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1

Calibrated Peer Review: A New Tool for Integrating Information Literacy Skills in Writing-Intensive Large Classroom Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Calibrated Peer Review[TM] (CPR) is a program that can significantly enhance the ability to integrate intensive information literacy exercises into large classroom settings. CPR is founded on a solid pedagogic base for learning, and it is formulated in such a way that information skills can easily be inserted. However, there is no mention of its…

Fosmire, Michael

2010-01-01

2

Setting Up a Classroom Business  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Junior high school home economics students plan and operate a holiday boutique in their school. The organization, operation, and evaluation involved in setting up a simulated business in the classroom is described. (BM)

Morgan, Madeline L.

1977-01-01

3

Individualizing in Traditional Classroom Settings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Effective individualized instruction depends primarily on the teacher possessing the skills to implement it. Individualization is therefore quite compatible with the traditional self-contained elementary classroom model, but not with its alternative, departmentalization, which allows teachers neither the time flexibility nor the familiarity with…

Thornell, John G.

1980-01-01

4

Classroom Management: Setting Up the Classroom for Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student learning is directly related to classroom control established the first week of school (Wong and Wong 2001)--what you do the first day counts, and what you do the first 10 minutes counts even more. This article shares the advanced planning aspects of classroom management that should be in place before students enter the classroom for the…

Sterling, Donna R.

2009-01-01

5

Classroom Management: Setting Up the Classroom for Learning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Student learning is directly related to classroom control established the first week of school (Wong and Wong 2001)—what you do the first day counts, and what you do the first 10 minutes counts even more. This article shares the advanced planning aspects of classroom management that should be in place before students enter the classroom for the first time: the physical environment; routines, policies, and procedures; materials management; as well as a review process to extend what students learn.

Donna R. Sterling

2009-07-01

6

Collaboration within large groups in the classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to show how a large group of students can work collaboratively in a synchronous way within the\\u000a classroom using the cheapest possible technological support. Making use of the features of Single Display Groupware and of\\u000a Multiple Mice we propose a computer-supported collaborative learning approach for big groups within the classroom. The approach\\u000a uses a

Eyal Szewkis; Miguel Nussbaum; Tal Rosen; Jose Abalos; Fernanda Denardin; Daniela Caballero; Arturo Tagle; Cristian Alcoholado

7

Adolescent Substance Use Prevention Interventions Outside of Classroom Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Substance use prevention programs empowering individual adolescents to resist substance use through education and skills training\\u000a are crucial to reducing substance use within this population. However, existing programs of this type are designed primarily\\u000a for classroom use, and may not meet the needs of social workers intervening with adolescents outside classroom settings. A\\u000a literature review identified six programs that have

Natalie L. Hill

2008-01-01

8

Social Studies Instruction in a Non-Classroom Setting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Certain areas in the social studies can be effectively taught in a non-classroom setting. This experiment determined if, in a supermarket situation, consumer preferences (as measured in sales figures and augmented by questionnaire data) could be altered by the addition of nutritional information to the labels of sixteen items which had moderate…

Murphy, Margaret M.

9

Observations of Children’s Interactions with Teachers, Peers, and Tasks across Preschool Classroom Activity Settings  

PubMed Central

This descriptive study examined classroom activity settings in relation to children’s observed behavior during classroom interactions, child gender, and basic teacher behavior within the preschool classroom. 145 children were observed for an average of 80 minutes during 8 occasions across 2 days using the inCLASS, an observational measure that conceptualizes behavior into teacher, peer, task, and conflict interactions. Findings indicated that on average children’s interactions with teachers were higher in teacher-structured settings, such as large group. On average, children’s interactions with peers and tasks were more positive in child-directed settings, such as free choice. Children experienced more conflict during recess and routines/transitions. Finally, gender differences were observed within small group and meals. The implications of these findings might encourage teachers to be thoughtful and intentional about what types of support and resources are provided so children can successfully navigate the demands of particular settings. These findings are not meant to discourage certain teacher behaviors or imply value of certain classroom settings; instead, by providing an evidenced-based picture of the conditions under which children display the most positive interactions, teachers can be more aware of choices within these settings and have a powerful way to assist in professional development and interventions. PMID:25717282

Booren, Leslie M.; Downer, Jason T.; Vitiello, Virginia E.

2014-01-01

10

Observations of Children's Interactions with Teachers, Peers, and Tasks across Preschool Classroom Activity Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research Findings: This descriptive study examined classroom activity settings in relation to children's observed behavior during classroom interactions, child gender, and basic teacher behavior within the preschool classroom. A total of 145 children were observed for an average of 80 min during 8 occasions across 2 days using the Individualized Classroom Assessment Scoring System, an observational measure that conceptualizes behavior into

Leslie M. Booren; Jason T. Downer; Virginia E. Vitiello

2012-01-01

11

Silent Students' Participation in a Large Active Learning Science Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Active learning in large science classrooms furthers opportunities for students to engage in the content and in meaningful learning, yet students can still remain anonymously silent. This study aims to understand the impact of active learning on these silent students in a large General Chemistry course taught via Socratic questioning and…

Obenland, Carrie A.; Munson, Ashlyn H.; Hutchinson, John S.

2012-01-01

12

Using News Articles to Build a Critical Literacy Classroom in an EFL Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines an effort to support critical literacy in an English as a foreign language (EFL) setting by analyzing one college EFL reading classroom in which students read and responded to articles from "The New Yorker". Data include transcribed audiotapes of classroom interaction and interviews with students, classroom materials, and…

Park, Yujong

2011-01-01

13

AudioVisual Classroom Consoles(LARGE) AMX Touch panel  

E-print Network

AudioVisual Classroom Consoles(LARGE) AMX Touch panel Chapter 1: Start up console using console PC) 2. Touch AMX Panel to reveal access keypad. Touch number (please contact eMAP for code) then DONE of your computer screen. Make sure it is not muted and adjust the level with your mouse. 2. AMX TouchPanel

Peak, Derek

14

Teacher and Student Research Using Large Data Sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the objectives of teacher research experiences is to immerse the teacher in an authentic research situation to help the teacher understand what real research is all about: "to do science as scientists do." Experiences include doing experiments in laboratories, gathering data out in the field, and observing at professional observatories. However, a rapidly growing area of scientific research is in "data mining" increasingly large public data archives. In the earth and space sciences, such large archives are built around data from Landsat 7, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and in about seven years, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. The LSST will re-photograph the entire night sky every three day, resulting in a data flow of about 20 terabytes per night. The resulting LSST archive will represent a huge challenge of simple storage and retrieval for professional scientists. It will be a much greater challenge to help K-12 teachers use such gargantuan files and collections of data effectively in the classroom and to understand and begin to practice the new research procedures involved in data mining. At NOAO we are exploring ways of using large data sets in formal educational settings like classrooms, and public settings like planetariums and museums. In our existing professional development programs, such as our Teacher leaders in Research Based Science Education, we have introduced teachers to research via on-site observing experiences and partnerships with active astronomers. To successfully initiate research in the classroom, we have found that teachers need training in specific science content, use of specialized software to work with the data, development of research questions and objectives, and explicit pedagogical strategies for classroom use. Our research projects are well defined, though not "canned," and incorporate specific types of data, such as solar images. These data can be replaced with new data from an archive for the classroom research experience. This is already a form of data mining that can be applied to large data sets. We are looking at ways to apply our experience with hands-on observation experiences to the relatively abstract world of data mining. We are also looking at ways to move beyond the well-defined application to training teachers to develop their own more open-ended research activities. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

Croft, S. K.; Pompea, S. M.; Sparks, R. T.

2005-12-01

15

THE CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR SETTING--ITS NATURE AND RELATION TO STUDENT BEHAVIOR. FINAL REPORT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

CONCEPTS AND METHODS FOR THE DESCRIPTION OF THE CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR SETTING ARE DEVELOPED THROUGH THE USE OF PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES FROM ECOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY. THE ECOLOGICAL SUBUNITS WITHIN A THIRD-GRADE CLASSROOM SETTING WERE IDENTIFIED AND THE QUALITIES OF THESE SUBUNITS WERE SPECIFIED. THE SYSTEM, DEVELOPED QUALITATIVELY, DESCRIBES THE…

GUMP, PAUL V.

16

Why Should We Care About Noise in Classrooms and Child Care Settings?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasing numbers of young children spend extended portions of their days in group care settings. However, little attention has been given to the acoustical properties of these settings and how these may affect development, particularly speech and language development. This article provides a review of how classroom acoustics are measured, what researchers have found, and why poor classroom acoustics are

Elizabeth E. Manlove; Tom Frank; Lynne Vernon-Feagans

2001-01-01

17

Radial sets: interactive visual analysis of large overlapping sets.  

PubMed

In many applications, data tables contain multi-valued attributes that often store the memberships of the table entities to multiple sets such as which languages a person masters, which skills an applicant documents, or which features a product comes with. With a growing number of entities, the resulting element-set membership matrix becomes very rich of information about how these sets overlap. Many analysis tasks targeted at set-typed data are concerned with these overlaps as salient features of such data. This paper presents Radial Sets, a novel visual technique to analyze set memberships for a large number of elements. Our technique uses frequency-based representations to enable quickly finding and analyzing different kinds of overlaps between the sets, and relating these overlaps to other attributes of the table entities. Furthermore, it enables various interactions to select elements of interest, find out if they are over-represented in specific sets or overlaps, and if they exhibit a different distribution for a specific attribute compared to the rest of the elements. These interactions allow formulating highly-expressive visual queries on the elements in terms of their set memberships and attribute values. As we demonstrate via two usage scenarios, Radial Sets enable revealing and analyzing a multitude of overlapping patterns between large sets, beyond the limits of state-of-the-art techniques. PMID:24051816

Alsallakh, Bilal; Aigner, Wolfgang; Miksch, Silvia; Hauser, Helwig

2013-12-01

18

Clickers in the Large Classroom: Current Research and Best-Practice Tips  

PubMed Central

Audience response systems (ARS) or clickers, as they are commonly called, offer a management tool for engaging students in the large classroom. Basic elements of the technology are discussed. These systems have been used in a variety of fields and at all levels of education. Typical goals of ARS questions are discussed, as well as methods of compensating for the reduction in lecture time that typically results from their use. Examples of ARS use occur throughout the literature and often detail positive attitudes from both students and instructors, although exceptions do exist. When used in classes, ARS clickers typically have either a benign or positive effect on student performance on exams, depending on the method and extent of their use, and create a more positive and active atmosphere in the large classroom. These systems are especially valuable as a means of introducing and monitoring peer learning methods in the large lecture classroom. So that the reader may use clickers effectively in his or her own classroom, a set of guidelines for writing good questions and a list of best-practice tips have been culled from the literature and experienced users. PMID:17339389

2007-01-01

19

The Categorical Facilitation Effects on L2 Vocabulary Learning in a Classroom Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the field of vocabulary acquisition, there have been many studies on the efficacy of word lists. However, very few of these were based on research in a classroom setting, and therefore, their results may not be applicable to standard classroom situations. This study investigated which of the five types of word lists (synonyms, antonyms,…

Hoshino, Yuko

2010-01-01

20

Patterns of Classroom Discourse in an Integrated, Interpreted Elementary School Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to describe the patterns of classroom discourse experienced by an integrated deaf child with full-time interpreting services in an elementary setting. The child was videotaped for 3 hours during classroom instructional time. The videotapes were analyzed to determine patterns of discourse between the child and the teacher and the child and the interpreter, as

Jeanne Shaw; Janet Jamieson

1997-01-01

21

Classroom Management Strategies for Young Children with Challenging Behavior Within Early Childhood Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many preschool, Head Start, and kindergarten educators of young children express concern about the number of children who exhibit frequent challenging behaviors and report that managing these behaviors is difficult within these classrooms. This article describes research-based strategies with practical applications that can be used as part of classroom management practices in settings with young children to improve children's social

Kristine Jolivette; Elizabeth A. Steed

2010-01-01

22

The Emergence of Student Creativity in Classroom Settings: A Case Study of Elementary Schools in Korea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research explores the emergence of student creativity in classroom settings, specifically within two content areas: science and social studies. Fourteen classrooms in three elementary schools in Korea were observed, and the teachers and students were interviewed. The three types of student creativity emerging in the teaching and learning…

Cho, Younsoon; Chung, Hye Young; Choi, Kyoulee; Seo, Choyoung; Baek, Eunjoo

2013-01-01

23

Understanding Bystander Perceptions of Cyberbullying in Inclusive Classroom Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cyberbullying is a pervasive problem that puts students at risk of successful academic outcomes and the ability to feel safe in school. As most students with disabilities are served in inclusive classrooms, there is a growing concern that students with special needs are at an increased risk of online bullying harassment. Enhancing responsible…

Guckert, Mary

2013-01-01

24

Thinking Routines: Replicating Classroom Practices within Museum Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes thinking routines as tools to guide and support young children's thinking. These learning strategies, developed by Harvard University's Project Zero Classroom, actively engage students in constructing meaning while also understanding their own thinking process. The authors discuss how thinking routines can be used in both…

Wolberg, Rochelle Ibanez; Goff, Allison

2012-01-01

25

Setting of Classroom Environments for Hearing Impaired Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper aims to explain effects of acoustical environments in sound perception of hearing impaired people. Important aspects of sound and hearing impairment are explained. Detrimental factors in acoustic conditions for speech perception are mentioned. Necessary acoustic treatment in classrooms and use of FM systems to eliminate these factors…

Turan, Zerrin

2007-01-01

26

Indexing Large Trajectory Data Sets With SETI  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the rapid increase in the use of inexpensive, location-aware sensors in a variety of new appli- cations, large amounts of time-sequenced location data will soon be accumulated. Efficient indexing techniques for managing these large volumes of trajectory data sets are urgently needed. The key requirements for a good trajectory indexing tech- nique is that it must support both searches

V. Prasad Chakka; Adam Everspaugh; Jignesh M. Patel

2003-01-01

27

Classroom Climate in Regular Primary School Settings with Children with Special Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the classroom climate in two settings of the 6th-grade class (a setting of children with special needs and a setting without children with special needs), focusing on aspects of satisfaction and cohesiveness on one side and friction, competitiveness and difficulties on the other. The study results indicate the existence of…

Schmidt, Majda; Cagran, Branka

2006-01-01

28

Concept Formation From Very Large Training Sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract This,paper ,proposes ,an alternative ,to Quinlan's,algorithm ,for ,forming ,classification trees,from ,large ,sets,of examples. ,My algorithm is guaranteed,to terminate. ,Quinlan's ,algorithm isusually,faster. I.The,Nature,of the ,Problem.

Richard A. O'keefe

1983-01-01

29

Experiences with Large Planetary Hyperspectral Data Sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The authors report on their experiences from implementing data analysis algorithms on large planetary data sets, mainly hyperspectral data sets from the Mars Express mission. A data preparation, calibration and organisation pipeline has to be set up before meaningful information can be extracted from the data algorithmically. Often, this represents a significant factor in overall time and cost. Especially when dealing with novel approaches this pipeline has to be particularly flexible to accommodate changes in data layout and semantics. The authors gathered their experiences in the field of implementation of non-negative matrix approximation (NNMA) algorithms, which in recent years have reached a level of maturity that makes them suitable for application on large planetary datasets. This implies that these algorithms can be used effectively to factor large collections of hyperspectral measurements into sources and abundances under linearity and non-negativity constraints with reasonable computational resources. The results include (semi-)automatic large-scale analysis of hyperspectral data sets with the focus on spectral and geographical summarisation. The method uses randomised algorithms to extract source spectra; these are then distributed on a virtual sphere and classified according to similarity and proximity; for each class of source, an abundance map is generated and presented to the user for interpretation. Results can be obtained with reasonable resources in minutes to hours, depending on the size of the dataset and the accuracy required.

Schmidt, Albrecht; Schmidt, Frederic; Moussaoui, Sa

30

Activity Settings and Daily Routines in Preschool Classrooms: Diverse Experiences in Early Learning Settings for Low-Income Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines activity settings and daily classroom routines experienced by 3- and 4-year-old low-income children in public center-based preschool programs, private center-based programs, and family child care homes. Two daily routine profiles were identified using a time-sampling coding procedure: a High Free-Choice pattern in which…

Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Howes, Carollee; Huang, Yiching; Hong, Sandra Soliday; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

2012-01-01

31

Using Self-Management Procedures to Improve Classroom Social Skills in Multiple General Education Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study used self-monitoring, coupled with a student/teacher matching strategy, to improve the classroom social skills of five inner-city middle school students, who were at risk for school failure. Using a multiple-probe across students and settings (class periods) design, we evaluated intervention effects in up to six different settings.…

Peterson, Lloyd Douglas; Young, K. Richard; Salzberg, Charles L.; West, Richard P.; Hill, Mary

2006-01-01

32

Content-Based Instruction for English Language Learners: An Exploration across Multiple Classroom Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the content-based literacy instruction of English language learners (ELLs) across multiple classroom settings in U.S. elementary schools. The following research questions guided the study: (a) How are ELLs taught English in two types of instructional settings: regular content-area literacy instruction in the all-English…

Park, Seo Jung

2009-01-01

33

Technological Challenges: Designing Large Compressed Video and Multimedia Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designing a distance learning classroom requires integration of educational goals and philosophy with technology and ergonomics. The technological challenge and key to designing effective distance learning and multimedia classrooms is creating an environment in which the participants--students, and teacher--may easily interact with instructional…

Hart, Russ A.; Parker, Roger

34

Generalizability and Decision Studies to Inform Observational and Experimental Research in Classroom Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attaining reliable estimates of observational measures can be challenging in school and classroom settings, as behavior can be influenced by multiple contextual factors. Generalizability (G) studies can enable researchers to estimate the reliability of observational data, and decision (D) studies can inform how many observation sessions are…

Bottema-Beutel, Kristen; Lloyd, Blair; Carter, Erik W.; Asmus, Jennifer M.

2014-01-01

35

Reliability Issues and Solutions for Coding Social Communication Performance in Classroom Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To explore the utility of time-interval analysis for documenting the reliability of coding social communication performance of children in classroom settings. Of particular interest was finding a method for determining whether independent observers could reliably judge both occurrence and duration of ongoing behavioral dimensions for…

Olswang, Lesley B.; Svensson, Liselotte; Coggins, Truman E.; Beilinson, Jill S.; Donaldson, Amy L.

2006-01-01

36

Sizable Sharks Swim Swiftly: Learning Correlations through Inference in a Classroom Setting  

E-print Network

Sizable Sharks Swim Swiftly: Learning Correlations through Inference in a Classroom Setting Yasuaki more properties of the shark categories acquired through inference than those acquired through, Tiger vs. Sixgill shark). classifying a series of animals presented to them. In the next class session

Love, Bradley C.

37

Performance in an Online Introductory Course in a Hybrid Classroom Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared the academic achievement between undergraduate students taking an introductory managerial accounting course online (N = 104) and students who took the same course in a hybrid classroom setting (N = 203). Student achievement was measured using scores from twelve weekly online assignments, two major online assignments, a final…

Aly, Ibrahim

2013-01-01

38

A Collaborative Model for Developing Classroom Management Skills in Urban Professional Development School Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a school-university partnership that focuses on the development of classroom management skills for preservice teachers in an urban setting, through collaboration between mentors, principals, and a university supervisor. To prepare preservice teachers for the unique challenges of urban schools, three key elements were…

Dobler, Elizabeth; Kesner, Cathy; Kramer, Rebecca; Resnik, Marilyn; Devin, Libby

2009-01-01

39

Mobile-IT Education (MIT.EDU): M-Learning Applications for Classroom Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, we describe the Mobile-IT Education (MIT.EDU) system, which demonstrates the potential of using a distributed mobile device architecture for rapid prototyping of wireless mobile multi-user applications for use in classroom settings. MIT.EDU is a stable, accessible system that combines inexpensive, commodity hardware, a flexible…

Sung, M.; Gips, J.; Eagle, N.; Madan, A.; Caneel, R.; DeVaul, R.; Bonsen, J.; Pentland, A.

2005-01-01

40

Conceptualizing the Classroom of Target Students: A Qualitative Investigation of Panelists' Experiences during Standard Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increasingly, research has focused on the cognitive processes associated with various standard-setting activities. This qualitative study involved an examination of 16 third-grade reading teachers' experiences with the cognitive task of conceptualizing an entire classroom of hypothetical target students when the single-passage bookmark method or…

Hein, Serge F.; Skaggs, Gary

2010-01-01

41

Online decision problems with large strategy sets  

E-print Network

In an online decision problem, an algorithm performs a sequence of trials, each of which involves selecting one element from a fixed set of alternatives (the "strategy set") whose costs vary over time. After T trials, the ...

Kleinberg, Robert David

2005-01-01

42

Detecting Novel Associations in Large Data Sets  

E-print Network

. We apply MIC and MINE to data sets in global health, gene expression, major-league baseball common in fields as varied as genomics, physics, political science, and econom- ics, making this question demonstrate the application of MIC and MINE to data sets in health, baseball, genomics, and the human

Masci, Frank

43

Ready, Set, SCIENCE!: Putting Research to Work in K-8 Science Classrooms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What types of instructional experiences help K-8 students learn science with understanding? What do science educators teachers, teacher leaders, science specialists, professional development staff, curriculum designers, school administrators need to know to create and support such experiences? Ready, Set, Science! guides the way with an account of the groundbreaking and comprehensive synthesis of research into teaching and learning science in kindergarten through eighth grade. Based on the recently released National Research Council report Taking Science to School: Learning and Teaching Science in Grades K-8, this book summarizes a rich body of findings from the learning sciences and builds detailed cases of science educators at work to make the implications of research clear, accessible, and stimulating for a broad range of science educators. Ready, Set, Science! is filled with classroom case studies that bring to life the research findings and help readers to replicate success. Most of these stories are based on real classroom experiences that illustrate the complexities that teachers grapple with every day. They show how teachers work to select and design rigorous and engaging instructional tasks, manage classrooms, orchestrate productive discussions with culturally and linguistically diverse groups of students, and help students make their thinking visible using a variety of representational tools. This book is the winner of the Association of Educational Publishers 2008 Distinguished Achievement Award and is an essential resource for science education practitioners and contains information that will be extremely useful to everyone including parents directly or indirectly involved in the teaching of science.

Sarah Michaels

2007-01-01

44

Training Children's Self-Control: A Field Experiment in Self-Monitoring and Goal-Setting in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the effects of training in self-monitoring and goal setting skills on classroom study behavior and on the academic achievement of fifth and sixth grade children in an individualized mathematics program. (BD)

Sagotsky, Gerald; And Others

1978-01-01

45

Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents K-12 and college classrooms considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, focusing on concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm, client,…

American School & University, 2003

2003-01-01

46

Using Large Shared Displays to Create a Collaborative Classroom Learning Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our goal in this work is to create a more collaborative learning environment in the classroom, by designing and implementing a system infrastructure to support easy use and management of a large shared (tiled) display. Through this shared display space, instructor and student interaction is facilitated. This large display space provides the primary means of presentation of lecture material, allowing

Patrick E. Mantey; Jeremy Richards

47

ON DISTANCE SETS OF LARGE SETS OF INTEGER POINTS AKOS MAGYAR  

E-print Network

1 ON DISTANCE SETS OF LARGE SETS OF INTEGER POINTS ´AKOS MAGYAR Abstract. Distance sets of large by NSF Grant DMS-0202021 1 #12;2 ´AKOS MAGYAR 2. Main results. We say that a set A Zn has upper density

Magyar, Akos

48

Science Teacher Beliefs and Classroom Practice Related to Constructivism in Different School Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Science teacher beliefs and classroom practice related to constructivism and factors that may influence classroom practice were examined in this cross-case study. Data from four science teachers in two schools included interviews, demographic questionnaire, Classroom Learning Environment Survey (preferred/perceived), and classroom observations and…

Savasci, Funda; Berlin, Donna F.

2012-01-01

49

Clickers in the Large Classroom: Current Research and Best-Practice Tips  

Microsoft Academic Search

Audience response systems (ARS) or clickers, as they are commonly called, offer a management tool for engaging students in the large classroom. Basic elements of the technology are discussed. These systems have been used in a variety of fields and at all levels of education. Typical goals of ARS questions are discussed, as well as methods of compensating for the

Jane E. Caldwell

2007-01-01

50

Large Classroom Experience with an Interactive Tiled Display Mural  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents work on an advanced multimedia lecture hall exploiting large tiled displays and student laptops, the software supporting their combined use, and the initial validation of this environment in enhancing learning and student-instructor interaction. Large resolution tiled displays allow multiple students with laptops or tablet PC's to present their work and collaborate with the instructor and other students

Jeremy Richards; Patrick E. Mantey

2006-01-01

51

Setting-level influences on implementation of the responsive classroom approach.  

PubMed

We used mixed methods to examine the association between setting-level factors and observed implementation of a social and emotional learning intervention (Responsive Classroom® approach; RC). In study 1 (N?=?33 3rd grade teachers after the first year of RC implementation), we identified relevant setting-level factors and uncovered the mechanisms through which they related to implementation. In study 2 (N?=?50 4th grade teachers after the second year of RC implementation), we validated our most salient Study 1 finding across multiple informants. Findings suggested that teachers perceived setting-level factors, particularly principal buy-in to the intervention and individualized coaching, as influential to their degree of implementation. Further, we found that intervention coaches' perspectives of principal buy-in were more related to implementation than principals' or teachers' perspectives. Findings extend the application of setting theory to the field of implementation science and suggest that interventionists may want to consider particular accounts of school setting factors before determining the likelihood of schools achieving high levels of implementation. PMID:23065349

Wanless, Shannon B; Patton, Christine L; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Deutsch, Nancy L

2013-02-01

52

Comparing Outcomes from Field and Classroom Based Settings for Undergraduate Geoscience Courses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field based learning can be found in nearly every course offered in Geology at Brigham Young University. For example, in our Structural Geology course field studies substitute for labs. Students collect data their own data from several different structural settings of the Wasatch Range. Our curriculum also includes a two-week, sophomore-level field course that introduces students to interpreting field relations themselves and sets the stage for much of what they learn in their upper-division courses. Our senior-level six-week field geology course includes classical field mapping with exercises in petroleum and mineral exploration, environmental geology and geological hazards. Experiments with substituting field-based general education courses for those in traditional classroom settings indicate that student cognition, course enjoyment and recruiting of majors significantly increase in a field-based course. We offer a field-based introductory geology course (Geo 102) that is taught in seven, six-hour field trips during which students travel to localities of geologic interest to investigate a variety of fundamental geological problems. We compare the outcomes of Geo 102 with a traditional classroom-based geology course (Geo 101). For the comparison both courses are taught by the same instructor, use the same text and supplementary materials and take the same exams. The results of 7 years of reporting indicate that test scores and final grades are one-half grade point higher for Geo 102 students versus those in traditional introductory courses. Student evaluations of the course are also 0.8-1.4 points higher on a scale of 1-8, and are consistently the highest in the Department and College. Other observations include increased attendance, attention and curiosity. The later two are measured by the number of students asking questions of other students as well as the instructors, and the total number of questions asked during class time in the field versus the classroom. Normal classroom involvement includes two or three students asking nearly all of the questions, while in Geo 102 it is closer to half the class, and not the same students each time. Not only do more individuals participate in asking questions in Geo 102, but each participant asks more questions as well. Questions asked in class are generally specific to the discussion, while field questions are commonly multidisciplinary in nature. Field-based courses also encourage more students to collaborate with each other and to integrate shared observations due to the many different aspects of the geosciences present at each site. One of the most important pay-offs is the 50% increase in the number of students changing their major to geology in the field-based versus classroom-based courses. Field-based learning increases the depth of student understanding of the subjects they investigate as well as student involvement and enthusiasm in the class. The tradeoff we make for realizing significant individual and group discovery in the field is that more responsibility is placed on the student to understand the broad based geologic concepts found in the text. The field based approach allows the students to immediately apply their learning in real world applications.

Skinner, M. R.; Harris, R. A.; Flores, J.

2011-12-01

53

Implementing Concept-Based Learning in a Large Undergraduate Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experiment explicitly introducing learning strategies to a large, first-year undergraduate cell biology course was undertaken to see whether awareness and use of strategies had a measurable impact on student performance. The construction of concept maps was selected as the strategy to be introduced because of an inherent coherence with a course…

Morse, David; Jutras, France

2008-01-01

54

Interaction and Uptake in Large Foreign Language Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Inteaction determines and affects the conditions of language acquisition especially in contexts where exposure to the target language is limited. This is believed to be successful only within the context of small classes (Chavez, 2009). This paper examines learners' progress resulting from interaction in large classes. Using pre-, post-, and…

Ekembe, Eric Enongene

2014-01-01

55

The Effects of a Teacher-Child Play Intervention on Classroom Compliance in Young Children in Child Care Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study evaluated the effects of a teacher-conducted play intervention on preschool-aged children's compliance in child care settings. Study participants included 8 children ranging in age from 3 to 5 years and 5 early childhood education teachers within 5 classrooms across 5 child care centers. A combination ABAB and multiple baseline…

Levine, Darren G.; Ducharme, Joseph M.

2013-01-01

56

Student-Centred Anti-Smoking Education: Comparing a Classroom-Based and an Out-of-School Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study monitored a student-centred educational anti-smoking intervention with fifth graders by focusing on their cognitive achievement and intrinsic motivation. In order to assess the potential influence of the setting on self-directed learning, the intervention was conducted in two different learning environments: a classroom-based…

Geier, Christine S.; Bogner, Franz X.

2010-01-01

57

An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Electronic Classroom Communication Systems in Large Lecture Classes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Since 2002 we have been investigating the use of an electronic classroom communication system in large first year lecture classes. Handheld keypads were distributed to teams of students during a lecture class. Students used the keypads to answer two step multiple choice problems after a discussion within their group. The questions were generated using students answers from previous exams. We have evaluated our use of the classroom communication system using a survey about how comfortable students are with this type of interaction. In addition, we have tried to determine if the use of the classroom communication system can be linked to student performance on exams. Our results show that students are comfortable with this technology and feel that, on the whole, interactive lectures are useful. At a first glance, there is an improvement in students' exam performance, but there are too many competing factors to clearly say that this improvement is solely due to the use of the classroom communication system. Even though this paper is based in physics and a physics example is used to illustrate points, the technique can be applied to other discipline areas.

58

Science Teacher Beliefs and Classroom Practice Related to Constructivism in Different School Settings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Science teacher beliefs and classroom practice related to constructivism and factors that may influence classroom practice were examined in this cross-case study. Data from four science teachers in two schools included interviews, demographic questionnaire, Classroom Learning Environment Survey (preferred/perceived), and classroom observations and documents. Using an inductive analytic approach, results suggested that the teachers embraced constructivism, but classroom observations did not confirm implementation of these beliefs for three of the four teachers. The most preferred constructivist components were personal relevance and student negotiation; the most perceived component was critical voice. Shared control was the least preferred, least perceived, and least observed constructivist component. School type, grade, student behavior/ability, curriculum/standardized testing, and parental involvement may influence classroom practice.

Savasci, Funda; Berlin, Donna F.

2012-02-01

59

Who's Doing the Pointing? Investigating Facilitated Communication in a Classroom Setting with Students with Autism  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first author, a certified speech-language pathologist (SLP), served as the facilitator for two students with autism to assess pointing control during facilitated communication. The teacher instructed the students during typical classroom activities, and two classroom assistants collected data. We used a counterbalanced alternating treatments design with the SLP\\/facilitator being either blind or sighted. She wore sunglasses throughout the investigation

Rosemary G. Kerrin; Jane Y. Murdock; William R. Sharpton; Nichelle Jones

1998-01-01

60

Examining Play among Young Children in Single-Age and Multi-Age Preschool Classroom Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advocates for multi-age classrooms claim multi-age groupings benefit children (Brynes, Shuster, & Jones, 1994). Currently, there is a lack of research examining play among students in multi-age classrooms. If indeed there is a positive benefit of play among children, research is needed to examine these behaviors among and between young children in…

Youhne, Mia Song

2009-01-01

61

The Interests of Full Disclosure: Agenda-Setting and the Practical Initiation of the Feminist Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several theoretical and pragmatic questions arise when one attempts to employ feminist pedagogy in the classroom (or to study it), such as how to strike a balance between classroom order and instructor de-centering and how to productively address student resistance. In this article, the author describes how she took on her final project for a…

Seymour, Nicole

2007-01-01

62

Teaching and learning in an integrated curriculum setting: A case study of classroom practices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Curriculum integration, while a commonly used educational term, remains a challenging concept to define and examine both in research and in classroom practice. Numerous types and definitions of curriculum integration exist in educational research, while, in comparison, teachers tend to focus on curriculum integration simply as a mixing of subject areas. To better understand curriculum integration in practice, this thesis details a case study that examines both teacher and student perspectives regarding a grade nine integrated unit on energy. Set in a public secondary school in Ontario, Canada, I comprehensively describe and analyze teacher understandings of, and challenges with, the implementation of an integrated unit, while also examining student perspectives and academic learning. My participants consisted of two high school teachers, a geography teacher and a science teacher, and their twenty-three students. Using data gathered from interviews before, during, and after the implementation of a 16-lesson unit, as well as observations throughout, I completed a case description and thematic analysis. My results illustrate the importance of examining why teachers choose to implement an integrated unit and the planning and scheduling challenges that exist. In addition, while the students in this study were academically successful, clarification is needed regarding whether student success can be linked to the integration of these two subjects or the types of activities these two teachers utilized.

MacMath, Sheryl Lynn

63

Adaptive, multiresolution visualization of large data sets using parallel octrees.  

SciTech Connect

The interactive visualization and exploration of large scientific data sets is a challenging and difficult task; their size often far exceeds the performance and memory capacity of even the most powerful graphics work-stations. To address this problem, we have created a technique that combines hierarchical data reduction methods with parallel computing to allow interactive exploration of large data sets while retaining full-resolution capability. The hierarchical representation is built in parallel by strategically inserting field data into an octree data structure. We provide functionality that allows the user to interactively adapt the resolution of the reduced data sets so that resolution is increased in regions of interest without sacrificing local graphics performance. We describe the creation of the reduced data sets using a parallel octree, the software architecture of the system, and the performance of this system on the data from a Rayleigh-Taylor instability simulation.

Freitag, L. A.; Loy, R. M.

1999-06-10

64

Preceptor use of classroom assessment techniques to stimulate higher-order thinking in the clinical setting.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to provide examples of learning activities to be used as formative (interim) evaluation of an in-hospital orientation or cross-training program. Examples are provided in the form of vignettes that have been derived from strategies described in the literature as classroom assessment techniques. Although these classroom assessment techniques were originally designed for classroom experiences, they are proposed as methods for preceptors to stimulate the development of higher-order thinking such as synthesizing information, solving problems, and learning how to learn. PMID:19326822

Davidson, Judy E

2009-03-01

65

A Comparative Analysis of Learning Experience in a Traditional vs. Virtual Classroom Setting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the impact of a computer-mediated versus traditional classroom on students' learning, performance, and interactivity in a graduate finance class. Questionnaire responses revealed no significant differences between groups in terms of learning experience or satisfaction. (EV)

Ashkeboussi, Rahim

2001-01-01

66

An approach to visualization of large data sets from LIDAR  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapid development of laser scanning technology in past decades has resulted in a wide area of its applications. LI- DAR is a system that uses this technology to gather in- formation about distant targets. Gathered data are stored into large data sets that are further processed, visualized and analyzed. Fast and accurate visualization is the key factor when working with

Bostjan Kova

67

The Single and Combined Effects of Multiple Intensities of Behavior Modification and Methylphenidate for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in a Classroom Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Currently behavior modification, stimulant medication, and combined treatments are supported as evidence-based interventions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in classroom settings. However, there has been little study of the relative effects of these two modalities and their combination in classrooms. Using a within-subject design, the…

Fabiano, Gregory A.; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Burrows-MacLean, Lisa; Coles, Erika K.; Chacko, Anil; Wymbs, Brian T.; Walker, Kathryn S.; Arnold, Fran; Garefino, Allison; Keenan, Jenna K.; Onyango, Adia N.; Hoffman, Martin T.; Massetti, Greta M.; Robb, Jessica A.

2007-01-01

68

Increasing the Writing Performance of Urban Seniors Placed At-Risk through Goal-Setting in a Culturally Responsive and Creativity-Centered Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Efforts to support marginalized students require not only identifying systemic inequities, but providing a classroom infrastructure that supports the academic achievement of all students. This action research study examined the effects of implementing goal-setting strategies and emphasizing creativity in a culturally responsive classroom (CRC) on…

Estrada, Brittany; Warren, Susan

2014-01-01

69

The search for structure - Object classification in large data sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research concerning object classifications schemes are reviewed, focusing on large data sets. Classification techniques are discussed, including syntactic, decision theoretic methods, fuzzy techniques, and stochastic and fuzzy grammars. Consideration is given to the automation of MK classification (Morgan and Keenan, 1973) and other problems associated with the classification of spectra. In addition, the classification of galaxies is examined, including the problems of systematic errors, blended objects, galaxy types, and galaxy clusters.

Kurtz, Michael J.

70

Visualizing Large Data Sets in the Earth Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors describe the capabilities of McIDAS , an interactive visualization system that is vastly increasing the ability of earth scientists to manage and analyze data from remote sensing instruments and numerical simulation models. McIDAS provides animated three-dimensional images and highly interactive displays. The software can manage, analyze, and visualize large data sets that span many physical variables (such as

William L. Hibbard; David A. Santek

1989-01-01

71

A Comparative Study on Second Language Vocabulary Development: Study Abroad vs Classroom Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present paper aims to achieve a better understanding of the process of vocabulary acquisition by examining the development of lexical knowledge in both classroom and study abroad contexts. Taking Ife, Vives Boix, and Meara's (2000) study as a starting point, this study attempts to determine whether development in both levels of vocabulary…

Jimenez-Jimenez, Antonio F.

2010-01-01

72

Multimodal Literacy Practices in the Indigenous Sámi Classroom: Children Navigating in a Complex Multilingual Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores multimodal literacy practices in a transforming multilingual context of an indigenous and endangered Sámi language classroom. Looking at literacy practices as embedded in a complex and shifting terrain of language ideologies, language norms, and individual experiences and attitudes, we examined how multilingual Sámi children…

Pietikäinen, Sari; Pitkänen-Huhta, Anne

2013-01-01

73

Effectiveness of Wellness-Based Classroom Guidance in Elementary School Settings: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A three-session, wellness-based classroom guidance unit was developed based on the Indivisible Self wellness model and presented to 55 students in 5th grade. Participants completed the Five Factor Wellness Inventory, Elementary School Version, before and after the unit. Wellness scores were significantly and positively higher at post-testing for…

Villalba, Jose A.; Myers, Jane E.

2008-01-01

74

Classroom Management Strategies for Young Children with Challenging Behavior within Early Childhood Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many preschool, Head Start, and kindergarten educators of young children express concern about the number of children who exhibit frequent challenging behaviors and report that managing these behaviors is difficult within these classrooms. This article describes research-based strategies with practical applications that can be used as part of…

Jolivette, Kristine; Steed, Elizabeth A.

2010-01-01

75

By What Token Economy? A Classroom Learning Tool for Inclusive Settings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a token economy that used tokens styled as license plates to elicit appropriate behavior in an inclusive fifth-grade class in which four students with behavior disorders were enrolled. Student involvement in establishing the "driving rules" of the classroom is explained, the components of a token economy are outlined, and steps for group…

Anderson, Carol; Katsiyannis, Antonis

1997-01-01

76

Unsupervised Source Separation for Large Planetary Data Sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Implementations of non-negative matrix approximation (NNMA) algorithms have reached a level of maturity that makes them suitable for application on large planetary datasets. Our results imply that they can effectively factor large collections of hyperspectral measurements into sources and abundances under linearity and non-negativity constraints with reasonable resources. This work presents our first steps towards automated large-scale analysis of hyperspectral data sets with the focus on spectral and geographical summarization using NNMA. The method we implement consists of various steps: after initial calibration, randomized NNMA is used to extract source spectra; these are then distributed on a virtual sphere and classified according to similarity and proximity; for each class of source, an abundance map is generated and presented to the user for interpretation. We use the method on both imaging and point spectrometer data but require a selection of appropriate imagery (for example, a consistent set of nadir pointing images with compatible illumination conditions). Results can be obtained with reasonable resources in minutes to hours, depending on the size of the dataset and the accuracy required. For the datasets we studied, results have been mostly in line with related work and community opinion. Future work includes treatment of overlapping image regions, incorporation of more robust features and inclusion of more datasets.

Schmidt, A.; Moussaoui, S.; Legendre, M.; Schmidt, F.

2012-12-01

77

Service user involvement in pre-registration mental health nurse education classroom settings: a review of the literature.  

PubMed

Service user involvement in pre-registration nurse education is now a requirement, yet little is known about how students engage with users in the classroom, how such initiatives are being evaluated, how service users are prepared themselves to teach students, or the potential influence on clinical practice. The aim of this literature review was to bring together published articles on service user involvement in classroom settings in pre-registration mental health nurse education programmes, including their evaluations. A comprehensive review of the literature was carried out via computer search engines and the Internet, as well as a hand search of pertinent journals and references. This produced eight papers that fitted the inclusion criteria, comprising four empirical studies and four review articles, which were then reviewed using a seven-item checklist. The articles revealed a range of teaching and learning strategies had been employed, ranging from exposure to users' personal stories, to students being required to demonstrate awareness of user perspectives in case study presentations, with others involving eLearning and assessment skills initiatives. This review concludes that further longitudinal research is needed to establish the influence of user involvement in the classroom over time. PMID:22296494

Terry, J

2012-11-01

78

Support vector machine classifiers for large data sets.  

SciTech Connect

This report concerns the generation of support vector machine classifiers for solving the pattern recognition problem in machine learning. Several methods are proposed based on interior point methods for convex quadratic programming. Software implementations are developed by adapting the object-oriented packaging OOQP to the problem structure and by using the software package PETSc to perform time-intensive computations in a distributed setting. Linear systems arising from classification problems with moderately large numbers of features are solved by using two techniques--one a parallel direct solver, the other a Krylov-subspace method incorporating novel preconditioning strategies. Numerical results are provided, and computational experience is discussed.

Gertz, E. M.; Griffin, J. D.

2006-01-31

79

Do emotional support and classroom organization earlier in the year set the stage for higher quality instruction?  

PubMed

Many teachers believe that providing greater emotional and organizational supports in the beginning of the year strengthens their ability to teach effectively as the year progresses. Some interventions, such as the Responsive Classroom (RC) approach, explicitly embed this sequence into professional development efforts. We tested the hypothesis that earlier emotional and organizational supports set the stage for improved instruction later in the year in a sample of third- and fourth-grade teachers enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of the RC approach. Further, we examined the extent to which the model generalized for teachers using varying levels of RC practices as well as whether or not teachers were in the intervention or control groups. Teachers' emotional, organizational, and instructional interactions were observed using the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (Pianta, La Paro, & Hamre, 2008) on five occasions throughout the year. Results indicated a reciprocal relation between emotional and instructional supports. Specifically, higher levels of emotional support earlier in the year predicted higher instructional support later in the year. Also, higher levels of instructional support earlier in the year predicted higher emotional support later in the year. Classroom organization was not found to have longitudinal associations with the other domains across a year. This pattern was robust when controlling for the use of RC practices as well as across intervention and control groups. Further, teachers' use of RC practices predicted higher emotional support and classroom organization throughout the year, suggesting the malleability of this teacher characteristic. Discussion highlights the connection between teachers' emotional and instructional supports and how the use of RC practices improves teachers' emotionally supportive interactions with students. PMID:24060059

Curby, Timothy W; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Abry, Tashia

2013-10-01

80

Using Mobile Phones to Increase Classroom Interaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the possible benefits of using mobile phones to increase interaction and promote active learning in large classroom settings. First year undergraduate students studying Cellular Processes at the University of East London took part in a trial of a new text-based classroom interaction system and evaluated their experience by…

Cobb, Stephanie; Heaney, Rose; Corcoran, Olivia; Henderson-Begg, Stephanie

2010-01-01

81

Mobile-Phone-Based Classroom Response Systems: Students' Perceptions of Engagement and Learning in a Large Undergraduate Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a Classroom Response System (CRS) has been associated with positive educational outcomes, by fostering student engagement and by allowing immediate feedback to both students and instructors. This study examined a low-cost CRS (VotApedia) in a large first-year class, where students responded to questions using their mobile phones. This study…

Dunn, Peter K.; Richardson, Alice; Oprescu, Florin; McDonald, Christine

2013-01-01

82

Silent and Vocal Students in a Large Active Learning Chemistry Classroom: Comparison of Performance and Motivational Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Active learning is becoming more prevalent in large science classrooms, and this study shows the impact on performance of being vocal during Socratic questioning in a General Chemistry course. 800 college students over a two year period were given a pre and post-test using the Chemistry Concept Reasoning Test. The pre-test results showed that…

Obenland, Carrie A.; Munson, Ashlyn H.; Hutchinson, John S.

2013-01-01

83

Peer Instruction versus Class-Wide Discussion in Large Classes: A Comparison of Two Interaction Methods in the Wired Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom communication system (CCS) technology makes it easier to give students immediate feedback on concept tests and to manage peer and class discussions in large classes. This study compared the effects of two different CCS discussion sequences on students' experiences of learning engineering. The results demonstrated that the type of…

Nicol, David J.; Boyle, James T.

2003-01-01

84

Safety and science at sea: connecting science research settings to the classroom through live video  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many science teachers start the year off with classroom safety topics. Annual repetition helps with mastery of this important and basic knowledge, while helping schools to meet their legal obligations for safe lab science. Although these lessons are necessary, they are often topical, rarely authentic and relatively dull. Interesting connections can, however, be drawn between the importance of safety in science classrooms and the importance of safety in academic laboratories, fieldwork, shipboard research, and commercial research. Teachers can leverage these connections through live video interactions with scientists in the field, thereby creating an authentic learning environment. During the School of Rock 2009, a professional teacher research experience aboard the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's research vessel JOIDES Resolution, safety and nature-of-science curricula were created to help address this need. By experimenting with various topics and locations on the ship that were accessible and applicable to middle school learning, 43 highly visual "safety signs" and activities were identified and presented "live" by graduate students, teachers, scientists; the ship's mates, doctor and technical staff. Students were exposed to realistic science process skills along with safety content from the world's only riserless, deep-sea drilling research vessel. The once-in-a-lifetime experience caused the students' eyes to brighten behind their safety glasses, especially as they recognized the same eye wash station and safety gear they have to wear and attended a ship's fire and safety drill along side scientists in hard hats and personal floatation devices. This collaborative and replicable live vide approach will connect basic safety content and nature-of-science process skills for a memorable and authentic learning experience for students.

Cohen, E.; Peart, L. W.

2011-12-01

85

Efficient clustering of large EST data sets on parallel computers  

PubMed Central

Clustering expressed sequence tags (ESTs) is a powerful strategy for gene identification, gene expression studies and identifying important genetic variations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms. To enable fast clustering of large-scale EST data, we developed PaCE (for Parallel Clustering of ESTs), a software program for EST clustering on parallel computers. In this paper, we report on the design and development of PaCE and its evaluation using Arabidopsis ESTs. The novel features of our approach include: (i) design of memory efficient algorithms to reduce the memory required to linear in the size of the input, (ii) a combination of algorithmic techniques to reduce the computational work without sacrificing the quality of clustering, and (iii) use of parallel processing to reduce run-time and facilitate clustering of larger data sets. Using a combination of these techniques, we report the clustering of 168 200 Arabidopsis ESTs in 15 min on an IBM xSeries cluster with 30 dual-processor nodes. We also clustered 327 632 rat ESTs in 47 min and 420 694 Triticum aestivum ESTs in 3 h and 15 min. We demonstrate the quality of our software using benchmark Arabidopsis EST data, and by comparing it with CAP3, a software widely used for EST assembly. Our software allows clustering of much larger EST data sets than is possible with current software. Because of its speed, it also facilitates multiple runs with different parameters, providing biologists a tool to better analyze EST sequence data. Using PaCE, we clustered EST data from 23 plant species and the results are available at the PlantGDB website. PMID:12771222

Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman; Aluru, Srinivas; Kothari, Suresh; Brendel, Volker

2003-01-01

86

Initial validation of the prekindergarten Classroom Observation Tool and goal setting system for data-based coaching.  

PubMed

Although coaching is a popular approach for enhancing the quality of Tier 1 instruction, limited research has addressed observational measures specifically designed to focus coaching on evidence-based practices. This study explains the development of the prekindergarten (pre-k) Classroom Observation Tool (COT) designed for use in a data-based coaching model. We examined psychometric characteristics of the COT and explored how coaches and teachers used the COT goal-setting system. The study included 193 coaches working with 3,909 pre-k teachers in a statewide professional development program. Classrooms served 3 and 4 year olds (n = 56,390) enrolled mostly in Title I, Head Start, and other need-based pre-k programs. Coaches used the COT during a 2-hr observation at the beginning of the academic year. Teachers collected progress-monitoring data on children's language, literacy, and math outcomes three times during the year. Results indicated a theoretically supported eight-factor structure of the COT across language, literacy, and math instructional domains. Overall interrater reliability among coaches was good (.75). Although correlations with an established teacher observation measure were small, significant positive relations between COT scores and children's literacy outcomes indicate promising predictive validity. Patterns of goal-setting behaviors indicate teachers and coaches set an average of 43.17 goals during the academic year, and coaches reported that 80.62% of goals were met. Both coaches and teachers reported the COT was a helpful measure for enhancing quality of Tier 1 instruction. Limitations of the current study and implications for research and data-based coaching efforts are discussed. PMID:24059812

Crawford, April D; Zucker, Tricia A; Williams, Jeffrey M; Bhavsar, Vibhuti; Landry, Susan H

2013-12-01

87

Effective Extensive Reading outside the Classroom: A Large-Scale Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We report on a large-scale implementation of extensive reading (ER) in a university setting in Japan where all students were required to read outside class time as part of their course requirement. A pre/posttest comparison between the 2009 cohort of students who read outside of class and the 2008 cohort who did no outside reading shows that the…

Robb, Thomas; Kano, Makimi

2013-01-01

88

Dynamic level set regularization for large distributed parameter estimation problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper considers inverse problems of shape recovery from noisy boundary data, where the forward problem involves the inversion of elliptic PDEs. The piecewise constant solution, a scaling and translation of a characteristic function, is described in terms of a smoother level set function. A fast and simple dynamic regularization method has been recently proposed that has a robust stopping criterion and typically terminates after very few iterations. Direct linear algebra methods have been used for the linear systems arising in both forward and inverse problems, which is suitable for problems of moderate size in 2D. For larger problems, especially in 3D, iterative methods are required. In this paper we extend our previous results to large-scale problems by proposing and investigating iterative linear system solvers in the present context. Perhaps contrary to one's initial intuition, the iterative methods are particularly useful for the inverse rather than the forward linear systems. Moreover, only very few preconditioned conjugate gradient iterations are applied towards the solution of the linear system for the inverse problem, allowing the regularizing effects of such iterations to take centre stage. The efficacy of the obtained method is demonstrated.

van den Doel, K.; Ascher, U. M.

2007-06-01

89

Using JPEG 2000 interactive protocol to stream a large image or a large image set.  

PubMed

The electronic health record (EHR) is expected to improve the quality of care by enabling access to relevant information at the diagnostic decision moment. During deployment efforts for including images in the EHR, a main challenge has come up from the need to compare old images with current ones. When old images reside in a different system, they need to be imported for visualization which leads to a problem related to persistency management and information consistency. A solution consisting in avoiding image import is achievable with image streaming. In this paper we present, evaluate, and discuss two medical-specific streaming use cases: displaying a large image such as a digital mammography image and displaying a large set of relatively small images such as a large CT series. PMID:20978921

Noumeir, Rita; Pambrun, Jean-François

2011-10-01

90

The Distracting Effects of a Ringing Cell Phone: An Investigation of the Laboratory and the Classroom Setting.  

PubMed

The detrimental effects of a ringing phone on cognitive performance were investigated in four experiments. In Experiments 1 and 2, the effects of different types of sounds (a standard cell phone ring, irrelevant tones and an instrumental song commonly encountered by participants) on performance were examined. In Experiment 1, slower responses were observed in all auditory groups relative to a silence condition, but participants in the ring and song conditions recovered more slowly. In Experiment 2, participants who were warned about the potential for distraction recovered more quickly, suggesting a benefit of this prior knowledge. This investigation continued in a college classroom setting (Experiments 3a and 3b); students were exposed to a ringing cell phone during the lecture. Performance on a surprise quiz revealed low accuracy rates on material presented while the phone was ringing. These findings offer insight into top-down cognitive processes that moderate involuntary orienting responses associated with a common stimulus encountered in the environment. PMID:21234286

Shelton, Jill T; Elliott, Emily M; Lynn, Sharon D; Exner, Amanda L

2009-12-01

91

Responsive Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Responsive Classroom addresses some of the challenges present in any elementary classroom, be it first-grade mathematics or third-grade science, by offering "an approach to teaching and learning that fosters safe, challenging, and joyful classrooms and schools, kindergarten through eighth grade." Through this website, classroom teachers share "practical strategies for bringing together social and academic learning throughout the school day." They report that teachers in urban, rural, and suburban settings nationwide find that these strategies have increased student investment, responsibility, and learning, and decreased problem behaviors. Studies detailing the effectiveness of the program are posted on this website. The basic principles of the program are also described, but the books detailing their approach must be purchased. The newsletter, however, is available free of charge and the archive includes previously published articles, which can be searched by topic, such as technology in the classroom and family involvement.

92

Introduction to Statistical Methods for Analyzing Large Data Sets: Gene-Set Enrichment Analysis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes, slides, and a problem set for a series of lectures introducing the mathematical concepts behind gene-set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and were part of a course entitled “Systems Biology: Biomedical Modeling.” GSEA is a statistical functional enrichment analysis commonly applied to identify enrichment of biological functional categories in sets of ranked differentially expressed genes from genome-wide mRNA expression data sets.

Neil R. Clark (New York; Mount Sinai School of Medicine REV)

2011-09-13

93

A Classroom Exercise in Spatial Analysis Using an Imaginary Data Set.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One skill that elementary students need to acquire is the ability to analyze spatially distributed data. In this activity students are asked to complete the following tasks: (1) plot a set of data (related to "mud-sharks"--an imaginary fish) on a map of the state of Alabama, (2) identify trends in the data, (3) make graphs using the data…

Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

94

Intercultural Education Set Forward: Operational Strategies and Procedures in Cypriot Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers in Cyprus are being called upon for the first time to teach within culturally diverse educational settings. Given the substantial role, teachers play in the implementation of intercultural education, this paper explores the intercultural strategies and procedures adopted by primary school teachers in Cyprus. Interviews were carried out…

Hajisoteriou, Christina

2012-01-01

95

Guide to Basic Citizenship Competencies: Recommendations to Compare Curriculum Materials, Assess Classroom Instruction, and Set Goals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Part of the Basic Citizenship Competencies Project, this guide is intended for teachers, supervisors, and curriculum committees. It provides diagnostic guidelines which aid in assessing needs, setting goals, and making systematic judgments about citizenship education programs and materials. The objective of the entire project is to assist in…

Turner, Mary Jane

96

Impact of Abbreviated Lecture with Interactive Mini-cases vs Traditional Lecture on Student Performance in the Large Classroom  

PubMed Central

Objective. To compare the impact of 2 different teaching and learning methods on student mastery of learning objectives in a pharmacotherapy module in the large classroom setting. Design. Two teaching and learning methods were implemented and compared in a required pharmacotherapy module for 2 years. The first year, multiple interactive mini-cases with inclass individual assessment and an abbreviated lecture were used to teach osteoarthritis; a traditional lecture with 1 inclass case discussion was used to teach gout. In the second year, the same topics were used but the methods were flipped. Student performance on pre/post individual readiness assessment tests (iRATs), case questions, and subsequent examinations were compared each year by the teaching and learning method and then between years by topic for each method. Students also voluntarily completed a 20-item evaluation of the teaching and learning methods. Assessment. Postpresentation iRATs were significantly higher than prepresentation iRATs for each topic each year with the interactive mini-cases; there was no significant difference in iRATs before and after traditional lecture. For osteoarthritis, postpresentation iRATs after interactive mini-cases in year 1 were significantly higher than postpresentation iRATs after traditional lecture in year 2; the difference in iRATs for gout per learning method was not significant. The difference between examination performance for osteoarthritis and gout was not significant when the teaching and learning methods were compared. On the student evaluations, 2 items were significant both years when answers were compared by teaching and learning method. Each year, students ranked their class participation higher with interactive cases than with traditional lecture, but both years they reported enjoying the traditional lecture format more. Conclusion. Multiple interactive mini-cases with an abbreviated lecture improved immediate mastery of learning objectives compared to a traditional lecture format, regardless of therapeutic topic, but did not improve student performance on subsequent examinations. PMID:25657376

Nykamp, Diane L.; Momary, Kathryn M.

2014-01-01

97

Visual Data Mining of Large Spatial Data Sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extraction of interesting knowledge from large spatial databases is an important task in the development of spatial database systems. Spatial data mining is the branch of data mining that deals with spatial (location) data. Analyzing the huge amount (usually tera- bytes) of spatial data obtained from large databases such as credit card payments, telephone calls, environmental records, census demographics etc.

Daniel A. Keim; Christian Panse; Mike Sips

2003-01-01

98

Teleconsultation in School Settings: Linking Classroom Teachers and Behavior Analysts Through Web-Based Technology  

PubMed Central

This paper describes a technically driven, collaborative approach to assessing the function of problem behavior using web-based technology. A case example is provided to illustrate the process used in this pilot project. A school team conducted a functional analysis with a child who demonstrated challenging behaviors in a preschool setting. Behavior analysts at a university setting provided the school team with initial workshop trainings, on-site visits, e-mail and phone communication, as well as live web-based feedback on functional analysis sessions. The school personnel implemented the functional analysis with high fidelity and scored the data reliably. Outcomes of the project suggest that there is great potential for collaboration via the use of web-based technologies for ongoing assessment and development of effective interventions. However, an empirical evaluation of this model should be conducted before wide-scale adoption is recommended. PMID:22477705

Frieder, Jessica E; Peterson, Stephanie M; Woodward, Judy; Crane, JaeLee; Garner, Marlane

2009-01-01

99

The Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (COSMIC): An Observational Measure of the Intentional Communication of Children with Autism in an Unstructured Classroom Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (COSMIC) was devised to provide ecologically valid outcome measures for a communication-focused intervention trial. Ninety-one children with autism spectrum disorder aged 6 years 10 months (SD 16 months) were videoed during their everyday snack, teaching and free play…

Pasco, Greg; Gordon, Rosanna K.; Howlin, Patricia; Charman, Tony

2008-01-01

100

Coaching as a Key Component in Teachers' Professional Development: Improving Classroom Practices in Head Start Settings. OPRE Report 2012-4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Head Start CARES (Classroom-based Approaches and Resources for Emotion and Social Skill Promotion) is a large-scale, national research demonstration that was designed to test the effects of a one-year program aimed at improving pre-kindergarteners' social and emotional readiness for school. To facilitate the delivery of the program, teachers…

Lloyd, Chrrishana M.; Modlin, Emmily L.

2012-01-01

101

Query-driven visualization of large data sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a practical and general-purpose approach to large and complex visual data analysis where visualization processing, rendering and subsequent human interpretation is constrained to the subset of data deemed interesting by the user. In many scientific data analysis applications, \\

Kurt Stockinger; John Shalf; K. Wu; E. W. Bethel

2005-01-01

102

Classifying large data sets using SVMs with hierarchical clusters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Support vector machines (SVMs) have been promising methods for classification and regression analysis because of their solid mathematical foundations which convery several salient properties that other methods hardly provide. However, despite the prominent properties of SVMs, they are not as favored for large-scale data mining as for pattern recognition or machine learning because the training complexity of SVMs is highly

Hwanjo Yu; Jiong Yang; Jiawei Han

2003-01-01

103

The Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (COSMIC): An Observational Measure of the Intentional Communication of Children with Autism in an Unstructured Classroom Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (COSMIC) was devised to provide ecologically valid\\u000a outcome measures for a communication-focused intervention trial. Ninety-one children with autism spectrum disorder aged 6 years\\u000a 10 months (SD 16 months) were videoed during their everyday snack, teaching and free play activities. Inter-rater reliability\\u000a was high and relevant items showed significant associations with comparable items from concurrent Autism

Greg Pasco; Rosanna K. Gordon; Patricia Howlin; Tony Charman

2008-01-01

104

Assessing the Effectiveness of Inquiry-based Learning Techniques Implemented in Large Classroom Settings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geoscience and education faculty at The University of Akron jointly developed a series of inquiry-based learning modules aimed at both non-major and major student populations enrolled in introductory geology courses. These courses typically serve 2500 students per year in four to six classes of 40-160 students each per section. Twelve modules were developed that contained common topics and assessments appropriate to Earth Science, Environmental Geology and Physical Geology classes. All modules were designed to meet four primary learning objectives agreed upon by Department of Geology faculty. These major objectives include: 1) Improvement of student understanding of the scientific method; 2) Incorporation of problem solving strategies involving analysis, synthesis, and interpretation; 3) Development of the ability to distinguish between inferences, data and observations; and 4) Obtaining an understanding of basic processes that operate on Earth. Additional objectives that may be addressed by selected modules include: 1) The societal relevance of science; 2) Use and interpretation of quantitative data to better understand the Earth; 3) Development of the students' ability to communicate scientific results; 4) Distinguishing differences between science, religion and pseudo-science; 5) Evaluation of scientific information found in the mass media; and 6) Building interpersonal relationships through in-class group work. Student pre- and post-instruction progress was evaluated by administering a test of logical thinking, an attitude toward science survey, and formative evaluations. Scores from the logical thinking instrument were used to form balanced four-person working groups based on the students' incoming cognitive level. Groups were required to complete a series of activities and/or exercises that targeted different cognitive domains based upon Bloom's taxonomy (knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation of information). Daily assessments of knowledge-level learning included evaluations of student responses to pre- and post-instruction conceptual test questions, short group exercises and content-oriented exam questions. Higher level thinking skills were assessed when students completed exercises that required the completion of Venn diagrams, concept maps and/or evaluation rubrics both during class periods and on exams. Initial results indicate that these techniques improved student attendance significantly and improved overall retention in the course by 8-14% over traditional lecture formats. Student scores on multiple choice exam questions were slightly higher (1-3%) for students taught in the active learning environment and short answer questions showed larger gains (7%) over students' scores in a more traditional class structure.

Steer, D. N.; McConnell, D. A.; Owens, K.

2001-12-01

105

Experiments and other methods for developing expertise with design of experiments in a classroom setting  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The only way to gain genuine expertise in Statistical Process Control (SPC) and the design of experiments (DOX) is with repeated practice, but not on canned problems with dead data sets. Rather, one must negotiate a wide variety of problems each with its own peculiarities and its own constantly changing data. The problems should not be of the type for which there is a single, well-defined answer that can be looked up in a fraternity file or in some text. The problems should match as closely as possible the open-ended types for which there is always an abundance of uncertainty. These are the only kinds that arise in real research, whether that be basic research in academe or engineering research in industry. To gain this kind of experience, either as a professional consultant or as an industrial employee, takes years. Vast amounts of money, not to mention careers, must be put at risk. The purpose here is to outline some realistic simulation-type lab exercises that are so simple and inexpensive to run that the students can repeat them as often as desired at virtually no cost. Simulations also allow the instructor to design problems whose outcomes are as noisy as desired but still predictable within limits. Also the instructor and the students can learn a great deal more from the postmortum conducted after the exercise is completed. One never knows for sure what the true data should have been when dealing only with real life experiments. To add a bit more realism to the exercises, it is sometimes desirable to make the students pay for each experimental result from a make-believe budget allocation for the problem.

Patterson, John W.

1990-01-01

106

Computing Steerable Principal Components of a Large Set of Images and their Rotations  

E-print Network

1 Computing Steerable Principal Components of a Large Set of Images and their Rotations Colin Ponce (PCA) of a large image set consisting of images and, for each image, the set of its uniform rotations application of the algorithm to the problem of cryo-electron microscopy. EDICS Category: TEC-PRC Image & Video

Singer, Amit

107

Characterization of oligopeptide patterns in large protein sets  

PubMed Central

Background Recent sequencing projects and the growth of sequence data banks enable oligopeptide patterns to be characterized on a genome or kingdom level. Several studies have focused on kingdom or habitat classifications based on the abundance of short peptide patterns. There have also been efforts at local structural prediction based on short sequence motifs. Oligopeptide patterns undoubtedly carry valuable information content. Therefore, it is important to characterize these informational peptide patterns to shed light on possible new applications and the pitfalls implicit in neglecting bias in peptide patterns. Results We have studied four classes of pentapeptide patterns (designated POP, NEP, ORP and URP) in the kingdoms archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes. POP are highly abundant patterns statistically not expected to exist; NEP are patterns that do not exist but are statistically expected to; ORP are patterns unique to a kingdom; and URP are patterns excluded from a kingdom. We used two data sources: the de facto standard of protein knowledge Swiss-Prot, and a set of 386 completely sequenced genomes. For each class of peptides we looked at the 100 most extreme and found both known and unknown sequence features. Most of the known sequence motifs can be explained on the basis of the protein families from which they originate. Conclusion We find an inherent bias of certain oligopeptide patterns in naturally occurring proteins that cannot be explained solely on the basis of residue distribution in single proteins, kingdoms or databases. We see three predominant categories of patterns: (i) patterns widespread in a kingdom such as those originating from respiratory chain-associated proteins and translation machinery; (ii) proteins with structurally and/or functionally favored patterns, which have not yet been ascribed this role; (iii) multicopy species-specific retrotransposons, only found in the genome set. These categories will affect the accuracy of sequence pattern algorithms that rely mainly on amino acid residue usage. Methods presented in this paper may be used to discover targets for antibiotics, as we identify numerous examples of kingdom-specific antigens among our peptide classes. The methods may also be useful for detecting coding regions of genes. PMID:17908308

Bresell, Anders; Persson, Bengt

2007-01-01

108

(522)revision:2004-09-14modified:2005-06-17 BOREL SETS WITH LARGE SQUARES  

E-print Network

of the form "there is a Borel set B which contains a µ-square iff µ Rectangles(522)revision:2004-09-14modified:2005-06-17 BOREL SETS WITH LARGE SQUARES SAHARON SHELAH Abstract: µ: if a Borel set B R � R contains a µ-square (i.e. a set of the form A � A, |A| = µ

Shelah, Saharon

109

Processing large remote sensing image data sets on Beowulf clusters  

USGS Publications Warehouse

High-performance computing is often concerned with the speed at which floating- point calculations can be performed. The architectures of many parallel computers and/or their network topologies are based on these investigations. Often, benchmarks resulting from these investigations are compiled with little regard to how a large dataset would move about in these systems. This part of the Beowulf study addresses that concern by looking at specific applications software and system-level modifications. Applications include an implementation of a smoothing filter for time-series data, a parallel implementation of the decision tree algorithm used in the Landcover Characterization project, a parallel Kriging algorithm used to fit point data collected in the field on invasive species to a regular grid, and modifications to the Beowulf project's resampling algorithm to handle larger, higher resolution datasets at a national scale. Systems-level investigations include a feasibility study on Flat Neighborhood Networks and modifications of that concept with Parallel File Systems.

Steinwand, Daniel R.; Maddox, Brian; Beckmann, Tim; Schmidt, Gail

2003-01-01

110

Value-based customer grouping from large retail data sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we propose OPOSSUM, a novel similarity-based clustering algorithm using constrained, weighted graph- partitioning. Instead of binary presence or absence of products in a market-basket, we use an extended 'revenue per product' measure to better account for management objectives. Typically the number of clusters desired in a database marketing application is only in the teens or less. OPOSSUM proceeds top-down, which is more efficient and takes a small number of steps to attain the desired number of clusters as compared to bottom-up agglomerative clustering approaches. OPOSSUM delivers clusters that are balanced in terms of either customers (samples) or revenue (value). To facilitate data exploration and validation of results we introduce CLUSION, a visualization toolkit for high-dimensional clustering problems. To enable closed loop deployment of the algorithm, OPOSSUM has no user-specified parameters. Thresholding heuristics are avoided and the optimal number of clusters is automatically determined by a search for maximum performance. Results are presented on a real retail industry data-set of several thousand customers and products, to demonstrate the power of the proposed technique.

Strehl, Alexander; Ghosh, Joydeep

2000-04-01

111

Cockroaches in the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Welcome the Madagascar hissing cockroach into your classroom--they are not your average pest! This article describes the basic biology of this relatively tame creature, and how to set up and care for a classroom colony. It includes a list of suggested inquiry-centered classroom activities that you and your students will find both educational and fun!

Christine Moseley

2005-03-01

112

The Effects of Fixed-Time Reinforcement Schedules on Problem Behavior of Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in a Day-Treatment Classroom Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study assessed the effects of fixed-time reinforcement schedules on problem behavior of students with emotional-behavioral disorders in a clinical day-treatment classroom setting. Three elementary-aged students with a variety of emotional and behavioral problems participated in the study. Initial functional assessments indicated that social attention was the maintaining reinforcer for their verbally disruptive behavior. Baseline phases were alternated with

Karina Rasmussen; ROBERT E. O'NEILL

2006-01-01

113

Coffee Shops, Classrooms and Conversations: public engagement and outreach in a large interdisciplinary research Hub  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Public engagement and outreach activities are increasingly using specialist staff for co-ordination, training and support for researchers, they are also becoming expected for large investments. Here, the experience of public engagement and outreach a large, interdisciplinary Research Hub is described. dot.rural, based at the University of Aberdeen UK, is a £11.8 million Research Councils UK Rural Digital Economy Hub, funded as part of the RCUK Digital Economy Theme (2009-2015). Digital Economy research aims to realise the transformational impact of digital technologies on aspects of the environment, community life, cultural experiences, future society, and the economy. The dot.rural Hub involves 92 researchers from 12 different disciplines, including Geography, Hydrology and Ecology. Public Engagement and Outreach is embedded in the dot.rural Digital Economy Hub via an Outreach Officer. Alongside this position, public engagement and outreach activities are compulsory part of PhD student contracts. Public Engagement and Outreach activities at the dot.rural Hub involve individuals and groups in both formal and informal settings organised by dot.rural and other organisations. Activities in the realms of Education, Public Engagement, Traditional and Social Media are determined by a set of Underlying Principles designed for the Hub by the Outreach Officer. The underlying Engagement and Outreach principles match funding agency requirements and expectations alongside researcher demands and the user-led nature of Digital Economy Research. All activities include researchers alongside the Outreach Officer are research informed and embedded into specific projects that form the Hub. Successful public engagement activities have included participation in Café Scientifique series, workshops in primary and secondary schools, and online activities such as I'm a Scientist Get Me Out of Here. From how to engage 8 year olds with making hydrographs more understandable to members of the public to blogging birds and engaging with remote, rural communities to Spiegeltents. This presentation will share successful public engagement and outreach events alongside some less successful experiences and lessons learnt along the way.

Holden, Jennifer A.

2014-05-01

114

Hyper-Rectangle Based Segmentation and Clustering of Large Video Data Sets  

E-print Network

Hyper-Rectangle Based Segmentation and Clustering of Large Video Data Sets Seok-Lyong Lee* and Chin@islab.kaist.ac.kr, chungcw@cs.kaist.ac.kr Abstract Video information processing has been one of great challenging areas investigate the problem of clustering large video data sets that are collections of video clips

Chung, Chin-Wan

115

Response Grids: Practical Ways to Display Large Data Sets with High Visual Impact  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Spreadsheets are useful for large data sets but they may be too wide or too long to print as conventional tables. Response grids offer solutions to the challenges posed by any large data set. They have wide application throughout science and for every subject and context where visual data displays are designed, within education and elsewhere.…

Gates, Simon

2013-01-01

116

Vertical Set Square Distance: A Fast and Scalable Technique to Compute Total Variation in Large Datasets  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we introduce the vertical set square distance (VSSD) technique that is designed to efficiently and scalably measure the total variation of a set about a fixed point in large datasets. The set can be any projected subspace of any vector space, including oblique subspaces (not just dimensional subspaces). VSSD can determine the closeness of a point to

Taufik Abidin; Amal Perera; Masum Serazi; William Perrizo

2005-01-01

117

Identifying at risk individuals for drug and alcohol dependence: teaching the competency to students in classroom and clinical settings.  

PubMed

Alcohol use and other drug use affect patient healthcare outcomes. This article describes a classroom-to-clinical approach teaching nursing students to utilize motivational interviewing techniques to support patient behavior change. Through the lens of a universal prevention method, nursing students learned about reward circuit activation leading to risky substance use and the difference between addiction and at-risk use. Specific assessment tools and motivational interviewing techniques were presented in the classroom. Students then applied their knowledge in simulation laboratories and clinical rotations. PMID:24743176

Kane, Irene; Mitchell, Ann M; Puskar, Kathryn R; Hagle, Holly; Talcott, Kimberly; Fioravanti, Marie; Droppa, Mandy; Luongo, Peter F; Lindsay, Dawn

2014-01-01

118

Analogies as Tools for Meaning Making in Elementary Science Education: How Do They Work in Classroom Settings?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper there is a critical overview of the role of analogies as tools for meaning making in science education, their advantages and disadvantages. Two empirical studies on the use of analogies in primary classrooms are discussed and analysed. In the first study, the "string circuit" analogy was used in the teaching of electric circuits with…

Guerra-Ramos, Maria Teresa

2011-01-01

119

Classroom-Based Interventions and Teachers' Perceived Job Stressors and Confidence: Evidence from a Randomized Trial in Head Start Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preschool teachers' job stressors have received increasing attention but have been understudied in the literature. We investigated the impacts of a classroom-based intervention, the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP), on teachers' perceived job stressors and confidence, as indexed by their perceptions of job control, job resources, job…

Zhai, Fuhua; Raver, C. Cybele; Li-Grining, Christine

2011-01-01

120

An Analogous Study of Children's Attitudes Toward School in an Open Classroom Environment as Opposed to a Conventional Setting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study sought to determine whether intermediate age children exposed to open classroom teaching strategy have a more positive attitude toward school than intermediate age children exposed to conventional teaching strategy. The hypothesis was that there would be no significant difference in attitude between the two groups. The study was limited to…

Zeli, Doris Conti

121

Child and Setting Characteristics Affecting the Adult Talk Directed at Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the Inclusive Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Difficulty with social competence is a core deficit of autism spectrum disorder. Research on typically developing children and children with disabilities, in general, suggests the adult talk received in the classroom is related to their social development. The aims of this study were to examine (1) the types and amounts of adult talk children with…

Irvin, Dwight W.; Boyd, Brian A.; Odom, Samuel L.

2015-01-01

122

Science in the Classroom: Finding a Balance Between Autonomous Exploration and Teacher-Led Instruction in Preschool Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research Findings: This paper reports on children's use of science materials in preschool classrooms during their free choice time. Baseline observations showed that children and teachers rarely spend time in the designated science area. An intervention was designed to “market” the science center by introducing children to 1 science tool, the balance scale. Baseline measures showed that children did not

Irena Nayfeld; Kimberly Brenneman; Rochel Gelman

2011-01-01

123

Is Your Classroom Exciting?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests ways for making classrooms fun, including giving children opportunities to work together, moving things around, letting children learn to set their own controls, setting up the classroom so students can experiment and discover together, and providing bonuses or incentives for the child who is falling behind. (CR)

Grambo, Gregory

1997-01-01

124

Classroom Acoustics  

MedlinePLUS

Classroom Acoustics A student's ability to hear and understand what is being said in the classroom is vital for ... reverberation time. Who is affected by poor classroom acoustics? All children are affected by poor classroom acoustics, ...

125

The advantages of dense marker sets for linkage analysis with very large families.  

PubMed

Dense sets of hundreds of thousands of markers have been developed for genome-wide association studies. These marker sets are also beneficial for linkage analysis of large, deep pedigrees containing distantly related cases. It is impossible to analyse jointly all genotypes in large pedigrees using the Lander-Green Algorithm, however, as marker density increases it becomes less crucial to analyse all individuals' genotypes simultaneously. In this report, an approximate multipoint non-parametric technique is described, where large pedigrees are split into many small pedigrees, each containing just two cases. This technique is demonstrated, using phased data from the International Hapmap Project to simulate sets of 10,000, 50,000 and 250,000 markers, showing that it becomes increasingly accurate as more markers are genotyped. This method allows routine linkage analysis of large families with dense marker sets and represents a more easily applied alternative to Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods. PMID:17252250

Thomson, Russell; Quinn, Stephen; McKay, James; Silver, Jeremy; Bahlo, Melanie; FitzGerald, Liesel; Foote, Simon; Dickinson, Jo; Stankovich, Jim

2007-05-01

126

Classroom-based Interventions and Teachers' Perceived Job Stressors and Confidence: Evidence from a Randomized Trial in Head Start Settings.  

PubMed

Preschool teachers' job stressors have received increasing attention but have been understudied in the literature. We investigated the impacts of a classroom-based intervention, the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP), on teachers' perceived job stressors and confidence, as indexed by their perceptions of job control, job resources, job demands, and confidence in behavior management. Using a clustered randomized controlled trial (RCT) design, the CSRP provided multifaceted services to the treatment group, including teacher training and mental health consultation, which were accompanied by stress-reduction services and workshops. Overall, 90 teachers in 35 classrooms at 18 Head Start sites participated in the study. After adjusting for teacher and classroom factors and site fixed effects, we found that the CSRP had significant effects on the improvement of teachers' perceived job control and work-related resources. We also found that the CSRP decreased teachers' confidence in behavior management and had no statistically significant effects on job demands. Overall, we did not find significant moderation effects of teacher race/ethnicity, education, teaching experience, or teacher type. The implications for research and policy are discussed. PMID:21927538

Zhai, Fuhua; Raver, C Cybele; Li-Grining, Christine

2011-09-01

127

Any Questions? An Application of Weick's Model of Organizing to Increase Student Involvement in the Large-Lecture Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Microblogs, with their interactive nature, can engage students in community building and sensemaking. Using Weick's model of organizing as a framework, we integrated the use of micromessaging to increase student engagement in the large-lecture classroom. Students asked significantly more questions and asked a greater diversity of questions…

Ledford, Christy J. W.; Saperstein, Adam K.; Cafferty, Lauren A.; McClintick, Stacey H.; Bernstein, Ethan M.

2015-01-01

128

An Evaluation of the Developmental Designs Approach and Professional Development Model on Classroom Management in 22 Middle Schools in a Large, Midwestern School District  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study presents findings from an evaluation of the Developmental Designs classroom management approach and professional development model during its first year of implementation across 22 middle schools in a large, Midwestern school district. The impact of this professional development model on teaching and learning as related to participants'…

Hough, David L.

2011-01-01

129

Introduction to Statistical Methods to Analyze Large Data Sets: Principal Components Analysis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes, slides, and a problem set for a series of lectures from a course entitled “Systems Biology: Biomedical Modeling.” The materials are a lecture introducing the mathematical concepts behind principal components analysis (PCA). The lecture describes how to handle large data sets with correlation methods and unsupervised clustering with this popular method of analysis, PCA.

Neil R. Clark (New York; Mount Sinai School of Medicine REV)

2011-09-13

130

Core Vector Machines: Fast SVM Training on Very Large Data Sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Standard SVM training has . Experiments on large toy and real-world data sets demonstrate that the CVM is as accurate as existing SVM implementations, but is much faster and can handle much larger data sets than existing scale-up methods. For example, CVM with the Gaussian kernel produces superior results on the KDDCUP-99 intrusion detection data, which has about five million

Ivor W. Tsang; James T. Kwok; Pak-Ming Cheung

2005-01-01

131

Phylogenetic Approach Reveals That Virus Genotype Largely Determines HIV Set-Point Viral Load  

E-print Network

Phylogenetic Approach Reveals That Virus Genotype Largely Determines HIV Set-Point Viral Load this trait. The idea is to use viral RNA sequences obtained from patients infected by HIV-1 subtype B. The approach reveals that up to half of the variance in set-point viral load, a trait associated with virulence

132

Interactive Web-Based Map: Applications to Large Data Sets in the Geosciences. Interactive Web-Based Map: Applications to Large Data Sets in the Geosciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current advances in computer hardware, information technology and data collection techniques have produced very large data sets, sometimes more than terabytes,in a wide variety of scientific and engineering disciplines. We must harness this opportunity to visualize and extract useful information from geophysical and geological data. We have taken the task of data-mining by using a map-like approach over the web

Z. A. Garbow; N. R. Olson; D. A. Yuen; J. M. Boggs

2001-01-01

133

Taking Energy to the Physics Classroom from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2008, the greatest experiment in history began. When in full operation, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate the greatest amount of information that has ever been produced in an experiment before. It will also reveal some of the most fundamental secrets of nature. Despite the enormous amount of information available on this…

Cid, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

2009-01-01

134

Student Perceptions of Active Learning in a Large Cross-Disciplinary Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This investigation reports on a study that assesses how students value active, cooperative, and traditional learning activities within a single large cross-disciplinary class. The study surveyed students' perceived value of a range of teaching techniques (from traditional to cooperative) utilized within a general education class. Students rated…

Machemer, Patricia L.; Crawford, Pat

2007-01-01

135

Operational Aspects of Dealing with the Large BaBar Data Set  

Microsoft Academic Search

To date, the BaBar experiment has stored over 0.7PB of data in an Objectivity\\/DB database. Approximately half this data-set comprises simulated data of which more than 70% has been produced at more than 20 collaborating institutes outside of SLAC. The operational aspects of managing such a large data set and providing access to the physicists in a timely manner is

Tofigh Azemoon; Adil Hasan; Wilko Kroeger; Artem Trunov

2003-01-01

136

An Examination of Classroom Social Environment on Motivation and Engagement of College Early Entrant Honors Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study set out to examine the relationships between the classroom social environment, motivation, engagement and achievement of a group of early entrant Honors students at a large urban university. Prior research on the classroom environment, motivation, engagement and high ability students was examined, leading to the assumption that the…

Maddox, Richard S.

2010-01-01

137

Evaluation in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Six classroom research-based instructional projects funded under Chapter 2 are described, and their outcomes are summarized. The projects each used computer hardware and software in the classroom setting. The projects and their salient points include: (1) the Science Technology Project, in which 48 teachers and 2,847 students in 18 schools used…

Becnel, Shirley

138

Active Learning in a Large Classroom for Teaching Physiology: Acid-Base Cases  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Active Learning exercise described here has been used to replace some lecture hours in the renal portion of an integrated, organ-system based curriculum for First Year Medical Students. The exercise takes place in a large auditorium with approximately 150 students. Two Faculty, Drs. Dietz (a Physiology) and Dr. Panzarino (a Nephrologist) lead the discussions which are based on two clinical cases developed from actual patient data. The cases have already been published in the APS Teaching Archive previously (Objects 197 & 192). The Students are pre-assigned to groups of 5 or 6 and designated to sit in clusters to facilitate their individual group discussions. Each of the Faculty wears a lapel microphone and each carries a handheld microphone to pass between the student groups.

PhD John R. Dietz (University of South Florida Department of Physiology and Biophysics)

2011-08-03

139

Taking energy to the physics classroom from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 2008, the greatest experiment in history began. When in full operation, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate the greatest amount of information that has ever been produced in an experiment before. It will also reveal some of the most fundamental secrets of nature. Despite the enormous amount of information available on this topic, it is not easy for non-specialists to know where the data comes from. The aim of this article is to introduce at a secondary school level a few simple physical calculations about power phenomena that will be present in the LHC: stored beam energy, power and LHC dipole, energy stored in the compact muon solenoid (CMS), energy stored in the ATLAS solenoid and toroid, delivered energy for radiofrequency (RF) cavities, and energy dissipated in dump blocks. In addition, we will be talking about one of the most important scientific institutions in the world and introducing the greatest experiment in history. The calculations that you will find in this article are adapted from physics at secondary school level, and in most cases they are just very simple approaches to the correct results.

Cid, Xabier; Cid, Ramón

2009-01-01

140

Gaining A Geological Perspective Through Active Learning in the Large Lecture Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NATS 101 A Geological Perspective is a general education course taken by non science majors. We offer 600 seats per semester, with four large lecture sections taught by different faculty members. In the past we have offered optional once a week study groups taught by graduate teaching assistants. Students often feel overwhelmed by the science and associated jargon, and many are prone to skipping lectures altogether. Optional study groups are only attended by ~50% of the students. Faculty members find the class to be a lot of work, mainly due to the grading it generates. Activities given in lecture are often short multiple choice or true false assignments, limiting the depth of understanding we can evaluate. Our students often lack math and critical thinking skills, and we spend a lot of time in lecture reintroducing ideas students should have already gotten from the text. In summer 2007 we were funded to redesign the course. Our goals were to 1) cut the cost of running the course, and 2) improve student learning. Under our redesign optional study groups were replaced by once a week mandatory break out sessions where students complete activities that have been introduced in lecture. Break out sessions substitute for one hour of lecture, and are run by undergraduate preceptors and graduate teaching assistants (GTAs). During the lecture period, lectures themselves are brief with a large portion of the class devoted to active learning in small groups. Weekly reading quizzes are submitted via the online course management system. Break out sessions allow students to spend more time interacting with their fellow students, undergraduate preceptors, and GTAs. They get one on one help in break out sessions on assignments designed to enhance the lecture material. The active lecture format means less of their time is devoted to listening passively to a lecture, and more time is spent peer learning an interacting with the instructor. Completing quizzes online allows students more freedom in when and where they complete their work, and we provide instant feedback on their submitted work. The University of Wyoming Cognition in Astronomy, Physics and Earth sciences Research (CAPER) Team, who specialize in project evaluation, are leading the evaluation effort. We are comparing pre-test to post-test gains on the Geoscience Concept Inventory and Attitudes Toward Science surveys before and after the redesign, and inductive analysis of student interviews and reflective writing that describe student perceptions of the modified learning environment. The redesign has cut the cost of the class per student by more than half. This was achieved primarily in two ways: 1) by greatly reducing the number of hours spent by faculty and graduate teaching assistants on preparation, class time, and grading; and 2) reducing the number of graduate teaching assistants required for the class and replacing many of them with undergraduate preceptors. Undergraduate preceptors are not paid, but receive academic credit for their teaching service. The savings from the redesign is used to allow faculty more time to work on institutional priorities.

Kapp, J. L.; Richardson, R. M.; Slater, S. J.

2008-12-01

141

Functional Connectivity: The Principal-Component Analysis of Large (PET) Data Sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: The distributed brain systems associated with performance of a verbal fluency task were identified in a nondirected correlational analysis of neurophysiological data obtained with positron tomography. This analysis used a recursive principal-component analysis developed specifically for large data sets. This analysis is interpreted in terms of functional connectivity, defined as the temporal correlation of a neurophysiological index measured in

K. J. Friston; C. D. Frith; P. F. Liddle; R. S. J. Frackowiak

1993-01-01

142

Implementing a Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Police Presence in a Large International Airport Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents findings from two focus groups involving nine Crisis Intervention Team (CIT)-trained officers stationed at a large, international airport. The objective was to uncover themes that could inform crisis intervention approaches in special settings. The focus groups described officers’ motivations for participating in CIT and perceived benefits of CIT training. Additionally, the groups discussed special issues pertaining to

Joanne A. McGriff; Beth Broussard; Berivan N. Demir Neubert; Nancy J. Thompson; Michael T. Compton

2010-01-01

143

MSci Project 20122013 Dr Gareth Tribello Automated analysis of large data sets  

E-print Network

MSci Project 2012­2013 Dr Gareth Tribello Automated analysis of large data sets Background developed for the sort of big data questions these algorithms were originally develped for. Aims been used to analyse data yourself. Towards the end of the project you would then try applying some

Paxton, Anthony T.

144

Answering Approximate String Queries on Large Data Sets Using External Memory  

E-print Network

to answer approximate string queries. Given a collection of data strings such as person names, publicationAnswering Approximate String Queries on Large Data Sets Using External Memory Alexander Behm1@ics.uci.edu, 2 chenli@ics.uci.edu, 3 mjcarey@ics.uci.edu Abstract-- An approximate string query is to find from

Li, Chen

145

Large bichromatic point sets admit empty monochromatic 4-gons O. Aichholzer  

E-print Network

Large bichromatic point sets admit empty monochromatic 4-gons O. Aichholzer T. Hackl C. Huemer§ F carried out during the visit of Clemens Huemer and Ferran Hurtado at the Institute for Soft- ware`ecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Barcelona, Spain, clemens.huemer@upc.edu ¶Departament de Matem`atica Aplicada II

Hackl, Thomas

146

DocCube: Multi-Dimensional Visualization and Exploration of Large Document Sets.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a user interface that provides global visualizations of large document sets to help users formulate the query that corresponds to their information needs. Highlights include concept hierarchies that users can browse to specify and refine information needs; knowledge discovery in databases and texts; and multidimensional modeling.…

Mothe, Josiane; Chrisment, Claude; Dousset, Bernard; Alaux, Joel

2003-01-01

147

Probabilistic Analysis of a Large-Scale Urban Traffic Sensor Data Set  

E-print Network

source from which to extract information about urban transportation patterns, traffic flow, accidentsProbabilistic Analysis of a Large-Scale Urban Traffic Sensor Data Set Jon Hutchins Dept from 1700 freeway traffic sensors over a period of seven months in Southern California. We discuss

Smyth, Padhraic

148

Setting Cut Scores on Large-Scale Assessments. The State Board Connection Issues in Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Brief builds on the work of the National Association of State Boards of Education 1997 Study Group on State Assessment Systems by examining one of the state board actions that is most likely to capture the publics attention: setting cut scores on state assessments. This process involves a large measure of human judgment and politics and a…

National Association of State Boards of Education, Alexandria, VA.

149

Comparative assessment of large-scale data sets of protein-protein interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Comprehensive protein-protein interaction maps promise to reveal many aspects of the complex regulatory network underlying cellular function. Recently, large-scale approaches have predicted many new protein interactions in yeast. To measure their accuracy and potential as well as to identify biases, strengths and weaknesses, we compare the methods with each other and with a reference set of previously reported protein interactions.

Christian von Mering; Roland Krause; Berend Snel; Michael Cornell; Stephen G. Oliver; Peer Bork

2002-01-01

150

Fast UDFs to compute sufficient statistics on large data sets exploiting caching and sampling  

Microsoft Academic Search

User-Defined Functions (UDFs) represent an extensibility mechanism provided by most DBMSs, whose execution happens in main memory. Also, UDFs leverage the DBMS multi-threaded capabilities and exploit the C language speed and flexibility for mathematical computations. In this article, we study how to accelerate computation of sufficient statistics on large data sets with UDFs exploiting caching and sampling techniques. We present

Carlos Ordonez; Sasi K. Pitchaimalai

2010-01-01

151

Fast UDFs to Compute Sufficient Statistics on Large Data Sets Exploiting Caching and Sampling  

E-print Network

Fast UDFs to Compute Sufficient Statistics on Large Data Sets Exploiting Caching and Sampling-Defined Functions (UDFs) represent an extensibility mechanism provided by most DBMSs, whose execution happens in main memory. Also, UDFs leverage the DBMS multithreaded capabilities and exploit the C language speed

Ordonez, Carlos

152

Fast PCA and Bayesian Variable Selection for Large Data Sets Based on SQL and UDFs  

E-print Network

Fast PCA and Bayesian Variable Selection for Large Data Sets Based on SQL and UDFs Mario Navas, using SQL queries and User-Defined Functions (UDFs). Both of our algorithms consist of two main phases the model from such such sufficient statistics, in main mem- ory with UDFs. PCA is efficiently solved

Ordonez, Carlos

153

Preschoolers' Nonsymbolic Arithmetic with Large Sets: Is Addition More Accurate than Subtraction?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adult and developing humans share with other animals analog magnitude representations of number that support nonsymbolic arithmetic with large sets. This experiment tested the hypothesis that such representations may be more accurate for addition than for subtraction in children as young as 3 1/2 years of age. In these tasks, the experimenter hid…

Shinskey, Jeanne L.; Chan, Cindy Ho-man; Coleman, Rhea; Moxom, Lauren; Yamamoto, Eri

2009-01-01

154

A Wavelet Toolkit for Visualization and Analysis of Large Data Sets In Earthquake Research  

E-print Network

A Wavelet Toolkit for Visualization and Analysis of Large Data Sets In Earthquake Research G in earthquake physics and other nonlinear problems in the solid earth geosciences. Keywords: wavelets, visualization, grid computing, collaboration, web-based maps, earthquakes 1 Introduction As in many other fields

Erlebacher, Gordon

155

Large-scale detection of metals with a small set of fluorescent DNA-like chemosensors.  

PubMed

An important advantage of pattern-based chemosensor sets is their potential to detect and differentiate a large number of analytes with only few sensors. Here we test this principle at a conceptual limit by analyzing a large set of metal ion analytes covering essentially the entire periodic table, employing fluorescent DNA-like chemosensors on solid support. A tetrameric "oligodeoxyfluoroside" (ODF) library of 6561 members containing metal-binding monomers was screened for strong responders to 57 metal ions in solution. Our results show that a set of 9 chemosensors could successfully discriminate the 57 species, including alkali, alkaline earth, post-transition, transition, and lanthanide metals. As few as 6 ODF chemosensors could detect and differentiate 50 metals at 100 ?M; sensitivity for some metals was achieved at midnanomolar ranges. A blind test with 50 metals further confirmed the discriminating power of the ODFs. PMID:25255102

Yuen, Lik Hang; Franzini, Raphael M; Tan, Samuel S; Kool, Eric T

2014-10-15

156

Engaged: Making Large Classes Feel Small through Blended Learning Instructional Strategies that Promote Increased Student Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is not enough to be great at sharing information in a large classroom setting. To be an effective teacher you must be able to meaningfully engage your students with their peers and with the content. And you must do this regardless of class size or content. The issues of teaching effectively in large classroom settings have presented ongoing…

Francis, Raymond W.

2012-01-01

157

Supporting Classroom Activities with the BSUL System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the integration of ubiquitous computing systems into classroom settings, in order to provide basic support for classrooms and field activities. We have developed web application components using Java technology and configured a classroom with wireless network access and a web camera for our purposes. In this classroom, the students interact among each other and with the professor

Hiroaki Ogata; Nobuji A. Saito; Rosa G. J. Paredes; Gerardo Ayala San Martin; Yoneo Yano

2008-01-01

158

Construction of a facsimile data set for large genome sequence analysis.  

PubMed

A test was devised for exploring the question of whether it will be possible to identify genes in large-scale genome studies solely by sequence comparison with current sequence collections. To this end, a facsimile data set was constructed by dividing GenBank Release 56 randomly into two halves, one to serve as a reference set and the other intended to simulate raw data anticipated from large genome sequence projects. All supplementary information and identifying marks were removed from the test set after assignment of random identification numbers to each entry and their encryption. Because noncoding intervening sequences (introns) are underrepresented in GenBank, a program that introduced (simulated) introns into mRNA and prokaryotic sequences was devised. In a further attempt to make the problem of identification more realistic, random base substitutions and single-base deletions were also incorporated. The randomly ordered entries were concatenated, along with random intergenic flanking sequences, into a single long "chromosome" 33 Mb in length and then cut into "cosmids" 50-100 kb long. The chopping process was conducted in such a way that terminal overlaps would allow the order of the entries in the chromosome to be reconstituted. Finally, the sequences of a substantial fraction of the cosmids were converted to their complements. Preliminary searching of 10 test cosmids revealed that more than two-thirds of the entries in the test set should be readily identifiable by type of gene product solely on the basis of comparison with the reference set. These preliminary results suggest that existing computer regimens and sequence collections would be able to identify the majority of eukaryotic genes in any new raw data set, the existence of introns not withstanding. Moreover, the analysis can be conducted in pace with the data collection so that the search results and summary identifications will be instantly available to the research community at large. PMID:2081603

Seely, O; Feng, D F; Smith, D W; Sulzbach, D; Doolittle, R F

1990-09-01

159

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: Parallel Analysis Tools and New Visualization Techniques for Ultra-Large Climate Data Set  

SciTech Connect

ParVis was a project funded under LAB 10-05: “Earth System Modeling: Advanced Scientific Visualization of Ultra-Large Climate Data Sets”. Argonne was the lead lab with partners at PNNL, SNL, NCAR and UC-Davis. This report covers progress from January 1st, 2013 through Dec 1st, 2014. Two previous reports covered the period from Summer, 2010, through September 2011 and October 2011 through December 2012, respectively. While the project was originally planned to end on April 30, 2013, personnel and priority changes allowed many of the institutions to continue work through FY14 using existing funds. A primary focus of ParVis was introducing parallelism to climate model analysis to greatly reduce the time-to-visualization for ultra-large climate data sets. Work in the first two years was conducted on two tracks with different time horizons: one track to provide immediate help to climate scientists already struggling to apply their analysis to existing large data sets and another focused on building a new data-parallel library and tool for climate analysis and visualization that will give the field a platform for performing analysis and visualization on ultra-large datasets for the foreseeable future. In the final 2 years of the project, we focused mostly on the new data-parallel library and associated tools for climate analysis and visualization.

middleton, Don [Co-PI; Haley, Mary

2014-12-10

160

A Complementary Graphical Method for Reducing and Analyzing Large Data Sets*  

PubMed Central

Summary Objectives Graphical displays can make data more understandable; however, large graphs can challenge human comprehension. We have previously described a filtering method to provide high-level summary views of large data sets. In this paper we demonstrate our method for setting and selecting thresholds to limit graph size while retaining important information by applying it to large single and paired data sets, taken from patient and bibliographic databases. Methods Four case studies are used to illustrate our method. The data are either patient discharge diagnoses (coded using the International Classification of Diseases, Clinical Modifications [ICD9-CM]) or Medline citations (coded using the Medical Subject Headings [MeSH]). We use combinations of different thresholds to obtain filtered graphs for detailed analysis. The thresholds setting and selection, such as thresholds for node counts, class counts, ratio values, p values (for diff data sets), and percentiles of selected class count thresholds, are demonstrated with details in case studies. The main steps include: data preparation, data manipulation, computation, and threshold selection and visualization. We also describe the data models for different types of thresholds and the considerations for thresholds selection. Results The filtered graphs are 1%-3% of the size of the original graphs. For our case studies, the graphs provide 1) the most heavily used ICD9-CM codes, 2) the codes with most patients in a research hospital in 2011, 3) a profile of publications on “heavily represented topics” in MEDLINE in 2011, and 4) validated knowledge about adverse effects of the medication of rosiglitazone and new interesting areas in the ICD9-CM hierarchy associated with patients taking the medication of pioglitazone. Conclusions Our filtering method reduces large graphs to a manageable size by removing relatively unimportant nodes. The graphical method provides summary views based on computation of usage frequency and semantic context of hierarchical terminology. The method is applicable to large data sets (such as a hundred thousand records or more) and can be used to generate new hypotheses from data sets coded with hierarchical terminologies. PMID:24727931

Jing, X.; Cimino, J. J.

2014-01-01

161

Assessment of the dependence structure of the annual rainfall using a large data set  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Natural processes are considered to be influenced by long-term persistence, the so-called Hurst effect. A variety of studies have been conducted to identify the Hurst behaviour in different data sets and different scientific disciplines ranging from geophysics to economics and to social sciences. In this study we try to test the hypothesis of the existence of long-range dependence in annual rainfall by applying the aggregated variance method in a large set of annual rainfall time series from more than a thousand stations worldwide. In addition, we figure out a simple statistical test in order to assess the hypothesis that the dependence structure of annual rainfall is Markovian.

Iliopoulou, Theano; Papalexiou, Simon Michael; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

2013-04-01

162

Validating a large geophysical data set: Experiences with satellite-derived cloud parameters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We are validating the global cloud parameters derived from the satellite-borne HIRS2 and MSU atmospheric sounding instrument measurements, and are using the analysis of these data as one prototype for studying large geophysical data sets in general. The HIRS2/MSU data set contains a total of 40 physical parameters, filling 25 MB/day; raw HIRS2/MSU data are available for a period exceeding 10 years. Validation involves developing a quantitative sense for the physical meaning of the derived parameters over the range of environmental conditions sampled. This is accomplished by comparing the spatial and temporal distributions of the derived quantities with similar measurements made using other techniques, and with model results. The data handling needed for this work is possible only with the help of a suite of interactive graphical and numerical analysis tools. Level 3 (gridded) data is the common form in which large data sets of this type are distributed for scientific analysis. We find that Level 3 data is inadequate for the data comparisons required for validation. Level 2 data (individual measurements in geophysical units) is needed. A sampling problem arises when individual measurements, which are not uniformly distributed in space or time, are used for the comparisons. Standard 'interpolation' methods involve fitting the measurements for each data set to surfaces, which are then compared. We are experimenting with formal criteria for selecting geographical regions, based upon the spatial frequency and variability of measurements, that allow us to quantify the uncertainty due to sampling. As part of this project, we are also dealing with ways to keep track of constraints placed on the output by assumptions made in the computer code. The need to work with Level 2 data introduces a number of other data handling issues, such as accessing data files across machine types, meeting large data storage requirements, accessing other validated data sets, processing speed and throughput for interactive graphical work, and problems relating to graphical interfaces.

Kahn, Ralph; Haskins, Robert D.; Knighton, James E.; Pursch, Andrew; Granger-Gallegos, Stephanie

1992-01-01

163

Evaluating knowledge transfer and zero-shot learning in a large-scale setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

While knowledge transfer (KT) between object classes has been accepted as a promising route towards scalable recognition, most experimental KT studies are surprisingly limited in the number of object classes considered. To support claims of KT w.r.t. scalability we thus advocate to evaluate KT in a large-scale setting. To this end, we provide an extensive evaluation of three popular approaches

Marcus Rohrbach; Michael Stark; Bernt Schiele

2011-01-01

164

The search for structure - Object classification in large data sets. [for astronomers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research concerning object classifications schemes are reviewed, focusing on large data sets. Classification techniques are discussed, including syntactic, decision theoretic methods, fuzzy techniques, and stochastic and fuzzy grammars. Consideration is given to the automation of MK classification (Morgan and Keenan, 1973) and other problems associated with the classification of spectra. In addition, the classification of galaxies is examined, including the problems of systematic errors, blended objects, galaxy types, and galaxy clusters.

Kurtz, Michael J.

1988-01-01

165

Two-stage incremental working set selection for fast support vector training on large datasets  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose iSVM - an incremental algorithm that achieves high speed in training support vector machines (SVMs) on large datasets. In the common decomposition framework, iSVM starts with a minimum working set (WS), and then iteratively selects one training example to update the WS in each optimization loop. iSVM employs a two-stage strategy in processing the training data. In the

Ducdung Nguyen; Kazunori MATSUMOTO; Yasuhiro Takishima; Kazunori Hashimoto; Masahiro Terabe

2008-01-01

166

Moving Large Data Sets Over High-Performance Long Distance Networks  

SciTech Connect

In this project we look at the performance characteristics of three tools used to move large data sets over dedicated long distance networking infrastructure. Although performance studies of wide area networks have been a frequent topic of interest, performance analyses have tended to focus on network latency characteristics and peak throughput using network traffic generators. In this study we instead perform an end-to-end long distance networking analysis that includes reading large data sets from a source file system and committing large data sets to a destination file system. An evaluation of end-to-end data movement is also an evaluation of the system configurations employed and the tools used to move the data. For this paper, we have built several storage platforms and connected them with a high performance long distance network configuration. We use these systems to analyze the capabilities of three data movement tools: BBcp, GridFTP, and XDD. Our studies demonstrate that existing data movement tools do not provide efficient performance levels or exercise the storage devices in their highest performance modes. We describe the device information required to achieve high levels of I/O performance and discuss how this data is applicable in use cases beyond data movement performance.

Hodson, Stephen W [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL; Ruwart, Thomas [ORNL; Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL

2011-04-01

167

Using Classroom-Based Assessment on a Large Scale: Supporting and Reporting on Student Learning with the Early Literacy Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the development work and research findings of an initiative to create a statewide literacy assessment in New York to inform teaching and learning and report on group performance trends. The Early Literacy Profile (ELP) is a classroom-based, standards-referenced performance assessment for students in the primary grades…

Falk, Beverly; Ort, Suzanna Wichterle; Moirs, Katie

168

Non-rigid Registration for Large Sets of Microscopic Images on Graphics Processors  

PubMed Central

Microscopic imaging is an important tool for characterizing tissue morphology and pathology. 3D reconstruction and visualization of large sample tissue structure requires registration of large sets of high-resolution images. However, the scale of this problem presents a challenge for automatic registration methods. In this paper we present a novel method for efficient automatic registration using graphics processing units (GPUs) and parallel programming. Comparing a C++ CPU implementation with Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) libraries and pthreads running on GPU we achieve a speed-up factor of up to 4.11× with a single GPU and 6.68× with a GPU pair. We present execution times for a benchmark composed of two sets of large-scale images: mouse placenta (16K × 16K pixels) and breast cancer tumors (23K × 62K pixels). It takes more than 12 hours for the genetic case in C++ to register a typical sample composed of 500 consecutive slides, which was reduced to less than 2 hours using two GPUs, in addition to a very promising scalability for extending those gains easily on a large number of GPUs in a distributed system. PMID:25328635

Ruiz, Antonio; Ujaldon, Manuel; Cooper, Lee

2014-01-01

169

Large Social Networks can be Targeted for Viral Marketing with Small Seed Sets  

E-print Network

In a "tipping" model, each node in a social network, representing an individual, adopts a behavior if a certain number of his incoming neighbors previously held that property. A key problem for viral marketers is to determine an initial "seed" set in a network such that if given a property then the entire network adopts the behavior. Here we introduce a method for quickly finding seed sets that scales to very large networks. Our approach finds a set of nodes that guarantees spreading to the entire network under the tipping model. After experimentally evaluating 31 real-world networks, we found that our approach often finds such sets that are several orders of magnitude smaller than the population size. Our approach also scales well - on a Friendster social network consisting of 5.6 million nodes and 28 million edges we found a seed sets in under 3.6 hours. We also find that highly clustered local neighborhoods and dense network-wide community structure together suppress the ability of a trend to spread under ...

Shakarian, Paulo

2012-01-01

170

Pre-Service Teachers and Classroom Authority  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the classroom practices of five pre-service teachers from three secondary schools in a large southeastern state. Through classroom observations, survey responses, reviews of refection logs, and focus-group interview responses, we centered on the issue of developing classroom authority as a means to effective classroom

Pellegrino, Anthony M.

2010-01-01

171

Culture in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

2014-01-01

172

Breeding and Genetics Symposium: really big data: processing and analysis of very large data sets.  

PubMed

Modern animal breeding data sets are large and getting larger, due in part to recent availability of high-density SNP arrays and cheap sequencing technology. High-performance computing methods for efficient data warehousing and analysis are under development. Financial and security considerations are important when using shared clusters. Sound software engineering practices are needed, and it is better to use existing solutions when possible. Storage requirements for genotypes are modest, although full-sequence data will require greater storage capacity. Storage requirements for intermediate and results files for genetic evaluations are much greater, particularly when multiple runs must be stored for research and validation studies. The greatest gains in accuracy from genomic selection have been realized for traits of low heritability, and there is increasing interest in new health and management traits. The collection of sufficient phenotypes to produce accurate evaluations may take many years, and high-reliability proofs for older bulls are needed to estimate marker effects. Data mining algorithms applied to large data sets may help identify unexpected relationships in the data, and improved visualization tools will provide insights. Genomic selection using large data requires a lot of computing power, particularly when large fractions of the population are genotyped. Theoretical improvements have made possible the inversion of large numerator relationship matrices, permitted the solving of large systems of equations, and produced fast algorithms for variance component estimation. Recent work shows that single-step approaches combining BLUP with a genomic relationship (G) matrix have similar computational requirements to traditional BLUP, and the limiting factor is the construction and inversion of G for many genotypes. A naïve algorithm for creating G for 14,000 individuals required almost 24 h to run, but custom libraries and parallel computing reduced that to 15 m. Large data sets also create challenges for the delivery of genetic evaluations that must be overcome in a way that does not disrupt the transition from conventional to genomic evaluations. Processing time is important, especially as real-time systems for on-farm decisions are developed. The ultimate value of these systems is to decrease time-to-results in research, increase accuracy in genomic evaluations, and accelerate rates of genetic improvement. PMID:22100598

Cole, J B; Newman, S; Foertter, F; Aguilar, I; Coffey, M

2012-03-01

173

An interactive environment for the analysis of large Earth observation and model data sets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Envision is an interactive environment that provides researchers in the earth sciences convenient ways to manage, browse, and visualize large observed or model data sets. Its main features are support for the netCDF and HDF file formats, an easy to use X/Motif user interface, a client-server configuration, and portability to many UNIX workstations. The Envision package also provides new ways to view and change metadata in a set of data files. It permits a scientist to conveniently and efficiently manage large data sets consisting of many data files. It also provides links to popular visualization tools so that data can be quickly browsed. Envision is a public domain package, freely available to the scientific community. Envision software (binaries and source code) and documentation can be obtained from either of these servers: ftp://vista.atmos.uiuc.edu/pub/envision/ and ftp://csrp.tamu.edu/pub/envision/. Detailed descriptions of Envision capabilities and operations can be found in the User's Guide and Reference Manuals distributed with Envision software.

Bowman, Kenneth P.; Walsh, John E.; Wilhelmson, Robert B.

1994-01-01

174

Corrected small basis set Hartree-Fock method for large systems.  

PubMed

A quantum chemical method based on a Hartree-Fock calculation with a small Gaussian AO basis set is presented. Its main area of application is the computation of structures, vibrational frequencies, and noncovalent interaction energies in huge molecular systems. The method is suggested as a partial replacement of semiempirical approaches or density functional theory (DFT) in particular when self-interaction errors are acute. In order to get accurate results three physically plausible atom pair-wise correction terms are applied for London dispersion interactions (D3 scheme), basis set superposition error (gCP scheme), and short-ranged basis set incompleteness effects. In total nine global empirical parameters are used. This so-called Hartee-Fock-3c (HF-3c) method is tested for geometries of small organic molecules, interaction energies and geometries of noncovalently bound complexes, for supramolecular systems, and protein structures. In the majority of realistic test cases good results approaching large basis set DFT quality are obtained at a tiny fraction of computational cost. PMID:23670872

Sure, Rebecca; Grimme, Stefan

2013-07-15

175

Main large data set features detection by a linear predictor model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of the present paper is to explore and obtain a simple method capable to detect the most important variables (features) from a large set of variables. To verify the performance of the approach described in the following sections, we used a set of news. Text sources are considered high-dimensional data, where each word is treated as a single variable. In our work, a linear predictor model has been used to uncover the most influential variables, reducing strongly the dimension of the data set. Input data is classified in two categories; arranged as a collection of plain text data, pre-processed and transformed into a numerical matrix containing around 10,000 different variables. We adjust the linear model's parameters based on its prediction results, the variables with strongest effect on output survive, while those with negligible effect are removed. In order to collect, automatically, a summarized set of features, we sacrifice some details and accuracy of the prediction model, although we try to balance the squared error with the subset obtained.

Gutierrez, Carlos Enrique; Alsharif, Mohamad Reza, Prof.; Khosravy, Mahdi; Yamashita, Katsumi, Prof.; Miyagi, Hayao, Prof.; Villa, Rafael

2014-10-01

176

Web-Queryable Large-Scale Data Sets for Hypothesis Generation in Plant Biology  

PubMed Central

The approaching end of the 21st century's first decade marks an exciting time for plant biology. Several National Science Foundation Arabidopsis 2010 Projects will conclude, and whether or not the stated goal of the National Science Foundation 2010 Program—to determine the function of 25,000 Arabidopsis genes by 2010—is reached, these projects and others in a similar vein, such as those performed by the AtGenExpress Consortium and various plant genome sequencing initiatives, have generated important and unprecedented large-scale data sets. While providing significant biological insights for the individual laboratories that generated them, these data sets, in conjunction with the appropriate tools, are also permitting plant biologists worldwide to gain new insights into their own biological systems of interest, often at a mouse click through a Web browser. This review provides an overview of several such genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data sets and describes Web-based tools for querying them in the context of hypothesis generation for plant biology. We provide five biological examples of how such tools and data sets have been used to provide biological insight. PMID:19401381

Brady, Siobhan M.; Provart, Nicholas J.

2009-01-01

177

Distributed Computation of the knn Graph for Large High-Dimensional Point Sets  

PubMed Central

High-dimensional problems arising from robot motion planning, biology, data mining, and geographic information systems often require the computation of k nearest neighbor (knn) graphs. The knn graph of a data set is obtained by connecting each point to its k closest points. As the research in the above-mentioned fields progressively addresses problems of unprecedented complexity, the demand for computing knn graphs based on arbitrary distance metrics and large high-dimensional data sets increases, exceeding resources available to a single machine. In this work we efficiently distribute the computation of knn graphs for clusters of processors with message passing. Extensions to our distributed framework include the computation of graphs based on other proximity queries, such as approximate knn or range queries. Our experiments show nearly linear speedup with over one hundred processors and indicate that similar speedup can be obtained with several hundred processors. PMID:19847318

Plaku, Erion; Kavraki, Lydia E.

2009-01-01

178

The Same or Separate? An Exploration of Teachers' Perceptions of the Classroom Assignment of Twins in Prior to School and Kindergarten to Year Two School Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigates the perceptions of 12 teachers from New South Wales, Australia, regarding the classroom assignment of twins. Analysis of semi-structured interviews with each of the teachers revealed four key findings: 1) teachers' perceptions about the classroom assignment of twins vary according to their previous experience and…

Jones, Laura; De Gioia, Katey

2010-01-01

179

The same or separate? An exploration of teachers’ perceptions of the classroom assignment of twins in prior to school and kindergarten to Year Two school settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article investigates the perceptions of 12 teachers from New South Wales, Australia, regarding the classroom assignment of twins. Analysis of semi-structured interviews with each of the teachers revealed four key findings: 1) teachers’ perceptions about the classroom assignment of twins vary according to their previous experience and relationship with twins in their personal life; 2) there are no sector-wide

Laura Jones; Katey De Gioia

2010-01-01

180

My Classroom Physical Activity Pyramid: A Tool for Integrating Movement into the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The classroom teacher is a critical team member of a comprehensive school physical activity program and an activity-friendly school environment. Students spend more time in the classroom than in any other school setting or environment. Classrooms are busy places, and classroom teachers must make decisions about how to make the best use of their…

Orlowski, Marietta; Lorson, Kevin; Lyon, Anna; Minoughan, Susan

2013-01-01

181

Classroom Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Perhaps the most important skill a good teacher should possess is the ability to control students. A teacher who can devise fascinating and unique lesson plans for her classroom is useless if she can't get the kids to sit down and listen to her instructions. Unfortunately, many beginning teachers simply are not prepared to manage their classrooms effectively. Managing a classroom means you must teach your students behavior expectations, not just post your rules on the classroom wall. Classroom management becomes even more of an issue when it applies to the active nature of the science classroom.

C. Jill Swango

2003-01-01

182

Analysis of Large One-Dimensional and Two-Dimensional Relaxation Data Sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large systems of equations arise during the analysis of one-dimensional and two-dimensional relaxation experiments. Practical solutions for least-squares relaxation components may be derived from a reduced number of averaged equations and differ little from solutions derived from the entire system. Size reductions of one or two orders of magnitude are possible. These methods are applied to synthetic data as well as a joint T1 and T2 data set from a sample of fully hydrated Western Red Cedar.

Whittall, K. P.

183

Unusually large shear wave anisotropy for chlorite in subduction zone settings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using first principle simulations we calculated the elasticity of chlorite. At a density ?~ 2.60 g cm-3, the elastic constant tensor reveals significant elastic anisotropy: VP ~27%, VS1 ~56%, and VS2 ~43%. The shear anisotropy is exceptionally large for chlorite and enhances upon compression. Upon compression, the shear elastic constant component C44 and C55 decreases, whereas C66 shear component stiffens. The softening in C44 and C55 is reflected in shear modulus, G, and the shear wave velocity, VS. Our results on elastic anisotropy at conditions relevant to the mantle wedge indicates that a 10-20 km layer of hydrated peridotite with serpentine and chlorite could account for the observed shear polarization anisotropy and associated large delay times of 1-2 s observed in some subduction zone settings. In addition, chlorite could also explain the low VP/VS ratios that have been observed in recent high-resolution seismological studies.

Mookherjee, Mainak; Mainprice, David

2014-03-01

184

A practical, bioinformatic workflow system for large data sets generated by next-generation sequencing.  

PubMed

Transcriptomics (at the level of single cells, tissues and/or whole organisms) underpins many fields of biomedical science, from understanding the basic cellular function in model organisms, to the elucidation of the biological events that govern the development and progression of human diseases, and the exploration of the mechanisms of survival, drug-resistance and virulence of pathogens. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are contributing to a massive expansion of transcriptomics in all fields and are reducing the cost, time and performance barriers presented by conventional approaches. However, bioinformatic tools for the analysis of the sequence data sets produced by these technologies can be daunting to researchers with limited or no expertise in bioinformatics. Here, we constructed a semi-automated, bioinformatic workflow system, and critically evaluated it for the analysis and annotation of large-scale sequence data sets generated by NGS. We demonstrated its utility for the exploration of differences in the transcriptomes among various stages and both sexes of an economically important parasitic worm (Oesophagostomum dentatum) as well as the prediction and prioritization of essential molecules (including GTPases, protein kinases and phosphatases) as novel drug target candidates. This workflow system provides a practical tool for the assembly, annotation and analysis of NGS data sets, also to researchers with a limited bioinformatic expertise. The custom-written Perl, Python and Unix shell computer scripts used can be readily modified or adapted to suit many different applications. This system is now utilized routinely for the analysis of data sets from pathogens of major socio-economic importance and can, in principle, be applied to transcriptomics data sets from any organism. PMID:20682560

Cantacessi, Cinzia; Jex, Aaron R; Hall, Ross S; Young, Neil D; Campbell, Bronwyn E; Joachim, Anja; Nolan, Matthew J; Abubucker, Sahar; Sternberg, Paul W; Ranganathan, Shoba; Mitreva, Makedonka; Gasser, Robin B

2010-09-01

185

Approaching the exa-scale: a real-world evaluation of rendering extremely large data sets  

SciTech Connect

Extremely large scale analysis is becoming increasingly important as supercomputers and their simulations move from petascale to exascale. The lack of dedicated hardware acceleration for rendering on today's supercomputing platforms motivates our detailed evaluation of the possibility of interactive rendering on the supercomputer. In order to facilitate our understanding of rendering on the supercomputing platform, we focus on scalability of rendering algorithms and architecture envisioned for exascale datasets. To understand tradeoffs for dealing with extremely large datasets, we compare three different rendering algorithms for large polygonal data: software based ray tracing, software based rasterization and hardware accelerated rasterization. We present a case study of strong and weak scaling of rendering extremely large data on both GPU and CPU based parallel supercomputers using Para View, a parallel visualization tool. Wc use three different data sets: two synthetic and one from a scientific application. At an extreme scale, algorithmic rendering choices make a difference and should be considered while approaching exascale computing, visualization, and analysis. We find software based ray-tracing offers a viable approach for scalable rendering of the projected future massive data sizes.

Patchett, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lo, Li - Ta [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Browniee, Carson S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Christopher J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hansen, Chuck [UNIV OF UTAH

2010-10-15

186

Data for the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Data for the Classroom collection gathers datasets that have accompanying instructional materials or other pertinent information for using the dataset in a classroom setting for grades K-16. The data may be numerical, visual, maps, charts, tables or images. The data may be observational, remotely sensed or model data. The primary component is that there are materials supporting the use and understanding of the data either by educators or directly by students. Additionally, the dataset itself is desribed.

187

Classroom Planetarium.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides instructions for the construction of a paper mache classroom planetarium and suggests several student activities using this planetarium model. Lists reasons why students have difficulties in transferring classroom instruction in astronomy to the night sky. (DS)

Ankney, Paul

1981-01-01

188

Home 2013 10 10 MU researchers can now move large data sets with new high-speed internet  

E-print Network

Home » 2013 » 10 » 10 » MU researchers can now move large data sets with new high-speed internet to move large data sets in a shorter amount of time using the high-speed Internet connection Internet2, in an announcement Thursday morning. The university has used Internet2 in the past, but it will now operate at a 100

Calyam, Prasad

189

Litho-kinematic facies model for large landslide deposits in arid settings  

SciTech Connect

Reconnaissance field studies of six large landslide deposits in the S. Basin and Range suggest that a set of characteristic features is common to the deposits of large landslides in an arid setting. These include a coarse boulder cap, an upper massive zone, a lower disrupted zone, and a mixed zone overlying disturbed substrate. The upper massive zone is dominated by crackel breccia. This grades downward into a lower disrupted zone composed of a more matrix-rich breccia that is internally sheared, intruded by clastic dikes, and often contains a cataclasite layer at its base. An underlying discontinuous mixed zone is composed of material from the overlying breccia mixed with material entrained from the underlying substrate. Bedding in the substrate sometimes displays folding and contortion that die out downward. The authors work suggests a spatial zonation of these characteristic features within many landslide deposits. In general, clastic dikes, the basal cataclasite, and folding in the substrate are observed mainly in distal parts of landslides. In most cases, total thickness, thickness of the basal disturbed and mixed zones, and the degree of internal shearing increase distally, whereas maximum clast size commonly decreases distally. Zonation of these features is interpreted to result from kinematics of emplacement that cause generally increased deformation in the distal regions of the landslide.

Yarnold, J.C.; Lombard, J.P.

1989-04-01

190

A Technique for Moving Large Data Sets over High-Performance Long Distance Networks  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we look at the performance characteristics of three tools used to move large data sets over dedicated long distance networking infrastructure. Although performance studies of wide area networks have been a frequent topic of interest, performance analyses have tended to focus on network latency characteristics and peak throughput using network traffic generators. In this study we instead perform an end-to-end long distance networking analysis that includes reading large data sets from a source file system and committing the data to a remote destination file system. An evaluation of end-to-end data movement is also an evaluation of the system configurations employed and the tools used to move the data. For this paper, we have built several storage platforms and connected them with a high performance long distance network configuration. We use these systems to analyze the capabilities of three data movement tools: BBcp, GridFTP, and XDD. Our studies demonstrate that existing data movement tools do not provide efficient performance levels or exercise the storage devices in their highest performance modes.

Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL] [ORNL; Dobson, Jonathan D [ORNL] [ORNL; Hodson, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL] [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL; Ruwart, Thomas [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01

191

Developing consistent Landsat data sets for large area applications: the MRLC 2001 protocol  

USGS Publications Warehouse

One of the major efforts in large area land cover mapping over the last two decades was the completion of two U.S. National Land Cover Data sets (NLCD), developed with nominal 1992 and 2001 Landsat imagery under the auspices of the MultiResolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium. Following the successful generation of NLCD 1992, a second generation MRLC initiative was launched with two primary goals: (1) to develop a consistent Landsat imagery data set for the U.S. and (2) to develop a second generation National Land Cover Database (NLCD 2001). One of the key enhancements was the formulation of an image preprocessing protocol and implementation of a consistent image processing method. The core data set of the NLCD 2001 database consists of Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) images. This letter details the procedures for processing the original ETM+ images and more recent scenes added to the database. NLCD 2001 products include Anderson Level II land cover classes, percent tree canopy, and percent urban imperviousness at 30-m resolution derived from Landsat imagery. The products are freely available for download to the general public from the MRLC Consortium Web site at http://www.mrlc.gov.

Chander, G.; Huang, C.; Yang, L.; Homer, C.; Larson, C.

2009-01-01

192

On the identification of representative samples from large data sets, with application to synoptic climatology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The analysis of large data sets in meteorological and air quality studies is often made though the examination of specific case studies, especially when time-consuming computational models are employed. This paper presents the development of a tool to identify specific case studies, termed as representative days, that would subsequently be modelled. The success of such tools should be judged on the discrimination between the specified cases: and the degree to which they capture and recreate historical characteristics of the original data set. The developed approach utilises a principal component algorithm with varimax rotation (r-PCA) and the subtractive clustering algorithm coupled with a cluster validity criterion. In this paper, the developed tool is applied to a data set from the North Sea, utilizing two years worth of data from the DNMI operational forecasting model. The results will be subsequently used in photochemical and radiative forcing modelling tools as part of the EC funded project AEOLOS, with the ultimate goal to estimate the global warming potential of non-radioactive tracing substances such as SF6 and PFCs, which are heavily used in the oil industry.

Sfetsos, A.; Vlachogiannis, D.; Gounaris, N.; Stubos, A. K.

2005-09-01

193

Impact of problem-based learning in a large classroom setting: student perception and problem-solving skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes a problem-based learning (PBL) approach (using tutorless groups) that was introduced as a supplement to standard didactic lectures in University of British Columbia Okanagan undergraduate biochemistry classes consisting of 45Â?85 students. PBL was chosen as an effective method to assist students in learning biochemical and physiological processes. By monitoring student attendance and using informal and formal surveys, we demonstrated that PBL has a significant positive impact on student motivation to attend and participate in the course work.

Andis Klegeris (University of British Columbia)

2011-12-01

194

Hierarchical Unbiased Graph Shrinkage (HUGS): A Novel Groupwise Registration for Large Data Set  

PubMed Central

Normalizing all images in a large data set into a common space is a key step in many clinical and research studies, e.g., for brain development, maturation, and aging. Recently, groupwise registration has been developed for simultaneous alignment of all images without selecting a particular image as template, thus potentially avoiding bias in the registration. However, most conventional groupwise registration methods do not explore the data distribution during the image registration. Thus, their performance could be affected by large inter-subject variations in the data set under registration. To solve this potential issue, we propose to use a graph to model the distribution of all image data sitting on the image manifold, with each node representing an image and each edge representing the geodesic pathway between two nodes (or images). Then, the procedure of warping all images to their population center turns to the dynamic shrinking of the graph nodes along their graph edges until all graph nodes become close to each other. Thus, the topology of image distribution on the image manifold is always preserved during the groupwise registration. More importantly, by modeling the distribution of all images via a graph, we can potentially reduce registration error since every time each image is warped only according to its nearby images with similar structures in the graph. We have evaluated our proposed groupwise registration method on both infant and adult data sets, by also comparing with the conventional group-mean based registration and the ABSORB methods. All experimental results show that our proposed method can achieve better performance in terms of registration accuracy and robustness. PMID:24055505

Ying, Shihui; Wu, Guorong; Wang, Qian; Shen, Dinggang

2014-01-01

195

21-inch common large-area display set for multiple military command and control workstation applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Battelle is under contract with Warner Robins Air Logistics Center to design a common large area display set (CLADS) for use in multiple airborne C4I applications that currently use unique 19 inch CRTs. Engineers at Battelle have determined that by taking advantage of the latest flat panel display technology and the commonality between C4I applications, one display head (21 inch diagonal, 1280 by 1024) can be used in multiple applications. In addition, common modules are being designed by Battelle to reduce the number of installation- specific circuit card assemblies required for a particular application. Initial USAF applications include replacements for the E-3 AWACS color monitor assembly, E-8 Joint STARS graphics display unit, and ABCCC airborne color display. Initial U. S. Navy applications include the E-2C ACIS display. For these applications reliability and maintainability are key objectives. The common design reduces the number of unique subassemblies in the USAF inventory by 56 to 66%. In addition to total module reductions, CLADs module/subassembly re-use across nine potential applications is estimated to be 73%. As more platforms implement CLADS, the percentage of module re-use increases. The new design is also expected to have a MTBF of at least 3350 hours, an order of magnitude better than one of the current systems. In the Joint STARS installation, more than 1400 pounds can be eliminated from the aircraft. In the E-3 installation, the CLADs is estimated to provide a power reduction of approximately 1750 watts per aircraft. This paper discuses the common large area display set design and it use in a variety of C4I applications that require a large area, high resolution, full color display.

Gorenflo, Ronald L.; Hermann, David J.

1996-05-01

196

Your Outdoor Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Physical education is still taught in outdoor settings in many warmer climates of the United States. Even when indoor facilities are available, physical education may be moved outside because of other curricular needs or facility issues. How can physical educators make the outdoor setting seem more like an indoor classroom? Outdoor teaching…

Hinman, Laurie

2005-01-01

197

Infusing creativity into Eastern classrooms: Evaluations from student perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infusing creativity elements into regular classroom was an important movement in recent Asian educational reforms. A large-scale research study was conducted in Hong Kong to explore the possibilities, outcomes and difficulties of this kind of curriculum change from students’ perspectives. Based mainly on Western creativity literature, this study developed a set of methods for infusing creativity learning elements into regular

Vivian M. Y. Cheng

2011-01-01

198

Classroom Dimensions and Classroom Types.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although classroom "openness" has been much discussed in recent years, there has been little effort to investigate to what degree this openness occurs within a general sample of classrooms. The purpose of this study is to identify significant attributes of classroom activity and organization relevant to the concepts of "traditional" and "open" and…

Kendall, Arthur J.; Solomon, Daniel

199

Classroom Management in Diverse Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom management continues to be a serious concern for teachers and especially in urban and diverse learning environments. The authors present the culturally responsive classroom management practices of two teachers from an urban and diverse middle school to extend the construct, culturally responsive classroom management. The principles that…

Milner, H. Richard, IV; Tenore, F. Blake

2010-01-01

200

Probing Fast X-ray Variability of Blazars with a Large Data Set from Swift  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Swift X-ray Telescope has obtained 0.2-10 keV x-ray data on numerous blazars over timescales ranging from seconds to more than 8 years. Much of these data come from intense target of opportunity observations that can be analyzed in a multiwavelength context and used to model jet parameters, particularly during flare states. Another large component of these data comes from monitoring that was obtained during a variety of flux states. By looking at this broad data set, one can evaluate variability timescales and limit the emission mechanisms and associated parameters. Some of these blazars are known to exhibit variability timescales on the order of minutes in the gamma-ray band and tens of minutes in the x-ray band. We report on our search for short timescale x-ray variability that could limit the size and nature of the emission region/s in blazar jets.

Falcone, Abraham; Pryal, Matthew; Stroh, Michael

2014-08-01

201

The use of reading instructional time by teachers in an urban balanced literacy setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this exploratory study was to document the nature of the time used for reading instruction provided by novice and expert teachers in an urban balanced literacy classroom setting. ^ The participants of this study were six volunteer female classroom teachers of literacy in a large urban elementary school, of which three were designated as experts and three

Geanine Pierro

2009-01-01

202

fastSTRUCTURE: Variational Inference of Population Structure in Large SNP Data Sets  

PubMed Central

Tools for estimating population structure from genetic data are now used in a wide variety of applications in population genetics. However, inferring population structure in large modern data sets imposes severe computational challenges. Here, we develop efficient algorithms for approximate inference of the model underlying the STRUCTURE program using a variational Bayesian framework. Variational methods pose the problem of computing relevant posterior distributions as an optimization problem, allowing us to build on recent advances in optimization theory to develop fast inference tools. In addition, we propose useful heuristic scores to identify the number of populations represented in a data set and a new hierarchical prior to detect weak population structure in the data. We test the variational algorithms on simulated data and illustrate using genotype data from the CEPH–Human Genome Diversity Panel. The variational algorithms are almost two orders of magnitude faster than STRUCTURE and achieve accuracies comparable to those of ADMIXTURE. Furthermore, our results show that the heuristic scores for choosing model complexity provide a reasonable range of values for the number of populations represented in the data, with minimal bias toward detecting structure when it is very weak. Our algorithm, fastSTRUCTURE, is freely available online at http://pritchardlab.stanford.edu/structure.html. PMID:24700103

Raj, Anil; Stephens, Matthew; Pritchard, Jonathan K.

2014-01-01

203

Motif-based analysis of large nucleotide data sets using MEME-ChIP  

PubMed Central

MEME-ChIP is a web-based tool for analyzing motifs in large DNA or RNA data sets. It can analyze peak regions identified by ChIP-seq, cross-linking sites identified by cLIP-seq and related assays, as well as sets of genomic regions selected using other criteria. MEME-ChIP performs de novo motif discovery, motif enrichment analysis, motif location analysis and motif clustering, providing a comprehensive picture of the DNA or RNA motifs that are enriched in the input sequences. MEME-ChIP performs two complementary types of de novo motif discovery: weight matrix–based discovery for high accuracy; and word-based discovery for high sensitivity. Motif enrichment analysis using DNA or RNA motifs from human, mouse, worm, fly and other model organisms provides even greater sensitivity. MEME-ChIP’s interactive HTML output groups and aligns significant motifs to ease interpretation. this protocol takes less than 3 h, and it provides motif discovery approaches that are distinct and complementary to other online methods. PMID:24853928

Ma, Wenxiu; Noble, William S; Bailey, Timothy L

2014-01-01

204

Duplications in RB1CC1 are associated with schizophrenia; identification in large European sample sets  

PubMed Central

Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a severe and debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder with an estimated heritability of ~80%. Recently, de novo mutations, identified by next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, have been suggested to contribute to the risk of developing SCZ. Although these studies show an overall excess of de novo mutations among patients compared with controls, it is not easy to pinpoint specific genes hit by de novo mutations as actually involved in the disease process. Importantly, support for a specific gene can be provided by the identification of additional alterations in several independent patients. We took advantage of existing genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data sets to screen for deletions or duplications (copy number variations, CNVs) in genes previously implicated by NGS studies. Our approach was based on the observation that CNVs constitute part of the mutational spectrum in many human disease-associated genes. In a discovery step, we investigated whether CNVs in 55 candidate genes, suggested from NGS studies, were more frequent among 1637 patients compared with 1627 controls. Duplications in RB1CC1 were overrepresented among patients. This finding was followed-up in large, independent European sample sets. In the combined analysis, totaling 8461 patients and 112 871 controls, duplications in RB1CC1 were found to be associated with SCZ (P=1.29 × 10?5; odds ratio=8.58). Our study provides evidence for rare duplications in RB1CC1 as a risk factor for SCZ.

Degenhardt, F; Priebe, L; Meier, S; Lennertz, L; Streit, F; Witt, S H; Hofmann, A; Becker, T; Mössner, R; Maier, W; Nenadic, I; Sauer, H; Mattheisen, M; Buizer-Voskamp, J; Ophoff, R A; Rujescu, D; Giegling, I; Ingason, A; Wagner, M; Delobel, B; Andrieux, J; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Heinz, A; Walter, H; Moebus, S; Corvin, A; Kahn, René S; Linszen, Don H; van Os, Jim; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; de Haan, Lieuwe; Krabbendam, Lydia; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Rietschel, M; Nöthen, M M; Cichon, S

2013-01-01

205

Evaluation of flow resistance in gravel-bed rivers through a large field data set  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A data set of 2890 field measurements was used to test the ability of several conventional flow resistance equations to predict mean flow velocity in gravel bed rivers when used with no calibration. The tests were performed using both flow depth and discharge as input since discharge may be a more reliable measure of flow conditions in shallow flows. Generally better predictions are obtained when using flow discharge as input. The results indicate that the Manning-Strickler and the Keulegan equations show considerable disagreement with observed flow velocities for flow depths smaller than 10 times the characteristic grain diameter. Most equations show some systematic deviation for small relative flow depth. The use of new definitions for dimensionless variables in terms of nondimensional hydraulic geometry equations allows the development of a new flow resistance equation. The best overall performance is obtained by the Ferguson approach, which combines two power law flow resistance equations that are different for deep and shallow flows. To use this approach with flow discharge as input, a logarithmic matching equation in terms of the new dimensionless variables is proposed. For the domains of intermediate and large-scale roughness, the field data indicate a considerable increase in flow resistance as compared with the domain of small-scale roughness. The Ferguson approach is used to discuss the importance of flow resistance partitioning for bed load transport calculations at flow conditions with intermediate- and large-scale roughness in natural gravel, cobble, and boulder bed streams.

Rickenmann, Dieter; Recking, Alain

2011-07-01

206

Stacking of large interferometric data sets in the image- and uv-domain - a comparative study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new algorithm for stacking radio interferometric data in the uv-domain. The performance of uv-stacking is compared to the stacking of fully imaged data using simulated Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) deep extragalactic surveys. We find that image- and uv-stacking produce similar results, however, uv-stacking is typically the more robust method. An advantage of the uv-stacking algorithm is the availability of uv-data post-stacking, which makes it possible to identify and remove problematic baselines. For deep VLA surveys uv-stacking yields a signal-to-noise ratio that is up to 20 per cent higher than image-stacking. Furthermore, we have investigated stacking of resolved sources with a simulated VLA data set where 1.5 arcsec (10-12 kpc at z ˜ 1-4) sources are stacked. We find that uv-stacking, where a model is fitted directly to the visibilities, significantly improves the accuracy and robustness of the size estimates. While scientific motivation for this work is studying faint, high-z galaxies, the algorithm analysed here would also be applicable in other fields of astronomy. Stacking of radio interferometric data is also expected to play a big role for future surveys with telescopes such as Low-Frequency Array and Square Kilometre Array.

Lindroos, L.; Knudsen, K. K.; Vlemmings, W.; Conway, J.; Martí-Vidal, I.

2015-02-01

207

Classroom Connectivity: Increasing Participation and Understanding Inside the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article shows how highly mobile computing, when used with new forms of network connectivity, can allow new forms of activities in the mathematics classroom. Examples are provided, such as the ability to share, harvest, and aggregate mathematical objects, and the ability for teachers and students to analyze the entire set of classroom

Hegedus, Stephen

2007-01-01

208

Galaxy Evolution Insights from Spectral Modeling of Large Data Sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

SciTech Connect

This thesis centers on the use of spectral modeling techniques on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to gain new insights into current questions in galaxy evolution. The SDSS provides a large, uniform, high quality data set which can be exploited in a number of ways. One avenue pursued here is to use the large sample size to measure precisely the mean properties of galaxies of increasingly narrow parameter ranges. The other route taken is to look for rare objects which open up for exploration new areas in galaxy parameter space. The crux of this thesis is revisiting the classical Kennicutt method for inferring the stellar initial mass function (IMF) from the integrated light properties of galaxies. A large data set ({approx} 10{sup 5} galaxies) from the SDSS DR4 is combined with more in-depth modeling and quantitative statistical analysis to search for systematic IMF variations as a function of galaxy luminosity. Galaxy H{alpha} equivalent widths are compared to a broadband color index to constrain the IMF. It is found that for the sample as a whole the best fitting IMF power law slope above 0.5 M{sub {circle_dot}} is {Lambda} = 1.5 {+-} 0.1 with the error dominated by systematics. Galaxies brighter than around M{sub r,0.1} = -20 (including galaxies like the Milky Way which has M{sub r,0.1} {approx} -21) are well fit by a universal {Lambda} {approx} 1.4 IMF, similar to the classical Salpeter slope, and smooth, exponential star formation histories (SFH). Fainter galaxies prefer steeper IMFs and the quality of the fits reveal that for these galaxies a universal IMF with smooth SFHs is actually a poor assumption. Related projects are also pursued. A targeted photometric search is conducted for strongly lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBG) similar to MS1512-cB58. The evolution of the photometric selection technique is described as are the results of spectroscopic follow-up of the best targets. The serendipitous discovery of two interesting blue compact dwarf galaxies is reported. These galaxies were identified by their extremely weak (< 150) [N {pi}] {lambda}6584 to H{alpha} emission line ratios. Abundance analysis from emission line fluxes reveals that these galaxies have gas phase oxygen abundances 12 + log(O/H) {approx} 7.7 to 7.9, not remarkably low, and near infrared imaging detects an old stellar population. However, the measured nitrogen to oxygen ratios log(N/O) < 1.7 are anomalously low for blue compact dwarf galaxies. These objects may be useful for understanding the chemical evolution of nitrogen.

Hoversten, Erik A.; /Johns Hopkins U.

2007-10-01

209

Measurement, visualization and analysis of extremely large data sets with a nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machines (NPM machines) developed at the Ilmenau University of Technology allow the measurement of micro- and nanostructures with nanometer precision in a measurement volume of 25 mm × 25 mm × 5 mm (NMM-1) or 200 mm × 200 mm × 25 mm (NPMM-200). Various visual, tactile or atomic force sensors can all be used to measure specimens. Atomic force sensors have emerged as a powerful tool in nanotechnology. Large-scale AFM measurements are very time-consuming and in fact in a practical sense they are impossible over millimeter ranges due to low scanning speeds. A cascaded multi-sensor system can be used to implement a multi-scale measurement and testing strategy for nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machines. This approach involves capturing an overview image at the limit of optical resolution and automatically scanning the measured data for interesting test areas that are suitable for a higher-resolution measurement. These "fields of interest" can subsequently be measured in the same NPM machine using individual AFM sensor scans. The results involve extremely large data sets that cannot be handled by off-the-shelf software. Quickly navigating within terabyte-sized data files requires preprocessing to be done on the measured data to calculate intermediate images based on the principle of a visualization pyramid. This pyramid includes the measured data of the entire volume, prepared in the form of discrete measurement volumes (spatial tiles or cubes) with certain edge lengths at specific zoom levels. The functionality of the closed process chain is demonstrated using a blob analysis for automatically selecting regions of interest on the specimen. As expected, processing large amounts of data places particularly high demands on both computing power and the software architecture.

Birli, O.; Franke, K.-H.; Linß, G.; Machleidt, T.; Manske, E.; Schale, F.; Schwannecke, H.-C.; Sparrer, E.; Weiß, M.

2013-04-01

210

Efficient Implementation of an Optimal Interpolator for Large Spatial Data Sets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Scattered data interpolation is a problem of interest in numerous areas such as electronic imaging, smooth surface modeling, and computational geometry. Our motivation arises from applications in geology and mining, which often involve large scattered data sets and a demand for high accuracy. The method of choice is ordinary kriging. This is because it is a best unbiased estimator. Unfortunately, this interpolant is computationally very expensive to compute exactly. For n scattered data points, computing the value of a single interpolant involves solving a dense linear system of size roughly n x n. This is infeasible for large n. In practice, kriging is solved approximately by local approaches that are based on considering only a relatively small'number of points that lie close to the query point. There are many problems with this local approach, however. The first is that determining the proper neighborhood size is tricky, and is usually solved by ad hoc methods such as selecting a fixed number of nearest neighbors or all the points lying within a fixed radius. Such fixed neighborhood sizes may not work well for all query points, depending on local density of the point distribution. Local methods also suffer from the problem that the resulting interpolant is not continuous. Meyer showed that while kriging produces smooth continues surfaces, it has zero order continuity along its borders. Thus, at interface boundaries where the neighborhood changes, the interpolant behaves discontinuously. Therefore, it is important to consider and solve the global system for each interpolant. However, solving such large dense systems for each query point is impractical. Recently a more principled approach to approximating kriging has been proposed based on a technique called covariance tapering. The problems arise from the fact that the covariance functions that are used in kriging have global support. Our implementations combine, utilize, and enhance a number of different approaches that have been introduced in literature for solving large linear systems for interpolation of scattered data points. For very large systems, exact methods such as Gaussian elimination are impractical since they require 0(n(exp 3)) time and 0(n(exp 2)) storage. As Billings et al. suggested, we use an iterative approach. In particular, we use the SYMMLQ method, for solving the large but sparse ordinary kriging systems that result from tapering. The main technical issue that need to be overcome in our algorithmic solution is that the points' covariance matrix for kriging should be symmetric positive definite. The goal of tapering is to obtain a sparse approximate representation of the covariance matrix while maintaining its positive definiteness. Furrer et al. used tapering to obtain a sparse linear system of the form Ax = b, where A is the tapered symmetric positive definite covariance matrix. Thus, Cholesky factorization could be used to solve their linear systems. They implemented an efficient sparse Cholesky decomposition method. They also showed if these tapers are used for a limited class of covariance models, the solution of the system converges to the solution of the original system. Matrix A in the ordinary kriging system, while symmetric, is not positive definite. Thus, their approach is not applicable to the ordinary kriging system. Therefore, we use tapering only to obtain a sparse linear system. Then, we use SYMMLQ to solve the ordinary kriging system. We show that solving large kriging systems becomes practical via tapering and iterative methods, and results in lower estimation errors compared to traditional local approaches, and significant memory savings compared to the original global system. We also developed a more efficient variant of the sparse SYMMLQ method for large ordinary kriging systems. This approach adaptively finds the correct local neighborhood for each query point in the interpolation process.

Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Mount, David M.

2007-01-01

211

Assembly of large metagenome data sets using a Convey HC-1 hybrid core computer (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

ScienceCinema

Alex Copeland on "Assembly of large metagenome data sets using a Convey HC-1 hybrid core computer" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Copeland, Alex [DOE JGI

2013-02-11

212

Registering coherent change detection products associated with large image sets and long capture intervals  

DOEpatents

A set of co-registered coherent change detection (CCD) products is produced from a set of temporally separated synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of a target scene. A plurality of transformations are determined, which transformations are respectively for transforming a plurality of the SAR images to a predetermined image coordinate system. The transformations are used to create, from a set of CCD products produced from the set of SAR images, a corresponding set of co-registered CCD products.

Perkins, David Nikolaus; Gonzales, Antonio I

2014-04-08

213

BACHSCORE. A tool for evaluating efficiently and reliably the quality of large sets of protein structures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In protein structure prediction it is of crucial importance, especially at the refinement stage, to score efficiently large sets of models by selecting the ones that are closest to the native state. We here present a new computational tool, BACHSCORE, that allows its users to rank different structural models of the same protein according to their quality, evaluated by using the BACH++ (Bayesian Analysis Conformation Hunt) scoring function. The original BACH statistical potential was already shown to discriminate with very good reliability the protein native state in large sets of misfolded models of the same protein. BACH++ features a novel upgrade in the solvation potential of the scoring function, now computed by adapting the LCPO (Linear Combination of Pairwise Orbitals) algorithm. This change further enhances the already good performance of the scoring function. BACHSCORE can be accessed directly through the web server: bachserver.pd.infn.it. Catalogue identifier: AEQD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEQD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 130159 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 24 687 455 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Any computer capable of running an executable produced by a g++ compiler (4.6.3 version). Operating system: Linux, Unix OS-es. RAM: 1 073 741 824 bytes Classification: 3. Nature of problem: Evaluate the quality of a protein structural model, taking into account the possible “a priori” knowledge of a reference primary sequence that may be different from the amino-acid sequence of the model; the native protein structure should be recognized as the best model. Solution method: The contact potential scores the occurrence of any given type of residue pair in 5 possible contact classes (?-helical contact, parallel ?-sheet contact, anti-parallel ?-sheet contact, side-chain contact, no contact). The solvation potential scores the occurrence of any residue type in 2 possible environments: buried and solvent exposed. Residue environment is assigned by adapting the LCPO algorithm. Residues present in the reference primary sequence and not present in the model structure contribute to the model score as solvent exposed and as non contacting all other residues. Restrictions: Input format file according to the Protein Data Bank standard Additional comments: Parameter values used in the scoring function can be found in the file /folder-to-bachscore/BACH/examples/bach_std.par. Running time: Roughly one minute to score one hundred structures on a desktop PC, depending on their size.

Sarti, E.; Zamuner, S.; Cossio, P.; Laio, A.; Seno, F.; Trovato, A.

2013-12-01

214

Considerations for observational research using large data sets in radiation oncology.  

PubMed

The radiation oncology community has witnessed growing interest in observational research conducted using large-scale data sources such as registries and claims-based data sets. With the growing emphasis on observational analyses in health care, the radiation oncology community must possess a sophisticated understanding of the methodological considerations of such studies in order to evaluate evidence appropriately to guide practice and policy. Because observational research has unique features that distinguish it from clinical trials and other forms of traditional radiation oncology research, the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics assembled a panel of experts in health services research to provide a concise and well-referenced review, intended to be informative for the lay reader, as well as for scholars who wish to embark on such research without prior experience. This review begins by discussing the types of research questions relevant to radiation oncology that large-scale databases may help illuminate. It then describes major potential data sources for such endeavors, including information regarding access and insights regarding the strengths and limitations of each. Finally, it provides guidance regarding the analytical challenges that observational studies must confront, along with discussion of the techniques that have been developed to help minimize the impact of certain common analytical issues in observational analysis. Features characterizing a well-designed observational study include clearly defined research questions, careful selection of an appropriate data source, consultation with investigators with relevant methodological expertise, inclusion of sensitivity analyses, caution not to overinterpret small but significant differences, and recognition of limitations when trying to evaluate causality. This review concludes that carefully designed and executed studies using observational data that possess these qualities hold substantial promise for advancing our understanding of many unanswered questions of importance to the field of radiation oncology. PMID:25195986

Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E; Chen, Aileen; Chen, Ronald C; Hoffman, Karen; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Smith, Benjamin D; Yu, James B

2014-09-01

215

Anomaly Detection in Large Sets of High-Dimensional Symbol Sequences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper addresses the problem of detecting and describing anomalies in large sets of high-dimensional symbol sequences. The approach taken uses unsupervised clustering of sequences using the normalized longest common subsequence (LCS) as a similarity measure, followed by detailed analysis of outliers to detect anomalies. As the LCS measure is expensive to compute, the first part of the paper discusses existing algorithms, such as the Hunt-Szymanski algorithm, that have low time-complexity. We then discuss why these algorithms often do not work well in practice and present a new hybrid algorithm for computing the LCS that, in our tests, outperforms the Hunt-Szymanski algorithm by a factor of five. The second part of the paper presents new algorithms for outlier analysis that provide comprehensible indicators as to why a particular sequence was deemed to be an outlier. The algorithms provide a coherent description to an analyst of the anomalies in the sequence, compared to more normal sequences. The algorithms we present are general and domain-independent, so we discuss applications in related areas such as anomaly detection.

Budalakoti, Suratna; Srivastava, Ashok N.; Akella, Ram; Turkov, Eugene

2006-01-01

216

Public-private partnerships with large corporations: setting the ground rules for better health.  

PubMed

Public-private partnerships with large corporations offer potential benefits to the health sector but many concerns have been raised, highlighting the need for appropriate safeguards. In this paper we propose five tests that public policy makers may wish to apply when considering engaging in such a public-private partnership. First, are the core products and services provided by the corporation health enhancing or health damaging? In some cases, such as tobacco, the answer is obvious but others, such as food and alcohol, are contested. In such cases, the burden of proof is on the potential partners to show that their activities are health enhancing. Second, do potential partners put their policies into practice in the settings where they can do so, their own workplaces? Third, are the corporate social responsibility activities of potential partners independently audited? Fourth, do potential partners make contributions to the commons rather than to narrow programmes of their choosing? Fifth, is the role of the partner confined to policy implementation rather than policy development, which is ultimately the responsibility of government alone? PMID:24581699

Galea, Gauden; McKee, Martin

2014-04-01

217

iScout: an intelligent scout for navigating large image sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new intelligent software tool for PACS systems called 'iScout' has been developed that constructs and displays an overview of large series or studies before downloading the set of images to a PACS workstation. The overview consists of two orthogonal cross-section images that allow the user to select and download a subset of images, avoiding long delays that can occur while downloading hundreds or even thousands of images. The iScout also provides a navigational tool, allowing the user to click on anatomical regions and view the relevant slices, while displaying the anatomical location of the image currently being displayed by the PACS workstation software. The construction of an iScout can be done on either a workstation or a server with only minimal overhead that does not significantly affect the speed of loading. A working iScout tool has been integrated with multi-modality PACS workstation software (McKesson Medical Imaging Solutions), and it was found that the iScout can be generated on the workstation with a maximum added overhead of only 3.4 seconds while downloading a study containing 433 512x512 CT images. The iScout is flexible and can generate scouts for virtually all types of CT and MR images, as well as 3D Ultrasound.

Weathermon, Adam C.; Rohling, Robert N.

2003-05-01

218

Asymmetrical filters for vision chips: a basis for the design of large sets of spatial and spatiotemporal filters  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of actual vision machines on VLSI is the implementation of a large set of linear filters selective to features such as edges, corners, orientations, motion. This procedure requires large arrays of filters with complex structures. In order to reduce the complexity, we propose to implement a simple basis of filters able to generate more complex filters such as

A. B. Torralba; J. Herault

1999-01-01

219

Perturbation corrections to Koopmans' theorem. V - A study with large basis sets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The vertical ionization potentials of N2, F2 and H2O were calculated by perturbation corrections to Koopmans' theorem using six different basis sets. The largest set used includes several sets of polarization functions. Comparison is made with measured values and with results of computations using Green's functions.

Chong, D. P.; Langhoff, S. R.

1982-01-01

220

Toward accurate thermochemical models for transition metals : G3large basis sets for atoms Sc-Zn.  

SciTech Connect

An augmented valence triple-zeta basis set, referred to as G3Large, is reported for the first-row transition metal elements Sc through Zn. The basis set is constructed in a manner similar to the G3Large basis set developed previously for other elements (H-Ar, K, Ca, Ga-Kr) and used as a key component in Gaussian-3 theory. It is based on a contraction of a set of 15s13p5d Gaussian primitives to 8s7p3d, and also includes sets of f and g polarization functions, diffuse spd functions, and core df polarization functions. The basis set is evaluated with triples-augmented coupled cluster [CCSD(T)] and Brueckner orbital [BD(T)] methods for a small test set involving energies of atoms, atomic ions, and diatomic hydrides. It performs well for the low-lying s{yields}d excitation energies of atoms, atomic ionization energies, and the dissociation energies of the diatomic hydrides. The Brueckner orbital-based BD(T) method performs substantially better than Hartree-Fock-based CCSD(T) for molecules such as NiH, where the starting unrestricted Hartree-Fock wavefunction suffers from a high degree of spin contamination. Comparison with available data for geometries of transition metal hydrides also shows good agreement. A smaller basis set without core polarization functions, G3MP2Large, is also defined.

Mayhall, N. J.; Raghavachari, K.; Redfern, P. C.; Curtiss, L. A.; Rassolov, V.; Indiana Univ.; Univ. of South Carolina

2008-04-01

221

The Impact of Brief Teacher Training on Classroom Management and Child Behavior in At-Risk Preschool Settings: Mediators and Treatment Utility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers from fourteen classrooms were randomly assigned to an adaptation of Incredible Years (IY) teacher training or to teacher training-as-usual. Observations were made of the behavior of 136 target preschool boys and girls nominated by teachers as having many or few conduct problems. Peer and teacher behavior were observed at baseline and post…

Snyder, James; Low, Sabina; Schultz, Tara; Barner, Stacy; Moreno, Desirae; Garst, Meladee; Leiker, Ryan; Swink, Nathan; Schrepferman, Lynn

2011-01-01

222

Humor in the Physics Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides examples of several ways that humor may be used in the physics classroom. Included are the use of cartoons, puns, visual puns, unusual units of measurement, scientific errors which have amusing consequences, posters, and amusing problem sets. (CS)

Peterson, Ivars

1980-01-01

223

Outdoor Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An outdoor classroom is the ideal vehicle for community involvement: Parents, native plant societies, 4-H, garden clubs, and master naturalists are all resources waiting to be tapped, as are local businesses offering support. If you enlist your community in the development and maintenance of your outdoor classroom, the entire community will…

Mayes, Valynda

2010-01-01

224

Classroom Management Issues for Teaching Assistants  

Microsoft Academic Search

For many graduate teaching assistants, the task of planning, organizing, motivating, and controlling classroom environments can be overwhelming. Empirical research pertaining to major classroom management problems experienced by TAs is scarce. This article is a report of a survey study regarding TA classroom management at a large, land-grant Research 1 University. The study provides specific information about TAs' perceptions of

Jiali Luo; Laurie Bellows; Marilyn Grady

2000-01-01

225

Classroom Management That Works  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to find the best classroom management strategies to use when teaching in an elementary school setting. I wanted to conduct the best possible management tools for a variety of age groups as well as meet educational standards. Through my research I found different approaches in different grade levels is an important…

Cleve, Lauren

2012-01-01

226

Goal Setting and Student Achievement: A Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The connection between goals and student motivation has been widely investigated in the research literature, but the relationship of goal setting and student achievement at the classroom level has remained largely unexplored. This article reports the findings of a 5-year quasi-experimental study examining goal setting and student achievement in…

Moeller, Aleidine J.; Theiler, Janine M.; Wu, Chaorong

2012-01-01

227

Rough Set Theory in Very Large Databases Department of Mathematics and Computer Science  

E-print Network

San Jose State University, San Jose, California 95192-0103 and Berkeley Initiative in Soft Computing, Department of Electric Engineering and Computer Science University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 are prohibitively expensive. Even in small data set environment, researchers have softened or generalized rough set

Lin, Tsau Young

228

Improving Library Effectiveness: A Proposal for Applying Fuzzy Set Concepts in the Management of Large Collections.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fuzzy set theory, a mathematical modeling technique that allows for the consideration of such factors as "professional expertise" in decision making, is discussed as a tool for use in libraries--specifically in collection management. The fundamentals of fuzzy set theory are introduced and a reference list is included. (JL)

Robinson, Earl J.; Turner, Stephen J.

1981-01-01

229

Computerized Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An electronic system has been developed by which individual multiple-choice responses from a large group of students can be recorded and analyzed for the teacher's information. The equipment includes individual sets of response buttons, computer processing of responses, and control unit for the instructor, and a control and display unit showing a…

Berkell, Arthur

1968-01-01

230

Tools for Analysis and Visualization of Large Time-Varying CFD Data Sets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the second year, we continued to built upon and improve our scanline-based direct volume renderer that we developed in the first year of this grant. This extremely general rendering approach can handle regular or irregular grids, including overlapping multiple grids, and polygon mesh surfaces. It runs in parallel on multi-processors. It can also be used in conjunction with a k-d tree hierarchy, where approximate models and error terms are stored in the nodes of the tree, and approximate fast renderings can be created. We have extended our software to handle time-varying data where the data changes but the grid does not. We are now working on extending it to handle more general time-varying data. We have also developed a new extension of our direct volume renderer that uses automatic decimation of the 3D grid, as opposed to an explicit hierarchy. We explored this alternative approach as being more appropriate for very large data sets, where the extra expense of a tree may be unacceptable. We also describe a new approach to direct volume rendering using hardware 3D textures and incorporates lighting effects. Volume rendering using hardware 3D textures is extremely fast, and machines capable of using this technique are becoming more moderately priced. While this technique, at present, is limited to use with regular grids, we are pursuing possible algorithms extending the approach to more general grid types. We have also begun to explore a new method for determining the accuracy of approximate models based on the light field method described at ACM SIGGRAPH '96. In our initial implementation, we automatically image the volume from 32 equi-distant positions on the surface of an enclosing tessellated sphere. We then calculate differences between these images under different conditions of volume approximation or decimation. We are studying whether this will give a quantitative measure of the effects of approximation. We have created new tools for exploring the differences between images produced by various rendering methods. Images created by our software can be stored in the SGI RGB format. Our idtools software reads in pair of images and compares them using various metrics. The differences of the images using the RGB, HSV, and HSL color models can be calculated and shown. We can also calculate the auto-correlation function and the Fourier transform of the image and image differences. We will explore how these image differences compare in order to find useful metrics for quantifying the success of various visualization approaches. In general, progress was consistent with our research plan for the second year of the grant.

Wilhelms, Jane; VanGelder, Allen

1997-01-01

231

The Effective Use of Stations to Teach Elementary Students in a Small Classroom Setting About Cardiopulmonary Physiology - PhUn Week Poster Session EB 2011  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This poster describes a Physiology Understanding (PhUn) Week activity performed with 3rd and 5th grade elementary students in limited classroom space that demonstrated how the heart and lung work together to meet tissue demands. This poster was presented at the PhUn Week Poster Session, Experimental Biology 2011, by Michael J. Ryan, PhD, University of Mississippi Medical Center.

PhD Michael J Ryan (University of Mississippi Medical Center)

2011-05-07

232

c Copyright by YOJI YAMADA, 1995 DATA RELOCATION AND PREFETCHING FOR PROGRAMS WITH LARGE DATA SETS  

E-print Network

SETS BY YOJI YAMADA B.Engr., Tokyo Institute of Technology, 1980 M.Engr., Tokyo Institute of Technology the nancial support of Mazda Motor Corporation for my graduate study. Lastly, I would like to acknowledge

Hwu, Wen-mei W.

233

A Study of Classroom Response System Clickers: Increasing Student Engagement and Performance in a Large Undergraduate Lecture Class on Architectural Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the effectiveness of a classroom response system (CRS) and architecture students' perceptions of real-time feedback. CRS is designed to increase active engagement of students by their responses to a question or prompt via wireless keypads. Feedback is immediately portrayed on a classroom projector for discussion. The authors…

Bachman, Leonard; Bachman, Christine

2011-01-01

234

The learning environment in clicker classrooms: student processes of learning and involvement in large university?level courses using student response systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

To explore what social and educational infrastructure is needed to support classroom use of student response systems (Roschelle et al., 2004), this study investigated the ways in which student characteristics and course design choices were related to students’ assessments of the contribution of clicker use to their learning and involvement in the classroom. Survey responses of over 1500 undergraduates enrolled

April R. Trees; Michele H. Jackson

2007-01-01

235

Flexible Classroom Furniture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom design for the 21st-century learning environment should accommodate a variety of learning skills and needs. The space should be large enough so it can be configured to accommodate a number of learning activities. This also includes furniture that provides flexibility and accommodates collaboration and interactive work among students and…

Kim Hassell,

2011-01-01

236

Inclusive Classrooms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Five Standards-based strategies for successful inclusion of special-needs students in the secondary science classroom are described in this article. Use a multisensory approach; encourage collaboration among students; provide specific expectations and ass

Konstantinos Alexakos

2001-03-01

237

Classroom Wildlife.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A game is used to study population control factors on a wolf pack and to explore human competition with these animals. A game board and chance cards to be photocopied for use in the classroom are provided. (DH)

Fleer, Daryl

1984-01-01

238

Classroom Catapults  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"Wow, our plastic load flew 540 centimeters! This is so cool!" An interdisciplinary unit on catapults was responsible for the excitement and enthusiasm generated in the author's classroom. In their social studies class, students learned about the Middle A

Diane D. Villano

2001-02-01

239

Large Carnivore Management in a MultiLevel Institutional Setting: Problems and Prospects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of the large carnivore policies in Finland, Norway and Sweden (Fennoscandia) is to establish sustainable management of the four large (mammal) carnivores; bear ( ursus arctos ), wolf ( canis lupus ), lynx ( lynx lynx ) wolverine ( gulo gulo ) but also the golden eagle ( aquila chrysaetos ). Since this is clearly in conflict with

Camilla Sandström; Jani Pellikka

240

Classroom Triangles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students use bearing measurements to triangulate and determine objects' locations. Working in teams of two or three, they must put on their investigative hats as they take bearing measurements to specified landmarks in their classroom (or other rooms in the school) from a "mystery location." With the extension activity, students are challenged with creating their own maps of the classroom or other school location and comparing them with their classmates' efforts.

2014-09-18

241

Classroom Triangles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students will use bearing measurements to triangulate and determine objects' locations. Working in teams of two or three, students must put on their investigative hats as they take bearing measurements to specified landmarks in their classroom (or other rooms in the school) from a mystery location. With the extension activity, students are challenged with creating their own map of the classroom or other school location and comparing it with their classmates' efforts.

Matt Lippis

2006-01-01

242

Caught you: threats to confidentiality due to the public release of large-scale genetic data sets  

PubMed Central

Background Large-scale genetic data sets are frequently shared with other research groups and even released on the Internet to allow for secondary analysis. Study participants are usually not informed about such data sharing because data sets are assumed to be anonymous after stripping off personal identifiers. Discussion The assumption of anonymity of genetic data sets, however, is tenuous because genetic data are intrinsically self-identifying. Two types of re-identification are possible: the "Netflix" type and the "profiling" type. The "Netflix" type needs another small genetic data set, usually with less than 100 SNPs but including a personal identifier. This second data set might originate from another clinical examination, a study of leftover samples or forensic testing. When merged to the primary, unidentified set it will re-identify all samples of that individual. Even with no second data set at hand, a "profiling" strategy can be developed to extract as much information as possible from a sample collection. Starting with the identification of ethnic subgroups along with predictions of body characteristics and diseases, the asthma kids case as a real-life example is used to illustrate that approach. Summary Depending on the degree of supplemental information, there is a good chance that at least a few individuals can be identified from an anonymized data set. Any re-identification, however, may potentially harm study participants because it will release individual genetic disease risks to the public. PMID:21190545

2010-01-01

243

Development and characterization of a large set of microsatellite markers in grapevine ( Vitis vinifera L.) suitable for multiplex PCR  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite their numerous advantages, the use of microsatellites as genetic markers could be limited because of the low number of loci that can be simultaneously analysed per experiment. To increase the information per simple sequence repeat (SSR) assay in the grapevine, we developed a large set of new markers suitable for multiplexing and multi-loading. We produced microsatellite motif-enriched genomic libraries

Didier Merdinoglu; Giséle Butterlin; Lucie Bevilacqua; Vincent Chiquet; Anne-Françoise Adam-Blondon; Stéphane Decroocq

2005-01-01

244

Projected Sequential Gaussian Processes: A C++ tool for interpolation of large data sets with heterogeneous noise$  

E-print Network

, Universidad de Talca, Camino Los Niches Km. 1, Curicó, Chile cFaculty of Mathematics and Informatics, Babe. In the context of a large monitoring network, the network infrastructure is often based on many existing smaller

Oakley, Jeremy

245

Hager-Zhang Active Set Algorithm for Large-Scale Continuous ...  

E-print Network

ods to solve knapsack problems, while preserving their efficiency and ... ods to solve large-scale linearly constrained optimization problems with the following structure ... [2009] extended the affine-scaling interior-point CBB method. [Hager et ...

R.Tavakoli

2009-09-17

246

Biff (Bloom Filter) Codes: Fast Error Correction for Large Data Sets  

E-print Network

are low-density parity- check codes; they are similar to Tornado codes, but are designed for errors that are designed for large data. We also show why other approaches (such as Reed-Solomon Codes or Tornado codes

Mitzenmacher, Michael

247

STRESSOR DATA SETS FOR STUDYING SPECIES DIVERSITY AT LARGE SPATIAL SCALES  

EPA Science Inventory

There is increasing scientific and societal concern over the impact of anthropogenic activities (e.g., habitat destruction, pollution) on biodiversity. he impact of anthropogenic activities on biodiversity is generally recognized as a global phenomenon. t large spatial scales, se...

248

Tolerance Rough Set Theory Based Data Summarization for Clustering Large Datasets  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Finding clusters in large datasets is an interesting challenge in many fields of Science and Technology. Many clustering methods\\u000a have been successfully developed over the years. However, most of the existing clustering methods need multiple data scans\\u000a to get converged. Therefore, these methods cannot be applied for cluster analysis in large datasets. Data summarization can\\u000a be used as a pre-processing

Bidyut Patra; Sukumar Nandi

249

San Fermín: Aggregating Large Data Sets Using a Binomial Swap Forest  

Microsoft Academic Search

San Ferm´õn is a system for aggregating large amounts of data from the nodes of large-scale distributed systems. Each San Ferm´õn node individually computes the aggre- gated result by swapping data with other nodes to dy- namically create its own binomial tree. Nodes that fall behind aborttheirtrees, therebyreducing overhead. Hav- ing each node create its own binomial tree makes San

Justin Cappos; John H. Hartman

2008-01-01

250

Letter-Value Box Plots - adjusting box plots for large data sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conventional boxplots (Tukey 1977) are useful displays for conveying rough information about the central 50% of the data and the extent of the data. For moderate-sized data sets (n < 1000), detailed estimates of tail behavior beyond the quartiles may not be trustworthy, so the information provided by boxplots is appropriately somewhat vague beyond the quartiles, and the expected number

Heike Hofmann; Karen Kafadar; Hadley Wickham

2006-01-01

251

Fast SVM Training Algorithm with Decomposition on Very Large Data Sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Training a support vector machine on a data set of huge size with thousands of classes is a challenging problem. This paper proposes an efficient algorithm to solve this problem. The key idea is to introduce a parallel optimization step to quickly remove most of the nonsupport vectors, where block diagonal matrices are used to approximate the original kernel matrix

Jian-xiong Dong; Adam Krzyzak; Ching Y. Suen

2005-01-01

252

Strategy Training in a Task-Based Language Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent literature that examines the implementation of task-based language teaching (TBLT) in classroom settings has reported various challenges related to educational cultures, classroom management, teacher cognition and learner perceptions. To facilitate the smooth transition of TBLT from laboratory settings to classroom contexts, measures need…

Lai, Chun; Lin, Xiaolin

2015-01-01

253

Teaching Cell Biology in the Large-Enrollment Classroom: Methods to Promote Analytical Thinking and Assessment of Their Effectiveness  

PubMed Central

A large-enrollment, undergraduate cellular biology lecture course is described whose primary goal is to help students acquire skill in the interpretation of experimental data. The premise is that this kind of analytical reasoning is not intuitive for most people and, in the absence of hands-on laboratory experience, will not readily develop unless instructional methods and examinations specifically designed to foster it are employed. Promoting scientific thinking forces changes in the roles of both teacher and student. We describe didactic strategies that include directed practice of data analysis in a workshop format, active learning through verbal and written communication, visualization of abstractions diagrammatically, and the use of ancillary small-group mentoring sessions with faculty. The implications for a teacher in reducing the breadth and depth of coverage, becoming coach instead of lecturer, and helping students to diagnose cognitive weaknesses are discussed. In order to determine the efficacy of these strategies, we have carefully monitored student performance and have demonstrated a large gain in a pre- and posttest comparison of scores on identical problems, improved test scores on several successive midterm examinations when the statistical analysis accounts for the relative difficulty of the problems, and higher scores in comparison to students in a control course whose objective was information transfer, not acquisition of reasoning skills. A novel analytical index (student mobility profile) is described that demonstrates that this improvement was not random, but a systematic outcome of the teaching/learning strategies employed. An assessment of attitudes showed that, in spite of finding it difficult, students endorse this approach to learning, but also favor curricular changes that would introduce an analytical emphasis earlier in their training. PMID:14506506

Kitchen, Elizabeth; Bell, John D.; Reeve, Suzanne; Sudweeks, Richard R.; Bradshaw, William S.

2003-01-01

254

Learning through Discussions: Comparing the Benefits of Small-Group and Large-Class Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The literature on teaching and learning heralds the benefits of discussion for student learner outcomes, especially its ability to improve students' critical thinking skills. Yet, few studies compare the effects of different types of face-to-face discussions on learners. Using student surveys, we analyze the benefits of small-group and large-class…

Pollock, Philip H.; Hamann, Kerstin; Wilson, Bruce M.

2011-01-01

255

Number Bias for the Discrimination of Large Visual Sets in Infancy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This brief report attempts to resolve the claim that infants preferentially attend to continuous variables over number [e.g. Psychol. Sci. 10 (1999) 408; Cognit. Psychol.44 (2002) 33] with the finding that when continuous variables are controlled, infants as young as 6-months of age discriminate large numerical values [e.g. Psychol. Sci. 14 (2003)…

Brannon, Elizabeth M.; Abbott, Sara; Lutz, Donna J.

2004-01-01

256

Design of Availability-Dependent Distributed Services in Large-Scale Uncooperative Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Thesis Statement: "Availability-dependent global predicates can be efficiently and scalably realized for a class of distributed services, in spite of specific selfish and colluding behaviors, using local and decentralized protocols". Several types of large-scale distributed systems spanning the Internet have to deal with availability variations…

Morales, Ramses Victor

2009-01-01

257

The PRRS Host Genomic Consortium (PHGC) Database: Management of large data sets.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In any consortium project where large amounts of phenotypic and genotypic data are collected across several research labs, issues arise with maintenance and analysis of datasets. The PRRS Host Genomic Consortium (PHGC) Database was developed to meet this need for the PRRS research community. The sch...

258

Identifying the full set of transcripts --including large and small RNAs, novel transcripts from unannotated  

E-print Network

, in which both strands are sequenced, RNA-seq experi- ments can be strand-specific. Transcriptome assemblers for a comprehensive study of the transcriptome. For a long time, our knowledge of the transcriptome was largely. Recently, however, whole- transcriptome sequencing using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies

259

Biaxial box plots and ordered trial ranks for visualizing large sets of experimental results  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a novel method for visualizing large experimental datasets called a Biaxial Box Plot which provides both an easily read general impression of the results that highlights performance trends whilst also allowing for careful comparison of individual results. The Biaxial Box Plot is compared against heatmaps and traditional box plots where it is argued that the new method

Kent McClymont

2012-01-01

260

iScout: An Intelligent Scout for Accessing and Navigating Large Image Sets in a PACS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new software tool for PACS, called iScout (intelligent scout), has been developed and optimized for a radiology workstation. The purpose of iScout is to display an overview of a large image series, allowing the user to select images for priority downloading from a PACS server to a PACS workstation. This allows radiologists to reduce the delays that are associated

Adam Weathermon; Jonathan Tsui; Robert Rohling

2004-01-01

261

Efficient and Accurate Label Propagation on Large Graphs and Label Sets Michele Covell and Shumeet Baluja  

E-print Network

nodes, starting from partial information and a weighted- connection graph. In their work on video propagation across weighted graphs of nodes [1,2,3,4,5,6]. These applications share the characteristics of having a limited amount of label data, often of uneven quality, associated with a large graph of weighted

Tomkins, Andrew

262

High-throughput film-densitometry: An efficient approach to generate large data sets  

SciTech Connect

A film-handling machine (robot) has been built which can, in conjunction with a commercially available film densitometer, exchange and digitize over 300 electron micrographs per day. Implementation of robotic film handling effectively eliminates the delay and tedium associated with digitizing images when data are initially recorded on photographic film. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of the commercially available densitometer is significantly worse than that of a high-end, scientific microdensitometer. Nevertheless, its signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) is quite excellent, allowing substantial restoration of the output to ''near-to-perfect'' performance. Due to the large area of the standard electron microscope film that can be digitized by the commercial densitometer (up to 10,000 x 13,680 pixels with an appropriately coded holder), automated film digitization offers a fast and inexpensive alternative to high-end CCD cameras as a means of acquiring large amounts of image data in electron microscopy.

Typke, Dieter; Nordmeyer, Robert A.; Jones, Arthur; Lee, Juyoung; Avila-Sakar, Agustin; Downing, Kenneth H.; Glaeser, Robert M.

2004-07-14

263

iScout: an intelligent scout for accessing and navigating large image sets in a PACS.  

PubMed

A new software tool for PACS, called iScout (intelligent scout), has been developed and optimized for a radiology workstation. The purpose of iScout is to display an overview of a large image series, allowing the user to select images for priority downloading from a PACS server to a PACS workstation. This allows radiologists to reduce the delays that are associated with downloading hundreds or even thousands of images. Several schemes that semiautomatically manage the download process are presented along with tests to measure performance. The results of the tests confirm that priority downloading provides faster access to images in large image series and that the time savings increase in proportion to the study size. PMID:15156356

Weathermon, Adam; Tsui, Jonathan; Rohling, Robert

2004-06-01

264

A metric multidimensional scaling method for large objects sets and its Monte Carlo evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multidimensional scaling (MDS) techniques always pose the problem of analysing a large number n of points, without collecting all (N(N-1))\\/2 possible interstimuli dissimilarities and while keeping satisfactory solutions. In the case of metric MDS it was found that a theoretical minimum of appropriate 2N-3 exact Euclidean distances are sufficient for the unique representation of N points in a 2-dimensional Euclidean

L. Tsogo; M. H. Masson; A. Bardot

1997-01-01

265

Inference of higher-order relationships in the cycads from a large chloroplast data set  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated higher-order relationships in the cycads, an ancient group of seed-bearing plants, by examining a large portion of the chloroplast genome from seven species chosen to exemplify our current understanding of taxonomic diversity in the order. The regions considered span ?13.5kb of unaligned data per taxon, and comprise a diverse range of coding sequences, introns and intergenic spacers dispersed

Hardeep S. Rai; Heath E. O’Brien; Patrick A. Reeves; Richard G. Olmstead; Sean W. Graham

2003-01-01

266

Parallel k-Means Clustering for Quantitative Ecoregion Delineation Using Large Data Sets  

SciTech Connect

Identification of geographic ecoregions has long been of interest to environmental scientists and ecologists for identifying regions of similar ecological and environmental conditions. Such classifications are important for predicting suitable species ranges, for stratification of ecological samples, and to help prioritize habitat preservation and remediation efforts. Hargrove and Hoffman (1999, 2009) have developed geographical spatio-temporal clustering algorithms and codes and have successfully applied them to a variety of environmental science domains, including ecological regionalization; environmental monitoring network design; analysis of satellite-, airborne-, and ground-based remote sensing, and climate model-model and model-measurement intercomparison. With the advances in state-of-the-art satellite remote sensing and climate models, observations and model outputs are available at increasingly high spatial and temporal resolutions. Long time series of these high resolution datasets are extremely large in size and growing. Analysis and knowledge extraction from these large datasets are not just algorithmic and ecological problems, but also pose a complex computational problem. This paper focuses on the development of a massively parallel multivariate geographical spatio-temporal clustering code for analysis of very large datasets using tens of thousands processors on one of the fastest supercomputers in the world.

Kumar, Jitendra [ORNL] [ORNL; Mills, Richard T [ORNL] [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL] [ORNL; HargroveJr., William Walter [USDA Forest Service

2011-01-01

267

Using large clinical data sets to infer pathogenicity for rare copy number variants in autism cohorts.  

PubMed

Copy number variants (CNVs) have a major role in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and several of these have reached statistical significance in case-control analyses. Nevertheless, current ASD cohorts are not large enough to detect very rare CNVs that may be causative or contributory (that is, risk alleles). Here, we use a tiered approach, in which clinically significant CNVs are first identified in large clinical cohorts of neurodevelopmental disorders (including but not specific to ASD), after which these CNVs are then systematically identified within well-characterized ASD cohorts. We focused our initial analysis on 48 recurrent CNVs (segmental duplication-mediated 'hotspots') from 24 loci in 31?516 published clinical cases with neurodevelopmental disorders and 13?696 published controls, which yielded a total of 19 deletion CNVs and 11 duplication CNVs that reached statistical significance. We then investigated the overlap of these 30 CNVs in a combined sample of 3955 well-characterized ASD cases from three published studies. We identified 73 deleterious recurrent CNVs, including 36 deletions from 11 loci and 37 duplications from seven loci, for a frequency of 1 in 54; had we considered the ASD cohorts alone, only 58 CNVs from eight loci (24 deletions from three loci and 34 duplications from five loci) would have reached statistical significance. In conclusion, until there are sufficiently large ASD research cohorts with enough power to detect very rare causative or contributory CNVs, data from larger clinical cohorts can be used to infer the likely clinical significance of CNVs in ASD. PMID:23044707

Moreno-De-Luca, D; Sanders, S J; Willsey, A J; Mulle, J G; Lowe, J K; Geschwind, D H; State, M W; Martin, C L; Ledbetter, D H

2013-10-01

268

MUSI: an integrated system for identifying multiple specificity from very large peptide or nucleic acid data sets  

PubMed Central

Peptide recognition domains and transcription factors play crucial roles in cellular signaling. They bind linear stretches of amino acids or nucleotides, respectively, with high specificity. Experimental techniques that assess the binding specificity of these domains, such as microarrays or phage display, can retrieve thousands of distinct ligands, providing detailed insight into binding specificity. In particular, the advent of next-generation sequencing has recently increased the throughput of such methods by several orders of magnitude. These advances have helped reveal the presence of distinct binding specificity classes that co-exist within a set of ligands interacting with the same target. Here, we introduce a software system called MUSI that can rapidly analyze very large data sets of binding sequences to determine the relevant binding specificity patterns. Our pipeline provides two major advances. First, it can detect previously unrecognized multiple specificity patterns in any data set. Second, it offers integrated processing of very large data sets from next-generation sequencing machines. The results are visualized as multiple sequence logos describing the different binding preferences of the protein under investigation. We demonstrate the performance of MUSI by analyzing recent phage display data for human SH3 domains as well as microarray data for mouse transcription factors. PMID:22210894

Kim, TaeHyung; Tyndel, Marc S.; Huang, Haiming; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Bader, Gary D.; Gfeller, David; Kim, Philip M.

2012-01-01

269

SeqPig: simple and scalable scripting for large sequencing data sets in Hadoop  

PubMed Central

Summary: Hadoop MapReduce-based approaches have become increasingly popular due to their scalability in processing large sequencing datasets. However, as these methods typically require in-depth expertise in Hadoop and Java, they are still out of reach of many bioinformaticians. To solve this problem, we have created SeqPig, a library and a collection of tools to manipulate, analyze and query sequencing datasets in a scalable and simple manner. SeqPigscripts use the Hadoop-based distributed scripting engine Apache Pig, which automatically parallelizes and distributes data processing tasks. We demonstrate SeqPig’s scalability over many computing nodes and illustrate its use with example scripts. Availability and Implementation: Available under the open source MIT license at http://sourceforge.net/projects/seqpig/ Contact: andre.schumacher@yahoo.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24149054

Schumacher, André; Pireddu, Luca; Niemenmaa, Matti; Kallio, Aleksi; Korpelainen, Eija; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Heljanko, Keijo

2014-01-01

270

Setting up a Rayleigh Scattering Based Flow Measuring System in a Large Nozzle Testing Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A molecular Rayleigh scattering based air density measurement system has been built in a large nozzle testing facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The technique depends on the light scattering by gas molecules present in air; no artificial seeding is required. Light from a single mode, continuous wave laser was transmitted to the nozzle facility by optical fiber, and light scattered by gas molecules, at various points along the laser beam, is collected and measured by photon-counting electronics. By placing the laser beam and collection optics on synchronized traversing units, the point measurement technique is made effective for surveying density variation over a cross-section of the nozzle plume. Various difficulties associated with dust particles, stray light, high noise level and vibration are discussed. Finally, a limited amount of data from an underexpanded jet are presented and compared with expected variations to validate the technique.

Panda, Jayanta; Gomez, Carlos R.

2002-01-01

271

A hybrid structure for the storage and manipulation of very large spatial data sets  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The map data input and output problem for geographic information systems is rapidly diminishing with the increasing availability of mass digitizing, direct spatial data capture and graphics hardware based on raster technology. Although a large number of efficient raster-based algorithms exist for performing a wide variety of common tasks on these data, there are a number of procedures which are more efficiently performed in vector mode or for which raster mode equivalents of current vector-based techniques have not yet been developed. This paper presents a hybrid spatial data structure, named the ?vaster' structure, which can utilize the advantages of both raster and vector structures while potentially eliminating, or greatly reducing, the need for raster-to-vector and vector-to-raster conversion. Other advantages of the vaster structure are also discussed.

Peuquet, Donna J.

1982-01-01

272

Processing large sensor data sets for safeguards : the knowledge generation system.  

SciTech Connect

Modern nuclear facilities, such as reprocessing plants, present inspectors with significant challenges due in part to the sheer amount of equipment that must be safeguarded. The Sandia-developed and patented Knowledge Generation system was designed to automatically analyze large amounts of safeguards data to identify anomalous events of interest by comparing sensor readings with those expected from a process of interest and operator declarations. This paper describes a demonstration of the Knowledge Generation system using simulated accountability tank sensor data to represent part of a reprocessing plant. The demonstration indicated that Knowledge Generation has the potential to address several problems critical to the future of safeguards. It could be extended to facilitate remote inspections and trigger random inspections. Knowledge Generation could analyze data to establish trust hierarchies, to facilitate safeguards use of operator-owned sensors.

Thomas, Maikel A.; Smartt, Heidi Anne; Matthews, Robert F.

2012-04-01

273

Data Mining on Large Data Set for Predicting Salmon Spawning Habitat  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic properties related to river flow affect salmon spawning habitat. Accurate prediction of salmon spawning habitat and understanding the influential properties on the spawning behavior are of great interest for hydroelectric dam management. Previous research predicted salmon spawning habitat through deriving river specific spawning suitability indices and employing a function estimate method like logistic regression on several static river flow related properties and had some success. The objective of this study was two-fold. First dynamic river flow properties associated with upstream dam operation were successfully derived from a huge set of time series of both water velocity and water depth for about one fifth of a million habitat cells through principal component analysis (PCA) using nonlinear iterative partial least squares (NIPLAS). The inclusion of dynamic variables in the models greatly improved the model prediction. Secondly, nine machine learning methods were applied to the data and it was found that decision tree and rule induction methods were generally outperformed usually used logistic regression. Specifically random forest, an advanced decision tree algorithm, provided unanimous better results. Over-prediction problem in previous studies were greatly alleviated.

Xie, YuLong; Murray, Christopher J.; Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Geist, David R.

2008-07-01

274

"Just Don't": The Suppression and Invitation of Dialogue in the Mathematics Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responding to concerns raised by grade 11 mathematics students, we examined a broad set of mathematics classroom transcripts from multiple teachers to examine how the word "just" was and could be used to suppress and invite dialogue. We used corpus linguistics tools to process and quantify the large body of text, not to describe the nature of the…

Wagner, David; Herbel-Eisenmann, Beth

2008-01-01

275

Classroom Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are described: (1) "Sequences of Definite Integrals" by T. Dana-Picard; (2) "Structural Analysis of Pythagorean Monoids" by M.-Q Zhan and J. Tong; (3) "A Random Walk Phenomenon under an Interesting Stopping Rule" by S. Chakraborty; (4) "On Some Confidence Intervals for Estimating the…

International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

2007-01-01

276

Classroom Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without…

International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

2007-01-01

277

Classroom Tips.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes five classroom activities or projects used in Canadian social studies classes. Includes discussions of the use of artifacts, a field trip to Spain, a simulation of the Earth Summit meeting, and the application of mahatma Gandhi's philosophy to current problems. (CFR)

Stevens, Jacqueline; And Others

1993-01-01

278

Classroom Tech  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features the latest classroom technologies namely the FLY Pentop, WriteToLearn, and a new iris scan identification system. The FLY Pentop is a computerized pen from Leapster that "magically" understands what kids write and draw on special FLY paper. WriteToLearn is an automatic grading software from Pearson Knowledge Technologies and…

Instructor, 2006

2006-01-01

279

Jigsaw Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Jigsaw Classroom is a website for the jigsaw cooperative learning technique that strives to reduce racial conflict, promote better learning, improve motivation, and increase the enjoyment of the learning experience among school children. The website includes an overview of jigsaw techniques, jigsaw history, implementing tips, related books and articles, and links on cooperative learning, school violence, and jigsaw developer Elliot Aronson.

Elliot Aronson

280

Classroom Antarctica  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As part of the Australian Antarctic Division, Classroom Antarctica gives dozens of downloadable Adobe Acrobat files that allow students to discover this unique continent. Subjects include the history of the scientific research undertaken on Antarctica, surviving its climate, its biological ecosystem, the land's physical characteristics and affects on climate, and much more.

1969-12-31

281

Hepatitis C virus testing perspectives among primary care physicians in four large primary care settings.  

PubMed

Background. In 1998, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published Recommendations for Prevention and Control of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection and HCV-Related Chronic Disease, recommending HCV testing for populations most likely to be infected with HCV. However, the implementation of risk-based screening has not been widely adopted in health care settings, and 45% to 85% of infected U.S. adults remain unidentified. Objectives. To develop a better understanding of why CDC's 1998 recommendations have had limited success in identifying persons with HCV infection and provide information about how CDC's 2012 Recommendations for the Identification of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection Among Persons Born During 1945-1965 may be implemented more effectively. Design. Qualitative data were collected and analyzed from a multidisciplinary team as part of the Birth Cohort Evaluation to Advance Screening and Testing for Hepatitis C project. Respondents. Nineteen providers were asked open-ended questions to identify current perspectives, practices, facilitators, and barriers to HCV screening and testing. Providers were affiliated with Henry Ford Hospital, Mount Sinai Hospital, the University of Alabama, and the University of Texas Health Science Center. Results. Respondents reported the complexity of the 1998 recommendations, and numerous indicated risk factors were major barriers to effective implementation. Other hindrances to hepatitis C testing included physician discomfort in asking questions about socially undesirable behaviors and physician uncertainty about patient insurance coverage. Conclusion. Implementation of the CDC's 2012 recommendations could be more successful than the 1998 recommendations due to their relative simplicity; however, effective strategies need to be used for dissemination and implementation for full success. PMID:24776636

Jewett, Amy; Garg, Arika; Meyer, Katherine; Wagner, Laura Danielle; Krauskopf, Katherine; Brown, Kimberly A; Pan, Jen-Jung; Massoud, Omar; Smith, Bryce D; Rein, David B

2015-03-01

282

Mining unusual and rare stellar spectra from large spectroscopic survey data sets using the outlier-detection method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The large number of spectra obtained from sky surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the survey executed by the Large sky Area Multi-Object fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also called GuoShouJing Telescope) provide us with opportunities to search for peculiar or even unknown types of spectra. In response to the limitations of existing methods, a novel outlier-mining method, the Monte Carlo Local Outlier Factor (MCLOF), is proposed in this paper, which can be used to highlight unusual and rare spectra from large spectroscopic survey data sets. The MCLOF method exposes outliers automatically and efficiently by marking each spectrum with a number, i.e. using outlier index as a flag for an unusual and rare spectrum. The Local Outlier Factor (LOF) represents how unusual and rare a spectrum is compared with other spectra and the Monte Carlo method is used to compute the global LOF for each spectrum by randomly selecting samples in each independent iteration. Our MCLOF method is applied to over half a million stellar spectra (classified as STAR by the SDSS Pipeline) from the SDSS data release 8 (DR8) and a total of 37 033 spectra are selected as outliers with signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) ? 3 and outlier index ?0.85. Some of these outliers are shown to be binary stars, emission-line stars, carbon stars and stars with unusual continuum. The results show that our proposed method can efficiently highlight these unusual spectra from the survey data sets. In addition, some relatively rare and interesting spectra are selected, indicating that the proposed method can also be used to mine rare, even unknown, spectra. The proposed method can be applicable not only to spectral survey data sets but also to other types of survey data sets. The spectra of all peculiar objects selected by our MCLOF method are available from a user-friendly website: http://sciwiki.lamost.org/Miningdr8/.

Wei, Peng; Luo, Ali; Li, Yinbi; Pan, Jingchang; Tu, Liangping; Jiang, Bin; Kong, Xiao; Shi, Zhixin; Yi, Zhenping; Wang, Fengfei; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Yongheng

2013-05-01

283

"Tools For Analysis and Visualization of Large Time- Varying CFD Data Sets"  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the four years of this grant (including the one year extension), we have explored many aspects of the visualization of large CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) datasets. These have included new direct volume rendering approaches, hierarchical methods, volume decimation, error metrics, parallelization, hardware texture mapping, and methods for analyzing and comparing images. First, we implemented an extremely general direct volume rendering approach that can be used to render rectilinear, curvilinear, or tetrahedral grids, including overlapping multiple zone grids, and time-varying grids. Next, we developed techniques for associating the sample data with a k-d tree, a simple hierarchial data model to approximate samples in the regions covered by each node of the tree, and an error metric for the accuracy of the model. We also explored a new method for determining the accuracy of approximate models based on the light field method described at ACM SIGGRAPH (Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Computer Graphics) '96. In our initial implementation, we automatically image the volume from 32 approximately evenly distributed positions on the surface of an enclosing tessellated sphere. We then calculate differences between these images under different conditions of volume approximation or decimation.

Wilhelms, Jane; vanGelder, Allen

1999-01-01

284

Can Wide Consultation Help with Setting Priorities for Large-Scale Biodiversity Monitoring Programs?  

PubMed Central

Climate and other global change phenomena affecting biodiversity require monitoring to track ecosystem changes and guide policy and management actions. Designing a biodiversity monitoring program is a difficult task that requires making decisions that often lack consensus due to budgetary constrains. As monitoring programs require long-term investment, they also require strong and continuing support from all interested parties. As such, stakeholder consultation is key to identify priorities and make sound design decisions that have as much support as possible. Here, we present the results of a consultation conducted to serve as an aid for designing a large-scale biodiversity monitoring program for the province of Québec (Canada). The consultation took the form of a survey with 13 discrete choices involving tradeoffs in respect to design priorities and 10 demographic questions (e.g., age, profession). The survey was sent to thousands of individuals having expected interests and knowledge about biodiversity and was completed by 621 participants. Overall, consensuses were few and it appeared difficult to create a design fulfilling the priorities of the majority. Most participants wanted 1) a monitoring design covering the entire territory and focusing on natural habitats; 2) a focus on species related to ecosystem services, on threatened and on invasive species. The only demographic characteristic that was related to the type of prioritization was the declared level of knowledge in biodiversity (null to high), but even then the influence was quite small. PMID:25525798

Boivin, Frédéric; Simard, Anouk; Peres-Neto, Pedro

2014-01-01

285

Analysis of a large set of color spaces for skin pixel detection in color images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Human skin color is a powerful fundamental cue that can be used in particular, at an early stage, for the important applications of face and hand detection in color images, and ultimately, for meaningful human-computer interactions. In this paper, we analyze the distribution of human skin for a large number of three-dimensional (3-D) color spaces (or 2-D chrominance spaces) and for skin images recorded with two different camera systems. By use of seven different criteria, we show that mainly the normalized r-g and CIE-xy chrominance spaces, or spaces constructed as a suitable linear combination or as ratios of normalized r, g and b values, or a space normalized by ?R2+G2+B2, are consistently the most efficient for skin pixel detection and consequently, for image segmentation based on skin color. In particular, in these spaces the skin distribution can be modeled by a simple, single elliptical Gaussian, and it is most robust to a change of camera system.

Terrillon, Jean-Christophe; Pilpre, Arnaud; Niwa, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

2003-04-01

286

Inference of higher-order relationships in the cycads from a large chloroplast data set.  

PubMed

We investigated higher-order relationships in the cycads, an ancient group of seed-bearing plants, by examining a large portion of the chloroplast genome from seven species chosen to exemplify our current understanding of taxonomic diversity in the order. The regions considered span approximately 13.5 kb of unaligned data per taxon, and comprise a diverse range of coding sequences, introns and intergenic spacers dispersed throughout the plastid genome. Our results provide substantial support for most of the inferred backbone of cycad phylogeny, and weak evidence that the sister-group of the cycads among living seed plants is Ginkgo biloba. Cycas (representing Cycadaceae) is the sister-group of the remaining cycads; Dioon is part of the next most basal split. Two of the three commonly recognized families of cycads (Zamiaceae and Stangeriaceae) are not monophyletic; Stangeria is embedded within Zamiaceae, close to Zamia and Ceratozamia, and not closely allied to the other genus of Stangeriaceae, Bowenia. In contrast to the other seed plants, cycad chloroplast genomes share two features with Ginkgo: a reduced rate of evolution and an elevated transition:transversion ratio. We demonstrate that the latter aspect of their molecular evolution is unlikely to have affected inference of cycad relationships in the context of seed-plant wide analyses. PMID:13678689

Rai, Hardeep S; O'Brien, Heath E; Reeves, Patrick A; Olmstead, Richard G; Graham, Sean W

2003-11-01

287

A direct iterative-variational method for solving large sets of linear algebraic equations  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a direct iterative-variational technique for solving large systems of linear equations: Ax = b, where N is the order of the matrix A and the length of the vectors x and b. The method, which has analogues in the conjugate gradient and Lanczos schemes as well as the direct configuration interaction procedures of quantum chemistry, involves the construction of an orthonormal basis from successive applications of the general linear algebraic (LA) matrix, A, to an initial guess for the solution vector. The solution vector is expanded in this basis, and the coefficients are determined from a variational prescription. For n iterations, the number of operations to solve the LA equations is of the order N/sup 2/n. Since the basis is orthonormal, the procedure is guaranteed to converge within N iterations, provided that the basis vectors remain linearly independent. In practice, the convergence is much more rapid (n << N). Another advantage of the method is that the whole matrix A need not be stored. In the more general case of multiple right-hand-sides (x and b, matrices), the method can be applied simultaneously to all of the solutions, thus saving many redundant operations that would arise from treating each column of x independently. We have applied the technique to the solution of LA systems that arise from converting radial coupled integrodifferential equations to an integral representation on a discrete quadrature, in particular, to a variety of problems for electron-atom and -molecule collisions. 21 refs.

Schneider, B.I.; Collins, L.A.

1988-01-01

288

The Viking viewer for connectomics: scalable multi-user annotation and summarization of large volume data sets  

PubMed Central

Modern microscope automation permits the collection of vast amounts of continuous anatomical imagery in both two and three dimensions. These large data sets present significant challenges for data storage, access, viewing, annotation and analysis. The cost and overhead of collecting and storing the data can be extremely high. Large data sets quickly exceed an individual's capability for timely analysis and present challenges in efficiently applying transforms, if needed. Finally annotated anatomical data sets can represent a significant investment of resources and should be easily accessible to the scientific community. The Viking application was our solution created to view and annotate a 16.5 TB ultrastructural retinal connectome volume and we demonstrate its utility in reconstructing neural networks for a distinctive retinal amacrine cell class. Viking has several key features. (1) It works over the internet using HTTP and supports many concurrent users limited only by hardware. (2) It supports a multi-user, collaborative annotation strategy. (3) It cleanly demarcates viewing and analysis from data collection and hosting. (4) It is capable of applying transformations in real-time. (5) It has an easily extensible user interface, allowing addition of specialized modules without rewriting the viewer. PMID:21118201

ANDERSON, JR; MOHAMMED, S; GRIMM, B; JONES, BW; KOSHEVOY, P; TASDIZEN, T; WHITAKER, R; MARC, RE

2011-01-01

289

Collaborative Classroom Management. Video to Accompany "A Biological Brain in a Cultural Classroom: Applying Biological Research to Classroom Management." [Videotape].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This 43-minute VHS videotape is designed to be used in course and workshop settings with "A Biological Brain in a Cultural Classroom: Applying Biological Research to Classroom Management." The videotape's principal values are as an introduction to the issues explored in the book and as a catalyst for group discussions and activities related to…

2001

290

Designing Websites for Displaying Large Data Sets and Images on Multiple Platforms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The desire to build websites to analyze and display ever increasing amounts of scientific data and images pushes for web site designs which utilize large displays, and to use the display area as efficiently as possible. Yet, scientists and users of their data are increasingly wishing to access these websites in the field and on mobile devices. This results in the need to develop websites that can support a wide range of devices and screen sizes, and to optimally use whatever display area is available. Historically, designers have addressed this issue by building two websites; one for mobile devices, and one for desktop environments, resulting in increased cost, duplicity of work, and longer development times. Recent advancements in web design technology and techniques have evolved which allow for the development of a single website that dynamically adjusts to the type of device being used to browse the website (smartphone, tablet, desktop). In addition they provide the opportunity to truly optimize whatever display area is available. HTML5 and CSS3 give web designers media query statements which allow design style sheets to be aware of the size of the display being used, and to format web content differently based upon the queried response. Web elements can be rendered in a different size, position, or even removed from the display entirely, based upon the size of the display area. Using HTML5/CSS3 media queries in this manner is referred to as "Responsive Web Design" (RWD). RWD in combination with technologies such as LESS and Twitter Bootstrap allow the web designer to build web sites which not only dynamically respond to the browser display size being used, but to do so in very controlled and intelligent ways, ensuring that good layout and graphic design principles are followed while doing so. At the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Alaska Satellite Facility SAR Data Center (ASF) recently redesigned their popular Vertex application and converted it from a traditional, fixed-layout website into a RWD site built on HTML5, LESS and Twitter Bootstrap. Vertex is a data portal for remotely sensed imagery of the earth, offering Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data products from the global ASF archive. By using Responsive Web Design, ASF is able to provide access to a massive collection of SAR imagery and allow the user to use mobile devices and desktops to maximum advantage. ASF's Vertex web site demonstrates that with increased interface flexibility, scientists, managers and users can increase their personal effectiveness by accessing data portals from their preferred device as their science dictates.

Anderson, A.; Wolf, V. G.; Garron, J.; Kirschner, M.

2012-12-01

291

Actual Versus Estimated Utility Factor of a Large Set of Privately Owned Chevrolet Volts  

SciTech Connect

In order to determine the overall fuel economy of a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), the amount of operation in charge depleting (CD) versus charge sustaining modes must be determined. Mode of operation is predominantly dependent on customer usage of the vehicle and is therefore highly variable. The utility factor (UF) concept was developed to quantify the distance a group of vehicles has traveled or may travel in CD mode. SAE J2841 presents a UF calculation method based on data collected from travel surveys of conventional vehicles. UF estimates have been used in a variety of areas, including the calculation of window sticker fuel economy, policy decisions, and vehicle design determination. The EV Project, a plug-in electric vehicle charging infrastructure demonstration being conducted across the United States, provides the opportunity to determine the real-world UF of a large group of privately owned Chevrolet Volt extended range electric vehicles. Using data collected from Volts enrolled in The EV Project, this paper compares the real-world UF of two groups of Chevrolet Volts to estimated UF's based on J2841. The actual observed fleet utility factors (FUF) for the MY2011/2012 and MY2013 Volt groups studied were observed to be 72% and 74%, respectively. Using the EPA CD ranges, the method prescribed by J2841 estimates a FUF of 65% and 68% for the MY2011/2012 and MY2013 Volt groups, respectively. Volt drivers achieved higher percentages of distance traveled in EV mode for two reasons. First, they had fewer long-distance travel days than drivers in the national travel survey referenced by J2841. Second, they charged more frequently than the J2841 assumption of once per day - drivers of Volts in this study averaged over 1.4 charging events per day. Although actual CD range varied widely as driving conditions varied, the average CD ranges for the two Volt groups studied matched the EPA CD range estimates, so CD range variation did not affect FUF results.

John Smart; Thomas Bradley; Stephen Schey

2014-04-01

292

Knowledge and Theme Discovery across Very Large Biological Data Sets Using Distributed Queries: A Prototype Combining Unstructured and Structured Data  

PubMed Central

As the discipline of biomedical science continues to apply new technologies capable of producing unprecedented volumes of noisy and complex biological data, it has become evident that available methods for deriving meaningful information from such data are simply not keeping pace. In order to achieve useful results, researchers require methods that consolidate, store and query combinations of structured and unstructured data sets efficiently and effectively. As we move towards personalized medicine, the need to combine unstructured data, such as medical literature, with large amounts of highly structured and high-throughput data such as human variation or expression data from very large cohorts, is especially urgent. For our study, we investigated a likely biomedical query using the Hadoop framework. We ran queries using native MapReduce tools we developed as well as other open source and proprietary tools. Our results suggest that the available technologies within the Big Data domain can reduce the time and effort needed to utilize and apply distributed queries over large datasets in practical clinical applications in the life sciences domain. The methodologies and technologies discussed in this paper set the stage for a more detailed evaluation that investigates how various data structures and data models are best mapped to the proper computational framework. PMID:24312478

Repetski, Stephen; Venkataraman, Girish; Che, Anney; Luke, Brian T.; Girard, F. Pascal; Stephens, Robert M.

2013-01-01

293

Encouraging "Math Talk" in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses ways for middle school teachers to encourage their students to discuss mathematical concepts in the classroom. Considers setting up the classroom environment to facilitate mathematics discussion, the role of the teacher, small group discussions, whole-class discussions, and student presentations. (JPB)

Cooke, Linda B.; Adams, Verna M.

1998-01-01

294

Application of Transcultural Themes in International Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effective use of transcultural themes and images may help promote positive resonance in international settings, such as found in the traditional and online classrooms of globalizing higher education. Findings of transculturally resonant themes and images may be applied to international classroom pedagogy through such means as multimedia…

Van Hook, Steven R.

2007-01-01

295

Classroom Assessment Techniques: Interviews  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page describes the technique of using interviews to assess student understanding. The assessment tool is one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. Interviews enable instructors to judge the extent of understanding students have developed with respect to a series of well-focused, conceptually-related scientific ideas. This site provides an overview of this assessment instrument including information about how to use classroom interviews to their maximum benefit. The site is also linked to a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use, as well as supplementary links and sources to further explore this assessment tool.

Mike U. Smith

296

Systemize Classroom Management to Enhance Teaching and Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Good classroom management is one of the most important goals teachers strive to establish from the first day of class. The rules, procedures, activities, and behaviors set the classroom tone throughout the school year. By revising, updating, and systemizing classroom management activities, teachers can eliminate many problems created by students…

Delman, Douglas J.

2011-01-01

297

Practical Classroom Applications of Language Experience: Looking Back, Looking Forward.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 38 essays in this book look back at language experience as an educational approach, provide practical classroom applications, and reconceptualize language experience as an overarching education process. Classroom teachers and reading specialists describe strategies in use in a variety of classroom settings and describe ways to integrate…

Nelson, Olga G., Ed.; Linek, Wayne M., Ed.

298

Promoting Active Involvement in Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a rationale for using active involvement techniques, describes large- and small-group methods based on their documented effectiveness and applicability to K-12 classrooms, and illustrates their use. These approaches include ways of engaging students in large groups (e.g., unison responses, response cards, dry-erase boards,…

Conderman, Greg; Bresnahan, Val; Hedin, Laura

2012-01-01

299

The Classroom Animal: Crickets.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests using crickets for classroom activities, providing background information on their anatomy and reproduction and tips on keeping individual organisms or a breeding colony in the classroom. (JN)

Kramer, David C.

1985-01-01

300

A new wavelet-based approach for the automated treatment of large sets of lunar occultation data  

E-print Network

The introduction of infrared arrays for lunar occultations (LO) work and the improvement of predictions based on new deep IR catalogues have resulted in a large increase in the number of observable occultations. We provide the means for an automated reduction of large sets of LO data. This frees the user from the tedious task of estimating first-guess parameters for the fit of each LO lightcurve. At the end of the process, ready-made plots and statistics enable the user to identify sources which appear to be resolved or binary and to initiate their detailed interactive analysis. The pipeline is tailored to array data, including the extraction of the lightcurves from FITS cubes. Because of its robustness and efficiency, the wavelet transform has been chosen to compute the initial guess of the parameters of the lightcurve fit. We illustrate and discuss our automatic reduction pipeline by analyzing a large volume of novel occultation data recorded at Calar Alto Observatory. The automated pipeline package is available from the authors.

O. Fors; A. Richichi; X. Otazu; J. Nunez

2008-01-14

301

Large-area land surface simulations in heterogeneous terrain driven by global data sets: application to mountain permafrost  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerical simulations of land surface processes are important in order to perform landscape-scale assessments of earth systems. This task is problematic in complex terrain due to (i) high-resolution grids required to capture strong lateral variability, and (ii) lack of meteorological forcing data where they are required. In this study we test a topography and climate processor, which is designed for use with large-area land surface simulation, in complex and remote terrain. The scheme is driven entirely by globally available data sets. We simulate air temperature, ground surface temperature and snow depth and test the model with a large network of measurements in the Swiss Alps. We obtain root-mean-squared error (RMSE) values of 0.64 °C for air temperature, 0.67-1.34 °C for non-bedrock ground surface temperature, and 44.5 mm for snow depth, which is likely affected by poor input precipitation field. Due to this we trial a simple winter precipitation correction method based on melt dates of the snowpack. We present a test application of the scheme in the context of simulating mountain permafrost. The scheme produces a permafrost estimate of 2000 km2, which compares well to published estimates. We suggest that this scheme represents a useful step in application of numerical models over large areas in heterogeneous terrain.

Fiddes, J.; Endrizzi, S.; Gruber, S.

2015-02-01

302

New Ways of Classroom Assessment. Revised  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this revised edition in the popular New Ways Series, teachers have once again been given an opportunity to show how they do assessment in their classrooms on an everyday basis. Often feeling helpless when confronted with large-scale standardized testing practices, teachers here offer classroom testing created with the direct aim of helping…

Brown, J. D., Ed.

2013-01-01

303

Creating Learning Communities in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are many ways to construct classroom-based learning communities. Nevertheless, the emphasis is always on cooperative learning. In this article, the authors focus on three teaching methods--interteaching, team-based learning, and cooperative learning in large, lecture-based courses--that they have used successfully to create classroom-based…

Saville, Bryan K.; Lawrence, Natalie Kerr; Jakobsen, Krisztina V.

2012-01-01

304

Classroom Antarctica  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website is a collection of units designed to teach students about the global importance of Antarctica. Topics covered in these units includes ice, the ocean, geology, weather, topography, auroras, the history of Antarctic exploration, living in Antarctica, animals, plants, the Antarctic Treaty, and the environment. Each unit has a selection of activities that are adaptable to the range of abilities in a class and the particular interests of the students. There are hundreds of useful web links throughout and a wealth of support material listed under Classroom Resources.

Elizabeth Haywood

305

Classroom Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

StarDate.org is the public education and outreach department of the University of Texas McDonald Observatory, which offers astronomy resources for teaches on their Classroom Activities site. The various projects are categorized by age and grade level including k-4, 5-8, and 9-12. Each provides a teachers guide, materials needed, a description of the process, any needed links (such as the StarDate Moon Phase Calculator within the Observing the Moon activity), and even printable versions of each lesson. Although not remarkable, the site does give teachers well designed and easy to accomplish activities which students should enjoy.

306

Student Perceptions of Classroom Achievement Goals as Predictors of Belonging and Content Instrumentality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of the current study was to examine the predictive relationships among a set of cognitive-motivational variables that have been found in previous studies to support academic achievement. Student perception of a classroom's achievement goal structure (classroom mastery, classroom performance-approach, classroom performance-avoidance) was…

Walker, Christopher O.

2012-01-01

307

Classroom Culture Promotes Academic Resiliency  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Resiliency is what propels many students to continue moving forward under difficult learning and life conditions. We intuitively think that such resilience is a character quality that cannot be taught. On the contrary, when a teacher sets the right conditions and culture for it in the classroom by teaching collaboration and communication skills,…

DiTullio, Gina

2014-01-01

308

New BAC probe set to narrow down chromosomal breakpoints in small and large derivative chromosomes, especially suited for mosaic conditions.  

PubMed

Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and/or array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) performed after initial banding cytogenetics is still the gold standard for detection of chromosomal rearrangements. Although aCGH provides a higher resolution, FISH has two main advantages over the array-based approaches: (1) it can be applied to characterize balanced as well as unbalanced rearrangements, whereas aCGH is restricted to unbalanced ones, and (2) chromosomal aberrations present in low level or complex mosaics can be characterized by FISH without any problems, while aCGH requires presence of over 50 % of aberrant cells in the sample for detection. Recently, a new FISH-based probe set was presented: the so-called pericentric-ladder-FISH (PCL-FISH) that enables characterization of chromosomal breakpoints especially in mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC). It can also be applied on large inborn or acquired derivative chromosomes. The main feature of this set is that the probes are applied in a chromosome-specific manner and they align along the chromosome in average intervals of ten megabasepairs. Hence PCL-FISH provides denser coverage and a more precise anchorage on the human DNA-sequence than most other FISH-banding approaches. PMID:25239752

Hamid, Ahmed B; Fan, Xiaobo; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Radhakrishnan, Gopakumar; Liehr, Thomas; Karamysheva, Tatyana

2015-01-01

309

Petascale Global Kinetic Simulations of The Magnetosphere and Visualization Strategies for Analysis of Very Large Multi-Variate Data Sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

3D global electromagnetic hybrid (fluid electrons, kinetic ions) simulations have long been considered the holy grail in kinetic modeling of the magnetosphere but high computational requirements have kept them out of reach. Petascale computers provide the computational power to make such simulations possible but peta computing poses two technical challenges. One is related to the development of efficient and scalable algorithms that can take advantage of the large number of cores. The second is related to knowledge extraction from the resulting simulation output. The challenge of science discovery from the extremely large data sets (˜ 200 TB from a single run) generated from global kinetic simulations is compounded by the multi-variate and "noisy" nature of the data. Here, we review our innovations to overcome both challenges. We have developed a highly scalable hybrid simulation code (H3D) that we used to perform the first petascale global kinetic simulation of the magnetosphere using 98,304 cores on the NSF Kraken supercomputer. To facilitate analysis of data from such runs, we have developed complex visualization pipeline including physics based algorithms to detect and track events of interest in the data. The effectiveness of this approach is illustrated through examples.

Karimabadi, H.; Loring, B.; Vu, H. X.; Omelchenko, Y.; Tatineni, M.; Majumdar, A.; Ayachit, U.; Geveci, B.

2011-10-01

310

Early Childhood/CDA Learning Modules: A Competency-Based Training Program for Classroom Personnel in Preschool Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This training manual for early childhood CDA candidates provides 21 learning modules on the following subjects: field trips, books, parent involvement, setting up the classroom, the role of play, creative expression (art), preschool science, cooking, self-image, large motor development, speaking and listening skills, daily program planning, small…

Beaty, Janice J.

311

Behavior Problems in Learning Activities and Social Interactions in Head Start Classrooms and Early Reading, Mathematics, and Approaches to Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relations between early problem behavior in preschool classrooms and a comprehensive set of school readiness outcomes were examined for a stratified random sample (N = 256) of 4-year-old children enrolled in a large, urban school district Head Start program. A series of multilevel models examined the unique contribution of early problem behavior…

Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca J.; Fernandez, Veronica; Dominguez, Ximena; Rouse, Heather L.

2011-01-01

312

Classroom Management and Teachers' Coping Strategies: Inside Classrooms in Australia, China and Israel  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the degree to which recently reported relationships between the classroom management techniques and coping styles of Australian teachers apply in two other national settings: China and Israel. Little is known about which teacher characteristics relate to their approach to classroom management, although researchers in Australia…

Romi, Shlomo; Lewis, Ramon; Roache, Joel

2013-01-01

313

WebViz:A Web-based Collaborative Interactive Visualization System for large-Scale Data Sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

WebViz is a web-based application designed to conduct collaborative, interactive visualizations of large data sets for multiple users, allowing researchers situated all over the world to utilize the visualization services offered by the University of Minnesota’s Laboratory for Computational Sciences and Engineering (LCSE). This ongoing project has been built upon over the last 3 1/2 years .The motivation behind WebViz lies primarily with the need to parse through an increasing amount of data produced by the scientific community as a result of larger and faster multicore and massively parallel computers coming to the market, including the use of general purpose GPU computing. WebViz allows these large data sets to be visualized online by anyone with an account. The application allows users to save time and resources by visualizing data ‘on the fly’, wherever he or she may be located. By leveraging AJAX via the Google Web Toolkit (http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/), we are able to provide users with a remote, web portal to LCSE's (http://www.lcse.umn.edu) large-scale interactive visualization system already in place at the University of Minnesota. LCSE’s custom hierarchical volume rendering software provides high resolution visualizations on the order of 15 million pixels and has been employed for visualizing data primarily from simulations in astrophysics to geophysical fluid dynamics . In the current version of WebViz, we have implemented a highly extensible back-end framework built around HTTP "server push" technology. The web application is accessible via a variety of devices including netbooks, iPhones, and other web and javascript-enabled cell phones. Features in the current version include the ability for users to (1) securely login (2) launch multiple visualizations (3) conduct collaborative visualization sessions (4) delegate control aspects of a visualization to others and (5) engage in collaborative chats with other users within the user interface of the web application. These features are all in addition to a full range of essential visualization functions including 3-D camera and object orientation, position manipulation, time-stepping control, and custom color/alpha mapping.

Yuen, D. A.; McArthur, E.; Weiss, R. M.; Zhou, J.; Yao, B.

2010-12-01

314

The Impact of Course Delivery Systems on Student Achievement and Sense of Community: A Comparison of Learning Community versus Stand-Alone Classroom Settings in an Open-Enrollment Inner City Public Community College  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the effects of two types of course delivery systems (learning community classroom environments versus stand-alone classroom environments) on the achievement of students who were simultaneously enrolled in remedial and college-level social science courses at an inner city open-enrollment public community college. This study was…

Bandyopadhyay, Pamela

2010-01-01

315

Revoicing Classrooms: A Spatial Manifesto  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Why is the physical learning environment in schools largely ignored by teachers within pedagogical practice? The cellular classroom has remained seemingly immutable since the Industrial Revolution, with spatiality playing a silent and subconscious role in schooling other than related to concerns around surveillance. Previous studies have shown…

Fisher, Kenn

2004-01-01

316

Simulation Studies as Designed Experiments: The Comparison of Penalized Regression Models in the “Large p, Small n” Setting  

PubMed Central

New algorithms are continuously proposed in computational biology. Performance evaluation of novel methods is important in practice. Nonetheless, the field experiences a lack of rigorous methodology aimed to systematically and objectively evaluate competing approaches. Simulation studies are frequently used to show that a particular method outperforms another. Often times, however, simulation studies are not well designed, and it is hard to characterize the particular conditions under which different methods perform better. In this paper we propose the adoption of well established techniques in the design of computer and physical experiments for developing effective simulation studies. By following best practices in planning of experiments we are better able to understand the strengths and weaknesses of competing algorithms leading to more informed decisions about which method to use for a particular task. We illustrate the application of our proposed simulation framework with a detailed comparison of the ridge-regression, lasso and elastic-net algorithms in a large scale study investigating the effects on predictive performance of sample size, number of features, true model sparsity, signal-to-noise ratio, and feature correlation, in situations where the number of covariates is usually much larger than sample size. Analysis of data sets containing tens of thousands of features but only a few hundred samples is nowadays routine in computational biology, where “omics” features such as gene expression, copy number variation and sequence data are frequently used in the predictive modeling of complex phenotypes such as anticancer drug response. The penalized regression approaches investigated in this study are popular choices in this setting and our simulations corroborate well established results concerning the conditions under which each one of these methods is expected to perform best while providing several novel insights. PMID:25289666

Chaibub Neto, Elias; Bare, J. Christopher; Margolin, Adam A.

2014-01-01

317

Joint Conference on Standard Setting for Large-Scale Assessments (Washington, D.C., October 5-7, 1994). Proceedings, Volume II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Assessment Governing Board and the National Center for Education Statistics sponsored a Joint Conference on Standard Setting for Large-Scale Assessments to provide a forum for technical and policy issues relevant to setting standards at local, state, and national levels. Volume I contains an executive summary of the conference and…

Crocker, Linda; Zieky, Michael

318

Joint Conference on Standard Setting for Large-Scale Assessments (Washington, D.C., October 5-7, 1994). Executive Summary, Volume I.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Assessment Governing Board and the National Center for Education Statistics sponsored a Joint Conference on Standard Setting for Large-Scale Assessments to provide a forum for technical and policy issues relevant to setting standards at local, state, and national levels. This executive summary conveys the essence of the conference by…

Crocker, Linda; Zieky, Michael

319

Massive Data Streams in Graph Theory and Computational Geometry Streaming is an important paradigm for handling data sets that are too large to fit  

E-print Network

Abstract Massive Data Streams in Graph Theory and Computational Geometry Jian Zhang 2005 Streaming is an important paradigm for handling data sets that are too large to fit in main memory. In the streaming. The massive data set is accessed in a sequential fashion and, therefore, can be viewed as a stream of data

Feigenbaum, Joan

320

Jin Yu, Ehud Reiter, Jim Hunter and Chris Mellish Choosing the content of textual summaries of large time-series data sets  

E-print Network

of large time-series data sets JIN YU, EHUD REITER, JIM HUNTER AND CHRIS MELLISH Department of Computing or more) time-series data sets. The architecture integrates pattern recognition, pattern abstraction simply from sensors in aircraft engines (Hey and Trefethen 2003). Currently numeric time-series data

Sripada, Yaji

321

Wide-range photoabsorption cross-sections of simple metals: large basis-set OPW calculations for sodium.  

PubMed

Photoabsorption cross-sections of simple metals are formulated through a solid-state band theory based on the orthogonalized-plane-wave (OPW) method in Slater's local-exchange approximation, where interband transitions of core and conduction electrons are evaluated up to the soft x-ray regime by using large basis sets. The photoabsorption cross-sections of a sodium crystal are computed for a wide photon energy range from 3 to 1800 eV. It is found that the numerical results reproduce the existing x-ray databases fairly well for energies above the L(2,3)-edge (31 eV), verifying a consistency between solid-state and atomic models for inner-shell photoabsorption; additional oscillatory structures in the present spectra manifest solid-state effects. Our computed results in the vacuum ultraviolet regime (6-30 eV) are also in better agreement with experimental data compared to earlier theories, although some discrepancies remain in the range of 20-30 eV. The influence of the core eigenvalues on the absorption spectra is examined. PMID:23334229

Kitamura, Hikaru

2013-02-13

322

Early Miocene Kirka-Phrigian caldera, western Anatolia - an example of large volume silicic magma generation in extensional setting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large rhyolitic ignimbrite occurrences are close connected to the Early Miocene initiation of extensional processes in the central-west Anatolia along Ta?vanl?-Afyon zones. Field correlations, petrographical, geochemical and geochronological data lead to a substantial reinterpretation of the ignimbrite surrounding K?rka area, known from its world-class borate deposits, as representing the climatic event of a caldera collapse, unknown up to now and newly named "K?rka-Phrigian caldera". The caldera, which is roughly oval (24 km x 15km) in shape, one of the largest in Turkey, is supposed to have been formed in a single stage collapse event, at ~19 Ma that generated huge volume extracaldera outflow ignimbrites. Transtensive/distensive tectonic stresses since 25 Ma ago resulted in the NNW-SSE elongation of the magma chamber and influenced the roughly elliptical shape of the subsided block (caldera floor) belonging to the apex of Eski?ehir-Afyon-Isparta volcanic area. Intracaldera post-collapse sedimentation and volcanism (at ~ 18 Ma) was controlled through subsidence-related faults with generation of a series of volcanic structures (mainly domes) showing a large compositional range from saturated silicic rhyolites and crystal-rich trachytes to undersaturated lamproites. Such volcanic rock association is typical for lithospheric extension. In this scenario, enriched mantle components within the subcontinental lithospheric mantle will begin to melt via decompression melting during the initiation of extension. Interaction of these melts with crustal rocks, fractionation processes and crustal anatexis driven by the heat contained in the ascending mantle melts produced the silicic compositions in a large crustal reservoir. Such silicic melts generated the initial eruptions of K?rka-Phrigian caldera ignimbrites. The rock volume and geochemical evidence suggests that silicic volcanic rocks come from a long-lived magma chamber that evolved episodically; after caldera generation there is a shift to small volume episodic rhyolitic, trachytic and lamproitic volcanism, the last ones indicating a more primitive magma input with evident origin in an enriched mantle lithosphere. The volcanic rock succession provides a direct picture of the state of the magmatic system at the time of eruptions that generated caldera and post-caldera structures and offer an excellent example for silicic magma generation and associated potassic and ultrapotassic intermediate-mafic rocks in post-collisional extensional setting.

Seghedi, Ioan; Helvac?, Cahit

2014-05-01

323

Mendel in the Modern Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mendel is an icon in the history of genetics and part of our common culture and modern biology instruction. The aim of this paper is to summarize the place of Mendel in the modern biology classroom. In the present article we will identify key issues that make Mendel relevant in the classroom today. First, we recount some of the historical controversies that have relevance to modern curricular design, such as Fisher's (Ann Sci 1:115-137, 1936/2008) claim that Mendel's data were too good to be true. We also address questions about Mendel's status as the father of genetics as well as questions about the sequencing of Mendel's work in genetics instruction in relation to modern molecular genetics and evolution. Next, we present a systematic set of examples of research based approaches to the use of Mendel in the modern classroom along with criticisms of these designs and questions about the historical accuracy of the story of Mendel as presented in the typical classroom. Finally, we identify gaps in our understanding in need of further study and present a selected set of resources that, along with the references cited, should be valuable to science educators interested in further study of the story of Mendel.

Smith, Mike U.; Gericke, Niklas M.

2015-01-01

324

Photonics Explorer: revolutionizing photonics in the classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The `Photonics Explorer' is a unique intra-curricular optics kit designed to engage, excite and educate secondary school students about the fascination of working with light - hands-on, in their own classrooms. Developed with a pan European collaboration of experts, the kit equips teachers with class sets of experimental material provided within a supporting didactic framework, distributed in conjunction with teacher training courses. The material has been specifically designed to integrate into European science curricula. Each kit contains robust and versatile components sufficient for a class of 25-30 students to work in groups of 2-3. The didactic content is based on guided inquiry-based learning (IBL) techniques with a strong emphasis on hands-on experiments, team work and relating abstract concepts to real world applications. The content has been developed in conjunction with over 30 teachers and experts in pedagogy to ensure high quality and ease of integration. It is currently available in 7 European languages. The Photonics Explorer allows students not only to hone their essential scientific skills but also to really work as scientists and engineers in the classroom. Thus, it aims to encourage more young people to pursue scientific careers and avert the imminent lack of scientific workforce in Europe. 50 Photonics Explorer kits have been successfully tested in 7 European countries with over 1500 secondary school students. The positive impact of the kit in the classroom has been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated. A non-profit organisation, EYESTvzw [Excite Youth for Engineering Science and Technology], is responsible for the large scale distribution of the Photonics Explorer.

Prasad, Amrita; Debaes, Nathalie; Cords, Nina; Fischer, Robert; Vlekken, Johan; Euler, Manfred; Thienpont, Hugo

2012-10-01

325

Twelve tips for "flipping" the classroom.  

PubMed

Abstract The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed. The following tips outline the steps involved in making a successful transition to a flipped classroom approach. The tips are based on the available literature alongside the author's experience of using the approach in a medical education setting. Flipping a classroom has a number of potential benefits, for example increased educator-student interaction, but must be planned and implemented carefully to support effective learning. PMID:25154646

Moffett, Jennifer

2015-04-01

326

Empirical Mining of Large Data Sets Already Helps to Solve Practical Ecological Problems; A Panoply of Working Examples (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here we present diverse examples where empirical mining and statistical analysis of large data sets have already been shown to be useful for a wide variety of practical decision-making problems within the realm of large-scale ecology. Because a full understanding and appreciation of particular ecological phenomena are possible only after hypothesis-directed research regarding the existence and nature of that process, some ecologists may feel that purely empirical data harvesting may represent a less-than-satisfactory approach. Restricting ourselves exclusively to process-driven approaches, however, may actually slow progress, particularly for more complex or subtle ecological processes. We may not be able to afford the delays caused by such directed approaches. Rather than attempting to formulate and ask every relevant question correctly, empirical methods allow trends, relationships and associations to emerge freely from the data themselves, unencumbered by a priori theories, ideas and prejudices that have been imposed upon them. Although they cannot directly demonstrate causality, empirical methods can be extremely efficient at uncovering strong correlations with intermediate "linking" variables. In practice, these correlative structures and linking variables, once identified, may provide sufficient predictive power to be useful themselves. Such correlation "shadows" of causation can be harnessed by, e.g., Bayesian Belief Nets, which bias ecological management decisions, made with incomplete information, toward favorable outcomes. Empirical data-harvesting also generates a myriad of testable hypotheses regarding processes, some of which may even be correct. Quantitative statistical regionalizations based on quantitative multivariate similarity have lended insights into carbon eddy-flux direction and magnitude, wildfire biophysical conditions, phenological ecoregions useful for vegetation type mapping and monitoring, forest disease risk maps (e.g., sudden oak death), global aquatic ecoregion risk maps for aquatic invasives, and forest vertical structure ecoregions (e.g., using extensive LiDAR data sets). Multivariate Spatio-Temporal Clustering, which quantitatively places alternative future conditions on a common footing with present conditions, allows prediction of present and future shifts in tree species ranges, given alternative climatic change forecasts. ForWarn, a forest disturbance detection and monitoring system mining 12 years of national 8-day MODIS phenology data, has been operating since 2010, producing national maps every 8 days showing many kinds of potential forest disturbances. Forest resource managers can view disturbance maps via a web-based viewer, and alerts are issued when particular forest disturbances are seen. Regression-based decadal trend analysis showing long-term forest thrive and decline areas, and individual-based, brute-force supercomputing to map potential movement corridors and migration routes across landscapes will also be discussed. As significant ecological changes occur with increasing rapidity, such empirical data-mining approaches may be the most efficient means to help land managers find the best, most-actionable policies and decision strategies.

Hargrove, W. W.; Hoffman, F. M.; Kumar, J.; Spruce, J.; Norman, S. P.

2013-12-01

327

Rates and Mechanisms of Solidification in Large Magma Bodies: Implications for Melt Extraction in all Tectonic Settings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As is observed in both experiment and theory, in the absence of hydrothermal convection, the majority of magma chamber heat loss occurs via conduction through the roof of the intrusion and into the cold country rock above. The formation of an upper solidification front (or Upper Border Series, UBS), recorded in the rocks both geochemically and texturally, is a natural outcome of the progression of the solidification front from the cold roof to the hot center of the magma chamber. There are, however, a few unique layered mafic intrusions for which little or no UBS exists. In this study, I examine the thermal evolution and crystallization rates of several classic layered intrusions as it is recorded in the extent of the preserved UBS. For those intrusions that have experienced crystallization at the roof, such as the Skaergaard Intrusion, the development of a UBS reduces the temperature gradient at the roof and effectively slows the rate of heat loss from the main magma body. However, for those intrusions that do not have an UBS, such as the Bushveld Complex, the cooling rate is controlled only by the maximum rate of conductive heat loss through the overlying roof rocks, which decreases with time. The implications are two-fold: (1) The relative thickness of the UBS in large intrusions may be the key to quantifying their cooling and solidification rates; and (2) The nature of the magma mush zone near the roof of an intrusion may depend principally on the long-term thermal evolution of the magma body. Particularly at the end stages of crystallization, when the liquids are likely to be highly evolved and high viscosities may inhibit convection, intrusions lacking a well-defined UBS may provide important insights into the mechanics of crystal-liquid separation, melt extraction, and compaction in felsic plutons as well as mafic intrusions. These results are important for long-lived (>500 kyr) or repeatedly replenished magma chambers in all tectonic settings.

VanTongeren, J. A.

2013-12-01

328

Hyperview-fast, economical access to large data sets: a system for the archiving and distribution of hyperspectral data sets and derived products  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

TRW, under a Small Satellite Technology Initiative (SSTI) contract, is building the Lewis satellite. The principal sensor on Lewis is a hyperspectral imaging spectrometer. Part of the SSTI mission is to establish the commercial and educational utility of this data and the hyperspectral data already being acquired on airborne platforms. Essential requirements are rapid availability (after data acquisition) and easy accessibility to a catalog of images and imagery products. Each image is approximately 256 by 512 pixels with 384 bands of data acquired at each pixel. For some applications, some users will want the entire data sets; in other cases partial data sets (e.g. three band images) will be all that a user can handle or need for a given application. In order to make the most effective use of this new imagery and justify the cost of collecting it, we must find ways to make the information it contains more readily accessible to an ever broadening community of potential users. Tools are needed to store, access, and communicate the data more efficiently, to place it in context, and to derive both qualitative and quantitative information from it. A variety of information products which address the specific needs of particular user communities will be derived from the imagery. The data is unique in its ability to provide high spatial and spectral resolution simultaneously, and shows great promise in both military and civilian applications. A data management and analysis system has been built at TRW. This development has been prompted by the business opportunities, by the series of instruments built here and by the availability of data from other instruments. The products of the processing system have been shown to prospective customers in the U.S. and abroad. The system has been used to process data produced by TRW sensors and other instruments. This paper provides an overview of the TRW hyperspectral collection, data handling and exploitation capability.

Lurie, Joan B.

1996-12-01

329

Classroom Creature Culture: Algae to Anoles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Living organisms are important classroom resources and require appropriate, responsible care. This anthology of articles from NSTA's award-winning journal Science and Children provides the basics about collecting, investigating, and caring for plants and animals in classroom settings. From daddy longlegs to box turtles, from duckweed to butterflies, emphasis is placed on responsible observation, respect for living beings, and the individual needs of nature's many creatures. Also makes an excellent complement to ecological studies.

1994-01-01

330

Problem-Based Teaching of a Large Class  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage, authored by a biology professor from the University of Delaware, addresses the question of how one might adapt the problem-based learning approach for use in a large classroom setting. The page contains no links. The information is not dated and will be useful to all teaching faculty concerned with this question.

Dion, Linda

331

Classroom Management. TESOL Classroom Practice Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This series captures the dynamics of the contemporary ESOL classroom. It showcases state-of-the-art curricula, materials, tasks, and activities reflecting emerging trends in language education and seeks to build localized language teaching and learning theories based on teachers' and students' unique experiences in and beyond the classroom. Each…

Farrell, Thomas S. C., Ed.

2008-01-01

332

Classroom Use and Utilization.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses how classrooms are distributed by size on a campus, how well they are used, and how their use changes with faculty and student needs and desires. Details how to analyze classroom space, use, and utilization, taking into account such factors as scheduling and classroom stations. (EV)

Fink, Ira

2002-01-01

333

Classrooms Are Killing Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From his knowledge of the brain and learning, the author argues that Horace Mann's classroom system is the core cause for the outdated state of public education and attendant problems. He asserts that the conventional classroom is brain-antagonistic and the continued use of graded classrooms, ruinous. (Author/WD)

Hart, Leslie A.

1981-01-01

334

Competition in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author shares the strategy she adopted to even out the participation among her multicultural students during their classroom discussions. The author realized that her students had different concepts about the classroom and different philosophies about competition. For the Americans and Indians, the classroom was a site of…

Jameson, Daphne

2007-01-01

335

Arranging the Informal Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the advent of the informal or open classroom, a new area of concern has become important--classroom arrangement. In the past, classrooms were oriented toward the front, toward the teacher's desk and the blackboard. Education depended mainly on the pupil's interaction with the teacher and with printed materials. Nowadays, in informal…

Engel, Brenda S.

336

A review of sea-spray aerosol source functions using a large global set of sea salt aerosol concentration measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sea-spray aerosols (SSA) are an important part of the climate system because of their effects on the global radiative budget - both directly as scatterers and absorbers of solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) influencing cloud formation, lifetime, and precipitation. In terms of their global mass, SSA have the largest uncertainty of all aerosols. In this study we review 21 SSA source functions from the literature, several of which are used in current climate models. In addition, we propose a~new function. Even excluding outliers, the global annual SSA mass produced spans roughly 3-70 Pg yr-1 for the different source functions, for particles with dry diameter Dp < 10 ?m, with relatively little interannual variability for a given function. The FLEXPART Lagrangian particle dispersion model was run in backward mode for a large global set of observed SSA concentrations, comprised of several station networks and ship cruise measurement campaigns. FLEXPART backward calculations produce gridded emission sensitivity fields, which can subsequently be multiplied with gridded SSA production fluxes in order to obtain modeled SSA concentrations. This allowed us to efficiently and simultaneously evaluate all 21 source functions against the measurements. Another advantage of this method is that source-region information on wind speed and sea surface temperatures (SSTs) could be stored and used for improving the SSA source function parameterizations. The best source functions reproduced as much as 70% of the observed SSA concentration variability at several stations, which is comparable with "state of the art" aerosol models. The main driver of SSA production is wind, and we found that the best fit to the observation data could be obtained when the SSA production is proportional to U103.5, where U10 is the source region averaged 10 m wind speed. A strong influence of SST on SSA production, with higher temperatures leading to higher production, could be detected as well, although the underlying physical mechanisms of the SST influence remains unclear. Our new source function with wind speed and temperature dependence gives a global SSA production for particles smaller than Dp < 10 ?m of 9 Pg yr-1, and is the best fit to the observed concentrations.

Grythe, H.; Ström, J.; Krejci, R.; Quinn, P.; Stohl, A.

2014-02-01

337

Classroom Assessment Techniques: Portfolios  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page describes the use of portfolios as an assessment tool. It is one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. This site provides an overview of what portfolios are, how and when to use them, and why they are useful for assessing student understanding. The site is also linked to a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use, as well as supplementary links and sources to further explore this assessment tool.

Timothy F. Slater

338

Classroom materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

How to read and understand poetry Edgar Allan Poe American story poemsPleasantville, New York: Educational Audio?Visual, Inc.The Cousteau oceanography series:“The Water Planet, Sets I and II” Burbank, California: Walt Disney Educational Media CompanyAmazing world of Dinosaurs multimedia kitBurbank, California: Walt Disney Educational Media Company

Gayle Kirker; Linda Poole; Janie Hamburger

1982-01-01

339

Developing Language and Mastering Content in Heterogeneous Classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In this chapter, I describe what teachers need to do to set up classroom conditions that support development in English, the\\u000a language of instruction, as well as mastery of subject matter content in academically and linguistically heterogeneous classrooms.\\u000a To support my argument, I use data from a study conducted in six diverse 7th grade social studies classrooms in California’s\\u000a Central

Rachel A. Lotan

340

Large-scale changes in observed daily maximum and minimum temperatures: Creation and analysis of a new gridded data set  

Microsoft Academic Search

A gridded land-only data set representing near-surface observations of daily maximum and minimum temperatures (HadGHCND) has been created to allow analysis of recent changes in climate extremes and for the evaluation of climate model simulations. Using a global data set of quality-controlled station observations compiled by the U.S. National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), daily anomalies were created relative to the

John Caesar; Lisa Alexander; Russell Vose

2006-01-01

341

Photometric selection of quasars in large astronomical data sets with a fast and accurate machine learning algorithm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Future astronomical surveys will produce data on ˜108 objects per night. In order to characterize and classify these sources, we will require algorithms that scale linearly with the size of the data, that can be easily parallelized and where the speedup of the parallel algorithm will be linear in the number of processing cores. In this paper, we present such an algorithm and apply it to the question of colour selection of quasars. We use non-parametric Bayesian classification and a binning algorithm implemented with hash tables (BASH tables). We show that this algorithm's run time scales linearly with the number of test set objects and is independent of the number of training set objects. We also show that it has the same classification accuracy as other algorithms. For current data set sizes, it is up to three orders of magnitude faster than commonly used naive kernel-density-estimation techniques and it is estimated to be about eight times faster than the current fastest algorithm using dual kd-trees for kernel density estimation. The BASH table algorithm scales linearly with the size of the test set data only, and so for future larger data sets, it will be even faster compared to other algorithms which all depend on the size of the test set and the size of the training set. Since it uses linear data structures, it is easier to parallelize compared to tree-based algorithms and its speedup is linear in the number of cores unlike tree-based algorithms whose speedup plateaus after a certain number of cores. Moreover, due to the use of hash tables to implement the binning, the memory usage is very small. While our analysis is for the specific problem of selection of quasars, the ideas are general and the BASH table algorithm can be applied to any density-estimation problem involving sparse high-dimensional data sets. Since sparse high-dimensional data sets are a common type of scientific data set, this method has the potential to be useful in a broad range of machine-learning applications in astrophysics.

Gupta, Pramod; Connolly, Andrew J.; Gardner, Jeffrey P.

2014-03-01

342

Inter-species inference of gene set enrichment in lung epithelial cells from proteomic and large transcriptomic datasets  

PubMed Central

Motivation: Translating findings in rodent models to human models has been a cornerstone of modern biology and drug development. However, in many cases, a naive ‘extrapolation’ between the two species has not succeeded. As a result, clinical trials of new drugs sometimes fail even after considerable success in the mouse or rat stage of development. In addition to in vitro studies, inter-species translation requires analytical tools that can predict the enriched gene sets in human cells under various stimuli from corresponding measurements in animals. Such tools can improve our understanding of the underlying biology and optimize the allocation of resources for drug development. Results: We developed an algorithm to predict differential gene set enrichment as part of the sbv IMPROVER (systems biology verification in Industrial Methodology for Process Verification in Research) Species Translation Challenge, which focused on phosphoproteomic and transcriptomic measurements of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) primary cells under various stimuli and corresponding measurements in rat (NRBE) primary cells. We find that gene sets exhibit a higher inter-species correlation compared with individual genes, and are potentially more suited for direct prediction. Furthermore, in contrast to a similar cross-species response in protein phosphorylation states 5 and 25 min after exposure to stimuli, gene set enrichment 6 h after exposure is significantly different in NHBE cells compared with NRBE cells. In spite of this difference, we were able to develop a robust algorithm to predict gene set activation in NHBE with high accuracy using simple analytical methods. Availability and implementation: Implementation of all algorithms is available as source code (in Matlab) at http://bhanot.biomaps.rutgers.edu/wiki/codes_SC3_Predicting_GeneSets.zip, along with the relevant data used in the analysis. Gene sets, gene expression and protein phosphorylation data are available on request. Contact: hormoz@kitp.ucsb.edu PMID:25152231

Hormoz, Sahand; Bhanot, Gyan; Biehl, Michael; Bilal, Erhan; Meyer, Pablo; Norel, Raquel; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Dayarian, Adel

2015-01-01

343

The Social Network Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Online social networking is an important part in the everyday life of college students. Despite the increasing popularity of online social networking among students and faculty members, its educational benefits are largely untested. This paper presents our experience in using social networking applications and video content distribution websites as a complement of traditional classroom education. In particular, the solution has been based on effective adaptation, extension and integration of Facebook, Twitter, Blogger YouTube and iTunes services for delivering educational material to students on mobile platforms like iPods and 3 rd generation mobile phones. The goals of the proposed educational platform, described in this paper, are to make the learning experience more engaging, to encourage collaborative work and knowledge sharing among students, and to provide an interactive platform for the educators to reach students and deliver lecture material in a totally new way.

Bunus, Peter

344

Just in Time to Flip Your Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With advocates like Sal Khan and Bill Gates, flipped classrooms are attracting an increasing amount of media and research attention.2 We had heard Khan's TED talk and were aware of the concept of inverted pedagogies in general. Yet it really hit home when we accidentally flipped our classroom. Our objective was to better prepare our students for class. We set out to effectively move some of our course content outside of class and decided to tweak the Just-in-Time Teaching approach (JiTT).3 To our surprise, this tweak—which we like to call the flip-JiTT—ended up completely flipping our classroom. What follows is narrative of our experience and a procedure that any teacher can use to extend JiTT to a flipped classroom.

Lasry, Nathaniel; Dugdale, Michael; Charles, Elizabeth

2014-01-01

345

Just in Time to Flip Your Classroom  

E-print Network

With advocates like Sal Khan and Bill Gates, flipped classrooms are attracting an increasing amount of media and research attention. We had heard Khan's TED talk and were aware of the concept of inverted pedagogies in general. Yet, it really hit home when we accidentally flipped our classroom. Our objective was to better prepare our students for class. We set out to effectively move some of our course content outside of class and decided to tweak the Just-in-Time-Teaching approach (JiTT). To our surprise, this tweak - which we like to call the flip-JiTT - ended up completely flipping our classroom. What follows is narrative of our experience and a procedure that any teacher can use to extend JiTT to a flipped classroom.

Lasry, Nathaniel; Charles, Elizabeth

2013-01-01

346

MASTER of the Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy Power Spectrum: A Fast Method for Statistical Analysis of Large and Complex Cosmic Microwave Background Data Sets  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a fast and accurate method for estimation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy angular power spectrum-Monte Carlo Apodized Spherical Transform Estimator (MASTER). Originally devised for use in the interpretation of the BOOMERANG experimental data, MASTER is both a computationally efficient method suitable for use with the currently available CMB data sets (already large in size, despite covering

Eric Hivon; Krzysztof M. Górski; C. Barth Netterfield; Brendan P. Crill; Simon Prunet; Frode Hansen

2002-01-01

347

DISPOSITION OF ANTHRACENE IN THE WATER AND AUFWUCHS MATRICES OF A LARGE OUTDOOR CHANNEL MICROCOSM: A DATA SET FOR MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION MODELS  

EPA Science Inventory

Large-scale, outdoor microcosms were used to study the fate of anthracene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, in the aquatic environment. The study provides a data set for describing the disposition of anthracene in the water and aufwuchs of the microcosms for the purpose of comp...

348

Integrating Community Outreach into the Undergraduate Neuroscience Classroom  

PubMed Central

While both federal agencies and professional associations emphasize the importance of neuroscience outreach, this goal seldom reaches the undergraduate neuroscience classroom. However, incorporating outreach into undergraduate neuroscience classes is an efficient means to reach not only future scientists, but also the future practitioners (K-12 teachers, social service workers, etc.) with whom neuroscientists hope to communicate. It also provides a vehicle for faculty members to engage in outreach activities that are typically un- or under-rewarded in faculty reviews. In this article, a Neuroscience Community Outreach Project (NCOP) is described. The project has been used in three offerings of a Cognitive Neuroscience course at a small liberal arts college, shared and applied at a large state university, and presented at a regional Society for Neuroscience meeting as an example of outreach opportunities for faculty. The NCOP assignment is a student-driven, modular activity that can be easily incorporated into existing neuroscience course frameworks. The assignment builds on student interests and connections in the community, providing a way for faculty at institutions without formal outreach programs to incorporate neuroscience outreach into the classroom and connect students to online resources. Several sample student projects are described across three broad domains (K-12 outreach, presentations to social service organizations, and media / popular press presentations). The article ends with a set of suggestions addressing common faculty concerns about incorporating community outreach into the undergraduate neuroscience classroom. PMID:23626492

Stevens, Courtney

2011-01-01

349

Becoming urban science teachers by transforming middle-school classrooms: A study of the Urban Science Education Fellows Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current scenario in American education shows a large achievement and opportunity gap in science between urban children in poverty and more privileged youth. Research has shown that one essential factor that accounts for this gap is the shortage of qualified science teachers in urban schools. Teaching science in a high poverty school presents unique challenges to beginner teachers. Limited resources and support and a significant cultural divide with their students are some of the common problems that cause many novice teachers to quit their jobs or to start enacting what has been described as "the pedagogy of poverty." In this study I looked at the case of the Urban Science Education Fellows Program. This program aimed to prepare preservice teachers (i.e. "fellows") to enact socially just science pedagogies in urban classrooms. I conducted qualitative case studies of three fellows. Fellows worked over one year with science teachers in middle-school classrooms in order to develop transformative action research studies. My analysis focused on how fellows coauthored hybrid spaces within these studies that challenged the typical ways science was taught and learned in their classrooms towards a vision of socially just teaching. By coauthoring these hybrid spaces, fellows developed grounded generativity, i.e. a capacity to create new teaching scenarios rooted in the pragmatic realities of an authentic classroom setting. Grounded generativity included building upon their pedagogical beliefs in order to improvise pedagogies with others, repositioning themselves and their students differently in the classroom and constructing symbols of possibility to guide their practice. I proposed authentic play as the mechanism that enabled fellows to coauthor hybrid spaces. Authentic play involved contexts of moderate risk and of distributed expertise and required fellows to be positioned at the intersection of the margins and the center of the classroom community of practice. In all, this study demonstrates that engaging in classroom reform can support preservice teachers in developing specialized tools to teach science in urban classrooms.

Furman, Melina Gabriela

350

Classroom Vocabulary Classroom Vocabulary [msamiati wa darasani  

E-print Network

/ chaki [chalk / chalks] zulia / mazulia [carpet / carpets] swichi [switch] swichi ya feni [fan switch, ubao... [This classroom has a table, backpack, chalk, board...] 2. Hii ni nini? [What is this?] Hii ni

351

Teaching and Learning as Multimedia Authoring: The Classroom 2000 Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

We view college classroom teaching and learning as a multimedia authoring activity. The classroom provides a rich setting in which a number of different forms of communication co-exist, such as speech, writing and projected images. Much of the information in a lec- ture is poorly recorded or lost currently. Our hypoth- esis is that tools to aid in the capture

Gregory D. Abowd; Christopher G. Atkeson; Ami Feinstein; Cindy E. Hmelo; Rob Kooper; Sue Long; Mikiya Tani

1996-01-01

352

Rewards, Intrinsic Motivation, and Achievement in Intact Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of performance-contingent rewards in a real-world setting, namely the sixth grade math classroom. This study is significant in that it represents a field study on the effects of rewards in the classroom. The purpose of this study was to investigate what effect, if any, the choice of a reward had…

Luis, Melissa Ann

2011-01-01

353

The Columbia Classroom Environments Project.... Second Progress Report, February 1971.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report discusses the Columbia Classroom Environments Project Autonomy in Learning An Exploration of Pupils' and Teachers Roles in Different Classroom Environments to develop Criteria and Procedures for Evaluation in Project Follow Through. The report begins with a discussion of a set of matrices which combine all of the behavior code…

Grannis, Joseph C.

354

Gender Inequality in the Primary Classroom: Will Interactive Whiteboards Help?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper sets out to investigate (i) gender differences in whole class classroom interaction with a sample of teachers who were not using interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in their lessons; and (ii) the short-term and longer term impact of IWB use upon gender differences in classroom interaction. The study focused upon teacher-student interaction…

Smith, Fay; Hardman, Frank; Higgins, Steve

2007-01-01

355

Learning Environments in Information and Communications Technology Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study of learning environments provides a useful research framework for investigating the effects of educational innovations such as those which are associated with the use of the Internet in classroom settings. This study reports an investigation into the use of Internet technologies in high-school classrooms in Australia and Canada.…

Zandvliet, David B.; Fraser, Barry J.

2004-01-01

356

Teacher's Survival Guide: Differentiating Instruction in the Elementary Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Teacher's Survival Guide: Differentiating Instruction in the Elementary Classroom" answers the most common questions about differentiation, including what it is, how teachers can set up a classroom that promotes differentiation, which topics should be differentiated, what strategies are most effective, and how teachers can assess students engaged…

Roberts, Julia L.; Inman, Tracy F.

2012-01-01

357

Integrating Fiction and Nonfiction Reading into the Business Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One goal of high school teachers is to help students appreciate that reading does not end when they leave the classroom. When students find reading meaningful, they are more likely to see themselves as readers and choose to read long after they leave the classroom setting (Hinchman, Alvermann, Boyd, Brozo, & Vacca, 2003-2004; Wilhelm, 2001).…

Fiene, Judy; Pedersen, Erin

2013-01-01

358

Shared-Reading Volume in Early Childhood Special Education Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study describes book reading practices occurring in early childhood special education (ECSE) classrooms in comparison to early childhood education (ECE) classrooms. Reading logs submitted by 19 ECSE teachers and 13 ECE teachers over one academic year included all books read in whole class settings; these logs were analyzed to assess the…

Dynia, Jaclyn M.; Justice, Laura M.

2015-01-01

359

Physical and Psychosocial Environments Associated with Networked Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports a study of the learning environments in computer networked classrooms. The study is unique in that it involved an evaluation of both the physical and psychosocial classroom environments in these computerised settings through the use of a combination of questionnaires and ergonomic evaluations. The study involved administering…

Zandvliet, David B.; Fraser, Barry J.

2005-01-01

360

Dialogical Patterns of Interaction in Pre-School Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study set out to identify and examine dialogic educational interactions in Finnish pre-school classrooms. Video recordings of five observed pre-school classrooms that had shown a high or moderate quality of instructional support in literacy, maths and science studies were transcribed for micro-scale qualitative content analysis. Three…

Rasku-Puttonen, Helena; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Siekkinen, Martti

2012-01-01

361

An On-Line Classroom for the Unix Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes an electronic classroom (ECR) program that has been developed at Nova University to facilitate online real-time group instruction in graduate degree programs in information and computer science. The first section describes the educational uses of the program, including the simulation of a classroom-type educational setting

Scigliano, John A.; And Others

362

Oral Feedback in Classroom SLA: A Meta-Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To investigate the pedagogical effectiveness of oral corrective feedback (CF) on target language development, we conducted a meta-analysis that focused exclusively on 15 classroom-based studies (N = 827). The analysis was designed to investigate whether CF was effective in classroom settings and, if so, whether its effectiveness varied according…

Lyster, Roy; Saito, Kazuya

2010-01-01

363

Multilingual Literacies in the Primary Classroom: Making the Connections.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report explores how students' multilingual literacies can become part of everyday classroom practices. It discusses the contribution made by the home language in English language learning and literacy by highlighting the connections between languages in mainstream classroom settings. The strategies highlighted here focus on the representation…

Diaz, Criss Jones

364

Science Sampler: Classroom management, rules, consequences, and rewards! Oh, my!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teachers must start with an organized classroom. Think through how you want your classroom arranged, how students will turn in work, and where supplies are located. Students should also be instructed how the classroom is set up and who should be retrieving supplies. Having numbered containers with supplies is a quick way to distribute materials and check that everything has been returned at the end of the period. This article outlines additional classroom management plans that will prepare new teachers for the first day of school and throughout the entire school year.

Julie McIntosh

2009-07-01

365

Critical Health Literacy: Shifting Textual-Social Practices in the Health Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper will consider ways in which students are constructed as aliens in health classrooms. Creating the classroom as a setting for health promotion requires closer attention to those who make use of such space. If classrooms are places where diversity exists and is recognised, then health educators are challenged to consider how students are…

Renwick, Kerry

2014-01-01

366

The Classroom as Community: Ideas from an Early Childhood Teacher. Occasional Paper No. 3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper responds to the questions: "How do we shape classroom life to reflect a spirit of social justice and equality, of tolerance and respect?" It presents a philosophy and a set of practices by which preschool classrooms may become communities that work for everyone. The paper begins with an observation of a preschool classroom and notes…

Stone, Jeannette G.

367

Using Representational Tools to Learn about Complex Systems: A Tale of Two Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Orchestrating inquiry-based science learning in the classroom is a complex undertaking. It requires fitting the culture of the classroom with the teacher's teaching and inquiry practices. To understand the interactions between these variables in relation to student learning, we conducted an investigation in two different classroom settings to…

Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.; Liu, Lei; Gray, Steven; Jordan, Rebecca

2015-01-01

368

Measuring Civic Engagement Processes and Youth Civic Empowerment in the Classroom: The CIVVICS Observation Tool  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Grounded in the context of the gap in civic participation, action-based civics curricula, and how classroom interactions may affect student development, we present the CIVVICS (Civic Interactions motiVating diVerse Individuals in Classroom Settings) observation tool. CIVVICS's four domains--Lesson Planning and Implementation, Classroom

Stolte, Laurel Cadwallader; Isenbarger, Molly; Cohen, Alison Klebanoff

2014-01-01

369

EFL Teachers' Language Use for Classroom Discipline: A Look at Complex Interplay of Variables  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The issue of classroom management in the English as a foreign language (EFL) setting has not been addressed adequately despite teachers' views of it as constituting one of their prioritized tasks. Among the aspects of classroom management, in particular, classroom discipline seems to warrant research focus because it contributes to "smooth and…

Kang, Dae-Min

2013-01-01

370

The Classroom Animal.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides background information on the earthworm. Reviews basic anatomical, behavioral, and reproductive facts. Offers suggestions for procuring, maintaining, and breeding colonies for classroom use. (ML)

Science and Children, 1986

1986-01-01

371

pXRF quantitative analysis of the Otowi Member of the Bandelier Tuff: Generating large, robust data sets to decipher trace element zonation in large silicic magma chambers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advances in portable X-Ray fluorescence (pXRF) analytical technology have made it possible for high-quality, quantitative data to be collected in a fraction of the time required by standard, non-portable analytical techniques. Not only do these advances reduce analysis time, but data may also be collected in the field in conjunction with sampling. Rhyolitic pumice, being primarily glass, is an excellent material to be analyzed with this technology. High-quality, quantitative data for elements that are tracers of magmatic differentiation (e.g. Rb, Sr, Y, Nb) can be collected for whole, individual pumices and subsamples of larger pumices in 4 minutes. We have developed a calibration for powdered rhyolite pumice from the Otowi Member of the Bandelier Tuff analyzed with the Bruker Tracer IV pXRF using Bruker software and influence coefficients for pumice, which measures the following 19 oxides and elements: SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, FeO*, MnO, CaO, K2O, P2O5, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba, Ce, Pb, and Th. With this calibration for the pXRF and thousands of individual powdered pumice samples, we have generated an unparalleled data set for any single eruptive unit with known trace element zonation. The Bandelier Tuff of the Valles-Toledo Caldera Complex, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, is divided into three main eruptive events. For this study, we have chosen the 1.61 Ma, 450 km3 Otowi Member as it is primarily unwelded and pumice samples are easily accessible. The eruption began with a plinian phase from a single source located near center of the current caldera and deposited the Guaje Pumice Bed. The initial Unit A of the Guaje is geochemically monotonous, but Units B through E, co-deposited with ignimbrite show very strong chemical zonation in trace elements, progressing upwards through the deposits from highly differentiated compositions (Rb ~350 ppm, Nb ~200 ppm) to less differentiated (Rb ~100 ppm, Nb ~50 ppm). Co-erupted ignimbrites emplaced during column collapse show similar trace element zonation. The eruption culminated in caldera collapse after transitioning from a single central vent to ring fracture vents. Ignimbrites deposited at this time have lithic breccias and chaotic geochemical profiles. The geochemical discrepancy between early and late deposits warrants detailed, high-resolution sampling and analysis in order to fully understand the dynamics behind zonation processes. Samples were collected from locations that circumvent the caldera and prepared and analyzed in the field and the laboratory with the pXRF. Approximately 2,000 pumice samples will complete this unprecedented data set, allowing detailed reconstruction of trace element zonation around all sides of the Valles Caldera. These data are then used to constrain models of magma chamber processes that produce trace element zonation and how it is preserved in the deposits after a catastrophic, caldera-forming eruption.

Van Hoose, A. E.; Wolff, J.; Conrey, R.

2013-12-01

372

Statistical Analysis of a Large Sample Size Pyroshock Test Data Set Including Post Flight Data Assessment. Revision 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra spacecraft was launched on an Atlas IIAS launch vehicle on its mission to observe planet Earth in late 1999. Prior to launch, the new design of the spacecraft's pyroshock separation system was characterized by a series of 13 separation ground tests. The analysis methods used to evaluate this unusually large amount of shock data will be discussed in this paper, with particular emphasis on population distributions and finding statistically significant families of data, leading to an overall shock separation interface level. The wealth of ground test data also allowed a derivation of a Mission Assurance level for the flight. All of the flight shock measurements were below the EOS Terra Mission Assurance level thus contributing to the overall success of the EOS Terra mission. The effectiveness of the statistical methodology for characterizing the shock interface level and for developing a flight Mission Assurance level from a large sample size of shock data is demonstrated in this paper.

Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

2010-01-01

373

Flipping the classroom with team-based learning in undergraduate nursing education.  

PubMed

This article describes the use of team-based learning (TBL) within a flipped classroom setting in an undergraduate nursing course. TBL facilitates active learning through the use of small group, classroom activities. Students used classroom time to solve problems while developing important professional competencies. A preclass PowerPoint lecture with narration, a component of the flipped classroom, was added to address student feedback. Despite mediocre course evaluations, improved student performance on the final course examination was noted. PMID:25402712

Ratta, Carol B Della

2015-01-01

374

Dissecting the genetic make-up of North-East Sardinia using a large set of haploid and autosomal markers  

PubMed Central

Sardinia has been used for genetic studies because of its historical isolation, genetic homogeneity and increased prevalence of certain rare diseases. Controversy remains concerning the genetic substructure and the extent of genetic homogeneity, which has implications for the design of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We revisited this issue by examining the genetic make-up of a sample from North-East Sardinia using a dense set of autosomal, Y chromosome and mitochondrial markers to assess the potential of the sample for GWAS and fine mapping studies. We genotyped individuals for 500K single-nucleotide polymorphisms, Y chromosome markers and sequenced the mitochondrial hypervariable (HVI–HVII) regions. We identified major haplogroups and compared these with other populations. We estimated linkage disequilibrium (LD) and haplotype diversity across autosomal markers, and compared these with other populations. Our results show that within Sardinia there is no major population substructure and thus it can be considered a genetically homogenous population. We did not find substantial differences in the extent of LD in Sardinians compared with other populations. However, we showed that at least 9% of genomic regions in Sardinians differed in LD structure, which is helpful for identifying functional variants using fine mapping. We concluded that Sardinia is a powerful setting for genetic studies including GWAS and other mapping approaches. PMID:22378280

Pardo, Luba M; Piras, Giovanna; Asproni, Rosanna; van der Gaag, Kristiaan J; Gabbas, Attilio; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; de Knijff, Peter; Monne, Maria; Rizzu, Patrizia; Heutink, Peter

2012-01-01

375

Pressures of the Season: A Descriptive Look at Classroom Quality in Second and Third Grade Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents findings from two years of classroom observation designed to help understand the in-school experiences of students who had been first graders in eight Baltimore public schools in 2007-08. During the 2008-09 and 2009-10 school years, the authors conducted fieldwork to understand learning opportunities and settings for a set of…

Plank, Stephen B.; Condliffe, Barbara

2011-01-01

376

Approaching the complete basis set limit of CCSD(T) for large systems by the third-order incremental dual-basis set zero-buffer F12 method  

SciTech Connect

The third-order incremental dual-basis set zero-buffer approach was combined with CCSD(T)-F12x (x = a, b) theory to develop a new approach, i.e., the inc3-db-B0-CCSD(T)-F12 method, which can be applied as a black-box procedure to efficiently obtain the near complete basis set (CBS) limit of the CCSD(T) energies also for large systems. We tested this method for several cases of different chemical nature: four complexes taken from the standard benchmark sets S66 and X40, the energy difference between isomers of water hexamer and the rotation barrier of biphenyl. The results show that our method has an error relative to the best estimation of CBS energy of only 0.2 kcal/mol or less. By parallelization, our method can accomplish the CCSD(T)-F12 calculations of about 60 correlated electrons and 800 basis functions in only several days, which by standard implementation are impossible for ordinary hardware. We conclude that the inc3-db-B0-CCSD(T)-F12a/AVTZ method, which is of CCSD(T)/AV5Z quality, is close to the limit of accuracy that one can achieve for large systems currently.

Zhang, Jun, E-mail: zhangjunqcc@gmail.com; Dolg, Michael, E-mail: m.dolg@uni-koeln.de [Department of Chemistry, University of Cologne, Cologne 50939 (Germany)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Cologne, Cologne 50939 (Germany)

2014-01-28

377

A model of formative assessment practice in secondary science classrooms using an audience response system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Formative assessment involves the probing of students' ideas to determine their level of understanding during the instructional sequence. Often conceptualized as a cycle, formative assessment consists of the teacher posing an instructional task to students, collecting data about student understanding, and engaging in follow-up strategies such as clarifying student understanding and adjusting instruction to meet learning needs. Despite having been shown to increase student achievement in a variety of classroom settings, formative assessment remains a relative weak area of teacher practice. Methods that enhance formative assessment strategies may therefore have a positive effect on student achievement. Audience response systems comprise a broad category of technologies that support richer classroom interaction and have the potential to facilitate formative assessment. Results from a large national research study, Classroom Connectivity in Promoting Mathematics and Science Achievement (CCMS), show that students in algebra classrooms where the teacher has implemented a type of audience response system experience significantly higher achievement gains compared to a control group. This suggests a role for audience response systems in promoting rich formative assessment. The importance of incorporating formative assessment strategies into regular classroom practice is widely recognized. However, it remains challenging to identify whether rich formative assessment is occurring during a particular class session. This dissertation uses teacher interviews and classroom observations to develop a fine-grained model of formative assessment in secondary science classrooms employing a type of audience response system. This model can be used by researchers and practitioners to characterize components of formative assessment practice in classrooms. A major component of formative assessment practice is the collection and aggregation of evidence of student learning. This dissertation proposes the use of the assessment episode to characterize extended cycles of teacher-student interactions. Further, the model presented here provides a new methodology to describe the teacher's use of questioning and subsequent classroom discourse to uncover student learning. Additional components of this model of formative assessment focus on the recognition of student learning by the teacher and the resultant changes in instructional practice to enhance student understanding.

Shirley, Melissa L.

378

Control of tectonic setting and large-scale faults on the basin-scale distribution of deformation bands in porous sandstone (Provence, France)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From outcrops located in Provence (South-East France), we describe the distribution, the microstructures, and the petrophysical properties of deformation bands networks related to different tectonic events. In contractional setting, pervasively distributed networks of reverse-sense compactional-shear bands are observed in all the folded-sand units of the foreland, whereas localized networks of clustered reverse-sense shear bands are only observed close to a large-scale thrust. In extensional setting, networks of clustered normal-sense shear bands are generally observed adjacent to large-scale faults, although few and randomly distributed bands are also observed between these faults. Normal-sense cataclastic faults are also observed restricted to sand units, suggesting that faults can initiate in the sands in extension, which is not observed in contraction. Shear bands and faults show cataclastic microstructures of low-permeability whereas compactional-shear bands show crush microbreccia or protocataclastic microstructures of moderate permeability. This basin-scale analysis underlines the major role of tectonic settings (thrust-fault versus normal-fault andersonian-stress regime) and the influence of inherited large-scale faults on the formation of low-permeability shear bands. We also provide a geometrical analysis of the band network properties (spacing, thickness, shear/compaction ratio, degree of cataclasis, petrophysical properties) with respect to the host sand granulometry. This analysis suggests that granulometry, although less important than tectonic setting and the presence of large-scale faults, has however a non-negligible effect on the band networks geometry.

Ballas, G.; Soliva, R.; Benedicto, A.; Sizun, J.

2013-12-01

379

DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included: ? The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).? Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.? Currently-available optical people counting systems work well much of the time but have large counting errors in some situations. ? In meeting rooms, measurements of carbon dioxide at return-air grilles appear to be a better choice than wall-mounted sensors.? In California, demand controlled ventilation in general office spaces is projected to save significant energy and be cost effective only if typical VRs without demand controlled ventilation are very high relative to VRs in codes. Based on the research, several recommendations were developed for demand controlled ventilation specifications in the California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards.The research on classroom ventilation collected data over two years on California elementary school classrooms to investigate associations between VRs and student illness absence (IA). Major findings included: ? Median classroom VRs in all studied climate zones were below the California guideline, and 40percent lower in portable than permanent buildings.? Overall, one additional L/s per person of VR was associated with 1.6percent less IA. ? Increasing average VRs in California K-12 classrooms from the current average to the required level is estimated to decrease IA by 3.4percent, increasing State attendance-based funding to school districts by $33M, with $6.2 M in increased energy costs. Further VR increases would provide additional benefits.? Confirming these findings in intervention studies is recommended. ? Energy costs of heating/cooling unoccupied classrooms statewide are modest, but a large portion occurs in relatively few classrooms.

Fisk, William J.; Mendell, Mark J.; Davies, Molly; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Faulkner, David; Hong, Tienzen; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2014-01-06

380

Mobile Phone Application Development for the Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With smartphone sales currently surpassing laptop sales, it is hard not to think that these devices will have a place in the classroom. More specifically, with little to no monetary investment, classroom-centric mobile applications have the ability to suit the needs of teachers. Previously, programming such an item was a daunting task to the classroom teacher. But now, through the use of online visual tools, anyone has the ability to generate a mobile application to suit individual classroom needs. The "MY NASA DATA" (MND) project has begun work on such an application. Using online tools that are directed at the non-programmer, the team has developed two usable mobile applications ("apps") that fit right into the science classroom. The two apps generated include a cloud dichotomous key for cloud identification in the field, and an atmospheric science glossary to help with standardized testing key vocabulary and classroom assignments. Through the use of free online tools, teachers and students now have the ability to customize mobile applications to meet their individual needs. As an extension of the mobile applications, the MND team is planning web-based application programming interfaces (API's) that will be generated from data that is currently included in the MND Live Access Server. This will allow teachers and students to choose data sets that they want to include in the mobile application without having to populate the API themselves. Through the use of easy to understand online mobile app tutorials and MND data sets, teachers will have the ability to generate unit-specific mobile applications to further engage and empower students in the science classroom.

Lewis, P.; Oostra, D.; Crecelius, S.; Chambers, L. H.

2012-08-01

381

The Blended Classroom Revolution: Virtual Technology Goes to School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While virtual schools, which currently serve only a tiny fraction of the nation's 48 million K-12 students, get all the buzz, a much bigger, largely untold story of online learning is unfolding in America's brick-and-mortar classrooms: a simple yet profound merger of virtual-school technology and the traditional classroom is taking place. This…

Weil, Marty

2009-01-01

382

Putting Books in the Classroom Seems Necessary But Not Sufficient  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors found statistically significant effects on the educational outcomes of kindergarten students enrolled in the classrooms of teachers who received a large supply of high-quality children's books and who participated in teacher development training. Kindergarten children who were taught by teachers who had a well-stocked classroom library and who had participated in a series of training sessions on the

Anne McGill-franzen; Richard L. Allington; Linda Yokoi; Gregory Brooks

1999-01-01

383

Teaching Cockpit Automation in the Classroom  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study explores the idea of teaching fundamental cockpit automation concepts and skills to aspiring professional pilots in a classroom setting, without the use of sophisticated aircraft or equipment simulators. Pilot participants from a local professional pilot academy completed eighteen hours of classroom instruction that placed a strong emphasis on understanding the underlying principles of cockpit automation systems and their use in a multi-crew cockpit. The instructional materials consisted solely of a single textbook. Pilots received no hands-on instruction or practice during their training. At the conclusion of the classroom instruction, pilots completed a written examination testing their mastery of what had been taught during the classroom meetings. Following the written exam, each pilot was given a check flight in a full-mission Level D simulator of a Boeing 747-400 aircraft. Pilots were given the opportunity to fly one practice leg, and were then tested on all concepts and skills covered in the class during a second leg. The results of the written exam and simulator checks strongly suggest that instruction delivered in a traditional classroom setting can lead to high levels of preparation without the need for expensive airplane or equipment simulators.

Casner, Stephen M.

2003-01-01

384

Ideas for the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author shares some of the activities for the classroom invented by Gill Hatch. One of those activities is the activity for older students, which is for the five-year-olds through to post-graduates. Card-sorting game, geometry games, algebra games, and loop games are also some of those activities for the classroom invented by…

Mathematics Teaching Incorporating Micromath, 2006

2006-01-01

385

For the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four games for use in the foreign language classroom are described. The first, "A Shopping Game," by Gordon Hartig, is played on a game board in the German classroom and provides practice in producing sentences with the preposition "in," which in some instances takes the dative and in others takes the accusative. A diagram of the game board is…

Hartig, Gordon; And Others

1978-01-01

386

Technology in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theme issue contains 20 articles dealing with technology in the classroom. The articles are: (1) "Distance Learning and the Future of Kamehameha Schools Bishop Estate" (Henry E. Meyer); (2) "Technology and Multiple Intelligences" (Bette Savini); (3) "Technology Brings Voyagers into Classrooms" (Kristina Inn and others); (4) "Technologies Old…

Speidel, Gisela E., Ed.

1995-01-01

387

Speaking in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Too much speaking and indiscipline in class is an on-going problem for any teacher, it is at its least disruptive and at most it destroys a good positive classroom atmosphere. This article recognizes this and continues this debate and suggests key clues to support teachers in their efforts to maintain a positive classroom atmosphere and discipline…

McBain, Robert

2011-01-01

388

The Homeliving Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A system of point cards, which may be redeemed in tokens, money, or privileges, motivates mentally retarded teenagers to succeed in a "homeliving" classroom employing individualized work stations to prepare functioning students to leave the institution and live in the community. The classroom procedures are outlined. (AJ)

Langdon, Katie

1975-01-01

389

Artifacts, Tools, and Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although schools contain many material artifacts, studies in classrooms have tended to focus on discourse and quality of social interaction even when artifacts are being used. Responding to Engstrom's (1999) invitation to take artifacts seriously, three studies are described in which a material object was essential to a classroom activity. The…

McDonald, Geraldine; Le, Huong; Higgins, Joanna; Podmore, Valerie

2005-01-01

390

Frontloading Classroom Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors describe a systematic approach to planning for the first days of school that is appropriate for today's demanding high school science classrooms. These strategies apply to any science subject and benefit student teachers, new teachers, and those teachers wishing to improve their classroom management skills. (Contains 3…

Roscoe, Keith; Orr, Kim

2010-01-01

391

Classroom versus Online Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined students' effort and performance using online versus traditional classroom testing procedures. The instructor and instructional methodology were the same in different sections of an introductory finance class. Only the procedure in which students were tested--online versus in the classroom--differed. The authors measured…

Spivey, Michael F.; McMillan, Jeffrey J.

2014-01-01

392

Classroom Management and Safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Welcome to the challenge of making good science come to life in your classroom. In this chapter, we look at how to get the science classroom ready for inquiry-based lessons and how to prepare students for engaging, productive, and safe activities. In addition, suggestions are provided to foster an emotionally safe environment for your middle level students.

Jackie Cleveland

2004-01-01

393

Epidemiology in the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This high school classroom exercise from the Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion gives an introduction to epidemiology. Visitors will find background materials (including an introduction to epidemiology and how to investigate and outbreak) and suggestions for classroom use.

394

Teacher Classroom Management Practices: Effects on Disruptive or Aggressive Student Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the large research base grounded in behavioral theory for strategies to increase appropriate behavior and prevent or decrease inappropriate behavior in the classroom, a systematic review of multi-component universal classroom management research is necessary to establish the effects of teachers' universal classroom management approaches.…

Oliver, Regina M.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Reschly, Daniel J.

2011-01-01

395

Neurosharing: large-scale data sets (spike, LFP) recorded from the hippocampal-entorhinal system in behaving rats.  

PubMed

Using silicon-based recording electrodes, we recorded neuronal activity of the dorsal hippocampus and dorsomedial entorhinal cortex from behaving rats. The entorhinal neurons were classified as principal neurons and interneurons based on monosynaptic interactions and wave-shapes. The hippocampal neurons were classified as principal neurons and interneurons based on monosynaptic interactions, wave-shapes and burstiness. The data set contains recordings from 7,736 neurons (6,100 classified as principal neurons, 1,132 as interneurons, and 504 cells that did not clearly fit into either category) obtained during 442 recording sessions from 11 rats (a total of 204.5 hours) while they were engaged in one of eight different behaviours/tasks. Both original and processed data (time stamp of spikes, spike waveforms, result of spike sorting and local field potential) are included, along with metadata of behavioural markers. Community-driven data sharing may offer cross-validation of findings, refinement of interpretations and facilitate discoveries. PMID:25075302

Mizuseki, Kenji; Diba, Kamran; Pastalkova, Eva; Teeters, Jeff; Sirota, Anton; Buzsáki, György

2014-01-01

396

Neurosharing: large-scale data sets (spike, LFP) recorded from the hippocampal-entorhinal system in behaving rats  

PubMed Central

Using silicon-based recording electrodes, we recorded neuronal activity of the dorsal hippocampus and dorsomedial entorhinal cortex from behaving rats. The entorhinal neurons were classified as principal neurons and interneurons based on monosynaptic interactions and wave-shapes. The hippocampal neurons were classified as principal neurons and interneurons based on monosynaptic interactions, wave-shapes and burstiness. The data set contains recordings from 7,736 neurons (6,100 classified as principal neurons, 1,132 as interneurons, and 504 cells that did not clearly fit into either category) obtained during 442 recording sessions from 11 rats (a total of 204.5 hours) while they were engaged in one of eight different behaviours/tasks. Both original and processed data (time stamp of spikes, spike waveforms, result of spike sorting and local field potential) are included, along with metadata of behavioural markers. Community-driven data sharing may offer cross-validation of findings, refinement of interpretations and facilitate discoveries. PMID:25075302

Mizuseki, Kenji; Diba, Kamran; Pastalkova, Eva; Teeters, Jeff; Sirota, Anton; Buzsáki, György

2014-01-01

397

Application of the RIMARC algorithm to a large data set of action potentials and clinical parameters for risk prediction of atrial fibrillation.  

PubMed

Ex vivo recorded action potentials (APs) in human right atrial tissue from patients in sinus rhythm (SR) or atrial fibrillation (AF) display a characteristic spike-and-dome or triangular shape, respectively, but variability is huge within each rhythm group. The aim of our study was to apply the machine-learning algorithm ranking instances by maximizing the area under the ROC curve (RIMARC) to a large data set of 480 APs combined with retrospectively collected general clinical parameters and to test whether the rules learned by the RIMARC algorithm can be used for accurately classifying the preoperative rhythm status. APs were included from 221 SR and 158 AF patients. During a learning phase, the RIMARC algorithm established a ranking order of 62 features by predictive value for SR or AF. The model was then challenged with an additional test set of features from 28 patients in whom rhythm status was blinded. The accuracy of the risk prediction for AF by the model was very good (0.93) when all features were used. Without the seven AP features, accuracy still reached 0.71. In conclusion, we have shown that training the machine-learning algorithm RIMARC with an experimental and clinical data set allows predicting a classification in a test data set with high accuracy. In a clinical setting, this approach may prove useful for finding hypothesis-generating associations between different parameters. PMID:25466224

Ravens, Ursula; Katircioglu-Öztürk, Deniz; Wettwer, Erich; Christ, Torsten; Dobrev, Dobromir; Voigt, Niels; Poulet, Claire; Loose, Simone; Simon, Jana; Stein, Agnes; Matschke, Klaus; Knaut, Michael; Oto, Emre; Oto, Ali; Güvenir, H Altay

2015-03-01

398

Professional Learning outside the Classroom: Expedition Iceland  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A bunch of intrepid teachers spent a week in Iceland in a quest to learn more about the country's challenging landscape, by engaging in a unique and inspiring professional development opportunity to learn about innovative ways to teach science and mathematics outside of a classroom setting. A 2008 Ofsted report highlighted the benefits of learning…

Jordan, Julie; Bull, Sue

2012-01-01

399

Mainstream Literature for Full, Inclusive Secondary Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The U.S. Department of Education (2000) reported that approximately 80% of students identified with learning disabilities (LD) received half of their instruction within the general education classroom setting. Therefore, it is important that general education teachers implement teaching strategies and practices that meet the distinct educational…

McFall, Lindsey; Fitzpatrick, Michael

2010-01-01

400

Classroom Voting Patterns in Differential Calculus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We study how different sections voted on the same set of classroom voting questions in differential calculus, finding that voting patterns can be used to identify some of the questions that have the most pedagogic value. We use statistics to identify three types of especially useful questions: 1. To identify good discussion questions, we look for…

Cline, Kelly; Zullo, Holly; VonEpps, Lahna

2012-01-01

401

Dynamic Assessment in the Language Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The focus of this paper is on the implementation of Dynamic Assessment (henceforth, DA) in the L2 classroom setting. DA is an approach to assessment and instruction derived from Vygotsky's theory of the Zone of Proximal Development (henceforth, ZPD). In what follows, we will first discuss briefly the concept of the ZPD and its realization in DA…

Poehner, Matthew E.; Lantolf, James P.

2005-01-01

402

Collaborative Learning in a Virtual Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website features an article describing a study which shows that effective communication is not happening in the virtual classroom. This failure appears to be fragmenting learning communities and causing feelings of isolation and confusion among some students. The article offers a set of fourteen pilot guidelines to help address this issue.

Julie Ann Richardson

403

Gesture in a Kindergarten Mathematics Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent studies have advocated that mathematical meaning is mediated by gestures. This case study explores the gestures kindergarten children produce when learning spatial concepts in a mathematics classroom setting. Based on a video study of a mathematical lesson in a kindergarten class, we concentrated on the verbal and non-verbal behavior of one…

Elia, Iliada; Evangelou, Kyriacoulla

2014-01-01

404

Accountable game designs for classroom learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simple yet powerful design strategy for leveraging children's natural proclivity to play has been to tie educational content to the rules of a game. A common criticism of many game designs used in classroom settings however, is that they fail to meaningfully embody content. Another, more subtle problem, is that design elements such as chance and skill; competitive versus

Timothy Charoenying

2008-01-01

405

Bully Prevention in the Physical Education Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bullying takes on many forms and occurs in all classrooms, and the activities found in physical education often provide fertile ground for these behaviors. For example, dodgeball is often played in physical education settings, even though the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance has clearly stated that dodgeball…

Fuller, Brett; Gulbrandson, Kim; Herman-Ukasick, Beth

2013-01-01

406

Negotiated Interaction in the L2 Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present paper reports on an approximate replication of Foster's (1998) study on the negotiation of meaning. Foster investigated the interactional adjustments produced by L2 English learners working on different types of language learning tasks in a classroom setting. The replication study duplicates the methods of data collection and data…

Eckerth, Johannes

2009-01-01

407

The Gay Word in a Junior Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers concerned with issues of social justice are sometimes confronted by classroom incidents that compel them to take action. This article draws on an incident in a primary school setting where deprecating language, used toward a child of lesbian parents, challenged the teacher to confront the issue of homophobic language. The teacher worked…

Hardie, Ann; Bowers, Warren

2012-01-01

408

Classroom Management Challenges in the Dance Class  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching dance can be a challenge because of the unique classroom-management situations that arise from the dynamic nature of the class content. Management is a delicate navigation of advance planning; rule setting; the establishment and implementation of daily protocols, routines, and interventions; and the teacher's own presentation. This…

Clark, Dawn

2007-01-01

409

The Physics Classroom: Graph Sketching and Recognition  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This set of interactive practice questions allows students of introductory physics to test their own understanding of the graphical depiction of motion. It consists of 37 questions/tasks, with answers provided. Extensive scaffolding is provided in the form of "Explanation" links. This resource is part of The Physics Classroom an educational website for teachers and learners of introductory physics.

Tom Henderson

410

Stirling Engine for Classroom Demonstration Purposes  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the study of Thermodynamics, the Carnot cycle is representative of an ideal engine. Such an engine has the maximum efficiency possible for a given temperature difference. The Stirling Cycle engine closely resembles the Carnot cycle in terms of efficiency. In order to demonstrate the Stirling Cycle in a classroom setting, a Stirling engine was built. Robert Stirling first patented

Andrew Miller

2005-01-01

411

Preschool Teachers' Exposure to Classroom Noise  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research examined exposure to classroom noise of 25 full-time teaching staff in 14 preschool settings located across Western Sydney. The results indicated that one teacher exceeded the maximum permissible level of daily noise exposure for employees under the health and safety legislation. Three staff approached this level and 92% of teachers…

Grebennikov, Leonid

2006-01-01

412

Observed Classroom Quality Profiles of Kindergarten Classrooms in Finland  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: The aim of the present study was to examine classroom quality profiles of kindergarten classrooms using a person-centered approach and to analyze these patterns in regard to teacher and classroom characteristics. Observations of the domains of Emotional Support, Classroom Organization, and Instructional Support were conducted in…

Salminen, Jenni; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Pakarinen, Eija; Siekkinen, Martti; Hannikainen, Maritta; Poikonen, Pirjo-Liisa; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena

2012-01-01

413

Application of a statistical software package for analysis of large patient dose data sets obtained from RIS.  

PubMed

For the purpose of patient dose audit, clinical audit and radiology workload analysis, data from Radiology Information Systems (RIS) at many hospitals are collected using a database and the analysis was automated using a statistical package and Visual Basic coding. The database is a Structured Query Language database, which can be queried using an off-the-shelf statistical package, Statistica. Macros were created to automatically format the data to a consistent format between different hospitals ready for analysis. These macros can also be used to automate further analysis such as detailing mean kV, mAs and entrance surface dose per room and per gender. Standard deviation and standard error of the mean are also generated. Graphs can also be generated to illustrate the trends in doses between different variables such as room and gender. Collectively, this information can be used to generate a report. A process that once could take up to 1 d to complete now takes around 1 h. A major benefit in providing the service to hospital trusts is that less resource is now required to report on RIS data, making the possibility of continuous dose audit more likely. Time that was spent on sorting through data can now be spent on improving the analysis to provide benefit to the customer. Using data sets from RIS is a good way to perform dose audits as the huge numbers of data available provide the bases for very accurate analysis. Using macros written in Statistica Visual Basic has helped sort and consistently analyse these data. Being able to analyse by exposure factors has provided a more detailed report to the customer. PMID:20304769

Fazakerley, J; Charnock, P; Wilde, R; Jones, R; Ward, M

2010-01-01

414

NASA Classroom Bioreactor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Exploration of space provides a compelling need for cell-based research into the basic mechanisms that underlie the profound changes that occur in terrestrial life that is transitioned to low gravity environments. Toward that end, NASA developed a rotating bioreactor in which cells are cultured while continuously suspended in a cylinder in which the culture medium rotates with the cylinder. The randomization of the gravity vector accomplished by the continuous rotation, in a low shear environment, provides an analog of microgravity. Because cultures grown in bioreactors develop structures and functions that are much closer to those exhibited by native tissue than can be achieved with traditional culture methods, bioreactors have contributed substantially to advancing research in the fields of cancer, diabetes, infectious disease modeling for vaccine production, drug efficacy, and tissue engineering. NASA has developed a Classroom Bioreactor (CB) that is built from parts that are easily obtained and assembled, user-friendly and versatile. It can be easily used in simple school settings to examine the effect cultures of seeds or cells. An educational brief provides assembly instructions and lesson plans that describes activities in science, math and technology that explore free fall, microgravity, orbits, bioreactors, structure-function relationships and the scientific method.

Scully, Robert

2004-01-01

415

LINC-NIRVANA for the large binocular telescope: setting up the world's largest near infrared binoculars for astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

LINC-NIRVANA (LN) is the near-infrared, Fizeau-type imaging interferometer for the large binocular telescope (LBT) on Mt. Graham, Arizona (elevation of 3267 m). The instrument is currently being built by a consortium of German and Italian institutes under the leadership of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany. It will combine the radiation from both 8.4 m primary mirrors of LBT in such a way that the sensitivity of a 11.9 m telescope and the spatial resolution of a 22.8 m telescope will be obtained within a 10.5×10.5 arcsec scientific field of view. Interferometric fringes of the combined beams are tracked in an oval field with diameters of 1 and 1.5 arcmin. In addition, both incoming beams are individually corrected by LN's multiconjugate adaptive optics system to reduce atmospheric image distortion over a circular field of up to 6 arcmin in diameter. A comprehensive technical overview of the instrument is presented, comprising the detailed design of LN's four major systems for interferometric imaging and fringe tracking, both in the near infrared range of 1 to 2.4 ?m, as well as atmospheric turbulence correction at two altitudes, both in the visible range of 0.6 to 0.9 ?m. The resulting performance capabilities and a short outlook of some of the major science goals will be presented. In addition, the roadmap for the related assembly, integration, and verification process are discussed. To avoid late interface-related risks, strategies for early hardware as well as software interactions with the telescope have been elaborated. The goal is to ship LN to the LBT in 2014.

Hofferbert, Ralph; Baumeister, Harald; Bertram, Thomas; Berwein, Jürgen; Bizenberger, Peter; Böhm, Armin; Böhm, Michael; Borelli, José Luis; Brangier, Matthieu; Briegel, Florian; Conrad, Albert; De Bonis, Fulvio; Follert, Roman; Herbst, Tom; Huber, Armin; Kittmann, Frank; Kürster, Martin; Laun, Werner; Mall, Ulrich; Meschke, Daniel; Mohr, Lars; Naranjo, Vianak; Pavlov, Aleksei; Pott, Jörg-Uwe; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer; Schinnerer, Eva; Storz, Clemens; Trowitzsch, Jan; Yan, Zhaojun; Zhang, Xianyu; Eckart, Andreas; Horrobin, Matthew; Rost, Steffen; Straubmeier, Christian; Wank, Imke; Zuther, Jens; Beckmann, Udo; Connot, Claus; Heininger, Matthias; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Kröner, Tim; Nussbaum, Eddy; Schertl, Dieter; Weigelt, Gerd; Bergomi, Maria; Brunelli, Alessandro; Dima, Marco; Farinato, Jacopo; Magrin, Demetrio; Marafatto, Luca; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Viotto, Valentina; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Bregoli, Giovanni; Ciliegi, Paolo; Cosentino, Guiseppe; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Foppiani, Italo; Lombini, Matteo; Schreiber, Laura; D'Alessio, Francesco; Li Causi, Gianluca; Lorenzetti, Dario; Vitali, Fabrizio; Bertero, Mario; Boccacci, Patrizia; La Camera, Andrea

2013-08-01

416

HLA-B37 and HLA-A2.1 molecules bind largely nonoverlapping sets of peptides.  

PubMed Central

T-cell recognition of peptides that are bound and presented by class I major histocompatibility complex molecules is highly specific. At present it is unclear what role class I peptide binding plays relative to T-cell receptor specificity in determination of immune recognition. A previous study from our group demonstrated that the HLA-A2.1 molecule could bind to 25% of the members of a panel of unrelated synthetic peptides as assessed by a functional peptide competition assay. To determine the peptide-binding specificity of another HLA class I molecule, we have examined the capacity of this panel of peptides to compete for the presentation of influenza virus nucleoprotein peptide NP-(335-350) by HLA-B37 to NP-peptide-specific HLA-B37-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte lines. Forty-two percent of peptides tested were capable of inhibiting NP-(335-350) presentation by HLA-B37. Remarkably, none of these HLA-B37-binding peptides belong to the subset that was previously shown to bind to the HLA-A2.1 molecule. Only the NP-(335-350) peptide was capable of binding to both HLA-A2.1 and HLA-B37. These findings demonstrate that the peptide-binding specificities of HLA-B37 and HLA-A2.1 are largely nonoverlapping and suggest that, from the universe of peptides, individual HLA class I molecules can bind to clearly distinct subsets of these peptides. PMID:2333291

Carreno, B M; Anderson, R W; Coligan, J E; Biddison, W E

1990-01-01

417

Classroom Management: Theory into Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educators cite classroom management as intrinsic to the learning process. This paper presents a broad picture of classroom management and offers some suggestions for actual classroom implementation. Major findings are highlighted, along with practical techniques for their instructional application. Classroom management is an organizational process…

Guernsey, Marsha A.; Peary, Marjorie

418

Eruptive history and tectonic setting of Medicine Lake Volcano, a large rear-arc volcano in the southern Cascades  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV), located in the southern Cascades ??? 55??km east-northeast of contemporaneous Mount Shasta, has been found by exploratory geothermal drilling to have a surprisingly silicic core mantled by mafic lavas. This unexpected result is very different from the long-held view derived from previous mapping of exposed geology that MLV is a dominantly basaltic shield volcano. Detailed mapping shows that < 6% of the ??? 2000??km2 of mapped MLV lavas on this southern Cascade Range shield-shaped edifice are rhyolitic and dacitic, but drill holes on the edifice penetrated more than 30% silicic lava. Argon dating yields ages in the range ??? 475 to 300??ka for early rhyolites. Dates on the stratigraphically lowest mafic lavas at MLV fall into this time frame as well, indicating that volcanism at MLV began about half a million years ago. Mafic compositions apparently did not dominate until ??? 300??ka. Rhyolite eruptions were scarce post-300??ka until late Holocene time. However, a dacite episode at ??? 200 to ??? 180??ka included the volcano's only ash-flow tuff, which was erupted from within the summit caldera. At ??? 100??ka, compositionally distinctive high-Na andesite and minor dacite built most of the present caldera rim. Eruption of these lavas was followed soon after by several large basalt flows, such that the combined area covered by eruptions between 100??ka and postglacial time amounts to nearly two-thirds of the volcano's area. Postglacial eruptive activity was strongly episodic and also covered a disproportionate amount of area. The volcano has erupted 9 times in the past 5200??years, one of the highest rates of late Holocene eruptive activity in the Cascades. Estimated volume of MLV is ??? 600??km3, giving an overall effusion rate of ??? 1.2??km3 per thousand years, although the rate for the past 100??kyr may be only half that. During much of the volcano's history, both dry HAOT (high-alumina olivine tholeiite) and hydrous calcalkaline basalts erupted together in close temporal and spatial proximity. Petrologic studies indicate that the HAOT magmas were derived by dry melting of spinel peridotite mantle near the crust mantle boundary. Subduction-derived H2O-rich fluids played an important role in the generation of calcalkaline magmas. Petrology, geochemistry and proximity indicate that MLV is part of the Cascades magmatic arc and not a Basin and Range volcano, although Basin and Range extension impinges on the volcano and strongly influences its eruptive style. MLV may be analogous to Mount Adams in southern Washington, but not, as sometimes proposed, to the older distributed back-arc Simcoe Mountains volcanic field.

Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Grove, T.L.; Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E.; Ramsey, D.W.

2008-01-01

419

Supporting students' strategic competence: a case of a sixth-grade mathematics classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mathematics education research has documented several classroom practices that might influence student self-regulation. We know little, however, about the ways these classroom practices could be structured in real classroom settings. In this exploratory case study, we purposefully selected a sixth-grade mathematics teacher who had participated in a professional development program focussed on NCTM standards and SRL in the mathematics classroom for extensive classroom observation. The purpose was to explore how and to what extend she structured classroom practices to support strategic competence in her students. Four features of classroom practices were found as evidence for how strategic competence was potentially supported in this classroom: (a) allowing autonomy and shared responsibility during the early stages of learning, (b) focusing on student understanding, (c) creating contexts for students to learn about strategic learning and to exercise strategic behaviour, and (d) helping students to personalise strategies by recognising their ideas and strategic behaviours.

Özdemir, ?. Elif Yetkin; Pape, Stephen J.

2012-06-01

420

The Inclusion Classroom. Your Middle School Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Special education students struggle with labels. Other kids can be very cruel with names and attitudes toward anyone who is different. Teachers cannot solve this problem completely, but they can minimize its effects with careful manipulation. The author, a teacher in an inclusion classroom, suggests passing out modified assignments along with all…

Barnes, Peter

2006-01-01

421

Classroom Research by Classroom Teachers, 1992.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume celebrates teachers as life-long learners of the art of teaching, by presenting 21 action research studies designed and implemented by classroom teachers. A "How To Get Started" section outlines action research steps and offers worksheets. Descriptions of the research studies begin with ethnographic studies, which include "Adopt a…

Tanner, Michael, Ed.

1992-01-01

422

Consistency of Toddler Engagement across Two Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study documented the consistency of child engagement across two settings, toddler child care classrooms and mother-child dyadic play. One hundred twelve children, aged 14-36 months (M = 25.17, SD = 6.06), randomly selected from 30 toddler child care classrooms from the district of Porto, Portugal, participated. Levels of engagement were…

Aguiar, Cecilia; McWilliam, R. A.

2013-01-01

423

Antithrombotic Utilization Trends after Noncardioembolic Ischemic Stroke or TIA in the Setting of Large Antithrombotic Trials (2002–2009)  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose Several large trials published over the last decade have significantly altered recommended guidelines for therapy following a noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). The impact of these studies on patient usage of alternative antithrombotic agents has hitherto not been evaluated. We examined the usage of these agents in the United States over the last decade, with regard to the publication of the Management of Atherothrombosis with Clopidogrel in High-Risk Patients (MATCH), European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischaemia Trial (ESPRIT), and Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) clinical trials, in order to test the hypothesis that resulting recommendations are reflected in usage trends. Methods Antithrombotic utilization was prospectively collected as part of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) on a total of 53,608,351 patients in the United States between 2002 and 2009. Patients with a history of ischemic stroke or TIA were included. Patients were excluded if there was a prior history of subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage, or if other indications for antithrombotic treatment were present, including deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, atrial fibrillation or flutter, mechanical cardiac valve replacement, congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. Annual utilization of the following antithrombotic strategies was compared in 53,608,351 patients: 1) aspirin monotherapy, 2) clopidogrel monotherapy, 3) combined clopidogrel and aspirin, 4) combined extended-release dipyridamole (ERDP) and aspirin, and 5) warfarin. Annual utilization was compared before and after publication of MATCH, ESPRIT, and PRoFESS in 2004, 2006, and 2008, respectively. Trend analysis was performed with the Mantel–Haenszel test for trends. Sensitivity analysis of demographic and clinical characteristics stratified by antithrombotic-usage group was performed using the Wald Chi-square test. Results Utilization of combined clopidogrel and aspirin increased from 3.3% to 6.7% after the MATCH trial (p<0.0001). Following the results of the ESPRIT trial, utilization of combination ERDP and aspirin decreased from 4% to 3% (p<0.0001), utilization of clopidogrel declined from 6.8% to 6% (p<0.0001), and utilization of aspirin remained essentially unchanged. After the PRoFESS trial, utilization of clopidogrel increased from 5% to 9% (p<0.0001), utilization of ERDP-aspirin increased from 3 % to 4.6% (p<0.0001), and utilization of aspirin increased from 15.6% to 17.8% (p<0.0001). The proportion of patients on none of the five antithrombotic secondary prevention strategies steadily declined from a peak of 74% in 2003 to 57% by 2009. Conclusions The impact of the MATCH, ESPRIT, and PRoFESS trials on antithrombotic utilization has been variable. These findings highlight the importance of addressing factors that affect the implementation of findings from major clinical trials.

Khan, Amir S.; Qureshi, Adnan I.

2015-01-01

424

Peer Groups in Evolution: Inventing Classroom Communities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It can be very difficult for writers to invent classroom communities, to share their writing; it can be especially difficult for anxious young writers who have never before worked in peer groups. Student participation is largely influenced by gender roles shaped by years of socialization. Teachers should not be startled by less female…

Sommers, Elizabeth

425

Discovering Students' Voices in Teachers' Classroom Inquiry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study is part of a large project on teacher research and professional development in progress in the Teacher Enhancement Program (TEP), a collaborative mid-career program between the University of New Mexico and local public schools. The objective of the study was to describe teachers' engagement in classroom inquiry and the transformative…

Torres, Myriam N.

426

Classroom Instruction: The Influences of Marie Clay  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Marie Clay's body of work has influenced classroom instruction in direct and indirect ways, through large overarching themes in our pedagogical content knowledge as well as specific smart practices. This paper focuses on her the contributions to our thinking about instruction which come from two broad theoretical concepts; emergent literacy…

McNaughton, Stuart

2014-01-01

427

Tools to achieve the analysis of large data-set and handling intensity variations of sources with INTEGRAL/SPI : mapping of the sky and study of large-scale structures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nowadays, analysis and reduction of the ever-larger data-sets becomes a crucial issue, especially for long periods of observation combined. The INTEGRAL/SPI X/gamma-ray spectrometer (20 keV-8 MeV) is an instrument for which it is essential to process many exposures at the same time to increase the low signal-to-noise ratio weakest sources and/or low-surface brightness extended emission. Processing several years of data simultaneously (10 years actually) requires to compute not only the solution of a large system of equations (linear or non-linear), but also the associated uncertainties. In this context, traditional methods of data reduction are ineffective and sometimes not possible at all. Thanks to the newly developed tools, processing large data-sets from SPI is now possible both with a reasonable turnaround time and low memory usage. We propose also techniques that help overcome difficulties related to the intensity variation of sources/backgreound between sources between consecutive exposures. They allow the construction of pseudo light-curves of a more rational way. We have developed a specific algorithm which involves the transfer function SPI. Based on these advanced tools, we have developed imaging algorithms. Finally, we show some applications to point-sources studies and to the imaging and morphologies study of the large scale structures of the Galaxy ( 511 kev electron-positron annihilation line, the (26) Al line and the diffuse continuum).

Bouchet, Laurent

428

Classroom Misbehavior in the Eyes of Students: A Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Using individual interviews, this study investigated perceptions of classroom misbehaviors among secondary school students in Hong Kong (N = 18). Nineteen categories of classroom misbehaviors were identified, with talking out of turn, disrespecting teacher, and doing something in private being most frequently mentioned. Findings revealed that students tended to perceive misbehaviors as those actions inappropriate in the classroom settings and even disrupting teachers' teaching and other students' learning. Among various misbehaviors, talking out of turn and disrespecting teacher were seen as the most disruptive and unacceptable. These misbehaviors were unacceptable because they disturbed teaching and learning, and violated the values of respect, conformity, and obedience in the teacher-student relationship within the classroom. The frequency and intensity of misbehaviors would escalate if students found it fun, no punishment for such misbehaviors, or teachers were not authoritative enough in controlling the situations. Implications for further research and classroom management are discussed. PMID:22919316

Sun, Rachel C. F.; Shek, Daniel T. L.

2012-01-01

429

Classroom misbehavior in the eyes of students: a qualitative study.  

PubMed

Using individual interviews, this study investigated perceptions of classroom misbehaviors among secondary school students in Hong Kong (N = 18). Nineteen categories of classroom misbehaviors were identified, with talking out of turn, disrespecting teacher, and doing something in private being most frequently mentioned. Findings revealed that students tended to perceive misbehaviors as those actions inappropriate in the classroom settings and even disrupting teachers' teaching and other students' learning. Among various misbehaviors, talking out of turn and disrespecting teacher were seen as the most disruptive and unacceptable. These misbehaviors were unacceptable because they disturbed teaching and learning, and violated the values of respect, conformity, and obedience in the teacher-student relationship within the classroom. The frequency and intensity of misbehaviors would escalate if students found it fun, no punishment for such misbehaviors, or teachers were not authoritative enough in controlling the situations. Implications for further research and classroom management are discussed. PMID:22919316

Sun, Rachel C F; Shek, Daniel T L

2012-01-01

430

Toys in The Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A number of chemical concepts can be easily illustrated in a more friendly way to children by using toys as teaching tools in the classroom. Some of the examples illustrated are shrinking toys, drinking birds and hand boiler.

Sarquis, Jerry L.; Sarquis, Arlyne M.

2005-01-01

431

Cartoons in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Approaches the topic of responsible pet care through the use of cartoon strips. Provides a two-page cartoon layout that can be duplicated for classroom use. Poses questions for possible discussions and investigations. (ML)

Children and Animals, 1985

1985-01-01

432

Climatic Conditions in Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an overview of research on the ways in which classroom thermal environment, lighting conditions, ion state, and electromagnetic and air pollution affect learning and the performance of students and teachers. (SJL)

Kevan, Simon M.; Howes, John D.

1980-01-01

433

Polymer Literature for Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lists eight sources of technical information suitable for classroom use which deal with polymer materials. Provides the names and addresses of these societies and associations and describes the type of information each has available. (TW)

Kirshenbaum, Gerald S.

1987-01-01

434

Frontloading Classroom Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this article, the authors describe a systematic approach to planning for the first days of school that is appropriate for today's demanding high school science classrooms. These strategies apply to any science subject and benefit student teachers, new

Keith Roscoe

2010-07-01

435

Craters in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Details an activity in which students create and study miniature impact craters in the classroom. Engages students in making detailed, meaningful observations, drawing inferences, reaching conclusions based on scientific evidence, and designing experiments to test selected variables. (DDR)

McArdle, Heather K.

1997-01-01

436

The Classroom Animal.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the behavior, housing, care, diet, and feeding of painted turtles. Also suggests several classroom activities and provides guidelines related to long-term captivity and human disease prevention. (DH)

Kramer, David C., Ed.

1985-01-01

437

The Classroom Space Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces the Classroom Space project aimed at revitalizing science education at Key Stages 3 and 4 by using exciting examples from Space Science and Astronomy to illustrate key science concepts. (Author/YDS)

Verbickas, Sarah

2002-01-01

438

Critters in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of invertebrates as classroom "pets" can develop students' skills in scientific inquiry and instill respect for science. Few materials are needed for projects involving invertebrates. Suggested activities using snails, crickets, earthworms, crayfish, and guppies are offered. (DF)

Smith, Robert W.; Fleisher, Paul

1984-01-01

439

In the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using cartoons and comic strips to teach the concept of social class and newspapers to teach economic principles are suggested classroom activities for elementary and secondary courses. A lesson plan for teaching democratic values is also included. (JR)

History and Social Science Teacher, 1975

1975-01-01

440

Stargazing in Your Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When taking students outside to see the stars is not an option, teachers can bring the stars inside the classroom. These instructions for building a portable planetarium also include suggestions for cross-cultural and social studies connections.

Jos? Rios

2003-05-01

441

Natural Resources: Outdoor Classrooms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An outdoor classroom is the ideal vehicle for community involvement: Parents, native plant societies, 4-H, garden clubs, and master naturalists are all resources waiting to be tapped, as are local businesses offering support. If you enlist your community

Valynda Mayes

2010-02-01

442

Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides information on various classroom assessment techniques (CATs) such as primary trait analysis, using anonymous assessments, goal ranking and matching, self assessment, active learning, transfer and applied learning, and group work assessment.

443

For the Classroom: Scrimshaw.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Procedures are described for practicing the art of scrimshaw in the classroom. Several materials are suggested for use. These include beef soup bones, old piano keys, nails, sandpaper, and lampblack or charcoal. (SA)

Current, 1979

1979-01-01

444

Floor Plan Your Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource guides the learner, step-by-step, in creating a scale floor plan of a classroom. The instructions include sample drawings of student work. The activity includes: sketching a map of the classroom; measuring the room and calculating the area and perimeter; creating a scale drawing; and drafting a CAD (computer-aided design) floor plan. The lesson provides students with hands-on, real world practice solving problems of measurement, ratio, and scale.

2010-07-19

445

Solar Powered Classroom  

ScienceCinema

A group of fourth graders in Durham, North Carolina, are showing America the way to a clean energy future. They are installing solar panels on their classroom roof for a project that goes above and beyond a normal day in school. From researching solar panel installation, to generating funds for the project via Kickstarter, these are students who put their plans into action. Their accomplishments go beyond the classroom and stress the importance of getting people of all ages involved in renewable energy.

none

2013-06-27

446

Solar Powered Classroom  

SciTech Connect

A group of fourth graders in Durham, North Carolina, are showing America the way to a clean energy future. They are installing solar panels on their classroom roof for a project that goes above and beyond a normal day in school. From researching solar panel installation, to generating funds for the project via Kickstarter, these are students who put their plans into action. Their accomplishments go beyond the classroom and stress the importance of getting people of all ages involved in renewable energy.

none

2013-06-13

447

A geometrical correction for the inter- and intra-molecular basis set superposition error in Hartree-Fock and density functional theory calculations for large systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A semi-empirical counterpoise-type correction for basis set superposition error (BSSE) in molecular systems is presented. An atom pair-wise potential corrects for the inter- and intra-molecular BSSE in supermolecular Hartree-Fock (HF) or density functional theory (DFT) calculations. This geometrical counterpoise (gCP) denoted scheme depends only on the molecular geometry, i.e., no input from the electronic wave-function is required and hence is applicable to molecules with ten thousands of atoms. The four necessary parameters have been determined by a fit to standard Boys and Bernadi counterpoise corrections for Hobza's S66×8 set of non-covalently bound complexes (528 data points). The method's target are small basis sets (e.g., minimal, split-valence, 6-31G*), but reliable results are also obtained for larger triple-? sets. The intermolecular BSSE is calculated by gCP within a typical error of 10%-30% that proves sufficient in many practical applications. The approach is suggested as a quantitative correction in production work and can also be routinely applied to estimate the magnitude of the BSSE beforehand. The applicability for biomolecules as the primary target is tested for the crambin protein, where gCP removes intramolecular BSSE effectively and yields conformational energies comparable to def2-TZVP basis results. Good mutual agreement is also found with Jensen's ACP(4) scheme, estimating the intramolecular BSSE in the phenylalanine-glycine-phenylalanine tripeptide, for which also a relaxed rotational energy profile is presented. A variety of minimal and double-? basis sets combined with gCP and the dispersion corrections DFT-D3 and DFT-NL are successfully benchmarked on the S22 and S66 sets of non-covalent interactions. Outstanding performance with a mean absolute deviation (MAD) of 0.51 kcal/mol (0.38 kcal/mol after D3-refit) is obtained at the gCP-corrected HF-D3/(minimal basis) level for the S66 benchmark. The gCP-corrected B3LYP-D3/6-31G* model chemistry yields MAD=0.68 kcal/mol, which represents a huge improvement over plain B3LYP/6-31G* (MAD=2.3 kcal/mol). Application of gCP-corrected B97-D3 and HF-D3 on a set of large protein-ligand complexes prove the robustness of the method. Analytical gCP gradients make optimizations of large systems feasible with small basis sets, as demonstrated for the inter-ring distances of 9-helicene and most of the complexes in Hobza's S22 test set. The method is implemented in a freely available FORTRAN program obtainable from the author's website.

Kruse, Holger; Grimme, Stefan

2012-04-01

448

Methodologic implications of social inequalities for analyzing health disparities in large spatiotemporal data sets: an example using breast cancer incidence data (Northern and Southern California, 1988--2002).  

PubMed

Efforts to monitor, investigate, and ultimately eliminate health disparities across racial/ethnic and socioeconomic groups can benefit greatly from spatiotemporal models that enable exploration of spatial and temporal variation in health. Hierarchical Bayes methods are well-established tools in the statistical literature for fitting such models, as they permit smoothing of unstable small-area rates. However, issues presented by 'real-life' surveillance data can be a barrier to routine use of these models by epidemiologists. These include (1) shifting of regional boundaries over time, (2) social inequalities in racial/ethnic residential segregation, which imply differential spatial structuring across different racial/ethnic groups, and (3) heavy computational burdens for large spatiotemporal data sets. Using data from a study of changing socioeconomic gradients in female breast cancer incidence in two population-based cancer registries covering the San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles County, CA (1988--2002), we illustrate a two-stage approach to modeling health disparities and census tract (CT) variation in incidence over time. In the first stage, we fit race- and year-specific spatial models using CT boundaries normalized to the U.S. Census 2000. In stage 2, temporal patterns in the race- and year-specific estimates of racial/ethnic and socioeconomic effects are explored using a variety of methods. Our approach provides a straightforward means of fitting spatiotemporal models in large data sets, while highlighting differences in spatial patterning across racial/ethnic population and across time. PMID:18551507

Chen, Jarvis T; Coull, Brent A; Waterman, Pamela D; Schwartz, Joel; Krieger, Nancy

2008-09-10

449

Assessing the large-scale spatial representativeness of temporal dynamics of soil moisture over the United States using point and global scale data sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several studies highlight the important role of soil moisture in the water and energy cycles. Soil moisture is variable on both temporal and spatial scale, which is characterized by small- and large-scale variability as well as short- and long-term processes within the system. Several soil moisture data sets ranging from the point to the global scales are available and provide a promising tool to investigate the spatio-temporal variability as well as spatial representativeness of soil moisture. In the current study we assess the large-scale spatial representativeness of soil moisture over the United States using point as well as global scale soil moisture data sets. The following three data sets are used: (i) point scale in-situ measurements obtained through the International Soil Moisture Network (ISMN), provide soil moisture measurements at different depths and are defined as reference data set; at the global scale the (ii) remote sensing based Essential Climate Variable soil moisture data set (ECV-SM) from the European Space Agency (ESA), representing surface soil moisture for the period 1978 to 2010, as well as (iii) soil moisture estimates from the land surface model ERA Interim/Land, including soil moisture for four different soil layers over the period 1979 to 2010. Following Orlowsky and Seneviratne (in press) the spatial representativeness at the point scale is determined by defining an area surrounding a station in which other stations exhibit similar temporal dynamics, according to a given cutoff of similarity. Consequently, the areal extent of this area gives the measure of spatial representativeness. This method is similarly applied to the gridded data sets, where the area is then defined by the areal extent of the grid cells that comply with the similarity criteria. The spatial representativeness is calculated for the period April to September for absolute values, as well as for short- and long-term anomalies. We use the top soil layer for all three products, and in addition the root zone soil layer for ERA Interim/Land and the in-situ measurements. First results show that the spatial pattern of ERA Interim/Land representativeness compares better to in-situ for the absolute values of soil moisture while for the anomalies of soil moisture the ECV-SM compares better. Additionally, for the absolute values of soil moisture, ERA Interim/Land compares better to in-situ for areas of large spatial representativeness, while for the anomalies of soil moisture ECV-SM compares better to in-situ for small spatial representativeness. Further investigation will link the identified spatial patterns to, among others, large-scale circulation. References Orlowsky, B. and S.I. Seneviratne (in press), Short Communication: On the spatial representativeness of temporal dynamics at European weather stations, Int. J. of Climatology.

Nicolai-Shaw, Nadine; Hirschi, Martin; Mittelbach, Heidi; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

2014-05-01

450

Using a Classroom Approach To Teach Peer Mediation to Grades 3 and 4 by Developing a Peacebuster Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This practicum set up a classroom-based model for peer mediation in grades 3 and 4. During the project's implementation, the school psychologist delivered, individually to each of 6 different third and fourth-grade classrooms, 8 weeks of classroom instruction on conflict resolution. When all 6 classes were familiar with conflict resolution…

Aitken, Claudia Jean

451

Classroom research and child and adolescent development in South america.  

PubMed

The article reviews recent classroom research developed in South America related to child and adolescent development. We review work about three themes: ethnicity, school climate and violence, and the learning process. The few studies found on ethnicity and classroom experiences told a story of invisibility, if not exclusion and discrimination. Research on violence suggests that, although there are variations within countries, school climate is an area of concern. Intervention work, still limited, is necessary considering the incidence of violence in the classrooms. Research on learning showed that most classrooms adhere to a very conventional pedagogy. There is a need to advance on international comparisons across all themes. Similarly, there is a need to go beyond the description of classroom dynamics to test educational interventions that may shed light on ways to improve educational performance, to decrease school violence, and to promote diversity within the classroom. Notwithstanding its limitations, the research here reviewed provides clear evidence of the relevant role that classroom experiences play in human development. In addition to their essential role in schooling, classrooms are the settings where processes related to peer relations, identity formation, and socioemotional development unfold. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25732019

Preiss, David Daniel; Calcagni, Elisa; Grau, Valeska

2015-03-01

452

mzDB: A File Format Using Multiple Indexing Strategies for the Efficient Analysis of Large LC-MS/MS and SWATH-MS Data Sets.  

PubMed

The analysis and management of MS data, especially those generated by data independent MS acquisition, exemplified by SWATH-MS, pose significant challenges for proteomics bioinformatics. The large size and vast amount of information inherent to these data sets need to be properly structured to enable an efficient and straightforward extraction of the signals used to identify specific target peptides. Standard XML based formats are not well suited to large MS data files, for example, those generated by SWATH-MS, and compromise high-throughput data processing and storing. We developed mzDB, an efficient file format for large MS data sets. It relies on the SQLite software library and consists of a standardized and portable server-less single-file database. An optimized 3D indexing approach is adopted, where the LC-MS coordinates (retention time and m/z), along with the precursor m/z for SWATH-MS data, are used to query the database for data extraction. In comparison with XML formats, mzDB saves ?25% of storage space and improves access times by a factor of twofold up to even 2000-fold, depending on the particular data access. Similarly, mzDB shows also slightly to significantly lower access times in comparison with other formats like mz5. Both C++ and Java implementations, converting raw or XML formats to mzDB and providing access methods, will be released under permissive license. mzDB can be easily accessed by the SQLite C library and its drivers for all major languages, and browsed with existing dedicated GUIs. The mzDB described here can boost existing mass spectrometry data analysis pipelines, offering unprecedented performance in terms of efficiency, portability, compactness, and flexibility. PMID:25505153

Bouyssié, David; Dubois, Marc; Nasso, Sara; Gonzalez de Peredo, Anne; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Aebersold, Ruedi; Monsarrat, Bernard

2015-03-01

453

Policy and Strategies for ESL Pedagogy in Multilingual Classrooms: The Classroom Talk Programme  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores the impact of a specially designed programme of communicative strategies on English second language (ESL) development in a scaffolded case study that set out to promote teacher-guided, constructive learner talk in the outcomes-based education arts and culture classroom. The programme was implemented in a multilingual secondary…

Naicker, Shalina; Balfour, Robert J.

2009-01-01

454

Exposures to Molds in School Classrooms of Children with Asthma  

PubMed Central

Background Students spend a large portion of their day in classrooms which may be a source of mold exposure. We examined the diversity and concentrations of molds in inner-city schools and described differences between classrooms within the same school. Methods Classroom airborne mold spores, collected over a 2 day period, were measured twice during the school year by direct microscopy. Results There were 180 classroom air samples collected from 12 schools. Mold was present in 100% of classrooms. Classrooms within the same school had differing mold levels and mold diversity scores. The total mold per classroom was 176.6 ± 4.2 spores/m3 (geometric mean ± standard deviation) and ranged from 11.2 to 16,288.5 spores/m3. Mold diversity scores for classroom samples ranged from 1 to 19 (7.7 ± 3.5). The classroom accounted for the majority of variance (62%) in the total mold count, and for the majority of variance (56%) in the mold diversity score versus the school. The species with the highest concentrations and found most commonly included Cladosporium (29.3 ± 4.2 spores/m3), Penicillium/Aspergillus (15.0 ± 5.4 spores/m3), smut spores (12.6 ± 4.0 spores/m3), and basidiospores (6.6 ± 7.1 spores/m3). Conclusions Our study found that the school is a source of mold exposure, but particularly the classroom microenvironment varies in quantity of spores and species among classrooms within the same school. We also verified that visible mold may be a predictor for higher mold spore counts. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical significance of mold exposure relative to asthma morbidity in sensitized and non-sensitized asthmatic children. PMID:24112429

Baxi, Sachin N.; Muilenberg, Michael L.; Rogers, Christine A.; Sheehan, William J.; Gaffin, Jonathan; Permaul, Perdita; Kopel, Lianne S.; Lai, Peggy S.; Lane, Jeffrey P.; Bailey, Ann; Petty, Carter R.; Fu, Chunxia; Gold, Diane R.; Phipatanakul, Wanda

2013-01-01

455

Bringing Technology into High School Physics Classrooms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In an effort to help high school physics teachers bring technology into their classrooms, we at JSU have been offering professional development to secondary education teachers. This effort is part of Project IMPACTSEED (IMproving Physics And Chemistry Teaching in SEcondary Education), a No-Child Left Behind (NCLB) grant funded by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education, serving high school physics teachers in Northeast Alabama. This project is motivated by a major pressing local need: A large number of high school physics teachers teach out of field. To achieve IMPACTSEED's goals, we have forged a functional collaboration with school districts from about ten counties. This collaboration is aimed at achieving a double aim: (a) to make physics and chemistry understandable and fun to learn within a hands-on, inquiry-based setting; (b) to overcome the fear- factor for physics and chemistry among students. Through a two-week long summer institute, a series of weekend technology workshops, and onsite support, we have been providing year-round support to the physics/chemistry teachers in this area. This outreach initiative has helped provide our students with a physics/chemistry education that enjoys a great deal of continuity and consistency from high school to college.

Zettili, Nouredine

2005-04-01

456

Classroom Assessment Techniques: Mathematical Thinking  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page describes five ways to assess mathematical thinking skills. The assessment tool is one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. The Mathematical Thinking Classroom Assessment Techniques (Math CATs) are designed to promote and assess thinking skills in mathematics by checking results and correcting mistakes, making plausible estimates of quantities which are not known, modeling and defining new concepts, judging statements and creating proofs, and organizing unsorted data and drawing conclusions. An overview of this assessment instrument includes information about why Math CATs are beneficial to use and how to use them. This site is also linked to a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use, as well as supplementary links and sources to further explore this assessment tool.

Malcolm Swan

457

Classroom Assessment Techniques: Minute Paper  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page describes the minute paper, one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. The minute paper is a concise note, taking one minute and written by students, that focuses on a short question presented by the instructor to the class. It provides real-time feedback from a class to find out if students recognized the main points of a class session and also helps the instructor make changes for the next class. This site provides an overview of this assessment instrument including information about how to use minute papers in the classroom. The site is also linked to a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use, as well as supplementary links and sources to further explore this assessment tool.

Michael Zeilik

458

Teachers' Practical Knowledge about Classroom Management in Multicultural Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Creating a positive working atmosphere in the classroom is the first concern of many student and beginning teachers in secondary education. Teaching in multicultural classrooms provides additional challenges for these teachers. This study identified shared practical knowledge about classroom management strategies of teachers who were successful in…

van Tartwijk, Jan; den Brok, Perry; Veldman, Ietje; Wubbels, Theo

2009-01-01

459

Sherlock Holmes in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a three-day classroom activity combining criminal investigations and scientific skills, especially observation skills. Provides detailed classroom procedures with an illustration of eight basic fingerprint patterns and a classification chart. (YP)

Faia, Jean E.

1988-01-01

460

The Dirt on Outdoor Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains the planning procedure for outdoor classrooms and introduces an integrated unit on monarch butterflies called the Monarch Watch program. Makes recommendations to solve financial problems of outdoor classrooms. (YDS)

Rich, Steve

2000-01-01

461

Managing Inquiry-Based Classrooms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Though it may seem that classroom management comes naturally to some teachers, upon closer examination you'll probably discover that preparation and adaptation are more important than any innate ability when it comes to successful classroom management. An

Christie Nicole Wolfgang

2009-07-01

462

Security for Classroom Learning Partner  

E-print Network

This MENG thesis implements a security system for a classroom presentation system called the Classroom Learning Partner (CLP). The goal of the security system is to prevent cheating on electronic quizzes. CLP is a system ...

Iancu, Karin

2006-01-01

463

Integrated QSPR models to predict the soil sorption coefficient for a large diverse set of compounds by using different modeling methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The soil sorption coefficient (Koc) is a key physicochemical parameter to assess the environmental risk of organic compounds. To predict soil sorption coefficient in a more effective and economical way, here, quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models were developed based on a large diverse dataset including 964 non-ionic organic compounds. Multiple linear regression (MLR), local lazy regression (LLR) and least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) were utilized to develop QSPR models based on the four most relevant theoretical molecular descriptors selected by genetic algorithms-variable subset selection (GA-VSS) procedure. The QSPR development strictly followed the OECD principles for QSPR model validation, thus great attentions were paid to internal and external validations, applicability domain and mechanistic interpretation. The obtained results indicate that the LS-SVM model performed better than the MLR and the LLR models. For best LS-SVM model, the correlation coefficients (R2) for the training set was 0.913 and concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) for the prediction set was 0.917. The root-mean square errors (RMSE) were 0.330 and 0.426, respectively. The results of internal and external validations together with applicability domain analysis indicate that the QSPR models proposed in our work are predictive and could provide a useful tool for prediction soil sorption coefficient of new compounds.

Shao, Yonghua; Liu, Jining; Wang, Meixia; Shi, Lili; Yao, Xiaojun; Gramatica, Paola

2014-05-01

464

Household malaria knowledge and its association with bednet ownership in settings without large–scale distribution programs: Evidence from rural Madagascar  

PubMed Central

Background Insecticide–treated bednets are effective at preventing malaria. This study focuses on household–level factors that are associated with bednet ownership in a rural area of Madagascar which had not been a recipient of large–scale ITN distribution. Methods Data were gathered on individual and household characteristics, malaria knowledge, household assets and bednet ownership. Principal components analysis was used to construct both a wealth index based on household assets and a malaria knowledge index based on responses to questions about malaria. Bivariate and multivariate regressions were used to determine predictors of household bednet ownership and malaria knowledge. Results Forty–seven of 560 households (8.4%) owned a bednet. In multivariate analysis, higher level of malaria knowledge among household members was the only variable significantly associated with bednet ownership (odds ratio 3.72, P?setting of limited supply of affordable bednets, malaria knowledge was associated with an increased probability of household bednet ownership. Further studies should determine how such malaria knowledge evolves and if malaria–specific education programs could help overcome the barriers to bednet ownership among at–risk households living outside the reach of large–scale bednet distribution programs. PMID:24976960

Krezanoski, Paul J.; Tsai, Alexander C.; Hamer, Davidson H.; Comfort, Alison B.; Bangsberg, David R.

2014-01-01

465

Inverting the Linear Algebra Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The inverted classroom is a course design model in which students' initial contact with new information takes place outside of class meetings, and students spend class time on high-level sense-making activities. The inverted classroom model is so called because it inverts or "flips" the usual classroom design where typically class…

Talbert, Robert

2014-01-01

466

Flipping the classroom (abstract only)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a flipped classroom, students watch or listen to the lecture at home and do homework in the classroom. The classroom becomes much more interactive and the educator has ample opportunity to provide individualized guidance when it's most needed. The watch-at-home content can include recorded lectures, demonstration videos, adaptive quizzes, or anything in between. Come share your experiences developing \\

Barry Brown

2012-01-01

467

MENTAL ILLNESS in the CLASSROOM  

E-print Network

MENTAL ILLNESS in the CLASSROOM: How Educators Can Help Students Succeed Ingle International cares about you and your students www.studyinsured.com #12;www.studyinsured.comMental Illness in the Classroom: How Educators Can Help Students Succeed Mental Illness in the Classroom: How Educators Can Help

468

Teacher Attitudes about Classroom Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This research was designed to investigate the possible relationship between the attitudes, teachers have about the condition of their classrooms when the classrooms were independently assessed. Previous research reported teachers in unsatisfactory classrooms felt frustrated and neglected to such an extent that they sometimes reported they…

Earthman, Glen I.; Lemasters, Linda K.

2009-01-01

469

Sound Advice on Classroom Acoustics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the importance of acoustic standards in classroom design, presenting an interview with the Acoustical Society of America's (ASA's) standards manager which focuses on reasons for the new ASA standards, the standards document (which was written for K-12 classroom but applies to college classrooms), the need to avoid echo and be able to…

Sturgeon, Julie

2003-01-01

470

GALAXY Classroom: Television for Tomorrow.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An interactive learning service for elementary grades, "GALAXY Classroom," offers enrichment opportunities to classrooms. Students communicate via fax in response to questions posed in satellite transmitted segments. The primary market for "GALAXY Classroom" is the at-risk student. Sidebars describe costs and current offerings. (SLW)

Graumann, Peter

1994-01-01

471

Classroom management at the university level: lessons from a former high school earth science teacher  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Just a few days before my career as a fledgling science teacher began in a large public high school in New York City, a mentor suggested I might get some ideas about how to run a classroom from a book called The First Days Of School by Harry Wong. Although the book seemed to concentrate more on elementary students, I found that many of the principles in the book worked well for high school students. Even as I have begun to teach at the university level, many of Wong’s themes have persisted in my teaching style. Wong’s central thesis is that for learning to occur, a teacher must create the proper environment. In education jargon, a good climate for learning is generated via classroom management, an array of methods used by elementary and secondary school teachers to provide structure and routine to a class period via a seamless flow of complementary activities. Many college professors would likely consider classroom management to be chiefly a set of rules to maintain discipline and order among an otherwise unruly herd of schoolchildren, and therefore not a useful concept for mature university students. However, classroom management is much deeper than mere rules for behavior; it is an approach to instructional design that considers the classroom experience holistically. A typical professorial management style is to lecture for an hour or so and ask students to demonstrate learning via examinations several times in a semester. In contrast, a good high school teacher will manage a class from bell-to-bell to create a natural order and flow to a given lesson. In this presentation, I will argue for an approach to college lesson design similar to the classroom management style commonly employed by high school and elementary school teachers. I will suggest some simple, practical techniques learned during my high school experience that work just as well in college: warm-up and practice problems, time management, group activities, bulletin boards, learning environment, and standard procedures. Central to all of these suggestions is the basic concept of planning activities for students beyond passive absorption of lecture material and fitting them smoothly within the typical time constraints of a class period. Well-managed students learn better. I close with the observation that the most basic desires of students are independent of age; learners of all ages and levels prefer well-designed classroom experiences. In this context, books and resources intended for the professional development of secondary--and even elementary—teachers suddenly contain a wealth of techniques that, with some modification, might be useful at the university level.

Lazar, C.

2009-12-01

472

Agriculture in the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Agriculture in the Classroom Web site(last mentioned in the October 27, 1999 Scout Report for Science & Engineering) has recently been updated. One of the current features, Listening to the Prairie - Farming in Nature's Image, is a useful resource which has many lesson plans and classroom activities for all grades and can be downloaded in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. These lesson plans explore subjects like how energy passes through food webs, where our food comes from, how agriculture affects our lives, and soil and erosion. This is a useful site that focuses on a subject that many urban students may not normally be exposed to.

473

Bringing Technology into Physics Classrooms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Through our outreach initiative at Jacksonville State University, we have been supporting a number of school districts in Northeast Alabama to improve the teaching of physics at the high school level. This initiative is part of Project IMPACTSEED (IMproving Physics And Chemistry Teaching in SEcondary Education), a grant funded by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education. This project is motivated by a major pressing local need: A large number of high school physics teachers teach out of field. The main aim of project IMPACTSEED is to help teachers learn and master the various physics topics required by the Alabama Course of Study. Teachers are offered year-round support through a rich variety of program. In this presentation, we want to present ideas on ways of bringing technology to physics classrooms. We have identified a number of ways of bringing technology into physics classrooms, most notably through a series of make-and-take technology workshops that were developed over several years of research. In turn, when the teachers assign these make-an-take projects to their students, the students will be able to see first-hand---by doing, rather than being told---that physics is not a dry, abstract subject. We found this approach to be particularly effective in heightening the students' interest in math and science.

Zettlili, Nouredine

2009-05-01

474

Classroom Assessment Techniques: Performance Assessment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page describes the performance assessment, one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. Performance assessments are designed to judge student abilities to use specific knowledge and research skills that require the student to manipulate equipment to solve a problem or make an analysis. Performance assessments may reveal a variety of problem-solving approaches, thus providing insight into a student's level of conceptual and procedural knowledge. This site provides an overview of this assessment technique and information about how to use it, as well as a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use. Supplementary links and sources are also included to further explore this assessment tool.

Timothy F. Slater

475

Classroom Assessment Techniques: Scoring Rubrics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page describes how to use scoring rubrics to assess student learning. It is one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. Rubrics are a way of describing evaluation criteria based on the expected outcomes and performances of students. This site provides information about why scoring rubrics are beneficial to use and how to use them. The site is also linked to a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use, as well as supplementary links and sources to further explore this assessment tool.

Diane Ebert-May

476

Classroom Assessment Techniques: Weekly Reports  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site describes the use of weekly reports as an assessment tool for student learning. It is one of a series of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) provided by the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) website. The CATs of FLAG were constructed as a resource for science, technology, engineering and mathematics instructors to emphasize deeper levels of learning and to give instructors valuable feedback during a course. Weekly reports provide rapid feedback about what students think they are learning and what conceptual difficulties they are experiencing. This site provides an overview of this assessment technique including information about how to use it. The site is also linked to a set of discipline-specific "tools" that can be downloaded for immediate use, as well as supplementary links and sources to further explore this assessment tool.

Eugenia Etkina

477

Opportunities for Inquiry Science in Montessori Classrooms: Learning from a Culture of Interest, Communication, and Explanation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although classroom inquiry is the primary pedagogy of science education, it has often been difficult to implement within conventional classroom cultures. This study turned to the alternatively structured Montessori learning environment to better understand the ways in which it fosters the essential elements of classroom inquiry, as defined by prominent policy documents. Specifically, we examined the opportunities present in Montessori classrooms for students to develop an interest in the natural world, generate explanations in science, and communicate about science. Using ethnographic research methods in four Montessori classrooms at the primary and elementary levels, this research captured a range of scientific learning opportunities. The study found that the Montessori learning environment provided opportunities for students to develop enduring interests in scientific topics and communicate about science in various ways. The data also indicated that explanation was largely teacher-driven in the Montessori classroom culture. This study offers lessons for both conventional and Montessori classrooms and suggests further research that bridges educational contexts.

Rinke, Carol R.; Gimbel, Steven J.; Haskell, Sophie

2013-08-01

478

Classroom Management: Beliefs of Preservice Teachers and Classroom Teachers Concerning Classroom Management Styles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that preservice teachers and experienced teachers share a concern for classroom management, this study compared the beliefs of classroom teachers, intern teachers, and senior level practicum students regarding classroom management styles. Participating in the study were 43 early childhood and 44 elementary education preservice teachers, and…

Laut, John

479

Mentoring Effects on Protégés' Classroom Practice: An Experimental Field Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The classroom practices of protégés assisted by mentors who participated in a formal mentoring program were compared with protégés mentored by experienced teachers with no formalized mentoring preparation. Forty-six protégé-mentor pairs (23 treatment; 23 comparison) participated in this study conducted in 2 large school consortia in a mid-western state. Data include ratings and narrative records from classroom observations, weekly summaries

Carolyn M. Evertson; Margaret W. Smithey

2000-01-01

480

Public and Personal Voices in Adolescents' Classroom Talk  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a reanalysis of data from a year-long study of classroom discussion of text, we looked at the factors that influenced the degree to which students' personal voices became part of the public talk of two classrooms, one an 11th-grade U.S. history class in a large urban high school, and the other an 8th-grade language arts class in a Southern

Stephen Phelps; Dera Weaver

1999-01-01

481

Injuries in Preschool Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The primary purpose of this paper is to examine the kinds of injuries that preschool teachers working in Indiana, USA, believed to be the most common in their preschool (3-6 year olds) classrooms, the causes of such injuries, and the most important precautions they take to prevent them. Also examined are the measures the teachers take…

Obeng, Cecilia

2009-01-01

482

Animals in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Use of animals in middle school science classrooms is a curriculum component worthy of consideration, providing proper investigation and planning are addressed. A responsible approach to this action, including safety, must be adopted for success. In this month's column, the author provides some suggestions on incorporating animals into the…

Roy, Ken

2011-01-01

483

Windows into Art Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An editorial by Kit Grauer introduces this collection of articles which establish that there is no such thing as a simple definition of art education even within one culture, and that people's views can be reflected by art educators across the world. The first article, "A Window on Three Singapore Art Classrooms" (Jane Chia; John Matthews; Paul…

Grauer, Kit, Ed.

1995-01-01

484

Tips from the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Seven articles on classroom icebreakers are compiled: "Picture Stories and Other Opportunities" (Joy Egbert, Deborah Hanley, Rosemary Delaney); "Hey, What's Your Name" (Janet Leamy); "Surprise!" (Lynne Burgess); "Memory Game" (Sally Winn); "Picturesque" (Margaret Beiter); "The Name Game" (Jeanne-Marie Garcia); "Exercise the Body--And the Mind…

TESOL Journal, 1993

1993-01-01

485

Inquiry in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

(Purpose) As schools scramble to restructure in the hope of thwarting failure, administrators often appropriate money for outside experts who counsel on professional development as well as outside magic-pill programs for student achievement. High-stakes testing remains the arbiter. Perhaps the use of the best practice of inquiry, or classroom

Stohl, Christina

2010-01-01

486

Barcode Your Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes applications of bar coding technology that will help teachers to organize and energize their classrooms. Explains how bar codes--the black-and-white lines used for identification--are read and produced. Educational applications include their use in testing, equipment inventory, specimen identification, time keeping in experiments,…

Speitel, Thomas W.

1992-01-01

487

The Classroom Traffic Jam  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of energy conservation is developed in this simulation. Children draw an automobile and then are asked to drive it through the classroom roadways. When a traffic jam results, students offer ways to eliminate it. The importance of mass transportation and car pools is stressed by the teacher. (MA)

Edwards, Arthur W.

1977-01-01

488

Cockroaches in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Madagascar hissing cockroach (MHC) provides an excellent avenue to introduce students to the joys of inquiry-centered learning. MHC's are relatively tame, produce little odor, do not bite, and are easy to handle and breed. Because of these characteristics, they are ideal for classroom activities, science projects, and as pets. They also help…

Wagler, Ron; Moseley, Christine

2005-01-01

489

Caring as Classroom Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When planning for the new school year, K-2 teachers might consider the benefits of creating a caring classroom. Caring has the potential to not only encourage thoughtful social studies practice, but to also enhance it. The best K-2 teachers also recognize the importance of caring in the development of responsible citizens. Such teachers plan and…

Johnson, Chrystal S.; Thomas, Adrian T.

2009-01-01

490

In the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fourteen conference papers on classroom techniques for second language teaching are presented, including: "Cooperative Learning at the Post-Secondary Level in Japan" (Steve McGuire, Patricia Thornton, David Kluge); "Shared Inquiry Fosters Critical Thinking Skills in EFL Students" (Carol Browning, Jerold Halvorsen, Denise Ahlquist); "Story Grammar:…

1997

491

Elementary Classroom Web Sites  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to understand how elementary classroom Web sites support children's literacy. From a sociocultural perspective of literacy and a transformative stance toward the integration of literacy and technology, and building on explorations of new literacies, I discuss opportunities provided by the Internet that can support…

Baker, Elizabeth A.

2007-01-01