Sample records for large classroom setting

  1. The Utility of Concept Maps to Facilitate Higher-Level Learning in a Large Classroom Setting

    PubMed Central

    Carr-Lopez, Sian M.; Vyas, Deepti; Patel, Rajul A.; Gnesa, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To describe the utility of concept mapping in a cardiovascular therapeutics course within a large classroom setting. Design. Students enrolled in a cardiovascular care therapeutics course completed concept maps for each major chronic cardiovascular condition. A grading rubric was used to facilitate peer-assessment of the concept map. Assessment. Students were administered a survey at the end of the course assessing their perceptions on the usefulness of the concept maps during the course and also during APPEs to assess utility beyond the course. Question item analyses were conducted on cumulative final examinations comparing student performance on concept-mapped topics compared to nonconcept-mapped topics. Conclusion. Concept maps help to facilitate meaningful learning within the course and the majority of students utilized them beyond the course. PMID:26056408

  2. Calibrated Peer Review: A New Tool for Integrating Information Literacy Skills in Writing-Intensive Large Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosmire, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Calibrated Peer Review[TM] (CPR) is a program that can significantly enhance the ability to integrate intensive information literacy exercises into large classroom settings. CPR is founded on a solid pedagogic base for learning, and it is formulated in such a way that information skills can easily be inserted. However, there is no mention of its…

  3. A Classroom Tariff-Setting Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchester, Niven

    2006-01-01

    The author outlines a classroom tariff-setting game that allows students to explore the consequences of import tariffs imposed by large countries (countries able to influence world prices). Groups of students represent countries, which are organized into trading pairs. Each group's objective is to maximize welfare by choosing an appropriate ad…

  4. Classroom Management in Inclusive Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soodak, Leslie C.

    2003-01-01

    The inclusion of children with disabilities in general education classes provides an opportunity for teachers to identify classroom management policies and practices that promote diversity and community. Community-building management strategies that facilitate friendships, collaboration, parent involvement, and address challenging behaviors in a…

  5. Collaboration within Large Groups in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szewkis, Eyal; Nussbaum, Miguel; Rosen, Tal; Abalos, Jose; Denardin, Fernanda; Caballero, Daniela; Tagle, Arturo; Alcoholado, Cristian

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how a large group of students can work collaboratively in a synchronous way within the classroom using the cheapest possible technological support. Making use of the features of Single Display Groupware and of Multiple Mice we propose a computer-supported collaborative learning approach for big groups within…

  6. Tangential Floor in a Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marti, Leyla

    2012-01-01

    This article examines floor management in two classroom sessions: a task-oriented computer lesson and a literature lesson. Recordings made in the computer lesson show the organization of floor when a task is given to students. Temporary or "incipient" side floors (Jones and Thornborrow, 2004) emerge beside the main floor. In the literature lesson,…

  7. Who Will Watch the Watchers? Setting Standards for Classroom Observers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Samuel A.; Sims-Gunzenhauser, Alice

    A study was conducted to provide information for setting two separate standards, the accuracy score and the documentation score, for the Praxis III: Classroom Performance Assessment (Praxis III). Praxis III is intended for making instructional and licensing decisions about beginning teachers. This standard-setting study was a person-judgment…

  8. Student Engagement and Success in the Large Astronomy 101 Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, J. B.

    2014-07-01

    The large auditorium classroom presents unique challenges to maintaining student engagement. During the fall 2012 semester, I adopted several specific strategies for increasing student engagement and reducing anonymity with the goal of maximizing student success in the large class. I measured attendance and student success in two classes, one with 300 students and one with 42, but otherwise taught as similarly as possible. While the students in the large class probably did better than they would have in a traditional lecture setting, attendance was still significantly lower in the large class, resulting in lower student success than in the small control class by all measures. I will discuss these results and compare to classes in previous semesters, including other small classes and large Distance Education classes conducted live over remote television link.

  9. A Student Response System in an Electronic Classroom: Technology Aids for Large Classroom Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ober, D.; Errington, P.; Islam, S.; Robertson, T.; Watson, J.

    1997-10-01

    In the fall of 1996, thirteen (13) classrooms on the Ball State campus were equipped with technological aids to enhance learning in large classrooms (for typically 100 students or larger). Each classroom was equipped with the following built-in equipment: computer, zip drive, laser disc player, VCR, LAN and Internet connection, TV monitors, and Elmo overhead camera with large-screen projection system. This past fall semester a student response system was added to a 108-seat classroom in the Physics and Astronomy department for use with large General Education courses. Each student seat was equipped with a hardwired hand-held unit possessing input capabilities and LCD feedback for the student. The introduction of the student response system was added in order enhance more active learning by students in the large classroom environment. Attendance, quizzes, hour exams, and in-class surveys are early uses for the system; initial reactions by student and faculty users will be given.

  10. Generating Parabola and Line Intersection Problems for a Classroom Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sher, David B.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the development of a method of generating problems that are easy to present in classroom settings because all the important points to be graphed are single-digit integers. Uses an algorithm that generates intersection problems that fit the criteria. A proof of the algorithm is included. (DDR)

  11. Social Studies Instruction in a Non-Classroom Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Margaret M.

    Certain areas in the social studies can be effectively taught in a non-classroom setting. This experiment determined if, in a supermarket situation, consumer preferences (as measured in sales figures and augmented by questionnaire data) could be altered by the addition of nutritional information to the labels of sixteen items which had moderate…

  12. Examining the Effectiveness of Team-Based Learning (TBL) in Different Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuretich, Richard F.; Kanner, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of effective learning in college classrooms, especially in a large lecture setting, has been a topic of discussion for a considerable span of time. Most efforts to improve learning incorporate various forms of student-active learning, such as in-class investigations or problems, group discussions, collaborative examinations and…

  13. Observations of Children’s Interactions with Teachers, Peers, and Tasks across Preschool Classroom Activity Settings

    PubMed Central

    Booren, Leslie M.; Downer, Jason T.; Vitiello, Virginia E.

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive study examined classroom activity settings in relation to children’s observed behavior during classroom interactions, child gender, and basic teacher behavior within the preschool classroom. 145 children were observed for an average of 80 minutes during 8 occasions across 2 days using the inCLASS, an observational measure that conceptualizes behavior into teacher, peer, task, and conflict interactions. Findings indicated that on average children’s interactions with teachers were higher in teacher-structured settings, such as large group. On average, children’s interactions with peers and tasks were more positive in child-directed settings, such as free choice. Children experienced more conflict during recess and routines/transitions. Finally, gender differences were observed within small group and meals. The implications of these findings might encourage teachers to be thoughtful and intentional about what types of support and resources are provided so children can successfully navigate the demands of particular settings. These findings are not meant to discourage certain teacher behaviors or imply value of certain classroom settings; instead, by providing an evidenced-based picture of the conditions under which children display the most positive interactions, teachers can be more aware of choices within these settings and have a powerful way to assist in professional development and interventions. PMID:25717282

  14. Implementing Concept-based Learning in a Large Undergraduate Classroom

    E-print Network

    ). There are many types of learning strategies, classified in general terms into cognitive, metacognitive, emotionalArticle Implementing Concept-based Learning in a Large Undergraduate Classroom David Morse, 2008 Monitoring Editor: Robin Wright An experiment explicitly introducing learning strategies

  15. Silent Students' Participation in a Large Active Learning Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obenland, Carrie A.; Munson, Ashlyn H.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Active learning in large science classrooms furthers opportunities for students to engage in the content and in meaningful learning, yet students can still remain anonymously silent. This study aims to understand the impact of active learning on these silent students in a large General Chemistry course taught via Socratic questioning and…

  16. Observations of Children's Interactions with Teachers, Peers, and Tasks across Preschool Classroom Activity Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booren, Leslie M.; Downer, Jason T.; Vitiello, Virginia E.

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: This descriptive study examined classroom activity settings in relation to children's observed behavior during classroom interactions, child gender, and basic teacher behavior within the preschool classroom. A total of 145 children were observed for an average of 80 min during 8 occasions across 2 days using the Individualized…

  17. The Minimal Covering Set in Large Tournaments

    E-print Network

    Scott, Alexander Alexander

    The Minimal Covering Set in Large Tournaments Alex Scott Mark Fey August 18, 2010 Abstract We prove, as the number of alternatives gets large, the probability that the minimal covering set of a uniformly chosen, 1977), the uncovered set (Miller, 1980), the Banks set (Banks, 1985), the minimal covering set (Dutta

  18. On Flipping the Classroom in Large First Year Calculus Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jungic, Veselin; Kaur, Harpreet; Mulholland, Jamie; Xin, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Over the course of two years, 2012-2014, we have implemented a "flipping" the classroom approach in three of our large enrolment first year calculus courses: differential and integral calculus for scientists and engineers. In this article we describe the details of our particular approach and share with the reader some experiences of…

  19. Visualizing Program Executions on Large Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John T. Stasko; Jeyakumar Muthukumarasamy

    1996-01-01

    Understanding and interpreting large data sets is an important but challenging operation in many technical disciplines. Computer visualization has become a valuable tool to help portray characteristics of large data sets. In software visualization, illustrating the operation of very large programs or programs working on very large data sets has remained one of the key open problems. We introduce an

  20. Teacher and Student Research Using Large Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, S. K.; Pompea, S. M.; Sparks, R. T.

    2005-12-01

    One of the objectives of teacher research experiences is to immerse the teacher in an authentic research situation to help the teacher understand what real research is all about: "to do science as scientists do." Experiences include doing experiments in laboratories, gathering data out in the field, and observing at professional observatories. However, a rapidly growing area of scientific research is in "data mining" increasingly large public data archives. In the earth and space sciences, such large archives are built around data from Landsat 7, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and in about seven years, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. The LSST will re-photograph the entire night sky every three day, resulting in a data flow of about 20 terabytes per night. The resulting LSST archive will represent a huge challenge of simple storage and retrieval for professional scientists. It will be a much greater challenge to help K-12 teachers use such gargantuan files and collections of data effectively in the classroom and to understand and begin to practice the new research procedures involved in data mining. At NOAO we are exploring ways of using large data sets in formal educational settings like classrooms, and public settings like planetariums and museums. In our existing professional development programs, such as our Teacher leaders in Research Based Science Education, we have introduced teachers to research via on-site observing experiences and partnerships with active astronomers. To successfully initiate research in the classroom, we have found that teachers need training in specific science content, use of specialized software to work with the data, development of research questions and objectives, and explicit pedagogical strategies for classroom use. Our research projects are well defined, though not "canned," and incorporate specific types of data, such as solar images. These data can be replaced with new data from an archive for the classroom research experience. This is already a form of data mining that can be applied to large data sets. We are looking at ways to apply our experience with hands-on observation experiences to the relatively abstract world of data mining. We are also looking at ways to move beyond the well-defined application to training teachers to develop their own more open-ended research activities. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  1. Clickers in the Large Classroom: Current Research and Best-Practice Tips

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Audience response systems (ARS) or clickers, as they are commonly called, offer a management tool for engaging students in the large classroom. Basic elements of the technology are discussed. These systems have been used in a variety of fields and at all levels of education. Typical goals of ARS questions are discussed, as well as methods of compensating for the reduction in lecture time that typically results from their use. Examples of ARS use occur throughout the literature and often detail positive attitudes from both students and instructors, although exceptions do exist. When used in classes, ARS clickers typically have either a benign or positive effect on student performance on exams, depending on the method and extent of their use, and create a more positive and active atmosphere in the large classroom. These systems are especially valuable as a means of introducing and monitoring peer learning methods in the large lecture classroom. So that the reader may use clickers effectively in his or her own classroom, a set of guidelines for writing good questions and a list of best-practice tips have been culled from the literature and experienced users. PMID:17339389

  2. The Emergence of Student Creativity in Classroom Settings: A Case Study of Elementary Schools in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Younsoon; Chung, Hye Young; Choi, Kyoulee; Seo, Choyoung; Baek, Eunjoo

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the emergence of student creativity in classroom settings, specifically within two content areas: science and social studies. Fourteen classrooms in three elementary schools in Korea were observed, and the teachers and students were interviewed. The three types of student creativity emerging in the teaching and learning…

  3. Navigating large data sets in virtual worlds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huaiyu Liu; Mic Bowman; Robert Adams; Dan Lake; Jerry Talton; Sean Koehl; Robert Noradki

    2012-01-01

    The ever increasing mass of information leads to new challenges on analyzing or navigating the large data sets. Combining visual perception and interaction capabilities with the enormous storage and computational power of today's computer systems, especially with the rise of 3D virtual worlds, has great potential in providing deeper immersion and intuitive interactions with large data sets. In this demo,

  4. Visualizing and Segmenting Large Volumetric Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Senger

    1999-01-01

    Current systems for segmenting and visualizing volumetric data sets characteristically require the user to possess a technical sophistication in volume visualization techniques, thus restricting the potential audience of users. As large volumetric data sets become more common, segmentation and visualization tools need to deemphasize the technical aspects of visualization and let users exploit their content knowledge of the data set.

  5. The moral development of baccalaureate nursing students: understanding unethical behavior in classroom and clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Pamela E; Boblin, Sheryl L

    2007-01-01

    Unethical behavior in both classroom and clinical settings is a concern for nurse educators and has the potential to greatly influence the quality of patient care. A review of the literature suggests that students may view unethical clinical behaviors as different from unethical classroom behaviors because they recognize that clinical behaviors may have a direct effect on patient care. An overview of three moral theories, proposed by Kohlberg, Gilligan, and Rest, provides insight into the reasons for unethical behavior. These theories provide the foundation for strategies nurse educators can use to help reduce unethical behavior in both classroom and clinical settings in an attempt to ensure quality patient care. PMID:17302096

  6. Thinking Routines: Replicating Classroom Practices within Museum Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolberg, Rochelle Ibanez; Goff, Allison

    2012-01-01

    This article describes thinking routines as tools to guide and support young children's thinking. These learning strategies, developed by Harvard University's Project Zero Classroom, actively engage students in constructing meaning while also understanding their own thinking process. The authors discuss how thinking routines can be used in both…

  7. Understanding Bystander Perceptions of Cyberbullying in Inclusive Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guckert, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Cyberbullying is a pervasive problem that puts students at risk of successful academic outcomes and the ability to feel safe in school. As most students with disabilities are served in inclusive classrooms, there is a growing concern that students with special needs are at an increased risk of online bullying harassment. Enhancing responsible…

  8. Corrective feedback and learner uptake in communicative classrooms across instructional settings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Younghee Sheen

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports similarities and differences in teachers' corrective feedback and learners' uptake across instructional settings. Four communicative classroom settingsFrench Immersion, Canada ESL, New Zealand ESL and Korean EFLwere examined using Lyster and Ranta's taxonomy of teachers' corrective feedback moves and learner uptake. The results indicate that recasts were the most frequent feedback type in all four contexts but were

  9. Corrective Feedback and Learner Uptake in Communicative Classrooms across Instructional Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheen, YoungHee

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports similarities and differences in teachers' corrective feedback and learners' uptake across instructional settings. Four communicative classroom settings--French Immersion, Canada ESL, New Zealand ESL and Korean EFL--were examined using Lyster and Ranta's taxonomy of teachers' corrective feedback moves and learner uptake. The…

  10. Computing percentiles of large data sets

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    An algorithm for finding percentiles of large data sets (those having 100,000 or more points) is described. This algorithm does not involve sorting the entire data set. Instead, the data are sampled and a guess for the percentile is obtained. Then the guess is used to extract a subset of the original data through which a search for the true percentile is conducted. 2 tables.

  11. Activity Settings and Daily Routines in Preschool Classrooms: Diverse Experiences in Early Learning Settings for Low-Income Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Howes, Carollee; Huang, Yiching; Hong, Sandra Soliday; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines activity settings and daily classroom routines experienced by 3- and 4-year-old low-income children in public center-based preschool programs, private center-based programs, and family child care homes. Two daily routine profiles were identified using a time-sampling coding procedure: a High Free-Choice pattern in which…

  12. Visual exploration of large data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miron Livny; Raghu Ramakrishnan; Jussi Myllymaki

    1996-01-01

    DEVise is a data visualization and exploration system capable of handling large data sets using off-the-shelf hardware with minimal memory requirements. Data can be large in volume, complex in structure (multi-dimensional and\\/or hierarchical), and may be imported from different sources such as database servers, external programs, and World Wide Web resources. Commercial and scientific databases can also be linked to

  13. Parallel visualization of large data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rob Rosenberg; Marco O. Lanzagorta; Almadena Chtchelkanova; Alexei Khokhlov

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we describe our efforts towards the parallel visualization of large data sets. We describe the fully threaded tree (FTT) structure developed at NRL to tackle the problem of massive parallel calculations using adaptive mesh refinement methods. All operations with FTT are performed in parallel and require only a small memory overhead. The FTT can be viewed as

  14. Activity Settings and Daily Routines in Preschool Classrooms: Diverse Experiences in Early Learning Settings for Low-Income Children

    PubMed Central

    Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Howes, Carollee; Huang, Yiching; Hong, Sandra Soliday; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines activity settings and daily classroom routines experienced by 3- and 4-year-old low-income children in public center-based preschool programs, private center-based programs, and family child care homes. Two daily routine profiles were identified using a time-sampling coding procedure: a High Free-Choice pattern in which children spent a majority of their day engaged in child-directed free-choice activity settings combined with relatively low amounts of teacher-directed activity, and a Structured-Balanced pattern in which children spent relatively equal proportions of their day engaged in child-directed free-choice activity settings and teacher-directed small- and whole-group activities. Daily routine profiles were associated with program type and curriculum use but not with measures of process quality. Children in Structured-Balanced classrooms had more opportunities to engage in language and literacy and math activities, whereas children in High Free-Choice classrooms had more opportunities for gross motor and fantasy play. Being in a Structured-Balanced classroom was associated with children’s language scores but profiles were not associated with measures of children’s math reasoning or socio-emotional behavior. Consideration of teachers’ structuring of daily routines represents a valuable way to understand nuances in the provision of learning experiences for young children in the context of current views about developmentally appropriate practice and school readiness. PMID:22665945

  15. Activity Settings and Daily Routines in Preschool Classrooms: Diverse Experiences in Early Learning Settings for Low-Income Children.

    PubMed

    Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Howes, Carollee; Huang, Yiching; Hong, Sandra Soliday; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

    2012-06-01

    This paper examines activity settings and daily classroom routines experienced by 3- and 4-year-old low-income children in public center-based preschool programs, private center-based programs, and family child care homes. Two daily routine profiles were identified using a time-sampling coding procedure: a High Free-Choice pattern in which children spent a majority of their day engaged in child-directed free-choice activity settings combined with relatively low amounts of teacher-directed activity, and a Structured-Balanced pattern in which children spent relatively equal proportions of their day engaged in child-directed free-choice activity settings and teacher-directed small- and whole-group activities. Daily routine profiles were associated with program type and curriculum use but not with measures of process quality. Children in Structured-Balanced classrooms had more opportunities to engage in language and literacy and math activities, whereas children in High Free-Choice classrooms had more opportunities for gross motor and fantasy play. Being in a Structured-Balanced classroom was associated with children's language scores but profiles were not associated with measures of children's math reasoning or socio-emotional behavior. Consideration of teachers' structuring of daily routines represents a valuable way to understand nuances in the provision of learning experiences for young children in the context of current views about developmentally appropriate practice and school readiness. PMID:22665945

  16. Observations of teacher–child interactions in classrooms serving Latinos and dual language learners: Applicability of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System in diverse settings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason T. Downer; Michael L. López; Kevin J. Grimm; Aki Hamagami; Robert C. Pianta; Carollee Howes

    With the rising number of Latino and dual language learner (DLL) children attending pre-k and the importance of assessing the quality of their experiences in those settings, this study examined the extent to which a commonly used assessment of teacher–child interactions, the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS), demonstrated similar psychometric properties in classrooms serving ethnically and linguistically diverse children as

  17. Technological Challenges: Designing Large Compressed Video and Multimedia Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Russ A.; Parker, Roger

    Designing a distance learning classroom requires integration of educational goals and philosophy with technology and ergonomics. The technological challenge and key to designing effective distance learning and multimedia classrooms is creating an environment in which the participants--students, and teacher--may easily interact with instructional…

  18. Mobile-IT Education (MIT.EDU): M-Learning Applications for Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, M.; Gips, J.; Eagle, N.; Madan, A.; Caneel, R.; DeVaul, R.; Bonsen, J.; Pentland, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the Mobile-IT Education (MIT.EDU) system, which demonstrates the potential of using a distributed mobile device architecture for rapid prototyping of wireless mobile multi-user applications for use in classroom settings. MIT.EDU is a stable, accessible system that combines inexpensive, commodity hardware, a flexible…

  19. Generalizability and Decision Studies to Inform Observational and Experimental Research in Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottema-Beutel, Kristen; Lloyd, Blair; Carter, Erik W.; Asmus, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    Attaining reliable estimates of observational measures can be challenging in school and classroom settings, as behavior can be influenced by multiple contextual factors. Generalizability (G) studies can enable researchers to estimate the reliability of observational data, and decision (D) studies can inform how many observation sessions are…

  20. Reliability Issues and Solutions for Coding Social Communication Performance in Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olswang, Lesley B.; Svensson, Liselotte; Coggins, Truman E.; Beilinson, Jill S.; Donaldson, Amy L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the utility of time-interval analysis for documenting the reliability of coding social communication performance of children in classroom settings. Of particular interest was finding a method for determining whether independent observers could reliably judge both occurrence and duration of ongoing behavioral dimensions for…

  1. Sizable Sharks Swim Swiftly: Learning Correlations through Inference in a Classroom Setting

    E-print Network

    Love, Bradley C.

    Sizable Sharks Swim Swiftly: Learning Correlations through Inference in a Classroom Setting Yasuaki more properties of the shark categories acquired through inference than those acquired through, Tiger vs. Sixgill shark). classifying a series of animals presented to them. In the next class session

  2. LARSON--MATH 255CLASSROOM WORKSHEET 07 Anonymous Functions--Sets--Matrices.

    E-print Network

    Larson, Craig E.

    Last name First name LARSON--MATH 255­CLASSROOM WORKSHEET 07 Anonymous Functions--Sets--Matrices. 1. Anonymous Functions Revisited An anonymous function is just a function without an associates name and, thus of an anonymous function (or "lambda construction") used to square all the elements of the list [2..9] map

  3. Setting the stage: developmental biology in pre-college classrooms.

    PubMed

    Borland, Sandra; Crawford, Karen; Brand, Victoria

    2003-01-01

    Exercises that employ dynamic living material have proved highly successful at generating interest in science among young students. Developing embryos and larvae are especially well suited for such endeavors, for they can be handled without expensive or elaborate equipment, and their changing nature engages students. Using amphibian embryos, which are relatively large and exhibit profound, easily observed morphological changes, and amphibian larvae, which are easily kept and observed, captures the attention of children. By designing inquiry-based exercises and focused discussion sessions, a high intellectual content can be integrated into these endeavors. The long-term implications for generating an informed citizenry, improving the participation of women in science, and empowering elementary school teachers are profound. Professional developmental biology researchers should feel encouraged to participate in these types of activities. PMID:12705654

  4. An investigation into the factors that encourage learner participation in a large group medical classroom

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, Jennifer; Berezowski, John; Spencer, Dustine; Lanning, Shari

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective lectures often incorporate activities that encourage learner participation. A challenge for educators is how to facilitate this in the large group lecture setting. This study investigates the individual student characteristics involved in encouraging (or dissuading) learners to interact, ask questions, and make comments in class. Methods Students enrolled in a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program at Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, St Kitts, were invited to complete a questionnaire canvassing their participation in the large group classroom. Data from the questionnaire were analyzed using Excel (Microsoft, Redmond, WA, USA) and the R software environment (http://www.r-project.org/). Results One hundred and ninety-two students completed the questionnaire (response rate, 85.7%). The results showed statistically significant differences between male and female students when asked to self-report their level of participation (P=0.011) and their confidence to participate (P<0.001) in class. No statistically significant difference was identified between different age groups of students (P=0.594). Student responses reflected that an “aversion to public speaking” acted as the main deterrent to participating during a lecture. Female participants were 3.56 times more likely to report a fear of public speaking than male participants (odds ratio 3.56, 95% confidence interval 1.28–12.33, P=0.01). Students also reported “smaller sizes of class and small group activities” and “other students participating” as factors that made it easier for them to participate during a lecture. Conclusion In this study, sex likely played a role in learner participation in the large group veterinary classroom. Male students were more likely to participate in class and reported feeling more confident to participate than female students. Female students in this study commonly identified aversion to public speaking as a factor which held them back from participating in the large group lecture setting. These are important findings for veterinary and medical educators aiming to improve learner participation in the classroom. Potential ways of addressing this challenge include addition of small group activities and audience response systems during lectures, and inclusion of training interventions in public speaking at an early stage of veterinary and medical curricula. PMID:24648783

  5. Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents K-12 and college classrooms considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, focusing on concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm, client,…

  6. Ready, Set, SCIENCE!: Putting Research to Work in K-8 Science Classrooms

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sarah Michaels

    2007-01-01

    What types of instructional experiences help K-8 students learn science with understanding? What do science educators teachers, teacher leaders, science specialists, professional development staff, curriculum designers, school administrators need to know to create and support such experiences? Ready, Set, Science! guides the way with an account of the groundbreaking and comprehensive synthesis of research into teaching and learning science in kindergarten through eighth grade. Based on the recently released National Research Council report Taking Science to School: Learning and Teaching Science in Grades K-8, this book summarizes a rich body of findings from the learning sciences and builds detailed cases of science educators at work to make the implications of research clear, accessible, and stimulating for a broad range of science educators. Ready, Set, Science! is filled with classroom case studies that bring to life the research findings and help readers to replicate success. Most of these stories are based on real classroom experiences that illustrate the complexities that teachers grapple with every day. They show how teachers work to select and design rigorous and engaging instructional tasks, manage classrooms, orchestrate productive discussions with culturally and linguistically diverse groups of students, and help students make their thinking visible using a variety of representational tools. This book is the winner of the Association of Educational Publishers 2008 Distinguished Achievement Award and is an essential resource for science education practitioners and contains information that will be extremely useful to everyone including parents directly or indirectly involved in the teaching of science.

  7. Online decision problems with large strategy sets

    E-print Network

    Kleinberg, Robert David

    2005-01-01

    In an online decision problem, an algorithm performs a sequence of trials, each of which involves selecting one element from a fixed set of alternatives (the "strategy set") whose costs vary over time. After T trials, the ...

  8. Teaching Nursing Research Using Large Data Sets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Christine A.; Eriksen, Lillian R.; Lin, Yu-Feng

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process for teaching nursing research via secondary analysis of data sets from the National Center for Health Statistics. Addresses advantages, potential problems and limitations, guidelines for students, and evaluation methods. (Contains 32 references.) (SK)

  9. Transformational School Leadership for Large-Scale Reform: Effects on Students, Teachers, and Their Classroom Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leithwood, Kenneth; Jantzi, Doris

    2006-01-01

    Using data from a larger 4-year evaluation of England's National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies, this study tested the effects of a school-specific model of transformational leadership on teachers (motivation, capacities, and work settings), their classroom practices, and gains in student achievement. Some 2,290 teachers from 655 primary schools…

  10. Science Teacher Beliefs and Classroom Practice Related to Constructivism in Different School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savasci, Funda; Berlin, Donna F.

    2012-01-01

    Science teacher beliefs and classroom practice related to constructivism and factors that may influence classroom practice were examined in this cross-case study. Data from four science teachers in two schools included interviews, demographic questionnaire, Classroom Learning Environment Survey (preferred/perceived), and classroom observations and…

  11. Knowledge Discovery in Large Data Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Simas, Tiago; Silva, Gabriel; Miranda, Bruno; Ribeiro, Rita [Uninova/CA3, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal); Moitinho, Andre [SIM, Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal)

    2008-12-05

    In this work we briefly address the problem of unsupervised classification on large datasets, magnitude around 100,000,000 objects. The objects are variable objects, which are around 10% of the 1,000,000,000 astronomical objects that will be collected by GAIA/ESA mission. We tested unsupervised classification algorithms on known datasets such as OGLE and Hipparcos catalogs. Moreover, we are building several templates to represent the main classes of variable objects as well as new classes to build a synthetic dataset of this dimension. In the future we will run the GAIA satellite scanning law on these templates to obtain a testable large dataset.

  12. Clickers in the Large Classroom: Current Research and Best-Practice Tips

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane E. Caldwell

    2007-01-01

    Audience response systems (ARS) or clickers, as they are commonly called, offer a management tool for engaging students in the large classroom. Basic elements of the technology are discussed. These systems have been used in a variety of fields and at all levels of education. Typical goals of ARS questions are discussed, as well as methods of compensating for the

  13. Large data sets analysis: help, where are we

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to define a large data set by a set of rules. The ideas of a preprocessor for looking for outliers in the data are discussed. Questions about data post-processors are asked. In addition, questions are asked about the analysis of large data sets. Data structures are discussed with the NURE and USGWS projects as examples.

  14. Exploring Uncertainty Visualization in Large Data Sets (Renewal Proposal)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alex T. Pang

    Executive Summary: This is a proposal to renew and extend the current project with LANL on uncer- tainty visualization of large data sets. The size of the data sets and the uncertainty in the data sets come from the fact that we are dealing with ensemble data sets. These are usually from monte carlo simulations where each output (out of

  15. Analysis Issues for Large CMB Data Sets

    E-print Network

    Górski, K M; Wandelt, B D

    1998-01-01

    Multi-frequency, high resolution, full sky measurements of the anisotropy in both temperature and polarisation of the cosmic microwave background radiation are the goals of the satellite missions MAP (NASA) and Planck (ESA). The ultimate data products of these missions - multiple microwave sky maps, each of which will have to comprise more than 10^6 pixels in order to render the angular resolution of the instruments - will present serious challenges to those involved in the analysis and scientific exploitation of the results of both surveys. Some considerations of the relevant aspects of the mathematical structure of future CMB data sets are presented in this contribution. >>> for better on-screen rendition of the figures see healpix or http://www.mpa-garching.mpg.de/~cosmo/contributions.html

  16. Analysis Issues for Large CMB Data Sets

    E-print Network

    K. M. Gorski; E. Hivon; B. D. Wandelt

    1998-12-18

    Multi-frequency, high resolution, full sky measurements of the anisotropy in both temperature and polarisation of the cosmic microwave background radiation are the goals of the satellite missions MAP (NASA) and Planck (ESA). The ultimate data products of these missions - multiple microwave sky maps, each of which will have to comprise more than 10^6 pixels in order to render the angular resolution of the instruments - will present serious challenges to those involved in the analysis and scientific exploitation of the results of both surveys. Some considerations of the relevant aspects of the mathematical structure of future CMB data sets are presented in this contribution. >>> for better on-screen rendition of the figures see healpix or http://www.mpa-garching.mpg.de/~cosmo/contributions.html

  17. Implementing Concept-Based Learning in a Large Undergraduate Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, David; Jutras, France

    2008-01-01

    An experiment explicitly introducing learning strategies to a large, first-year undergraduate cell biology course was undertaken to see whether awareness and use of strategies had a measurable impact on student performance. The construction of concept maps was selected as the strategy to be introduced because of an inherent coherence with a course…

  18. Large-N in Volcano Settings: Volcanosri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. M.; Song, W.; Xing, G.; Vick, S.; Phillips, D.

    2014-12-01

    We seek a paradigm shift in the approach we take on volcano monitoring where the compromise from high fidelity to large numbers of sensors is used to increase coverage and resolution. Accessibility, danger and the risk of equipment loss requires that we develop systems that are independent and inexpensive. Furthermore, rather than simply record data on hard disk for later analysis we desire a system that will work autonomously, capitalizing on wireless technology and in field network analysis. To this end we are currently producing a low cost seismic array which will incorporate, at the very basic level, seismological tools for first cut analysis of a volcano in crises mode. At the advanced end we expect to perform tomographic inversions in the network in near real time. Geophone (4 Hz) sensors connected to a low cost recording system will be installed on an active volcano where triggering earthquake location and velocity analysis will take place independent of human interaction. Stations are designed to be inexpensive and possibly disposable. In one of the first implementations the seismic nodes consist of an Arduino Due processor board with an attached Seismic Shield. The Arduino Due processor board contains an Atmel SAM3X8E ARM Cortex-M3 CPU. This 32 bit 84 MHz processor can filter and perform coarse seismic event detection on a 1600 sample signal in fewer than 200 milliseconds. The Seismic Shield contains a GPS module, 900 MHz high power mesh network radio, SD card, seismic amplifier, and 24 bit ADC. External sensors can be attached to either this 24-bit ADC or to the internal multichannel 12 bit ADC contained on the Arduino Due processor board. This allows the node to support attachment of multiple sensors. By utilizing a high-speed 32 bit processor complex signal processing tasks can be performed simultaneously on multiple sensors. Using a 10 W solar panel, second system being developed can run autonomously and collect data on 3 channels at 100Hz for 6 months with the installed 16Gb SD card. Initial designs and test results will be presented and discussed.

  19. CLUSTERING LARGE DATA SETS WITH MIXED NUMERIC AND CATEGORICAL VALUES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ZHEXUE HUANG

    1997-01-01

    Efficient partitioning of large data sets into homogenous clusters is a fundamental problem in data mining. The standard hierarchical clustering methods provide no solution for this problem due to their computational inefficiency. The k-means based methods are promising for their efficiency in processing large data sets. However, their use is often limited to numeric data. In this paper we present

  20. Adaptive, multiresolution visualization of large data sets using parallel octrees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. A. Freitag; R. M. Loy

    1999-01-01

    The interactive visualization and exploration of large scientific data sets is a challenging and difficult task; their size often far exceeds the performance and memory capacity of even the most powerful graphics work-stations. To address this problem, we have created a technique that combines hierarchical data reduction methods with parallel computing to allow interactive exploration of large data sets while

  1. Scalable visual assessment of cluster tendency for large data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard J. Hathaway; James C. Bezdek; Jacalyn M. Huband

    2006-01-01

    The problem of determining whether clusters are present in a data set (i.e., assessment of cluster tendency) is an important first step in cluster analysis. The visual assessment of cluster tendency (VAT) tool has been successful in determining potential cluster structure of various data sets, but it can be computationally expensive for large data sets. In this article, we present

  2. Ready, Set, Science! Putting Research To Work In K-8 Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Veen, Wil E.; Moody, T.

    2008-05-01

    What types of instructional experiences help students learn and understand science? What do professional development providers and curriculum designers need to know to create and support such experiences? Ready, Set, Science! is a book that provides a practical and accessible account of current research about teaching and learning science. Based on the groundbreaking National Research Council report "Taking Science to School: Learning and Teaching Science in Grades K-8” (2006), the book reviews principles derived from the latest educational research and applies them to effective teaching practice. Ready, Set, Science! is a MUST READ for everyone involved in K-12 education, or creating products intended for K-12 use. We will review Ready, Set, Science!'s new vision of science in education, its most important recommendations, and its implications for the place of astronomy in K-12 classrooms. We will review some useful suggestions on how to make student thinking visible and report on how we have put this into practice with teachers. We will engage the audience in a brief interactive demonstration of specific questioning techniques described in the book that help to make student thinking visible.

  3. Implementing Concept-based Learning in a Large Undergraduate Classroom

    PubMed Central

    Jutras, France

    2008-01-01

    An experiment explicitly introducing learning strategies to a large, first-year undergraduate cell biology course was undertaken to see whether awareness and use of strategies had a measurable impact on student performance. The construction of concept maps was selected as the strategy to be introduced because of an inherent coherence with a course structured by concepts. Data were collected over three different semesters of an introductory cell biology course, all teaching similar course material with the same professor and all evaluated using similar examinations. The first group, used as a control, did not construct concept maps, the second group constructed individual concept maps, and the third group first constructed individual maps then validated their maps in small teams to provide peer feedback about the individual maps. Assessment of the experiment involved student performance on the final exam, anonymous polls of student perceptions, failure rate, and retention of information at the start of the following year. The main conclusion drawn is that concept maps without feedback have no significant effect on student performance, whereas concept maps with feedback produced a measurable increase in student problem-solving performance and a decrease in failure rates. PMID:18519616

  4. A comparative study of grade point average (GPA) between the students in traditional classroom setting and the distance learning classroom setting in selected colleges and universities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Connie Ellison McKissack

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether there is a significant difference in the grade distribution in sections taught using the distance learning format and in sections taught by the same instructor in the same term, but utilizing the traditional classroom format.^ Data for courses were collected from the four colleges and\\/or universities by questionnaire, and were compared

  5. Experiencing Visuo-Motor Plasticity by Prism Adaptation in a Classroom Setting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Neural plasticity is a key topic in the study of behavioral neuroscience, yet it can be a difficult concept to demonstrate in a classroom setting. In this report, we describe an interactive technique that can be used to demonstrate and quantify in a laboratory setting the plasticity of motor coordination to altered visual input, i.e. visuo-motor plasticity. Visual input can be easily altered by horizontally-displacing prism goggles. Open-loop motor coordination immediately after putting on these goggles is inaccurate. However, after performing a number of visuo-motor tasks wearing these goggles, coordination adapts and improves. Immediately after removing the goggles, a robust negative aftereffect resulting from adaptation to the goggles is consistently demonstrated. This negative aftereffect can be used to quantify the amount of adaptation that has taken place. We document how to create the prism goggles, how to quantify accuracy of motor coordination, what kinds of visuo-motor tasks consistently lead to significant adaptation, and the importance of active over passive adaptation conditions. PMID:23494088

  6. Towards Perceptual Interface for Visualization Navigation of Large Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Min C. Shin; Leonid V. Tsap; Dmitry B. Goldgof

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a perceptual interface for visualization navigation using gesture recognition. Scientists are interested in developing interactive settings for exploring large data sets in an intuitive environment. The input consists of registered 3-D data. Bezier curves are used for trajectory analysis and classification of gestures. The method is robust and reliable: correct hand identification rate is 99.9% (from 1641

  7. Visualization of Large Data Sets: The Zoom Star Solution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Noirhomme-fraiture

    2002-01-01

    Progress in Knowledge Discovery in Large Databases has raised the necessity of visualizing sets of data on aggregated form. These sets can be given as native data or as results of pr eliminary analysis. Symbolic data analysis has been developed to solve the problem of the analysis of data known on an aggregated form, i.e. where quantitative variables are given

  8. Multiresolution Data Aggregation and Analytical Exploration of Large Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li Yang Mustafa Sanver

    Analytical processing of large relation data demands for a shared compact representation of data in multiple reso- lutions in order to efficiently facilitate the incurring data aggregation, data cube, and range queries. This paper ad- dresses technical problems of multi-resolution data aggre- gation and investigates enabling technologies for efficient analytical processing of large data sets. In particular, the paper discusses

  9. An Architecture for Fast Processing of Large Unstructured Data Sets

    E-print Network

    Chamberlain, Roger

    An Architecture for Fast Processing of Large Unstructured Data Sets Mark Franklin, Roger Henrichs, Berkley Shands, and Jason White, "An Architecture for Fast Processing of Large Unstructured Data-287. Washington University in St. Louis and Data Search Systems, Inc. #12;An Architecture for Fast Processing

  10. Turkish Pre-Service Teachers` Perceived Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Knowledge about Using Expository Text as an Instructional Tool in Their Future Classroom Settings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kasim Yildirim; Seyit Ates

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to examine Turkish pre-service teachers` knowledge and perceived self-efficacy beliefs toward using expository text as an instructional tool in their future classroom settings. The research sample were 346 pre-service teachers who studied in different teacher preparation programs which included elementary classroom and middle content classrooms (for example, science, social studies and Turkish language arts)

  11. Preceptor use of classroom assessment techniques to stimulate higher-order thinking in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Judy E

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide examples of learning activities to be used as formative (interim) evaluation of an in-hospital orientation or cross-training program. Examples are provided in the form of vignettes that have been derived from strategies described in the literature as classroom assessment techniques. Although these classroom assessment techniques were originally designed for classroom experiences, they are proposed as methods for preceptors to stimulate the development of higher-order thinking such as synthesizing information, solving problems, and learning how to learn. PMID:19326822

  12. Design Experiments: Theoretical and Methodological Challenges in Creating Complex Interventions in Classroom Settings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Brown

    1992-01-01

    Ann L. Brown University of California—Berkeley The lion's share of my current research program is devoted to the study of learning in the blooming, buzzing confusion of inner-city classrooms. My high-level goal is to transform grade-school classrooms from work sites where students perform assigned tasks under the management of teachers into communities of learning (Bereiter & Scardamalia, 1989; Brown &

  13. Turkish Pre-Service Teachers' Perceived Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Knowledge about Using Expository Text as an Instructional Tool in Their Future Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildirim, Kasim; Ates, Seyit

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to examine Turkish pre-service teachers' knowledge and perceived self-efficacy beliefs toward using expository text as an instructional tool in their future classroom settings. The research sample were 346 pre-service teachers who studied in different teacher preparation programs which included elementary classroom and…

  14. Increasing the Writing Performance of Urban Seniors Placed At-Risk through Goal-Setting in a Culturally Responsive and Creativity-Centered Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Brittany; Warren, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to support marginalized students require not only identifying systemic inequities, but providing a classroom infrastructure that supports the academic achievement of all students. This action research study examined the effects of implementing goal-setting strategies and emphasizing creativity in a culturally responsive classroom (CRC) on…

  15. Adaptive, multiresolution visualization of large data sets using parallel octrees.

    SciTech Connect

    Freitag, L. A.; Loy, R. M.

    1999-06-10

    The interactive visualization and exploration of large scientific data sets is a challenging and difficult task; their size often far exceeds the performance and memory capacity of even the most powerful graphics work-stations. To address this problem, we have created a technique that combines hierarchical data reduction methods with parallel computing to allow interactive exploration of large data sets while retaining full-resolution capability. The hierarchical representation is built in parallel by strategically inserting field data into an octree data structure. We provide functionality that allows the user to interactively adapt the resolution of the reduced data sets so that resolution is increased in regions of interest without sacrificing local graphics performance. We describe the creation of the reduced data sets using a parallel octree, the software architecture of the system, and the performance of this system on the data from a Rayleigh-Taylor instability simulation.

  16. Structure of large incomplete sets in abelian groups

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Van Vu

    2010-01-01

    Let G be a finite abelian group and A be a subset of G. We say that A is complete if every element of G can be represented as a sum of different elements of A. In this paper, we study the following question\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a What is the structure of a large incomplete set?\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a We show that such a set is

  17. Looking at large data sets using binned data plots

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.B.

    1990-04-01

    This report addresses the monumental challenge of developing exploratory analysis methods for large data sets. The goals of the report are to increase awareness of large data sets problems and to contribute simple graphical methods that address some of the problems. The graphical methods focus on two- and three-dimensional data and common task such as finding outliers and tail structure, assessing central structure and comparing central structures. The methods handle large sample size problems through binning, incorporate information from statistical models and adapt image processing algorithms. Examples demonstrate the application of methods to a variety of publicly available large data sets. The most novel application addresses the too many plots to examine'' problem by using cognostics, computer guiding diagnostics, to prioritize plots. The particular application prioritizes views of computational fluid dynamics solution sets on the fly. That is, as each time step of a solution set is generated on a parallel processor the cognostics algorithms assess virtual plots based on the previous time step. Work in such areas is in its infancy and the examples suggest numerous challenges that remain. 35 refs., 15 figs.

  18. Using Very Large Volume Data Sets for Collaborative Systems Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ion IVAN; Cristian CIUREA

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the study requests for collaborative systems, the structure and volume of data necessary for collaborative systems analysis. The paper defines procedures for collecting and validating data. This article identifies algorithms to construct homogeneous collectivities. Calculations are carried out with very large data sets and the results are interpreted.

  19. An approach to visualization of large data sets from LIDAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bostjan Kova

    Rapid development of laser scanning technology in past decades has resulted in a wide area of its applications. LI- DAR is a system that uses this technology to gather in- formation about distant targets. Gathered data are stored into large data sets that are further processed, visualized and analyzed. Fast and accurate visualization is the key factor when working with

  20. Using aggregation and dynamic queries for exploring large data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jade Goldstein; Steven F. Roth

    1994-01-01

    When working with large data sets, users perform three primary types of activities: data manipulation, data analysis, and data visualization. The data manipulation process involves the selection and transformation of data prior to viewing. This paper addresses user goals for this process and the interactive interface mechanisms that support them. We consider three classes of data manipulation goals: controlling the

  1. Extremal Forex Returns in Extremely Large Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michel M. Dacorogna; Ulrich A. Müller; Olivier V. Pictet; Casper G. de Vries

    2001-01-01

    Exciting information for risk and investment analysis is obtained from an exceptionally large and automatically filtered high frequency data set containing all the forex quote prices on Reuters during a ten-year period. It is shown how the high frequency data improve the efficiency of the tail risk cum loss estimates. We demonstrate theoretically and empirically that the heavy tail feature

  2. Direct haptic rendering for large data sets with high gradients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bob Ménélas; Nicolas Fauvet; Mehdi Ammi; Patrick Bourdot

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses haptic rendering for large data sets resulting from CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) applications. We present a new haptic interaction technique for volume rendering of isosurfaces. This method is based on an existing process [1]. This contribution makes it possible to take into account 3D regions presenting high frequency data. In addition, with this technique we can explore

  3. Enhancing student learning in database courses with large data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Venkat N Gudivada; Jagadeesh Nandigam; Yonglei Tao

    2007-01-01

    Rapidly increasing storage device capacities at ever decreasing costs have resulted in mushrooming of publicly available large data sets on the Web. In this paper, we describe a novel approach to teaching relational database course by using such data repositories. We demonstrate our approach using the Amazon.com product database, though the approach is generic and is applicable to other data

  4. An Interaction Analysis of Teacher-Inspired Classroom Language Behaviour in Alternative Language Media Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awoniyi, Timothy A.; Ala, Florence B.O.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluated impact of using English, the "Mother Tongue" (Yoruba), or a structural bilingual mix of English and Yoruba in classroom communication. Found little difference in frequency of teaching behavior patterns, although in some instances teachers speaking Yoruba were more active. (CJM)

  5. Visualization of Large Data Sets with the Active Data Repository

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tahsin M. Kurç; Ümit V. Çatalyürek; Chialin Chang; Alan Sussman; Joel H. Saltz

    2001-01-01

    We implement ray-casting-based volume rendering and isosurface rendering methods using the Active Data Repository (ADR) for visualizing out-of-core data sets. We have developed the ADR object-oriented framework to provide support for applications that employ range queries with user-defined mapping and aggregation operations on large-scale multidimensional data. ADR targets distributed-memory parallel machines with one or more disks attached to each node.

  6. Visualizing Large Data Sets in the Earth Sciences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William L. Hibbard; David A. Santek

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe the capabilities of McIDAS , an interactive visualization system that is vastly increasing the ability of earth scientists to manage and analyze data from remote sensing instruments and numerical simulation models. McIDAS provides animated three-dimensional images and highly interactive displays. The software can manage, analyze, and visualize large data sets that span many physical variables (such as

  7. Engaging millennial learners: Effectiveness of personal response system technology with nursing students in small and large classrooms.

    PubMed

    Revell, Susan M Hunter; McCurry, Mary K

    2010-05-01

    Nurse educators must explore innovative technologies that make the most of the characteristics and learning styles of millennial learners. These students are comfortable with technology and prefer interactive classrooms with individual feedback and peer collaboration. This study evaluated the perceived effectiveness of personal response system (PRS) technology in enhancing student learning in small and large classrooms. PRS technology was integrated into two undergraduate courses, nursing research (n = 33) and junior medical-surgical nursing (n = 116). Multiple-choice, true-false, NCLEX-RN alternate format, and reading quiz questions were incorporated within didactic PowerPoint presentations. Data analysis of Likert-type and open-response questions supported the use of PRS technology as an effective strategy for educating millennial learners in both small and large classrooms. PRS technology promotes active learning, increases participation, and provides students and faculty with immediate feedback that reflects comprehension of content and increases faculty-student interaction. PMID:20055325

  8. Using Mobile Phones to Increase Classroom Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Stephanie; Heaney, Rose; Corcoran, Olivia; Henderson-Begg, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the possible benefits of using mobile phones to increase interaction and promote active learning in large classroom settings. First year undergraduate students studying Cellular Processes at the University of East London took part in a trial of a new text-based classroom interaction system and evaluated their experience by…

  9. STEME: a robust, accurate motif finder for large data sets.

    PubMed

    Reid, John E; Wernisch, Lorenz

    2014-01-01

    Motif finding is a difficult problem that has been studied for over 20 years. Some older popular motif finders are not suitable for analysis of the large data sets generated by next-generation sequencing. We recently published an efficient approximation (STEME) to the EM algorithm that is at the core of many motif finders such as MEME. This approximation allows the EM algorithm to be applied to large data sets. In this work we describe several efficient extensions to STEME that are based on the MEME algorithm. Together with the original STEME EM approximation, these extensions make STEME a fully-fledged motif finder with similar properties to MEME. We discuss the difficulty of objectively comparing motif finders. We show that STEME performs comparably to existing prominent discriminative motif finders, DREME and Trawler, on 13 sets of transcription factor binding data in mouse ES cells. We demonstrate the ability of STEME to find long degenerate motifs which these discriminative motif finders do not find. As part of our method, we extend an earlier method due to Nagarajan et al. for the efficient calculation of motif E-values. STEME's source code is available under an open source license and STEME is available via a web interface. PMID:24625410

  10. A large-scale crop protection bioassay data set

    PubMed Central

    Gaulton, Anna; Kale, Namrata; van Westen, Gerard J. P.; Bellis, Louisa J.; Bento, A. Patrícia; Davies, Mark; Hersey, Anne; Papadatos, George; Forster, Mark; Wege, Philip; Overington, John P.

    2015-01-01

    ChEMBL is a large-scale drug discovery database containing bioactivity information primarily extracted from scientific literature. Due to the medicinal chemistry focus of the journals from which data are extracted, the data are currently of most direct value in the field of human health research. However, many of the scientific use-cases for the current data set are equally applicable in other fields, such as crop protection research: for example, identification of chemical scaffolds active against a particular target or endpoint, the de-convolution of the potential targets of a phenotypic assay, or the potential targets/pathways for safety liabilities. In order to broaden the applicability of the ChEMBL database and allow more widespread use in crop protection research, an extensive data set of bioactivity data of insecticidal, fungicidal and herbicidal compounds and assays was collated and added to the database. PMID:26175909

  11. Towards effective analysis of large grain boundary data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowinski, K.; Morawiec, A.

    2015-04-01

    Grain boundaries affect properties of polycrystals. Novel experimental techniques for three-dimensional orientation mapping give new opportunities for studies of this influence. Large networks of boundaries can be analyzed based on all five ’macroscopic’ boundary parameters. We demonstrate benefits of applying two methods for improving these analyses. The fractions of geometrically special boundaries in ferrite are estimated based on ’approximate’ distances to the nearest special boundaries; by using these parameters, the times needed for processing boundary data sets are shortened. Moreover, grain-boundary distributions for nickel are obtained using kernel density estimation; this approach leads to distribution functions more accurate than those obtained based on partition of the space into bins.

  12. Support vector machine classifiers for large data sets.

    SciTech Connect

    Gertz, E. M.; Griffin, J. D.

    2006-01-31

    This report concerns the generation of support vector machine classifiers for solving the pattern recognition problem in machine learning. Several methods are proposed based on interior point methods for convex quadratic programming. Software implementations are developed by adapting the object-oriented packaging OOQP to the problem structure and by using the software package PETSc to perform time-intensive computations in a distributed setting. Linear systems arising from classification problems with moderately large numbers of features are solved by using two techniques--one a parallel direct solver, the other a Krylov-subspace method incorporating novel preconditioning strategies. Numerical results are provided, and computational experience is discussed.

  13. Observing physical education teachers' need-supportive interactions in classroom settings.

    PubMed

    Haerens, Leen; Aelterman, Nathalie; Van den Berghe, Lynn; De Meyer, Jotie; Soenens, Bart; Vansteenkiste, Maarten

    2013-02-01

    According to self-determination theory, teachers can motivate students by supporting their psychological needs for relatedness, competence, and autonomy. The present study complements extant research (most of which relied on self-report measures) by relying on observations of need-supportive teaching in the domain of physical education (PE), which allows for the identification of concrete, real-life examples of how teacher need support manifests in the classroom. Seventy-four different PE lessons were coded for 5-min intervals to assess the occurrence of 21 need-supportive teaching behaviors. Factor analyses provided evidence for four interpretable factors, namely, relatedness support, autonomy support, and two components of structure (structure before and during the activity). Reasonable evidence was obtained for convergence between observed and student perceived need support. Yet, the low interrater reliability for two of the four scales indicates that these scales need further improvement. PMID:23404876

  14. Manifold sequencing: Efficient processing of large sets of sequencing reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerkvist, A.; Stewart, J.; Lagerstroem-Fermer, M.; Landegren, U. [Beijer Lab., Uppsala (Sweden)

    1994-03-15

    Automated instruments for DNA sequencing greatly simplify data collection in the Sanger sequencing procedure. By contrast, the so-called front-end problems of preparing sequencing templates, performing sequencing reactions, and loading these on the instruments remain major obstacles to extensive sequencing projects. The authors describe here the use of a manifold support to prepare and perform sequencing reactions on large sets of templates in parallel, as well as to load the reaction products on a sequencing instrument. In this manner, all reaction steps are performed without pipetting the samples. The strategy is applied to sequencing PCR-amplified clones of the human mitochondrial D-loop and for detection of heterozygous positions in the human major histocompatibility complex class II gene HLA-DQB, amplified from genomic DNA samples. This technique will promote sequencing in a clinical context and could form the basis of more efficient genomic sequencing strategies. 24 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Manifold sequencing: efficient processing of large sets of sequencing reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Lagerkvist, A; Stewart, J; Lagerström-Fermér, M; Landegren, U

    1994-01-01

    Automated instruments for DNA sequencing greatly simplify data collection in the Sanger sequencing procedure. By contrast, the so-called front-end problems of preparing sequencing templates, performing sequencing reactions, and loading these on the instruments remain major obstacles to extensive sequencing projects. We describe here the use of a manifold support to prepare and perform sequencing reactions on large sets of templates in parallel, as well as to load the reaction products on a sequencing instrument. In this manner, all reaction steps are performed without pipetting the samples. The strategy is applied to sequencing PCR-amplified clones of the human mitochondrial D-loop and for detection of heterozygous positions in the human major histocompatibility complex class II gene HLA-DQB, amplified from genomic DNA samples. This technique will promote sequencing in a clinical context and could form the basis of more efficient genomic sequencing strategies. Images PMID:8134382

  16. Responsive Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Responsive Classroom addresses some of the challenges present in any elementary classroom, be it first-grade mathematics or third-grade science, by offering "an approach to teaching and learning that fosters safe, challenging, and joyful classrooms and schools, kindergarten through eighth grade." Through this website, classroom teachers share "practical strategies for bringing together social and academic learning throughout the school day." They report that teachers in urban, rural, and suburban settings nationwide find that these strategies have increased student investment, responsibility, and learning, and decreased problem behaviors. Studies detailing the effectiveness of the program are posted on this website. The basic principles of the program are also described, but the books detailing their approach must be purchased. The newsletter, however, is available free of charge and the archive includes previously published articles, which can be searched by topic, such as technology in the classroom and family involvement.

  17. Recruiting Participants for Large-Scale Random Assignment Experiments in School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roschelle, Jeremy; Feng, Mingyu; Gallagher, H. Alix; Murphy, Robert; Harris, Christopher; Kamdar, Danae; Trinidad, Gucci

    2014-01-01

    Recruitment is a key challenge for researchers conducting any large school-based study. Control is needed not only over the condition participants receive, but also over how the intervention is implemented, and may include restrictions in other areas of school and classroom functioning. We report here on our experiences in recruiting participants…

  18. An Exploration Tool for Very Large Spectrum Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbon, Duane F.; Henze, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We present an exploration tool for very large spectrum data sets such as the SDSS, LAMOST, and 4MOST data sets. The tool works in two stages: the first uses batch processing and the second runs interactively. The latter employs the NASA hyperwall, a configuration of 128 workstation displays (8x16 array) controlled by a parallelized software suite running on NASA's Pleiades supercomputer. The stellar subset of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR10 was chosen to show how the tool may be used. In stage one, SDSS files for 569,738 stars are processed through our data pipeline. The pipeline fits each spectrum using an iterative continuum algorithm, distinguishing emission from absorption and handling molecular absorption bands correctly. It then measures 1659 discrete atomic and molecular spectral features that were carefully preselected based on their likelihood of being visible at some spectral type. The depths relative to the local continuum at each feature wavelength are determined for each spectrum: these depths, the local S/N level, and DR10-supplied variables such as magnitudes, colors, positions, and radial velocities are the basic measured quantities used on the hyperwall. In stage two, each hyperwall panel is used to display a 2-D scatter plot showing the depth of feature A vs the depth of feature B for all of the stars. A and B change from panel to panel. The relationships between the various (A,B) strengths and any distinctive clustering are immediately apparent when examining and inter-comparing the different panels on the hyperwall. The interactive software allows the user to select the stars in any interesting region of any 2-D plot on the hyperwall, immediately rendering the same stars on all the other 2-D plots in a unique color. The process may be repeated multiple times, each selection displaying a distinctive color on all the plots. At any time, the spectra of the selected stars may be examined in detail on a connected workstation display. We illustrate how our approach allows us to quickly isolate and examine such interesting stellar subsets as EMP stars, CV stars and C-rich stars.

  19. Intercultural Education Set Forward: Operational Strategies and Procedures in Cypriot Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajisoteriou, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Teachers in Cyprus are being called upon for the first time to teach within culturally diverse educational settings. Given the substantial role, teachers play in the implementation of intercultural education, this paper explores the intercultural strategies and procedures adopted by primary school teachers in Cyprus. Interviews were carried out…

  20. Setting Up an SSR Program in the Foreign Language Classroom: Some Questions and Answers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenewald, M. Jane

    1978-01-01

    A Sustained Silent Reading (SSR) program provides a way to upgrade reading instruction by stressing self-selection, independent practice, and the use of reading as a communication tool. Guidelines are offered for setting up SSR programs, a resource library, and scheduling SSR periods. (Author/SW)

  1. A Classroom Exercise in Spatial Analysis Using an Imaginary Data Set.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    One skill that elementary students need to acquire is the ability to analyze spatially distributed data. In this activity students are asked to complete the following tasks: (1) plot a set of data (related to "mud-sharks"--an imaginary fish) on a map of the state of Alabama, (2) identify trends in the data, (3) make graphs using the data…

  2. Ready, Set, SCIENCE!: Putting Research to Work in K-8 Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, Sarah; Shouse, Andrew W.; Schweingruber, Heidi A.

    2007-01-01

    What types of instructional experiences help K-8 students learn science with understanding? What do science educators, teachers, teacher leaders, science specialists, professional development staff, curriculum designers, and school administrators need to know to create and support such experiences? "Ready, Set, Science!" guides the way with an…

  3. The Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (COSMIC): An Observational Measure of the Intentional Communication of Children with Autism in an Unstructured Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasco, Greg; Gordon, Rosanna K.; Howlin, Patricia; Charman, Tony

    2008-01-01

    The Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (COSMIC) was devised to provide ecologically valid outcome measures for a communication-focused intervention trial. Ninety-one children with autism spectrum disorder aged 6 years 10 months (SD 16 months) were videoed during their everyday snack, teaching and free play…

  4. Classroom Discourse and Reading Comprehension in Bilingual Settings: A Case Study of Collaborative Reasoning in a Chinese Heritage Language Learners' Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Hsiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the participation of one Chinese teacher and five 13 to 15 year-old Chinese heritage students in a classroom in a Chinese community school during group discussions about narrative texts. In this study, the teacher used Collaborative Reasoning (CR) (Anderson, et al., 2001) to help the Chinese heritage students extend…

  5. Approximate Single Linkage Cluster Analysis of Large Data Sets in High

    E-print Network

    Approximate Single Linkage Cluster Analysis of Large Data Sets in High Dimensional Spaces William F of data sets we are presented for analysis is ever increasing. The recent increase in very large data sets and Oue [1]. We intend to use the ideas described here on other data sets. Our analysis is based

  6. Value and Relation Display: Interactive Visual Exploration of Large Data Sets with Hundreds of Dimensions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jing Yang; Daniel Hubball; Matthew O. Ward; Elke A. Rundensteiner; William Ribarsky

    2007-01-01

    Few existing visualization systems can handle large data sets with hundreds of dimensions, since high-dimensional data sets cause clutter on the display and large response time in interactive exploration. In this paper, we present a significantly improved multidimensional visualization approach named Value and Relation (VaR) display that allows users to effectively and efficiently explore large data sets with several hundred

  7. Cockroaches in the Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christine Moseley

    2005-03-01

    Welcome the Madagascar hissing cockroach into your classroom--they are not your average pest! This article describes the basic biology of this relatively tame creature, and how to set up and care for a classroom colony. It includes a list of suggested inquiry-centered classroom activities that you and your students will find both educational and fun!

  8. The Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (COSMIC): An Observational Measure of the Intentional Communication of Children with Autism in an Unstructured Classroom Setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greg Pasco; Rosanna K. Gordon; Patricia Howlin; Tony Charman

    2008-01-01

    The Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (COSMIC) was devised to provide ecologically valid\\u000a outcome measures for a communication-focused intervention trial. Ninety-one children with autism spectrum disorder aged 6 years\\u000a 10 months (SD 16 months) were videoed during their everyday snack, teaching and free play activities. Inter-rater reliability\\u000a was high and relevant items showed significant associations with comparable items from concurrent Autism

  9. Distributed and collaborative visualization of large data sets using high-speed networks

    E-print Network

    Prohaska, Steffen

    Distributed and collaborative visualization of large data sets using high-speed networks Andrei- quality collaborative interaction and remote visualization of large data. Key words: Collaborative large scale data, huge computer simulations, and diverse distributed collaborations of experts from

  10. Assessing the Effectiveness of Inquiry-based Learning Techniques Implemented in Large Classroom Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, D. N.; McConnell, D. A.; Owens, K.

    2001-12-01

    Geoscience and education faculty at The University of Akron jointly developed a series of inquiry-based learning modules aimed at both non-major and major student populations enrolled in introductory geology courses. These courses typically serve 2500 students per year in four to six classes of 40-160 students each per section. Twelve modules were developed that contained common topics and assessments appropriate to Earth Science, Environmental Geology and Physical Geology classes. All modules were designed to meet four primary learning objectives agreed upon by Department of Geology faculty. These major objectives include: 1) Improvement of student understanding of the scientific method; 2) Incorporation of problem solving strategies involving analysis, synthesis, and interpretation; 3) Development of the ability to distinguish between inferences, data and observations; and 4) Obtaining an understanding of basic processes that operate on Earth. Additional objectives that may be addressed by selected modules include: 1) The societal relevance of science; 2) Use and interpretation of quantitative data to better understand the Earth; 3) Development of the students' ability to communicate scientific results; 4) Distinguishing differences between science, religion and pseudo-science; 5) Evaluation of scientific information found in the mass media; and 6) Building interpersonal relationships through in-class group work. Student pre- and post-instruction progress was evaluated by administering a test of logical thinking, an attitude toward science survey, and formative evaluations. Scores from the logical thinking instrument were used to form balanced four-person working groups based on the students' incoming cognitive level. Groups were required to complete a series of activities and/or exercises that targeted different cognitive domains based upon Bloom's taxonomy (knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation of information). Daily assessments of knowledge-level learning included evaluations of student responses to pre- and post-instruction conceptual test questions, short group exercises and content-oriented exam questions. Higher level thinking skills were assessed when students completed exercises that required the completion of Venn diagrams, concept maps and/or evaluation rubrics both during class periods and on exams. Initial results indicate that these techniques improved student attendance significantly and improved overall retention in the course by 8-14% over traditional lecture formats. Student scores on multiple choice exam questions were slightly higher (1-3%) for students taught in the active learning environment and short answer questions showed larger gains (7%) over students' scores in a more traditional class structure.

  11. Setting the scale for DIS at large Bjorken x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuti, Simonetta

    2011-09-01

    We discuss the extension of a systematic perturbative QCD based analysis to the x ? 1 region. After subtracting a number of effects that transcend NLO pQCD evolution, such as target mass corrections and large x resummation effects, the remaining power corrections can be interpreted as dynamical higher twists. The quantitative outcome of the analysis is dominated by the interplay between the value of ?S in the infrared region and the higher twists. We uncover a dual role played by ?S at large Bjorken x that can be used to experimentally extract its value in the non-perturbative regime.

  12. Remote visualization for large data sets from plasma simulations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. T. Abreu; R. A. Fonseca; M. Marti; L. O. Silva

    2004-01-01

    Three dimensional simulations in a massively parallel computing environment open new challenges in monitoring the simulations in run-time, in data exploration, and in the visualization of the huge amounts of simulation data generated in these simulations. We will present an integrated system, coupling a web interface with a set of IDL routines (idl.zamb) specially design to explore PIC\\/hybrid plasma simulation

  13. Interactive Texture-Based Volume Rendering for Large Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joe Kniss; Patrick S. Mccormick; Allen Mcpherson; James P. Ahrens; James S. Painter; Alan Keahey; Charles D. Hansen

    2001-01-01

    isualization is an integral part of scien- tific computation and simulation. State- of-the-art simulations of physical systems can generate terabytes to petabytes of time-varying data where a sin- gle time step can contain more than a gigabyte of data per variable. As memory sizes continue to increase, the size of data sets will likely increase at a comparably high rate.

  14. Fast principal component analysis of large data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F Vogt; M Tacke

    2001-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) and principal component regression (PCR) are widespread algorithms for calibration of spectrometers and evaluation of unknown measurement spectra. In many measurement tasks, the amount of calibration data is increasing nowadays due to new devices like hyperspectral imagers. Core of PCA is the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the matrix containing the calibration spectra. SVD of large

  15. Query-driven visualization of large data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kurt Stockinger; John Shalf; K. Wu; E. W. Bethel

    2005-01-01

    We present a practical and general-purpose approach to large and complex visual data analysis where visualization processing, rendering and subsequent human interpretation is constrained to the subset of data deemed interesting by the user. In many scientific data analysis applications, \\

  16. Query-Driven Visualization of Large Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kurt Stockinger; John Shalf; Kesheng Wu; E. Wes Bethel

    2005-01-01

    We present a practical and general-purpose approach to large and complex visual data analysis where visualization processing, ren- dering and subsequent human interpretation is constrained to the subset of data deemed interesting by the user. In many scien- tific data analysis applications, \\

  17. Classroom Management and the Librarian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Heidi; Hays, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    As librarians take on more instructional responsibilities, the need for classroom management skills becomes vital. Unfortunately, classroom management skills are not taught in library school and therefore, many librarians are forced to learn how to manage a classroom on the job. Different classroom settings such as one-shot instruction sessions…

  18. Hierarchical models facilitate spatial analysis of large data sets: a case study on invasive plant species

    E-print Network

    Silander Jr., John A.

    LETTER Hierarchical models facilitate spatial analysis of large data sets: a case study on invasive issues require the analysis of large spatial point data sets ­ for example, modelling species point data sets, presents major computational challenges. We use a novel Bayesian hierarchical

  19. Hierarchical Artificial Neural Networks for Recognizing High Similar Large Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yen-Ling Lu; Chin-Shyurng Fahn

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a hierarchical artificial neural network for recognizing high similar large data sets. It is usually required to classify large data sets with high similar characteristics in many applications. Analyzing and identifying those data is a laborious task when the methods adopted are primarily based on visual inspection. In many field applications, data sets are measured and recorded

  20. Coffee Shops, Classrooms and Conversations: public engagement and outreach in a large interdisciplinary research Hub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Jennifer A.

    2014-05-01

    Public engagement and outreach activities are increasingly using specialist staff for co-ordination, training and support for researchers, they are also becoming expected for large investments. Here, the experience of public engagement and outreach a large, interdisciplinary Research Hub is described. dot.rural, based at the University of Aberdeen UK, is a £11.8 million Research Councils UK Rural Digital Economy Hub, funded as part of the RCUK Digital Economy Theme (2009-2015). Digital Economy research aims to realise the transformational impact of digital technologies on aspects of the environment, community life, cultural experiences, future society, and the economy. The dot.rural Hub involves 92 researchers from 12 different disciplines, including Geography, Hydrology and Ecology. Public Engagement and Outreach is embedded in the dot.rural Digital Economy Hub via an Outreach Officer. Alongside this position, public engagement and outreach activities are compulsory part of PhD student contracts. Public Engagement and Outreach activities at the dot.rural Hub involve individuals and groups in both formal and informal settings organised by dot.rural and other organisations. Activities in the realms of Education, Public Engagement, Traditional and Social Media are determined by a set of Underlying Principles designed for the Hub by the Outreach Officer. The underlying Engagement and Outreach principles match funding agency requirements and expectations alongside researcher demands and the user-led nature of Digital Economy Research. All activities include researchers alongside the Outreach Officer are research informed and embedded into specific projects that form the Hub. Successful public engagement activities have included participation in Café Scientifique series, workshops in primary and secondary schools, and online activities such as I'm a Scientist Get Me Out of Here. From how to engage 8 year olds with making hydrographs more understandable to members of the public to blogging birds and engaging with remote, rural communities to Spiegeltents. This presentation will share successful public engagement and outreach events alongside some less successful experiences and lessons learnt along the way.

  1. Processing large remote sensing image data sets on Beowulf clusters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinwand, Daniel R.; Maddox, Brian; Beckmann, Tim; Schmidt, Gail

    2003-01-01

    High-performance computing is often concerned with the speed at which floating- point calculations can be performed. The architectures of many parallel computers and/or their network topologies are based on these investigations. Often, benchmarks resulting from these investigations are compiled with little regard to how a large dataset would move about in these systems. This part of the Beowulf study addresses that concern by looking at specific applications software and system-level modifications. Applications include an implementation of a smoothing filter for time-series data, a parallel implementation of the decision tree algorithm used in the Landcover Characterization project, a parallel Kriging algorithm used to fit point data collected in the field on invasive species to a regular grid, and modifications to the Beowulf project's resampling algorithm to handle larger, higher resolution datasets at a national scale. Systems-level investigations include a feasibility study on Flat Neighborhood Networks and modifications of that concept with Parallel File Systems.

  2. Value-based customer grouping from large retail data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehl, Alexander; Ghosh, Joydeep

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, we propose OPOSSUM, a novel similarity-based clustering algorithm using constrained, weighted graph- partitioning. Instead of binary presence or absence of products in a market-basket, we use an extended 'revenue per product' measure to better account for management objectives. Typically the number of clusters desired in a database marketing application is only in the teens or less. OPOSSUM proceeds top-down, which is more efficient and takes a small number of steps to attain the desired number of clusters as compared to bottom-up agglomerative clustering approaches. OPOSSUM delivers clusters that are balanced in terms of either customers (samples) or revenue (value). To facilitate data exploration and validation of results we introduce CLUSION, a visualization toolkit for high-dimensional clustering problems. To enable closed loop deployment of the algorithm, OPOSSUM has no user-specified parameters. Thresholding heuristics are avoided and the optimal number of clusters is automatically determined by a search for maximum performance. Results are presented on a real retail industry data-set of several thousand customers and products, to demonstrate the power of the proposed technique.

  3. A Bayesian spatiotemporal model for very large data sets.

    PubMed

    Harrison, L M; Green, G G R

    2010-04-15

    Functional MRI provides a unique perspective of neuronal organization; however, these data include many complex sources of spatiotemporal variability, which require spatial preprocessing and statistical analysis. For the latter, Bayesian models provide a promising alternative to classical inference, which uses results from Gaussian random field theory to assess the significance of spatially correlated statistic images. A Bayesian approach generalizes the application of these ideas in that (1) random fields are used to model all spatial parameters, not solely observation error, (2) their smoothness is optimized, and (3) a broader class of models can be compared. The main problem, however, is computational, due to the large number of voxels in a brain volume. Sampling methods are time-consuming; however, approximate inference using variational Bayes (VB) offers a principled and transparent way to specify assumptions necessary for computational tractability. Penny et al. (2005b) described such a scheme using a joint spatial prior and approximated the joint posterior density with one that factorized over voxels. However, a further computational bottleneck is encountered when evaluating the log model evidence used to compare models. This has lead to dividing a brain volume into slices and treating each independently. This amounts to approximating the spatial prior over a full volume with stacked 2D priors. That is, smoothness along the z-axis is not included in the model. Here we describe a VB scheme that approximates the zero mean joint spatial prior with a non-zero mean empirical prior that factors over voxels, thereby overcoming this problem. We do this by modifying the original VB algorithm of Penny et al. using the conditional form of a so-called conditional autoregressive (CAR) prior to update a marginal prior over voxels. We refer to this as a spatially-informed voxel-wise prior (SVP) and use them to spatially regularise general linear model (GLM) and autoregressive (AR) coefficients (over time to model serial correlations). This algorithm scales more favourably with the number of voxels providing a truly 3D spatiotemporal model over volumes containing tens of thousands of voxels. We compare the scaling of compute times with the number of voxels and performance with a joint prior applied to synthetic and single-subject data. PMID:20026230

  4. ANALYSIS AND VISUALIZATION OF LARGE SET OF UNORGANIZED DATA POINTS USING THE DISTANCE FUNCTION

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Hongkai

    ANALYSIS AND VISUALIZATION OF LARGE SET OF UNORGANIZED DATA POINTS USING THE DISTANCE FUNCTION. Introduction. EÆcient algorithms for analysis, processing and visualization of large data sets of un- organized points are very important in computer visualization, data mining, range data analysis, biomedical imaging

  5. Adaptive, multiresolution visualization of large data sets using a distributed memory octree

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lori A. Freitag; Raymond M. Loy

    1999-01-01

    The interactive visualization and exploration of large scientific data sets is a challenging and difficult task; their size often far exceeds the performance and memory capacity of even the most powerful graphics workstations. To address this problem, we have created a technique that combines hierarchical data re- duction methods with parallel computing to allow interactive exploration of large data sets

  6. Adaptive, Multiresolution Visualization of Large Data Sets using a Distributed Memory Octree

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lori A. Freitag; Raymond M. Loy

    1999-01-01

    The interactive visualization and exploration of large scientific data sets is a challenging and difficult task; their size often far exceeds the performance and memory capacity of even the most powerful graphics workstations. To address this problem, we have created a technique that combines hierarchical data reduction methods with parallel computing to allow interactive exploration of large data sets while

  7. Flag Manifolds for the Characterization of Geometric Structure in Large Data Sets

    E-print Network

    Draper, Bruce A.

    Flag Manifolds for the Characterization of Geometric Structure in Large Data Sets T. Marrinan, J. R@math.colostate.edu Abstract. We propose a flag manifold representation as a framework for exposing geometric structure in a large data set. We illustrate the approach by building pose flags for pose identification in digital

  8. Analyzing large free-response qualitative data sets — a novel quantitative-qualitative hybrid approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer Light; Ken Yasuhara

    2008-01-01

    Qualitative analysis tends to be unwieldy for large data sets yet is an indispensable tool for understanding how and why phenomena occur. Consequently, the goal of this study was to develop a method that is credible yet economical for large, specific, qualitative data sets. The strength of our hybrid, qualitative-quantitative method comes from using automated text analysis techniques to focus

  9. Science in the Classroom: Finding a Balance between Autonomous Exploration and Teacher-Led Instruction in Preschool Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayfeld, Irena; Brenneman, Kimberly; Gelman, Rochel

    2011-01-01

    Research Findings: This paper reports on children's use of science materials in preschool classrooms during their free choice time. Baseline observations showed that children and teachers rarely spend time in the designated science area. An intervention was designed to "market" the science center by introducing children to 1 science tool, the…

  10. Science in the Classroom: Finding a Balance Between Autonomous Exploration and Teacher-Led Instruction in Preschool Settings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Irena Nayfeld; Kimberly Brenneman; Rochel Gelman

    2011-01-01

    Research Findings: This paper reports on children's use of science materials in preschool classrooms during their free choice time. Baseline observations showed that children and teachers rarely spend time in the designated science area. An intervention was designed to “market” the science center by introducing children to 1 science tool, the balance scale. Baseline measures showed that children did not

  11. An Analogous Study of Children's Attitudes Toward School in an Open Classroom Environment as Opposed to a Conventional Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeli, Doris Conti

    A study sought to determine whether intermediate age children exposed to open classroom teaching strategy have a more positive attitude toward school than intermediate age children exposed to conventional teaching strategy. The hypothesis was that there would be no significant difference in attitude between the two groups. The study was limited to…

  12. Classroom-Based Interventions and Teachers' Perceived Job Stressors and Confidence: Evidence from a Randomized Trial in Head Start Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhai, Fuhua; Raver, C. Cybele; Li-Grining, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Preschool teachers' job stressors have received increasing attention but have been understudied in the literature. We investigated the impacts of a classroom-based intervention, the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP), on teachers' perceived job stressors and confidence, as indexed by their perceptions of job control, job resources, job…

  13. Genomes & Developmental Control Defining a large set of full-length clones from a

    E-print Network

    Amaya, Enrique

    Genomes & Developmental Control Defining a large set of full-length clones from a Xenopus,000 clusters and 16,000 singletons. Furthermore, we developed a computational method to identify clones of approximately 7000 such clones, the full-length (FL) clone set. The entire EST set is cloned in a eukaryotic

  14. Issues in Estimating Program Effects and Studying Implementation in Large-Scale Educational Experiments: The Case of a Connected Classroom Technology Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Hye Sook

    2009-01-01

    Using data from a nationwide, large-scale experimental study of the effects of a connected classroom technology on student learning in algebra (Owens et al., 2004), this dissertation focuses on challenges that can arise in estimating treatment effects in educational field experiments when samples are highly heterogeneous in terms of various…

  15. An Evaluation of the Developmental Designs Approach and Professional Development Model on Classroom Management in 22 Middle Schools in a Large, Midwestern School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hough, David L.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents findings from an evaluation of the Developmental Designs classroom management approach and professional development model during its first year of implementation across 22 middle schools in a large, Midwestern school district. The impact of this professional development model on teaching and learning as related to participants'…

  16. Listserv Lemmings and Fly-brarians on the Wall: A Librarian-Instructor Team Taming the Cyberbeast in the Large Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickstein, Ruth; McBride, Kari Boyd

    1998-01-01

    Computer technology can empower students if they have the tools to find their way through print and online sources. This article describes how a reference librarian and a faculty instructor collaborated to teach research strategies and critical thinking skills (including analysis and evaluation of resources) in a large university classroom using a…

  17. PORTAAL: A Classroom Observation Tool Assessing Evidence-Based Teaching Practices for Active Learning in Large Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Classes.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Sarah L; Converse, Mercedes; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that active learning works better than a completely passive lecture. Despite this evidence, adoption of these evidence-based teaching practices remains low. In this paper, we offer one tool to help faculty members implement active learning. This tool identifies 21 readily implemented elements that have been shown to increase student outcomes related to achievement, logic development, or other relevant learning goals with college-age students. Thus, this tool both clarifies the research-supported elements of best practices for instructor implementation of active learning in the classroom setting and measures instructors' alignment with these practices. We describe how we reviewed the discipline-based education research literature to identify best practices in active learning for adult learners in the classroom and used these results to develop an observation tool (Practical Observation Rubric To Assess Active Learning, or PORTAAL) that documents the extent to which instructors incorporate these practices into their classrooms. We then use PORTAAL to explore the classroom practices of 25 introductory biology instructors who employ some form of active learning. Overall, PORTAAL documents how well aligned classrooms are with research-supported best practices for active learning and provides specific feedback and guidance to instructors to allow them to identify what they do well and what could be improved. PMID:26033871

  18. PORTAAL: A Classroom Observation Tool Assessing Evidence-Based Teaching Practices for Active Learning in Large Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Classes

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Sarah L.; Converse, Mercedes; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that active learning works better than a completely passive lecture. Despite this evidence, adoption of these evidence-based teaching practices remains low. In this paper, we offer one tool to help faculty members implement active learning. This tool identifies 21 readily implemented elements that have been shown to increase student outcomes related to achievement, logic development, or other relevant learning goals with college-age students. Thus, this tool both clarifies the research-supported elements of best practices for instructor implementation of active learning in the classroom setting and measures instructors’ alignment with these practices. We describe how we reviewed the discipline-based education research literature to identify best practices in active learning for adult learners in the classroom and used these results to develop an observation tool (Practical Observation Rubric To Assess Active Learning, or PORTAAL) that documents the extent to which instructors incorporate these practices into their classrooms. We then use PORTAAL to explore the classroom practices of 25 introductory biology instructors who employ some form of active learning. Overall, PORTAAL documents how well aligned classrooms are with research-supported best practices for active learning and provides specific feedback and guidance to instructors to allow them to identify what they do well and what could be improved. PMID:26033871

  19. A Case Study Examination of Culturally Relevant Pedagogical Practices for English Language Learners in a Pre-Kindergarten Classroom Setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa Anne Matthews

    2010-01-01

    Presently, over five million English-language learners (ELLs) are being educated in U.S. schools, and by the year 2020, more than half of the public school system population in the U.S. will be from families whose native language is not English (National Center for Educational Statistics, 2005). Culturally relevant pedagogy (CRP) (Ladson-Billings, 1995) provides a framework for classroom teachers to meet

  20. Classroom-based Interventions and Teachers' Perceived Job Stressors and Confidence: Evidence from a Randomized Trial in Head Start Settings.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Fuhua; Raver, C Cybele; Li-Grining, Christine

    2011-09-01

    Preschool teachers' job stressors have received increasing attention but have been understudied in the literature. We investigated the impacts of a classroom-based intervention, the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP), on teachers' perceived job stressors and confidence, as indexed by their perceptions of job control, job resources, job demands, and confidence in behavior management. Using a clustered randomized controlled trial (RCT) design, the CSRP provided multifaceted services to the treatment group, including teacher training and mental health consultation, which were accompanied by stress-reduction services and workshops. Overall, 90 teachers in 35 classrooms at 18 Head Start sites participated in the study. After adjusting for teacher and classroom factors and site fixed effects, we found that the CSRP had significant effects on the improvement of teachers' perceived job control and work-related resources. We also found that the CSRP decreased teachers' confidence in behavior management and had no statistically significant effects on job demands. Overall, we did not find significant moderation effects of teacher race/ethnicity, education, teaching experience, or teacher type. The implications for research and policy are discussed. PMID:21927538

  1. Redefining the Ojibwe Classroom: Indigenous Language Programs within Large Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Mindy J.

    2005-01-01

    Indigenous languages are powerful symbols of self-determination and sovereignty for tribal communities in the United States, and many community-based programs have been developed to support and maintain them. The successes of these programs, however, have been difficult to replicate at large research institutions. This article examines the issues…

  2. Taking Energy to the Physics Classroom from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, the greatest experiment in history began. When in full operation, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate the greatest amount of information that has ever been produced in an experiment before. It will also reveal some of the most fundamental secrets of nature. Despite the enormous amount of information available on this…

  3. Large Atomic Natural Orbital Basis Sets for the First Transition Row Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Large atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets are tabulated for the Sc to Cu. The primitive sets are taken from the large sets optimized by Partridge, namely (21s 13p 8d) for Sc and Ti and (20s 12p 9d) for V to Cu. These primitive sets are supplemented with three p, one d, six f, and four g functions. The ANO sets are derived from configuration interaction density matrices constructed as the average of the lowest states derived from the 3d(sup n)4s(sup 2) and 3d(sup n+1)4s(sup 1) occupations. For Ni, the 1S(3d(sup 10)) state is included in the averaging. The choice of basis sets for molecular calculations is discussed.

  4. An Examination of Classroom Social Environment on Motivation and Engagement of College Early Entrant Honors Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddox, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    This study set out to examine the relationships between the classroom social environment, motivation, engagement and achievement of a group of early entrant Honors students at a large urban university. Prior research on the classroom environment, motivation, engagement and high ability students was examined, leading to the assumption that the…

  5. Techniques and Tools for Effective Collaboration with Large Model Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Signell

    2006-01-01

    In coastal marine environmental modeling, it is common to have multiple models from various investigators and\\/or institutions running with different grids and utilizing a variety of data sets collected on multiple space and time scales. Techniques and tools are described for delivery of results from large multidimensional data sets, such as those from meteorological and oceanographic models, directly into generic

  6. Out-of-core assessment of clustering tendency for large data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Malay K. Pakhira

    2010-01-01

    Determining the number of clusters present in a data set automatically is a very important problem. Conventional clustering techniques assume a certain number of clusters, and then try to find out the possible cluster structure associated to the above number. For very large and complex data sets it is not easy to guess this number of clusters. There exists validity

  7. DARE: A Multidimensional Environment For Visualizing Large Set of Medical Data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giuseppe Santucci; Tiziana Catarci

    2002-01-01

    We deal with the problem of automatic visualization of a large set of medical data and propose a framework that addresses the involved issues. Our approach does not depend on the particular data under analysis and its aim is to produce a highly effective visual representation. Such objective is made possible by the consistency of a set of logic rules

  8. Information Visualization, Nonlinear Dimensionality Reduction and Sampling for Large and Complex Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Meyer Z. Pesenson; I. Z. Pesenson; B. McCollum

    2010-01-01

    Recent and forthcoming increases in the amount and complexity of astronomy data are creating data sets that are not amenable to the methods of analysis with which astronomers are familiar. Traditional methods are often inadequate not merely because the data sets are too large and too complex to fully be analyzed \\

  9. Reduction of Large Training Set by Guided Progressive Sampling: Application to Neonatal Intensive Care Data

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    of this method to neonatal intensive care data shows that it is possible to reduce a training set to a thirdReduction of Large Training Set by Guided Progressive Sampling: Application to Neonatal Intensive Care Data François Portet1 , Feng Gao1 , Jim Hunter1 and René Quiniou2 1 Department of Computing

  10. Introduction to Statistical Methods to Analyze Large Data Sets: Principal Components Analysis

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Neil R. Clark (New York; Mount Sinai School of Medicine REV)

    2011-09-13

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes, slides, and a problem set for a series of lectures from a course entitled “Systems Biology: Biomedical Modeling.” The materials are a lecture introducing the mathematical concepts behind principal components analysis (PCA). The lecture describes how to handle large data sets with correlation methods and unsupervised clustering with this popular method of analysis, PCA.

  11. Evaluation in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becnel, Shirley

    Six classroom research-based instructional projects funded under Chapter 2 are described, and their outcomes are summarized. The projects each used computer hardware and software in the classroom setting. The projects and their salient points include: (1) the Science Technology Project, in which 48 teachers and 2,847 students in 18 schools used…

  12. Classroom Assessment in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shermis, Mark D.; DiVesta, Francis J.

    2011-01-01

    "Classroom Assessment in Action" clarifies the multi-faceted roles of measurement and assessment and their applications in a classroom setting. Comprehensive in scope, Shermis and Di Vesta explain basic measurement concepts and show students how to interpret the results of standardized tests. From these basic concepts, the authors then provide…

  13. Interactive Web-Based Map: Applications to Large Data Sets in the Geosciences. Interactive Web-Based Map: Applications to Large Data Sets in the Geosciences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. A. Garbow; N. R. Olson; D. A. Yuen; J. M. Boggs

    2001-01-01

    Current advances in computer hardware, information technology and data collection techniques have produced very large data sets, sometimes more than terabytes,in a wide variety of scientific and engineering disciplines. We must harness this opportunity to visualize and extract useful information from geophysical and geological data. We have taken the task of data-mining by using a map-like approach over the web

  14. An interactive environment for the analysis of large Earth observation and model data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kenneth P.; Walsh, John E.; Wilhelmson, Robert B.

    1993-01-01

    We propose to develop an interactive environment for the analysis of large Earth science observation and model data sets. We will use a standard scientific data storage format and a large capacity (greater than 20 GB) optical disk system for data management; develop libraries for coordinate transformation and regridding of data sets; modify the NCSA X Image and X DataSlice software for typical Earth observation data sets by including map transformations and missing data handling; develop analysis tools for common mathematical and statistical operations; integrate the components described above into a system for the analysis and comparison of observations and model results; and distribute software and documentation to the scientific community.

  15. An interactive environment for the analysis of large Earth observation and model data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kenneth P.; Walsh, John E.; Wilhelmson, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    We propose to develop an interactive environment for the analysis of large Earth science observation and model data sets. We will use a standard scientific data storage format and a large capacity (greater than 20 GB) optical disk system for data management; develop libraries for coordinate transformation and regridding of data sets; modify the NCSA X Image and X Data Slice software for typical Earth observation data sets by including map transformations and missing data handling; develop analysis tools for common mathematical and statistical operations; integrate the components described above into a system for the analysis and comparison of observations and model results; and distribute software and documentation to the scientific community.

  16. Evaluating Knowledge Transfer and Zero-Shot Learning in a Large-Scale Setting Marcus Rohrbach Michael Stark Bernt Schiele

    E-print Network

    Evaluating Knowledge Transfer and Zero-Shot Learning in a Large-Scale Setting Marcus Rohrbach.r.t. scalability we thus advocate to eval- uate KT in a large-scale setting. To this end, we provide an extensive evaluation of three popular approaches to KT on a recently proposed large-scale data set, the ImageNet Large

  17. Using desktop graphics workstations for interactive remote exploration of large data sets

    SciTech Connect

    Freitag, L. A.; Loy, R. M.

    2000-05-09

    The interactive visualization and exploration of large scientific data sets is a challenging and difficult task; their size often far exceeds the performance and memory capacity of even the most powerful graphics workstations. To address this problem, we have created a technique that combines multiresolution data reduction methods with parallel computing to allow interactive exploration of large data sets while retaining full-resolution capability. We describe the creation of reduced data sets using several different criteria including user-specified error bounds or a preset performance criterion. We discuss the software architecture of the system with particular emphasis on the algorithms used to efficiently create a reduced data set and the software used to communicate between the remote data reduction server and the local graphics client. We present performance results for the visualization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability and hairpin vortex data sets.

  18. Confirming the Phylogeny of Mammals by Use of Large Comparative Sequence Data Sets

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Arjun B.; Allard, Marc W.

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing generation of prodigious amounts of genomic sequence data from myriad vertebrates is providing unparalleled opportunities for establishing definitive phylogenetic relationships among species. The size and complexities of such comparative sequence data sets not only allow smaller and more difficult branches to be resolved but also present unique challenges, including large computational requirements and the negative consequences of systematic biases. To explore these issues and to clarify the phylogenetic relationships among mammals, we have analyzed a large data set of over 60 megabase pairs (Mb) of high-quality genomic sequence, which we generated from 41 mammals and 3 other vertebrates. All sequences are orthologous to a 1.9-Mb region of the human genome that encompasses the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR). To understand the characteristics and challenges associated with phylogenetic analyses of such a large data set, we partitioned the sequence data in several ways and utilized maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Neighbor-Joining algorithms, implemented in parallel on Linux clusters. These studies yielded well-supported phylogenetic trees, largely confirming other recent molecular phylogenetic analyses. Our results provide support for rooting the placental mammal tree between Atlantogenata (Xenarthra and Afrotheria) and Boreoeutheria (Euarchontoglires and Laurasiatheria), illustrate the difficulty in resolving some branches even with large amounts of data (e.g., in the case of Laurasiatheria), and demonstrate the valuable role that very large comparative sequence data sets can play in refining our understanding of the evolutionary relationships of vertebrates. PMID:18453548

  19. Supporting Classroom Activities with the BSUL System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroaki Ogata; Nobuji A. Saito; Rosa G. J. Paredes; Gerardo Ayala San Martin; Yoneo Yano

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the integration of ubiquitous computing systems into classroom settings, in order to provide basic support for classrooms and field activities. We have developed web application components using Java technology and configured a classroom with wireless network access and a web camera for our purposes. In this classroom, the students interact among each other and with the professor

  20. Supporting Classroom Activities with the BSUL System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Saito, Nobuji A.; Paredes J., Rosa G.; San Martin, Gerardo Ayala; Yano, Yoneo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the integration of ubiquitous computing systems into classroom settings, in order to provide basic support for classrooms and field activities. We have developed web application components using Java technology and configured a classroom with wireless network access and a web camera for our purposes. In this classroom, the…

  1. Engaged: Making Large Classes Feel Small through Blended Learning Instructional Strategies that Promote Increased Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Raymond W.

    2012-01-01

    It is not enough to be great at sharing information in a large classroom setting. To be an effective teacher you must be able to meaningfully engage your students with their peers and with the content. And you must do this regardless of class size or content. The issues of teaching effectively in large classroom settings have presented ongoing…

  2. Operational Aspects of Dealing with the Large BaBar Data Set

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tofigh Azemoon; Adil Hasan; Wilko Kroeger; Artem Trunov

    2003-01-01

    To date, the BaBar experiment has stored over 0.7PB of data in an Objectivity\\/DB database. Approximately half this data-set comprises simulated data of which more than 70% has been produced at more than 20 collaborating institutes outside of SLAC. The operational aspects of managing such a large data set and providing access to the physicists in a timely manner is

  3. Visual Clustering of Multidimensional and Large Data Sets Using Parallel Environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jan Blasiak; Witold Dzwinel

    1998-01-01

    A method for visual clustering of large N-dimensional data sets is presented briefly. Its implementation on HP\\/Convex SPP\\/1600 enables visualization of data sets consisting of more than 104 multidimensional data vectors. The method was tested in PVM, MPI and data parallel environments. In the paper, the authors compare the parallel algorithm performance for these three interfaces. The results of tests,

  4. Computing Steerable Principal Components of a Large Set of Images and Their Rotations

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, Colin; Singer, Amit

    2013-01-01

    We present here an efficient algorithm to compute the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of a large image set consisting of images and, for each image, the set of its uniform rotations in the plane. We do this by pointing out the block circulant structure of the covariance matrix and utilizing that structure to compute its eigenvectors. We also demonstrate the advantages of this algorithm over similar ones with numerical experiments. Although it is useful in many settings, we illustrate the specific application of the algorithm to the problem of cryo-electron microscopy. PMID:21536533

  5. Cloud Computing Service for Managing Large Medical Image Data-Sets Using Balanced Collaborative Agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raúl Alonso-Calvo; José Crespo; Victor Maojo; Alberto Muñoz; Miguel García-Remesal; David Pérez-Rey

    2011-01-01

    \\u000a Managing large medical image collections is an increasingly demanding important issue in many hospitals and other medical\\u000a settings. A huge amount of this information is daily generated, which requires robust and agile systems. In this paper we\\u000a present a distributed multi-agent system capable of managing very large medical image datasets. In this approach, agents extract\\u000a low-level information from images and

  6. Analysis of Large-Scale mRNA Expression Data Sets by Genetic Algorithms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chia Huey Ooi; Patrick Tan

    DNA microarray experiments typically produce large-scale data sets comprising thousands of mRNA expression values measured\\u000a across multiple biological samples. A common problem in the analysis of this data is the ‘curse of dimensionality’, where\\u000a the number of available samples is often insufficient for reliable analysis due to the large number of individual measurements\\u000a made per sample. Genetic algorithms (GAs) are

  7. Secondary Data Analysis of Large Data Sets in Urology: Successes and Errors to Avoid

    PubMed Central

    Schlomer, Bruce J.; Copp, Hillary L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Secondary data analysis is the use of data collected for research by someone other than the investigator. In the last several years there has been a dramatic increase in the number of these studies being published in urological journals and presented at urological meetings, especially involving secondary data analysis of large administrative data sets. Along with this expansion, skepticism for secondary data analysis studies has increased for many urologists. Materials and Methods In this narrative review we discuss the types of large data sets that are commonly used for secondary data analysis in urology, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of secondary data analysis. A literature search was performed to identify urological secondary data analysis studies published since 2008 using commonly used large data sets, and examples of high quality studies published in high impact journals are given. We outline an approach for performing a successful hypothesis or goal driven secondary data analysis study and highlight common errors to avoid. Results More than 350 secondary data analysis studies using large data sets have been published on urological topics since 2008 with likely many more studies presented at meetings but never published. Nonhypothesis or goal driven studies have likely constituted some of these studies and have probably contributed to the increased skepticism of this type of research. However, many high quality, hypothesis driven studies addressing research questions that would have been difficult to conduct with other methods have been performed in the last few years. Conclusions Secondary data analysis is a powerful tool that can address questions which could not be adequately studied by another method. Knowledge of the limitations of secondary data analysis and of the data sets used is critical for a successful study. There are also important errors to avoid when planning and performing a secondary data analysis study. Investigators and the urological community need to strive to use secondary data analysis of large data sets appropriately to produce high quality studies that hopefully lead to improved patient outcomes. PMID:24140846

  8. Using Content-Specific Lyrics to Familiar Tunes in a Large Lecture Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLachlin, Derek T.

    2009-01-01

    Music can be used in lectures to increase student engagement and help students retain information. In this paper, I describe my use of biochemistry-related lyrics written to the tune of the theme to the television show, The Flintstones, in a large class setting (400-800 students). To determine student perceptions, the class was surveyed several…

  9. A technique for moving large data sets over high-performance long distance networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bradley W. Settlemyer; Jonathan D. Dobson; Stephen W. Hodson; Jeffery A. Kuehn; Stephen W. Poole; Thomas M. Ruwart

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we look at the performance character- istics of three tools used to move large data sets over dedicated long distance networking infrastructure. Although performance studies of wide area networks have been a frequent topic of interest, performance analyses have tended to focus on network latency characteristics and peak throughput using network traffic generators. In this study we

  10. Making SVMs Scalable to Large Data Sets using Hierarchical Cluster Indexing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hwanjo Yu; Jiong Yang; Jiawei Han; Xiaolei Li

    2005-01-01

    Support vector machines (SVMs) have been promising methods for classification and regression analysis due to their solid mathematical foundations, which include two desirable properties: margin maximization and nonlinear classification using kernels. However, despite these prominent properties, SVMs are usually not chosen for large-scale data mining problems because their training complexity is highly dependent on the data set size. Unlike traditional

  11. Comparison of Remote Visualization Strategies for Interactive Exploration of Large Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lori A. Freitag; Raymond M. Loy

    2001-01-01

    We compare three remote visualization strategies used for i n- teractive exploration of large data sets: image-based rend er- ing, parallel visualization servers, and subsampling. We r eview each strategy and provide details for an adaptive multireso lu- tion subsampling technique that we have developed. To deter - mine the problem regimes for which each approach is most cost effective,

  12. A Computational Framework for Nonlinear Dimensionality Reduction of Large Data Sets: The Exploratory Inspection Machine (XIM)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Axel Wismüller

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel computational framework for nonlinear dimensionality reduction which is specifically suited to process large data sets: the Exploratory Inspection Machine (XIM). XIM introduces a conceptual cross-link between hitherto separate domains of machine learning, namely topographic vector quantization and divergence-based neighbor embedding approaches. There are three ways to conceptualize XIM, namely (i) as the inversion

  13. Comparison of remote visualization strategies for interactive exploration of large data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. A. Freitag; R. M. Loy

    2000-01-01

    We compare three remote visualization strategies used for interactive exploration of large data sets: image-based rendering, parallel visualization servers, and subsampling. We review each strategy and provide details for an adaptive multiresolution subsampling technique that we have developed. To determine the problem regimes for which each approach is most cost effective, we develop performance models to analyze the costs of

  14. bigVAT: Visual assessment of cluster tendency for large data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacalyn M. Huband; James C. Bezdek; Richard J. Hathaway

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of clustering tendency is an important first step in cluster analysis. One tool for assessing cluster tendency is the Visual Assessment of Tendency (VAT) algorithm. VAT produces an image matrix that can be used for visual assessment of cluster tendency in either relational or object data. However, VAT becomes intractable for large data sets. The revised VAT (reVAT) algorithm

  15. Small Group Collaboration in the Large Lecture Setting: Collaborative Process, Pedagogical Paradigms, and Institutional Constraints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalchik, Vera; Schaeffer, Evonne; Tovar, Lawrence; Steinbeck, Reinhold; Bhargava, Tina; Kerns, Charles; Engel, Claudia; Levtov, Ruti

    This paper focuses on some of the key issues involved in implementing a collaborative design project in the setting of the large undergraduate lecture course at a major research university, offering a preliminary analysis of the assignment mainly as a function of how students managed and interpreted it. The collaborative design project was…

  16. TQuEST: Threshold Query Execution for Large Sets of Time Series

    E-print Network

    Kriegel, Hans-Peter

    TQuEST: Threshold Query Execution for Large Sets of Time Series Johannes Aßfalg, Hans-Peter Kriegel data mining in time series databases is essential in many application domains as for instance dependencies between time series are of capital importance for these applications. In this paper, we present

  17. A Wavelet Toolkit for Visualization and Analysis of Large Data Sets In Earthquake Research

    E-print Network

    Erlebacher, Gordon

    A Wavelet Toolkit for Visualization and Analysis of Large Data Sets In Earthquake Research G in earthquake physics and other nonlinear problems in the solid earth geosciences. Keywords: wavelets, visualization, grid computing, collaboration, web-based maps, earthquakes 1 Introduction As in many other fields

  18. Preschoolers' Nonsymbolic Arithmetic with Large Sets: Is Addition More Accurate than Subtraction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinskey, Jeanne L.; Chan, Cindy Ho-man; Coleman, Rhea; Moxom, Lauren; Yamamoto, Eri

    2009-01-01

    Adult and developing humans share with other animals analog magnitude representations of number that support nonsymbolic arithmetic with large sets. This experiment tested the hypothesis that such representations may be more accurate for addition than for subtraction in children as young as 3 1/2 years of age. In these tasks, the experimenter hid…

  19. Promoting a Culture of Reflection in Teacher Education: The Challenge of Large Lecture Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Marie

    2011-01-01

    The promotion of reflective practice, while widely advocated in higher education settings, nonetheless presents numerous challenges. This is an under-researched aspect of the discourse on reflective practice. A key challenge for those working in the field of teacher education within higher education is to promote a culture of refection in large

  20. DocCube: Multi-Dimensional Visualization and Exploration of Large Document Sets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mothe, Josiane; Chrisment, Claude; Dousset, Bernard; Alaux, Joel

    2003-01-01

    Describes a user interface that provides global visualizations of large document sets to help users formulate the query that corresponds to their information needs. Highlights include concept hierarchies that users can browse to specify and refine information needs; knowledge discovery in databases and texts; and multidimensional modeling.…

  1. Answering Approximate String Queries on Large Data Sets Using External Memory

    E-print Network

    Li, Chen

    Answering Approximate String Queries on Large Data Sets Using External Memory Alexander Behm1@ics.uci.edu, 2 chenli@ics.uci.edu, 3 mjcarey@ics.uci.edu Abstract-- An approximate string query is to find from a collection of strings those that are similar to a given query string. Answering such queries is important

  2. Options in Education, Transcript for February 16, 1976: National Commitment to Equal Rights & Equal Educational Opportunity, Racial Conflict in the Classroom, Setting Up a Publishing Business, and Women in Education (Mathematics and Sex).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Inst. for Educational Leadership.

    "Options in Education" is a radio news program which focuses on issues and developments in education. This transcript contains discussions of the national commitment to desegregated education, racial conflict in the classroom, learning how to set up a publishing business, women in education (mathematics and sex) and education news highlights.…

  3. The Impact of Mobile Learning on Students' Learning Behaviours and Performance: Report from a Large Blended Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Minjuan; Shen, Ruimin; Novak, Daniel; Pan, Xiaoyan

    2009-01-01

    Chinese classrooms, whether on school grounds or online, have long suffered from a lack of interactivity. Many online classes simply provide recorded instructor lectures, which only reinforces the negative effects of passive nonparticipatory learning. At Shanghai Jiaotong University, researchers and developers actively seek technologic…

  4. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: Parallel Analysis Tools and New Visualization Techniques for Ultra-Large Climate Data Set

    SciTech Connect

    middleton, Don [Co-PI; Haley, Mary

    2014-12-10

    ParVis was a project funded under LAB 10-05: “Earth System Modeling: Advanced Scientific Visualization of Ultra-Large Climate Data Sets”. Argonne was the lead lab with partners at PNNL, SNL, NCAR and UC-Davis. This report covers progress from January 1st, 2013 through Dec 1st, 2014. Two previous reports covered the period from Summer, 2010, through September 2011 and October 2011 through December 2012, respectively. While the project was originally planned to end on April 30, 2013, personnel and priority changes allowed many of the institutions to continue work through FY14 using existing funds. A primary focus of ParVis was introducing parallelism to climate model analysis to greatly reduce the time-to-visualization for ultra-large climate data sets. Work in the first two years was conducted on two tracks with different time horizons: one track to provide immediate help to climate scientists already struggling to apply their analysis to existing large data sets and another focused on building a new data-parallel library and tool for climate analysis and visualization that will give the field a platform for performing analysis and visualization on ultra-large datasets for the foreseeable future. In the final 2 years of the project, we focused mostly on the new data-parallel library and associated tools for climate analysis and visualization.

  5. An Analysis Framework Addressing the Scale and Legibility of Large Scientific Data Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, H R

    2006-11-20

    Much of the previous work in the large data visualization area has solely focused on handling the scale of the data. This task is clearly a great challenge and necessary, but it is not sufficient. Applying standard visualization techniques to large scale data sets often creates complicated pictures where meaningful trends are lost. A second challenge, then, is to also provide algorithms that simplify what an analyst must understand, using either visual or quantitative means. This challenge can be summarized as improving the legibility or reducing the complexity of massive data sets. Fully meeting both of these challenges is the work of many, many PhD dissertations. In this dissertation, we describe some new techniques to address both the scale and legibility challenges, in hope of contributing to the larger solution. In addition to our assumption of simultaneously addressing both scale and legibility, we add an additional requirement that the solutions considered fit well within an interoperable framework for diverse algorithms, because a large suite of algorithms is often necessary to fully understand complex data sets. For scale, we present a general architecture for handling large data, as well as details of a contract-based system for integrating advanced optimizations into a data flow network design. We also describe techniques for volume rendering and performing comparisons at the extreme scale. For legibility, we present several techniques. Most noteworthy are equivalence class functions, a technique to drive visualizations using statistical methods, and line-scan based techniques for characterizing shape.

  6. A Complementary Graphical Method for Reducing and Analyzing Large Data Sets*

    PubMed Central

    Jing, X.; Cimino, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives Graphical displays can make data more understandable; however, large graphs can challenge human comprehension. We have previously described a filtering method to provide high-level summary views of large data sets. In this paper we demonstrate our method for setting and selecting thresholds to limit graph size while retaining important information by applying it to large single and paired data sets, taken from patient and bibliographic databases. Methods Four case studies are used to illustrate our method. The data are either patient discharge diagnoses (coded using the International Classification of Diseases, Clinical Modifications [ICD9-CM]) or Medline citations (coded using the Medical Subject Headings [MeSH]). We use combinations of different thresholds to obtain filtered graphs for detailed analysis. The thresholds setting and selection, such as thresholds for node counts, class counts, ratio values, p values (for diff data sets), and percentiles of selected class count thresholds, are demonstrated with details in case studies. The main steps include: data preparation, data manipulation, computation, and threshold selection and visualization. We also describe the data models for different types of thresholds and the considerations for thresholds selection. Results The filtered graphs are 1%-3% of the size of the original graphs. For our case studies, the graphs provide 1) the most heavily used ICD9-CM codes, 2) the codes with most patients in a research hospital in 2011, 3) a profile of publications on “heavily represented topics” in MEDLINE in 2011, and 4) validated knowledge about adverse effects of the medication of rosiglitazone and new interesting areas in the ICD9-CM hierarchy associated with patients taking the medication of pioglitazone. Conclusions Our filtering method reduces large graphs to a manageable size by removing relatively unimportant nodes. The graphical method provides summary views based on computation of usage frequency and semantic context of hierarchical terminology. The method is applicable to large data sets (such as a hundred thousand records or more) and can be used to generate new hypotheses from data sets coded with hierarchical terminologies. PMID:24727931

  7. Validating a large geophysical data set: Experiences with satellite-derived cloud parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Haskins, Robert D.; Knighton, James E.; Pursch, Andrew; Granger-Gallegos, Stephanie

    1992-01-01

    We are validating the global cloud parameters derived from the satellite-borne HIRS2 and MSU atmospheric sounding instrument measurements, and are using the analysis of these data as one prototype for studying large geophysical data sets in general. The HIRS2/MSU data set contains a total of 40 physical parameters, filling 25 MB/day; raw HIRS2/MSU data are available for a period exceeding 10 years. Validation involves developing a quantitative sense for the physical meaning of the derived parameters over the range of environmental conditions sampled. This is accomplished by comparing the spatial and temporal distributions of the derived quantities with similar measurements made using other techniques, and with model results. The data handling needed for this work is possible only with the help of a suite of interactive graphical and numerical analysis tools. Level 3 (gridded) data is the common form in which large data sets of this type are distributed for scientific analysis. We find that Level 3 data is inadequate for the data comparisons required for validation. Level 2 data (individual measurements in geophysical units) is needed. A sampling problem arises when individual measurements, which are not uniformly distributed in space or time, are used for the comparisons. Standard 'interpolation' methods involve fitting the measurements for each data set to surfaces, which are then compared. We are experimenting with formal criteria for selecting geographical regions, based upon the spatial frequency and variability of measurements, that allow us to quantify the uncertainty due to sampling. As part of this project, we are also dealing with ways to keep track of constraints placed on the output by assumptions made in the computer code. The need to work with Level 2 data introduces a number of other data handling issues, such as accessing data files across machine types, meeting large data storage requirements, accessing other validated data sets, processing speed and throughput for interactive graphical work, and problems relating to graphical interfaces.

  8. Data for the Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Data for the Classroom collection gathers datasets that have accompanying instructional materials or other pertinent information for using the dataset in a classroom setting for grades K-16. The data may be numerical, visual, maps, charts, tables or images. The data may be observational, remotely sensed or model data. The primary component is that there are materials supporting the use and understanding of the data either by educators or directly by students. Additionally, the dataset itself is desribed.

  9. A Lagrangian-based heuristic for large-scale set covering problems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sebastifin Ceria; Paolo Nobili; Antonio Sassano

    1998-01-01

    We present a new Lagrangian-based heuristic for solving large-scale set-covering problems arising from crew-scheduling at the Italian Railways (Ferrovie dello Stato). Our heuristic obtained impressive results when compared to state-of-the-art codes on a test-bed provided by the company, which includes instances with sizes ranging from 50,000 variables and 500 constraints to 1,000,000 variables and 5000 constraints. © 1998 The Mathematical

  10. Development of Graphical Indices for Displaying Large Scale Building Energy Data Sets 

    E-print Network

    Abbas, M.; Haberl, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    DEVELOPMENT OF GRAPHICAL INDICES FOR DISPLAYING LARGE SCALE BUILDING ENERGY DATA SETS Mustafa Abbas Jeff Haberl Research Associate Assistant Professor Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University, College Station, TX ABSTRACT Graphs... in Abbas (1993). GRAPHICAL INDICES OF BUILDING ENERGY DATA In this section the graphical indices that have been developed by Abbas (1993) are used to analyze building energy consumption data. The graphical indices are further enhanced with widely used...

  11. Evolutionary mining for multivariate associations in large time-varying data sets: a healthcare network application

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Narine Manukyan; Margaret J. Eppstein; Jeffrey D. Horbar; Kathleen A. Leahy; Michael J. Kenny; Shreya Mukherjee; Donna M. Rizzo

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new method for exploratory analysis of large data sets with time-varying features, where the aim is to automatically discover novel relationships between features (over some time period) that are predictive of any of a number of time-varying outcomes (over some other time period). Using a genetic algorithm, we co-evolve (i) a subset of predictive features, (ii) which

  12. OpenGL volumizer: a toolkit for high quality volume rendering of large data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Bhanirantka; Yves Demange

    2002-01-01

    We present the OpenGL Volumizer API for interactive, high-quality, scalable visualization of large volumetric data sets. Volumizer provides a high-level interface to OpenGL hardware to allow application writers and researchers to visualize multiple gigabytes of volumetric data. Use of multiple graphics pipes scales rendering performance and system resources including pixel-fill rate and texture memory size. Volume roaming and multi-resolution volume

  13. Using image pyramids for the visualization of large terrain data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanfill, Daniel F., IV

    1991-01-01

    Viewing terrain data from various remote sensors in three dimensions has proven to be a valuable tool for scientists in understanding a variety of problems. A technique is presented for using image pyramids in such visualization of large terrain data sets, providing up to two orders of magnitude performance enhancement over simpler techniques, while at the same time eliminating false high-frequency information, which causes animations to sparkle.

  14. Parallel Multiresolution Volume Rendering of Large Data Sets with Error-Guided Load Balancing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chaoli Wang; Jinzhu Gao; Han-wei Shen

    2004-01-01

    We present a new parallel multiresolution volume rendering algorithm for visualizing large data sets. Using the wavelet transform, the raw data is r st converted into a multiresolution wavelet tree. To eliminate the parent-child data dependency for reconstruction and achieve load-balanced rendering, we design a novel algorithm to parti- tion the tree and distribute the data along a hierarchical space-lling

  15. Sort-last parallel rendering for viewing extremely large data sets on tile displays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth Moreland; Brian N. Wylie; Constantine J. Pavlakos

    2001-01-01

    Due to the impressive price-performance of today's PC-based graphics accelerator cards, Sandia National Laboratories is attempting to use PC clusters to render extremely large data sets in interactive applications. This paper describes a sort-last parallel rendering system running on a PC cluster that is capable of rendering enormous amounts of geometry onto high-resolution tile displays by taking advantage of the

  16. A Visual and Interactive Data Exploration Method for Large Data Sets and Clustering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Da Costa; Gilles Venturini

    2007-01-01

    We present in this paper a new method for the visual exploration of large data sets with up to one million of objects. We\\u000a highlight some limitations of the existing visual methods in this context. Our approach is based on previous systems like\\u000a Vibe, Sqwid or Radviz which have been used in information retrieval: several data called points of interest

  17. Evaluating knowledge transfer and zero-shot learning in a large-scale setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcus Rohrbach; Michael Stark; Bernt Schiele

    2011-01-01

    While knowledge transfer (KT) between object classes has been accepted as a promising route towards scalable recognition, most experimental KT studies are surprisingly limited in the number of object classes considered. To support claims of KT w.r.t. scalability we thus advocate to evaluate KT in a large-scale setting. To this end, we provide an extensive evaluation of three popular approaches

  18. Performance evaluation of a large axial field-of-view PET scanner: SET2400W

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takehiko Fujiwara; Shoichi Watanuki; Seiichi Yamamoto; Masayasu Miyake; Shinya Seo; Masatoshi Itoh; Keizou Ishii; Hikonojyou Orihara; Hiroshi Fukuda; Tomohiko Satoh; Keishi Kitamura; Kazumi Tanaka; Shigekazu Takahashi

    1997-01-01

    The SET-2400W is a newly designed whole-body PET scanner with a large axial field of view (20 cm). Its physical performance\\u000a was investigated and evaluated. The scanner consists of four rings of 112 BGO detector units (22.8 mm in-plane × 50 mm axial\\u000a × 30 mm depth). Each detector unit has a 6 (in-plane) × 8 (axial) matrix of BGO

  19. Parallel Tuning of Support Vector Machine Learning Parameters for Large and Unbalanced Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatjana Eitrich; Bruno Lang

    2005-01-01

    \\u000a We consider the problem of selecting and tuning learning parameters of support vector machines, especially for the classification\\u000a of large and unbalanced data sets. We show why and how simple models with few parameters should be refined and propose an\\u000a automated approach for tuning the increased number of parameters in the extended model. Based on a sensitive quality measure\\u000a we

  20. Automatic alignment of individual peaks in large high-resolution spectral data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanova, Radka; Nicholls, Andrew W.; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Lindon, John C.; Brown, Truman R.

    2004-10-01

    Pattern recognition techniques are effective tools for reducing the information contained in large spectral data sets to a much smaller number of significant features which can then be used to make interpretations about the chemical or biochemical system under study. Often the effectiveness of such approaches is impeded by experimental and instrument induced variations in the position, phase, and line width of the spectral peaks. Although characterizing the cause and magnitude of these fluctuations could be important in its own right (pH-induced NMR chemical shift changes, for example) in general they obscure the process of pattern discovery. One major area of application is the use of large databases of 1H NMR spectra of biofluids such as urine for investigating perturbations in metabolic profiles caused by drugs or disease, a process now termed metabonomics. Frequency shifts of individual peaks are the dominant source of such unwanted variations in this type of data. In this paper, an automatic procedure for aligning the individual peaks in the data set is described and evaluated. The proposed method will be vital for the efficient and automatic analysis of large metabonomic data sets and should also be applicable to other types of data.

  1. The Same or Separate? An Exploration of Teachers' Perceptions of the Classroom Assignment of Twins in Prior to School and Kindergarten to Year Two School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Laura; De Gioia, Katey

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the perceptions of 12 teachers from New South Wales, Australia, regarding the classroom assignment of twins. Analysis of semi-structured interviews with each of the teachers revealed four key findings: 1) teachers' perceptions about the classroom assignment of twins vary according to their previous experience and…

  2. Classroom Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Walter

    This booklet describes a foundation for effective classroom management and focuses on some of the basic processes involved in creating a cooperative atmosphere in the classroom. Four topics are considered: the beginning of the school year, selecting and arranging activities, monitoring and timing activities in the classroom, and stopping…

  3. Non-rigid Registration for Large Sets of Microscopic Images on Graphics Processors

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Antonio; Ujaldon, Manuel; Cooper, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Microscopic imaging is an important tool for characterizing tissue morphology and pathology. 3D reconstruction and visualization of large sample tissue structure requires registration of large sets of high-resolution images. However, the scale of this problem presents a challenge for automatic registration methods. In this paper we present a novel method for efficient automatic registration using graphics processing units (GPUs) and parallel programming. Comparing a C++ CPU implementation with Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) libraries and pthreads running on GPU we achieve a speed-up factor of up to 4.11× with a single GPU and 6.68× with a GPU pair. We present execution times for a benchmark composed of two sets of large-scale images: mouse placenta (16K × 16K pixels) and breast cancer tumors (23K × 62K pixels). It takes more than 12 hours for the genetic case in C++ to register a typical sample composed of 500 consecutive slides, which was reduced to less than 2 hours using two GPUs, in addition to a very promising scalability for extending those gains easily on a large number of GPUs in a distributed system. PMID:25328635

  4. Your Outdoor Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinman, Laurie

    2005-01-01

    Physical education is still taught in outdoor settings in many warmer climates of the United States. Even when indoor facilities are available, physical education may be moved outside because of other curricular needs or facility issues. How can physical educators make the outdoor setting seem more like an indoor classroom? Outdoor teaching…

  5. Cable in the Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cable in the Classroom is an "initiative by Canada's cable companies and programming services to provide copyright cleared, commercial free, educationally relevant television programming for Canadian schools." Included are a list of hyperlinked program service providers, a searchable and browsable list of classroom TV programs all over Canada, and a large list of Internet resources including schools on the Internet, resources for teachers, and information on getting your school on the Internet. http://www.cableducation.ca/

  6. Faculty Morale and Perceptions of Equity in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouse, Linda P.

    The usefulness of equity theory for understanding the social/motivational dynamics of the classroom was studied. Attention was directed to how faculty (and students) calculate equity and what the consequences may be. A first set of questionnaires was completed by 238 graduate students and 41 faculty members in 56 classes at a large southern state…

  7. Information Visualization, Nonlinear Dimensionality Reduction and Sampling for Large and Complex Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesenson, Meyer Z.; Pesenson, I. Z.; McCollum, B.

    2010-01-01

    Recent and forthcoming increases in the amount and complexity of astronomy data are creating data sets that are not amenable to the methods of analysis with which astronomers are familiar. Traditional methods are often inadequate not merely because the data sets are too large and too complex to fully be analyzed "manually", but because many conventional algorithms and techniques cannot be scaled up enough to work effectively on the new data sets. It is essential to develop new methods for organization, scientific visualization (as opposed to illustrative visualization) and analysis of heterogeneous, multiresolution data across application domains. Scientific utilization of highly complex and massive data sets poses significant challenges, and calls for some mathematical approaches more advanced than are now generally available. In this paper, we both give an overview of several innovative developments that address these challenges, and describe a few specific examples of algorithms we have developed, as well as the ones we are developing in the course of this ongoing work. These approaches will enhance scientific visualization and data analysis capabilities, thus facilitating astronomical research and enabling discoveries. This work was carried out with partial funding from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency University Research Initiative (NURI), grant HM1582-08-1-0019.

  8. Probabilistic Analysis of a Large-Scale Urban Traffic Sensor Data Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, Jon; Ihler, Alexander; Smyth, Padhraic

    Real-world sensor time series are often significantly noisier and more difficult to work with than the relatively clean data sets that tend to be used as the basis for experiments in many research papers. In this paper we report on a large case-study involving statistical data mining of over 100 million measurements from 1700 freeway traffic sensors over a period of seven months in Southern California. We discuss the challenges posed by the wide variety of different sensor failures and anomalies present in the data. The volume and complexity of the data precludes the use of manual visualization or simple thresholding techniques to identify these anomalies. We describe the application of probabilistic modeling and unsupervised learning techniques to this data set and illustrate how these approaches can successfully detect underlying systematic patterns even in the presence of substantial noise and missing data.

  9. Distributed Computation of the knn Graph for Large High-Dimensional Point Sets

    PubMed Central

    Plaku, Erion; Kavraki, Lydia E.

    2009-01-01

    High-dimensional problems arising from robot motion planning, biology, data mining, and geographic information systems often require the computation of k nearest neighbor (knn) graphs. The knn graph of a data set is obtained by connecting each point to its k closest points. As the research in the above-mentioned fields progressively addresses problems of unprecedented complexity, the demand for computing knn graphs based on arbitrary distance metrics and large high-dimensional data sets increases, exceeding resources available to a single machine. In this work we efficiently distribute the computation of knn graphs for clusters of processors with message passing. Extensions to our distributed framework include the computation of graphs based on other proximity queries, such as approximate knn or range queries. Our experiments show nearly linear speedup with over one hundred processors and indicate that similar speedup can be obtained with several hundred processors. PMID:19847318

  10. Experimental set-up for three PHOEBUS type large-area heliostats at the PSA

    SciTech Connect

    Haeger, M. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Almeria (Spain). Plataforma Solar de Almeria; Schiel, W. [Schlaich Bergermann and Partner, Stuttgart (Germany); Romero, M. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Madrid (Spain). Instituto de Energias Renovables; Schmitz-Goeb, M. [L. and C. Steinmueller, Gummersbach (Germany)

    1995-11-01

    Three large-area heliostat prototypes are being erected at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria by Spanish and German industry. The objective is to demonstrate their technical and economical suitability for a PHOEBUS power tower plant. The two different heliostat designs including two 100 ml glass/metal faceted heliostats and one 150 m{sup 2} stressed membrane heliostat are tested at a representative distance of 485 m to the PSA`s CESA tower. The paper introduces the heliostat designs and test set-up, such as location, targets, flux measurement, data acquisition and control.

  11. Envision: An interactive system for the management and visualization of large geophysical data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Searight, K. R.; Wojtowicz, D. P.; Walsh, J. E.; Pathi, S.; Bowman, K. P.; Wilhelmson, R. B.

    1995-01-01

    Envision is a software project at the University of Illinois and Texas A&M, funded by NASA's Applied Information Systems Research Project. It provides researchers in the geophysical sciences convenient ways to manage, browse, and visualize large observed or model data sets. Envision integrates data management, analysis, and visualization of geophysical data in an interactive environment. It employs commonly used standards in data formats, operating systems, networking, and graphics. It also attempts, wherever possible, to integrate with existing scientific visualization and analysis software. Envision has an easy-to-use graphical interface, distributed process components, and an extensible design. It is a public domain package, freely available to the scientific community.

  12. A practical, bioinformatic workflow system for large data sets generated by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cantacessi, Cinzia; Jex, Aaron R; Hall, Ross S; Young, Neil D; Campbell, Bronwyn E; Joachim, Anja; Nolan, Matthew J; Abubucker, Sahar; Sternberg, Paul W; Ranganathan, Shoba; Mitreva, Makedonka; Gasser, Robin B

    2010-09-01

    Transcriptomics (at the level of single cells, tissues and/or whole organisms) underpins many fields of biomedical science, from understanding the basic cellular function in model organisms, to the elucidation of the biological events that govern the development and progression of human diseases, and the exploration of the mechanisms of survival, drug-resistance and virulence of pathogens. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are contributing to a massive expansion of transcriptomics in all fields and are reducing the cost, time and performance barriers presented by conventional approaches. However, bioinformatic tools for the analysis of the sequence data sets produced by these technologies can be daunting to researchers with limited or no expertise in bioinformatics. Here, we constructed a semi-automated, bioinformatic workflow system, and critically evaluated it for the analysis and annotation of large-scale sequence data sets generated by NGS. We demonstrated its utility for the exploration of differences in the transcriptomes among various stages and both sexes of an economically important parasitic worm (Oesophagostomum dentatum) as well as the prediction and prioritization of essential molecules (including GTPases, protein kinases and phosphatases) as novel drug target candidates. This workflow system provides a practical tool for the assembly, annotation and analysis of NGS data sets, also to researchers with a limited bioinformatic expertise. The custom-written Perl, Python and Unix shell computer scripts used can be readily modified or adapted to suit many different applications. This system is now utilized routinely for the analysis of data sets from pathogens of major socio-economic importance and can, in principle, be applied to transcriptomics data sets from any organism. PMID:20682560

  13. A determination of dark matter bispectrum with a large set of N-body simulations

    E-print Network

    Guo, Hong

    2009-01-01

    We use a set of numerical N-body simulations to study the large-scale behavior of the reduced bispectrum of dark matter and compare the results with the second-order perturbation theory and the halo models for different halo mass functions. We find that the second-order perturbation theory (PT2) agrees with the simulations fairly well on large scales of k<0.05 h/Mpc, but it shows a signature of deviation as the scale goes down. Even on the largest scale where the bispectrum can be measured reasonably well in our simulations, the inconsistency between PT2 and the simulations appears for the colinear triangle shapes. For the halo model, we find that it can only serve as a qualitative method to help study the behavior of Q on large scales and also on relatively small scales. The failure of second-order perturbation theory will also affect the precise determination of the halo models, since they are connected through the 3-halo term in the halo model. The 2-halo term has too much contribution on the large scal...

  14. Innovation from within the Box: Evaluation of Online Problem Sets in a Series of Large Lecture Undergraduate Science Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaeffer, Evonne; Bhargava, Tina; Nash, John; Kerns, Charles; Stocker, Scott

    A technology-mediated solution to enhance the learning experience for students in a large lecture setting was evaluated. Online problem sets were developed to engage students in the content of a human biology course and implemented in the classes of eight faculty coordinators. The weekly problem sets contained several multiple choice problems,…

  15. Caught you: threats to confidentiality due to the public release of large-scale genetic data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthias Wjst

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Large-scale genetic data sets are frequently shared with other research groups and even released on the Internet to allow for secondary analysis. Study participants are usually not informed about such data sharing because data sets are assumed to be anonymous after stripping off personal identifiers. DISCUSSION: The assumption of anonymity of genetic data sets, however, is tenuous because genetic

  16. Improved residue contact prediction using support vector machines and a large feature set

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jianlin; Baldi, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Background Predicting protein residue-residue contacts is an important 2D prediction task. It is useful for ab initio structure prediction and understanding protein folding. In spite of steady progress over the past decade, contact prediction remains still largely unsolved. Results Here we develop a new contact map predictor (SVMcon) that uses support vector machines to predict medium- and long-range contacts. SVMcon integrates profiles, secondary structure, relative solvent accessibility, contact potentials, and other useful features. On the same test data set, SVMcon's accuracy is 4% higher than the latest version of the CMAPpro contact map predictor. SVMcon recently participated in the seventh edition of the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP7) experiment and was evaluated along with seven other contact map predictors. SVMcon was ranked as one of the top predictors, yielding the second best coverage and accuracy for contacts with sequence separation >= 12 on 13 de novo domains. Conclusion We describe SVMcon, a new contact map predictor that uses SVMs and a large set of informative features. SVMcon yields good performance on medium- to long-range contact predictions and can be modularly incorporated into a structure prediction pipeline. PMID:17407573

  17. Hierarchical unbiased graph shrinkage (HUGS): a novel groupwise registration for large data set.

    PubMed

    Ying, Shihui; Wu, Guorong; Wang, Qian; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Normalizing all images in a large data set into a common space is a key step in many clinical and research studies, e.g., for brain development, maturation, and aging. Recently, groupwise registration has been developed for simultaneous alignment of all images without selecting a particular image as template, thus potentially avoiding bias in the registration. However, most conventional groupwise registration methods do not explore the data distribution during the image registration. Thus, their performance could be affected by large inter-subject variations in the data set under registration. To solve this potential issue, we propose to use a graph to model the distribution of all image data sitting on the image manifold, with each node representing an image and each edge representing the geodesic pathway between two nodes (or images). Then, the procedure of warping all images to their population center turns to the dynamic shrinking of the graph nodes along their graph edges until all graph nodes become close to each other. Thus, the topology of image distribution on the image manifold is always preserved during the groupwise registration. More importantly, by modeling the distribution of all images via a graph, we can potentially reduce registration error since every time each image is warped only according to its nearby images with similar structures in the graph. We have evaluated our proposed groupwise registration method on both infant and adult data sets, by also comparing with the conventional group-mean based registration and the ABSORB methods. All experimental results show that our proposed method can achieve better performance in terms of registration accuracy and robustness. PMID:24055505

  18. 21-inch common large-area display set for multiple military command and control workstation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenflo, Ronald L.; Hermann, David J.

    1996-05-01

    Battelle is under contract with Warner Robins Air Logistics Center to design a common large area display set (CLADS) for use in multiple airborne C4I applications that currently use unique 19 inch CRTs. Engineers at Battelle have determined that by taking advantage of the latest flat panel display technology and the commonality between C4I applications, one display head (21 inch diagonal, 1280 by 1024) can be used in multiple applications. In addition, common modules are being designed by Battelle to reduce the number of installation- specific circuit card assemblies required for a particular application. Initial USAF applications include replacements for the E-3 AWACS color monitor assembly, E-8 Joint STARS graphics display unit, and ABCCC airborne color display. Initial U. S. Navy applications include the E-2C ACIS display. For these applications reliability and maintainability are key objectives. The common design reduces the number of unique subassemblies in the USAF inventory by 56 to 66%. In addition to total module reductions, CLADs module/subassembly re-use across nine potential applications is estimated to be 73%. As more platforms implement CLADS, the percentage of module re-use increases. The new design is also expected to have a MTBF of at least 3350 hours, an order of magnitude better than one of the current systems. In the Joint STARS installation, more than 1400 pounds can be eliminated from the aircraft. In the E-3 installation, the CLADs is estimated to provide a power reduction of approximately 1750 watts per aircraft. This paper discuses the common large area display set design and it use in a variety of C4I applications that require a large area, high resolution, full color display.

  19. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and Foundations for Data Exploitation of Petabyte Data Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, K H; Nikolaev, S; Huber, M E

    2007-02-26

    The next generation of imaging surveys in astronomy, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), will require multigigapixel cameras that can process enormous amounts of data read out every few seconds. This huge increase in data throughput (compared to megapixel cameras and minute- to hour-long integrations of today's instruments) calls for a new paradigm for extracting the knowledge content. We have developed foundations for this new approach. In this project, we have studied the necessary processes for extracting information from large time-domain databases systematics. In the process, we have produced significant scientific breakthroughs by developing new methods to probe both the elusive time and spatial variations in astrophysics data sets from the SuperMACHO (Massive Compact Halo Objects) survey, the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search (LONEOS), and the Taiwanese American Occultation Survey (TAOS). This project continues to contribute to the development of the scientific foundations for future wide-field, time-domain surveys. Our algorithm and pipeline development has provided the building blocks for the development of the LSST science software system. Our database design and performance measures have helped to size and constrain LSST database design. LLNL made significant contributions to the foundations of the LSST, which has applications for large-scale imaging and data-mining activities at LLNL. These developments are being actively applied to the previously mentioned surveys producing important scientific results that have been released to the scientific community and more continue to be published and referenced, enhancing LLNL's scientific stature.

  20. Generating extreme weather event sets from very large ensembles of regional climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Neil; Guillod, Benoit; Otto, Friederike; Allen, Myles; Jones, Richard; Hall, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Generating extreme weather event sets from very large ensembles of regional climate models Neil Massey, Benoit P. Guillod, Friederike E. L. Otto, Myles R. Allen, Richard Jones, Jim W. Hall Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Extreme events can have large impacts on societies and are therefore being increasingly studied. In particular, climate change is expected to impact the frequency and intensity of these events. However, a major limitation when investigating extreme weather events is that, by definition, only few events are present in observations. A way to overcome this issue it to use large ensembles of model simulations. Using the volunteer distributed computing (VDC) infrastructure of weather@home [1], we run a very large number (10'000s) of RCM simulations over the European domain at a resolution of 25km, with an improved land-surface scheme, nested within a free-running GCM. Using VDC allows many thousands of climate model runs to be computed. Using observations for the GCM boundary forcings we can run historical "hindcast" simulations over the past 100 to 150 years. This allows us, due to the chaotic variability of the atmosphere, to ascertain how likely an extreme event was, given the boundary forcings, and to derive synthetic event sets. The events in these sets did not actually occur in the observed record but could have occurred given the boundary forcings, with an associated probability. The event sets contain time-series of fields of meteorological variables that allow impact modellers to assess the loss the event would incur. Projections of events into the future are achieved by modelling projections of the sea-surface temperature (SST) and sea-ice boundary forcings, by combining the variability of the SST in the observed record with a range of warming signals derived from the varying responses of SSTs in the CMIP5 ensemble to elevated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in three RCP scenarios. Simulating the future with a range of SST responses, as well as a range of RCP scenarios, allows us to assess the uncertainty in the response to elevated GHG emissions that occurs in the CMIP5 ensemble. Numerous extreme weather events can be studied. Firstly, we analyse droughts in Europe with a focus on the UK in the context of the project MaRIUS (Managing the Risks, Impacts and Uncertainties of droughts and water Scarcity). We analyse the characteristics of the simulated droughts, the underlying physical mechanisms, and assess droughts observed in the recent past. Secondly, we analyse windstorms by applying an objective storm-identification and tracking algorithm to the ensemble output, isolating those storms that cause high loss and building a probabilistic storm catalogue, which can be used by impact modellers, insurance loss modellers, etc. Finally, we combine the model output with a heat-stress index to determine the detrimental effect on health of heat waves in Europe. [1] Massey, N. et al., 2014, Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc.

  1. Comparison of remote visualization strategies for interactive exploration of large data sets

    SciTech Connect

    Freitag, L. A.; Loy, R. M.

    2000-05-12

    We compare three remote visualization strategies used for interactive exploration of large data sets: image-based rendering, parallel visualization servers, and subsampling. We review each strategy and provide details for an adaptive multiresolution subsampling technique that we have developed. To determine the problem regimes for which each approach is most cost effective, we develop performance models to analyze the costs of computation and communication associated with the common visualization task of isosurface generation. Using these models, we investigate a number of hardware system configurations and task complexity scenarios when parameters such as problem size, visualization demands, and network bandwidth change. For one particular strategy, subsampling, we further investigate the tradeoffs between multiresolution and uniform grid methods in terms of performance and approximation errors.

  2. Calculations of safe collimator settings and ?* at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, R.; Assmann, R. W.; Redaelli, S.

    2015-06-01

    The first run of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN was very successful and resulted in important physics discoveries. One way of increasing the luminosity in a collider, which gave a very significant contribution to the LHC performance in the first run and can be used even if the beam intensity cannot be increased, is to decrease the transverse beam size at the interaction points by reducing the optical function ?*. However, when doing so, the beam becomes larger in the final focusing system, which could expose its aperture to beam losses. For the LHC, which is designed to store beams with a total energy of 362 MJ, this is critical, since the loss of even a small fraction of the beam could cause a magnet quench or even damage. Therefore, the machine aperture has to be protected by the collimation system. The settings of the collimators constrain the maximum beam size that can be tolerated and therefore impose a lower limit on ?*. In this paper, we present calculations to determine safe collimator settings and the resulting limit on ?*, based on available aperture and operational stability of the machine. Our model was used to determine the LHC configurations in 2011 and 2012 and it was found that ?* could be decreased significantly compared to the conservative model used in 2010. The gain in luminosity resulting from the decreased margins between collimators was more than a factor 2, and a further contribution from the use of realistic aperture estimates based on measurements was almost as large. This has played an essential role in the rapid and successful accumulation of experimental data in the LHC.

  3. fastSTRUCTURE: variational inference of population structure in large SNP data sets.

    PubMed

    Raj, Anil; Stephens, Matthew; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2014-06-01

    Tools for estimating population structure from genetic data are now used in a wide variety of applications in population genetics. However, inferring population structure in large modern data sets imposes severe computational challenges. Here, we develop efficient algorithms for approximate inference of the model underlying the STRUCTURE program using a variational Bayesian framework. Variational methods pose the problem of computing relevant posterior distributions as an optimization problem, allowing us to build on recent advances in optimization theory to develop fast inference tools. In addition, we propose useful heuristic scores to identify the number of populations represented in a data set and a new hierarchical prior to detect weak population structure in the data. We test the variational algorithms on simulated data and illustrate using genotype data from the CEPH-Human Genome Diversity Panel. The variational algorithms are almost two orders of magnitude faster than STRUCTURE and achieve accuracies comparable to those of ADMIXTURE. Furthermore, our results show that the heuristic scores for choosing model complexity provide a reasonable range of values for the number of populations represented in the data, with minimal bias toward detecting structure when it is very weak. Our algorithm, fastSTRUCTURE, is freely available online at http://pritchardlab.stanford.edu/structure.html. PMID:24700103

  4. Duplications in RB1CC1 are associated with schizophrenia; identification in large European sample sets

    PubMed Central

    Degenhardt, F; Priebe, L; Meier, S; Lennertz, L; Streit, F; Witt, S H; Hofmann, A; Becker, T; Mössner, R; Maier, W; Nenadic, I; Sauer, H; Mattheisen, M; Buizer-Voskamp, J; Ophoff, R A; Rujescu, D; Giegling, I; Ingason, A; Wagner, M; Delobel, B; Andrieux, J; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Heinz, A; Walter, H; Moebus, S; Corvin, A; Kahn, René S; Linszen, Don H; van Os, Jim; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; de Haan, Lieuwe; Krabbendam, Lydia; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Rietschel, M; Nöthen, M M; Cichon, S

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a severe and debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder with an estimated heritability of ~80%. Recently, de novo mutations, identified by next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, have been suggested to contribute to the risk of developing SCZ. Although these studies show an overall excess of de novo mutations among patients compared with controls, it is not easy to pinpoint specific genes hit by de novo mutations as actually involved in the disease process. Importantly, support for a specific gene can be provided by the identification of additional alterations in several independent patients. We took advantage of existing genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data sets to screen for deletions or duplications (copy number variations, CNVs) in genes previously implicated by NGS studies. Our approach was based on the observation that CNVs constitute part of the mutational spectrum in many human disease-associated genes. In a discovery step, we investigated whether CNVs in 55 candidate genes, suggested from NGS studies, were more frequent among 1637 patients compared with 1627 controls. Duplications in RB1CC1 were overrepresented among patients. This finding was followed-up in large, independent European sample sets. In the combined analysis, totaling 8461 patients and 112 871 controls, duplications in RB1CC1 were found to be associated with SCZ (P=1.29 × 10?5; odds ratio=8.58). Our study provides evidence for rare duplications in RB1CC1 as a risk factor for SCZ.

  5. Motif-based analysis of large nucleotide data sets using MEME-ChIP.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenxiu; Noble, William S; Bailey, Timothy L

    2014-01-01

    MEME-ChIP is a web-based tool for analyzing motifs in large DNA or RNA data sets. It can analyze peak regions identified by ChIP-seq, cross-linking sites identified by CLIP-seq and related assays, as well as sets of genomic regions selected using other criteria. MEME-ChIP performs de novo motif discovery, motif enrichment analysis, motif location analysis and motif clustering, providing a comprehensive picture of the DNA or RNA motifs that are enriched in the input sequences. MEME-ChIP performs two complementary types of de novo motif discovery: weight matrix-based discovery for high accuracy; and word-based discovery for high sensitivity. Motif enrichment analysis using DNA or RNA motifs from human, mouse, worm, fly and other model organisms provides even greater sensitivity. MEME-ChIP's interactive HTML output groups and aligns significant motifs to ease interpretation. This protocol takes less than 3 h, and it provides motif discovery approaches that are distinct and complementary to other online methods. PMID:24853928

  6. Classroom Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinsmore, Terri Sue

    This paper is a report of a middle-school teacher's study of classroom management. The teacher/researcher was interested in how some of the techniques in the Kovalik Integrated Thematic Instruction model of training would influence the teacher/researcher's classroom management; the effects of direct instruction within a community circle; the…

  7. Computer Games in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, C. Bruce; Wold, Allen L.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the use of computer games in the classroom as tools which foster logical reasoning, perserverance, goal setting, and attention to detail. Names and addresses of six magazines containing computer games information are included. (JJD)

  8. A Zebra in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leake, Devin; Morvillo, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Describes the care and breeding of zebra fish, suggests various experiments and observations easily performed in a classroom setting, and provides some ideas to further student interest and exploration of these organisms. (DDR)

  9. A multivariate approach to filling gaps in large ecological data sets using probabilistic matrix factorization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrodt, F. I.; Shan, H.; Kattge, J.; Reich, P.; Banerjee, A.; Reichstein, M.

    2012-12-01

    With the advent of remotely sensed data and coordinated efforts to create global databases, the ecological community has progressively become more data-intensive. However, in contrast to other disciplines, statistical ways of handling these large data sets, especially the gaps which are inherent to them, are lacking. Widely used theoretical approaches, for example model averaging based on Akaike's information criterion (AIC), are sensitive to missing values. Yet, the most common way of handling sparse matrices - the deletion of cases with missing data (complete case analysis) - is known to severely reduce statistical power as well as inducing biased parameter estimates. In order to address these issues, we present novel approaches to gap filling in large ecological data sets using matrix factorization techniques. Factorization based matrix completion was developed in a recommender system context and has since been widely used to impute missing data in fields outside the ecological community. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of probabilistic matrix factorization techniques for imputing missing data in ecological matrices using two imputation techniques. Hierarchical Probabilistic Matrix Factorization (HPMF) effectively incorporates hierarchical phylogenetic information (phylogenetic group, family, genus, species and individual plant) into the trait imputation. Kernelized Probabilistic Matrix Factorization (KPMF) on the other hand includes environmental information (climate and soils) into the matrix factorization through kernel matrices over rows and columns. We test the accuracy and effectiveness of HPMF and KPMF in filling sparse matrices, using the TRY database of plant functional traits (http://www.try-db.org). TRY is one of the largest global compilations of plant trait databases (750 traits of 1 million plants), encompassing data on morphological, anatomical, biochemical, phenological and physiological features of plants. However, despite of unprecedented coverage, the TRY database is still very sparse, severely limiting joint trait analyses. Plant traits are the key to understanding how plants as primary producers adjust to changes in environmental conditions and in turn influence them. Forming the basis for Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs), plant traits are also fundamental in global change studies for predicting future ecosystem changes. It is thus imperative that missing data is imputed in as accurate and precise a way as possible. In this study, we show the advantage of applying probabilistic matrix factorization techniques in incorporating hierarchical and environmental information for the prediction of missing plant traits as compared to conventional imputation techniques such as the complete case and mean approaches. We will discuss advantages of the proposed imputation techniques over other widely used methods such as multiple imputation (MI), as well as possible applications to other data sets.

  10. Stacking of large interferometric data sets in the image- and uv-domain - a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, L.; Knudsen, K. K.; Vlemmings, W.; Conway, J.; Martí-Vidal, I.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new algorithm for stacking radio interferometric data in the uv-domain. The performance of uv-stacking is compared to the stacking of fully imaged data using simulated Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) deep extragalactic surveys. We find that image- and uv-stacking produce similar results, however, uv-stacking is typically the more robust method. An advantage of the uv-stacking algorithm is the availability of uv-data post-stacking, which makes it possible to identify and remove problematic baselines. For deep VLA surveys uv-stacking yields a signal-to-noise ratio that is up to 20 per cent higher than image-stacking. Furthermore, we have investigated stacking of resolved sources with a simulated VLA data set where 1.5 arcsec (10-12 kpc at z ˜ 1-4) sources are stacked. We find that uv-stacking, where a model is fitted directly to the visibilities, significantly improves the accuracy and robustness of the size estimates. While scientific motivation for this work is studying faint, high-z galaxies, the algorithm analysed here would also be applicable in other fields of astronomy. Stacking of radio interferometric data is also expected to play a big role for future surveys with telescopes such as Low-Frequency Array and Square Kilometre Array.

  11. Galaxy Evolution Insights from Spectral Modeling of Large Data Sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hoversten, Erik A.; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2007-10-01

    This thesis centers on the use of spectral modeling techniques on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to gain new insights into current questions in galaxy evolution. The SDSS provides a large, uniform, high quality data set which can be exploited in a number of ways. One avenue pursued here is to use the large sample size to measure precisely the mean properties of galaxies of increasingly narrow parameter ranges. The other route taken is to look for rare objects which open up for exploration new areas in galaxy parameter space. The crux of this thesis is revisiting the classical Kennicutt method for inferring the stellar initial mass function (IMF) from the integrated light properties of galaxies. A large data set ({approx} 10{sup 5} galaxies) from the SDSS DR4 is combined with more in-depth modeling and quantitative statistical analysis to search for systematic IMF variations as a function of galaxy luminosity. Galaxy H{alpha} equivalent widths are compared to a broadband color index to constrain the IMF. It is found that for the sample as a whole the best fitting IMF power law slope above 0.5 M{sub {circle_dot}} is {Lambda} = 1.5 {+-} 0.1 with the error dominated by systematics. Galaxies brighter than around M{sub r,0.1} = -20 (including galaxies like the Milky Way which has M{sub r,0.1} {approx} -21) are well fit by a universal {Lambda} {approx} 1.4 IMF, similar to the classical Salpeter slope, and smooth, exponential star formation histories (SFH). Fainter galaxies prefer steeper IMFs and the quality of the fits reveal that for these galaxies a universal IMF with smooth SFHs is actually a poor assumption. Related projects are also pursued. A targeted photometric search is conducted for strongly lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBG) similar to MS1512-cB58. The evolution of the photometric selection technique is described as are the results of spectroscopic follow-up of the best targets. The serendipitous discovery of two interesting blue compact dwarf galaxies is reported. These galaxies were identified by their extremely weak (< 150) [N {pi}] {lambda}6584 to H{alpha} emission line ratios. Abundance analysis from emission line fluxes reveals that these galaxies have gas phase oxygen abundances 12 + log(O/H) {approx} 7.7 to 7.9, not remarkably low, and near infrared imaging detects an old stellar population. However, the measured nitrogen to oxygen ratios log(N/O) < 1.7 are anomalously low for blue compact dwarf galaxies. These objects may be useful for understanding the chemical evolution of nitrogen.

  12. Measurement, visualization and analysis of extremely large data sets with a nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birli, O.; Franke, K.-H.; Linß, G.; Machleidt, T.; Manske, E.; Schale, F.; Schwannecke, H.-C.; Sparrer, E.; Weiß, M.

    2013-04-01

    Nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machines (NPM machines) developed at the Ilmenau University of Technology allow the measurement of micro- and nanostructures with nanometer precision in a measurement volume of 25 mm × 25 mm × 5 mm (NMM-1) or 200 mm × 200 mm × 25 mm (NPMM-200). Various visual, tactile or atomic force sensors can all be used to measure specimens. Atomic force sensors have emerged as a powerful tool in nanotechnology. Large-scale AFM measurements are very time-consuming and in fact in a practical sense they are impossible over millimeter ranges due to low scanning speeds. A cascaded multi-sensor system can be used to implement a multi-scale measurement and testing strategy for nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machines. This approach involves capturing an overview image at the limit of optical resolution and automatically scanning the measured data for interesting test areas that are suitable for a higher-resolution measurement. These "fields of interest" can subsequently be measured in the same NPM machine using individual AFM sensor scans. The results involve extremely large data sets that cannot be handled by off-the-shelf software. Quickly navigating within terabyte-sized data files requires preprocessing to be done on the measured data to calculate intermediate images based on the principle of a visualization pyramid. This pyramid includes the measured data of the entire volume, prepared in the form of discrete measurement volumes (spatial tiles or cubes) with certain edge lengths at specific zoom levels. The functionality of the closed process chain is demonstrated using a blob analysis for automatically selecting regions of interest on the specimen. As expected, processing large amounts of data places particularly high demands on both computing power and the software architecture.

  13. Efficient Implementation of an Optimal Interpolator for Large Spatial Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Mount, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Scattered data interpolation is a problem of interest in numerous areas such as electronic imaging, smooth surface modeling, and computational geometry. Our motivation arises from applications in geology and mining, which often involve large scattered data sets and a demand for high accuracy. The method of choice is ordinary kriging. This is because it is a best unbiased estimator. Unfortunately, this interpolant is computationally very expensive to compute exactly. For n scattered data points, computing the value of a single interpolant involves solving a dense linear system of size roughly n x n. This is infeasible for large n. In practice, kriging is solved approximately by local approaches that are based on considering only a relatively small'number of points that lie close to the query point. There are many problems with this local approach, however. The first is that determining the proper neighborhood size is tricky, and is usually solved by ad hoc methods such as selecting a fixed number of nearest neighbors or all the points lying within a fixed radius. Such fixed neighborhood sizes may not work well for all query points, depending on local density of the point distribution. Local methods also suffer from the problem that the resulting interpolant is not continuous. Meyer showed that while kriging produces smooth continues surfaces, it has zero order continuity along its borders. Thus, at interface boundaries where the neighborhood changes, the interpolant behaves discontinuously. Therefore, it is important to consider and solve the global system for each interpolant. However, solving such large dense systems for each query point is impractical. Recently a more principled approach to approximating kriging has been proposed based on a technique called covariance tapering. The problems arise from the fact that the covariance functions that are used in kriging have global support. Our implementations combine, utilize, and enhance a number of different approaches that have been introduced in literature for solving large linear systems for interpolation of scattered data points. For very large systems, exact methods such as Gaussian elimination are impractical since they require 0(n(exp 3)) time and 0(n(exp 2)) storage. As Billings et al. suggested, we use an iterative approach. In particular, we use the SYMMLQ method, for solving the large but sparse ordinary kriging systems that result from tapering. The main technical issue that need to be overcome in our algorithmic solution is that the points' covariance matrix for kriging should be symmetric positive definite. The goal of tapering is to obtain a sparse approximate representation of the covariance matrix while maintaining its positive definiteness. Furrer et al. used tapering to obtain a sparse linear system of the form Ax = b, where A is the tapered symmetric positive definite covariance matrix. Thus, Cholesky factorization could be used to solve their linear systems. They implemented an efficient sparse Cholesky decomposition method. They also showed if these tapers are used for a limited class of covariance models, the solution of the system converges to the solution of the original system. Matrix A in the ordinary kriging system, while symmetric, is not positive definite. Thus, their approach is not applicable to the ordinary kriging system. Therefore, we use tapering only to obtain a sparse linear system. Then, we use SYMMLQ to solve the ordinary kriging system. We show that solving large kriging systems becomes practical via tapering and iterative methods, and results in lower estimation errors compared to traditional local approaches, and significant memory savings compared to the original global system. We also developed a more efficient variant of the sparse SYMMLQ method for large ordinary kriging systems. This approach adaptively finds the correct local neighborhood for each query point in the interpolation process.

  14. Assembly of large metagenome data sets using a Convey HC-1 hybrid core computer (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Alex [DOE JGI] [DOE JGI

    2012-06-01

    Alex Copeland on "Assembly of large metagenome data sets using a Convey HC-1 hybrid core computer" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  15. Making Remote Tools Available for Visualization of Large Data Sets: Parallel Isosurface Calculation and Rendering of Large Data Sets in IRIS Explorer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Santiago V. Lombeyda; Michael Aivazis

    2000-01-01

    The foremost challenge in visualization is the ability to best convey large amounts of information given limited resources. In this paper we study a framework that offers diverse high level visualization tools to scientists whose primary computer interface is a desktop workstation networked to multi-process or compute engine. As a case study we discuss an implementation for isosurface computation and

  16. Advances in direct volume rendering for visualizing large 3D data sets from scientific and medical applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guy M. Nicoletti

    2002-01-01

    Volume rendering permits the visualization of 3D structures without a prior segmentation process. Direct volume rendering is a key technology for visualizing large 3D data sets from scientific or medical applications. This technology employs the use of transfer functions to assign optical properties, such as color, opacity and shading, to original values of the data set being visualized. Thus, a

  17. May 25 -27, 2005 The visualization of real astrophysical data sets is a powerful tool for communicating

    E-print Network

    Collar, Juan I.

    of settings (e.g. TV programs, museums, websites, digital planetaria, magazines, & undergraduate classrooms convey large amounts of information in a visceral fashion that can inform both experts and the public

  18. A Case Study of Literacy Instruction Delivered to Kindergarten Struggling Readers within the Response to Intervention Model in Three Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelenka, Valerie Lynn

    2010-01-01

    A portion of the 2004 reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA, 2004), Response to Intervention (RtI), aims to prevent unnecessary student placement in special education. The intent of RtI is to provide all students with effective classroom instruction first and afford low-performing students with increasingly…

  19. Navigating the Problem Space of Academia: Exploring Processes of Course Design and Classroom Teaching in Postsecondary Settings. WCER Working Paper No. 2014-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hora, Matthew T.

    2014-01-01

    Policymakers and educators alike increasing focus on faculty adoption of interactive teaching techniques as a way to improve undergraduate education. Yet, little empirical research exists that examines the processes whereby faculty make decisions about curriculum design and classroom teaching in real-world situations. In this study, I use the idea…

  20. The Impact of Brief Teacher Training on Classroom Management and Child Behavior in At-Risk Preschool Settings: Mediators and Treatment Utility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, James; Low, Sabina; Schultz, Tara; Barner, Stacy; Moreno, Desirae; Garst, Meladee; Leiker, Ryan; Swink, Nathan; Schrepferman, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Teachers from fourteen classrooms were randomly assigned to an adaptation of Incredible Years (IY) teacher training or to teacher training-as-usual. Observations were made of the behavior of 136 target preschool boys and girls nominated by teachers as having many or few conduct problems. Peer and teacher behavior were observed at baseline and post…

  1. BACHSCORE. A tool for evaluating efficiently and reliably the quality of large sets of protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarti, E.; Zamuner, S.; Cossio, P.; Laio, A.; Seno, F.; Trovato, A.

    2013-12-01

    In protein structure prediction it is of crucial importance, especially at the refinement stage, to score efficiently large sets of models by selecting the ones that are closest to the native state. We here present a new computational tool, BACHSCORE, that allows its users to rank different structural models of the same protein according to their quality, evaluated by using the BACH++ (Bayesian Analysis Conformation Hunt) scoring function. The original BACH statistical potential was already shown to discriminate with very good reliability the protein native state in large sets of misfolded models of the same protein. BACH++ features a novel upgrade in the solvation potential of the scoring function, now computed by adapting the LCPO (Linear Combination of Pairwise Orbitals) algorithm. This change further enhances the already good performance of the scoring function. BACHSCORE can be accessed directly through the web server: bachserver.pd.infn.it. Catalogue identifier: AEQD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEQD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 130159 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 24 687 455 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Any computer capable of running an executable produced by a g++ compiler (4.6.3 version). Operating system: Linux, Unix OS-es. RAM: 1 073 741 824 bytes Classification: 3. Nature of problem: Evaluate the quality of a protein structural model, taking into account the possible “a priori” knowledge of a reference primary sequence that may be different from the amino-acid sequence of the model; the native protein structure should be recognized as the best model. Solution method: The contact potential scores the occurrence of any given type of residue pair in 5 possible contact classes (?-helical contact, parallel ?-sheet contact, anti-parallel ?-sheet contact, side-chain contact, no contact). The solvation potential scores the occurrence of any residue type in 2 possible environments: buried and solvent exposed. Residue environment is assigned by adapting the LCPO algorithm. Residues present in the reference primary sequence and not present in the model structure contribute to the model score as solvent exposed and as non contacting all other residues. Restrictions: Input format file according to the Protein Data Bank standard Additional comments: Parameter values used in the scoring function can be found in the file /folder-to-bachscore/BACH/examples/bach_std.par. Running time: Roughly one minute to score one hundred structures on a desktop PC, depending on their size.

  2. Megapixel mythology and photospace: estimating photospace for camera phones from large image sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultgren, Bror O.; Hertel, Dirk W.

    2008-01-01

    It is a myth that more pixels alone result in better images. The marketing of camera phones in particular has focused on their pixel numbers. However, their performance varies considerably according to the conditions of image capture. Camera phones are often used in low-light situations where the lack of a flash and limited exposure time will produce underexposed, noisy and blurred images. Camera utilization can be quantitatively described by photospace distributions, a statistical description of the frequency of pictures taken at varying light levels and camera-subject distances. If the photospace distribution is known, the user-experienced distribution of quality can be determined either directly by direct measurement of subjective quality, or by photospace-weighting of objective attributes. The population of a photospace distribution requires examining large numbers of images taken under typical camera phone usage conditions. ImagePhi was developed as a user-friendly software tool to interactively estimate the primary photospace variables, subject illumination and subject distance, from individual images. Additionally, subjective evaluations of image quality and failure modes for low quality images can be entered into ImagePhi. ImagePhi has been applied to sets of images taken by typical users with a selection of popular camera phones varying in resolution. The estimated photospace distribution of camera phone usage has been correlated with the distributions of failure modes. The subjective and objective data show that photospace conditions have a much bigger impact on image quality of a camera phone than the pixel count of its imager. The 'megapixel myth' is thus seen to be less a myth than an ill framed conditional assertion, whose conditions are to a large extent specified by the camera's operational state in photospace.

  3. Considerations for observational research using large data sets in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E; Chen, Aileen; Chen, Ronald C; Hoffman, Karen; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Smith, Benjamin D; Yu, James B

    2014-09-01

    The radiation oncology community has witnessed growing interest in observational research conducted using large-scale data sources such as registries and claims-based data sets. With the growing emphasis on observational analyses in health care, the radiation oncology community must possess a sophisticated understanding of the methodological considerations of such studies in order to evaluate evidence appropriately to guide practice and policy. Because observational research has unique features that distinguish it from clinical trials and other forms of traditional radiation oncology research, the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics assembled a panel of experts in health services research to provide a concise and well-referenced review, intended to be informative for the lay reader, as well as for scholars who wish to embark on such research without prior experience. This review begins by discussing the types of research questions relevant to radiation oncology that large-scale databases may help illuminate. It then describes major potential data sources for such endeavors, including information regarding access and insights regarding the strengths and limitations of each. Finally, it provides guidance regarding the analytical challenges that observational studies must confront, along with discussion of the techniques that have been developed to help minimize the impact of certain common analytical issues in observational analysis. Features characterizing a well-designed observational study include clearly defined research questions, careful selection of an appropriate data source, consultation with investigators with relevant methodological expertise, inclusion of sensitivity analyses, caution not to overinterpret small but significant differences, and recognition of limitations when trying to evaluate causality. This review concludes that carefully designed and executed studies using observational data that possess these qualities hold substantial promise for advancing our understanding of many unanswered questions of importance to the field of radiation oncology. PMID:25195986

  4. A HYBRID MULTILEVEL-ACTIVE SET METHOD FOR LARGE BOX-CONSTRAINED DISCRETE ILL-POSED INVERSE PROBLEMS

    E-print Network

    Plemmons, Robert J.

    A HYBRID MULTILEVEL-ACTIVE SET METHOD FOR LARGE BOX-CONSTRAINED DISCRETE ILL-POSED INVERSE PROBLEMS and engineering give rise to ill-posed inverse problems whose solution is known to satisfy box constrains a two-phase algorithm for the solution of large-scale box-constrained discrete ill-posed problems

  5. Tips from the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TESOL Journal, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Four short articles are combined: "Adding Discourse-Level Practice to Sentence-Level Exercises" (Eric S. Nelson); "Presenting Picture Books in the ESL Classroom" (Lijun Shen); "Role Playing in a Large Class" (Ellen Rosen); and "Calvin and Hobbes and Other Icons of Americana" (Daniel J. Conrad). (Contains seven references.) (LB)

  6. Information Theoretic Approaches to Rapid Discovery of Relationships in Large Climate Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, Kevin H.; Rossow, William B.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Mutual information as the asymptotic Bayesian measure of independence is an excellent starting point for investigating the existence of possible relationships among climate-relevant variables in large data sets, As mutual information is a nonlinear function of of its arguments, it is not beholden to the assumption of a linear relationship between the variables in question and can reveal features missed in linear correlation analyses. However, as mutual information is symmetric in its arguments, it only has the ability to reveal the probability that two variables are related. it provides no information as to how they are related; specifically, causal interactions or a relation based on a common cause cannot be detected. For this reason we also investigate the utility of a related quantity called the transfer entropy. The transfer entropy can be written as a difference between mutual informations and has the capability to reveal whether and how the variables are causally related. The application of these information theoretic measures is rested on some familiar examples using data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) to identify relation between global cloud cover and other variables, including equatorial pacific sea surface temperature (SST), over seasonal and El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycles.

  7. Public-private partnerships with large corporations: setting the ground rules for better health.

    PubMed

    Galea, Gauden; McKee, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Public-private partnerships with large corporations offer potential benefits to the health sector but many concerns have been raised, highlighting the need for appropriate safeguards. In this paper we propose five tests that public policy makers may wish to apply when considering engaging in such a public-private partnership. First, are the core products and services provided by the corporation health enhancing or health damaging? In some cases, such as tobacco, the answer is obvious but others, such as food and alcohol, are contested. In such cases, the burden of proof is on the potential partners to show that their activities are health enhancing. Second, do potential partners put their policies into practice in the settings where they can do so, their own workplaces? Third, are the corporate social responsibility activities of potential partners independently audited? Fourth, do potential partners make contributions to the commons rather than to narrow programmes of their choosing? Fifth, is the role of the partner confined to policy implementation rather than policy development, which is ultimately the responsibility of government alone? PMID:24581699

  8. Finding Large 3-free Sets I: The Small n Case William Gasarch a

    E-print Network

    Kruskal, Clyde

    no arithmetic progressions of length 3. We call such sets 3-free. Most of the work has been asymptotic sets, Arithmetic Sequence, Arithmetic Progression, van der Waerden's Theorem, non-averaging sets-AP is an arithmetic progression of length k. Theorem 2 (van der Waerden (41) but see also (18)) For all k, for all c

  9. Classroom Network Technology as a Support for Systemic Mathematics Reform: The Effects of TI MathForward on Student Achievement in a Large, Diverse District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William; Singleton, Corinne; Roschelle, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Low-cost, portable classroom network technologies have shown great promise in recent years for improving teaching and learning in mathematics. This paper explores the impacts on student learning in mathematics when a program to introduce network technologies into mathematics classrooms is integrated into a systemic reform initiative at the…

  10. A Study of Classroom Response System Clickers: Increasing Student Engagement and Performance in a Large Undergraduate Lecture Class on Architectural Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Leonard; Bachman, Christine

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a classroom response system (CRS) and architecture students' perceptions of real-time feedback. CRS is designed to increase active engagement of students by their responses to a question or prompt via wireless keypads. Feedback is immediately portrayed on a classroom projector for discussion. The authors…

  11. Getting specific: making taxonomic and ecological sense of large sequencing data sets.

    PubMed

    Massana, Ramon

    2015-06-01

    Eukaryotic microbes comprise a diverse collection of phototrophic and heterotrophic creatures known to play fundamental roles in ecological processes. Some can be identified by light microscopy, generally the largest and with conspicuous shapes, while the smallest can be counted by epifluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry but remain largely unidentified. Microbial diversity studies greatly advanced with the analysis of phylogenetic markers sequenced from natural assemblages. Molecular surveys began in 1990 targeting marine bacterioplankton (Giovannoni et al. ) and first approached microbial eukaryotes in three studies published in 2001 (Díez et al. ; López-García et al. ; Moon-van der Staay et al. ). These seminal studies, based on cloning and Sanger sequencing the complete 18S rDNA, were critical for obtaining broad pictures of microbial diversity in contrasted habitats and for describing novel lineages by robust phylogenies, but were limited by the number of sequences obtained. So, inventories of species richness in a given sample and community comparisons through environmental gradients were very incomplete. These limitations have been overcome with the advent of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) methods, initially 454-pyrosequencing, today Illumina and soon others to come. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Egge et al. () show a nice example of the use of HTS to study the biodiversity and seasonal succession of a particularly important group of marine microbial eukaryotes, the haptophytes. Temporal changes were analysed first at the community level, then at the clade level, and finally at the lowest rank comparable to species. Interesting and useful ecological insights were obtained at each taxonomic scale. Haptophyte diversity differed along seasons in a systematic manner, with some species showing seasonal preferences and others being always present. Many of these species had no correspondence with known species, pointing out the high level of novelty in microbial assemblages, only accessible by molecular tools. Moreover, the number of species detected was limited, agreeing with a putative scenario of constrained evolutionary diversification in free-living small eukaryotes. This study illustrates the potential of HTS to address ecological relevant questions in an accessible way by processing large data sets that, nonetheless, need to be treated with a fair understanding of their limitations. PMID:26095583

  12. Validation and evaluation of common large-area display set (CLADS) performance specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, David J.; Gorenflo, Ronald L.

    1998-09-01

    Battelle is under contract with Warner Robins Air Logistics Center to design a Common Large Area Display Set (CLADS) for use in multiple Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence (C4I) applications that currently use 19- inch Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs). Battelle engineers have built and fully tested pre-production prototypes of the CLADS design for AWACS, and are completing pre-production prototype displays for three other platforms simultaneously. With the CLADS design, any display technology that can be packaged to meet the form, fit, and function requirements defined by the Common Large Area Display Head Assembly (CLADHA) performance specification is a candidate for CLADS applications. This technology independent feature reduced the risk of CLADS development, permits life long technology insertion upgrades without unnecessary redesign, and addresses many of the obsolescence problems associated with COTS technology-based acquisition. Performance and environmental testing were performed on the AWACS CLADS and continues on other platforms as a part of the performance specification validation process. A simulator assessment and flight assessment were successfully completed for the AWACS CLADS, and lessons learned from these assessments are being incorporated into the performance specifications. Draft CLADS specifications were released to potential display integrators and manufacturers for review in 1997, and the final version of the performance specifications are scheduled to be released to display integrators and manufacturers in May, 1998. Initial USAF applications include replacements for the E-3 AWACS color monitor assembly, E-8 Joint STARS graphics display unit, and ABCCC airborne color display. Initial U.S. Navy applications include the E-2C ACIS display. For these applications, reliability and maintainability are key objectives. The common design will reduce the cost of operation and maintenance by an estimated 3.3M per year on E-3 AWACS alone. It is realistic to anticipate savings of over 30M per year as CLADS is implemented widely across DoD applications. As commonality and open systems interfaces begin to surface in DoD applications, the CLADS architecture can easily and cost effectively absorb the changes, and avoid COTS obsolescence issues.

  13. The Effective Use of Stations to Teach Elementary Students in a Small Classroom Setting About Cardiopulmonary Physiology - PhUn Week Poster Session EB 2011

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PhD Michael J Ryan (University of Mississippi Medical Center)

    2011-05-07

    This poster describes a Physiology Understanding (PhUn) Week activity performed with 3rd and 5th grade elementary students in limited classroom space that demonstrated how the heart and lung work together to meet tissue demands. This poster was presented at the PhUn Week Poster Session, Experimental Biology 2011, by Michael J. Ryan, PhD, University of Mississippi Medical Center.

  14. Teaching Cell Biology in the Large-Enrollment Classroom: Methods to Promote Analytical Thinking and Assessment of Their Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchen, Elizabeth; Bell, John D.; Reeve, Suzanne; Sudweeks, Richard R.; Bradshaw, William S.

    2003-01-01

    A large-enrollment, undergraduate cellular biology lecture course is described whose primary goal is to help students acquire skill in the interpretation of experimental data. The premise is that this kind of analytical reasoning is not intuitive for most people and, in the absence of hands-on laboratory experience, will not readily develop unless…

  15. Solving large sets of coupled equations iteratively by vector processing on the cyber 205 computer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. D. Tolsma

    1985-01-01

    The set of coupled linear second-order differential equations which has to be solved for the quantum-mechanical description of inelastic scattering of atomic and nuclear particles can be rewritten as an equivalent set of coupled integral equations. This set can be solved iteratively. A concept of vectorization of coupled-channel Fortran programs, based upon this integral method, is presented for the use

  16. Spatial and temporal data integration in large scale hydrology: a gridded hydrometeorological data set for Peninsular Malaysia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. L. Wong; A. B. M. Jamil; R. Venneker; S. Uhlenbrook

    2009-01-01

    The integration of spatially and temporally varying data is an important step to formulate and generalize the large-scale relationships and feedback between atmosphere and hydrological processes. In this contribution, we present a moderate resolution surface hydrometeorological data set for Peninsular Malaysia. The data set is gridded from daily observation data at a grid size of 0.05 degree resolution (~5.5km) for

  17. Classification of a large anticancer data set by Adaptive Fuzzy Partition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nadáge Piclin; Marco Pintore; Christophe Wechman; Jacques R. Chrétien

    2004-01-01

    An Adaptive Fuzzy Partition (AFP) algorithm, derived from Fuzzy Logic concepts, was used to classify an anticancer data set, including about 1300 compounds subdivided into eight mechanisms of action. AFP classification builds relationships between molecular descriptors and bio-activities by dynamically dividing the descriptor hyperspace into a set of fuzzy subspaces. These subspaces are described by simple linguistic rules, from which

  18. Under-approximating Cut Sets for Reachability in Large Scale Automata Networks

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Geoffroy Andrieux2 , Heinz Koeppl1,3 1 ETH Zürich, Switzerland. 2 IRISA Rennes, France. 3 IBM Research is necessary for the reachability of a given local state. If all the local states from such a set are disabled or additional cut sets for the given reachability. Applied to qualitative models of biological systems, such cut

  19. Teaching Cell Biology in the Large-Enrollment Classroom: Methods to Promote Analytical Thinking and Assessment of Their Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Elizabeth; Bell, John D.; Reeve, Suzanne; Sudweeks, Richard R.; Bradshaw, William S.

    2003-01-01

    A large-enrollment, undergraduate cellular biology lecture course is described whose primary goal is to help students acquire skill in the interpretation of experimental data. The premise is that this kind of analytical reasoning is not intuitive for most people and, in the absence of hands-on laboratory experience, will not readily develop unless instructional methods and examinations specifically designed to foster it are employed. Promoting scientific thinking forces changes in the roles of both teacher and student. We describe didactic strategies that include directed practice of data analysis in a workshop format, active learning through verbal and written communication, visualization of abstractions diagrammatically, and the use of ancillary small-group mentoring sessions with faculty. The implications for a teacher in reducing the breadth and depth of coverage, becoming coach instead of lecturer, and helping students to diagnose cognitive weaknesses are discussed. In order to determine the efficacy of these strategies, we have carefully monitored student performance and have demonstrated a large gain in a pre- and posttest comparison of scores on identical problems, improved test scores on several successive midterm examinations when the statistical analysis accounts for the relative difficulty of the problems, and higher scores in comparison to students in a control course whose objective was information transfer, not acquisition of reasoning skills. A novel analytical index (student mobility profile) is described that demonstrates that this improvement was not random, but a systematic outcome of the teaching/learning strategies employed. An assessment of attitudes showed that, in spite of finding it difficult, students endorse this approach to learning, but also favor curricular changes that would introduce an analytical emphasis earlier in their training. PMID:14506506

  20. ADAPTIVELY FINDING AND COMBINING FIRST-ORDER RULES FOR LARGE, SKEWED DATA SETS

    E-print Network

    Shavlik, Jude W.

    helped me. Ryan Woods has worked on maintaining the University of Wisconsin Hospital data set which I use discussions with Houssam Nassif and Jie Liu both research related and otherwise. I appreci- ate their help

  1. c Copyright by YOJI YAMADA, 1995 DATA RELOCATION AND PREFETCHING FOR PROGRAMS WITH LARGE DATA SETS

    E-print Network

    Hwu, Wen-mei W.

    SETS BY YOJI YAMADA B.Engr., Tokyo Institute of Technology, 1980 M.Engr., Tokyo Institute of Technology the nancial support of Mazda Motor Corporation for my graduate study. Lastly, I would like to acknowledge

  2. An Evolutionary Algorithm for Large Scale Set Covering Problems with Application to Airline Crew Scheduling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elena Marchiori; Adri G. Steenbeek

    2000-01-01

    . The set covering problem is a paradigmatic NP-hard combinatorialoptimization problem which is used as model in relevant applications,in particular crew scheduling in airline and mass-transit companies.This paper is concerned with the approximated solution of largescale set covering problems arising from crew scheduling in airline companies.We propose an adaptive heuristic-based evolutionary algorithmwhose main ingredient is a mechanism for selecting a

  3. An Adaptive Algorithm for Splitting Large Sets of Strings and Its Application to Ecient External Sorting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatsuya Asai; Seishi Okamoto; Hiroki Arimura

    In this paper, we study the problem of sorting a large collection of strings in external memory. Based on adaptive construction of a summary data structure, called adaptive synopsis trie, we present a practi- cal string sorting algorithm DistStrSort, which is suitable to sorting string collections of large size in external memory, and also suitable for more com- plex string

  4. Large Carnivore Management in a MultiLevel Institutional Setting: Problems and Prospects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Camilla Sandström; Jani Pellikka

    The goal of the large carnivore policies in Finland, Norway and Sweden (Fennoscandia) is to establish sustainable management of the four large (mammal) carnivores; bear ( ursus arctos ), wolf ( canis lupus ), lynx ( lynx lynx ) wolverine ( gulo gulo ) but also the golden eagle ( aquila chrysaetos ). Since this is clearly in conflict with

  5. Home 2013 10 10 MU researchers can now move large data sets with new high-speed internet

    E-print Network

    Calyam, Prasad

    to move large data sets in a shorter amount of time using the high-speed Internet connection Internet2 in the MU computer science department. Internet2's 100-gigabit speed is 10,000 times faster than regular at-home Internet and 100 times faster than Kansas City's Google Fiber network, said Gordon Springer, an associate

  6. Ssecrett and NeuroTrace: Interactive Visualization and Analysis Tools for Large-Scale Neuroscience Data Sets

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Won-Ki; Beyer, Johanna; Hadwiger, Markus; Blue, Rusty; Law, Charles; Vázquez-Reina, Amelio; Reid, R. Clay; Lichtman, Jeff; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2010-01-01

    Data sets imaged with modern electron microscopes can range from tens of terabytes to about one petabyte. Two new tools, Ssecrett and NeuroTrace, support interactive exploration and analysis of large-scale optical and electron-microscopy images to help scientists reconstruct complex neural circuits of the mammalian nervous system. PMID:20650718

  7. Caught you: threats to confidentiality due to the public release of large-scale genetic data sets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Large-scale genetic data sets are frequently shared with other research groups and even released on the Internet to allow for secondary analysis. Study participants are usually not informed about such data sharing because data sets are assumed to be anonymous after stripping off personal identifiers. Discussion The assumption of anonymity of genetic data sets, however, is tenuous because genetic data are intrinsically self-identifying. Two types of re-identification are possible: the "Netflix" type and the "profiling" type. The "Netflix" type needs another small genetic data set, usually with less than 100 SNPs but including a personal identifier. This second data set might originate from another clinical examination, a study of leftover samples or forensic testing. When merged to the primary, unidentified set it will re-identify all samples of that individual. Even with no second data set at hand, a "profiling" strategy can be developed to extract as much information as possible from a sample collection. Starting with the identification of ethnic subgroups along with predictions of body characteristics and diseases, the asthma kids case as a real-life example is used to illustrate that approach. Summary Depending on the degree of supplemental information, there is a good chance that at least a few individuals can be identified from an anonymized data set. Any re-identification, however, may potentially harm study participants because it will release individual genetic disease risks to the public. PMID:21190545

  8. Prediction of the adsorption capability onto activated carbon of a large data set of chemicals by local lazy regression method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Beilei; Ma, Yimeng; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-08-01

    Accurate quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models based on a large data set containing a total of 3483 organic compounds were developed to predict chemicals' adsorption capability onto activated carbon in gas phrase. Both global multiple linear regression (MLR) method and local lazy regression (LLR) method were used to develop QSPR models. The results proved that LLR has prediction accuracy 10% higher than that of MLR model. By applying LLR method we can predict the test set (787 compounds) with Q2ext of 0.900 and root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.129. The accurate model based on this large data set could be useful to predict adsorption property of new compounds since such model covers a highly diverse structural space.

  9. Rethinking the Christian Studies Classroom: Reflections on the Dynamics of Teaching Religion in Southern Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravett, Sandie; Hulsether, Mark; Medine, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    An extended set of conversations conducted by three religious studies faculty teaching at large public universities in the Southern United States spurred these reflections on how their institutional locations inflected issues such as the cultural expectations students bring to the classroom, how these expectations interact with the evolving…

  10. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without…

  11. JPA Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Elizabeth; And Others

    This instructional guide offers classroom lesson plans that can be used by teachers or police officers with a videotape to present a "Junior Police Academy" (JPA) program for middle school students. The guide also contains lesson plans and student activities to be used independently of the videotape. Following a description of the goals of the…

  12. Classroom Tech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article features the latest classroom technologies namely the FLY Pentop, WriteToLearn, and a new iris scan identification system. The FLY Pentop is a computerized pen from Leapster that "magically" understands what kids write and draw on special FLY paper. WriteToLearn is an automatic grading software from Pearson Knowledge Technologies and…

  13. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are described: (1) "Sequences of Definite Integrals" by T. Dana-Picard; (2) "Structural Analysis of Pythagorean Monoids" by M.-Q Zhan and J. Tong; (3) "A Random Walk Phenomenon under an Interesting Stopping Rule" by S. Chakraborty; (4) "On Some Confidence Intervals for Estimating the…

  14. Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Carmit

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants and malleability of noncognitive skills. Using data on boys from the National Education Longitudinal Survey, I focus on youth behavior in the classroom as a measure of noncognitive skills. I find that student behavior during adolescence is persistent. The variation in behavior can be attributed to…

  15. Classroom Vocabulary Classroom Vocabulary [msamiati wa darasani

    E-print Network

    Lesson 3: Classroom Vocabulary Classroom Vocabulary [msamiati wa darasani] A). Vocabulary. Darasa hili lina vitu gani? [What things does this classroom have?] Darasa hili lina meza, mkoba, chaki, ubao... [This classroom has a table, backpack, chalk, board...] 2. Hii ni nini? [What is this?] Hii ni

  16. A posteriori correction of camera characteristics from large image data sets.

    PubMed

    Afanasyev, Pavel; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Matadeen, Rishi; De Carlo, Sacha; van Duinen, Gijs; Alewijnse, Bart; Peters, Peter J; Abrahams, Jan-Pieter; Portugal, Rodrigo V; Schatz, Michael; van Heel, Marin

    2015-01-01

    Large datasets are emerging in many fields of image processing including: electron microscopy, light microscopy, medical X-ray imaging, astronomy, etc. Novel computer-controlled instrumentation facilitates the collection of very large datasets containing thousands of individual digital images. In single-particle cryogenic electron microscopy ("cryo-EM"), for example, large datasets are required for achieving quasi-atomic resolution structures of biological complexes. Based on the collected data alone, large datasets allow us to precisely determine the statistical properties of the imaging sensor on a pixel-by-pixel basis, independent of any "a priori" normalization routinely applied to the raw image data during collection ("flat field correction"). Our straightforward "a posteriori" correction yields clean linear images as can be verified by Fourier Ring Correlation (FRC), illustrating the statistical independence of the corrected images over all spatial frequencies. The image sensor characteristics can also be measured continuously and used for correcting upcoming images. PMID:26068909

  17. A posteriori correction of camera characteristics from large image data sets

    PubMed Central

    Afanasyev, Pavel; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Matadeen, Rishi; De Carlo, Sacha; van Duinen, Gijs; Alewijnse, Bart; Peters, Peter J.; Abrahams, Jan-Pieter; Portugal, Rodrigo V.; Schatz, Michael; van Heel, Marin

    2015-01-01

    Large datasets are emerging in many fields of image processing including: electron microscopy, light microscopy, medical X-ray imaging, astronomy, etc. Novel computer-controlled instrumentation facilitates the collection of very large datasets containing thousands of individual digital images. In single-particle cryogenic electron microscopy (“cryo-EM”), for example, large datasets are required for achieving quasi-atomic resolution structures of biological complexes. Based on the collected data alone, large datasets allow us to precisely determine the statistical properties of the imaging sensor on a pixel-by-pixel basis, independent of any “a priori” normalization routinely applied to the raw image data during collection (“flat field correction”). Our straightforward “a posteriori” correction yields clean linear images as can be verified by Fourier Ring Correlation (FRC), illustrating the statistical independence of the corrected images over all spatial frequencies. The image sensor characteristics can also be measured continuously and used for correcting upcoming images. PMID:26068909

  18. An Adaptive Algorithm for Splitting Large Sets of Strings and Its Application to Efficient External Sorting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatsuya Asai; Seishi Okamoto; Hiroki Arimura

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the problem of sorting a large collection of strings in external memory. Based on adaptive construction\\u000a of a summary data structure, called adaptive synopsis trie, we present a practical string sorting algorithm DistStrSort, which is suitable for sorting string collections of large size in external memory, and also suitable for more complex string\\u000a processing problems

  19. Color Constrained ICP for Registration of Large Unstructured 3D Color Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Druon; M. J. Aldon; A. Crosnier

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of pair-wise registration of large unstructured 3D\\/color datasets. Our purpose is to improve the classical ICP (Iterative closest point) algorithm by using color information, in order to deal with large datasets and with objects for which the geometric information is not significant enough. After a brief presentation of classical ICP (iterative closest point)

  20. Improved student engagement, satisfaction, and learning outcomes in a "flipped" large-lecture setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, A. S.; Bettis, E. A., III; Russell, J. E.; Van Horne, S.; Rocheford, M. K.; Sipola, M.; Colombo, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Large lecture courses are traditional teaching practices of most large institutions of public higher education. They have historically provided an efficient way to deliver content information to the large number of students with the least amount of faculty resources. However, research of student learning indicates that the traditional lecture format does not provide the best learning experience for students, and students learn better in the active learning environments in which students engage in meaningful learning activities rather than just listening. In this study, we compare two offerings of Introduction to Environmental Science, a large-lecture general education course, offered in two formats by the same instructors in subsequent years. In the first offering (Spring 2013) the course was offered as a traditional large-lecture course, with lecture to large audiences and a limited number of exams for assessment. In the second offering (Spring 2014), the course included small-group discussion periods, peer-review of writing assignments, guest lectures, and online learning with limited traditional lecture. Our primary objective was to quantify differences in student engagement and learning outcomes between the two course offerings. Results of our study show that the students in the transformed course indicated higher interest, engagement level, and satisfaction than the students in the traditional lecture course. Furthermore, students in the transformed course reported increased behavior, emotional, and cognitive engagement over those in the traditional course, and also increased satisfaction with the course.

  1. Classification of a large anticancer data set by adaptive fuzzy partition.

    PubMed

    Piclin, Nadège; Pintore, Marco; Wechman, Christophe; Chrétien, Jacques R

    2004-01-01

    An Adaptive Fuzzy Partition (AFP) algorithm, derived from Fuzzy Logic concepts, was used to classify an anticancer data set, including about 1300 compounds subdivided into eight mechanisms of action. AFP classification builds relationships between molecular descriptors and bio-activities by dynamically dividing the descriptor hyperspace into a set of fuzzy subspaces. These subspaces are described by simple linguistic rules, from which scores ranging between 0 and 1 can be derived. The latter values define, for each compound, the degrees of membership of the different mechanisms analyzed. A particular attention was devoted to develop structure-activity relations that have a real utility. Then, well-defined and widely accepted protocols were used to validate the models by defining their robustness and prediction ability. More particularly, after selecting the most relevant descriptors with help of a genetic algorithm, a training set of 640 compounds was isolated by a rational procedure based on Self-Organizing Maps. The related AFP model was then validated with help of a validation set and, above all, of cross-validation and Y-randomization procedures. Good validation scores of about 80% were obtained, underlining the robustness of the model. Moreover, the prediction ability was evaluated with 374 test compounds that had not been used to establish the model and 77% of them were predicted correctly. PMID:15729856

  2. Method of particles in visual clustering of multi-dimensional and large data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Witold Dzwinel; Jan Blasiak

    1999-01-01

    A method dedicated for visual clustering of N -dimensional data sets is presented. It is based on the classical feature extraction technique - the Sammon's mapping. This technique empowered by a particle approach used in the Sammon's criterion minimization makes the method more reliable, general and efficient. To show its reliability, the results of tests are presented, which were made

  3. P-AutoClass: Scalable Parallel Clustering for Mining Large Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clara Pizzuti; Domenico Talia

    2003-01-01

    Data clustering is an important task in the area of data mining. Clustering is the unsupervised classification of data items into homogeneous groups called clusters. Clustering methods partition a set of data items into clusters, such that items in the same cluster are more similar to each other than items in different clusters according to some defined criteria. Clustering algorithms

  4. A Dynamic Adaptation of AD-trees for Efficient Machine Learning on Large Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Komarek; Andrew W. Moore

    2000-01-01

    This paper has no novel learning or statistics: it is concerned with making a wide class of pre- existing statistics and learning algorithms com- putationally tractable when faced with data sets with massive numbers of records or attributes. It briefly reviews the static AD-tree structure of Moore and Lee (1998), and offers a new struc- ture with more attractive properties:

  5. Analysis of bibliometric indicators for individual scholars in a large data set

    E-print Network

    Radicchi, Filippo

    in modern science. Citation numbers, or other measures derived from bibliographic data, are commonly used understood (Lehmann et al. 2006). Even in the basic case of citation distributions of papers, where data and the data set analyzed, citation distributions have been judged compatible with several possible statistical

  6. A Controlled Trial of Active versus Passive Learning Strategies in a Large Group Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haidet, Paul; Morgan, Robert O.; O'Malley, Kimberly; Moran, Betty Jeanne; Richards, Boyd F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of active and didactic teaching strategies on learning- and process-oriented outcomes. Design: Controlled trial. Setting: After-hours residents' teaching session. Participants: Family and Community Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Pediatrics residents at two academic medical institutions. Interventions: We…

  7. Study on the drawbead setting of the large deformation area in a trunk lid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lin Zhongqin; Bao Youxia; Chen Guanlong; Liu Gang

    2000-01-01

    In the stamping forming process of an automotive panel, some defects such as wrinkles and fractures can be eliminated by setting a proper drawbead, such that a successful forming operation can be obtained. The effect of the structure, the geometrical shape and the parameters of a drawbead on the draw restraining force has been analyzed, as also the effect of

  8. Interactive 3-D Immersive Visualization for Analysis of Large MultiParameter Atmospheric Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. B. Frenzer; J. M. Hoell; J. J. Holdzkom; D. Jacob; H. Fuelberg; M. Avery; G. Carmichael; D. L. Hopkins

    2001-01-01

    Significant improvements in the ability of atmospheric chemistry models to predict the transport and production of atmospheric constituents on regional and global scales have been realized over the past decade. Concurrent with the model improvements, has been an increase in the size and complexity of atmospheric observational data sets. As a result, the challenge to provide efficient and realistic visualization

  9. Thermal comfort in tropical classrooms

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, A.G. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Architecture

    1998-10-01

    This paper examines the comfort criteria of ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55-1992 for their applicability in tropical classrooms. A field study conducted in Hawaii used a variety of methods to collect the data: survey questionnaires, physical measurements, interviews, and behavioral observations. A total of 3,544 students and teachers completed questionnaires in 29 naturally ventilated and air-conditioned classrooms in six schools during two seasons. The majority of classrooms failed to meet the physical specifications of the Standard 55 comfort zone. Thermal neutrality, preference, and acceptability results are compared with other field studies and the Standard 55 criteria. Acceptability votes by occupants of both naturally ventilated and air-conditioned classrooms exceeded the standard`s 80% acceptability criteria, regardless of whether physical conditions were in or out of the comfort zone. Responses from these two school populations suggest not only a basis for separate comfort standards but energy conservation opportunities through raising thermostat set points.

  10. Collaborative Classroom Management. Video to Accompany "A Biological Brain in a Cultural Classroom: Applying Biological Research to Classroom Management." [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This 43-minute VHS videotape is designed to be used in course and workshop settings with "A Biological Brain in a Cultural Classroom: Applying Biological Research to Classroom Management." The videotape's principal values are as an introduction to the issues explored in the book and as a catalyst for group discussions and activities related to…

  11. K-groups: Tractable Group Detection on Large Link Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeremy Kubica; Andrew Moore; Jeff Schneider

    Abstract Discovering underlying structure from co-occurrence data is an important task in many fields, including: insurance, intelligence, criminal investigation, epidemiology, human resources, and marketing. For example a store may wish to identify underlying sets of items purchased together or a human,resources department may wish to identify groups of employees,that collaborate with each other. Previously Kubica et. al. presented the group

  12. A Wavelet Toolkit for Visualization and Analysis of Large Data Sets in Earthquake Research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Erlebacher; D. A. Yuen

    2004-01-01

    — Wavelets have a wide range of useful functions that permit them to effectively treat problems such as data compression, scale-localization analysis, feature extraction, visualization, statistics, numerical simulation, and communication. We discuss their features and their use in an integrated manner to handle large-scale problems in earthquake physics and other nonlinear problems in the solid earth geosciences.

  13. Design and implementation of a visualization strategy for maintaining integrity of large data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Krishnan R. Nair; M. L. Peterson

    2000-01-01

    The interpretation of data plays a critical role in present day nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. This need for visualization technology arises because systems can scan at a faster rate and at a higher resolution than was possible in even the recent past. As a result a very large number of data points are generated and must be efficiently interpreted. To

  14. Flip Zooming: A Practical Focus+Context Approach to Visualizing Large Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lars Erik Holmquist; Christopher Ahlberg

    1997-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONWhen working with a large material, such as a document or a database, it is often desirable tobe able to examine some part of the material in detail, while still retaining a contextual overview.This becomes problematic when the material has to be displayed on a computer screen.Many visualization techniques that attempt to overcome problems associated with displayinglarge amounts of data

  15. Value-Cell Bar Charts for Visualizing Large Transaction Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel A. Keim; Ming C. Hao; Umeshwar Dayal; Martha Lyons

    2007-01-01

    One of the common problems businesses need to solve is how to use large volumes of sales histories, Web transactions, and other data to understand the behavior of their customers and increase their revenues. Bar charts are widely used for daily analysis, but only show highly aggregated data. Users often need to visualize detailed multidimensional information reflecting the health of

  16. Design of Availability-Dependent Distributed Services in Large-Scale Uncooperative Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales, Ramses Victor

    2009-01-01

    Thesis Statement: "Availability-dependent global predicates can be efficiently and scalably realized for a class of distributed services, in spite of specific selfish and colluding behaviors, using local and decentralized protocols". Several types of large-scale distributed systems spanning the Internet have to deal with availability variations…

  17. Computer Literacy Programs: The Effects of the Large-Class Setting on Student Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berghel, Hal

    1986-01-01

    Summarizes results of a University of Nebraska study on effects of different teaching methods on student performance in a computer literacy course for business administration students. Merits and weaknesses of the large class approach--the more successful method--are discussed, and academic achievement as a function of gender is analyzed. (MBR)

  18. Early Childhood Experiences and Kindergarten Success: A Population-Based Study of a Large Urban Setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John W. Fantuzzo; Heather L. Rouse; Paul A. McDermott; Yumiko Sekino; Stephanie Childs; Andrea Weiss

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the unique protective influence of center-based early care and education experiences on kindergarten outcomes for children entering public school kindergarten. The 3,969 participants were geographically and de- mographically representative of an entire kindergarten cohort in a large urban school district. Child age, gender, ethnicity, family poverty, low maternal education, and neighborhood were found to be risks for

  19. yFS: A Journaling File System Design for Handling Large Data Sets with Reduced Seeking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhihui Zhang; Kanad Ghose

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, disk seek times have not improved commensurately with CPU performance, memory system performance, and disk transfer rates. Furthermore, many modern applications are making increasing use of large files. Traditional file system designs are limited in how they address these two trends. We present the design of a file system called yFS that consciously reduces disk seeking and

  20. Parallel Based on Cloud Computing to Achieve Large Data Sets Clustering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heng Li; Dan Yang; WeiTao Fang

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a CPCluster Map Reduce algorithm to achieve parallelism in cloud computing platform for clustering large, high-dimensional datasets. The proposed Map Reduce paradigm based clustering algorithm improves the traditional cluster algorithm in a parallelized way. It is scalability and has a good acceleration capability, and by adding the compute nodes, speedup is achieved. Experimental results show that the

  1. Multilevel and Diverse Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baurain, Bradley, Ed.; Ha, Phan Le, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The benefits and advantages of classroom practices incorporating unity-in-diversity and diversity-in-unity are what "Multilevel and Diverse Classrooms" is all about. Multilevel classrooms--also known as mixed-ability or heterogeneous classrooms--are a fact of life in ESOL programs around the world. These classrooms are often not only multilevel…

  2. A cognitive learning model in classroom interaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cui Guangzuo

    2010-01-01

    This paper, based on the cognitive architecture of learning and thinking, proposes a cognitive learning model in classroom interaction, which bridges the gap between classroom interaction and learning outcome. In this model, a learning activity is defined as a cognitive matrix at a low level in which M rows and N columns are set, each row represents a logical cognitive

  3. Enhancing Vocabulary Development in Multiple Classroom Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Janis M.; Staton, Denise G.

    1999-01-01

    Describes ways teachers can enhance students' vocabulary development through multiple contexts available in typical middle school classroom settings. Addresses questions about vocabulary learning and offers suggestions for enhancing vocabulary with narrative and expository texts that involve multiple classroom contexts. Considers the Vocab-o-gram…

  4. Bringing the Great Outdoors to Your Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort. Div. of Program Development.

    This guide suggests ways to study the environment in the classroom. It provides information for setting up a classroom learning center including learning outcomes, activity suggestions, and resources and equipment for the learning center. Guidelines for a recycling program, a bird-feeding program, and terrarium-making are given. A bibliography of…

  5. Application of Transcultural Themes in International Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hook, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    The effective use of transcultural themes and images may help promote positive resonance in international settings, such as found in the traditional and online classrooms of globalizing higher education. Findings of transculturally resonant themes and images may be applied to international classroom pedagogy through such means as multimedia…

  6. Classroom Assessment Techniques: Interviews

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mike U. Smith

    This page describes the technique of using interviews to assess student understanding. The assessment tool is one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. Interviews enable instructors to judge the extent of understanding students have developed with respect to a series of well-focused, conceptually-related scientific ideas. This site provides an overview of this assessment instrument including information about how to use classroom interviews to their maximum benefit. The site is also linked to a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use, as well as supplementary links and sources to further explore this assessment tool.

  7. MASTER of the CMB Anisotropy Power Spectrum: A Fast Method for Statistical Analysis of Large and Complex CMB Data Sets

    E-print Network

    E. Hivon; K. M. Gorski; C. B. Netterfield; B. P. Crill; S. Prunet; F. Hansen

    2001-05-17

    We describe a fast and accurate method for estimation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy angular power spectrum --- Monte Carlo Apodised Spherical Transform EstimatoR. Originally devised for use in the interpretation of the Boomerang experimental data, MASTER is both a computationally efficient method suitable for use with the currently available CMB data sets (already large in size, despite covering small fractions of the sky, and affected by inhomogeneous and correlated noise), and a very promising application for the analysis of very large future CMB satellite mission products.

  8. Generating mock data sets for large-scale Lyman-? forest correlation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Font-Ribera, Andreu [Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Fac. Ciències, torre C5 parell 2, Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); McDonald, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Miralda-Escudé, Jordi, E-mail: font@ieec.uab.es, E-mail: pvmcdonald@lbl.gov, E-mail: miralda@icc.ub.edu [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2012-01-01

    Massive spectroscopic surveys of high-redshift quasars yield large numbers of correlated Ly? absorption spectra that can be used to measure large-scale structure. Simulations of these surveys are required to accurately interpret the measurements of correlations and correct for systematic errors. An efficient method to generate mock realizations of Ly? forest surveys is presented which generates a field over the lines of sight to the survey sources only, instead of having to generate it over the entire three-dimensional volume of the survey. The method can be calibrated to reproduce the power spectrum and one-point distribution function of the transmitted flux fraction, as well as the redshift evolution of these quantities, and is easily used for modeling any survey systematic effects. We present an example of how these mock surveys are applied to predict the measurement errors in a survey with similar parameters as the BOSS quasar survey in SDSS-III.

  9. Development of Graphical Indices for Displaying Large Scale Building Energy Data Sets

    E-print Network

    Abbas, M.; Haberl, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    as access to computer graphics software has increased (Cleveland 1985). The purpose of any graphic presentation is to allow the reader to easily and accurately decode information that is encoded by the graph's author. However, the information encoded... looked at how to present large amounts of building energy data with regard to graphical perception. There are several seminal references on graphics, including: Cleveland (1985), Tufte (1983, 1990), and Tukey (1977, 1988). These works provide a very...

  10. Distilling Artificial Recombinants from Large Sets of Complete mtDNA Genomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qing-Peng Kong; Antonio Salas; Chang Sun; Noriyuki Fuku; Masashi Tanaka; Li Zhong; Cheng-Ye Wang; Yong-Gang Yao; Hans-Jürgen Bandelt

    2008-01-01

    Background: Large-scale genome sequencing poses enormous problems to the logistics of laboratory work and data handling. When numerous fragments of different genomes are PCR amplified and sequenced in a laboratory, there is a high immanent risk of sample confusion. For genetic markers, such as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which are free of natural recombination, single instances of sample mix-up involving different

  11. On Building and Visualizing Proximity Graphs for Large Data Sets with Artificial Ants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julien Lavergne; Hanane Azzag; Christiane Guinot; Gilles Venturini

    \\u000a We present in this paper a new incremental and bio-inspired algorithm that builds proximity graphs for large amounts of data\\u000a (i.e. 1 million). It is inspired from the self-assembly behavior of real ants where each ant progressively becomes attached\\u000a to an existing support and then successively to other attached ants. The ants that we have defined will similarly build a

  12. A metric multidimensional scaling method for large objects sets and its Monte Carlo evaluation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Tsogo; M. H. Masson; A. Bardot

    1997-01-01

    Multidimensional scaling (MDS) techniques always pose the problem of analysing a large number n of points, without collecting all (N(N-1))\\/2 possible interstimuli dissimilarities and while keeping satisfactory solutions. In the case of metric MDS it was found that a theoretical minimum of appropriate 2N-3 exact Euclidean distances are sufficient for the unique representation of N points in a 2-dimensional Euclidean

  13. A geospatially enabled, PC-based, software to fuse and interactively visualize large 4D\\/5D data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Andres; M. Davis; K. Fujiwara; J. C. Anderson; Tie Fang; M. Nedbal

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development and main operational capabilities of a PC-based, geospatial enabled software that can fuse and visualize large, multi-variable data sets that change in space (x, y, z) and time (t). The new software has the ability to simultaneously visualize imagery, bathymetry\\/terrain, and true volumetric (voxel) data in a fully interactive geo-referenced mode. In addition to providing

  14. WebViz:A Web-based Collaborative Interactive Visualization System for large-Scale Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Yuen; E. McArthur; R. M. Weiss; J. Zhou; B. Yao

    2010-01-01

    WebViz is a web-based application designed to conduct collaborative, interactive visualizations of large data sets for multiple users, allowing researchers situated all over the world to utilize the visualization services offered by the University of Minnesota's Laboratory for Computational Sciences and Engineering (LCSE). This ongoing project has been built upon over the last 3 1\\/2 years .The motivation behind WebViz

  15. USING DATA MINING TO ANALYZE LARGE DATA SETS IN HIGHER EDUCATION RESEARCH: AN EXAMPLE OF PREDICTION WITH NSOPF: 99

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yonghong Jade Xu

    The recent advancement in computing technology, availability of low-cost storage devices, and popularity of Internet have\\u000a empowered data acquisition that is substantially different from the traditional approach (Hand, Mannila, and Smyth, 2001;Wegman,\\u000a 1995). This trend has influenced higher education in many aspects, one of which is the increasing number of large data sets\\u000a as secondary data sources for academic research.

  16. Promoting Active Involvement in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg; Bresnahan, Val; Hedin, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a rationale for using active involvement techniques, describes large- and small-group methods based on their documented effectiveness and applicability to K-12 classrooms, and illustrates their use. These approaches include ways of engaging students in large groups (e.g., unison responses, response cards, dry-erase boards,…

  17. CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK IN TURKISH PRE-SERVICE EFL TEACHERS' CLASSROOMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mustafa CANER; ZINGIR GÜLTEN; Pinar SALI

    2006-01-01

    Corrective feedback seems to be of significance in the sense that it aids in the formulation and reformulation of interactive patterns in language classrooms. Many studies have been conducted on corrective feedback in second and foreign language classroom settings; however, not much has been written on corrective feedback in pre-service EFL teachers' classrooms. The present study thus aims to explore

  18. Practical Classroom Applications of Language Experience: Looking Back, Looking Forward.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Olga G., Ed.; Linek, Wayne M., Ed.

    The 38 essays in this book look back at language experience as an educational approach, provide practical classroom applications, and reconceptualize language experience as an overarching education process. Classroom teachers and reading specialists describe strategies in use in a variety of classroom settings and describe ways to integrate…

  19. Teaching and Learning as Multimedia Authoring: The Classroom 2000 Project

    E-print Network

    Abowd, Gregory D.

    Teaching and Learning as Multimedia Authoring: The Classroom 2000 Project Gregory D. Abowd 1, Osaka, JAPAN ABSTRACT We view college classroom teaching and learning as a multimedia authoring activity. The classroom provides a rich setting in which a number of different forms of communication co

  20. Multilingual Label Quests: A Practice for the "Asymmetrical" Multilingual Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonacina-Pugh, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Research on multilingual classrooms usually focuses on contexts where both teachers and pupils share the same linguistic repertoire; what can be called "symmetrical" multilingual classrooms. This paper sets out to investigate whether (and how) pupils' multilingual resources can be used in classrooms where the teacher does not share pupils'…

  1. Systemize Classroom Management to Enhance Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delman, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01

    Good classroom management is one of the most important goals teachers strive to establish from the first day of class. The rules, procedures, activities, and behaviors set the classroom tone throughout the school year. By revising, updating, and systemizing classroom management activities, teachers can eliminate many problems created by students…

  2. Propagation of large uncertainty sets in orbital dynamics by automatic domain splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, Alexander; Di Lizia, Pierluigi; Armellin, Roberto; Makino, Kyoko; Bernelli-Zazzera, Franco; Berz, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Current approaches to uncertainty propagation in astrodynamics mainly refer to linearized models or Monte Carlo simulations. Naive linear methods fail in nonlinear dynamics, whereas Monte Carlo simulations tend to be computationally intensive. Differential algebra has already proven to be an efficient compromise by replacing thousands of pointwise integrations of Monte Carlo runs with the fast evaluation of the arbitrary order Taylor expansion of the flow of the dynamics. However, the current implementation of the DA-based high-order uncertainty propagator fails when the non-linearities of the dynamics prohibit good convergence of the Taylor expansion in one or more directions. We solve this issue by introducing automatic domain splitting. During propagation, the polynomial expansion of the current state is split into two polynomials whenever its truncation error reaches a predefined threshold. The resulting set of polynomials accurately tracks uncertainties, even in highly nonlinear dynamics. The method is tested on the propagation of (99942) Apophis post-encounter motion.

  3. Automated hierarchical density shaving: a robust automated clustering and visualization framework for large biological data sets.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Gunjan; Liu, Alexander; Ghosh, Joydeep

    2010-01-01

    A key application of clustering data obtained from sources such as microarrays, protein mass spectroscopy, and phylogenetic profiles is the detection of functionally related genes. Typically, only a small number of functionally related genes cluster into one or more groups, and the rest need to be ignored. For such situations, we present Automated Hierarchical Density Shaving (Auto-HDS), a framework that consists of a fast hierarchical density-based clustering algorithm and an unsupervised model selection strategy. Auto-HDS can automatically select clusters of different densities, present them in a compact hierarchy, and rank individual clusters using an innovative stability criteria. Our framework also provides a simple yet powerful 2D visualization of the hierarchy of clusters that is useful for further interactive exploration. We present results on Gasch and Lee microarray data sets to show the effectiveness of our methods. Additional results on other biological data are included in the supplemental material. PMID:20431143

  4. Propagation of large uncertainty sets in orbital dynamics by automatic domain splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, Alexander; Di Lizia, Pierluigi; Armellin, Roberto; Makino, Kyoko; Bernelli-Zazzera, Franco; Berz, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Current approaches to uncertainty propagation in astrodynamics mainly refer to linearized models or Monte Carlo simulations. Naive linear methods fail in nonlinear dynamics, whereas Monte Carlo simulations tend to be computationally intensive. Differential algebra has already proven to be an efficient compromise by replacing thousands of pointwise integrations of Monte Carlo runs with the fast evaluation of the arbitrary order Taylor expansion of the flow of the dynamics. However, the current implementation of the DA-based high-order uncertainty propagator fails when the non-linearities of the dynamics prohibit good convergence of the Taylor expansion in one or more directions. We solve this issue by introducing automatic domain splitting. During propagation, the polynomial expansion of the current state is split into two polynomials whenever its truncation error reaches a predefined threshold. The resulting set of polynomials accurately tracks uncertainties, even in highly nonlinear dynamics. The method is tested on the propagation of (99942) Apophis post-encounter motion.

  5. Distilling Artificial Recombinants from Large Sets of Complete mtDNA Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qing-Peng; Salas, Antonio; Sun, Chang; Fuku, Noriyuki; Tanaka, Masashi; Zhong, Li; Wang, Cheng-Ye; Yao, Yong-Gang; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Background Large-scale genome sequencing poses enormous problems to the logistics of laboratory work and data handling. When numerous fragments of different genomes are PCR amplified and sequenced in a laboratory, there is a high immanent risk of sample confusion. For genetic markers, such as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which are free of natural recombination, single instances of sample mix-up involving different branches of the mtDNA phylogeny would give rise to reticulate patterns and should therefore be detectable. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed a strategy for comparing new complete mtDNA genomes, one by one, to a current skeleton of the worldwide mtDNA phylogeny. The mutations distinguishing the reference sequence from a putative recombinant sequence can then be allocated to two or more different branches of this phylogenetic skeleton. Thus, one would search for two (or three) near-matches in the total mtDNA database that together best explain the variation seen in the recombinants. The evolutionary pathway from the mtDNA tree connecting this pair together with the recombinant then generate a grid-like median network, from which one can read off the exchanged segments. Conclusions We have applied this procedure to a large collection of complete human mtDNA sequences, where several recombinants could be distilled by our method. All these recombinant sequences were subsequently corrected by de novo experiments – fully concordant with the predictions from our data-analytical approach. PMID:18714389

  6. Diagnosis of palpable breast masses: ultrasound-guided large core biopsy in a multidisciplinary setting.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Hernan I; Vargas, M Perla; Gonzalez, Katherine D; Venegas, Rose; Canet, Martha; Burla, Melissa; Eldrageely, Kamal; Khalkhali, Iraj

    2004-10-01

    Cytologic diagnosis of palpable breast masses is an accepted method for diagnosis. However, the high nondiagnostic rate causes repeat biopsy, unnecessary delays, and increased costs. Our purpose is to evaluate the use of ultrasound (US)-guided large-core needle biopsy as part of the minimally invasive multidisciplinary diagnosis of palpable breast masses. We studied 502 consecutive patients with 510 palpable solid breast masses seen and evaluated by a multidisciplinary team. Patients had US-guided core biopsy. Clinical-imaging-pathologic correlation (CIPC) was done in all cases. Core biopsy was deemed conclusive if CIPC was congruent and was used to guide definitive management. The median age of our patients was 39 years. Median tumor size was 2.2 cm. Of these cases, 463 (91%) had a conclusive diagnosis on CIPC. Core needle findings on 47 masses were nondefinitive to guide therapy (fibroepithelial lesion, atypical ductal hyperplasia, intraductal papilloma, CIPC). Three cancers were detected in this group on excisional biopsy. In conclusion, US-guided large-core needle biopsy is a sensitive method for diagnosis of palpable breast masses. Multidisciplinary correlation of clinical findings, imaging, and pathology is essential for success. This approach improves use of operating room resources and maximizes patient participation in the decision-making process. PMID:15529839

  7. Block-suffix shifting: fast, simultaneous medical concept set identification in large medical record corpora.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Lita, Lucian Vlad; Niculescu, Radu Stefan; Mitra, Prasenjit; Giles, C Lee

    2008-01-01

    Owing to new advances in computer hardware, large text databases have become more prevalent than ever.Automatically mining information from these databases proves to be a challenge due to slow pattern/string matching techniques. In this paper we present a new, fast multi-string pattern matching method based on the well known Aho-Chorasick algorithm. Advantages of our algorithm include:the ability to exploit the natural structure of text, the ability to perform significant character shifting, avoiding backtracking jumps that are not useful, efficiency in terms of matching time and avoiding the typical "sub-string" false positive errors.Our algorithm is applicable to many fields with free text, such as the health care domain and the scientific document field. In this paper, we apply the BSS algorithm to health care data and mine hundreds of thousands of medical concepts from a large Electronic Medical Record (EMR) corpora simultaneously and efficiently. Experimental results show the superiority of our algorithm when compared with the top of the line multi-string matching algorithms. PMID:18999282

  8. Improving Interactions in the Large Language Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Patricia M.; Raymond, Jacques; Pilon, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    Describes a prototypical microcomputer system that improves the interactions between teacher and large language classes in a traditional language classroom setting. This system achieves dynamic interactions through multiple student/professor interventions, immediate and delayed feedback, and individual teacher/student conferences. The system uses…

  9. A hybrid structure for the storage and manipulation of very large spatial data sets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peuquet, Donna J.

    1982-01-01

    The map data input and output problem for geographic information systems is rapidly diminishing with the increasing availability of mass digitizing, direct spatial data capture and graphics hardware based on raster technology. Although a large number of efficient raster-based algorithms exist for performing a wide variety of common tasks on these data, there are a number of procedures which are more efficiently performed in vector mode or for which raster mode equivalents of current vector-based techniques have not yet been developed. This paper presents a hybrid spatial data structure, named the ?vaster' structure, which can utilize the advantages of both raster and vector structures while potentially eliminating, or greatly reducing, the need for raster-to-vector and vector-to-raster conversion. Other advantages of the vaster structure are also discussed.

  10. Processing large sensor data sets for safeguards : the knowledge generation system.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Maikel A.; Smartt, Heidi Anne; Matthews, Robert F.

    2012-04-01

    Modern nuclear facilities, such as reprocessing plants, present inspectors with significant challenges due in part to the sheer amount of equipment that must be safeguarded. The Sandia-developed and patented Knowledge Generation system was designed to automatically analyze large amounts of safeguards data to identify anomalous events of interest by comparing sensor readings with those expected from a process of interest and operator declarations. This paper describes a demonstration of the Knowledge Generation system using simulated accountability tank sensor data to represent part of a reprocessing plant. The demonstration indicated that Knowledge Generation has the potential to address several problems critical to the future of safeguards. It could be extended to facilitate remote inspections and trigger random inspections. Knowledge Generation could analyze data to establish trust hierarchies, to facilitate safeguards use of operator-owned sensors.

  11. Data Mining on Large Data Set for Predicting Salmon Spawning Habitat

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, YuLong; Murray, Christopher J.; Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Geist, David R.

    2008-07-01

    Hydraulic properties related to river flow affect salmon spawning habitat. Accurate prediction of salmon spawning habitat and understanding the influential properties on the spawning behavior are of great interest for hydroelectric dam management. Previous research predicted salmon spawning habitat through deriving river specific spawning suitability indices and employing a function estimate method like logistic regression on several static river flow related properties and had some success. The objective of this study was two-fold. First dynamic river flow properties associated with upstream dam operation were successfully derived from a huge set of time series of both water velocity and water depth for about one fifth of a million habitat cells through principal component analysis (PCA) using nonlinear iterative partial least squares (NIPLAS). The inclusion of dynamic variables in the models greatly improved the model prediction. Secondly, nine machine learning methods were applied to the data and it was found that decision tree and rule induction methods were generally outperformed usually used logistic regression. Specifically random forest, an advanced decision tree algorithm, provided unanimous better results. Over-prediction problem in previous studies were greatly alleviated.

  12. Broad-Enrich: functional interpretation of large sets of broad genomic regions

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, Raymond G.; Lee, Chee; Welch, Ryan P.; Patil, Snehal; Weymouth, Terry; Scott, Laura J.; Sartor, Maureen A.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Functional enrichment testing facilitates the interpretation of Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) data in terms of pathways and other biological contexts. Previous methods developed and used to test for key gene sets affected in ChIP-seq experiments treat peaks as points, and are based on the number of peaks associated with a gene or a binary score for each gene. These approaches work well for transcription factors, but histone modifications often occur over broad domains, and across multiple genes. Results: To incorporate the unique properties of broad domains into functional enrichment testing, we developed Broad-Enrich, a method that uses the proportion of each gene’s locus covered by a peak. We show that our method has a well-calibrated false-positive rate, performing well with ChIP-seq data having broad domains compared with alternative approaches. We illustrate Broad-Enrich with 55 ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets using different methods to define gene loci. Broad-Enrich can also be applied to other datasets consisting of broad genomic domains such as copy number variations. Availability and implementation: http://broad-enrich.med.umich.edu for Web version and R package. Contact: sartorma@umich.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25161225

  13. The Classroom Animal: Crickets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using crickets for classroom activities, providing background information on their anatomy and reproduction and tips on keeping individual organisms or a breeding colony in the classroom. (JN)

  14. New Ways of Classroom Assessment. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, J. D., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    In this revised edition in the popular New Ways Series, teachers have once again been given an opportunity to show how they do assessment in their classrooms on an everyday basis. Often feeling helpless when confronted with large-scale standardized testing practices, teachers here offer classroom testing created with the direct aim of helping…

  15. Creating Learning Communities in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saville, Bryan K.; Lawrence, Natalie Kerr; Jakobsen, Krisztina V.

    2012-01-01

    There are many ways to construct classroom-based learning communities. Nevertheless, the emphasis is always on cooperative learning. In this article, the authors focus on three teaching methods--interteaching, team-based learning, and cooperative learning in large, lecture-based courses--that they have used successfully to create classroom-based…

  16. Bayesian Inversion in the Age of Large Data Sets and High Performance Computing (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanidis, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    The geostatistical approach to inverse problems recognizes the need to account for structure, in addition to raw data. The approach is stochastic, i.e., it accounts for uncertainty and can be used to generate an ensemble of solutions that are consistent with available information. However, as currently implemented, this approach is computationally very expensive when there are millions of unknowns and many thousands of observations, as is the case of assimilation or fusion of data from many sources in hydrogeology. The extensions presented in this work involve models and approaches that, for large inverse problems, have fewer computational and storage requirements than the conventional geostatistical methodology. In others words, they "scale up" better than prevalent methods. They are also more amenable to high-performance techniques and more suited to multiple processor computer architectures. We start by showing how new models can be generated within a Bayesian maximum-entropy formalism that take into account some statistics related to structural characteristics like continuity and smoothness. Then, the analysis focuses on models that produce matrix formulation with a very high degree of sparseness and we show that computational requirements can be dramatically reduced by exploiting this sparseness. Finally, we discuss relations with existing approaches, such as stochastic methods that employ semivariograms and generalized covariance functions and deterministic methods such as Tikhonov regularization.

  17. Large-scale assessment of missed opportunity risks in a complex hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yidong; Erdem, Ergin; Shi, Jing; Masek, Christopher; Woodbridge, Peter

    2014-10-17

    In this research, we apply a large-scale logistic regression analysis to assess the patient missed opportunity risks at a complex VA (US Department of Veterans Affairs) hospital in three categories, namely, no-show alone, no-show combined with late patient cancellation and no-show combined with late patient and clinic cancellations. The analysis includes unique explanatory variables related to VA patients for predicting missed opportunity risks. Furthermore, we develop two aggregated weather indices by combining many weather measures and include them as explanatory variables. The results indicate that most of the explanatory variables considered are significant factors for predicting the missed opportunity risks. Patients with afternoon appointment, higher percentage service connected, and insurance, married patients, shorter lead time and appointments with longer appointment length are consistently related to lower risks of missed opportunity. Furthermore, the VA patient-related factors and the two proposed weather indices are useful predictors for the risks of no-show and patient cancellation. More importantly, this research presents an effective procedure for VA hospitals and clinics to analyze the missed opportunity risks within the complex VA information technology system, and help them to develop proper interventions to mitigate the adverse effects caused by the missed opportunities. PMID:25325215

  18. "Tools For Analysis and Visualization of Large Time- Varying CFD Data Sets"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelms, Jane; vanGelder, Allen

    1999-01-01

    During the four years of this grant (including the one year extension), we have explored many aspects of the visualization of large CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) datasets. These have included new direct volume rendering approaches, hierarchical methods, volume decimation, error metrics, parallelization, hardware texture mapping, and methods for analyzing and comparing images. First, we implemented an extremely general direct volume rendering approach that can be used to render rectilinear, curvilinear, or tetrahedral grids, including overlapping multiple zone grids, and time-varying grids. Next, we developed techniques for associating the sample data with a k-d tree, a simple hierarchial data model to approximate samples in the regions covered by each node of the tree, and an error metric for the accuracy of the model. We also explored a new method for determining the accuracy of approximate models based on the light field method described at ACM SIGGRAPH (Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Computer Graphics) '96. In our initial implementation, we automatically image the volume from 32 approximately evenly distributed positions on the surface of an enclosing tessellated sphere. We then calculate differences between these images under different conditions of volume approximation or decimation.

  19. The Viking viewer for connectomics: scalable multi-user annotation and summarization of large volume data sets

    PubMed Central

    ANDERSON, JR; MOHAMMED, S; GRIMM, B; JONES, BW; KOSHEVOY, P; TASDIZEN, T; WHITAKER, R; MARC, RE

    2011-01-01

    Modern microscope automation permits the collection of vast amounts of continuous anatomical imagery in both two and three dimensions. These large data sets present significant challenges for data storage, access, viewing, annotation and analysis. The cost and overhead of collecting and storing the data can be extremely high. Large data sets quickly exceed an individual's capability for timely analysis and present challenges in efficiently applying transforms, if needed. Finally annotated anatomical data sets can represent a significant investment of resources and should be easily accessible to the scientific community. The Viking application was our solution created to view and annotate a 16.5 TB ultrastructural retinal connectome volume and we demonstrate its utility in reconstructing neural networks for a distinctive retinal amacrine cell class. Viking has several key features. (1) It works over the internet using HTTP and supports many concurrent users limited only by hardware. (2) It supports a multi-user, collaborative annotation strategy. (3) It cleanly demarcates viewing and analysis from data collection and hosting. (4) It is capable of applying transformations in real-time. (5) It has an easily extensible user interface, allowing addition of specialized modules without rewriting the viewer. PMID:21118201

  20. Knowledge and theme discovery across very large biological data sets using distributed queries: a prototype combining unstructured and structured data.

    PubMed

    Mudunuri, Uma S; Khouja, Mohamad; Repetski, Stephen; Venkataraman, Girish; Che, Anney; Luke, Brian T; Girard, F Pascal; Stephens, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    As the discipline of biomedical science continues to apply new technologies capable of producing unprecedented volumes of noisy and complex biological data, it has become evident that available methods for deriving meaningful information from such data are simply not keeping pace. In order to achieve useful results, researchers require methods that consolidate, store and query combinations of structured and unstructured data sets efficiently and effectively. As we move towards personalized medicine, the need to combine unstructured data, such as medical literature, with large amounts of highly structured and high-throughput data such as human variation or expression data from very large cohorts, is especially urgent. For our study, we investigated a likely biomedical query using the Hadoop framework. We ran queries using native MapReduce tools we developed as well as other open source and proprietary tools. Our results suggest that the available technologies within the Big Data domain can reduce the time and effort needed to utilize and apply distributed queries over large datasets in practical clinical applications in the life sciences domain. The methodologies and technologies discussed in this paper set the stage for a more detailed evaluation that investigates how various data structures and data models are best mapped to the proper computational framework. PMID:24312478

  1. Knowledge and Theme Discovery across Very Large Biological Data Sets Using Distributed Queries: A Prototype Combining Unstructured and Structured Data

    PubMed Central

    Repetski, Stephen; Venkataraman, Girish; Che, Anney; Luke, Brian T.; Girard, F. Pascal; Stephens, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    As the discipline of biomedical science continues to apply new technologies capable of producing unprecedented volumes of noisy and complex biological data, it has become evident that available methods for deriving meaningful information from such data are simply not keeping pace. In order to achieve useful results, researchers require methods that consolidate, store and query combinations of structured and unstructured data sets efficiently and effectively. As we move towards personalized medicine, the need to combine unstructured data, such as medical literature, with large amounts of highly structured and high-throughput data such as human variation or expression data from very large cohorts, is especially urgent. For our study, we investigated a likely biomedical query using the Hadoop framework. We ran queries using native MapReduce tools we developed as well as other open source and proprietary tools. Our results suggest that the available technologies within the Big Data domain can reduce the time and effort needed to utilize and apply distributed queries over large datasets in practical clinical applications in the life sciences domain. The methodologies and technologies discussed in this paper set the stage for a more detailed evaluation that investigates how various data structures and data models are best mapped to the proper computational framework. PMID:24312478

  2. Classroom Culture Promotes Academic Resiliency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiTullio, Gina

    2014-01-01

    Resiliency is what propels many students to continue moving forward under difficult learning and life conditions. We intuitively think that such resilience is a character quality that cannot be taught. On the contrary, when a teacher sets the right conditions and culture for it in the classroom by teaching collaboration and communication skills,…

  3. Getting Started in Classroom Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahl, David H.

    Written for secondary students, this booklet provides an introduction to several computer-related concepts through a set of six classroom games, most of which can be played with little more than a sheet of paper and a pencil. The games are: 1) SECRET CODES--introduction to binary coding, punched cards, and paper tape; 2) GUESS--efficient methods…

  4. News Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

  5. Behavior Problems in Learning Activities and Social Interactions in Head Start Classrooms and Early Reading, Mathematics, and Approaches to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca J.; Fernandez, Veronica; Dominguez, Ximena; Rouse, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    Relations between early problem behavior in preschool classrooms and a comprehensive set of school readiness outcomes were examined for a stratified random sample (N = 256) of 4-year-old children enrolled in a large, urban school district Head Start program. A series of multilevel models examined the unique contribution of early problem behavior…

  6. Impact of classroom design on interactive whiteboard use in a special needs classroom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grant Shannon; Sally Jo Cunningham

    2009-01-01

    The physical environment of a classroom—how space is organized and controlled—impacts the use of technology within that setting. This paper presents the initial rationale for choosing an interactive whiteboard (IWB) as the platform for software designed to encourage play in primary students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. An observational study of normal classroom practice and of an installed version of the

  7. The View from the Classroom: A Panel Discussion of Classroom Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Experiential Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents excerpts from a conversation with four classroom teachers who use experiential approaches. Discussion covers drawbacks and advantages of experiential methods in school settings, reasons for choosing to teach experientially rather than traditionally, and practical advice for those considering careers as classroom teachers with an…

  8. Effects of Methylphenidate and Expectancy on Children With ADHD: Behavior, Academic Performance, and Attributions in a Summer Treatment Program and Regular Classroom Settings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William E. Pelham; Betsy Hoza; David R. Pillow; Elizabeth M. Gnagy; Heidi L. Kipp; Andrew R. Greiner; Daniel A. Waschbusch; Sarah T. Trane; Joel Greenhouse; Lara Wolfson; Erin Fitzpatrick

    2002-01-01

    Pharmacological and expectancy effects of 0.3 mg\\/kg methylphenidate on the behavior and attributions of boys with attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder were evaluated. In a within-subject, balanced-placebo design, 136 boys received 4 medication–expectancy conditions. Attributions for success and failure on a daily report card were gathered. Assessments took place within the setting of a summer treatment program and were repeated in boys' regular

  9. The plateau in mnemonic resolution across large set sizes indicates discrete resource limits in visual working memory

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, David E.

    2015-01-01

    The precision of visual working memory (WM) representations declines monotonically with increasing storage load. Two distinct models of WM capacity predict different shapes for this precision-by-set-size function. Flexible-resource models, which assert a continuous allocation of resources across an unlimited number of items, predict a monotonic decline in precision across a large range of set sizes. Conversely, discrete-resource models, which assert a relatively small item limit for WM storage, predict that precision will plateau once this item limit is exceeded. Recent work has demonstrated such a plateau in mnemonic precision. Moreover, the set size at which mnemonic precision reached asymptote has been strongly predicted by estimated item limits in WM. In the present work, we extend this evidence in three ways. First, we show that this empirical pattern generalizes beyond orientation memory to color memory. Second, we rule out encoding limits as the source of discrete limits by demonstrating equivalent performance across simultaneous and sequential presentations of the memoranda. Finally, we demonstrate that the analytic approach commonly used to estimate precision yields flawed parameter estimates when the range of stimulus space is narrowed (e.g., a 180° rather than a 360° orientation space) and typical numbers of observations are collected. Such errors in parameter estimation reconcile an apparent conflict between our findings and others based on different stimuli. These findings provide further support for discrete-resource models of WM capacity. PMID:22477058

  10. Impact of a Classroom Interaction System on Student Joseph Beuckman, N. Sanjay Rebello and Dean Zollman

    E-print Network

    Zollman, Dean

    Impact of a Classroom Interaction System on Student Learning$ Joseph Beuckman, N. Sanjay Rebello-2601 Abstract. We have developed and deployed a Web-based wireless classroom interaction system in a large us to create a real- time adaptive classroom interaction system rather than merely a classroom

  11. Classroom Games: A Prisoner's Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Charles A.; Capra, Monica

    2000-01-01

    Describes a classroom game called the prisoner's dilemma that illustrates the conflict between social incentives to cooperate and private incentives to defect. Explains that it is a simple card game involving a large number of students. States that the students should be introduced to the real-world applications of the game. (CMK)

  12. Network analysis for today's classrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. V. Bapeswara Rao

    Analysis of an electric circuit in terms of element variables instead of loop currents involves the formulation of more equations, but their formulation is easier. Since calculators used by students in a classroom in recent times can solve a large system of equations with relative ease, one may not be concerned with such an increase. Over the years, in teaching

  13. Using Data in the Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-01-01

    This site provides information and discussion for educators and resource developers interested in effective teaching methods and pedagogical approaches for using data in the classroom. Much of the information currently on the site reflects discussions at the recent NSDL sponsored workshop on Using Data in the Classroom. Engaging students in using data to address scientific questions has long been an integral aspect of science education. Today's information technology provides many new mechanisms for collecting, manipulating, and aggregating data. In addition, large on-line data repositories provide the opportunity for completely new kinds of student experiences.

  14. Possible calcium centers for hydrogen storage applications: An accurate many-body study by AFQMC calculations with large basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwanto, Wirawan; Krakauer, Henry; Zhang, Shiwei; Virgus, Yudistira

    2011-03-01

    Weak H2 physisorption energies present a significant challenge to first-principle theoretical modeling and prediction of materials for H storage. There has been controversy regarding the accuracy of DFT on systems involving Ca cations. We use the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) method to accurately predict the binding energy of Ca + , - 4{H}2 . AFQMC scales as Nbasis3and has demonstrated accuracy similar to or better than the gold-standard coupled cluster CCSD(T) method. We apply a modified Cholesky decomposition to achieve efficient Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation in AFQMC at large basis sizes. We employ the largest correlation consistent basis sets available, up to Ca/cc-pCV5Z, to extrapolate to the complete basis limit. The calculated potential energy curve exhibits binding with a double-well structure. Supported by DOE and NSF. Calculations were performed at OLCF Jaguar and CPD.

  15. Mendel in the Modern Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mike U.; Gericke, Niklas M.

    2015-01-01

    Mendel is an icon in the history of genetics and part of our common culture and modern biology instruction. The aim of this paper is to summarize the place of Mendel in the modern biology classroom. In the present article we will identify key issues that make Mendel relevant in the classroom today. First, we recount some of the historical controversies that have relevance to modern curricular design, such as Fisher's (Ann Sci 1:115-137, 1936/2008) claim that Mendel's data were too good to be true. We also address questions about Mendel's status as the father of genetics as well as questions about the sequencing of Mendel's work in genetics instruction in relation to modern molecular genetics and evolution. Next, we present a systematic set of examples of research based approaches to the use of Mendel in the modern classroom along with criticisms of these designs and questions about the historical accuracy of the story of Mendel as presented in the typical classroom. Finally, we identify gaps in our understanding in need of further study and present a selected set of resources that, along with the references cited, should be valuable to science educators interested in further study of the story of Mendel.

  16. UNCORRECTEDPROOF Challenging Mathematics: Classroom Practices

    E-print Network

    Sriraman, Bharath

    UNCORRECTEDPROOF Chapter 7 Challenging Mathematics: Classroom Practices Gloria Stillman, Kwok classroom practice issues related to teachers provid- ing mathematical challenges in their everyday classrooms. We examine how challenging mathematics can become the essence of mathematics classrooms, how

  17. Traveling Tags: The Informal Literacies of Mexican Newcomers in and out of the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruna, Katherine Richardson

    2007-01-01

    This article documents tagging as one of several informal literacy practices used by newcomer Mexican youth in a Midwest school and classroom setting. Specifically, it details how tagging travels into the classroom. Using the tool of interactional ethnography to analyze videotaped classroom observation data of an English Learner Science setting, I…

  18. Petascale Global Kinetic Simulations of The Magnetosphere and Visualization Strategies for Analysis of Very Large Multi-Variate Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Loring, B.; Vu, H. X.; Omelchenko, Y.; Tatineni, M.; Majumdar, A.; Ayachit, U.; Geveci, B.

    2011-10-01

    3D global electromagnetic hybrid (fluid electrons, kinetic ions) simulations have long been considered the holy grail in kinetic modeling of the magnetosphere but high computational requirements have kept them out of reach. Petascale computers provide the computational power to make such simulations possible but peta computing poses two technical challenges. One is related to the development of efficient and scalable algorithms that can take advantage of the large number of cores. The second is related to knowledge extraction from the resulting simulation output. The challenge of science discovery from the extremely large data sets (˜ 200 TB from a single run) generated from global kinetic simulations is compounded by the multi-variate and "noisy" nature of the data. Here, we review our innovations to overcome both challenges. We have developed a highly scalable hybrid simulation code (H3D) that we used to perform the first petascale global kinetic simulation of the magnetosphere using 98,304 cores on the NSF Kraken supercomputer. To facilitate analysis of data from such runs, we have developed complex visualization pipeline including physics based algorithms to detect and track events of interest in the data. The effectiveness of this approach is illustrated through examples.

  19. Photonics Explorer: revolutionizing photonics in the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Amrita; Debaes, Nathalie; Cords, Nina; Fischer, Robert; Vlekken, Johan; Euler, Manfred; Thienpont, Hugo

    2012-10-01

    The `Photonics Explorer' is a unique intra-curricular optics kit designed to engage, excite and educate secondary school students about the fascination of working with light - hands-on, in their own classrooms. Developed with a pan European collaboration of experts, the kit equips teachers with class sets of experimental material provided within a supporting didactic framework, distributed in conjunction with teacher training courses. The material has been specifically designed to integrate into European science curricula. Each kit contains robust and versatile components sufficient for a class of 25-30 students to work in groups of 2-3. The didactic content is based on guided inquiry-based learning (IBL) techniques with a strong emphasis on hands-on experiments, team work and relating abstract concepts to real world applications. The content has been developed in conjunction with over 30 teachers and experts in pedagogy to ensure high quality and ease of integration. It is currently available in 7 European languages. The Photonics Explorer allows students not only to hone their essential scientific skills but also to really work as scientists and engineers in the classroom. Thus, it aims to encourage more young people to pursue scientific careers and avert the imminent lack of scientific workforce in Europe. 50 Photonics Explorer kits have been successfully tested in 7 European countries with over 1500 secondary school students. The positive impact of the kit in the classroom has been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated. A non-profit organisation, EYESTvzw [Excite Youth for Engineering Science and Technology], is responsible for the large scale distribution of the Photonics Explorer.

  20. WebViz:A Web-based Collaborative Interactive Visualization System for large-Scale Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, D. A.; McArthur, E.; Weiss, R. M.; Zhou, J.; Yao, B.

    2010-12-01

    WebViz is a web-based application designed to conduct collaborative, interactive visualizations of large data sets for multiple users, allowing researchers situated all over the world to utilize the visualization services offered by the University of Minnesota’s Laboratory for Computational Sciences and Engineering (LCSE). This ongoing project has been built upon over the last 3 1/2 years .The motivation behind WebViz lies primarily with the need to parse through an increasing amount of data produced by the scientific community as a result of larger and faster multicore and massively parallel computers coming to the market, including the use of general purpose GPU computing. WebViz allows these large data sets to be visualized online by anyone with an account. The application allows users to save time and resources by visualizing data ‘on the fly’, wherever he or she may be located. By leveraging AJAX via the Google Web Toolkit (http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/), we are able to provide users with a remote, web portal to LCSE's (http://www.lcse.umn.edu) large-scale interactive visualization system already in place at the University of Minnesota. LCSE’s custom hierarchical volume rendering software provides high resolution visualizations on the order of 15 million pixels and has been employed for visualizing data primarily from simulations in astrophysics to geophysical fluid dynamics . In the current version of WebViz, we have implemented a highly extensible back-end framework built around HTTP "server push" technology. The web application is accessible via a variety of devices including netbooks, iPhones, and other web and javascript-enabled cell phones. Features in the current version include the ability for users to (1) securely login (2) launch multiple visualizations (3) conduct collaborative visualization sessions (4) delegate control aspects of a visualization to others and (5) engage in collaborative chats with other users within the user interface of the web application. These features are all in addition to a full range of essential visualization functions including 3-D camera and object orientation, position manipulation, time-stepping control, and custom color/alpha mapping.

  1. Connecting classrooms to the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomé, P.; Radiguet, A.; Albert, B.; Batrung, M.; Caillat, M.; Gheudin, M.; Libert, Y.; Ferlet, R.; Maestrini, A.; Melchior, A.-L.; Munier, J.-M.; Rudolph, A.

    2012-12-01

    'Connecting Classrooms to the Milky Way' is a project of the EU-HOU Consortium (Hands-On-Universe, Europe), involving 11 European countries. It is supported by the lifelong Learning Programme of the European Community. The main goal of this project was to set up the first network of small radio-telescopes dedicated to education all around Europe and directly accessible from a simple Web interface. Any classroom connected to Internet via any Web-browser can now remotely control one of the radio-telescopes and observe the HI emission coming from our Galaxy. The interface also provides the users with simple tools to analyse the data: (i) derive the Milky-Way rotation curve and (ii) map the spiral arms HI distribution. A special emphasis has been made to enable the young generation to understand the challenges of these wavelengths, which are currently at the frontline of the new instruments with the development of the ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array) and SKA (Square Kilometer Array) projects.

  2. Classroom Creature Culture: Algae to Anoles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1994-01-01

    Living organisms are important classroom resources and require appropriate, responsible care. This anthology of articles from NSTA's award-winning journal Science and Children provides the basics about collecting, investigating, and caring for plants and animals in classroom settings. From daddy longlegs to box turtles, from duckweed to butterflies, emphasis is placed on responsible observation, respect for living beings, and the individual needs of nature's many creatures. Also makes an excellent complement to ecological studies.

  3. Inside the Primary Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Brian

    1980-01-01

    Presents some of the findings of the ORACLE research program (Observational Research and Classroom Learning Evaluation), a detailed observational study of teacher-student interaction, teaching styles, and management methods within a sample of primary classrooms. (Editor/SJL)

  4. Calculators in the Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royce, George; Shank, James

    1977-01-01

    Reports results of a student attitude survey among junior high school students who had been allowed to utilize classroom calculators to check results of mathematical computations. Students displayed a significant preference for using calculators in the classroom. (SL)

  5. "Did Ronald McDonald also Tend to Scare You as a Child?": Working to Emplace Consumption, Commodities and Citizen-Students in a Large Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    So-called "radical" and "critical"pedagogy seems to be everywhere these days on the landscapes of geographical teaching praxis and theory. Part of the remit of radical/critical pedagogy involves a de-centring of the traditional "banking" method of pedagogical praxis. Yet, how do we challenge this "banking" model of knowledge transmission in both a…

  6. Towards Perceptual Interface for Visualization Navigation of Large Data Sets Using Gesture Recognition with Bezier Curves and Registered 3-D Data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M C Shin; L V Tsap; D B Goldgof

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a gesture recognition system for visualization navigation. Scientists are interested in developing interactive settings for exploring large data sets in an intuitive environment. The input consists of registered 3-D data. A geometric method using Bezier curves is used for the trajectory analysis and classification of gestures. The hand gesture speed is incorporated into the algorithm to enable

  7. Quick Guide: Democratic Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Service Learning Clearinghouse, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Democratic classrooms are those in which the curriculum actively engages students in collaborative inquiry, decision making is shared between students and staff, and students choose their daily activities. Compared with traditional classrooms, students in democratic classrooms take more ownership of and responsibility for their own learning.…

  8. Classroom Quick Breaks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven D Smith

    2010-01-01

    Classroom Quick Breaks helps classroom teachers get their kids moving during the course of the day! Hundreds of creative fitness activities, plus informative fitness tips, make classroom-based physicalEducation programs fun and exciting without the need for specialized equipment.

  9. Competition in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Daphne

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the strategy she adopted to even out the participation among her multicultural students during their classroom discussions. The author realized that her students had different concepts about the classroom and different philosophies about competition. For the Americans and Indians, the classroom was a site of…

  10. Classroom Assessment Techniques: Portfolios

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Timothy F. Slater

    This page describes the use of portfolios as an assessment tool. It is one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. This site provides an overview of what portfolios are, how and when to use them, and why they are useful for assessing student understanding. The site is also linked to a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use, as well as supplementary links and sources to further explore this assessment tool.

  11. Spatial Fingerprints of Community Structure in Human Interaction Network for an Extensive Set of Large-Scale Regions

    PubMed Central

    Kallus, Zsófia; Barankai, Norbert; Szüle, János; Vattay, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    Human interaction networks inferred from country-wide telephone activity recordings were recently used to redraw political maps by projecting their topological partitions into geographical space. The results showed remarkable spatial cohesiveness of the network communities and a significant overlap between the redrawn and the administrative borders. Here we present a similar analysis based on one of the most popular online social networks represented by the ties between more than 5.8 million of its geo-located users. The worldwide coverage of their measured activity allowed us to analyze the large-scale regional subgraphs of entire continents and an extensive set of examples for single countries. We present results for North and South America, Europe and Asia. In our analysis we used the well-established method of modularity clustering after an aggregation of the individual links into a weighted graph connecting equal-area geographical pixels. Our results show fingerprints of both of the opposing forces of dividing local conflicts and of uniting cross-cultural trends of globalization. PMID:25993329

  12. Determination of counterfeit medicines by Raman spectroscopy: Systematic study based on a large set of model tablets.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, Sabine; Neusüß, Christian

    2015-08-10

    In the last decade, counterfeit pharmaceutical products have become a widespread issue for public health. Raman spectroscopy which is easy, non-destructive and information-rich is particularly suitable as screening method for fast characterization of chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Combined with chemometric techniques, it provides a powerful tool for the analysis and determination of counterfeit medicines. Here, for the first time, a systematic study of the benefits and limitations of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of pharmaceutical samples on a large set of model tablets, varying with respect to chemical and physical properties, was performed. To discriminate between the different mixtures, a combination of dispersive Raman spectroscopy performing in backscattering mode and principal component analysis was used. The discrimination between samples with different coatings, a varying amount of active pharmaceutical ingredients and a diversity of excipients were possible. However, it was not possible to distinguish between variations of the press power, mixing quality and granulation. As a showcase, the change in Raman signals of commercial acetylsalicylic acid effervescent tablets due to five different storage conditions was monitored. It was possible to detect early small chemical changes caused by inappropriate storage conditions. These results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate data analysis provides a powerful methodology for the fast and easy characterization of genuine and counterfeit medicines. PMID:25956227

  13. Vicarious Learning Experiences and Goal Setting: Impact on Preservice Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Technology Integration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ling Wang; Peggy A. Ertmer

    Abstract This study was designed ,to explore ,how ,vicarious learning experiences ,and goal setting influence preservice teachers’ self-efficacy for integrating technology ,into the classroom. Two hundred and eighty undergraduate students, enrolled in an introductory educational technology course at a large Mid-western university, participated. Students were divided into eighteen lab sections, which were assigned to one of four conditions (3 experimental

  14. RESISTANCE TO DISRUPTION IN A CLASSROOM SETTING

    PubMed Central

    Parry-Cruwys, Diana E; Neal, Carrie M; Ahearn, William H; Wheeler, Emily E; Premchander, Raseeka; Loeb, Melissa B; Dube, William V

    2011-01-01

    Substantial experimental evidence indicates that behavior reinforced on a denser schedule is more resistant to disruption than is behavior reinforced on a thinner schedule. The present experiment studied resistance to disruption in a natural educational environment. Responding during familiar activities was reinforced on a multiple variable-interval (VI) 7-s VI 30-s schedule for 6 participants with developmental disabilities. Resistance to disruption was measured by presenting a distracting item. Response rates in the disruption components were compared to within-session response rates in prior baseline components. Results were consistent with the predictions of behavioral momentum theory for 5 of 6 participants. PMID:21709794

  15. Resistance to Disruption in a Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry-Cruwys, Diana E.; Neal, Carrie M.; Ahearn, William H.; Wheeler, Emily E.; Premchander, Raseeka; Loeb, Melissa B.; Dube, William V.

    2011-01-01

    Substantial experimental evidence indicates that behavior reinforced on a denser schedule is more resistant to disruption than is behavior reinforced on a thinner schedule. The present experiment studied resistance to disruption in a natural educational environment. Responding during familiar activities was reinforced on a multiple…

  16. "Studio" Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLoughry, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    At Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (NY), some introductory science and engineering classes are taught in "studios," where students work on problems on computers, followed by a mini-lecture or summary and class discussion. The method replaces impersonal large-group lectures with less expensive, more effective instruction and more interpersonal…

  17. Just in Time to Flip Your Classroom

    E-print Network

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Charles, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    With advocates like Sal Khan and Bill Gates, flipped classrooms are attracting an increasing amount of media and research attention. We had heard Khan's TED talk and were aware of the concept of inverted pedagogies in general. Yet, it really hit home when we accidentally flipped our classroom. Our objective was to better prepare our students for class. We set out to effectively move some of our course content outside of class and decided to tweak the Just-in-Time-Teaching approach (JiTT). To our surprise, this tweak - which we like to call the flip-JiTT - ended up completely flipping our classroom. What follows is narrative of our experience and a procedure that any teacher can use to extend JiTT to a flipped classroom.

  18. Master Classrooms: Classroom Design with Technology in Mind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Kathryn

    Technology is changing the classroom requiring new design features and considerations to make the classroom flexible and interactive with the teaching process. The design of a Master Classroom, a product of the Classroom Improvement Project at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is described. These classrooms are specially-equipped to…

  19. Patterns of Limnohabitans Microdiversity across a Large Set of Freshwater Habitats as Revealed by Reverse Line Blot Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Jezbera, Jan; Jezberová, Jitka; Kasalický, Vojt?ch; Šimek, Karel; Hahn, Martin W.

    2013-01-01

    Among abundant freshwater Betaproteobacteria, only few groups are considered to be of central ecological importance. One of them is the well-studied genus Limnohabitans and mainly its R-BT subcluster, investigated previously mainly by fluorescence in situ hybridization methods. We designed, based on sequences from a large Limnohabitans culture collection, 18 RLBH (Reverse Line Blot Hybridization) probes specific for different groups within the genus Limnohabitans by targeting diagnostic sequences on their 16 S–23 S rRNA ITS regions. The developed probes covered in sum 92% of the available isolates. This set of probes was applied to environmental DNA originating from 161 different European standing freshwater habitats to reveal the microdiversity (intra-genus) patterns of the Limnohabitans genus along a pH gradient. Investigated habitats differed in various physicochemical parameters, and represented a very broad range of standing freshwater habitats. The Limnohabitans microdiversity, assessed as number of RLBH-defined groups detected, increased significantly along the gradient of rising pH of habitats. 14 out of 18 probes returned detection signals that allowed predictions on the distribution of distinct Limnohabitans groups. Most probe-defined Limnohabitans groups showed preferences for alkaline habitats, one for acidic, and some seemed to lack preferences. Complete niche-separation was indicated for some of the probe-targeted groups. Moreover, bimodal distributions observed for some groups of Limnohabitans, suggested further niche separation between genotypes within the same probe-defined group. Statistical analyses suggested that different environmental parameters such as pH, conductivity, oxygen and altitude influenced the distribution of distinct groups. The results of our study do not support the hypothesis that the wide ecological distribution of Limnohabitans bacteria in standing freshwater habitats results from generalist adaptations of these bacteria. Instead, our observations suggest that the genus Limnohabitans, as well as its R-BT subgroup, represent ecologically heterogeneous taxa, which underwent pronounced ecological diversification. PMID:23554898

  20. Integrating community outreach into the undergraduate neuroscience classroom.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Courtney

    2011-01-01

    While both federal agencies and professional associations emphasize the importance of neuroscience outreach, this goal seldom reaches the undergraduate neuroscience classroom. However, incorporating outreach into undergraduate neuroscience classes is an efficient means to reach not only future scientists, but also the future practitioners (K-12 teachers, social service workers, etc.) with whom neuroscientists hope to communicate. It also provides a vehicle for faculty members to engage in outreach activities that are typically un- or under-rewarded in faculty reviews. In this article, a Neuroscience Community Outreach Project (NCOP) is described. The project has been used in three offerings of a Cognitive Neuroscience course at a small liberal arts college, shared and applied at a large state university, and presented at a regional Society for Neuroscience meeting as an example of outreach opportunities for faculty. The NCOP assignment is a student-driven, modular activity that can be easily incorporated into existing neuroscience course frameworks. The assignment builds on student interests and connections in the community, providing a way for faculty at institutions without formal outreach programs to incorporate neuroscience outreach into the classroom and connect students to online resources. Several sample student projects are described across three broad domains (K-12 outreach, presentations to social service organizations, and media / popular press presentations). The article ends with a set of suggestions addressing common faculty concerns about incorporating community outreach into the undergraduate neuroscience classroom. PMID:23626492

  1. Integrating Community Outreach into the Undergraduate Neuroscience Classroom

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Courtney

    2011-01-01

    While both federal agencies and professional associations emphasize the importance of neuroscience outreach, this goal seldom reaches the undergraduate neuroscience classroom. However, incorporating outreach into undergraduate neuroscience classes is an efficient means to reach not only future scientists, but also the future practitioners (K-12 teachers, social service workers, etc.) with whom neuroscientists hope to communicate. It also provides a vehicle for faculty members to engage in outreach activities that are typically un- or under-rewarded in faculty reviews. In this article, a Neuroscience Community Outreach Project (NCOP) is described. The project has been used in three offerings of a Cognitive Neuroscience course at a small liberal arts college, shared and applied at a large state university, and presented at a regional Society for Neuroscience meeting as an example of outreach opportunities for faculty. The NCOP assignment is a student-driven, modular activity that can be easily incorporated into existing neuroscience course frameworks. The assignment builds on student interests and connections in the community, providing a way for faculty at institutions without formal outreach programs to incorporate neuroscience outreach into the classroom and connect students to online resources. Several sample student projects are described across three broad domains (K-12 outreach, presentations to social service organizations, and media / popular press presentations). The article ends with a set of suggestions addressing common faculty concerns about incorporating community outreach into the undergraduate neuroscience classroom. PMID:23626492

  2. Classroom Application of a Trial-Based Functional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Sarah E.; Iwata, Brian A.; Fritz, Jennifer N.; Roscoe, Eileen M.; Carreau, Abbey B.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated a trial-based approach to conducting functional analyses in classroom settings. Ten students referred for problem behavior were exposed to a series of assessment trials, which were interspersed among classroom activities throughout the day. Results of these trial-based functional analyses were compared to those of more traditional…

  3. THE EFFECT OF WINDOWLESS CLASSROOMS ON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LARSON, C. THEODORE; AND OTHERS

    THIS CASE STUDY WAS MADE TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTS OF NONFENESTRATED CLASSROOMS ON CHILDREN'S LEARNING ACHIEVEMENT. USING GRADES K-3, OBSERVATIONS WERE MADE IN TWO SCHOOLS OF SIMILAR CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOGRAPHY. THE STUDY WAS MADE IN THREE SETTINGS--A YEAR IN EXISTING FENESTRATED CLASSROOMS, A YEAR WITH ALL WINDOWS REMOVED IN THE TEST SCHOOL AND…

  4. Learning Environments in Information and Communications Technology Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zandvliet, David B.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2004-01-01

    The study of learning environments provides a useful research framework for investigating the effects of educational innovations such as those which are associated with the use of the Internet in classroom settings. This study reports an investigation into the use of Internet technologies in high-school classrooms in Australia and Canada.…

  5. Physical and Psychosocial Environments Associated with Networked Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zandvliet, David B.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports a study of the learning environments in computer networked classrooms. The study is unique in that it involved an evaluation of both the physical and psychosocial classroom environments in these computerised settings through the use of a combination of questionnaires and ergonomic evaluations. The study involved administering…

  6. Shared-Reading Volume in Early Childhood Special Education Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dynia, Jaclyn M.; Justice, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes book reading practices occurring in early childhood special education (ECSE) classrooms in comparison to early childhood education (ECE) classrooms. Reading logs submitted by 19 ECSE teachers and 13 ECE teachers over one academic year included all books read in whole class settings; these logs were analyzed to assess the…

  7. Creating Discussions with Classroom Voting in Linear Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Kelly; Zullo, Holly; Duncan, Jonathan; Stewart, Ann; Snipes, Marie

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of classroom voting in linear algebra, in which the instructors posed multiple-choice questions to the class and then allowed a few minutes for consideration and small-group discussion. After each student in the class voted on the correct answer using a classroom response system, a set of clickers, the instructor then guided a…

  8. An On-Line Classroom for the Unix Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scigliano, John A.; And Others

    This paper describes an electronic classroom (ECR) program that has been developed at Nova University to facilitate online real-time group instruction in graduate degree programs in information and computer science. The first section describes the educational uses of the program, including the simulation of a classroom-type educational setting

  9. Classroom Crisis Intervention through Contracting: A Moral Development Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smaby, Marlowe H.; Tamminen, Armas W.

    1981-01-01

    A counselor can arbitrate problem situations using a systematic approach to classroom intervention which includes meetings with the teacher and students. This crisis intervention model based on moral development can be more effective than reliance on guidance activities disconnected from the actual classroom settings where the problems arise.…

  10. Non-linear visualization and analysis of large water quality data sets: a model-free basis for efficient monitoring and risk assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gunnar Lischeid

    2009-01-01

    Environmental monitoring programs provide large multivariate data sets that usually cover considerable spatial and temporal\\u000a variabilities. The apparent complexity of these data sets requires sophisticated tools for their processing. Usually, fixed\\u000a schemes are followed, including the application of numerical models, which are increasingly implemented in decision support\\u000a systems. However, these schemes are too rigid with respect to detecting unexpected features,

  11. Supporting Students' Strategic Competence: A Case of a Sixth-Grade Mathematics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdemir, I. Elif Yetkin; Pape, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Mathematics education research has documented several classroom practices that might influence student self-regulation. We know little, however, about the ways these classroom practices could be structured in real classroom settings. In this exploratory case study, we purposefully selected a sixth-grade mathematics teacher who had participated in…

  12. Using Representational Tools to Learn about Complex Systems: A Tale of Two Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.; Liu, Lei; Gray, Steven; Jordan, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Orchestrating inquiry-based science learning in the classroom is a complex undertaking. It requires fitting the culture of the classroom with the teacher's teaching and inquiry practices. To understand the interactions between these variables in relation to student learning, we conducted an investigation in two different classroom settings to…

  13. Regulative Practices in a "Progressivist" Classroom: "Good Habits" as a "Disciplinary Technology".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chouliaraki, Lille

    1996-01-01

    Explores a set of pedagogic practices in a 'progressivist' classroom as practices of covert institutional regulation. The article attempts to show how the instructional potential of the pedagogic act is subordinated to the regulative rules of the institutional context of the classroom, so that following classroom rules becomes the main focus of…

  14. Calling All Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    1999-01-01

    Presents examples of innovative public/private partnerships that have successfully provided affordable telephone access to school classrooms. Contact information for each of the programs is provided. (GR)

  15. The Classroom Animal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on the earthworm. Reviews basic anatomical, behavioral, and reproductive facts. Offers suggestions for procuring, maintaining, and breeding colonies for classroom use. (ML)

  16. Pressures of the Season: A Descriptive Look at Classroom Quality in Second and Third Grade Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plank, Stephen B.; Condliffe, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    This report presents findings from two years of classroom observation designed to help understand the in-school experiences of students who had been first graders in eight Baltimore public schools in 2007-08. During the 2008-09 and 2009-10 school years, the authors conducted fieldwork to understand learning opportunities and settings for a set of…

  17. Photometric selection of quasars in large astronomical data sets with a fast and accurate machine learning algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Pramod; Connolly, Andrew J.; Gardner, Jeffrey P.

    2014-03-01

    Future astronomical surveys will produce data on ˜108 objects per night. In order to characterize and classify these sources, we will require algorithms that scale linearly with the size of the data, that can be easily parallelized and where the speedup of the parallel algorithm will be linear in the number of processing cores. In this paper, we present such an algorithm and apply it to the question of colour selection of quasars. We use non-parametric Bayesian classification and a binning algorithm implemented with hash tables (BASH tables). We show that this algorithm's run time scales linearly with the number of test set objects and is independent of the number of training set objects. We also show that it has the same classification accuracy as other algorithms. For current data set sizes, it is up to three orders of magnitude faster than commonly used naive kernel-density-estimation techniques and it is estimated to be about eight times faster than the current fastest algorithm using dual kd-trees for kernel density estimation. The BASH table algorithm scales linearly with the size of the test set data only, and so for future larger data sets, it will be even faster compared to other algorithms which all depend on the size of the test set and the size of the training set. Since it uses linear data structures, it is easier to parallelize compared to tree-based algorithms and its speedup is linear in the number of cores unlike tree-based algorithms whose speedup plateaus after a certain number of cores. Moreover, due to the use of hash tables to implement the binning, the memory usage is very small. While our analysis is for the specific problem of selection of quasars, the ideas are general and the BASH table algorithm can be applied to any density-estimation problem involving sparse high-dimensional data sets. Since sparse high-dimensional data sets are a common type of scientific data set, this method has the potential to be useful in a broad range of machine-learning applications in astrophysics.

  18. Divide and recombine (D&R) for the analysis of large and complex data sets with application to VoIP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jin Xia

    2011-01-01

    Large complex data sets, or big data, pervade academia, industry, and government. They present substantial challenges to our historical methodological approaches to data analysis, and to our historical computational methods and environments for data analysis. They challenge achieving deep analysis, which means comprehensive detailed analysis that does not lose important information through inappropriate data reductions. They challenge the computational feasibility

  19. Key Issues and Strategies for Recruitment and Implementation in Large-Scale Randomized Controlled Trial Studies in Afterschool Settings. Afterschool Research Brief. Issue No. 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Debra Hughes; Vaden-Kiernan, Michael; Rudo, Zena; Fitzgerald, Robert; Hartry, Ardice; Chambers, Bette; Smith, Dewi; Muller, Patricia; Moss, Marcey A.

    2008-01-01

    Under the larger scope of the National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Learning, SEDL funded three awardees to carry out large-scale randomized controlled trials (RCT) assessing the efficacy of promising literacy curricula in afterschool settings on student academic achievement. SEDL provided analytic and technical support to the RCT studies…

  20. DISPOSITION OF ANTHRACENE IN THE WATER AND AUFWUCHS MATRICES OF A LARGE OUTDOOR CHANNEL MICROCOSM: A DATA SET FOR MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large-scale, outdoor microcosms were used to study the fate of anthracene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, in the aquatic environment. The study provides a data set for describing the disposition of anthracene in the water and aufwuchs of the microcosms for the purpose of comp...

  1. Inter-species inference of gene set enrichment in lung epithelial cells from proteomic and large transcriptomic datasets

    PubMed Central

    Hormoz, Sahand; Bhanot, Gyan; Biehl, Michael; Bilal, Erhan; Meyer, Pablo; Norel, Raquel; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Dayarian, Adel

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Translating findings in rodent models to human models has been a cornerstone of modern biology and drug development. However, in many cases, a naive ‘extrapolation’ between the two species has not succeeded. As a result, clinical trials of new drugs sometimes fail even after considerable success in the mouse or rat stage of development. In addition to in vitro studies, inter-species translation requires analytical tools that can predict the enriched gene sets in human cells under various stimuli from corresponding measurements in animals. Such tools can improve our understanding of the underlying biology and optimize the allocation of resources for drug development. Results: We developed an algorithm to predict differential gene set enrichment as part of the sbv IMPROVER (systems biology verification in Industrial Methodology for Process Verification in Research) Species Translation Challenge, which focused on phosphoproteomic and transcriptomic measurements of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) primary cells under various stimuli and corresponding measurements in rat (NRBE) primary cells. We find that gene sets exhibit a higher inter-species correlation compared with individual genes, and are potentially more suited for direct prediction. Furthermore, in contrast to a similar cross-species response in protein phosphorylation states 5 and 25 min after exposure to stimuli, gene set enrichment 6 h after exposure is significantly different in NHBE cells compared with NRBE cells. In spite of this difference, we were able to develop a robust algorithm to predict gene set activation in NHBE with high accuracy using simple analytical methods. Availability and implementation: Implementation of all algorithms is available as source code (in Matlab) at http://bhanot.biomaps.rutgers.edu/wiki/codes_SC3_Predicting_GeneSets.zip, along with the relevant data used in the analysis. Gene sets, gene expression and protein phosphorylation data are available on request. Contact: hormoz@kitp.ucsb.edu PMID:25152231

  2. DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Mendell, Mark J.; Davies, Molly; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Faulkner, David; Hong, Tienzen; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2014-01-06

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included: ? The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).? Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.? Currently-available optical people counting systems work well much of the time but have large counting errors in some situations. ? In meeting rooms, measurements of carbon dioxide at return-air grilles appear to be a better choice than wall-mounted sensors.? In California, demand controlled ventilation in general office spaces is projected to save significant energy and be cost effective only if typical VRs without demand controlled ventilation are very high relative to VRs in codes. Based on the research, several recommendations were developed for demand controlled ventilation specifications in the California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards.The research on classroom ventilation collected data over two years on California elementary school classrooms to investigate associations between VRs and student illness absence (IA). Major findings included: ? Median classroom VRs in all studied climate zones were below the California guideline, and 40percent lower in portable than permanent buildings.? Overall, one additional L/s per person of VR was associated with 1.6percent less IA. ? Increasing average VRs in California K-12 classrooms from the current average to the required level is estimated to decrease IA by 3.4percent, increasing State attendance-based funding to school districts by $33M, with $6.2 M in increased energy costs. Further VR increases would provide additional benefits.? Confirming these findings in intervention studies is recommended. ? Energy costs of heating/cooling unoccupied classrooms statewide are modest, but a large portion occurs in relatively few classrooms.

  3. Defining Teacher Educator Through the Eyes of Classroom Teachers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Byran B. Korth; Lynnette Erickson; Kendra M. Hall

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze a sample of classroom teachers' definitions of the term teacher educator and determine whether they considered themselves to be teacher educators. The extent that classroom teachers' definitions of a teacher educator were influenced by involvement in a university-public school partnership was also examined. Results indicated that a large majority of the study's

  4. The Blended Classroom Revolution: Virtual Technology Goes to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Marty

    2009-01-01

    While virtual schools, which currently serve only a tiny fraction of the nation's 48 million K-12 students, get all the buzz, a much bigger, largely untold story of online learning is unfolding in America's brick-and-mortar classrooms: a simple yet profound merger of virtual-school technology and the traditional classroom is taking place. This…

  5. Teaching Cockpit Automation in the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casner, Stephen M.

    2003-01-01

    This study explores the idea of teaching fundamental cockpit automation concepts and skills to aspiring professional pilots in a classroom setting, without the use of sophisticated aircraft or equipment simulators. Pilot participants from a local professional pilot academy completed eighteen hours of classroom instruction that placed a strong emphasis on understanding the underlying principles of cockpit automation systems and their use in a multi-crew cockpit. The instructional materials consisted solely of a single textbook. Pilots received no hands-on instruction or practice during their training. At the conclusion of the classroom instruction, pilots completed a written examination testing their mastery of what had been taught during the classroom meetings. Following the written exam, each pilot was given a check flight in a full-mission Level D simulator of a Boeing 747-400 aircraft. Pilots were given the opportunity to fly one practice leg, and were then tested on all concepts and skills covered in the class during a second leg. The results of the written exam and simulator checks strongly suggest that instruction delivered in a traditional classroom setting can lead to high levels of preparation without the need for expensive airplane or equipment simulators.

  6. Defining Authentic Classroom Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Bruce B.; Schmitt, Vicki L.; Allen, Justin P.

    2012-01-01

    A commonly advocated best practice for classroom assessment is to make the assessments authentic. Authentic is often used as meaning the mirroring of real-world tasks or expectations. There is no consensus, however, in the actual definition of the term or the characteristics of an authentic classroom assessment. Sometimes, the realistic component…

  7. Speaking in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBain, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Too much speaking and indiscipline in class is an on-going problem for any teacher, it is at its least disruptive and at most it destroys a good positive classroom atmosphere. This article recognizes this and continues this debate and suggests key clues to support teachers in their efforts to maintain a positive classroom atmosphere and discipline…

  8. Ideas for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teaching Incorporating Micromath, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author shares some of the activities for the classroom invented by Gill Hatch. One of those activities is the activity for older students, which is for the five-year-olds through to post-graduates. Card-sorting game, geometry games, algebra games, and loop games are also some of those activities for the classroom invented by…

  9. Classroom versus Online Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spivey, Michael F.; McMillan, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined students' effort and performance using online versus traditional classroom testing procedures. The instructor and instructional methodology were the same in different sections of an introductory finance class. Only the procedure in which students were tested--online versus in the classroom--differed. The authors measured…

  10. Copyrights and the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.; Gluckman, Ivan B.

    1983-01-01

    A copyright infringement suit involving duplication of material for classroom use without permission or acknowledgement and related cases are discussed with reference to the fair use privilege, the Copyright Act of 1976, and congressional guidelines. Generally, fair use has been rejected as a blanket defense in classroom copying. (MJL)

  11. Classrooms and Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloome, David, Ed.

    This book is intended for researchers and teachers interested in literacy and concerned about classrooms as a context for literacy activity and learning. The book contains the following chapters: (1) "What It Means to be Literate about Classrooms" (Lyn Corno); (2) "Beyond Access: An Ethnographic Study of Reading and Writing in a Seventh Grade…

  12. Classroom Assessment. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Airasian, Peter W.

    "Classroom Assessment" is designed for students taking a first course in classroom assessment and measurement. It shows how assessment principles apply to the full range of teacher decision making, and not just the formal evaluation of student learning. For this reason, the book has been organized in a manner that follows the natural progression…

  13. Teacher Classroom Management Practices: Effects on Disruptive or Aggressive Student Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Regina M.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the large research base grounded in behavioral theory for strategies to increase appropriate behavior and prevent or decrease inappropriate behavior in the classroom, a systematic review of multi-component universal classroom management research is necessary to establish the effects of teachers' universal classroom management approaches.…

  14. The ActiveClass Project: Experiments in Encouraging Classroom Participation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tan Minh Truong; William G. Griswold; Matthew Ratto

    2003-01-01

    Participation in classroom settings decreases with class size and di- versity, thus creating passive modes of learning, due to feelings of shyness, peer pressure, and the like. Computing technology can help by creating a \\

  15. Kronos: A Java-Based Software System for the Processing and Retrieval of Large Scale AVHRR Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zengyan Zhang; David A. Bader; Satya Kalluri

    1999-01-01

    At regional scales, satellite-based sensors are the primary source of information to study the earth's environment,as they provide the needed dynamic temporal view of the earth's surface. Raw satellite orbit data have to beprocessed and mapped into a standard projection to produce multitemporal data sets which can then be used forregional or global earth science studies. In this paper, we

  16. Clustering by Pattern Similarity in Large Data Sets Haixun Wang Wei Wang Jiong Yang Philip S. Yu

    E-print Network

    Wang, Wei

    if they exhibit a coherent pattern on a subset of dimensions. For instance, in DNA microarray analysis, the expression levels of two genes may rise and fall synchronously in response to a set of environmental stim areas, in- cluding statistics [14], machine learning [13, 10], pattern recognition [11], and image

  17. Red-Cockaded Woodpecker Classroom Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Parks and Wildlife, Austin.

    This packet provides information on the balance between the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker and modern forestry in Texas. A set of classroom activities about the Red-cockaded Woodpecker and its habitat for grades 3-6, and a booklet, a pamphlet, and a poster are featured. Sections of the booklet include: (1) "The Red-cockaded Woodpecker"; (2)…

  18. Transforming Classroom Culture: Inclusive Pedagogical Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallalfar, Arlene, Ed.; Kingston-Mann, Esther, Ed.; Sieber, Tim, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Transforming Classroom Culture" is an anthology of original work authored by diverse faculty who work in a variety of New England college and university settings--private and public, racially homogeneous and diverse. The authors focus on institutional contexts that promote innovation in teaching practice, faculty identity as a resource for…

  19. Interactive Instructional Television (IITV) Classroom System Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan-Nicholls, Kimberly D.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an analysis of three different Interactive Instructional Television (IITV) classroom system design applications. Findings indicate each IITV system design has its own set of defining characteristics; however, underlying these unique attributes some common elements are found that are fundamental to delivery of two-way audio and video IITV.…

  20. The Physics Classroom: Graph Sketching and Recognition

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Tom Henderson

    This set of interactive practice questions allows students of introductory physics to test their own understanding of the graphical depiction of motion. It consists of 37 questions/tasks, with answers provided. Extensive scaffolding is provided in the form of "Explanation" links. This resource is part of The Physics Classroom an educational website for teachers and learners of introductory physics.

  1. Collaborative Learning in a Virtual Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Julie Ann Richardson

    This website features an article describing a study which shows that effective communication is not happening in the virtual classroom. This failure appears to be fragmenting learning communities and causing feelings of isolation and confusion among some students. The article offers a set of fourteen pilot guidelines to help address this issue.

  2. Nationalism in Geography Classrooms: Challenges and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlosser, Kolson; White, George; Leib, Jonathan; Dalby, Simon; Algeo, Katie; Jansson, David; Zimmerman, Jackson

    2011-01-01

    This set of essays is based on a panel session convened at the 2009 meeting of the Association of American Geographers, which sought to explore the many challenges and pitfalls involved with teaching nationalism as a topic in geography classrooms. The authors offer different but complementary insights into the practical difficulties and potential…

  3. Harnessing mobile devices in the classroom.

    PubMed

    Smith, Charlene M

    2012-12-01

    This column describes the use of mobile devices in the classroom to support nurses' competency in information literacy. Nurses, as knowledge workers, require competency in information literacy and mobile technology to access accurate and current information promptly in practice settings. PMID:23181405

  4. Preschool Teachers' Exposure to Classroom Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grebennikov, Leonid

    2006-01-01

    This research examined exposure to classroom noise of 25 full-time teaching staff in 14 preschool settings located across Western Sydney. The results indicated that one teacher exceeded the maximum permissible level of daily noise exposure for employees under the health and safety legislation. Three staff approached this level and 92% of teachers…

  5. Constructing Multiple Subjectivities in Classroom Literacy Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthey, Sarah J.

    1998-01-01

    Demonstrates ways in which three students in a multi-age, literature-based grade 3/4 classroom constructed and reconstructed their subjectivities based on demands of the social setting. Notes that each student's participation was influenced by gender, social class, ethnicity, and the task. Suggests that interpretations of students' interactions…

  6. Dynamic Assessment in the Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehner, Matthew E.; Lantolf, James P.

    2005-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the implementation of Dynamic Assessment (henceforth, DA) in the L2 classroom setting. DA is an approach to assessment and instruction derived from Vygotsky's theory of the Zone of Proximal Development (henceforth, ZPD). In what follows, we will first discuss briefly the concept of the ZPD and its realization in DA…

  7. Bully Prevention in the Physical Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Brett; Gulbrandson, Kim; Herman-Ukasick, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Bullying takes on many forms and occurs in all classrooms, and the activities found in physical education often provide fertile ground for these behaviors. For example, dodgeball is often played in physical education settings, even though the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance has clearly stated that dodgeball…

  8. Toward the Instructional Utility of Large-Scale Writing Assessment: Validation of a New Narrative Rubric. Project 3.1. Studies in Improving Classroom and Local Assessments. Portfolio Assessment: Reliability of Teachers' Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gearhart, Maryl

    The "Writing What You Read" (WWYR) rubric was designed for large-scale assessments, and differs from most narrative rubrics in its narrative-specific content and its developmental framework. The rubric contains five analytic subscales for theme, character, setting, plot, and communication, and a sixth holistic scale for overall effectiveness.…

  9. Children's Evaluations of Classroom Friend and Classroom Best Friend Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meurling, Carl-Johan Nils; Ray, Glen E.; LoBello, Steven G.

    1999-01-01

    Examined second-, third-, fifth-, and sixth graders' evaluations of a classroom friend and a classroom best-friend relationship. Found that children rated a classroom best friend higher than a classroom friend on caring, help/guidance, companionship, intimacy, conflict resolution, and exclusivity. Older children distinguished more between friends…

  10. Observed Classroom Quality Profiles of Kindergarten Classrooms in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salminen, Jenni; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Pakarinen, Eija; Siekkinen, Martti; Hannikainen, Maritta; Poikonen, Pirjo-Liisa; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: The aim of the present study was to examine classroom quality profiles of kindergarten classrooms using a person-centered approach and to analyze these patterns in regard to teacher and classroom characteristics. Observations of the domains of Emotional Support, Classroom Organization, and Instructional Support were conducted in…

  11. NASA Classroom Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Exploration of space provides a compelling need for cell-based research into the basic mechanisms that underlie the profound changes that occur in terrestrial life that is transitioned to low gravity environments. Toward that end, NASA developed a rotating bioreactor in which cells are cultured while continuously suspended in a cylinder in which the culture medium rotates with the cylinder. The randomization of the gravity vector accomplished by the continuous rotation, in a low shear environment, provides an analog of microgravity. Because cultures grown in bioreactors develop structures and functions that are much closer to those exhibited by native tissue than can be achieved with traditional culture methods, bioreactors have contributed substantially to advancing research in the fields of cancer, diabetes, infectious disease modeling for vaccine production, drug efficacy, and tissue engineering. NASA has developed a Classroom Bioreactor (CB) that is built from parts that are easily obtained and assembled, user-friendly and versatile. It can be easily used in simple school settings to examine the effect cultures of seeds or cells. An educational brief provides assembly instructions and lesson plans that describes activities in science, math and technology that explore free fall, microgravity, orbits, bioreactors, structure-function relationships and the scientific method.

  12. Supporting students' strategic competence: a case of a sixth-grade mathematics classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, ?. Elif Yetkin; Pape, Stephen J.

    2012-06-01

    Mathematics education research has documented several classroom practices that might influence student self-regulation. We know little, however, about the ways these classroom practices could be structured in real classroom settings. In this exploratory case study, we purposefully selected a sixth-grade mathematics teacher who had participated in a professional development program focussed on NCTM standards and SRL in the mathematics classroom for extensive classroom observation. The purpose was to explore how and to what extend she structured classroom practices to support strategic competence in her students. Four features of classroom practices were found as evidence for how strategic competence was potentially supported in this classroom: (a) allowing autonomy and shared responsibility during the early stages of learning, (b) focusing on student understanding, (c) creating contexts for students to learn about strategic learning and to exercise strategic behaviour, and (d) helping students to personalise strategies by recognising their ideas and strategic behaviours.

  13. pXRF quantitative analysis of the Otowi Member of the Bandelier Tuff: Generating large, robust data sets to decipher trace element zonation in large silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoose, A. E.; Wolff, J.; Conrey, R.

    2013-12-01

    Advances in portable X-Ray fluorescence (pXRF) analytical technology have made it possible for high-quality, quantitative data to be collected in a fraction of the time required by standard, non-portable analytical techniques. Not only do these advances reduce analysis time, but data may also be collected in the field in conjunction with sampling. Rhyolitic pumice, being primarily glass, is an excellent material to be analyzed with this technology. High-quality, quantitative data for elements that are tracers of magmatic differentiation (e.g. Rb, Sr, Y, Nb) can be collected for whole, individual pumices and subsamples of larger pumices in 4 minutes. We have developed a calibration for powdered rhyolite pumice from the Otowi Member of the Bandelier Tuff analyzed with the Bruker Tracer IV pXRF using Bruker software and influence coefficients for pumice, which measures the following 19 oxides and elements: SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, FeO*, MnO, CaO, K2O, P2O5, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba, Ce, Pb, and Th. With this calibration for the pXRF and thousands of individual powdered pumice samples, we have generated an unparalleled data set for any single eruptive unit with known trace element zonation. The Bandelier Tuff of the Valles-Toledo Caldera Complex, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, is divided into three main eruptive events. For this study, we have chosen the 1.61 Ma, 450 km3 Otowi Member as it is primarily unwelded and pumice samples are easily accessible. The eruption began with a plinian phase from a single source located near center of the current caldera and deposited the Guaje Pumice Bed. The initial Unit A of the Guaje is geochemically monotonous, but Units B through E, co-deposited with ignimbrite show very strong chemical zonation in trace elements, progressing upwards through the deposits from highly differentiated compositions (Rb ~350 ppm, Nb ~200 ppm) to less differentiated (Rb ~100 ppm, Nb ~50 ppm). Co-erupted ignimbrites emplaced during column collapse show similar trace element zonation. The eruption culminated in caldera collapse after transitioning from a single central vent to ring fracture vents. Ignimbrites deposited at this time have lithic breccias and chaotic geochemical profiles. The geochemical discrepancy between early and late deposits warrants detailed, high-resolution sampling and analysis in order to fully understand the dynamics behind zonation processes. Samples were collected from locations that circumvent the caldera and prepared and analyzed in the field and the laboratory with the pXRF. Approximately 2,000 pumice samples will complete this unprecedented data set, allowing detailed reconstruction of trace element zonation around all sides of the Valles Caldera. These data are then used to constrain models of magma chamber processes that produce trace element zonation and how it is preserved in the deposits after a catastrophic, caldera-forming eruption.

  14. The large karstic holes at the top of the Syrian coastal Mountain Range. Importance of structural setting for the karstogenesis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocochain, Ludovic; Blanpied, Christian; Bigot, Jean-Yves; Peyronel, Olivier; Gorini, Christian; Abdalla, Abdelkarim Al; Azki, Fawaz

    2015-04-01

    Along the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, the Syria Coastal Mountain Range spreads from north to south over 150 km of long. This range is a monocline structure stopped by a major escarpment that domines Al-Gahb Graben to the East. The Coastal Mountain Range is mainly formed by Mesozoic limestone that show a major unconformity between the Upper Jurassic and Aptien deposits, and important erosions in the Upper Cretaceous deposits. Locally, the Juro-Cretaceous unconformity is characterized by a layer of continental basalts with fossil woods that reveal a long emersion of the platform. The most recent carbonate deposits at the top of the Coastal Mountain Range are Turonian age. In the center part of the Coastal Mountain Range, in a small area, the Cretaceous carbonates are affected by large karstic dolines. These dolines are curiously located at the top of the mountain range. This position is not beneficial for the development of large karstic holes.

  15. A High Performance Spatial Query Engine for Large Event Data Sets Developed for the GLAST LAT Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, T.

    2007-10-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the primary instrument on-board the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) satellite. The LAT is not a typical imaging instrument but rather records the energy and arrival direction of each individual gamma-ray photon. It is designed to operate primarily in sky survey mode, instead of pointing at fixed targets for long periods of time. The standard survey mode gives complete coverage of the celestial sphere every 2 orbits (˜3 hrs). Additionally, the LAT has a very large (˜2 sr) field of view, and an energy dependent point spread function (PSF). These factors combine to generate a large data volume and present a unique challenge in providing data to the user community for the study of astronomical sources. We present the design of the public data server at the GLAST Science Support Center (GSSC) for the LAT data as well as performance benchmarks of the initial implementation. The data server operates on event lists stored in FITS files. Based on the user's query, the photons matching the data cuts are extracted and presented to the user as a FITS file ready to be downloaded and used in the GLAST science analysis software. Running on a single CPU, the photon data server can extract and prepare the ˜1.5 million photons matching a typical user's query from the ˜80 million photons in a year's worth of observational data in approximately 40~s. The complete system is implemented as a small cluster of Linux PCs to improve performance even more by distributing the load of a single query or processing multiple queries simultaneously.

  16. Merger Simulation in the Presence of Large Choice Sets and Consumer Stockpiling: The Case of the Bottled Juice Industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geoffrey M. Pofahl

    2009-01-01

    We simulate the price effects of several hypothetical mergers in the shelf-stable bottled juice industry. In doing so, we\\u000a highlight the effects of consumer stockpiling on demand elasticity estimates and subsequent merger simulations. This task\\u000a is complicated by a large number of choice alternatives within the bottled juice category. To address this challenge we employ\\u000a a demand model based on

  17. New set-up for high-quality soft-X-ray absorption spectroscopy of large organic molecules in the gas phase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Florian Holch; Dominique Hübner; Rainer Fink; Achim Schöll; Eberhard Umbach

    2011-01-01

    We present a new experimental set-up for the investigation of large (>128amu) organic molecules in the gas-phase by means of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in the soft X-ray range. Our approach uses a gas cell, which is sealed off against the surrounding vacuum and which can be heated above the sublimation temperature of the respective molecular compound. Using

  18. Sharp Interface Immersed-Boundary\\/Level-Set Cartesian Grid Method for Large-Eddy Simulation of Two-Phase Flows with SurfacePiercing Moving Bodies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianming Yang; Frederick Stern

    2007-01-01

    A sharp interface Cartesian grid method for the large-eddy simulation of two-phase flows interacting with surface-piercing moving bodies is presented. The method is based on a sharp interface immersed boundary formulation for fluid flows with moving boundaries and a level set based ghost fluid method for two-phase interface treatment. A four-step fractional step method is adopted and a Lagrangian dynamic

  19. Classroom Instruction: The Influences of Marie Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNaughton, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Marie Clay's body of work has influenced classroom instruction in direct and indirect ways, through large overarching themes in our pedagogical content knowledge as well as specific smart practices. This paper focuses on her the contributions to our thinking about instruction which come from two broad theoretical concepts; emergent literacy…

  20. Discovering Students' Voices in Teachers' Classroom Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Myriam N.

    This study is part of a large project on teacher research and professional development in progress in the Teacher Enhancement Program (TEP), a collaborative mid-career program between the University of New Mexico and local public schools. The objective of the study was to describe teachers' engagement in classroom inquiry and the transformative…

  1. Increasing Instructional Effectiveness: Reducing Classroom Apprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishii, Satoshi; Klopf, Donald

    Research shows that a very large percentage of Japanese university students are apprehensive about communicating orally, to the degree that their fear may be debilitating, weakening their effectiveness as oral interactants in social and classroom situations. This uneasiness with speech has been culturally ingrained for centuries. Children are…

  2. A large, consistent plasma proteomics data set from prospectively collected breast cancer patient and healthy volunteer samples

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Variability of plasma sample collection and of proteomics technology platforms has been detrimental to generation of large proteomic profile datasets from human biospecimens. Methods We carried out a clinical trial-like protocol to standardize collection of plasma from 204 healthy and 216 breast cancer patient volunteers. The breast cancer patients provided follow up samples at 3 month intervals. We generated proteomics profiles from these samples with a stable and reproducible platform for differential proteomics that employs a highly consistent nanofabricated ChipCube™ chromatography system for peptide detection and quantification with fast, single dimension mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Protein identification is achieved with subsequent LC-MS/MS analysis employing the same ChipCube™ chromatography system. Results With this consistent platform, over 800 LC-MS plasma proteomic profiles from prospectively collected samples of 420 individuals were obtained. Using a web-based data analysis pipeline for LC-MS profiling data, analyses of all peptide peaks from these plasma LC-MS profiles reveals an average coefficient of variability of less than 15%. Protein identification of peptide peaks of interest has been achieved with subsequent LC-MS/MS analyses and by referring to a spectral library created from about 150 discrete LC-MS/MS runs. Verification of peptide quantity and identity is demonstrated with several Multiple Reaction Monitoring analyses. These plasma proteomic profiles are publicly available through ProteomeCommons. Conclusion From a large prospective cohort of healthy and breast cancer patient volunteers and using a nano-fabricated chromatography system, a consistent LC-MS proteomics dataset has been generated that includes more than 800 discrete human plasma profiles. This large proteomics dataset provides an important resource in support of breast cancer biomarker discovery and validation efforts. PMID:21619653

  3. A High-performance Spatial Query Engine for Large Event Data Sets Implemented for the Fermi LAT Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, T. E.

    2009-09-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the primary instrument on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). The LAT is not a typical imaging instrument but rather records the energy and arrival direction of each individual gamma-ray photon. It is designed to operate primarily in sky survey mode instead of pointing at fixed targets for long periods of time. The standard survey mode gives complete coverage of the celestial sphere every 2 orbits (˜3 hours). Additionally, the LAT has a very large (˜2 sr) field of view, and an energy-dependent point spread function (PSF). These factors combine to generate a large data volume and present a unique challenge in providing data to the user community for the study of astronomical sources. We present the design of the public data server at the Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC) for the LAT data as well as performance benchmarks of the initial flight implementation. The data server operates on event lists stored in FITS files. Based on the user's query, the photons matching the data cuts are extracted and presented to the user as a FITS file ready to be downloaded and used in the Fermi science analysis software. Running on a single CPU, the photon data server can extract and prepare the 3-4 million photons matching a typical user's query from the ˜120 million photons in a year's worth of observational data in approximately 20 seconds. The complete system is implemented as a small cluster of Linux PCs to improve performance even more by distributing the load of a single query or processing multiple queries simultaneously.

  4. Classroom Misbehavior in the Eyes of Students: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Rachel C. F.; Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2012-01-01

    Using individual interviews, this study investigated perceptions of classroom misbehaviors among secondary school students in Hong Kong (N = 18). Nineteen categories of classroom misbehaviors were identified, with talking out of turn, disrespecting teacher, and doing something in private being most frequently mentioned. Findings revealed that students tended to perceive misbehaviors as those actions inappropriate in the classroom settings and even disrupting teachers' teaching and other students' learning. Among various misbehaviors, talking out of turn and disrespecting teacher were seen as the most disruptive and unacceptable. These misbehaviors were unacceptable because they disturbed teaching and learning, and violated the values of respect, conformity, and obedience in the teacher-student relationship within the classroom. The frequency and intensity of misbehaviors would escalate if students found it fun, no punishment for such misbehaviors, or teachers were not authoritative enough in controlling the situations. Implications for further research and classroom management are discussed. PMID:22919316

  5. Outdoor Classroom Adventures

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kathy Jacobs Maher

    2010-02-01

    In this outdoor classroom adventure, students learn to work cooperatively when facing challenges during overnight camping trips. Perhaps most importantly, students gain direction and purpose in their lives. They also gain self-assurance, which in turn giv

  6. Climatic Conditions in Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevan, Simon M.; Howes, John D.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an overview of research on the ways in which classroom thermal environment, lighting conditions, ion state, and electromagnetic and air pollution affect learning and the performance of students and teachers. (SJL)

  7. The Classroom Animal: Mealworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes appearance, longevity, and changes in each step of the mealworm life cycle. Guidelines for starting a classroom colony are given with housing and care instructions. Suggested observations, activities, and questions for students are included. (DH)

  8. Critters in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert W.; Fleisher, Paul

    1984-01-01

    The use of invertebrates as classroom "pets" can develop students' skills in scientific inquiry and instill respect for science. Few materials are needed for projects involving invertebrates. Suggested activities using snails, crickets, earthworms, crayfish, and guppies are offered. (DF)

  9. The Classroom Space Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbickas, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Introduces the Classroom Space project aimed at revitalizing science education at Key Stages 3 and 4 by using exciting examples from Space Science and Astronomy to illustrate key science concepts. (Author/YDS)

  10. Science beyond the classroom

    SciTech Connect

    Petric, J.; Bonkalski, J. (Illinois Junior Academy of Science, Morris (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Not every student is meant to be a scientist. Students come into a classroom with a variety of experiences, interests, and abilities. Therefore, the goal of any science program is not the production of chemists, physicists, or biologists but the development of scientifically literature individuals: students who can question, hypothesize, test, record, and conclude. The classroom environment cannot always provide the range of real-life experiences necessary for students to internalize the scientific method. The Illinois Junior Academy of Science (IJAS), through its sponsorship of local, regional, and state science fair competitions, seeks to assist the schools by providing just such practical hands-on experiences. The IJAS-sponsored expositions allow students the opportunity to translate classroom knowledge into a form that is tangible and concrete, an event that goes beyond the walls of a classroom into the reality of the world in which they will live and work.

  11. For the Classroom: Scrimshaw.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Procedures are described for practicing the art of scrimshaw in the classroom. Several materials are suggested for use. These include beef soup bones, old piano keys, nails, sandpaper, and lampblack or charcoal. (SA)

  12. Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site provides information on various classroom assessment techniques (CATs) such as primary trait analysis, using anonymous assessments, goal ranking and matching, self assessment, active learning, transfer and applied learning, and group work assessment.

  13. Deep sequencing of large library selections allows computational discovery of diverse sets of zinc fingers that bind common targets

    PubMed Central

    Persikov, Anton V.; Rowland, Elizabeth F.; Oakes, Benjamin L.; Singh, Mona; Noyes, Marcus B.

    2014-01-01

    The Cys2His2 zinc finger (ZF) is the most frequently found sequence-specific DNA-binding domain in eukaryotic proteins. The ZF’s modular protein–DNA interface has also served as a platform for genome engineering applications. Despite decades of intense study, a predictive understanding of the DNA-binding specificities of either natural or engineered ZF domains remains elusive. To help fill this gap, we developed an integrated experimental-computational approach to enrich and recover distinct groups of ZFs that bind common targets. To showcase the power of our approach, we built several large ZF libraries and demonstrated their excellent diversity. As proof of principle, we used one of these ZF libraries to select and recover thousands of ZFs that bind several 3-nt targets of interest. We were then able to computationally cluster these recovered ZFs to reveal several distinct classes of proteins, all recovered from a single selection, to bind the same target. Finally, for each target studied, we confirmed that one or more representative ZFs yield the desired specificity. In sum, the described approach enables comprehensive large-scale selection and characterization of ZF specificities and should be a great aid in furthering our understanding of the ZF domain. PMID:24214968

  14. Solar Powered Classroom

    ScienceCinema

    none

    2013-06-27

    A group of fourth graders in Durham, North Carolina, are showing America the way to a clean energy future. They are installing solar panels on their classroom roof for a project that goes above and beyond a normal day in school. From researching solar panel installation, to generating funds for the project via Kickstarter, these are students who put their plans into action. Their accomplishments go beyond the classroom and stress the importance of getting people of all ages involved in renewable energy.

  15. Solar Powered Classroom

    SciTech Connect

    none

    2013-06-13

    A group of fourth graders in Durham, North Carolina, are showing America the way to a clean energy future. They are installing solar panels on their classroom roof for a project that goes above and beyond a normal day in school. From researching solar panel installation, to generating funds for the project via Kickstarter, these are students who put their plans into action. Their accomplishments go beyond the classroom and stress the importance of getting people of all ages involved in renewable energy.

  16. Consistency of Toddler Engagement across Two Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguiar, Cecilia; McWilliam, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    This study documented the consistency of child engagement across two settings, toddler child care classrooms and mother-child dyadic play. One hundred twelve children, aged 14-36 months (M = 25.17, SD = 6.06), randomly selected from 30 toddler child care classrooms from the district of Porto, Portugal, participated. Levels of engagement were…

  17. A Comparison of Self-Monitoring with and without Reinforcement to Improve On-Task Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Tonya N.; Dacus, Sharon; Bankhead, Jenna; Haupert, Megan; Fuentes, Lisa; Zoch, Tamara; Kang, Soyeon; Attai, Shanna; Lang, Russell

    2014-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the effects of a self-monitoring and self-monitoring plus reinforcement intervention on classroom behavior. A typically-developing high school student demonstrating difficulty staying on-task during classroom instruction was observed in three classroom settings associated with high levels of off-task behavior. During…

  18. Removal of a Student on a Methylphenidate (Ritalin) Prescription in an Open Classroom Condition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Irene

    Described by the teacher is the removal of a 10-year-old hyperactive boy from drug therapy (Ritalin). The setting, open classroom, and the involvement of four regular classroom teachers and a progressive teacher employing behavior modification in a small group setting are thought to be related to the boy's academic and behavioral progress. The boy…

  19. Automatic baseline recognition for the correction of large sets of spectra using continuous wavelet transform and iterative fitting.

    PubMed

    Bertinetto, Carlo G; Vuorinen, Tapani

    2014-01-01

    A new algorithm for the automatic recognition of peak and baseline regions in spectra is presented. It is part of a study to devise a baseline correction method that is particularly suitable for the simple and fast treatment of large amounts of data of the same type, such as those coming from high-throughput instruments, images, process monitoring, etc. This algorithm is based on the continuous wavelet transform, and its parameters are automatically determined using the criteria of Shannon entropy and the statistical distribution of noise, requiring virtually no user intervention. It was assessed on simulated spectra with different noise levels and baseline amplitudes, successfully recognizing the baseline points in all cases but for a few extremely weak and noisy signals. It can be combined with various fitting methods for baseline estimation and correction. In this work, it was used together with an iterative polynomial fitting to successfully process a real Raman image of 40,000 pixels in about 2.5 h. PMID:24624486

  20. Exposures to Molds in School Classrooms of Children with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Baxi, Sachin N.; Muilenberg, Michael L.; Rogers, Christine A.; Sheehan, William J.; Gaffin, Jonathan; Permaul, Perdita; Kopel, Lianne S.; Lai, Peggy S.; Lane, Jeffrey P.; Bailey, Ann; Petty, Carter R.; Fu, Chunxia; Gold, Diane R.; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    Background Students spend a large portion of their day in classrooms which may be a source of mold exposure. We examined the diversity and concentrations of molds in inner-city schools and described differences between classrooms within the same school. Methods Classroom airborne mold spores, collected over a 2 day period, were measured twice during the school year by direct microscopy. Results There were 180 classroom air samples collected from 12 schools. Mold was present in 100% of classrooms. Classrooms within the same school had differing mold levels and mold diversity scores. The total mold per classroom was 176.6 ± 4.2 spores/m3 (geometric mean ± standard deviation) and ranged from 11.2 to 16,288.5 spores/m3. Mold diversity scores for classroom samples ranged from 1 to 19 (7.7 ± 3.5). The classroom accounted for the majority of variance (62%) in the total mold count, and for the majority of variance (56%) in the mold diversity score versus the school. The species with the highest concentrations and found most commonly included Cladosporium (29.3 ± 4.2 spores/m3), Penicillium/Aspergillus (15.0 ± 5.4 spores/m3), smut spores (12.6 ± 4.0 spores/m3), and basidiospores (6.6 ± 7.1 spores/m3). Conclusions Our study found that the school is a source of mold exposure, but particularly the classroom microenvironment varies in quantity of spores and species among classrooms within the same school. We also verified that visible mold may be a predictor for higher mold spore counts. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical significance of mold exposure relative to asthma morbidity in sensitized and non-sensitized asthmatic children. PMID:24112429

  1. Wimba Classroom Version 6.0

    E-print Network

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    Wimba Classroom Version 6.0 Participant Guide #12;Wimba Classroom 6.0 Participant Guide ___________________________________ 1 The Wimba Classroom Interface ______________________________________________ 1 Text Chat Area and Video in Wimba Classroom ________________________________________10 Authorizing Wimba

  2. Barnes and Sutherland Researching classroom interactions

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Barnes and Sutherland Researching classroom interactions: A methodology for teachers on classroom learning is "conducted jointly by outsiders and insiders" (p 250). The work we present classroom interactions which incorporates the perspectives of both classroom teachers and educational

  3. Policy and Strategies for ESL Pedagogy in Multilingual Classrooms: The Classroom Talk Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naicker, Shalina; Balfour, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of a specially designed programme of communicative strategies on English second language (ESL) development in a scaffolded case study that set out to promote teacher-guided, constructive learner talk in the outcomes-based education arts and culture classroom. The programme was implemented in a multilingual secondary…

  4. 23. CLASSROOM 302 (SECOND FLOOR). VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. OTHER CLASSROOMS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CLASSROOM 302 (SECOND FLOOR). VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. OTHER CLASSROOMS IN EAST AND WEST WINGS ARE SIMILAR - Frederika Bremer Intermediate School, 1214 Lowry Avenue North, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  5. 22. CLASSROOM 303 (SECOND FLOOR). VIEW TO NORTHWEST. OTHER CLASSROOMS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. CLASSROOM 303 (SECOND FLOOR). VIEW TO NORTHWEST. OTHER CLASSROOMS IN EAST AND WEST WINGS ARE SIMILAR - Frederika Bremer Intermediate School, 1214 Lowry Avenue North, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  6. Eruptive history and tectonic setting of Medicine Lake Volcano, a large rear-arc volcano in the southern Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Grove, T.L.; Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E.; Ramsey, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV), located in the southern Cascades ??? 55??km east-northeast of contemporaneous Mount Shasta, has been found by exploratory geothermal drilling to have a surprisingly silicic core mantled by mafic lavas. This unexpected result is very different from the long-held view derived from previous mapping of exposed geology that MLV is a dominantly basaltic shield volcano. Detailed mapping shows that < 6% of the ??? 2000??km2 of mapped MLV lavas on this southern Cascade Range shield-shaped edifice are rhyolitic and dacitic, but drill holes on the edifice penetrated more than 30% silicic lava. Argon dating yields ages in the range ??? 475 to 300??ka for early rhyolites. Dates on the stratigraphically lowest mafic lavas at MLV fall into this time frame as well, indicating that volcanism at MLV began about half a million years ago. Mafic compositions apparently did not dominate until ??? 300??ka. Rhyolite eruptions were scarce post-300??ka until late Holocene time. However, a dacite episode at ??? 200 to ??? 180??ka included the volcano's only ash-flow tuff, which was erupted from within the summit caldera. At ??? 100??ka, compositionally distinctive high-Na andesite and minor dacite built most of the present caldera rim. Eruption of these lavas was followed soon after by several large basalt flows, such that the combined area covered by eruptions between 100??ka and postglacial time amounts to nearly two-thirds of the volcano's area. Postglacial eruptive activity was strongly episodic and also covered a disproportionate amount of area. The volcano has erupted 9 times in the past 5200??years, one of the highest rates of late Holocene eruptive activity in the Cascades. Estimated volume of MLV is ??? 600??km3, giving an overall effusion rate of ??? 1.2??km3 per thousand years, although the rate for the past 100??kyr may be only half that. During much of the volcano's history, both dry HAOT (high-alumina olivine tholeiite) and hydrous calcalkaline basalts erupted together in close temporal and spatial proximity. Petrologic studies indicate that the HAOT magmas were derived by dry melting of spinel peridotite mantle near the crust mantle boundary. Subduction-derived H2O-rich fluids played an important role in the generation of calcalkaline magmas. Petrology, geochemistry and proximity indicate that MLV is part of the Cascades magmatic arc and not a Basin and Range volcano, although Basin and Range extension impinges on the volcano and strongly influences its eruptive style. MLV may be analogous to Mount Adams in southern Washington, but not, as sometimes proposed, to the older distributed back-arc Simcoe Mountains volcanic field.

  7. Antithrombotic Utilization Trends after Noncardioembolic Ischemic Stroke or TIA in the Setting of Large Antithrombotic Trials (2002–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Amir S.; Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Several large trials published over the last decade have significantly altered recommended guidelines for therapy following a noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). The impact of these studies on patient usage of alternative antithrombotic agents has hitherto not been evaluated. We examined the usage of these agents in the United States over the last decade, with regard to the publication of the Management of Atherothrombosis with Clopidogrel in High-Risk Patients (MATCH), European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischaemia Trial (ESPRIT), and Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) clinical trials, in order to test the hypothesis that resulting recommendations are reflected in usage trends. Methods Antithrombotic utilization was prospectively collected as part of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) on a total of 53,608,351 patients in the United States between 2002 and 2009. Patients with a history of ischemic stroke or TIA were included. Patients were excluded if there was a prior history of subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage, or if other indications for antithrombotic treatment were present, including deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, atrial fibrillation or flutter, mechanical cardiac valve replacement, congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. Annual utilization of the following antithrombotic strategies was compared in 53,608,351 patients: 1) aspirin monotherapy, 2) clopidogrel monotherapy, 3) combined clopidogrel and aspirin, 4) combined extended-release dipyridamole (ERDP) and aspirin, and 5) warfarin. Annual utilization was compared before and after publication of MATCH, ESPRIT, and PRoFESS in 2004, 2006, and 2008, respectively. Trend analysis was performed with the Mantel–Haenszel test for trends. Sensitivity analysis of demographic and clinical characteristics stratified by antithrombotic-usage group was performed using the Wald Chi-square test. Results Utilization of combined clopidogrel and aspirin increased from 3.3% to 6.7% after the MATCH trial (p<0.0001). Following the results of the ESPRIT trial, utilization of combination ERDP and aspirin decreased from 4% to 3% (p<0.0001), utilization of clopidogrel declined from 6.8% to 6% (p<0.0001), and utilization of aspirin remained essentially unchanged. After the PRoFESS trial, utilization of clopidogrel increased from 5% to 9% (p<0.0001), utilization of ERDP-aspirin increased from 3 % to 4.6% (p<0.0001), and utilization of aspirin increased from 15.6% to 17.8% (p<0.0001). The proportion of patients on none of the five antithrombotic secondary prevention strategies steadily declined from a peak of 74% in 2003 to 57% by 2009. Conclusions The impact of the MATCH, ESPRIT, and PRoFESS trials on antithrombotic utilization has been variable. These findings highlight the importance of addressing factors that affect the implementation of findings from major clinical trials. PMID:25825628

  8. Teachers' Practical Knowledge about Classroom Management in Multicultural Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Tartwijk, Jan; den Brok, Perry; Veldman, Ietje; Wubbels, Theo

    2009-01-01

    Creating a positive working atmosphere in the classroom is the first concern of many student and beginning teachers in secondary education. Teaching in multicultural classrooms provides additional challenges for these teachers. This study identified shared practical knowledge about classroom management strategies of teachers who were successful in…

  9. Classroom Assessment Techniques: Minute Paper

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Zeilik

    This page describes the minute paper, one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. The minute paper is a concise note, taking one minute and written by students, that focuses on a short question presented by the instructor to the class. It provides real-time feedback from a class to find out if students recognized the main points of a class session and also helps the instructor make changes for the next class. This site provides an overview of this assessment instrument including information about how to use minute papers in the classroom. The site is also linked to a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use, as well as supplementary links and sources to further explore this assessment tool.

  10. Classroom Assessment Techniques: Mathematical Thinking

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Malcolm Swan

    This page describes five ways to assess mathematical thinking skills. The assessment tool is one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. The Mathematical Thinking Classroom Assessment Techniques (Math CATs) are designed to promote and assess thinking skills in mathematics by checking results and correcting mistakes, making plausible estimates of quantities which are not known, modeling and defining new concepts, judging statements and creating proofs, and organizing unsorted data and drawing conclusions. An overview of this assessment instrument includes information about why Math CATs are beneficial to use and how to use them. This site is also linked to a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use, as well as supplementary links and sources to further explore this assessment tool.

  11. Expert Secondary Inclusive Classroom Management 

    E-print Network

    Montague, Marcia

    2011-02-22

    The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the management practices of expert secondary general education teachers in inclusive classrooms. Specifically, expert teachers of classrooms who included students ...

  12. Security for Classroom Learning Partner

    E-print Network

    Iancu, Karin

    2006-01-01

    This MENG thesis implements a security system for a classroom presentation system called the Classroom Learning Partner (CLP). The goal of the security system is to prevent cheating on electronic quizzes. CLP is a system ...

  13. Visualization in Multicultural Mathematics Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presmeg, Norma C.

    1989-01-01

    Deals with the issue of visualization as it is related to the learning of mathematics in multicultural classrooms. Discusses the importance and the role of visualization in multicultural classrooms. (YP)

  14. The Dirt on Outdoor Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Explains the planning procedure for outdoor classrooms and introduces an integrated unit on monarch butterflies called the Monarch Watch program. Makes recommendations to solve financial problems of outdoor classrooms. (YDS)

  15. Improving Classroom Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Patricia

    2004-03-01

    Frustration with one's ability to deal with classroom discipline is cited as a primary problem facing new teachers and a major factor in teacher retention. As a novice teacher, perhaps you had never been in a classroom where you felt as if the teacher was not in control until it came your time to be the "teacher." Now you are faced with what you expect your students to do and the reality of what they actually will do. How do you develop and nurture a classroom environment where learning is the primary objective of both the students and the teacher? While there is no magic formula that will work for everyone, there are some guidelines to follow and pitfalls to avoid that can increase your chances for success.

  16. Patterns in Children's Online Behavior and Scientific Problem-Solving: A LargeN Microgenetic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David F. Feldon; Joanna Gilmore

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the viability of a computer-based system for collecting and analyzing data from large-N microgenetic studies of scientific reasoning. Most studies of children's scientific problem-solving strategies take place in classroom settings with established norms that homogenize student behavior. Small sample sizes and the limited range of settings limit the generalizability of the conclusions

  17. Sound Advice on Classroom Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of acoustic standards in classroom design, presenting an interview with the Acoustical Society of America's (ASA's) standards manager which focuses on reasons for the new ASA standards, the standards document (which was written for K-12 classroom but applies to college classrooms), the need to avoid echo and be able to…

  18. Cooperative Learning and Classroom Climate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahn, G. Lawrence; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Compared a traditional whole class format to the impact of two cooperative learning techniques, Student Teams-Achievement Divisions and Teams-Games-Tournaments, on classroom climate among students. Supports the conclusion that choice of classroom structure can bias classroom climate in favor of or against different ethnic groups. (Author/ABB)

  19. Expert Secondary Inclusive Classroom Management

    E-print Network

    Montague, Marcia

    2011-02-22

    ...................................................................... 5 Definition of Terms ..................................................................... 6 II REVIEW OF LITERATURE............................................................. 9 Classroom Management Decisions of Teachers... (Savage & Wolcott, 1994). 9 CHAPTER II REVIEW OF LITERATURE Classroom Management Decisions of Teachers Research has consistently shown that effective classroom management is associated with student achievement gains (Brophy & Evertson, 1976...

  20. River Modeling in Large and Ungauged Basins: Experience of Setting up the HEC RAS Model over the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, F.; Maswood, M.

    2014-12-01

    River modeling is the processing of setting up a physically-based hydrodynamic model that can simulate the water flow dynamics of a stream network against time varying boundary conditions. Such river models are an important component of any flood forecasting system that forecasts river levels in flood prone regions. However, many large river basins in the developing world such as the Ganges, Brahmaputra, Meghna (GBM), Indus, Irrawaddy, Salween, Mekong and Niger are mostly ungauged. Such large basins lack the necessary in-situ measurements of river bed depth/slope, bathymetry (river cross section), floodplain mapping and boundary condition flows for forcing a river model. For such basins, proxy approaches relying mostly on remote sensing data from space platforms are the only alternative. In this study, we share our experience of setting up the widely-used 1-D river model over the entire GBM basin and its stream network. Good quality in-situ measurements of river hydraulics (cross section, slope, flow) was available only for the downstream and flood prone region of the basin, which comprises only 7% of the basin area. For the remaining 93% of the basin area, we resorted to the use of data from the following satellite sensors to build a workable river model: a) Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) for deriving bed slope; b) LANDSAT/MODIS for updating river network and flow direction generated by elevation data; c) radar altimetry data to build depth versus width relationship at river locations; d) satellite precipitation based hydrologic modeling of lateral flows into main stem rivers. In addition, we referred to an extensive body of literature to estimate the prevailing baseline hydraulics of rivers in the ungauged region. We measured success of our approach by systematically testing how well the basin-wide river model could simulate river level dynamics at two measured locations inside Bangladesh. Our experience of river modeling was replete with numerous hurdles that we did not anticipate, and often required a change in plan. In this study we summarize these key hurdles faced and offer a step by step approach to setting up river models for large ungauged river basins. Such a guide can be useful for the community wishing to set up RAS type models in basins such as Niger, Mekong, Irrawaddy, Indus etc.

  1. Agriculture in the Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Agriculture in the Classroom Web site(last mentioned in the October 27, 1999 Scout Report for Science & Engineering) has recently been updated. One of the current features, Listening to the Prairie - Farming in Nature's Image, is a useful resource which has many lesson plans and classroom activities for all grades and can be downloaded in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. These lesson plans explore subjects like how energy passes through food webs, where our food comes from, how agriculture affects our lives, and soil and erosion. This is a useful site that focuses on a subject that many urban students may not normally be exposed to.

  2. Functional Network Construction in Arabidopsis Using Rule-Based Machine Learning on Large-Scale Data Sets[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bassel, George W.; Glaab, Enrico; Marquez, Julietta; Holdsworth, Michael J.; Bacardit, Jaume

    2011-01-01

    The meta-analysis of large-scale postgenomics data sets within public databases promises to provide important novel biological knowledge. Statistical approaches including correlation analyses in coexpression studies of gene expression have emerged as tools to elucidate gene function using these data sets. Here, we present a powerful and novel alternative methodology to computationally identify functional relationships between genes from microarray data sets using rule-based machine learning. This approach, termed “coprediction,” is based on the collective ability of groups of genes co-occurring within rules to accurately predict the developmental outcome of a biological system. We demonstrate the utility of coprediction as a powerful analytical tool using publicly available microarray data generated exclusively from Arabidopsis thaliana seeds to compute a functional gene interaction network, termed Seed Co-Prediction Network (SCoPNet). SCoPNet predicts functional associations between genes acting in the same developmental and signal transduction pathways irrespective of the similarity in their respective gene expression patterns. Using SCoPNet, we identified four novel regulators of seed germination (ALTERED SEED GERMINATION5, 6, 7, and 8), and predicted interactions at the level of transcript abundance between these novel and previously described factors influencing Arabidopsis seed germination. An online Web tool to query SCoPNet has been developed as a community resource to dissect seed biology and is available at http://www.vseed.nottingham.ac.uk/. PMID:21896882

  3. Children's Perceptions of the Classroom Environment and Social and Academic Performance: A Longitudinal Analysis of the Contribution of the "Responsive Classroom" Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Laura L.; Nishida, Tracy K.; Chiong, Cynthia; Grimm, Kevin J.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the contribution of the "Responsive Classroom" (RC) Approach, a set of teaching practices that integrate social and academic learning, to children's perceptions of their classroom, and children's academic and social performance over time. Three questions emerge: (a) What is the concurrent and cumulative relation between…

  4. Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) model using a large diverse set of natural, synthetic and environmental chemicals for binding to the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Hong, H; Fang, H; Xie, Q; Perkins, R; Sheehan, D M; Tong, W

    2003-01-01

    A large number of natural, synthetic and environmental chemicals are capable of disrupting the endocrine systems of experimental animals, wildlife and humans. These so-called endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), some mimic the functions of the endogenous androgens, have become a concern to the public health. Androgens play an important role in many physiological processes, including the development and maintenance of male sexual characteristics. A common mechanism for androgen to produce both normal and adverse effects is binding to the androgen receptor (AR). In this study, we used Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA), a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) technique, to examine AR-ligand binding affinities. A CoMFA model with r2 = 0.902 and q2 = 0.571 was developed using a large training data set containing 146 structurally diverse natural, synthetic, and environmental chemicals with a 10(6)-fold range of relative binding affinity (RBA). By comparing the binding characteristics derived from the CoMFA contour map with these observed in a human AR crystal structure, we found that the steric and electrostatic properties encoded in this training data set are necessary and sufficient to describe the RBA of AR ligands. Finally, the CoMFA model was challenged with an external test data set; the predicted results were close to the actual values with average difference of 0.637 logRBA. This study demonstrates the utility of this CoMFA model for real-world use in predicting the AR binding affinities of structurally diverse chemicals over a wide RBA range. PMID:14758981

  5. Classroom Assessment Techniques: Performance Assessment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Timothy F. Slater

    This page describes the performance assessment, one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. Performance assessments are designed to judge student abilities to use specific knowledge and research skills that require the student to manipulate equipment to solve a problem or make an analysis. Performance assessments may reveal a variety of problem-solving approaches, thus providing insight into a student's level of conceptual and procedural knowledge. This site provides an overview of this assessment technique and information about how to use it, as well as a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use. Supplementary links and sources are also included to further explore this assessment tool.

  6. Classroom Assessment Techniques: Scoring Rubrics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Diane Ebert-May

    This page describes how to use scoring rubrics to assess student learning. It is one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. Rubrics are a way of describing evaluation criteria based on the expected outcomes and performances of students. This site provides information about why scoring rubrics are beneficial to use and how to use them. The site is also linked to a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use, as well as supplementary links and sources to further explore this assessment tool.

  7. Classroom Assessment Techniques: Weekly Reports

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Eugenia Etkina

    This site describes the use of weekly reports as an assessment tool for student learning. It is one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. Weekly reports provide rapid feedback about what students think they are learning and what conceptual difficulties they are experiencing. This site provides an overview of this assessment technique including information about how to use it. The site is also linked to a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use, as well as supplementary links and sources to further explore this assessment tool.

  8. Visualizing Large Telecommunication Data Sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eleftherios Koutsofios; Stephen C. North; Daniel A. Keim

    1999-01-01

    Global telecommunication services create an enormous volume of real time data. Long distance voice networks, for example, can complete more than 250 million calls a day; wide area data networks can support many hundreds of thousands of virtual circuits and millions of Internet protocol (IP) flows and Web server sessions. Unlike terabyte databases, which typically contain images or multimedia streams,

  9. mzDB: a file format using multiple indexing strategies for the efficient analysis of large LC-MS/MS and SWATH-MS data sets.

    PubMed

    Bouyssié, David; Dubois, Marc; Nasso, Sara; Gonzalez de Peredo, Anne; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Aebersold, Ruedi; Monsarrat, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    The analysis and management of MS data, especially those generated by data independent MS acquisition, exemplified by SWATH-MS, pose significant challenges for proteomics bioinformatics. The large size and vast amount of information inherent to these data sets need to be properly structured to enable an efficient and straightforward extraction of the signals used to identify specific target peptides. Standard XML based formats are not well suited to large MS data files, for example, those generated by SWATH-MS, and compromise high-throughput data processing and storing. We developed mzDB, an efficient file format for large MS data sets. It relies on the SQLite software library and consists of a standardized and portable server-less single-file database. An optimized 3D indexing approach is adopted, where the LC-MS coordinates (retention time and m/z), along with the precursor m/z for SWATH-MS data, are used to query the database for data extraction. In comparison with XML formats, mzDB saves ?25% of storage space and improves access times by a factor of twofold up to even 2000-fold, depending on the particular data access. Similarly, mzDB shows also slightly to significantly lower access times in comparison with other formats like mz5. Both C++ and Java implementations, converting raw or XML formats to mzDB and providing access methods, will be released under permissive license. mzDB can be easily accessed by the SQLite C library and its drivers for all major languages, and browsed with existing dedicated GUIs. The mzDB described here can boost existing mass spectrometry data analysis pipelines, offering unprecedented performance in terms of efficiency, portability, compactness, and flexibility. PMID:25505153

  10. Principles and Enactment of Rapid Collaborative Knowledge Building in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looi, Chee-Kit; Chen, Wenli; Patton, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The authors discuss the notion of Rapid Collaborative Knowledge Building (RCKB) in classroom settings. RCKB seeks to harness the collective intelligence of groups to learn faster, envision new possibilities, and to reveal latent knowledge in a dynamic live setting. It is characterized by the notion of rapid cycles of knowledge building activities…

  11. Ecological Analysis of Early Childhood Settings: Implications for Mainstreaming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Karen L.

    In an effort to help developmentally delayed or disabled children succeed in an integrated or regular early childhood classroom setting, the Rural Area Model Preschool Project staff developed an ecological inventory to identify the behaviors and skills expected of preschoolers in classroom settings. The inventory was used for 2 months in eight…

  12. Analyzing Verbal Classroom Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kryspin, William J.; Feldhusen, John F.

    This textbook on verbal classroom interaction is designed to be used as one unit in an educational psychology course at the postsecondary level. The book is divided into three sections which discuss the Flanders' Interaction Analysis System (FIAS), the categories in the system, and the use of the system. The first section gives the underlying…

  13. LOGO in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Computing Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This collection of articles and features reprinted from "The Computing Teacher" begins with an outline (the table of contents) of a 20-session course, "Logo in the Classroom," by Shirley Torgerson, Mary Kay Kriley, and Janet Stone. The text of the first session and a student exercise sheet are also provided. Five articles included in the…

  14. Salvage in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollum, Dannel

    1977-01-01

    Describes the development of a program to establish in-school salvage systems for school-generated and nonschool-generated waste materials. Students from conservation classes became involved in collecting waste from "recycle" boxes in every classroom, in field trips, newspaper drives, and salvage of aluminum cans. (CS)

  15. Robots in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, George; Spain, Tom

    1984-01-01

    Educational robots are defined, their essential characteristics and features are outlined, and their educational applications and what makes them run are discussed. Classroom experiences with five educational robots--Topo, Rhino XR-2, RB5X, Hero I and Tasman Turtle--are described. (MBR)

  16. The Classroom as Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritschel, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the importance of creating a learning community in the classroom to help stimulate community college student success. Urges teachers to examine teaching methods and modify content and delivery to meet the complex needs of each new community. Urges instructors to encourage cooperation among students and respect diverse talents and ways of…

  17. Implementing the Synchronous Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Jan A.

    2010-01-01

    This commentary describes an action research project conducted by selected staff at the Northern Valley Regional High School District in New Jersey. The project focused on the idea of developing a synchronous classroom to provide world language learning opportunities to students. Relevant research is provided as are ideas regarding logistics and…

  18. Classroom of the Sea

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Denise Monte

    2000-03-01

    Although most students do not have the opportunity to conduct in situ research projects until college, the Classroom of the Sea program at the American School for the Deaf (ASD) provides an unusual opportunity for students to work directly with scientists

  19. Culture in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Thuong Van; Le, Nancylee

    New methods are proposed for teachers to increase the cultural knowledge of their students. Rather than emphasizing food, festivals, and famous faces from other lands, there should be an attempt to use culture in the classroom as content in the regular instruction of speaking, listening, writing, mathematics, reading, and science. Teaching…

  20. The CAS Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Sue

    2004-01-01

    The Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) Computer Algebra System (CAS)Pilot study (2001-2005) is monitoring the use of CAS in senior secondary mathematics. This article explores the author's experiences in the CAS classroom and delineates changes in teaching style, as a result of the introduction of CAS into the senior mathematics…