1995-01-01

305

Classroom Management. TESOL Classroom Practice Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This series captures the dynamics of the contemporary ESOL classroom. It showcases state-of-the-art curricula, materials, tasks, and activities reflecting emerging trends in language education and seeks to build localized language teaching and learning theories based on teachers' and students' unique experiences in and beyond the classroom. Each…

Farrell, Thomas S. C., Ed.

2008-01-01

306

Virtual Classroom Discussions versus Traditional Classroom Discussions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author of this paper designs, develops, and teaches online courses. This paper examines the students' constructive sociocultural interaction in which learning occurs. This paper compares the classroom discussions in virtual and traditional classrooms and analyses the virtual communication in greater detail according to their content.

Beate Baltes

2002-01-01

307

Competition in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author shares the strategy she adopted to even out the participation among her multicultural students during their classroom discussions. The author realized that her students had different concepts about the classroom and different philosophies about competition. For the Americans and Indians, the classroom was a site of…

Jameson, Daphne

2007-01-01

308

Using short forms of classroom climate instruments to assess and improve classroom psychosocial environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite international interest in research in the area of classroom environment, very little attention has been given to exploring how science teachers might apply ideas from the field of classroom environment in guiding practical improvements in science classrooms. In order to facilitate science teachers' use of classroom climate assessments, we developed economical short forms of the Classroom Environment Scale (CES), Individualized Classroom Environment Questionnaire (ICEQ), and My Class Inventory (MCI) which contain only approximately 25 items each and which are amenable to easy hand scoring. When each instrument was administered to a large sample of science classes, results supported each scale's internal consistency reliability, discriminant validity, and ability to differentiate between the perceptions of students in different classrooms. The methods for improving classrooms are illustrated by reporting some case studies of change attempts. For example, when the CES was used in an attempt to improve the environment of a ninth grade science class, the steps followed were, first, assessment of actual and preferred classroom environment in order to identify discrepancies between actual and preferred environment and, second, introducing interventions aimed at reducing these discrepancies. The interesting finding was that significant improvements occurred for the two dimensions on which change had been attempted.

Fraser, Barry J.; Fisher, Darrell L.

309

Self-Contained Classrooms. Research Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Determining the ideal academic setting in which students can be successful continues to be one of the primary goals of educators. Is there a best classroom structure in which students can be successful? Although there is research on the academic gains in the block schedule and in traditional departmentalized settings, both of which are common in…

Walker, Karen

2009-01-01

310

Allowing "Artistic Agency" in the Elementary Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author was interested in seeing what would happen if children were given more latitude when making art in school. In January 2009, he began by setting up environments in his classroom wherein he hoped his students would feel free to create self-initiated forms of artmaking. Two times each week an hour was set aside for an activity called Open…

Rufo, David

2011-01-01

311

Integrated QSPR models to predict the soil sorption coefficient for a large diverse set of compounds by using different modeling methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The soil sorption coefficient (Koc) is a key physicochemical parameter to assess the environmental risk of organic compounds. To predict soil sorption coefficient in a more effective and economical way, here, quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models were developed based on a large diverse dataset including 964 non-ionic organic compounds. Multiple linear regression (MLR), local lazy regression (LLR) and least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) were utilized to develop QSPR models based on the four most relevant theoretical molecular descriptors selected by genetic algorithms-variable subset selection (GA-VSS) procedure. The QSPR development strictly followed the OECD principles for QSPR model validation, thus great attentions were paid to internal and external validations, applicability domain and mechanistic interpretation. The obtained results indicate that the LS-SVM model performed better than the MLR and the LLR models. For best LS-SVM model, the correlation coefficients (R2) for the training set was 0.913 and concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) for the prediction set was 0.917. The root-mean square errors (RMSE) were 0.330 and 0.426, respectively. The results of internal and external validations together with applicability domain analysis indicate that the QSPR models proposed in our work are predictive and could provide a useful tool for prediction soil sorption coefficient of new compounds.

Shao, Yonghua; Liu, Jining; Wang, Meixia; Shi, Lili; Yao, Xiaojun; Gramatica, Paola

2014-05-01

312

The Social Network Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Online social networking is an important part in the everyday life of college students. Despite the increasing popularity of online social networking among students and faculty members, its educational benefits are largely untested. This paper presents our experience in using social networking applications and video content distribution websites as a complement of traditional classroom education. In particular, the solution has been based on effective adaptation, extension and integration of Facebook, Twitter, Blogger YouTube and iTunes services for delivering educational material to students on mobile platforms like iPods and 3 rd generation mobile phones. The goals of the proposed educational platform, described in this paper, are to make the learning experience more engaging, to encourage collaborative work and knowledge sharing among students, and to provide an interactive platform for the educators to reach students and deliver lecture material in a totally new way.

Bunus, Peter

313

Just in Time to Flip Your Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With advocates like Sal Khan and Bill Gates, flipped classrooms are attracting an increasing amount of media and research attention.2 We had heard Khan's TED talk and were aware of the concept of inverted pedagogies in general. Yet it really hit home when we accidentally flipped our classroom. Our objective was to better prepare our students for class. We set out to effectively move some of our course content outside of class and decided to tweak the Just-in-Time Teaching approach (JiTT).3 To our surprise, this tweak—which we like to call the flip-JiTT—ended up completely flipping our classroom. What follows is narrative of our experience and a procedure that any teacher can use to extend JiTT to a flipped classroom.

Lasry, Nathaniel; Dugdale, Michael; Charles, Elizabeth

2014-01-01

314

Just in Time to Flip Your Classroom  

E-print Network

With advocates like Sal Khan and Bill Gates, flipped classrooms are attracting an increasing amount of media and research attention. We had heard Khan's TED talk and were aware of the concept of inverted pedagogies in general. Yet, it really hit home when we accidentally flipped our classroom. Our objective was to better prepare our students for class. We set out to effectively move some of our course content outside of class and decided to tweak the Just-in-Time-Teaching approach (JiTT). To our surprise, this tweak - which we like to call the flip-JiTT - ended up completely flipping our classroom. What follows is narrative of our experience and a procedure that any teacher can use to extend JiTT to a flipped classroom.

Lasry, Nathaniel; Charles, Elizabeth

2013-01-01

315

Sharp Interface Immersed-Boundary/Level-Set Cartesian Grid Method for Large-Eddy Simulation of Two-Phase Flows with Surface-Piercing Moving Bodies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A sharp interface Cartesian grid method for the large-eddy simulation of two-phase flows interacting with surface-piercing moving bodies is presented. The method is based on a sharp interface immersed boundary formulation for fluid flows with moving boundaries and a level set based ghost fluid method for two-phase interface treatment. A four-step fractional step method is adopted and a Lagrangian dynamic Smagorinsky subgrid-scale model is used for large-eddy simulations. The combination of immersed boundary method for solid/fluid boundaries and ghost-fluid method for fluid/fluid interfaces is discussed in detail. A variety of test cases with different scales ranging from bubble dynamics to ship hydrodynamics are performed for verification and validation purpose. Several examples of interest such as water exit and entry of a circular cylinder, landslide generated waves, and ship waves are demonstrated to showcase the accuracy and efficiency of our method. Approaches for extending it to high Reynolds number ship flows by means of wall-layer modeling are also discussed.

Yang, Jianming; Stern, Frederick

2007-11-01

316

Household malaria knowledge and its association with bednet ownership in settings without large-scale distribution programs: Evidence from rural Madagascar  

PubMed Central

Background Insecticide–treated bednets are effective at preventing malaria. This study focuses on household–level factors that are associated with bednet ownership in a rural area of Madagascar which had not been a recipient of large–scale ITN distribution. Methods Data were gathered on individual and household characteristics, malaria knowledge, household assets and bednet ownership. Principal components analysis was used to construct both a wealth index based on household assets and a malaria knowledge index based on responses to questions about malaria. Bivariate and multivariate regressions were used to determine predictors of household bednet ownership and malaria knowledge. Results Forty–seven of 560 households (8.4%) owned a bednet. In multivariate analysis, higher level of malaria knowledge among household members was the only variable significantly associated with bednet ownership (odds ratio 3.72, P?setting of limited supply of affordable bednets, malaria knowledge was associated with an increased probability of household bednet ownership. Further studies should determine how such malaria knowledge evolves and if malaria–specific education programs could help overcome the barriers to bednet ownership among at–risk households living outside the reach of large–scale bednet distribution programs. PMID:24976960

Krezanoski, Paul J.; Tsai, Alexander C.; Hamer, Davidson H.; Comfort, Alison B.; Bangsberg, David R.

2014-01-01

317

Integrating Community Outreach into the Undergraduate Neuroscience Classroom  

PubMed Central

While both federal agencies and professional associations emphasize the importance of neuroscience outreach, this goal seldom reaches the undergraduate neuroscience classroom. However, incorporating outreach into undergraduate neuroscience classes is an efficient means to reach not only future scientists, but also the future practitioners (K-12 teachers, social service workers, etc.) with whom neuroscientists hope to communicate. It also provides a vehicle for faculty members to engage in outreach activities that are typically un- or under-rewarded in faculty reviews. In this article, a Neuroscience Community Outreach Project (NCOP) is described. The project has been used in three offerings of a Cognitive Neuroscience course at a small liberal arts college, shared and applied at a large state university, and presented at a regional Society for Neuroscience meeting as an example of outreach opportunities for faculty. The NCOP assignment is a student-driven, modular activity that can be easily incorporated into existing neuroscience course frameworks. The assignment builds on student interests and connections in the community, providing a way for faculty at institutions without formal outreach programs to incorporate neuroscience outreach into the classroom and connect students to online resources. Several sample student projects are described across three broad domains (K-12 outreach, presentations to social service organizations, and media / popular press presentations). The article ends with a set of suggestions addressing common faculty concerns about incorporating community outreach into the undergraduate neuroscience classroom. PMID:23626492

Stevens, Courtney

2011-01-01

318

Master Classrooms: Classroom Design with Technology in Mind.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Technology is changing the classroom requiring new design features and considerations to make the classroom flexible and interactive with the teaching process. The design of a Master Classroom, a product of the Classroom Improvement Project at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is described. These classrooms are specially-equipped to…

Conway, Kathryn

319

The Social Status of Aggressive Students across Contexts: The Role of Classroom Status Hierarchy, Academic Achievement, and Grade  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested the effects of 5 classroom contextual features on the social status (perceived popularity and social preference) that peers accord to aggressive students in late elementary school, including classroom peer status hierarchy (whether within-classroom differences in popularity are large or small), classroom academic level, and grade…

Garandeau, Claire F.; Ahn, Hai-Jeong; Rodkin, Philip C.

2011-01-01

320

Becoming urban science teachers by transforming middle-school classrooms: A study of the Urban Science Education Fellows Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current scenario in American education shows a large achievement and opportunity gap in science between urban children in poverty and more privileged youth. Research has shown that one essential factor that accounts for this gap is the shortage of qualified science teachers in urban schools. Teaching science in a high poverty school presents unique challenges to beginner teachers. Limited resources and support and a significant cultural divide with their students are some of the common problems that cause many novice teachers to quit their jobs or to start enacting what has been described as "the pedagogy of poverty." In this study I looked at the case of the Urban Science Education Fellows Program. This program aimed to prepare preservice teachers (i.e. "fellows") to enact socially just science pedagogies in urban classrooms. I conducted qualitative case studies of three fellows. Fellows worked over one year with science teachers in middle-school classrooms in order to develop transformative action research studies. My analysis focused on how fellows coauthored hybrid spaces within these studies that challenged the typical ways science was taught and learned in their classrooms towards a vision of socially just teaching. By coauthoring these hybrid spaces, fellows developed grounded generativity, i.e. a capacity to create new teaching scenarios rooted in the pragmatic realities of an authentic classroom setting. Grounded generativity included building upon their pedagogical beliefs in order to improvise pedagogies with others, repositioning themselves and their students differently in the classroom and constructing symbols of possibility to guide their practice. I proposed authentic play as the mechanism that enabled fellows to coauthor hybrid spaces. Authentic play involved contexts of moderate risk and of distributed expertise and required fellows to be positioned at the intersection of the margins and the center of the classroom community of practice. In all, this study demonstrates that engaging in classroom reform can support preservice teachers in developing specialized tools to teach science in urban classrooms.

Furman, Melina Gabriela

321

Effects of Classroom Structure on Student Achievement Goal Orientation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors assessed how classroom structure influenced student achievement goal orientation for mathematics. Three elementary school classes were assigned randomly to 1 classroom structure condition: token economy, contingency contract, or control. Students in each condition were required to set individual achievement goals on a weekly basis. The authors assessed differences in goal orientation by comparing the number of learning vs.

Shannon R. Self-brown; Samuel Mathews II

2003-01-01

322

Rewards, intrinsic motivation, and achievement in intact classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of performance-contingent rewards in a real-world setting, namely the sixth grade math classroom. This study is significant in that it represents a field study on the effects of rewards in the classroom. The purpose of this study was to investigate what effect, if any, the choice of a reward had

Melissa Ann Luis

2011-01-01

323

Rewards, Intrinsic Motivation, and Achievement in Intact Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of performance-contingent rewards in a real-world setting, namely the sixth grade math classroom. This study is significant in that it represents a field study on the effects of rewards in the classroom. The purpose of this study was to investigate what effect, if any, the choice of a reward had…

Luis, Melissa Ann

2011-01-01

324

Critical Conversations: Tensions and Opportunities of the Dialogical Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

English teachers and educators of English teachers should work within rather than against the tensions present in their classrooms. For us, nothing could be more key. Until university teacher educators construct and enact classrooms that embrace the dialogical tensions and possibilities within those settings, new and veteran teachers in the…

Fecho, Bob; Collier, Nicole D.; Friese, Elizabeth E. G.; Wilson, Amy Alexandra

2010-01-01

325

Physical and Psychosocial Environments Associated with Networked Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports a study of the learning environments in computer networked classrooms. The study is unique in that it involved an evaluation of both the physical and psychosocial classroom environments in these computerised settings through the use of a combination of questionnaires and ergonomic evaluations. The study involved administering…

Zandvliet, David B.; Fraser, Barry J.

2005-01-01

326

Learning Environments in Information and Communications Technology Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study of learning environments provides a useful research framework for investigating the effects of educational innovations such as those which are associated with the use of the Internet in classroom settings. This study reports an investigation into the use of Internet technologies in high-school classrooms in Australia and Canada.…

Zandvliet, David B.; Fraser, Barry J.

2004-01-01

327

Group Work and Electronic Meeting Systems: From Boardroom to Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Applies results from field and laboratory studies about business usage of electronic meeting systems (EMS) to the classroom setting. Argues that it transforms the classroom from a traditional instructor-centered environment to a student-centered environment in which students participate, participate more equally, and report a highly satisfying…

Tullar, William L.; Kaiser, Paula R.; Balthazard, Pierre A.

1998-01-01

328

Children's Systematic Use of Private Speech in Early Childhood Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study examined children's use of private speech in early childhood classrooms. The study's three goals were: to determine the degree to which private speech is used; to replicate and extend previous research with older children; and to examine the classroom's particular contexts and activity settings which maximize children's use of private…

Winsler, Adam; Carlton, Martha P.; Barry, Maryann J.

329

Small Steps to a Student-Centered Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes several techniques that have been used in a variety of college mathematics classes to shift the classroom experience from instructor-centered to student-centered. Discusses specific applications of these techniques to remedial mathematics, precalculus, liberal arts mathematics, calculus, and geometry classroom settings. (40 references)…

Castro, James

1991-01-01

330

Gender inequality in the primary classroom: will interactive whiteboards help?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper sets out to investigate (i) gender differences in whole class classroom interaction with a sample of teachers who were not using interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in their lessons; and (ii) the short?term and longer term impact of IWB use upon gender differences in classroom interaction. The study focused upon teacher–student interaction at Key Stage 2 in the teaching of

Fay Smith; Frank Hardman; Steve Higgins

2007-01-01

331

An Annotated Bibliography for the Barclay Classroom Climate Inventory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This annotated bibliography contains a record of the evolution of a system for evaluating children in the classroom setting. The Barclay Classroom Climate Inventory is a needs assessment system in the affective-social domain. It is unique in that it taps three inputs, self-report, peer judgements and teacher expectations. These inputs are blended…

Barclay, James R.

332

Activity-Oriented Classrooms. NEA Early Childhood Education Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide to designing activity-oriented classrooms for grades K-3 is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 provides an overview of research findings concerning the way children learn and the environments that best facilitate their learning. Chapter 2, which explains ways to set up an activity-oriented classroom, covers the administration's role…

Cowles, Milly; Aldridge, Jerry

333

Freedom of Expression for Teachers in the Public School Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers have recently gained significant First Amendment protection within the areas of classroom utterances; dress and appearance; badges, buttons, and other insignia; flag salutes; and classroom assignments. The extent of this academic freedom has not yet been determined, but various guidelines have been set by both federal and state appellate…

Sponseller, Edwin H.

334

An On-Line Classroom for the Unix Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes an electronic classroom (ECR) program that has been developed at Nova University to facilitate online real-time group instruction in graduate degree programs in information and computer science. The first section describes the educational uses of the program, including the simulation of a classroom-type educational setting

Scigliano, John A.; And Others

335

Creating Discussions with Classroom Voting in Linear Algebra  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We present a study of classroom voting in linear algebra, in which the instructors posed multiple-choice questions to the class and then allowed a few minutes for consideration and small-group discussion. After each student in the class voted on the correct answer using a classroom response system, a set of clickers, the instructor then guided a…

Cline, Kelly; Zullo, Holly; Duncan, Jonathan; Stewart, Ann; Snipes, Marie

2013-01-01

336

The Development of the Older Persons and Informal Caregivers Survey Minimum DataSet (TOPICS-MDS): A Large-Scale Data Sharing Initiative  

PubMed Central

Introduction In 2008, the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport commissioned the National Care for the Elderly Programme. While numerous research projects in older persons’ health care were to be conducted under this national agenda, the Programme further advocated the development of The Older Persons and Informal Caregivers Survey Minimum DataSet (TOPICS-MDS) which would be integrated into all funded research protocols. In this context, we describe TOPICS data sharing initiative (www.topics-mds.eu). Materials and Methods A working group drafted TOPICS-MDS prototype, which was subsequently approved by a multidisciplinary panel. Using instruments validated for older populations, information was collected on demographics, morbidity, quality of life, functional limitations, mental health, social functioning and health service utilisation. For informal caregivers, information was collected on demographics, hours of informal care and quality of life (including subjective care-related burden). Results Between 2010 and 2013, a total of 41 research projects contributed data to TOPICS-MDS, resulting in preliminary data available for 32,310 older persons and 3,940 informal caregivers. The majority of studies sampled were from primary care settings and inclusion criteria differed across studies. Discussion TOPICS-MDS is a public data repository which contains essential data to better understand health challenges experienced by older persons and informal caregivers. Such findings are relevant for countries where increasing health-related expenditure has necessitated the evaluation of contemporary health care delivery. Although open sharing of data can be difficult to achieve in practice, proactively addressing issues of data protection, conflicting data analysis requests and funding limitations during TOPICS-MDS developmental phase has fostered a data sharing culture. To date, TOPICS-MDS has been successfully incorporated into 41 research projects, thus supporting the feasibility of constructing a large (>30,000 observations), standardised dataset pooled from various study protocols with different sampling frameworks. This unique implementation strategy improves efficiency and facilitates individual-level data meta-analysis. PMID:24324716

Lutomski, Jennifer E.; Baars, Maria A. E.; Schalk, Bianca W. M.; Boter, Han; Buurman, Bianca M.; den Elzen, Wendy P. J.; Jansen, Aaltje P. D.; Kempen, Gertrudis I. J. M.; Steunenberg, Bas; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G. M.; Melis, Rene J. F.

2013-01-01

337

Bayesian Sets  

E-print Network

Inspired by “Google ™ Sets”, we consider the problem of retrieving items from a concept or cluster, given a query consisting of a few items from that cluster. We formulate this as a Bayesian inference problem and describe a very simple algorithm for solving it. Our algorithm uses a modelbased concept of a cluster and ranks items using a score which evaluates the marginal probability that each item belongs to a cluster containing the query items. For exponential family models with conjugate priors this marginal probability is a simple function of sufficient statistics. We focus on sparse binary data and show that our score can be evaluated exactly using a single sparse matrix multiplication, making it possible to apply our algorithm to very large datasets. We evaluate our algorithm on three datasets: retrieving movies from EachMovie, finding completions of author sets from the NIPS dataset, and finding completions of sets of words appearing in the Grolier encyclopedia. We compare to Google ™ Sets and show that Bayesian Sets gives very reasonable set completions. 1

Zoubin Ghahramani; Katherine A. Heller

2005-01-01

338

Bayesian Sets  

E-print Network

Inspired by "Google Sets", we consider the problem of retrieving items from a concept or cluster, given a query consisting of a few items from that cluster. We formulate this as a Bayesian inference problem and describe a very simple algorithm for solving it. Our algorithm uses a modelbased concept of a cluster and ranks items using a score which evaluates the marginal probability that each item belongs to a cluster containing the query items. For exponential family models with conjugate priors this marginal probability is a simple function of sufficient statistics. We focus on sparse binary data and show that our score can be evaluated exactly using a single sparse matrix multiplication, making it possible to apply our algorithm to very large datasets. We evaluate our algorithm on three datasets: retrieving movies from EachMovie, finding completions of author sets from the NIPS dataset, and finding completions of sets of words appearing in the Grolier encyclopedia. We compare to Google Sets and show that Bayesian Sets gives very reasonable set completions.

Zoubin Ghahramani And; Zoubin Ghahramani; Katherine A. Heller

2005-01-01

339

Supporting Students' Strategic Competence: A Case of a Sixth-Grade Mathematics Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mathematics education research has documented several classroom practices that might influence student self-regulation. We know little, however, about the ways these classroom practices could be structured in real classroom settings. In this exploratory case study, we purposefully selected a sixth-grade mathematics teacher who had participated in…

Ozdemir, I. Elif Yetkin; Pape, Stephen J.

2012-01-01

340

Critical Health Literacy: Shifting Textual-Social Practices in the Health Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper will consider ways in which students are constructed as aliens in health classrooms. Creating the classroom as a setting for health promotion requires closer attention to those who make use of such space. If classrooms are places where diversity exists and is recognised, then health educators are challenged to consider how students are…

Renwick, Kerry

2014-01-01

341

The Key Elements of Classroom Management: Managing Time and Space, Student Behavior, and Instructional Strategies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this book, three veteran teachers show how teachers can make real improvements in their classroom by concentrating on basic skills. There are 13 chapters in three sections. The first section, "Time and Classroom Space" (Joyce McLeod), focuses on (1) "Setting Up the Classroom"; (2) "Managing Instructional Time"; (3) "Managing Administrative…

McLeod, Joyce; Fisher, Jan; Hoover, Ginny

342

The Classroom Animal.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides background information on the earthworm. Reviews basic anatomical, behavioral, and reproductive facts. Offers suggestions for procuring, maintaining, and breeding colonies for classroom use. (ML)

Science and Children, 1986

1986-01-01

343

Considering the Chalkless Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article shares some personal reflections on several years of integrating educational technology into mathematics courses while retaining the direct interaction strengths of the traditional classroom.

Ellis-Monaghan, Joanna A.

2010-01-01

344

Comparison of Two Methods for Estimating the Sampling-Related Uncertainty of Satellite Rainfall Averages Based on a Large Radar Data Set  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The uncertainty of rainfall estimated from averages of discrete samples collected by a satellite is assessed using a multi-year radar data set covering a large portion of the United States. The sampling-related uncertainty of rainfall estimates is evaluated for all combinations of 100 km, 200 km, and 500 km space domains, 1 day, 5 day, and 30 day rainfall accumulations, and regular sampling time intervals of 1 h, 3 h, 6 h, 8 h, and 12 h. These extensive analyses are combined to characterize the sampling uncertainty as a function of space and time domain, sampling frequency, and rainfall characteristics by means of a simple scaling law. Moreover, it is shown that both parametric and non-parametric statistical techniques of estimating the sampling uncertainty produce comparable results. Sampling uncertainty estimates, however, do depend on the choice of technique for obtaining them. They can also vary considerably from case to case, reflecting the great variability of natural rainfall, and should therefore be expressed in probabilistic terms. Rainfall calibration errors are shown to affect comparison of results obtained by studies based on data from different climate regions and/or observation platforms.

Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor); Bell, Thomas L.; Steiner, Matthias; Zhang, Yu; Wood, Eric F.

2002-01-01

345

An investigation of behaviour management strategies on learners with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in the classroom.  

E-print Network

??Learners with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) traditionally display disruptive and other associated negative behaviour in the classroom setting. Behaviour management strategies utilised by the… (more)

Wulfsohn, Renee

2010-01-01

346

Learning Gender Roles in Three Urban U. S . Kindergarten Classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three U.S. kindergarten classrooms in two large Mid-western cities (Minneapolis and Cincinnati) are the context for this study of gender roles. Of particular interest are the patterns of social relations established in same sex groups of children in these classrooms. Data include field notes and transcriptions of audiotaped interactions gathered during more than 90 hours of observation across the three

Kathryn M. Borman; Patricia OReilly

1987-01-01

347

Maximum Technology in the Music Classroom: Minimum Requirements  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Music teachers are used to finding creative methods for accomplishing large tasks in spite of overwhelming obstacles, such as an insufficient budget and limited time. Yet, when it comes to incorporating technology into the classroom, many allow these obstacles to get the best of them. Finding ways to use computers in the classroom with limited…

Studer, Kathy

2005-01-01

348

Managing Classroom Problems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Schools need to meet unique problems through the development of special classroom management techniques. Factors which contribute to classroom problems include lack of supervision at home, broken homes, economic deprivation, and a desire for peer attention. The educational atmosphere should encourage creativity for both the student and the…

Long, James D.

349

The Caring Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Creating a safe place in which to learn is vital to providing all students with equal opportunity. The Caring Classroom is a model for using adventure techniques to create a classroom community. It begins at the formation stage of group development by addressing cooperation issues such as using put-ups instead of put-downs, using active listening,…

Frank, Laurie S.

350

Effective Learning in Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book addresses an important and seldom addressed issue: learning. Not teaching, not performance, not "work": this book really is about learning, what makes learning effective and how it may be promoted in classrooms. The authors take the context of the classroom seriously, not only because of its effects on teachers and pupils, but because…

Watkins, Chris; Carnell, Eileen; Lodge, Caroline M.

2007-01-01

351

Promoting Classroom Technology Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to test two hypotheses: (1) that participation in a course providing theory and practice in the classroom use of technology promotes its use and results in gained competence in technology use; and (2) that functional relations exist among the availability of technology in the classroom, technology utilization, and…

Rosenfeld, Barbara; Martinez-Pons, Manuel

2005-01-01

352

Evangelism in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is frequently said that evangelism or proselytizing has no place in the classroom. The purpose of this essay is to counter this generalization and to explore the nature of legitimate religious influence in the classroom. In doing so I will offer some criteria to help us determine what is and what is not acceptable by way of religious persuasion…

Thiessen, Elmer John

2013-01-01

353

The virtual classroom experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Modern technology creates an imperative for increasingly diverse classroom experiences. Both students and faculty can benefit from the constant technological advances occurring today. Students expect their educational experience to include the use of current technology, multimedia presentations of subject content, and engaging learning interactivity. A dramatic benefit can be achieved by the use of diverse tools, such as a classroom

Barbara Bernal Thomas

2003-01-01

354

Frontloading Classroom Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors describe a systematic approach to planning for the first days of school that is appropriate for today's demanding high school science classrooms. These strategies apply to any science subject and benefit student teachers, new teachers, and those teachers wishing to improve their classroom management skills. (Contains 3…

Roscoe, Keith; Orr, Kim

2010-01-01

355

Creating Better Classroom Tests.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the perspective that the quality of teacher-made, small classroom tests has not improved, and may have declined in recent years. This decline may be due to the fact that teachers have come to believe that the kinds of objective items used in national standardized tests are the only item types appropriate for classroom use.…

Gulliksen, Harold

356

Competition in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that teacher use of competition in the classroom may lead to anxiety, aggression, or a decrease in self-concept among students and that learning to compete is not so important in a postindustrial society. Advocates cooperative classroom activities. (SJL)

Napier, Erv

1981-01-01

357

Speaking in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Too much speaking and indiscipline in class is an on-going problem for any teacher, it is at its least disruptive and at most it destroys a good positive classroom atmosphere. This article recognizes this and continues this debate and suggests key clues to support teachers in their efforts to maintain a positive classroom atmosphere and discipline…

McBain, Robert

2011-01-01

358

The Physics Classroom: Graph Sketching and Recognition  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This set of interactive practice questions allows students of introductory physics to test their own understanding of the graphical depiction of motion. It consists of 37 questions/tasks, with answers provided. Extensive scaffolding is provided in the form of "Explanation" links. This resource is part of The Physics Classroom an educational website for teachers and learners of introductory physics.

Henderson, Tom

359

Gesture in a Kindergarten Mathematics Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent studies have advocated that mathematical meaning is mediated by gestures. This case study explores the gestures kindergarten children produce when learning spatial concepts in a mathematics classroom setting. Based on a video study of a mathematical lesson in a kindergarten class, we concentrated on the verbal and non-verbal behavior of one…

Elia, Iliada; Evangelou, Kyriacoulla

2014-01-01

360

Cultivating a Brain-Friendly Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent research has revealed remarkable data about the intricacies of brain-based learning and the integration of this knowledge into the academic setting. Prudent educators can create a brain-friendly classroom by developing an emotionally and physically safe environment, using laughter and simple exercises to eliminate mental cobwebs, creating…

Biller, Lowell W.

1997-01-01

361

Preschool teachers’ exposure to classroom noise  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examined exposure to classroom noise of 25 full?time teaching staff in 14 preschool settings located across Western Sydney. The results indicated that one teacher exceeded the maximum permissible level of daily noise exposure for employees under the health and safety legislation. Three staff approached this level and 92% of teachers were subjected to daily noise exposure which, if

Leonid Grebennikov

2006-01-01

362

Classroom Size: Does It Make a Difference?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This action research project reports on the effects of classroom size on the quality of work conditions, academic achievement, and students' behavior. The kindergarten through third grade levels were targeted at three schools, one in a suburban setting and the other two in a growing rural area. For the 1999-2000 school year, the urban school had…

Hunn-Sannito, Robin; Hunn-Tosi, Rinda; Tessling, Margaret

363

Collaborative Learning in a Virtual Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website features an article describing a study which shows that effective communication is not happening in the virtual classroom. This failure appears to be fragmenting learning communities and causing feelings of isolation and confusion among some students. The article offers a set of fourteen pilot guidelines to help address this issue.

Richardson, Julie A.; Turner, Anthony; Lab, Stanford L.

364

Teaching Strategies Used to Maintain Classroom Order  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the ever evolving environment of the classroom setting the role of the teacher is constantly being challenged and the responsibilities remain the same. Teachers are required to create a safe learning environment for student learning. Although this is an overwhelming responsibility it is not impossible. This study explored teachers'…

Roman, Daniel

2007-01-01

365

Mainstream Literature for Full, Inclusive Secondary Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The U.S. Department of Education (2000) reported that approximately 80% of students identified with learning disabilities (LD) received half of their instruction within the general education classroom setting. Therefore, it is important that general education teachers implement teaching strategies and practices that meet the distinct educational…

McFall, Lindsey; Fitzpatrick, Michael

2010-01-01

366

Negotiated Interaction in the L2 Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present paper reports on an approximate replication of Foster's (1998) study on the negotiation of meaning. Foster investigated the interactional adjustments produced by L2 English learners working on different types of language learning tasks in a classroom setting. The replication study duplicates the methods of data collection and data…

Eckerth, Johannes

2009-01-01

367

Classroom Management Challenges in the Dance Class  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching dance can be a challenge because of the unique classroom-management situations that arise from the dynamic nature of the class content. Management is a delicate navigation of advance planning; rule setting; the establishment and implementation of daily protocols, routines, and interventions; and the teacher's own presentation. This…

Clark, Dawn

2007-01-01

368

Nationalism in Geography Classrooms: Challenges and Opportunities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This set of essays is based on a panel session convened at the 2009 meeting of the Association of American Geographers, which sought to explore the many challenges and pitfalls involved with teaching nationalism as a topic in geography classrooms. The authors offer different but complementary insights into the practical difficulties and potential…

Schlosser, Kolson; White, George; Leib, Jonathan; Dalby, Simon; Algeo, Katie; Jansson, David; Zimmerman, Jackson

2011-01-01

369

Transforming Classroom Culture: Inclusive Pedagogical Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Transforming Classroom Culture" is an anthology of original work authored by diverse faculty who work in a variety of New England college and university settings--private and public, racially homogeneous and diverse. The authors focus on institutional contexts that promote innovation in teaching practice, faculty identity as a resource for…

Dallalfar, Arlene, Ed.; Kingston-Mann, Esther, Ed.; Sieber, Tim, Ed.

2011-01-01

370

The Gay Word in a Junior Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers concerned with issues of social justice are sometimes confronted by classroom incidents that compel them to take action. This article draws on an incident in a primary school setting where deprecating language, used toward a child of lesbian parents, challenged the teacher to confront the issue of homophobic language. The teacher worked…

Hardie, Ann; Bowers, Warren

2012-01-01

371

Professional Learning outside the Classroom: Expedition Iceland  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A bunch of intrepid teachers spent a week in Iceland in a quest to learn more about the country's challenging landscape, by engaging in a unique and inspiring professional development opportunity to learn about innovative ways to teach science and mathematics outside of a classroom setting. A 2008 Ofsted report highlighted the benefits of learning…

Jordan, Julie; Bull, Sue

2012-01-01

372

School Recess and Group Classroom Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES. This study examines the amount of recess that children 8 to 9 years of age receive in the United States and compares the group classroom behavior of children receiving daily recess with that of children not receiving daily recess. METHODS. This is a secondary analysis of a public-use data set, the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998

Romina M. Barros; Ellen J. Silver; Ruth E. K. Stein

2009-01-01

373

Classroom Voting Patterns in Differential Calculus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We study how different sections voted on the same set of classroom voting questions in differential calculus, finding that voting patterns can be used to identify some of the questions that have the most pedagogic value. We use statistics to identify three types of especially useful questions: 1. To identify good discussion questions, we look for…

Cline, Kelly; Zullo, Holly; VonEpps, Lahna

2012-01-01

374

Weight Loss in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients in an Ambulatory Care Setting Is Largely Unsuccessful but Correlates with Frequency of Clinic Visits  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NALFD) is a leading cause of liver disease. Weight loss improves clinical features of NAFLD; however, maintenance of weight loss outside of investigational protocols is poor. The goals of this study were to characterize patterns and clinical predictors of long-term weight loss in ambulatory patients with NAFLD. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 924 non-cirrhotic patients with NAFLD presenting to a liver clinic from May 1st 2007 to April 30th 2013. Overweight and obese patients were counseled on lifestyle modifications for weight loss as per USPSTF guidelines. The primary outcome was percent weight change between the first and last recorded visits: % weight change ?=? (weightinitial – weightfinal)/(weightinitial). Baseline BMI and percent BMI change were secondary measures. Predictors of weight loss were determined using logistic regression. Results The mean baseline BMI was 33.3±6.6 kg/m2, and the mean follow-up duration was 17.3±17.6 months. Most patients with NAFLD were in either overweight (26.1%) or class I obesity (30.5%) categories at baseline, while the prevalence of underweight and class III obesity was lower (0.2% and 15.4%, respectively). Overall, there was no change in mean weight or BMI during the follow-up period, and only 183 patients (19.8%) lost at least 5% body weight during the follow up period. Independent predictors of weight loss included number of clinic visits and baseline BMI, and patients with higher baseline BMI required more clinic visits to lose weight. Conclusions Weight loss is largely unsuccessful in NAFLD patients in the ambulatory care setting. Frequent clinical encounters are associated with weight reduction, especially among individuals with high baseline BMI. Future studies are required to define effective weight loss strategies in NAFLD patients. PMID:25375228

Shaik, Beebijan; Behari, Jaideep

2014-01-01

375

Physlets: Chapter 7: Classroom Exercises  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page is part of a collection of physics applets which accompany the book 'Physlets: Teaching Physics with Interactive Curricular Material' by Christian and Belloni. It contains a set of applet-based concept questions for use in physics classrooms. The questions are intended to probe student understanding and elicit misconceptions. Electronic student response systems (clickers) are often used to allow anonymous "voting" on the correct answer. Included topics within this collection are mechanics, electromagnetism, and advanced physics. This page is part of a much larger collection of applets and related curriculum materials developed specifically for teaching with Physlets, as well as a wide range of tools for input and display of information.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2009-01-13

376

Teacher Classroom Management Practices: Effects on Disruptive or Aggressive Student Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the large research base grounded in behavioral theory for strategies to increase appropriate behavior and prevent or decrease inappropriate behavior in the classroom, a systematic review of multi-component universal classroom management research is necessary to establish the effects of teachers' universal classroom management approaches.…

Oliver, Regina M.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Reschly, Daniel J.

2011-01-01

377

NASA Classroom Bioreactor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Exploration of space provides a compelling need for cell-based research into the basic mechanisms that underlie the profound changes that occur in terrestrial life that is transitioned to low gravity environments. Toward that end, NASA developed a rotating bioreactor in which cells are cultured while continuously suspended in a cylinder in which the culture medium rotates with the cylinder. The randomization of the gravity vector accomplished by the continuous rotation, in a low shear environment, provides an analog of microgravity. Because cultures grown in bioreactors develop structures and functions that are much closer to those exhibited by native tissue than can be achieved with traditional culture methods, bioreactors have contributed substantially to advancing research in the fields of cancer, diabetes, infectious disease modeling for vaccine production, drug efficacy, and tissue engineering. NASA has developed a Classroom Bioreactor (CB) that is built from parts that are easily obtained and assembled, user-friendly and versatile. It can be easily used in simple school settings to examine the effect cultures of seeds or cells. An educational brief provides assembly instructions and lesson plans that describes activities in science, math and technology that explore free fall, microgravity, orbits, bioreactors, structure-function relationships and the scientific method.

Scully, Robert

2004-01-01

378

Classroom Management and Students' Perceptions of Classroom Climate  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The impact of classroom management and the impact of classroom climate on student academic achievement has been independently documented by scholars. Less is currently know regarding the relationship linking classroom management and climate. Therefore, the purpose of this quasi experimental study was to explore the influence of classroom

Ratzburg, Susan A.

2010-01-01

379

Teachers’ practical knowledge about classroom management in multicultural classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Creating a positive working atmosphere in the classroom is the first concern of many student and beginning teachers in secondary education. Teaching in multicultural classrooms provides additional challenges for these teachers. This study identified shared practical knowledge about classroom management strategies of teachers who were successful in creating a positive working atmosphere in their multicultural classrooms. Twelve teachers were selected

Jan van Tartwijk; Perry den Brok; Ietje Veldman; Theo Wubbels

2009-01-01

380

Maintaining Discipline in Classroom Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document focuses on classroom discipline and how the teacher can maintain an environment that will optimize appropriate learning. Part 1 defines classroom discipline. Part 2 discusses classroom misbehavior and describes a number of classroom management techniques. Part 3 offers suggestions for control techniques. Part 4 discusses techniques…

Gnagey, William J.

381

Flipping the Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A recent trend in education is the "flipped" or "reversed" classroom. In this educational model, students view videos of the lectures as their homework and class time is used for activities and solving problems that might have been assigned as homework in a traditional classroom. Although far from an expert on flipping the classroom, I can see some merit in the idea. When students watch the videos at home, they can start and restart the lecture as often as they like. The lectures are also available for review before the exam. Class time can be used for higher-order questioning, experiments, and problem solving.

2012-11-01

382

Flipping the Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A recent trend in education is the ``flipped'' or ``reversed'' classroom. In this educational model, students view videos of the lectures as their homework and class time is used for activities and solving problems that might have been assigned as homework in a traditional classroom. Although far from an expert on flipping the classroom, I can see some merit in the idea. When students watch the videos at home, they can start and restart the lecture as often as they like. The lectures are also available for review before the exam. Class time can be used for higher-order questioning, experiments, and problem solving.

Riendeau, Diane

2012-11-01

383

Classroom Instruction: The Influences of Marie Clay  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Marie Clay's body of work has influenced classroom instruction in direct and indirect ways, through large overarching themes in our pedagogical content knowledge as well as specific smart practices. This paper focuses on her the contributions to our thinking about instruction which come from two broad theoretical concepts; emergent literacy…

McNaughton, Stuart

2014-01-01

384

Extracting Valuable Data from Classroom Trading Pits  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How well does competitive theory explain the outcome in experimental markets? The authors examined the results of a large number of classroom trading experiments that used a pit-trading design found in Experiments with Economic Principles, an introductory economics textbook by Bergstrom and Miller. They compared experimental outcomes with…

Bergstrom, Theodore C.; Kwok, Eugene

2005-01-01

385

Comparison of Students' Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction Factors in Different Classroom Types in Higher Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Effective classroom learning requires a good learning environment integrated with quality teaching, quality course content,\\u000a and a collaborative approach towards learning. This study sets out to examine the drivers of student satisfaction and dissatisfaction\\u000a in the three classroom settings common to higher education: face-to-face, Web-based, and blended classrooms. The Critical\\u000a Incident Technique was used to collect data and to form

Fong-Ling Fu

2010-01-01

386

For the Classroom: Scrimshaw.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Procedures are described for practicing the art of scrimshaw in the classroom. Several materials are suggested for use. These include beef soup bones, old piano keys, nails, sandpaper, and lampblack or charcoal. (SA)

Current, 1979

1979-01-01

387

Toys in The Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A number of chemical concepts can be easily illustrated in a more friendly way to children by using toys as teaching tools in the classroom. Some of the examples illustrated are shrinking toys, drinking birds and hand boiler.

Sarquis, Jerry L.; Sarquis, Arlyne M.

2005-01-01

388

Craters in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Details an activity in which students create and study miniature impact craters in the classroom. Engages students in making detailed, meaningful observations, drawing inferences, reaching conclusions based on scientific evidence, and designing experiments to test selected variables. (DDR)

McArdle, Heather K.

1997-01-01

389

View from My Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the philosophy of a high school chemistry teacher, providing examples through classroom experiences, with emphasis on the use of demonstrations as instructional aids. Specific stoichiometry and conductometric titration demonstrations are discussed. (CS)

Harris, Sidney P.

1980-01-01

390

Critters in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of invertebrates as classroom "pets" can develop students' skills in scientific inquiry and instill respect for science. Few materials are needed for projects involving invertebrates. Suggested activities using snails, crickets, earthworms, crayfish, and guppies are offered. (DF)

Smith, Robert W.; Fleisher, Paul

1984-01-01

391

Frontloading Classroom Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this article, the authors describe a systematic approach to planning for the first days of school that is appropriate for today's demanding high school science classrooms. These strategies apply to any science subject and benefit student teachers, new

Roscoe, Keith; Orr, Kim

2010-07-01

392

The Classroom Space Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces the Classroom Space project aimed at revitalizing science education at Key Stages 3 and 4 by using exciting examples from Space Science and Astronomy to illustrate key science concepts. (Author/YDS)

Verbickas, Sarah

2002-01-01

393

Frontiers in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides examples of ways to use the television show "Scientific American Frontiers" in the classroom. Outlines a range of approaches and discusses some motivational techniques to engage students. (DDR)

Coyne, Janet Smith

1998-01-01

394

Floor Plan Your Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource guides the learner, step-by-step, in creating a scale floor plan of a classroom. The instructions include sample drawings of student work. The activity includes: sketching a map of the classroom; measuring the room and calculating the area and perimeter; creating a scale drawing; and drafting a CAD (computer-aided design) floor plan. The lesson provides students with hands-on, real world practice solving problems of measurement, ratio, and scale.

2003-01-01

395

Solar Powered Classroom  

ScienceCinema

A group of fourth graders in Durham, North Carolina, are showing America the way to a clean energy future. They are installing solar panels on their classroom roof for a project that goes above and beyond a normal day in school. From researching solar panel installation, to generating funds for the project via Kickstarter, these are students who put their plans into action. Their accomplishments go beyond the classroom and stress the importance of getting people of all ages involved in renewable energy.

none

2013-06-27

396

Solar Powered Classroom  

SciTech Connect

A group of fourth graders in Durham, North Carolina, are showing America the way to a clean energy future. They are installing solar panels on their classroom roof for a project that goes above and beyond a normal day in school. From researching solar panel installation, to generating funds for the project via Kickstarter, these are students who put their plans into action. Their accomplishments go beyond the classroom and stress the importance of getting people of all ages involved in renewable energy.

none

2013-06-13

397

Removal of a Student on a Methylphenidate (Ritalin) Prescription in an Open Classroom Condition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described by the teacher is the removal of a 10-year-old hyperactive boy from drug therapy (Ritalin). The setting, open classroom, and the involvement of four regular classroom teachers and a progressive teacher employing behavior modification in a small group setting are thought to be related to the boy's academic and behavioral progress. The boy…

Hirst, Irene

398

Transforming modular classrooms in California and elsewhere  

SciTech Connect

This paper discussed a market-transformation program to reduce energy use in modular school classrooms, a large part of new construction activities in California's schools. Today's modular classrooms cost more to operate than is necessary to provide effective, comfortable learning conditions for students and teachers. Although past resource acquisition programs have created a demand for efficient products and services, modular classrooms remain poorly differentiated in this respect. The cost-effectiveness of a range of potential energy efficiency measures (EEM's) were evaluated including lighting, alternative HVAC options, and improved envelope features. Viable EEM's were combined in two separate packages. The first includes measures that can easily be implemented and are projected to reduce operating costs by 30%. The second implements a daylighting system, a two-stage evaporative cooler, and radiant heating, resulting in projected annual energy cost savings over 60%. Transforming the market for modular classrooms is accomplished using natural market forces, rather than financial incentives directed at an entire industry. Proactive efforts are focused on the manufacturing industry's change leaders to commercialize energy-efficient products. Lost market share and peer pressure do the heavy lifting of convincing market followers to upgrade their products. Demand for efficient classrooms is increased by educating schools about the new products' financial advantages, comfort enhancements, and environmental benefits. As new products become established in the marketplace, support will be gradually withdrawn. The relevance of this work extends beyond California, given other States' programs to reduce class size, and the Presidents initiative to reduce class size nationally.

Eilert, P.L.; Hoeschele, M.

1998-07-01

399

Using a Classroom Approach To Teach Peer Mediation to Grades 3 and 4 by Developing a Peacebuster Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This practicum set up a classroom-based model for peer mediation in grades 3 and 4. During the project's implementation, the school psychologist delivered, individually to each of 6 different third and fourth-grade classrooms, 8 weeks of classroom instruction on conflict resolution. When all 6 classes were familiar with conflict resolution…

Aitken, Claudia Jean

400

A Comparison of Self-Monitoring with and without Reinforcement to Improve On-Task Classroom Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study we analyzed the effects of a self-monitoring and self-monitoring plus reinforcement intervention on classroom behavior. A typically-developing high school student demonstrating difficulty staying on-task during classroom instruction was observed in three classroom settings associated with high levels of off-task behavior. During…

Davis, Tonya N.; Dacus, Sharon; Bankhead, Jenna; Haupert, Megan; Fuentes, Lisa; Zoch, Tamara; Kang, Soyeon; Attai, Shanna; Lang, Russell

2014-01-01

401

Policy and Strategies for ESL Pedagogy in Multilingual Classrooms: The Classroom Talk Programme  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores the impact of a specially designed programme of communicative strategies on English second language (ESL) development in a scaffolded case study that set out to promote teacher-guided, constructive learner talk in the outcomes-based education arts and culture classroom. The programme was implemented in a multilingual secondary…

Naicker, Shalina; Balfour, Robert J.

2009-01-01

402

Policy and strategies for ESL pedagogy in multilingual classrooms: the Classroom Talk Programme  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the impact of a specially designed programme of communicative strategies on English second language (ESL) development in a scaffolded case study that set out to promote teacher-guided, constructive learner talk in the outcomes-based education arts and culture classroom. The programme was implemented in a multilingual secondary school in Durban, South Africa, and focused on four groups of

Shalina Naicker; Robert J. Balfour

2009-01-01

403

Applying Ragin's Crisp and Fuzzy Set QCA to Large Datasets: Social Class and Educational Achievement in the National Child Development Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper explores the use of Charles Ragin's Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) in both its crisp and fuzzy set versions in the study of the relations between social class origin, sex, 'ability' and subsequent educational achievement. The work reported is part of a larger ongoing project which is employing QCA to compare these relations within two birth cohorts. Here data

Barry Cooper

2005-01-01

404

Exposures to Molds in School Classrooms of Children with Asthma  

PubMed Central

Background Students spend a large portion of their day in classrooms which may be a source of mold exposure. We examined the diversity and concentrations of molds in inner-city schools and described differences between classrooms within the same school. Methods Classroom airborne mold spores, collected over a 2 day period, were measured twice during the school year by direct microscopy. Results There were 180 classroom air samples collected from 12 schools. Mold was present in 100% of classrooms. Classrooms within the same school had differing mold levels and mold diversity scores. The total mold per classroom was 176.6 ± 4.2 spores/m3 (geometric mean ± standard deviation) and ranged from 11.2 to 16,288.5 spores/m3. Mold diversity scores for classroom samples ranged from 1 to 19 (7.7 ± 3.5). The classroom accounted for the majority of variance (62%) in the total mold count, and for the majority of variance (56%) in the mold diversity score versus the school. The species with the highest concentrations and found most commonly included Cladosporium (29.3 ± 4.2 spores/m3), Penicillium/Aspergillus (15.0 ± 5.4 spores/m3), smut spores (12.6 ± 4.0 spores/m3), and basidiospores (6.6 ± 7.1 spores/m3). Conclusions Our study found that the school is a source of mold exposure, but particularly the classroom microenvironment varies in quantity of spores and species among classrooms within the same school. We also verified that visible mold may be a predictor for higher mold spore counts. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical significance of mold exposure relative to asthma morbidity in sensitized and non-sensitized asthmatic children. PMID:24112429

Baxi, Sachin N.; Muilenberg, Michael L.; Rogers, Christine A.; Sheehan, William J.; Gaffin, Jonathan; Permaul, Perdita; Kopel, Lianne S.; Lai, Peggy S.; Lane, Jeffrey P.; Bailey, Ann; Petty, Carter R.; Fu, Chunxia; Gold, Diane R.; Phipatanakul, Wanda

2013-01-01

405

Action methods in the classroom: creative strategies for nursing education.  

PubMed

Nursing education recognizes the need for a framework of experiential learning that supports the development of professional roles. Action methods, originated by Jacob L. Moreno (1953), can be readily adapted to any nursing classroom to create the conditions under which students learn and practice professional nursing roles. While nurse faculty can learn to use action methods, they may not fully comprehend their theoretical underpinnings or may believe they are only used in therapy. This article explores Moreno's ideas related to psychodrama and sociodrama applied in classroom settings, and presents many examples and tips for classroom teachers who wish to incorporate action methods into their classes. PMID:16646938

McLaughlin, Dorcas E; Freed, Patricia E; Tadych, Rita A

2006-01-01

406

Classroom and playground interaction of students with and without disabilities.  

PubMed

The classroom and playground behaviors of students with disabilities, in an integrated classroom, are frequently cited as reasons for rejection of these students by their regular-class peers. We compared the classroom and playground behavior of 95 students with mild disabilities with that of 95 students without disabilities, age and sex matched, and enrolled in the same classes. The children, age 8-13 years, attended state government elementary schools. Behaviors were observed using a time-sampling method with nine categories of behavior in each setting. The behavior of both groups of students was in many ways similar, regardless of the presence of disabilities. PMID:2149552

Roberts, C; Pratt, C; Leach, D

407

Using the World-Wide Web to obtain large-scale word norms: 190,212 ratings on a set of 2,654 German nouns.  

PubMed

This article presents a new database of 2,654 German nouns rated by a sample of 3,907 subjects on three psycholinguistic attributes: concreteness, valence, and arousal. As a new means of data collection in the field of psycholinguistic research, all ratings were obtained via the Internet, using a tailored Web application. Analysis of the obtained word norms showed good agreement with two existing norm sets. A cluster analysis revealed a plausible set of four classes of nouns: abstract concepts, aversive events, pleasant activities, and physical objects. In an additional application example, we demonstrate the usefulness of the database for creating parallel word lists whose elements match as closely as possible. The complete database is available for free from ftp://ftp.uni-duesseldorf.de/pub/psycho/lahl/WWN. Moreover, the Web application used for data collection is inherently capable of collecting word norms in any language and is going to be released for public use as well. PMID:19182119

Lahl, Olaf; Göritz, Anja S; Pietrowsky, Reinhard; Rosenberg, Jessica

2009-02-01

408

Automatic Correction for Phase Shifts, Frequency Shifts, and Lineshape Distortions across a Series of Single Resonance Lines in Large Spectral Data Sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new model-free method is presented that automatically corrects for phase shifts, frequency shifts, and additional lineshape distortions of one single resonance peak across a series of in vivo NMR spectra. All separate phase and frequency variations are quickly and directly derived from the common lineshape in the data set using principal component analysis and linear regression. First, the new approach is evaluated on simulated data in order to quantitatively assess the phase and frequency shifts which can be removed by the proposed correction procedure. Subsequently, the value of the method is demonstrated on in vivo31P NMR spectra from skeletal muscle of the hind leg of the mouse focusing on the phosphocreatine resonance which is distorted by the experimental procedure. Phase shifts, frequency shifts, and lineshape distortions with respect to the common lineshape in the spectral data set could successfully be removed.

Witjes, H.; Melssen, W. J.; in `t Zandt, H. J. A.; van der Graaf, M.; Heerschap, A.; Buydens, L. M. C.

2000-05-01

409

Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) model using a large diverse set of natural, synthetic and environmental chemicals for binding to the androgen receptor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large number of natural, synthetic and environmental chemicals are capable of disrupting the endocrine systems of experimental animals, wildlife and humans. These so-called endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), some mimic the functions of the endogenous androgens, have become a concern to the public health. Androgens play an important role in many physiological processes, including the development and maintenance of male

H. Hong; H. Fang; Q. Xie; R. Perkins; D. M. Sheehan; W. Tong

2003-01-01

410

Classroom Teachers and Classroom Research. JALT Applied Materials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of papers leads classroom language teachers through the process of developing and completing a classroom research project. Arranged in four sections, they include: "Language Teaching and Research" (David Nunan); "Where Are We Now? Trends, Teachers, and Classroom Research" (Dale T. Griffee); "First Things First: Writing the Research…

Griffee, Dale T., Ed.; Nunan, David, Ed.

411

Turning the Looking Glass inside out: A Gifted Student in an At-Risk Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study occurred in a multigrade classroom of 3rd, 4th, and 5th graders in a school labeled at-risk. The focal student in this study was Kirby, identified in this setting as a gifted student. Kirby's classroom teacher and a university researcher collaborated in data collection that included interviews, classroom observations, a…

Barone, Diane; Schneider, Rebecca

2003-01-01

412

Managing Inquiry-Based Classrooms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Though it may seem that classroom management comes naturally to some teachers, upon closer examination you'll probably discover that preparation and adaptation are more important than any innate ability when it comes to successful classroom management. An

Wolfgang, Christie N.

2009-07-01

413

Sherlock Holmes in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a three-day classroom activity combining criminal investigations and scientific skills, especially observation skills. Provides detailed classroom procedures with an illustration of eight basic fingerprint patterns and a classification chart. (YP)

Faia, Jean E.

1988-01-01

414

Explicitly correlated PNO-MP2 and PNO-CCSD and their application to the S66 set and large molecular systems.  

PubMed

We present our current progress on the combination of explicit electron correlation with the pair natural orbital (PNO) representation. In particular we show cubic scaling PNO-MP2-F12, and PNO-CCSD[F12] implementations. The PNOs are constructed using a hybrid scheme, where the PNOs are generated in a truncated doubles space, spanned by orbital specific virtuals obtained using an iterative eigenvector algorithm. We demonstrate the performance of our implementation through calculations on a series of glycine chains. The accuracy of the local approximations is assessed using the S66 benchmark set, and we report for the first time explicitly correlated CCSD results for the whole set and improved estimates for the CCSD/CBS limits. For several dimers the PNO-CCSD[F12] calculations are more accurate than the current reference values. Additionally, we present pilot applications of our PNO-CCSD[F12] code to host-guest interactions in a cluster model for zeolite H-ZSM-5 and in a calix[4]arene-water complex. PMID:25213320

Schmitz, Gunnar; Hättig, Christof; Tew, David P

2014-10-28

415

Agriculture in the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Agriculture in the Classroom Web site(last mentioned in the October 27, 1999 Scout Report for Science & Engineering) has recently been updated. One of the current features, Listening to the Prairie - Farming in Nature's Image, is a useful resource which has many lesson plans and classroom activities for all grades and can be downloaded in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. These lesson plans explore subjects like how energy passes through food webs, where our food comes from, how agriculture affects our lives, and soil and erosion. This is a useful site that focuses on a subject that many urban students may not normally be exposed to.

2002-01-01

416

Classroom management at the university level: lessons from a former high school earth science teacher  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Just a few days before my career as a fledgling science teacher began in a large public high school in New York City, a mentor suggested I might get some ideas about how to run a classroom from a book called The First Days Of School by Harry Wong. Although the book seemed to concentrate more on elementary students, I found that many of the principles in the book worked well for high school students. Even as I have begun to teach at the university level, many of Wong’s themes have persisted in my teaching style. Wong’s central thesis is that for learning to occur, a teacher must create the proper environment. In education jargon, a good climate for learning is generated via classroom management, an array of methods used by elementary and secondary school teachers to provide structure and routine to a class period via a seamless flow of complementary activities. Many college professors would likely consider classroom management to be chiefly a set of rules to maintain discipline and order among an otherwise unruly herd of schoolchildren, and therefore not a useful concept for mature university students. However, classroom management is much deeper than mere rules for behavior; it is an approach to instructional design that considers the classroom experience holistically. A typical professorial management style is to lecture for an hour or so and ask students to demonstrate learning via examinations several times in a semester. In contrast, a good high school teacher will manage a class from bell-to-bell to create a natural order and flow to a given lesson. In this presentation, I will argue for an approach to college lesson design similar to the classroom management style commonly employed by high school and elementary school teachers. I will suggest some simple, practical techniques learned during my high school experience that work just as well in college: warm-up and practice problems, time management, group activities, bulletin boards, learning environment, and standard procedures. Central to all of these suggestions is the basic concept of planning activities for students beyond passive absorption of lecture material and fitting them smoothly within the typical time constraints of a class period. Well-managed students learn better. I close with the observation that the most basic desires of students are independent of age; learners of all ages and levels prefer well-designed classroom experiences. In this context, books and resources intended for the professional development of secondary--and even elementary—teachers suddenly contain a wealth of techniques that, with some modification, might be useful at the university level.

Lazar, C.

2009-12-01

417

Inverting the Linear Algebra Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The inverted classroom is a course design model in which students' initial contact with new information takes place outside of class meetings, and students spend class time on high-level sense-making activities. The inverted classroom model is so called because it inverts or "flips" the usual classroom design where typically class…

Talbert, Robert

2014-01-01

418

Group Cohesiveness and Classroom Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores group cohesiveness, class discussion, and group size in relation to classroom environment and the cognitive-personal growth outcomes of classroom learning. Implications are drawn from the research on cohesiveness for teachers who employ open classroom techniques. (Author/SJL)

Stancato, Frank A.

1979-01-01

419

Teacher attitudes about classroom conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This research was designed to investigate the possible relationship between the attitudes, teachers have about the condition of their classrooms when the classrooms were independently assessed. Previous research reported teachers in unsatisfactory classrooms felt frustrated and neglected to such an extent that they sometimes reported they were willing to leave the teaching profession. This paper aims to address

Glen I. Earthman; Linda K. Lemasters

2009-01-01

420

Teacher Attitudes about Classroom Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This research was designed to investigate the possible relationship between the attitudes, teachers have about the condition of their classrooms when the classrooms were independently assessed. Previous research reported teachers in unsatisfactory classrooms felt frustrated and neglected to such an extent that they sometimes reported they…

Earthman, Glen I.; Lemasters, Linda K.

2009-01-01

421

Flipping the classroom (abstract only)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a flipped classroom, students watch or listen to the lecture at home and do homework in the classroom. The classroom becomes much more interactive and the educator has ample opportunity to provide individualized guidance when it's most needed. The watch-at-home content can include recorded lectures, demonstration videos, adaptive quizzes, or anything in between. Come share your experiences developing \\

Barry Brown

2012-01-01

422

Managing Inquiry-Based Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Though it may seem that classroom management comes naturally to some teachers, upon closer examination you'll probably discover that preparation and adaptation are more important than any innate ability when it comes to successful classroom management. Any experienced middle school science teacher can tell you that successful classroom management…

Wolfgang, Christie Nicole

2009-01-01

423

Mainstreaming the Regular Classroom Student.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper presents activities, suggested by regular classroom teachers, to help prepare the regular classroom student for mainstreaming. The author points out that regular classroom children need a vehicle in which curiosity, concern, interest, fear, attitudes and feelings can be fully explored, where prejudices can be dispelled, and where the…

Kahn, Michael

424

GALAXY Classroom: Television for Tomorrow.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An interactive learning service for elementary grades, "GALAXY Classroom," offers enrichment opportunities to classrooms. Students communicate via fax in response to questions posed in satellite transmitted segments. The primary market for "GALAXY Classroom" is the at-risk student. Sidebars describe costs and current offerings. (SLW)

Graumann, Peter

1994-01-01

425

Principles and Enactment of Rapid Collaborative Knowledge Building in Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors discuss the notion of Rapid Collaborative Knowledge Building (RCKB) in classroom settings. RCKB seeks to harness the collective intelligence of groups to learn faster, envision new possibilities, and to reveal latent knowledge in a dynamic live setting. It is characterized by the notion of rapid cycles of knowledge building activities…

Looi, Chee-Kit; Chen, Wenli; Patton, Charles M.

2010-01-01

426

Classroom Assessment Techniques: Weekly Reports  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site describes the use of weekly reports as an assessment tool for student learning. It is one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. Weekly reports provide rapid feedback about what students think they are learning and what conceptual difficulties they are experiencing. This site provides an overview of this assessment technique including information about how to use it. The site is also linked to a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use, as well as supplementary links and sources to further explore this assessment tool.

Etkina, Eugenia; The National Institute for Science Education; College Level One Team

427

Classroom Assessment Techniques: Performance Assessment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page describes the performance assessment, one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. Performance assessments are designed to judge student abilities to use specific knowledge and research skills that require the student to manipulate equipment to solve a problem or make an analysis. Performance assessments may reveal a variety of problem-solving approaches, thus providing insight into a student's level of conceptual and procedural knowledge. This site provides an overview of this assessment technique and information about how to use it, as well as a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use. Supplementary links and sources are also included to further explore this assessment tool.

Slater, Timothy F.; The National Institute for Science Education; College Level One Team

428

Classroom Assessment Techniques: Scoring Rubrics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page describes how to use scoring rubrics to assess student learning. It is one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. Rubrics are a way of describing evaluation criteria based on the expected outcomes and performances of students. This site provides information about why scoring rubrics are beneficial to use and how to use them. The site is also linked to a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use, as well as supplementary links and sources to further explore this assessment tool.

Ebert-May, Diane; The National Institute for Science Education; College Level One Team

429

Hands-on Science. Getting Set Up for Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents strategies for getting organized and creating a classroom environment that promotes science learning for primary students. Teachers must first decide what topics they are going to cover and what materials they need. Next, they should determine how to organize the materials. Finally, they should identify and set up areas in the classroom

Kepler, Lynne

1998-01-01

430

Mathematics Education and Language Diversity: A Dialogue across Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article shares the authors' views on language-diversity issues in research in mathematics education. Described are tensions, questions, and myths that they have regularly faced as researchers. They use similarities and differences in two settings (multilingual classrooms in South Africa and U.S. mathematics classrooms with Latino/a…

Phakeng, Mamokgethi Setati; Moschkovich, Judit N.

2013-01-01

431

Final report for LDRD project 11-0029 : high-interest event detection in large-scale multi-modal data sets : proof of concept.  

SciTech Connect

Events of interest to data analysts are sometimes difficult to characterize in detail. Rather, they consist of anomalies, events that are unpredicted, unusual, or otherwise incongruent. The purpose of this LDRD was to test the hypothesis that a biologically-inspired anomaly detection algorithm could be used to detect contextual, multi-modal anomalies. There currently is no other solution to this problem, but the existence of a solution would have a great national security impact. The technical focus of this research was the application of a brain-emulating cognition and control architecture (BECCA) to the problem of anomaly detection. One aspect of BECCA in particular was discovered to be critical to improved anomaly detection capabilities: it's feature creator. During the course of this project the feature creator was developed and tested against multiple data types. Development direction was drawn from psychological and neurophysiological measurements. Major technical achievements include the creation of hierarchical feature sets created from both audio and imagery data.

Rohrer, Brandon Robinson

2011-09-01

432

Acquisition, Sharing, and Processing of Large Data Sets for Strain Imaging: An Example of an Indented Ni3Al/Mo Composite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The local effects of stress from a mechanical indentation have been studied on a Ni3Al single crystal containing submicron inclusions of molybdenum fibers. X-ray microdiffraction (PXM) was used to measure elastic and plastic deformations near the indents. An analysis of freshly acquired massive sets of PXM data has been carried out over the Science Studio network using parallel processing software called FOXMAS. This network and the FOXMAS software have greatly improved the efficiency of the data processing task. The analysis was successfully applied to study lattice orientation distribution and strain tensor components for both the Ni3Al and the Mo phases, particularly around eight indents patterned at the longitudinal section of the alloy.

McIntyre, N. S.; Barabash, R. I.; Qin, J.; Kunz, M.; Tamura, N.; Bei, H.

2013-01-01

433

A Coastal Seawater Temperature Dataset for Biogeographical Studies: Large Biases between In Situ and Remotely-Sensed Data Sets around the Coast of South Africa  

PubMed Central

Gridded SST products developed particularly for offshore regions are increasingly being applied close to the coast for biogeographical applications. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the dangers of doing so through a comparison of reprocessed MODIS Terra and Pathfinder v5.2 SSTs, both at 4 km resolution, with instrumental in situ temperatures taken within 400 m from the coast. We report large biases of up to +6°C in places between satellite-derived and in situ climatological temperatures for 87 sites spanning the entire ca. 2 700 km of the South African coastline. Although biases are predominantly warm (i.e. the satellite SSTs being higher), smaller or even cold biases also appear in places, especially along the southern and western coasts of the country. We also demonstrate the presence of gradients in temperature biases along shore-normal transects — generally SSTs extracted close to the shore demonstrate a smaller bias with respect to the in situ temperatures. Contributing towards the magnitude of the biases are factors such as SST data source, proximity to the shore, the presence/absence of upwelling cells or coastal embayments. Despite the generally large biases, from a biogeographical perspective, species distribution retains a correlative relationship with underlying spatial patterns in SST, but in order to arrive at a causal understanding of the determinants of biogeographical patterns we suggest that in shallow, inshore marine habitats, temperature is best measured directly. PMID:24312609

Smit, Albertus J.; Roberts, Michael; Anderson, Robert J.; Dufois, Francois; Dudley, Sheldon F. J.; Bornman, Thomas G.; Olbers, Jennifer; Bolton, John J.

2013-01-01

434

A coastal seawater temperature dataset for biogeographical studies: large biases between in situ and remotely-sensed data sets around the Coast of South Africa.  

PubMed

Gridded SST products developed particularly for offshore regions are increasingly being applied close to the coast for biogeographical applications. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the dangers of doing so through a comparison of reprocessed MODIS Terra and Pathfinder v5.2 SSTs, both at 4 km resolution, with instrumental in situ temperatures taken within 400 m from the coast. We report large biases of up to +6°C in places between satellite-derived and in situ climatological temperatures for 87 sites spanning the entire ca. 2 700 km of the South African coastline. Although biases are predominantly warm (i.e. the satellite SSTs being higher), smaller or even cold biases also appear in places, especially along the southern and western coasts of the country. We also demonstrate the presence of gradients in temperature biases along shore-normal transects - generally SSTs extracted close to the shore demonstrate a smaller bias with respect to the in situ temperatures. Contributing towards the magnitude of the biases are factors such as SST data source, proximity to the shore, the presence/absence of upwelling cells or coastal embayments. Despite the generally large biases, from a biogeographical perspective, species distribution retains a correlative relationship with underlying spatial patterns in SST, but in order to arrive at a causal understanding of the determinants of biogeographical patterns we suggest that in shallow, inshore marine habitats, temperature is best measured directly. PMID:24312609

Smit, Albertus J; Roberts, Michael; Anderson, Robert J; Dufois, Francois; Dudley, Sheldon F J; Bornman, Thomas G; Olbers, Jennifer; Bolton, John J

2013-01-01

435

Classroom Contexts for Creativity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Various factors influence the development of creative potential, including everything from individual differences to the kinds of experiences and opportunities that creators experience throughout the lifespan. When it comes to nurturing creativity in the classroom, the learning environment is one of the most important factors--determining, in…

Beghetto, Ronald A.; Kaufman, James C.

2014-01-01

436

Inviting Positive Classroom Discipline.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Invitational theory addresses the total educational environment and culture of the classroom and school, focusing on the people, places, policies, programs, and processes that constitute any school culture. Invitational teaching is a process for communicating caring and appropriate messages to nurture the realization of student potential as well…

Purkey, William Watson; Strahan, David B.

437

Managing Classroom Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses why classroom management is important; how behavior difficulties should be viewed as opportunities to instruct; and primary, secondary, and tertiary intervention techniques. Concludes that with adequate planning and implementation of a behavior plan, the student's behavior will change for the better. (SG)

Martella, Ronald C.; Nelson, J. Ron

2003-01-01

438

Optimizing Classroom Guidance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since students are facing an ever-increasing number of stressful personal, social, and emotional problems, classroom guidance must be made an integral part of the middle school's guidance program. This should be accomplished through a well-integrated, overall strategy incorporating daily homeroom advisement, guidance-related units,…

Stewart, William J.

1993-01-01

439

Leading Classroom Discussions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom discourse is a valuable teaching and learning tool. Discussions allow students to improve their communication and reasoning skills in mathematics and help teachers assess students' understanding of mathematical ideas. To get the greatest benefit from discussion, teachers must elicit student thinking, listen carefully to their ideas,…

Gonzalez, Gloriana; DeJarnette, Anna F.

2013-01-01

440

Tips from the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Seven articles on classroom icebreakers are compiled: "Picture Stories and Other Opportunities" (Joy Egbert, Deborah Hanley, Rosemary Delaney); "Hey, What's Your Name" (Janet Leamy); "Surprise!" (Lynne Burgess); "Memory Game" (Sally Winn); "Picturesque" (Margaret Beiter); "The Name Game" (Jeanne-Marie Garcia); "Exercise the Body--And the Mind…

TESOL Journal, 1993

1993-01-01

441

Icebreakers for Classroom Synergy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maintaining a high "synergy" classroom, when the total effect of the people in an environment seems to be greater than the sum of the effort of the individuals, requires a commitment to a cooperative learning environment and hard work. Here are some learning activities designed to provide students with "synergy" all year long. (Author/RK)

Abruscato, Joseph; Hassard, Jack

1977-01-01

442

Poetry in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The articles in this journal issue focus on the use of poetry for study in classrooms at all levels. Titles and authors of the articles include (1) "Summoning the Poem: Several Roads to Xanadu" by Ben F. Nelms; (2) "ABC's of Reading and Writing Poetry in Junior High" by Barbara Arnold; (3) "Invitations" by Elizabeth D. Nelms; (4) "Teaching Poetry…

Wyman, Linda, Ed.

1984-01-01

443

The Cultivated Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers who follow this monthly schedule for starting and cultivating plants in their classrooms can look forward to blooms and greenery throughout the year. Advice on choosing plants, making cuttings, forcing bulbs, rooting sweet potatoes and pineapples, and holding a Mother's Day plant sale is included. (PP)

Schilder, Rosalind

1983-01-01

444

Injuries in Preschool Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The primary purpose of this paper is to examine the kinds of injuries that preschool teachers working in Indiana, USA, believed to be the most common in their preschool (3-6 year olds) classrooms, the causes of such injuries, and the most important precautions they take to prevent them. Also examined are the measures the teachers take…

Obeng, Cecilia

2009-01-01

445

In the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fourteen conference papers on classroom techniques for second language teaching are presented, including: "Cooperative Learning at the Post-Secondary Level in Japan" (Steve McGuire, Patricia Thornton, David Kluge); "Shared Inquiry Fosters Critical Thinking Skills in EFL Students" (Carol Browning, Jerold Halvorsen, Denise Ahlquist); "Story Grammar:…

1997

446

Creating a Smart Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides a description of an affordable, smart classroom system that was built for the Technology Department at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC. In the hope that other educators might find his department's experience useful, this author, David Domermuth (the department's coordinator of manufacturing) describes the system,…

Domermuth, David

2005-01-01

447

Creating a Smart Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides a description of an affordable, smart classroom built for the Technology Department at Appalachian State university. The system consists of three basic components: a home theater combo, a tablet PC, and a digital projector, costing a total of $7,300, or $8,800 if a podium, screen, and projector mount are purchased. The…

Domermuth, David

2005-01-01

448

Opening the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We argue that information systems educators--and others in similarly dynamic professional disciplines--could benefit from an alternative infrastructure for learning. We present an "open classroom" model of education which expands upon Ferris' (2002) collaborative partnership model of education by integrating "open" technologies such as Wiki and…

Watson, Richard T.; Boudreau, Marie-Claude; York, Paul T.; Greiner, Martina; Wynn, Donald E.

2008-01-01

449

Flipping the Classroom Revisited  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I received many emails following the first column on flipping the classroom. Many of my local colleagues also approached me at our physics alliance, Physics Northwest. Teachers are very interested in this new pedagogy. As I result, I wanted to share some more videos to inspire you.

Riendeau, Diane

2013-02-01

450

The Classroom Traffic Jam  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of energy conservation is developed in this simulation. Children draw an automobile and then are asked to drive it through the classroom roadways. When a traffic jam results, students offer ways to eliminate it. The importance of mass transportation and car pools is stressed by the teacher. (MA)

Edwards, Arthur W.

1977-01-01

451

Creating a Differentiated Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers who differentiate their instruction begin by developing a broad and thorough understanding of their students, all of whom enter classrooms with varying interests, readiness levels, talents, and knowledge. Gathering this data about students and using it to purposefully implement differentiated practices can be time consuming and…

Keck, Susan; Kinney, Scott C.

2005-01-01

452

Cockroaches in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Madagascar hissing cockroach (MHC) provides an excellent avenue to introduce students to the joys of inquiry-centered learning. MHC's are relatively tame, produce little odor, do not bite, and are easy to handle and breed. Because of these characteristics, they are ideal for classroom activities, science projects, and as pets. They also help…

Wagler, Ron; Moseley, Christine

2005-01-01

453

Connellys' Classroom Cutaway  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article aims to help classroom teachers use the educational tool of student-produced media to meet their curriculum objectives. It has been the authors' experience in three decades of utilizing this tool personally and observing other teachers utilizing this tool, across nearly all grades and course content areas, that it is very effective.…

Connelly, John; Connelly, Marilyn

2008-01-01

454

Classroom Idea-Sparkers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents four Idea-Sparkers that were submitted by Jason McKinney, a graduate student at Southern Mississippi University and a 1st-grade teacher at Pisgah Elementary in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. First is entitled, "Raceway in the Classroom." This activity can help increase children's fluency and ability to identify numerous sight…

Kieff, Judith

2007-01-01

455

Drama in Your Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication contains articles offering new perceptions of creative drama in the elementary school basic English program. Creative dramatics is viewed as the core of a child's imagining, improvising, and languaging processes. Articles included are "Drama in the Classroom" by Sister Marie P. Hardy; "The Ray Bradbury Dramatic Workshop" by Dan…

Tiedt, Iris M., Ed.

456

The Network Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussion of the role of new computer communications technologies in education focuses on modern networking systems, including fiber distributed data interface and Integrated Services Digital Network; strategies for implementing networked-based communication; and public online information resources for the classroom, including Bitnet, Internet,…

Maule, R. William

1993-01-01

457

The Engineered Adjustment Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described are the curriculum, behavioral modification program, summer activities, and parent involvement in the Papillion (Nebraska) Title III elementary level "engineered classroom" program for emotionally disturbed students. Noted is program initiation after parents and teachers became upset over poor academic progress and behaviors of an…

Spilker, George

458

Photography in Pink Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The teaching of photography provides many opportunities to attack the assumption of universal heterosexuality, which is central to our society, in order to provide space for other sexualities such as gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender. This article is based on many years of lecturing in art schools and focuses on the classroom teaching of…

Ashburn, Liz

2007-01-01

459

LOGO in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of articles and features reprinted from "The Computing Teacher" begins with an outline (the table of contents) of a 20-session course, "Logo in the Classroom," by Shirley Torgerson, Mary Kay Kriley, and Janet Stone. The text of the first session and a student exercise sheet are also provided. Five articles included in the…

The Computing Teacher, 1985

1985-01-01

460

Assessing Classroom Assessment Techniques  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom assessment techniques (CATs) are teaching strategies that provide formative assessments of student learning. It has been argued that the use of CATs enhances and improves student learning. Although the various types of CATs have been extensively documented and qualitatively studied, there appears to be little quantitative research…

Simpson-Beck, Victoria

2011-01-01

461

Research for the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Current research upholds the significance of formative assessments in the classroom. Formative assessments are relevant to theory and practice; they offer positive possibilities with respect to both policy and pedagogy. At the policy level, formative assessments offer a means to minimize the negative effects of highstakes testing. The culture of…

Gorlewski, Julie, Ed.

2008-01-01

462

Injuries in preschool classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The primary purpose of this paper is to examine the kinds of injuries that preschool teachers working in Indiana, USA, believed to be the most common in their preschool (3-6 year olds) classrooms, the causes of such injuries, and the most important precautions they take to prevent them. Also examined are the measures the teachers take when an

Cecilia Obeng

2009-01-01

463

Singing Smoothes Classroom Transitions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Just as humming a merry tune helped Snow White and her furry animal friends to quickly clean a filthy cottage in the movie "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (Disney & Cottrell, 1937), singing can be an effective way to help keep young children fully engaged during classroom transitions. The purposes of this article are to: (1) consider why…

Mathews, Sarah E.

2012-01-01

464

Classroom management and disaffection  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports on aspects of the Norwich Area Schools Consortium (NASC) cross-school Classroom Management and Disaffection research project undertaken as part of the NASC programme. It documents the dual interwoven ‘stories’ of teacher engagement in research as a learning expand the substantive research undertaken. The project took place in two stages, the focus of the second stage emerging from

Barbara Zamorski; Terry Haydn

2002-01-01

465

Inquiry in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

(Purpose) As schools scramble to restructure in the hope of thwarting failure, administrators often appropriate money for outside experts who counsel on professional development as well as outside magic-pill programs for student achievement. High-stakes testing remains the arbiter. Perhaps the use of the best practice of inquiry, or classroom

Stohl, Christina

2010-01-01

466

Beyond the Classroom...  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Student Developmental Transcript, a formal written record that documents learning useful in employment gained beyond the classroom through involvement in the cocurricular life of the institution. Describes cocurricular life as consisting of clubs, organizations, part-time employment, and other experiences outside confines of academic…

Hofmann, Kurt; And Others

1988-01-01

467

The Electronic Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of telecommunications in establishing the electronic classroom in distance education is illustrated. Using a computer-based doctoral program and the UNIX operating system as an example, how a personal computer and modem may be combined with a telephone line for instructional delivery is described. A number of issues must be addressed in…

Mizell, Al P.; Centini, Barry M.

468

Classroom influences on bullying  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between estimates of teachers' management of the class, the social structure of the class and bullying otherswas investigated by questionnaires answered by 2,002 pupils and 99 teachers in Norwegian primary schools. A path analysis demonstrated that the social structure of the class had a direct impact on bullying behaviour. Classroom management had a direct impact on the prevalence

Erling Roland; David Galloway

2002-01-01

469

Composition: Classroom Strategies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The articles in this journal issue present a variety of teaching methods to enhance writing instruction. The titles of the articles and their authors are as follows: (1) "Writing for Real World Audiences in the Classroom?" (James P. Beck); (2) "Copycatting: Learning to Write by Imitating" (Mary Ann Stemper); (3) "The Journal" (Ellen Byers); (4)…

Karolides, Nicholas J., Ed.

1982-01-01

470

Idea Bank: Classroom Newsletter  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Have you ever struggled with trying to motivate your students to learn science? If your answer is a resounding "yes!"-- the implementation of a class newsletter may be the solution. A class newsletter project can improve student self-confidence and motivate students to learn science. This article describes how to incorporate this effective strategy into your science classroom.

O'Connor, Mackenzie

2005-02-01