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Sample records for large consanguineous family

  1. Novel homozygous large deletion including the 5′ part of the SPATA7 gene in a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Anja-Kathrin; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Zobor, Ditta; Bonin, Michael; Sharkia, Rajech

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify the genetic defect in a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family with juvenile retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods DNA samples were collected from the index patient, her parents, her affected sister, and two non-affected siblings. Genome-wide linkage analysis with 250 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays was performed using DNA from the two affected patients. Owing to consanguinity in the family, we applied homozygosity mapping to identify the disease-causing gene. The candidate gene SPATA7 was screened for mutations with PCR amplifications and direct Sanger sequencing. Results Following high-density SNP arrays, we identified several homozygous genomic regions one of which included the SPATA7 gene. Several mutations in SPATA7 have been reported for various forms of retinal dystrophy, including Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and juvenile RP. PCR-based sequence content mapping, long-distance PCR amplifications, and subsequent sequencing analysis revealed a homozygous 63.4 kb large deletion that encompasses the 5′ part of the SPATA7 gene including exons 1–5. The mutation showed concordant segregation with the phenotype in the family as expected for autosomal recessive mode of inheritance and is consistent with a diagnosis of juvenile RP. Conclusions We report a novel homozygous large deletion in SPATA7 associated with juvenile RP in a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family. This is the first larger deletion mutation reported for SPATA7. PMID:25814828

  2. Distinguishing 3 classes of corpus callosal abnormalities in consanguineous families

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, R.M.; Marsh, S.E.; Swistun, D.; Al-Gazali, L.; Zaki, M.S.; Abdel-Salam, G.M.; Al-Tawari, A.; Bastaki, L.; Kayserili, H.; Rajab, A.; Boglárka, B.; Dietrich, R.B.; Dobyns, W.B.; Truwit, C.L.; Sattar, S.; Chuang, N.A.; Sherr, E.H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We sought to create a classification system for pediatric corpus callosal abnormalities (CCA) based upon midline sagittal brain MRI. We used the term CCA for patients with structural variants of the corpus callosum, excluding patients with interhemispheric cyst variant or pure dysplasia without hypoplasia. Currently, no system exists for nonsyndromic forms of CCA, and attempts to create such a system have been hampered by highly variable morphology in patients with sporadic CCA. We reasoned that any useful strategy should classify affected family members within the same type, and that phenotypic variability should be minimized in patients with recessive disease. Methods: We focused recruitment toward multiplex consanguineous families, ascertained 30 patients from 19 consanguineous families, and analyzed clinical features together with brain imaging. Results: We identified 3 major CCA classes, including hypoplasia, hypoplasia with dysplasia, and complete agenesis. Affected individuals within a given multiplex family usually displayed the same variant of the class of abnormality and they always displayed the same class of abnormality within each family, or they displayed complete agenesis. The system was validated among a second cohort of 10 sporadic patients with CCA. Conclusions: The data suggest that complete agenesis may be a common end-phenotype, and implicate multiple overlapping pathways in the etiology of CCA. PMID:21263138

  3. Mutations in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta from consanguineous Indian families.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Joshi; Girisha, Katta Mohan; Dalal, Ashwin; Shukla, Anju; Shah, Hitesh; Srivastava, Priyanka; Kornak, Uwe; Phadke, Shubha R

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a spectrum of genetic disorders with decreased bone density and bone fragility. Most of the cases of OI are inherited in autosomal dominant fashion with mutations in COL1A1 or COL1A2 genes. Over last few years, twelve genes for autosomal recessive OI have been identified. In this study we have evaluated seven patients with OI from consanguineous Indian families. Homozygosity mapping using SNP microarray was done and selected candidate genes were sequenced. Candidate genes were identified in four out of seven patients studied. Four mutations, namely; a homozygous non-sense (p.Q178*) and a deletion (p.F277del) mutations in SERPINF1 gene, a missense mutation (p.M101K) in PPIB gene and a nonsense mutation (p.E45*) in CRTAP gene were identified. In three patients for whom the regions of homozygosity did not reveal any known autosomal recessive OI genes, exome sequencing was performed and we identified a known missense mutation (p.G1012S) in COL1A2 gene in one of the patients. As WNT1 gene was not properly covered in exome sequencing in one patient, the gene was sequenced and a homozygous in-frame deletion of four amino acids (p.Phe176_Leu179del) was identified. In one of the three cases the exome sequencing did not reveal a mutation in any known OI genes, suggesting the possibility of mutations in an unidentified gene. The phenotypes of all the cases are described. This work proves the power of homozygosity mapping followed by candidate gene sequencing approach for clinical application in consanguineous families. PMID:25450603

  4. Fragile X syndrome screening of families with consanguineous and non-consanguineous parents in the Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Pouya, Ali Reza; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Mansoorian, Neda; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Nikzat, Nooshin; Mohseni, Marzieh; Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; Abbasi Moheb, Lia; Darvish, Hossein; Monajemi, Gholamreza Bahrami; Banihashemi, Susan; Kahrizi, Kimia; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2009-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation (MR). It is caused by the expansion of CGG triplet repeats in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. In mentally retarded males, the frequency of fragile X syndrome is approximately 2-3 percent, but little is known about its proportion in mentally retarded patients from countries where parental consanguinity is common. The objective of this study was to estimate the frequency of fragile X syndrome (FXS) in mentally retarded patients from Iran. We examined a total of 508 families with MR that had been referred to the Genetics Research Center (GRC) in Tehran of which 467 families had at least two mentally retarded children. In 384 families, the parents were related and in 124 they were not related of which most of them had putative or established X-linked inheritance pattern. Full FMR1 mutations were found in 32 of the 508 families studied (6.3%), in 19 out of 124 families with apparently unrelated parents (15.3%), and in 13 of the 384 consanguineous families (3.4%). Thus, in Iran, the relative frequency of FXS seems to be high, and in patients with unrelated parents is much higher. We also show that even in families with consanguineous parents, FXS has to be ruled out before assuming that familial MR is due to autosomal recessive gene defects. Molecular studies are in progress to explain the high proportion of FMR1 mutations in mentally retarded offspring of unrelated Iranian parents. PMID:19361583

  5. Consanguinity profile in the Gaza Strip of Palestine: large-scale community-based study.

    PubMed

    Sirdah, Mahmoud M

    2014-02-01

    Consanguineous marriages which have been practiced throughout history continue to be practiced within different ethnic, religious and social groups to varying degrees with highest prevalences in North Africa, Middle East and central and south Asia. In the Gaza Strip of Palestine, little is known about the consanguinity profile, so the present large-scale study aims to explore the consanguinity profile of two generations using data from the β-thalassemia premarital screening program. Sociodemographic data analysis included 156,635 (141,200 males and 15,435 females) persons and their parents, representing 141,200 couples who were referred to the Thalassemia and Hemophilia Center for premarital testing. In addition, the consanguinity characteristics of parents of 217 transfusion-dependent β-thalassemic non-sibling patients were analyzed. Results revealed a significant decrease in the overall prevalence of consanguineous (first- and second-cousin) marriages between the previous (fathers') generation (45.2%) and the current (groom/bride) generation (39.9%). Among the five governorates of the Gaza Strip, records of Gaza Governorate revealed the lowest occurrence (36.9% current generation and 42.1% previous generation) of consanguineous marriages, as compared to all others. Consanguineous marriages are significantly higher in semi-urban areas (41.6%) than in urban areas (39.1%) in the current generation (previous generation, 46.4% vs 44.7%, respectively). Compound consanguinity (two generation) and a single level of consanguinity were seen in 20.7% and 43.7%, respectively, of the cases. The average age of those with first-cousin marriages is significantly lower (22.4±4.4 years) than those with second-cousin marriages (24.3±6.1 years) and the non-consanguineous (26.5±8.2 years). The rate of consanguineous marriages among never married people (42.2%) is significantly much higher than the rate of people with multiple marriages (18.1%). About 74.7% of the non-sibling thalassemic patients of the Gaza Strip are associated with consanguineous parents, of them 54.4% first-cousins and 20.3% second-cousins. In conclusion, although there is a decline in the consanguinity profile in the present compared to previous generation, consanguineous marriages are still a common practice in the Gaza Strip, which rationalizes the necessity for more awareness and counseling efforts about the potential health-related risks of consanguinity on individual lives and the population overall. PMID:24468669

  6. Mowat-Wilson syndrome in a Moroccan consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Ratbi, Ilham; Elalaoui, Chafai Siham; Dastot-Le, Moal Florence; Goossens, Michel; Giurgea, Irina; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2007-09-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome is a mental retardation-multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by a typical facies, developmental delay, epilepsy, and variable congenital malformations, including Hirschsprung disease, urogenital anomalies, congenital heart disease, and agenesis of the corpus callosum. This disorder is sporadic and is caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions of the ZFHX1B gene located in the 2q22 region. We report here the first Moroccan patient, born to consanguineous parents, with Mowat-Wilson syndrome, due to a de novo, unreported mutation of the ZFHX1B gene. PMID:21957361

  7. Unexpected genetic heterogeneity in a large consanguineous Brazilian pedigree presenting deafness.

    PubMed

    Lezirovitz, Karina; Pardono, Eliete; de Mello Auricchio, Maria T B; de Carvalho E Silva, Fernando L; Lopes, Juliana J; Abreu-Silva, Ronaldo S; Romanos, Jihane; Batissoco, Ana C; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C

    2008-01-01

    Nonsyndromic autosomal recessive deafness accounts for 80% of hereditary deafness. To date, 52 loci responsible for autosomal recessive deafness have been mapped and 24 genes identified. Here, we report a large inbred Brazilian pedigree with 26 subjects affected by prelingual deafness. Given the extensive consanguinity found in this pedigree, the most probable pattern of inheritance is autosomal recessive. However, our linkage and mutational analysis revealed, instead of an expected homozygous mutation in a single gene, two different mutant alleles and a possible third undetected mutant allele in the MYO15A gene (DFNB3 locus), as well as evidence for other causes for deafness in the same pedigree. Among the 26 affected subjects, 15 were homozygous for the novel c.10573delA mutation in the MYO15A gene, 5 were compound heterozygous for the mutation c.10573delA and the novel deletion c.9957_9960delTGAC and one inherited only a single c.10573delA mutant allele, while the other one could not be identified. Given the extensive consanguinity of the pedigree, there might be at least one more deafness locus segregating to explain the condition in some of the subjects whose deafness is not clearly associated with MYO15A mutations, although overlooked environmental causes could not be ruled out. Our findings illustrate a high level of etiological heterogeneity for deafness in the family and highlight some of the pitfalls of genetic analysis of large genes in extended pedigrees, when homozygosity for a single mutant allele is expected. PMID:17851452

  8. Diagnostic exome sequencing to elucidate the genetic basis of likely recessive disorders in consanguineous families.

    PubMed

    Makrythanasis, Periklis; Nelis, Mari; Santoni, Federico A; Guipponi, Michel; Vannier, Anne; Béna, Frédérique; Gimelli, Stefania; Stathaki, Elisavet; Temtamy, Samia; Mégarbané, André; Masri, Amira; Aglan, Mona S; Zaki, Maha S; Bottani, Armand; Fokstuen, Siv; Gwanmesia, Lorraine; Aliferis, Konstantinos; Bustamante Eduardo, Mariana; Stamoulis, Georgios; Psoni, Stavroula; Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sofia; Fryssira, Helen; Kanavakis, Emmanouil; Al-Allawi, Nasir; Sefiani, Abdelaziz; Al Hait, Sana'; Elalaoui, Siham C; Jalkh, Nadine; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Al-Jasmi, Fatma; Bouhamed, Habiba Chaabouni; Abdalla, Ebtesam; Cooper, David N; Hamamy, Hanan; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2014-10-01

    Rare, atypical, and undiagnosed autosomal-recessive disorders frequently occur in the offspring of consanguineous couples. Current routine diagnostic genetic tests fail to establish a diagnosis in many cases. We employed exome sequencing to identify the underlying molecular defects in patients with unresolved but putatively autosomal-recessive disorders in consanguineous families and postulated that the pathogenic variants would reside within homozygous regions. Fifty consanguineous families participated in the study, with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes suggestive of autosomal-recessive inheritance, but with no definitive molecular diagnosis. DNA samples from the patient(s), unaffected sibling(s), and the parents were genotyped with a 720K SNP array. Exome sequencing and array CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) were then performed on one affected individual per family. High-confidence pathogenic variants were found in homozygosity in known disease-causing genes in 18 families (36%) (one by array CGH and 17 by exome sequencing), accounting for the clinical phenotype in whole or in part. In the remainder of the families, no causative variant in a known pathogenic gene was identified. Our study shows that exome sequencing, in addition to being a powerful diagnostic tool, promises to rapidly expand our knowledge of rare genetic Mendelian disorders and can be used to establish more detailed causative links between mutant genotypes and clinical phenotypes. PMID:25044680

  9. Novel mutations in the EXT1 gene in two consanguineous families affected with multiple hereditary exostoses (familial osteochondromatosis).

    PubMed

    Faiyaz-Ul-Haque, M; Ahmad, W; Zaidi, S H E; Hussain, S; Haque, S; Ahmad, M; Cohn, D H; Tsui, L-C

    2004-08-01

    Multiple hereditary exostoses (HME) is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder exhibiting multiple osteocartilaginous bone tumors that generally arise near the ends of growing long bones. Here, we report two large consanguineous families from Pakistan, who display the typical features of HME. Affected individuals also show a previously unreported feature--bilateral overriding of single toes. Analysis using microsatellite markers for each of the known EXT loci, EXT1, EXT2, and EXT3 showed linkage to EXT1. In the first family, mutation analysis of the EXT1 gene revealed that affected individuals were heterozygous for an in-frame G-to-C transversion at the conserved splice donor site in intron 1. This mutation is predicted to disrupt splicing of the first intron and produce a frameshift that leads to a premature termination codon. In the second family, an insertion of an A in exon 8 is predicted to produce a frameshift at codon 555 followed by a premature termination, a further 10 codons downstream. In both families, an increased number of affected male subjects were observed. In affected females in family 2, phenotypic variability and incomplete penetrance were noted. PMID:15253765

  10. Autosomal recessive congenital cataract in consanguineous Pakistani families is associated with mutations in GALK1

    PubMed Central

    Yasmeen, Afshan; Kaul, Haiba; Mohsin, Sadia; Khan, Mohsin; Qazi, Zaheeruddin A.; Nasir, Idrees A.; Zafar, Ahmad U.; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Akram, Javed; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To identify the pathogenic mutations responsible for autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in consanguineous Pakistani families. Methods All affected individuals underwent detailed ophthalmologic and medical examination. Blood samples were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. A genome-wide scan was performed with polymorphic microsatellite markers on genomic DNA from affected and unaffected family members and logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. All coding exons of galactokinase (GALK1) were sequenced to identify pathogenic lesions. Results Clinical records and ophthalmological examinations suggested that affected individuals have nuclear cataracts. Linkage analysis localized the critical interval to chromosome 17q with a maximum LOD score of 5.54 at ?=0, with D17S785 in family PKCC030. Sequencing of GALK1, a gene present in the critical interval, identified a single base pair deletion: c.410delG, which results in a frame shift leading to a premature termination of GALK1: p.G137fsX27. Additionally, we identified a missense mutation: c.416T>C, in family PKCC055 that results in substitution of a leucine residue at position 139 with a proline residue: p.L139P, and is predicted to be deleterious to the native GALK1 structure. Conclusions Here, we report pathogenic mutations in GALK1 that are responsible for autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in consanguineous Pakistani families. PMID:20405025

  11. Whole exome sequencing unravels disease-causing genes in consanguineous families in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Fahiminiya, S; Almuriekhi, M; Nawaz, Z; Staffa, A; Lepage, P; Ali, R; Hashim, L; Schwartzentruber, J; Abu Khadija, K; Zaineddin, S; Gamal, H; Majewski, J; Ben-Omran, T

    2014-08-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) has greatly facilitated the identification of causal mutations for diverse human genetic disorders. We applied WES as a molecular diagnostic tool to identify disease-causing genes in consanguineous families in Qatar. Seventeen consanguineous families with diverse disorders were recruited. Initial mutation screening of known genes related to the clinical diagnoses did not reveal the causative mutations. Using WES approach, we identified the definitive disease-causing mutations in four families: (i) a novel nonsense homozygous (c.1034C>G) in PHKG2 causing glycogen storage disease type 9C (GSD9C) in a male with initial diagnosis of GSD3; (ii) a novel homozygous 1-bp deletion (c.915del) in NSUN2 in a male proband with Noonan-like syndrome; (iii) a homozygous SNV (c.1598C>G) in exon 11 of IDUA causing Hurler syndrome in a female proband with unknown clinical diagnosis; (iv) a de novo known splicing mutation (c.1645+1G>A) in PHEX in a female proband with initial diagnosis of autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets. Applying WES as a diagnostic tool led to the unambiguous identification of disease-causing mutations in phenotypically complex disorders or correction of the initial clinical diagnosis in ˜25% of our cases. PMID:24102521

  12. Wolcott-Rallison Syndrome Is the Most Common Genetic Cause of Permanent Neonatal Diabetes in Consanguineous Families

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Patch, Ann-Marie; Minton, Jayne A. L.; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Edghill, Emma L.; Hussain, Khalid; Balafrej, Amina; Deeb, Asma; Buchanan, Charles R.; Jefferson, Ian G.; Mutair, Angham; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Ellard, Sian

    2009-01-01

    Context and Objective: Mutations in EIF2AK3 cause Wolcott-Rallison syndrome (WRS), a rare recessive disorder characterized by early-onset diabetes, skeletal abnormalities, and liver dysfunction. Although early diagnosis is important for clinical management, genetic testing is generally performed after the full clinical picture develops. We aimed to identify patients with WRS before any other abnormalities apart from diabetes are present and study the overall frequency of WRS among patients with permanent neonatal diabetes. Research Design and Methods: The coding regions of EIF2AK3 were sequenced in 34 probands with infancy-onset diabetes with a clinical phenotype suggestive of WRS (n = 28) or homozygosity at the WRS locus (n = 6). Results: Twenty-five probands (73.5%) were homozygous or compound heterozygous for mutations in EIF2AK3. Twenty of the 26 mutations identified were novel. Whereas a diagnosis of WRS was suspected before genetic testing in 22 probands, three patients with apparently isolated diabetes were diagnosed after identifying a large homozygous region encompassing EIF2AK3. In contrast to nonconsanguineous pedigrees, mutations in EIF2AK3 are the most common known genetic cause of diabetes among patients born to consanguineous parents (24 vs. < 2%). Age at diabetes onset and birth weight might be used to prioritize genetic testing in the latter group. Conclusions: WRS is the most common cause of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus in consanguineous pedigrees. In addition to testing patients with a definite clinical diagnosis, EIF2AK3 should be tested in patients with isolated neonatal diabetes diagnosed after 3 wk of age from known consanguineous families, isolated populations, or countries in which inbreeding is frequent. PMID:19837917

  13. Splice-site mutations identified in PDE6A responsible for retinitis pigmentosa in consanguineous Pakistani families

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahid Y.; Ali, Shahbaz; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Butt, Nadeem H.; Qazi, Zaheeruddin A.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to localize and identify causal mutations associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in consanguineous familial cases of Pakistani origin. Methods Ophthalmic examinations that included funduscopy and electroretinography (ERG) were performed to confirm the affectation status. Blood samples were collected from all participating individuals, and genomic DNA was extracted. A genome-wide scan was performed, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. Sanger sequencing was performed to identify the causative variants. Subsequently, we performed whole exome sequencing to rule out the possibility of a second causal variant within the linkage interval. Sequence conservation was performed with alignment analyses of PDE6A orthologs, and in silico splicing analysis was completed with Human Splicing Finder version 2.4.1. Results A large multigenerational consanguineous family diagnosed with early-onset RP was ascertained. An ophthalmic clinical examination consisting of fundus photography and electroretinography confirmed the diagnosis of RP. A genome-wide scan was performed, and suggestive two-point LOD scores were observed with markers on chromosome 5q. Haplotype analyses identified the region; however, the region did not segregate with the disease phenotype in the family. Subsequently, we performed a second genome-wide scan that excluded the entire genome except the chromosome 5q region harboring PDE6A. Next-generation whole exome sequencing identified a splice acceptor site mutation in intron 16: c.2028–1G>A, which was completely conserved in PDE6A orthologs and was absent in ethnically matched 350 control chromosomes, the 1000 Genomes database, and the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project. Subsequently, we investigated our entire cohort of RP familial cases and identified a second family who harbored a splice acceptor site mutation in intron 10: c.1408–2A>G. In silico analysis suggested that these mutations will result in the elimination of wild-type splice acceptor sites that would result in either skipping of the respective exon or the creation of a new cryptic splice acceptor site; both possibilities would result in retinal photoreceptor cells that lack PDE6A wild-type protein. Conclusions we report two splice acceptor site variations in PDE6A in consanguineous Pakistani families who manifested cardinal symptoms of RP. Taken together with our previously published work, our data suggest that mutations in PDE6A account for about 2% of the total genetic load of RP in our cohort and possibly in the Pakistani population as well. PMID:26321862

  14. Mutations in GRM6 identified in consanguineous Pakistani families with congenital stationary night blindness

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Gottsch, Alexander D. H.; Ullah, Inayat; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Butt, Nadeem H.; Qazi, Zaheeruddin A.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to investigate the causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) in consanguineous Pakistani families. Methods Two consanguineous families with multiple individuals manifesting symptoms of stationary night blindness were recruited. Affected individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmological examination, including fundus examination and electroretinography. Blood samples were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. Exclusion analyses were completed by genotyping closely spaced microsatellite markers, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. All coding exons, along with the exon–intron boundaries of GRM6, were sequenced bidirectionally. Results According to the medical history available to us, affected individuals in both families had experienced night blindness from the early years of their lives. Fundus photographs of affected individuals in both the families appeared normal, with no signs of attenuated arteries or bone spicule pigmentation. The scotopic electroretinogram (ERG) response were absent in all of the affected individuals, while the photopic measurements show reduced b-waves. During exclusion analyses, both families localized to a region on chromosome 5q that harbors GRM6, a gene previously associated with autosomal recessive CSNB. Bidirectional sequencing of GRM6 identified homozygous single base pair changes, specifically c.1336C>T (p.R446X) and c.2267G>A (p.G756D) in families PKRP170 and PKRP172, respectively. Conclusions We identified a novel nonsense and a previously reported missense mutation in GRM6 that were responsible for autosomal recessive CSNB in patients of Pakistani decent. PMID:26628857

  15. APOA5 Q97X Mutation Identified through homozygosity mapping causes severe hypertriglyceridemia in a Chilean consanguineous family

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) has been linked to defects in LPL, APOC2, APOA5, LMF1 and GBIHBP1 genes. However, a number of severe HTG cases are probably caused by as yet unidentified mutations. Very high triglyceride plasma levels (>112 mmol/L at diagnosis) were found in two sisters of a Chilean consanguineous family, which is strongly suggestive of a recessive highly penetrant mutation. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic locus responsible for the severe HTG in this family. Methods We carried out a genome-wide linkage study with nearly 300,000 biallelic markers (Illumina Human CytoSNP-12 panel). Using the homozygosity mapping strategy, we searched for chromosome regions with excess of homozygous genotypes in the affected cases compared to non-affected relatives. Results A large homozygous segment was found in the long arm of chromosome 11, with more than 2,500 consecutive homozygous SNP shared by the proband with her affected sister, and containing the APOA5/A4/C3/A1 cluster. Direct sequencing of the APOA5 gene revealed a known homozygous nonsense Q97X mutation (p.Gln97Ter) found in both affected sisters but not in non-affected relatives nor in a sample of unrelated controls. Conclusion The Q97X mutation of the APOA5 gene in homozygous status is responsible for the severe hypertriglyceridemia in this family. We have shown that homozygosity mapping correctly pinpointed the genomic region containing the gene responsible for severe hypertriglyceridemia in this consanguineous Chilean family. PMID:23151256

  16. Genetic dissection of two Pakistani families with consanguineous localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis (LAH)

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Seyyedha; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Khan, Shakir; Yousaf, Muhammad Jawad; Azeem, Zahid; Razak, Suhail; Qaiser, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Genetic analysis of two consanguineous Pakistani families with localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis was performed with the goal to establish genotype-phenotype correlation. Materials and Methods: Genomic DNA extraction had been done from peripheral blood samples. Extracted DNA was then subjected to PCR (polymerase chain reaction) for amplification. Linkage analysis was performed using 8% polyacrylamide gel. Candidate gene was sequenced after gene linkage supported at highly polymorphic microsatellite markers of the diseased region. Results: Both families were initially tested for linkage to known genes, which were involved in human hereditary hypotrichosis, by genotyping Highly polymorphic microsatellite markers. Family B showed partial linkage at P2RY5 gene on chromosome 13q14.11-q21.32; hence, all exonic regions and their introns boundaries were subjected to DNA sequencing for any pathogenic mutation. Conclusion: Both families were tested for linkage by genotyping polymorphic microsatellite markers linked to known alopecia loci. Family A excluded all known diseased regions that is suggestive of some novel chromosomal disorder. However, sequencing of P2RY5 gene in family B showed no pathogenic mutation. PMID:25429336

  17. Homozygous sequence variants in the FKBP10 gene underlie osteogenesis imperfecta in consanguineous families.

    PubMed

    Umair, Muhammad; Hassan, Annum; Jan, Abid; Ahmad, Farooq; Imran, Muhammad; Samman, Muhammad I; Basit, Sulman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI, MIM 610968) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by bone fragility. It is one of the rare forms of skeletal deformity caused by sequence variants in at least 14 different genes, including FKBP10 (MIM 607063) encoding protein FKBP65. Here we present three consanguineous families of Pakistani origin segregating OI in an autosomal-recessive pattern. Genotyping using either single-nucleotide polymorphism markers by Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 250K Nsp array or polymorphic microsatellite markers revealed a homozygous region, containing a candidate gene FKBP10, among affected members on chromosome 17q21.2. Sequencing the FKBP10 gene revealed a homozygous novel nonsense variant (c.1490G>A, p.Trp497*) in the family A and two previously reported variants, including a missense (c.344G>A, p.Arg115Gln), in the family B and duplication of a nucleotide C (c.831dupC, p.Gly278ArgfsX295) in the family C. Our findings further extend the body of evidence that supports the importance of FKBP10 gene in the development of skeletal system. PMID:26538303

  18. Homozygosity mapping in 64 Syrian consanguineous families with non-specific intellectual disability reveals 11 novel loci and high heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Abou Jamra, R; Wohlfart, Sigrun; Zweier, Markus; Uebe, Steffen; Priebe, Lutz; Ekici, Arif; Giesebrecht, Susanne; Abboud, Ahmad; Al Khateeb, Mohammed Ayman; Fakher, Mahmoud; Hamdan, Saber; Ismael, Amina; Muhammad, Safia; Nöthen, Markus M; Schumacher, Johannes; Reis, André

    2011-01-01

    Non-specific intellectual disability of autosomal recessive inheritance (NS-ARID) represents an important fraction of severe cognitive dysfunction disorders. To date, only 10 genes have been identified, and further 24 linked-ARID loci have been reported, as well as others with suggestive linkage. To discover novel genes causing NS-ARID, we undertook genome-wide homozygosity mapping in 64 consanguineous multiplex families of Syrian descent. A total of 11 families revealed unique, significantly linked loci at 4q26-4q28 (MRT17), 6q12-q15 (MRT18), 18p11 (MRT19), 16p12-q12 (MRT20), 11p15 (MRT21), 11p13-q14 (MRT23), 6p12 (MRT24), 12q13-q15 (MRT25), 14q11-q12 (MRT26), 15q23-q26 (MRT27), and 6q26-q27 (MRT28), respectively. Loci ranged between 1.2 and 45.6 Mb in length. One family showed linkage to chromosome 8q24.3, and we identified a mutation in TRAPPC9. Our study further highlights the extreme heterogeneity of NS-ARID, and suggests that no major disease gene is to be expected, at least in this study group. Systematic analysis of large numbers of affected families, as presented here, will help discovering the genetic causes of ID. PMID:21629298

  19. Mutations in the ?-subunit of rod phosphodiesterase identified in consanguineous Pakistani families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shahbaz; Riazuddin, S. Amer; Shahzadi, Amber; Nasir, Idrees A.; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Akram, Javed; Sieving, Paul A.; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to identify pathogenic mutations causing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in consanguineous Pakistani families. Methods Two consanguineous families affected with autosomal recessive RP were identified from the Punjab Province of Pakistan. All affected individuals underwent a thorough ophthalmologic examination. Blood samples were collected, and genomic DNAs were extracted. Exclusion analysis was completed, and two-point LOD scores were calculated. Bidirectional sequencing of the ? subunit of phosphodiesterase 6 (PDE6?) was completed. Results During exclusion analyses both families localized to chromosome 4p, harboring PDE6?, a gene previously associated with autosomal recessive RP. Sequencing of PDE6? identified missense mutations: c.1655G>A (p.R552Q) and c.1160C>T (p.P387L) in families PKRP161 and PKRP183, respectively. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that both mutations are deleterious for the native three-dimensional structure of the PDE6? protein. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that mutations in PDE6? are responsible for the disease phenotype in the consanguineous Pakistani families. PMID:21655355

  20. Diagnostic exome sequencing for patients with a family history of consanguinity: over 38% of positive results are not autosomal recessive pattern.

    PubMed

    Powis, Zöe; Farwell, Kelly D; Alamillo, Christina L; Tang, Sha

    2016-02-01

    Diagnostic exome sequencing (DES) is an effective tool for diagnosis in intractable cases where the underlying cause is thought be genetic. It is commonly assumed that patients with a family history of consanguinity will have increased detection rates for rare autosomal recessive Mendelian disorders through DES. Herein, we analyzed the diagnostic yield and relevant inheritance patterns within the DES cases with a reported consanguineous family history. Of the first 500 unselected cases referred for DES, 40 (8.0%) had a known consanguineous family history. Among the 40 cases, 13 (32.5%) received a definitive molecular diagnosis through DES and such positive rate is similar to that of families with no reported consanguinity (139/460, 30.2%, P=0.63). Although homozygous alterations likely related to consanguinity have been identified in eight positive cases, the other five (38.4%) causative mutations were unrelated to autosomal recessive inheritance. Our retrospective analysis demonstrated that individuals with known consanguinity were not more likely to have a positive DES result and a significant portion of the positive findings were not within an autosomal recessive gene. These results highlight that all applicable inheritance patterns should be considered for patients with a known family history of consanguinity. PMID:26490185

  1. Autosomal recessive congenital cataract linked to EPHA2 in a consanguineous Pakistani family

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Haiba; Riazuddin, S. Amer; Shahid, Mariam; Kousar, Samra; Butt, Nadeem H.; Zafar, Ahmad U.; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Akram, Javed; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the genetic basis of autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in a consanguineous Pakistani family. Methods All affected individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmological and clinical examination. Blood samples were collected and genomic DNAs were extracted. A genome-wide scan was performed with polymorphic microsatellite markers. Logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated, and Eph-receptor type-A2 (EPHA2), residing in the critical interval, was sequenced bidirectionally. Results The clinical and ophthalmological examinations suggested that all affected individuals have nuclear cataracts. Genome-wide linkage analyses localized the critical interval to a 20.78 cM (15.08 Mb) interval on chromosome 1p, with a maximum two-point LOD score of 5.21 at ?=0. Sequencing of EPHA2 residing in the critical interval identified a missense mutation: c.2353G>A, which results in an alanine to threonine substitution (p.A785T). Conclusions Here, we report for the first time a missense mutation in EPHA2 associated with autosomal recessive congenital cataracts. PMID:20361013

  2. A novel missense NMNAT1 mutation identified in a consanguineous family with Leber congenital amaurosis by targeted next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ying; Huang, Hui; Wang, Yanping; Liu, Zhen; Li, Nana; Chen, Yanhua; Li, Xin; Li, Mingrong; Zhou, Xiaobo; Mu, Dezhi; Zhong, Jing; Wu, Jing; Su, Yan; Yi, Xin; Zhu, Jun

    2015-09-10

    Leber congenital amaurosis is the earliest onset and most severe inherited retinal dystrophy. Mutations in 21 genes have been identified to be responsible for LCA. To detect the causative variants, we performed targeted next generation sequencing in two affected siblings of a consanguineous Chinese family with suspected LCA. A novel homozygous missense mutation (c.721C>T, p. Pro241Ser) of NMNAT1 has been identified. The mutation was inherited from their consanguineous parents who were heterozygous and was absent in 300 unrelated healthy individuals. NMNAT1, which encodes the nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1, has been recently identified to be one of the LCA-causing genes. Our results expanded the spectrum of mutations in NMNAT1. In this study, targeted next generation sequencing provides an accurate and efficient method for identifying mutations in hereditary diseases with highly genetic and clinical heterogeneity. PMID:25988908

  3. A novel DFNB31 mutation associated with Usher type 2 syndrome showing variable degrees of auditory loss in a consanguineous Portuguese family.

    PubMed Central

    Bujakowska, Kinga; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Tronche, Sophie; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Antonio, Aline; Germain, Aurore; Lonjou, Christine; Carpentier, Wassila; Sahel, José-Alain; Bhattacharya, Shomi; Zeitz, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To identify the genetic defect of a consanguineous Portuguese family with rod-cone dystrophy and varying degrees of decreased audition. Methods A detailed ophthalmic and auditory examination was performed on a Portuguese patient with severe autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy. Known genetic defects were excluded by performing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) genotyping microarray analysis and by Sanger sequencing of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions of eyes shut homolog–drosophila (EYS) and chromosome 2 open reading frame 71 (C2orf71). Subsequently, genome-wide homozygosity mapping was performed in DNA samples from available family members using a 700K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray. Candidate genes present in the significantly large homozygous regions were screened for mutations using Sanger sequencing. Results The largest homozygous region (~11 Mb) in the affected family members was mapped to chromosome 9, which harbors deafness, autosomal recessive 31 (DFNB31; a gene previously associated with Usher syndrome). Mutation analysis of DFNB31 in the index patient identified a novel one-base-pair deletion (c.737delC), which is predicted to lead to a truncated protein (p.Pro246HisfsX13) and co-segregated with the disease in the family. Ophthalmic examination of the index patient and the affected siblings showed severe rod-cone dystrophy. Pure tone audiometry revealed a moderate hearing loss in the index patient, whereas the affected siblings were reported with more profound and early onset hearing impairment. Conclusions We report a novel truncating mutation in DFNB31 associated with severe rod-cone dystrophy and varying degrees of hearing impairment in a consanguineous family of Portuguese origin. This is the second report of DFNB31 implication in Usher type 2. PMID:21738389

  4. Consanguineous marriage and its relevance to obstetric practice.

    PubMed

    de Costa, Caroline M

    2002-08-01

    At the beginning of the twenty-first century, consanguineous marriage is practiced widely in many parts of the world. More than 2 billion people, of various religious and ethnic backgrounds, live in countries where a large proportion of marriages are contracted between blood relatives. The practice is seen as promoting family stability and having significant social and economic advantages. Consanguineous marriage is important genetically-the children of consanguineous unions are more often homozygous for particular alleles than are the offspring of unrelated parents, and therefore, autosomal recessive disorders, which may be lethal or debilitating, are more common in such children. Health-care providers working with communities where consanguineous marriage is common, in particular obstetricians, family physicians, and pediatricians, need to be aware of the possible impact of such marriages on pregnancy outcomes, so the best possible genetic and antenatal care can be provided, sympathetically and nonjudgmentally, and the best possible results obtained. PMID:12187152

  5. Endogamy, consanguinity and community genetics.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H

    2002-12-01

    The population of India is composed of many thousands of subpopulations, divided by geography, language, religion and caste or biraderi (patrilineage) boundaries, with endogamous marriage the norm. The net effect has been the creation of multiple genetic isolates with individual mutation profiles, but to date the clinical consequences of this highly complex differentiation have been largely ignored. In contrast, the topic of consanguinity continues to attract attention among medical and population geneticists, clinicians and social scientists. The significant progress made in India in improving childhood nutritional status and combating infectious disease means that genetic disorders have assumed ever-increasing importance. In populations where consanguineous marriage is widely practised, recessive genetic disorders will continue to gain greater prominence in the overall spectrum of ill health. At the same time this increase will in part be negated by urbanization and the move to smaller family sizes, which predictably will result in a decline in the prevalence of consanguineous unions. Developing an understanding of these changes will require a wide-ranging and multidisciplinary investigative approach for which community genetics is ideally suited. PMID:12717037

  6. Consanguineous marriages in Denizli, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Simşek, S; Türe, M; Tugrul, B; Mercan, N; Türe, H; Akdağ, B

    1999-01-01

    For the study 1000 families were interviewed during 1996 in the city of Denizli, which is situated in Western Anatolia and has a population of 79211 families. The overall rate of consanguinity was 11.7%, with a mean inbreeding coefficient of 0.00873. The principal type of consanguineous marriage recorded was between first cousins, which accounted for 49.6% of all unions. For both sexes, a significant negative association was observed between consanguinity and mean age at marriage and level of education. PMID:10541409

  7. Identification of two novel mutations in CDHR1 in consanguineous Spanish families with autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Avila-Fernandez, Almudena; Corton, Marta; Lopez-Molina, Maria Isabel; Perez-Carro, Raquel; Bontadelli, Lara; Di Gioia, Silvio Alessandro; Zurita, Olga; Garcia-Sandoval, Blanca; Rivolta, Carlo; Ayuso, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies present extensive phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity, posing a challenge for patients’ molecular and clinical diagnoses. In this study, we wanted to clinically characterize and investigate the molecular etiology of an atypical form of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy in two consanguineous Spanish families. Affected members of the respective families exhibited an array of clinical features including reduced visual acuity, photophobia, defective color vision, reduced or absent ERG responses, macular atrophy and pigmentary deposits in the peripheral retina. Genetic investigation included autozygosity mapping coupled with exome sequencing in the first family, whereas autozygome-guided candidate gene screening was performed by means of Sanger DNA sequencing in the second family. Our approach revealed nucleotide changes in CDHR1; a homozygous missense variant (c.1720C > G, p.P574A) and a homozygous single base transition (c.1485 + 2T > C) affecting the canonical 5’ splice site of intron 13, respectively. Both changes co-segregated with the disease and were absent among cohorts of unrelated control individuals. To date, only five mutations in CDHR1 have been identified, all resulting in premature stop codons leading to mRNA nonsense mediated decay. Our work reports two previously unidentified homozygous mutations in CDHR1 further expanding the mutational spectrum of this gene. PMID:26350383

  8. Consanguinity and dysmorphology in Arabs.

    PubMed

    Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Hamamy, Hanan

    2014-01-01

    Incidence rates of congenital disorders among the 350 million inhabitants of Arab countries could be influenced via the people's demographic and cultural characteristics. Arabs usually marry at a young age and have large families. They share certain core cultural values and beliefs, with the family accepted as the central structure of society. Consanguineous marriage is favored and respected in most if not all Arab communities, and intrafamilial unions currently account for 20-50% of all marriages. First-cousin unions are especially popular and constitute almost one quarter of all marriages in many Arab countries. Consequently, autosomal recessive (AR) dysmorphic syndromes constitute a considerable proportion of all birth defects among Arabs. Arab geneticists, with their persistent commitment to advancing research, have contributed to the description of a number of rare and new AR syndromes with the identification of novel genes. The collaboration with research teams in high-income countries resulted in a plethora of data on pathogenic variants and their function in causing dysmorphic syndromes. There could still be a considerable number of rare dysmorphic syndromes that prevail among Arabs which are not hitherto described and whose underlying molecular pathologies are not yet defined. Arab countries should thus strive to deploy DNA diagnostics and to build research capability around local priorities. Furthermore, a characterization of the prevailing genetic disorders in each geographic location, together with their mutations, is needed to plan for appropriate screening and testing protocols. An overview of consanguinity in Arab countries and examples of dysmorphology syndromes associated with consanguinity with their available molecular bases will be discussed. PMID:25060273

  9. Genome-Wide Linkage in a Highly Consanguineous Pedigree Reveals Two Novel Loci on Chromosome 7 for Non-Syndromic Familial Premature Ovarian Failure

    PubMed Central

    Caburet, Sandrine; Zavadakova, Petra; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Bouhali, Kamal; Dipietromaria, Aurélie; Charon, Céline; Besse, Céline; Laissue, Paul; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Vaiman, Daniel; Levi, Giovanni; Veitia, Reiner A.; Fellous, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Background The human condition known as Premature Ovarian Failure (POF) is characterized by loss of ovarian function before the age of 40. A majority of POF cases are sporadic, but 10–15% are familial, suggesting a genetic origin of the disease. Although several causal mutations have been identified, the etiology of POF is still unknown for about 90% of the patients. Methodology/Principal Findings We report a genome-wide linkage and homozygosity analysis in one large consanguineous Middle-Eastern POF-affected family presenting an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. We identified two regions with a LODmax of 3.26 on chromosome 7p21.1-15.3 and 7q21.3-22.2, which are supported as candidate regions by homozygosity mapping. Sequencing of the coding exons and known regulatory sequences of three candidate genes (DLX5, DLX6 and DSS1) included within the largest region did not reveal any causal mutations. Conclusions/Significance We detect two novel POF-associated loci on human chromosome 7, opening the way to the identification of new genes involved in the control of ovarian development and function. PMID:22428046

  10. Accelerating novel candidate gene discovery in neurogenetic disorders via whole-exome sequencing of prescreened multiplex consanguineous families.

    PubMed

    Alazami, Anas M; Patel, Nisha; Shamseldin, Hanan E; Anazi, Shamsa; Al-Dosari, Mohammed S; Alzahrani, Fatema; Hijazi, Hadia; Alshammari, Muneera; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Salih, Mustafa A; Faqeih, Eissa; Alhashem, Amal; Bashiri, Fahad A; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Kentab, Amal Y; Sogaty, Sameera; Al Tala, Saeed; Temsah, Mohamad-Hani; Tulbah, Maha; Aljelaify, Rasha F; Alshahwan, Saad A; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Alhadid, Adnan A; Aldhalaan, Hesham; AlQallaf, Fatema; Kurdi, Wesam; Alfadhel, Majid; Babay, Zainab; Alsogheer, Mohammad; Kaya, Namik; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Al-Sannaa, Nouriya; Al Mutairi, Fuad; El Khashab, Heba Y; Bohlega, Saeed; Jia, Xiaofei; Nguyen, Henry C; Hammami, Rakad; Adly, Nouran; Mohamed, Jawahir Y; Abdulwahab, Firdous; Ibrahim, Niema; Naim, Ewa A; Al-Younes, Banan; Meyer, Brian F; Hashem, Mais; Shaheen, Ranad; Xiong, Yong; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Aldeeri, Abdulrahman A; Monies, Dorota M; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2015-01-13

    Our knowledge of disease genes in neurological disorders is incomplete. With the aim of closing this gap, we performed whole-exome sequencing on 143 multiplex consanguineous families in whom known disease genes had been excluded by autozygosity mapping and candidate gene analysis. This prescreening step led to the identification of 69 recessive genes not previously associated with disease, of which 33 are here described (SPDL1, TUBA3E, INO80, NID1, TSEN15, DMBX1, CLHC1, C12orf4, WDR93, ST7, MATN4, SEC24D, PCDHB4, PTPN23, TAF6, TBCK, FAM177A1, KIAA1109, MTSS1L, XIRP1, KCTD3, CHAF1B, ARV1, ISCA2, PTRH2, GEMIN4, MYOCD, PDPR, DPH1, NUP107, TMEM92, EPB41L4A, and FAM120AOS). We also encountered instances in which the phenotype departed significantly from the established clinical presentation of a known disease gene. Overall, a likely causal mutation was identified in >73% of our cases. This study contributes to the global effort toward a full compendium of disease genes affecting brain function. PMID:25558065

  11. Combining gene mapping and phenotype assessment for fast mutation finding in non-consanguineous autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa families.

    PubMed

    Hebrard, Maxime; Manes, Gal; Bocquet, Batrice; Meunier, Isabelle; Coustes-Chazalette, Delphine; Hrald, Emilie; Snchal, Audrey; Bolland-Aug, Anne; Zelenika, Diana; Hamel, Christian P

    2011-12-01

    Among inherited retinal dystrophies, autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) is the most genetically heterogenous condition with 32 genes currently known that account for ~60 % of patients. Molecular diagnosis thus requires the tedious systematic sequencing of 506 exons. To rapidly identify the causative mutations, we devised a strategy that combines gene mapping and phenotype assessment in small non-consanguineous families. Two unrelated sibships with arRP had whole-genome scan using SNP microchips. Chromosomal regions were selected by calculating a score based on SNP coverage and genotype identity of affected patients. Candidate genes from the regions with the highest scores were then selected based on phenotype concordance of affected patients with previously described phenotype for each candidate gene. For families RP127 and RP1459, 33 and 40 chromosomal regions showed possible linkage, respectively. By comparing the scores with the phenotypes, we ended with one best candidate gene for each family, namely tubby-like protein 1 (TULP1) and C2ORF71 for RP127 and RP1459, respectively. We found that RP127 patients were compound heterozygous for two novel TULP1 mutations, p.Arg311Gln and p.Arg342Gln, and that RP1459 patients were compound heterozygous for two novel C2ORF71 mutations, p.Leu777PhefsX34 and p.Leu777AsnfsX28. Phenotype assessment showed that TULP1 patients had severe early onset arRP and that C2ORF71 patients had a cone rod dystrophy type of arRP. Only two affected individuals in each sibship were sufficient to lead to mutation identification by screening the best candidate gene selected by a combination of gene mapping and phenotype characterization. PMID:21792230

  12. Increased Probability of Co-Occurrence of Two Rare Diseases in Consanguineous Families and Resolution of a Complex Phenotype by Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Dennis; Neubauer, Bernd A.; Toliat, Mohammad R.; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Kamrath, Clemens; Schänzer, Anne; Sander, Thomas; Hahn, Andreas; Nothnagel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing of whole genomes and exomes has facilitated a direct assessment of causative genetic variation, now enabling the identification of genetic factors involved in rare diseases (RD) with Mendelian inheritance patterns on an almost routine basis. Here, we describe the illustrative case of a single consanguineous family where this strategy suffered from the difficulty to distinguish between two etiologically distinct disorders, namely the co-occurrence of hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets (HRR) and congenital myopathies (CM), by their phenotypic manifestation alone. We used parametric linkage analysis, homozygosity mapping and whole exome-sequencing to identify mutations underlying HRR and CM. We also present an approximate approach for assessing the probability of co-occurrence of two unlinked recessive RD in a single family as a function of the degree of consanguinity and the frequency of the disease-causing alleles. Linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping yielded elusive results when assuming a single RD, but whole-exome sequencing helped to identify two mutations in two genes, namely SLC34A3 and SEPN1, that segregated independently in this family and that have previously been linked to two etiologically different diseases. We assess the increase in chance co-occurrence of rare diseases due to consanguinity, i.e. under circumstances that generally favor linkage mapping of recessive disease, and show that this probability can increase by several orders of magnitudes. We conclude that such potential co-occurrence represents an underestimated risk when analyzing rare or undefined diseases in consanguineous families and should be given more consideration in the clinical and genetic evaluation. PMID:26789268

  13. A clinical variant in SCN1A inherited from a mosaic father cosegregates with a novel variant to cause Dravet syndrome in a consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Feyza N; Gormez, Zeliha; Calik, Mustafa; Altiokka Uzun, Gunes; Sagiroglu, Mahmut S; Yuceturk, Betul; Yuksel, Bayram; Baykan, Betul; Bebek, Nerses; Iscan, Akin; Ugur Iseri, Sibel A; Ozbek, Ugur

    2015-07-01

    A consanguineous family from Turkey having two children with intellectual disability exhibiting myoclonic, febrile and other generalized seizures was recruited to identify the genetic origin of these phenotypes. A combined approach of SNP genotyping and exome sequencing was employed both to screen genes associated with Dravet syndrome and to detect homozygous variants. Analysis of exome data was extended further to identify compound heterozygosity. Herein, we report identification of two paternally inherited genetic variants in SCN1A (rs121917918; p.R101Q and p.I1576T), one of which was previously implicated in Dravet syndrome. Interestingly, the previously reported clinical variant (rs121917918; p.R101Q) displayed mosaicism in the blood and saliva of the father. The study supported the genetic diagnosis of affected children as Dravet syndrome possibly due to the combined effect of one clinically associated (rs121917918; p.R101Q) and one novel (p.I1576T) variants in SCN1A gene. This finding is important given that heterozygous variants may be overlooked in standard exome scans of consanguineous families. Thus, we are presenting an interesting example, where the inheritance of the condition may be misinterpreted as recessive and identical by descent due to consanguinity and mosaicism in one of the parents. PMID:25986186

  14. Consanguinity among the Saudi Arabian population.

    PubMed Central

    el-Hazmi, M A; al-Swailem, A R; Warsy, A S; al-Swailem, A M; Sulaimani, R; al-Meshari, A A

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted on 3212 Saudi families to investigate the prevalence of consanguineous marriages. The families were interviewed and the information on the relationship between the husband and wife was obtained. The overall rate of consanguinity shows that 57.7% of the families screened were consanguineous. The most frequent were first cousin marriages (28.4%) followed by distant relative marriages (15.2%) and second cousin marriages (14.6%). The families were grouped according to the province of their origin and the consanguinity rates were calculated accordingly. There were slight differences in the consanguinity rates in the five provinces, which ranged from 52.1% to 67.7%. In each province first cousin marriages were the most frequently encountered pattern, ranging from 17.9% to 40.9%. The inbreeding coefficient (F) was calculated for each province and ranged from 0.020 to 0.030. Within each province, there were several significant differences among the populations in the different areas. The highest rate of consanguinity was 80.6% in Samtah and the lowest rate was around 34% in Abha in the South Western province. These results place Saudi Arabia among the countries of the world with a high rate of consanguinity. The possible consequences of increased consanguinity are presented and discussed. PMID:7473654

  15. Children in large families.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    A summary was provided of issues presented by Dr. Cynthia Lloyd in her chapter on investing in children from the 1994 volume "Population and Development: Old Debates, New Conclusions." Children in large families may miss the opportunities offered in a modernizing society. The possibilities for adverse consequences because of a large size of families include a smaller share of resources (time, income, and/or nutrition) among family members, limited access to public resources (health care and education), unequal distribution of resources among family members, and gender defined roles. Dr. Lloyd's review of the literature exposed the lack of emphasis on the impact of opportunity, equity, and intergenerational transfers on child welfare. Children's smaller share of resources had less impact on child welfare. Later-born and unwanted children were particularly vulnerable in large families. Unwanted children were usually later born or girls. The lack of investments in girl's education not only affected the limited earning power and opportunity to escape from gender restricting roles but also contributed to the perpetuation of the cycle of high fertility and gender discrimination. Family decisions about fertility and investments in children's education and nutrition can not be separated from the social context of culture, class, social custom, and level of socioeconomic development. Disadvantage is not assured in large families, but statistically more probable. Fewer children are more likely to be wanted and to receive better care. Societies should provide high quality family planning services, safe abortion services, and enforcement of primary school education requirements. Measures need to be adopted for promotion of schooling for girls that is sensitive to cultural norms. Laws must protect children's rights to economic support from both biological parents. Gender discrimination against women must be eliminated. PMID:12288919

  16. Novel homozygous mutations in the EVC and EVC2 genes in two consanguineous families segregating autosomal recessive Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Abdul; Raza, Syed I; Ali, Salman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a rare developmental disorder characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails, teeth, oral and cardiac abnormalities. It is caused by biallelic mutations in the EVC or EVC2 gene, separated by 2.6 kb of genomic sequence on chromosome 4p16. In the present study, we have investigated two consanguineous families of Pakistani origin, segregating EVC in autosomal recessive manner. Linkage in the families was established to chromosome 4p16. Subsequently, sequence analysis identified a novel nonsense mutation (p.Trp234*) in exon 8 of the EVC2 gene and 15 bp duplication in exon 14 of the EVC gene in the two families. This further expands the mutations in the EVC or EVC2 genes resulting in the EVC syndrome. PMID:26580685

  17. The Use of High-Density SNP Array to Map Homozygosity in Consanguineous Families to Efficiently Identify Candidate Genes: Application to Woodhouse-Sakati Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Molly B.; Wohler, Elizabeth; Batista, Denise A. S.; Applegate, Carolyn; Hoover-Fong, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Two consanguineous Qatari siblings presented for evaluation: a 17-4/12-year-old male with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, alopecia, intellectual disability, and microcephaly and his 19-year-old sister with primary amenorrhea, alopecia, and normal cognition. Both required hormone treatment to produce secondary sex characteristics and pubertal development beyond Tanner 1. SNP array analysis of both probands was performed to detect shared regions of homozygosity which may harbor homozygous mutations in a gene causing their common features of abnormal pubertal development, alopecia, and variable cognitive delay. Our patients shared multiple homozygous genomic regions; ten shared regions were >1 Mb in length and constituted 0.99% of the genome. DCAF17, encoding a transmembrane nuclear protein of uncertain function, was the only gene identified in a homozygous region known to cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. DCAF17 mutations are associated with Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome, a rare disorder characterized by alopecia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, sensorineural hearing loss, diabetes mellitus, and extrapyramidal movements. Sequencing of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions of DCAF17 in the proband revealed homozygosity for a previously described founder mutation (c.436delC). Targeted DCAF17 sequencing of his affected sibling revealed the same homozygous mutation. This family illustrates the utility of SNP array testing in consanguineous families to efficiently and inexpensively identify regions of genomic homozygosity in which genetic candidates for recessive conditions can be identified. PMID:26664771

  18. Reproductive behavior and health in consanguineous marriages.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H; Mason, W M; Greene, J; Rao, N A

    1991-05-10

    In many regions of Asia and Africa, consanguineous marriages currently account for approximately 20 to 50% of all unions, and preliminary observations indicate that migrants from these areas continue to contract marriages with close relatives when resident in North America and Western Europe. Consanguinity is associated with increased gross fertility, due at least in part to younger maternal age at first livebirth. Morbidity and mortality also may be elevated, resulting in comparable numbers of surviving offspring in consanguineous and nonconsanguineous families. With advances in medicine and public health, genetic disorders will account for an increased proportion of disease worldwide. Predictably, this burden will fall more heavily on countries and communities in which consanguinity is strongly favored, as the result of the expression of deleterious recessive genes. However, studies conducted in such populations indicate that the adverse effects associated with inbreeding are experienced by a minority of families. PMID:2028254

  19. Novel homozygous mutations in the WNT10B gene underlying autosomal recessive split hand/foot malformation in three consanguineous families.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Abdul; Irfanullah; Khan, Saadullah; Zimri, Faridullah Khan; Muhammad, Noor; Rashid, Sajid; Ahmad, Wasim

    2014-01-25

    Split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM), representing variable degree of median clefts of hands and feet, is a genetically heterogeneous group of limb malformations with seven loci mapped on different human chromosomes. However, only 3 genes (TP63, WNT10B, DLX5) for the seven loci have been identified. The study, presented here, described three consanguineous Pakistani families segregating SHFM in autosomal recessive manner. Linkage in the families was searched by genotyping microsatellite markers and mutation screening of candidate gene was performed by Sanger DNA sequencing. Clinical features of affected members of these families exhibited SHFM phenotype with involvement of hands and feet. Genotyping using microsatellite markers mapped the families to WNT10B gene at SHFM6 on chromosome 12q13.11-q13. Subsequently, sequence analysis of WNT10B gene revealed a novel 4-bp deletion mutation (c.1165_1168delAAGT) in one family and 7-bp duplication (c.300_306dupAGGGCGG) in two other families. Structure-based analysis showed a significant conformational shift in the active binding site of mutated WNT10B (p.Lys388Glufs*36), influencing binding with Fzd8. The mutations identified in the WNT10B gene extend the body of evidence implicating it in the pathogenesis of SHFM. PMID:24211389

  20. A Homozygous Nonsense Thyroid Peroxidase Mutation (R540X) Consistently Causes Congenital Hypothyroidism in Two Siblings Born to a Consanguineous Family

    PubMed Central

    Cangül, Hakan; Doğan, Murat; Üstek, Duran

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the most common neonatal endocrine disorder, and mutations in the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) gene have been reported to cause the disease. Our aim in this study was to determine the genetic basis of CH in two affected children coming from a consanguineous family. Methods: First, we investigated the potential genetic linkage of the family to any known CH locus using microsatellite markers and then screened for mutations in the linked gene by Sanger sequencing. By using next-generation sequencing, we also checked if any other mutation was present in the remaining 10 causative CH genes. Results: The family showed potential linkage to the TPO gene, and we detected a homozygous nonsense mutation (R540X) in both cases. The two patients had total iodide organification defect (TIOD). Both the microsatellite marker haplotypes and the mutation segregated with the disease status in the family, i.e. all healthy subjects were either heterozygous carriers or homozygous wild-type, confirming the pathogenic nature of the mutation. Neither was the mutation present in any of the 400 control chromosomes nor were there any other mutations in the remaining causative CH genes. Conclusion: This study proves the pathogenicity of R540X mutation and demonstrates the strong genotype/phenotype correlation associated with this mutation. It also highlights the power of working with familial cases in revealing the molecular basis of CH and in establishing accurate genotype/phenotype relationships associated with disease causing mutations. PMID:26777044

  1. Consanguinity and its relevance to clinical genetics.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A

    2001-08-01

    Marriage between close biological relatives is generally regarded with suspicion and distaste within Western society, reflecting historical and religious prejudice. By comparison, in many other populations there is a strong preference for consanguineous unions, most frequently contracted between first cousins, and marriage outside the family is perceived as a risky and disruptive option. The increasing importance of the genetic contribution to the overall disease profile in both developed and developing countries has highlighted potential problems associated with detrimental recessive gene expression in consanguineous progeny. This review examines the outcomes of consanguineous unions, with proposals as to how the ongoing preference for consanguinity in many communities can best be accommodated from a clinical genetics perspective. PMID:11553039

  2. Consanguinity and deafness in Omani children.

    PubMed

    Khabori, Mazin Al; Patton, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    This study was based on a national retrospective analysis of 1400 questionnaires on the causes of deafness in Omani children, collected from 1986 to 2000. It was found that 70% of the deaf children were from parents of consanguineous marriages, and 30% from non-consanguineous unions. In those with consanguineous families 70.16% were first cousin marriages, 17.54% were second cousins, and 10.86% were from the same tribe. The proportion arising from first cousin marriages was higher than the background rate of first cousin marriages in Oman. In the total cohort, 45% had other family members with hearing loss. There was a greater chance of other relatives being affected in the consanguineous group as opposed to the non-consanguineous group (29.7% versus 15.3%). In most cases the affected relative was a deaf sibling (67.8%). We have demonstrated a higher rate of consanguinity amongst parents of deaf children in Oman and suggest this is associated with a higher frequency of autosomal recessive deafness in this paediatric population. PMID:18196484

  3. Clinical and molecular effect on offspring of a marriage of consanguineous spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 mutation carriers: a family case report

    PubMed Central

    Magaña, Jonathan J; Tapia-Guerrero, Yessica S; Velázquez-Pérez, Luis; Cruz-Mariño, Tania; Cerecedo-Zapata, Cesar M; Gómez, Rocío; Murillo-Melo, Nadia M; González-Piña, Rigoberto; Hernández-Hernández, Oscar; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is a genetic disorder characterized by degeneration of the cerebellum, brainstem, and retina that is caused by abnormal expansion of a CAG repeat located in the ATXN7 gene encoding sequence on chromosome 3p21.1. Although SCA7 is an uncommon autosomal dominant ataxia, we previously found increased prevalence of the disease in a Southeastern Mexican population. In this study, we described to our knowledge for the first time a marriage of consanguineous SCA7 mutation carriers and their offspring effect. We characterized a severely affected infantile-onset female patient whose parents and two siblings exhibited no symptoms of the disease at time of diagnosis. A comprehensive clinical analysis of the proband showed a progressive cerebellar syndrome, including gait ataxia, movement disorders, and saccadic movements, as well as hyperreflexia, visual deterioration, urinary and cardiovascular dysfunction, and impaired nerve conduction. The SCA7 mutation was detected in the proband patient. Subsequently, genetic examination using four ATXN7 gene-linked markers (three centromeric microsatellite markers [D3S1228, D3S1287, and D3S3635] and an intragenic Single Nucleotide Polymorphism [SNP-3145G/A]) revealed that the proband descends from a couple of consanguineous SCA7 mutation carriers. Genotyping analysis demonstrated that all offspring inherited only one mutant allele, and that the severe infantile-onset phenotype is caused by germinal expansion (from 37 to 72 CAG repeats) of the paternal mutant allele. Interestingly, the couple also referred a miscarriage. Finally, we found no CAA interruptions in the ATXN7 gene CAG repeats tract in this family, which might explain, at least in part, the triplet instability in the proband. PMID:25664129

  4. The alkylglycerol monooxygenase (AGMO) gene previously involved in autism also causes a novel syndromic form of primary microcephaly in a consanguineous Saudi family.

    PubMed

    Alrayes, Nuha; Mohamoud, Hussein Sheikh Ali; Ahmed, Saleem; Almramhi, Mona Mohammad; Shuaib, Taghreed Mohammad; Wang, Jun; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Everett, Kate; Nasir, Jamal; Jelani, Musharraf

    2016-04-15

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) refers to a genetically heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders in which patients exhibit a marked decrease in occipitofrontal head circumference at birth and a variable degree of intellectual disability. To date, 18 genes have been reported for MCPH worldwide. We enrolled a consanguineous family from Saudi Arabia presenting with primary microcephaly, developmental delay, short stature and intellectual disability. Whole exome sequencing (WES) with 100× coverage was performed on two affected siblings after defining common regions of homozygosity through genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray genotyping. WES data analysis, confirmed by subsequent Sanger sequence validation, identified a novel homozygous deletion mutation (c.967delA; p.Glu324Lysfs12*) in exon 10 of the alkylglycerol monooxygenase (AGMO) gene on chromosome 7p21.2. Population screening of 178 ethnically matched control chromosomes and consultation of the Exome Aggregation Consortium database, containing 60,706 individuals' exomes worldwide, confirmed that this mutation was not present outside the family. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first evidence of an AGMO mutation underlying primary microcephaly and intellectual disability in humans. Our findings further expand the genetic heterogeneity of MCPH in familial cases. PMID:27000257

  5. Consanguineous marriages in a Saudi population and the effect of inbreeding on prenatal and postnatal mortality.

    PubMed

    al Husain, M; al Bunyan, M

    1997-06-01

    Consanguineous marriages are strongly favoured in the Saudi population. A population-based study of consanguineous marriages was conducted in the Riyadh area. The prevalence rate of consanguineous marriages was 51.3% with an average inbreeding coefficient of 0.02265, which is high compared with many other countries. The most important variables affecting inbreeding were the regional background of the family (p < 0.001) and the level of education, which was inversely associated with consanguineous marriage (p < 0.001). Perinatal and postnatal mortalities were not significantly different between consanguineous and non-consanguineous families. PMID:9230979

  6. From "New Genetics" to Everyday Knowledge: Ideas about How Genetic Diseases Are Transmitted in Two Large Brazilian Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Silvana; Bizzo, Nelio

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on everyday or lay understandings of inheritance. In the northeastern Brazil, 100 individuals were interviewed in order to describe how they explain the origin of genetic disorders affecting their relatives for several generations. There were involved 60 individuals from a large consanguineous family with many members affected

  7. From "New Genetics" to Everyday Knowledge: Ideas about How Genetic Diseases Are Transmitted in Two Large Brazilian Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Silvana; Bizzo, Nelio

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on everyday or lay understandings of inheritance. In the northeastern Brazil, 100 individuals were interviewed in order to describe how they explain the origin of genetic disorders affecting their relatives for several generations. There were involved 60 individuals from a large consanguineous family with many members affected…

  8. Consanguineous marriage among the Fulani.

    PubMed

    Hampshire, K R; Smith, M T

    2001-08-01

    The Fulani are a broad ethnic category of nomadic and seminomadic pastoralists and agropastoralists living in the semiarid Sahel region of sub-Saharan Africa. The Fulani are patrilineal, patrilocal, and moderately polygynous, with arranged first marriages accompanied by the payment of bridewealth, ideally in the form of cattle. Consanguineous marriage is frequent, with first or second cousin marriage preferred. In this paper we present data on levels of consanguineous marriage among the Fulani of northern Burkina Faso and test the hypothesis that inbreeding may be more frequent when there is a scarcity of cattle available, since bridewealth demands are thought to be reduced with close-kin marriage. Among 308 women's marriages, 203 (65.8%) were between kin up to and including second cousins, and 102 (33.1%) were between nonkin. Among 276 men's marriages, 196 (71.0%) were between kin up to and including second cousins, and 77 (27.9%) were between nonkin. The mean population inbreeding coefficient (alpha) was 0.0355 for women, and 0.0374 for men. No increase was found in population levels of inbreeding estimated from marriages contracted after the droughts of 1973 and 1984, which drastically reduced the Fulani's cattle stocks. However, a significantly higher rate of consanguineous marriage was found in families owning the fewest cattle. PMID:11512686

  9. Nonsyndromic Early-Onset Cone-Rod Dystrophy and Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy in a Consanguineous Israeli Family are Caused by Two Independent yet Linked Mutations in ALMS1 and DYSF.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Csilla H; Kimchi, Adva; Namburi, Prasanthi; Mutsuddi, Mousumi; Zelinger, Lina; Beryozkin, Avigail; Ben-Simhon, Shiran; Obolensky, Alexey; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Argov, Zohar; Pikarsky, Eli; Fellig, Yakov; Marks-Ohana, Devorah; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Banin, Eyal; Sharon, Dror; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-09-01

    Genetic analysis of clinical phenotypes in consanguineous families is complicated by coinheritance of large DNA regions carrying independent variants. Here, we characterized a family with early onset cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) and muscular dystrophy. Homozygosity mapping (HM) followed by whole exome sequencing revealed a nonsense mutation, p.R270*, in ALMS1 and two novel potentially disease-causing missense variants, p.R1581C and p.Y2070C, in DYSF. ALMS1 and DYSF are genetically and physically linked on chromosome 2 in a genomic region suggested by HM and associated with Alström syndrome, which includes CRD, and with limb girdle muscular dystrophy, respectively. Affected family members lack additional systemic manifestations of Alström syndrome but exhibit mild muscular dystrophy. RNA-seq data did not reveal any significant variations in ALMS1 transcripts in the human retina. Our study thus implicates ALMS1 as a nonsyndromic retinal disease gene and suggests a potential role of variants in interacting cilia genes in modifying clinical phenotypes. PMID:26077327

  10. Whole exome sequencing identifies causative mutations in the majority of consanguineous or familial cases with childhood-onset increased renal echogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Halbritter, Jan; Gee, Heon Yung; Porath, Jonathan D.; Lawson, Jennifer A.; Airik, Rannar; Shril, Shirlee; Allen, Susan J.; Stein, Deborah; Al Kindy, Adila; Beck, Bodo B.; Cengiz, Nurcan; Moorani, Khemchand N.; Ozaltin, Fatih; Hashmi, Seema; Sayer, John A.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Soliman, Neveen A.; Otto, Edgar A.; Lifton, Richard P.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    Chronically increased echogenicity on renal ultrasound is a sensitive early finding of chronic kidney disease that can be detected before manifestation of other symptoms. Increased echogenicity, however, is not specific for a certain etiology of chronic kidney disease. Here, we performed whole exome sequencing in 79 consanguineous or familial cases of suspected nephronophthisis in order to determine the underlying molecular disease cause. In 50 cases, there was a causative mutation in a known monogenic disease gene. In 32 of these cases whole exome sequencing confirmed the diagnosis of a nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy. In 8 cases it revealed the diagnosis of a renal tubulopathy. The remaining 10 cases were identified as Alport syndrome (4), autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease (2), congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (3), and APECED syndrome (1). In 5 families, in whom mutations in known monogenic genes were excluded, we applied homozygosity mapping for variant filtering, and identified 5 novel candidate genes (RBM48, FAM186B, PIAS1, INCENP, and RCOR1) for renal ciliopathies. Thus, whole exome sequencing allows the detection of the causative mutation in 2/3 of affected individuals, thereby presenting the etiologic diagnosis and allows identification of novel candidate genes. PMID:26489029

  11. In silico analysis of SIGMAR1 variant (rs4879809) segregating in a consanguineous Pakistani family showing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis without frontotemporal lobar dementia.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Muhammad Ikram; Ahmad, Arsalan; Raza, Syed Irfan; Amar, Ali; Ali, Amjad; Bhatti, Attya; John, Peter; Mohyuddin, Aisha; Ahmad, Wasim; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad

    2015-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting upper motor neurons in the brain and lower motor neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord, resulting in fatal paralysis. It has been found to be associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). In the present study, we have described homozygosity mapping and gene sequencing in a consanguineous autosomal recessive Pakistani family showing non-juvenile ALS without signs of FTLD. Gene mapping was carried out in all recruited family members using microsatellite markers, and linkage was established with sigma non-opioid intracellular receptor 1 (SIGMAR1) gene at chromosome 9p13.2. Gene sequencing of SIGMAR1 revealed a novel 3'-UTR nucleotide variation c.672*31A>G (rs4879809) segregating with disease in this family. The C9ORF72 repeat region in intron 1, previously implicated in a related phenotype, was excluded through linkage, and further confirmation of exclusion was obtained by amplifying intron 1 of C9ORF72 with multiple primers in affected individuals and controls. In silico analysis was carried out to explore the possible role of 3'-UTR variant of SIGMAR1 in ALS. The Regulatory RNA motif and Element Finder program revealed disturbance in miRNA (hsa-miR-1205) binding site due to this variation. ESEFinder analysis showed new SRSF1 and SRSF1-IgM-BRCA1 binding sites with significant scores due to this variation. Our results indicate that the 3'-UTR SIGMAR1 variant c.672*31A>G may have a role in the pathogenesis of ALS in this family. PMID:26205306

  12. Sociodemographic correlates of consanguineous marriage in the Muslim population of India.

    PubMed

    Hussain, R; Bittles, A H

    2000-10-01

    Using data derived from the 1992-1993 National Family Health Survey, the sociodemographic characteristics of consanguineous marriage were determined in the Muslim population of India. In this nationally representative sample of 8436 women, consanguineous marriages accounted for 22.0% of the total. No differences between the consanguineous and non-consanguineous groups were observed in terms of mean age at marriage or mean age at cohabitation. The study confirmed the negative association between consanguineous marriage and maternal education but also indicated that women in consanguineous unions were more likely to be employed, albeit mainly in agricultural work on behalf of the family. Consanguineous couples more frequently lived in smaller towns and in an extended family environment. Somewhat conflicting results were obtained with indicators of socioeconomic status, but the overall picture suggested that consanguineous households had greater access to consumer goods because of their larger number of co-resident persons. PMID:11075637

  13. Integration of Sequence Data from a Consanguineous Family with Genetic Data from an Outbred Population Identifies PLB1 as a Candidate Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Gene

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yukinori; Diogo, Dorothee; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Mouassess, Faten; Achkar, Walid A. L.; Fulton, Robert S.; Denny, Joshua C.; Gupta, Namrata; Mirel, Daniel; Gabriel, Stacy; Li, Gang; Kremer, Joel M.; Pappas, Dimitrios A.; Carroll, Robert J.; Eyler, Anne E.; Trynka, Gosia; Stahl, Eli A.; Cui, Jing; Saxena, Richa; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Dieudé, Philippe; Mariette, Xavier; Barton, Anne; Canhão, Helena; Fonseca, João E.; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P.; Moreland, Larry W.; Bridges, S. Louis; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Choi, Hyon K.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Galan, Pilar; Lathrop, Mark; Raj, Towfique; De Jager, Philip L.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Worthington, Jane; Padyukov, Leonid; Klareskog, Lars; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Arayssi, Thurayya; Kazkaz, Layla A.; Plenge, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Integrating genetic data from families with highly penetrant forms of disease together with genetic data from outbred populations represents a promising strategy to uncover the complete frequency spectrum of risk alleles for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we demonstrate that rare, low-frequency and common alleles at one gene locus, phospholipase B1 (PLB1), might contribute to risk of RA in a 4-generation consanguineous pedigree (Middle Eastern ancestry) and also in unrelated individuals from the general population (European ancestry). Through identity-by-descent (IBD) mapping and whole-exome sequencing, we identified a non-synonymous c.2263G>C (p.G755R) mutation at the PLB1 gene on 2q23, which significantly co-segregated with RA in family members with a dominant mode of inheritance (P = 0.009). We further evaluated PLB1 variants and risk of RA using a GWAS meta-analysis of 8,875 RA cases and 29,367 controls of European ancestry. We identified significant contributions of two independent non-coding variants near PLB1 with risk of RA (rs116018341 [MAF = 0.042] and rs116541814 [MAF = 0.021], combined P = 3.2×10−6). Finally, we performed deep exon sequencing of PLB1 in 1,088 RA cases and 1,088 controls (European ancestry), and identified suggestive dispersion of rare protein-coding variant frequencies between cases and controls (P = 0.049 for C-alpha test and P = 0.055 for SKAT). Together, these data suggest that PLB1 is a candidate risk gene for RA. Future studies to characterize the full spectrum of genetic risk in the PLB1 genetic locus are warranted. PMID:24520335

  14. Profiling β Thalassemia Mutations in Consanguinity and Nonconsanguinity for Prenatal Screening and Awareness Programme.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravindra; Arya, Vandana; Agarwal, Sarita

    2015-01-01

    Mutation spectrum varies significantly in different parts and different ethnic groups of India. Social factors such as preference to marry within the community and among 1st degree relatives (consanguinity) play an important role in impeding the gene pool of the disease within the community and so in society by and large. The present paper discusses the role of consanguinity in profiling of beta thalassemia mutation, and thus the approach for prenatal screening and prevention based awareness programme. Clinically diagnosed 516 cases of beta thalassemia were screened at molecular level. A detailed clinical Proforma was recorded with the information of origin of the family, ethnicity, and consanguinity. The present study reports that subjects originating from Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Bihar, and Jharkhand have c.92+5G>C and c.124_127delTTCT mutation as the commonest mutation compared to the subjects hailing from Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh and Nepal where sickle mutation was found more common. In 40 consanguineous unions more common and specific beta mutations with higher rate of homozygosity have been reported. This consanguinity-based data helps not only in deciding target oriented prenatal diagnostic strategies but also in objective based awareness programmes in prevention of thalassemia major birth. PMID:26576156

  15. Importance of Genetic Studies in Consanguineous Populations for the Characterization of Novel Human Gene Functions.

    PubMed

    Erzurumluoglu, A Mesut; Shihab, Hashem A; Rodriguez, Santiago; Gaunt, Tom R; Day, Ian N M

    2016-05-01

    Consanguineous offspring have elevated levels of homozygosity. Autozygous stretches within their genome are likely to harbour loss of function (LoF) mutations which will lead to complete inactivation or dysfunction of genes. Studying consanguineous offspring with clinical phenotypes has been very useful for identifying disease causal mutations. However, at present, most of the genes in the human genome have no disorder associated with them or have unknown function. This is presumably mostly due to the fact that homozygous LoF variants are not observed in outbred populations which are the main focus of large sequencing projects. However, another reason may be that many genes in the genome-even when completely "knocked out," do not cause a distinct or defined phenotype. Here, we discuss the benefits and implications of studying consanguineous populations, as opposed to the traditional approach of analysing a subset of consanguineous families or individuals with disease. We suggest that studying consanguineous populations "as a whole" can speed up the characterisation of novel gene functions as well as indicating nonessential genes and/or regions in the human genome. We also suggest designing a single nucleotide variant (SNV) array to make the process more efficient. PMID:27000383

  16. Profiling β Thalassemia Mutations in Consanguinity and Nonconsanguinity for Prenatal Screening and Awareness Programme

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravindra; Arya, Vandana; Agarwal, Sarita

    2015-01-01

    Mutation spectrum varies significantly in different parts and different ethnic groups of India. Social factors such as preference to marry within the community and among 1st degree relatives (consanguinity) play an important role in impeding the gene pool of the disease within the community and so in society by and large. The present paper discusses the role of consanguinity in profiling of beta thalassemia mutation, and thus the approach for prenatal screening and prevention based awareness programme. Clinically diagnosed 516 cases of beta thalassemia were screened at molecular level. A detailed clinical Proforma was recorded with the information of origin of the family, ethnicity, and consanguinity. The present study reports that subjects originating from Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Bihar, and Jharkhand have c.92+5G>C and c.124_127delTTCT mutation as the commonest mutation compared to the subjects hailing from Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh and Nepal where sickle mutation was found more common. In 40 consanguineous unions more common and specific beta mutations with higher rate of homozygosity have been reported. This consanguinity-based data helps not only in deciding target oriented prenatal diagnostic strategies but also in objective based awareness programmes in prevention of thalassemia major birth. PMID:26576156

  17. Prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of consanguineous marriages in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Koc, Ismet

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of consanguineous marriages in Turkey using data derived from the 2003 Turkey Demographic and Health Survey (TDHS-2003). Demographic surveys conducted in the last 40 years consistently show that Turkey is a country with a high level of consanguinity. In the latest demographic survey (TDHS-2003), a nationally representative sample of 8075 ever-married women, consanguineous marriages accounted for 22% of the total, which is equivalent to a mean coefficient of inbreeding (alpha) of 0.011. There are changing secular profiles in the rates of consanguinity in general and of the specific sub-types of cousin marriages in particular in Turkey. The prevalence of first cousin marriages among all consanguineous marriages presents a steady decline from one marriage cohort to the next. The changes observed over time may be attributable to several factors such as the increase in educational level of women, the nuclearization of the family system, the mobility from rural to urban settings, a better socioeconomic status of families, an increase in women's labour force participation in formal sectors, lower fertility rates resulting in a smaller number of cousins available for marriage, and an increased awareness of the effects of consanguineous unions on child health in cases where there is an inherited recessive disease in the family. Any attempts to discourage consanguinity at the population level appear to be inappropriate and undesirable, especially when the consanguineous union remains an integral part of the cultural and social life of Turkey. Nevertheless the WHO-recommended approach to minimizing the negative effects of consanguinity on child health should be followed, i.e. the identification of families with a high risk of a genetic disease and the provision of prospective genetic counselling. PMID:18028574

  18. Comments on "Consanguineous Marriages in Pakistan".

    PubMed

    Hakim, A

    1994-01-01

    Some critical comments are made on a paper entitled "Consanguineous Marriages in Pakistan." Most studies have considered early age at marriage, rural or extended family setup and low socioeconomic status when investigating the issue. The background demographic variables and behavioral aspects of consanguinity were studied only by a few, therefore a lack of data exists on pertinent social, cultural, and behavioral dynamics. In Pakistan over 60% of marriages are between first or second cousins. The highest rates of such marriages have been reported in rural areas, among individuals with low educational level, and among the poorest. However, cousin unions are also common among landowning families. In addition to socioeconomic reasons, these marriages are socially acceptable because they facilitate prenuptial negotiations and provide more compatibility between the husband and wife as well as the bride and the mother-in-law. The evidence on consanguinity and fertility is conflicting. The effect of inbreeding on fertility has been demonstrated by most studies. The effect of consanguinity on mortality is also wrought with ambiguities because of methodological flaws. Although the present authors used limited bivariate analysis, they could not account for increased fertility and mortality in consanguineous matings by examining socioeconomic differences and background demographic variables. There is a need to indicate clearly to what extent the genetic effect is responsible for the excess fertility and mortality after controlling for maternal, sociodemographic, and behavioral characteristics. The article made a contribution to elucidating the impact of cousin marriages, a well entrenched custom, on fertility, mortality, and the status of women. PMID:12346200

  19. Community perceptions of reasons for preference for consanguineous marriages in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hussain, R

    1999-10-01

    Although the recent Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) show that two-thirds of marriages in Pakistan are consanguineous, the sociocultural determinants of such marriages remain largely unexplored. This paper examines the relative importance of the three commonly perceived reasons for such marriages: religious, economic and cultural. The analysis is based on qualitative data collected in 1995 from multi-ethnic and multi-religious communities in Karachi, the largest city of Pakistan. Results show that consanguineous marriages are preferred across all ethnic and religious groups to a varying degree, and that parents continue to be the prime decision-makers for marriages of both sons and daughters. The major reasons for a preference for consanguineous marriages are sociocultural rather than any perceived economic benefits, either in the form of consolidation of family property or smaller and less expensive dowries. Among Muslims, following religious traditions is the least commonly cited reason for such marriages. Despite the reported sociocultural advantages of consanguineous marriages, such unions are perceived to be exploitative as they perpetuate the existing power structures within the family. PMID:10581876

  20. Consanguineous marriage in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Khoury, S A; Massad, D

    1992-07-15

    We conducted a population-based study of consanguineous marriages in Jordan. About two thousand households were interviewed. First cousin marriages were encountered in 32.03%, second cousin in 6.8%, distant relation in 10.5%, and no relation in 50% of all marriages, respectively. Inbreeding coefficients were compared with those of other countries. The most important variables affecting inbreeding were social tradition, religion, education, and place of residence--urban vs. rural. Secular trends appear rather stable since the early decades of the twentieth century, especially for first cousin marriages. Jordan society showed a deeply rooted traditional behavioral pattern when inbreeding is considered. PMID:1642259

  1. Consanguinity and reproductive wastage in the Palestinian Territories.

    PubMed

    Assaf, Shireen; Khawaja, Marwan; DeJong, Jocelyn; Mahfoud, Ziad; Yunis, Khalid

    2009-03-01

    Many studies have found that consanguinity poses a threat to child mortality and health and can also pose a threat to offspring survival before birth. However, there are conflicting findings with some studies having found no increased risk on offspring survival associated with consanguinity. Data from a population-based survey conducted in 2004 in the Palestinian Territories was used to assess the risk of consanguinity on offspring survival. The analysis was conducted on 4418 women aged 15-49 who were asked whether or not they had experienced a stillbirth or a spontaneous abortion. These two outcomes were combined together for the analysis of reproductive wastage. Multivariable negative binomial regression was conducted to calculate the incidence risk ratios (IRR) for each region in the Palestinian Territories separately. The strongest risk factors for reproductive wastage, after controlling for other variables, were found to be consanguinity, age and parity with age presenting the highest IRRs. Standard of living, locality type, education level, women's employment and past intrauterine device use were not found to be significant risk factors for reproductive wastage. In the West Bank only first cousin level of consanguinity was found to be significant and 'hamola' level (or from same family clan) lost its significance after adjusting for other variables. In the Gaza Strip both the first cousin and 'hamola' levels of consanguinity were significant and presented almost equal IRRs of 1.3. In conclusion, consanguinity was found to be a significant risk factor for reproductive wastage. PMID:19159397

  2. An analysis of consanguineous marriage in the Muslim population of India at regional and state levels.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H; Hussain, R

    2000-01-01

    Consanguineous marriage is widely favoured in a large majority of the world's Islamic populations. According to recent estimates, the resident Muslim population of India is over 100 million. However, apart from a few numerically small or geographically defined surveys, little is known about their patterns of marriage preferences since partition of the Indian Subcontinent in 1947. This study seeks to determine the prevalence and patterns of consanguineous marriages contracted among Indian Muslims at regional and state levels during the last two generations. Data from the 1992/93 Indian National Family Health Survey (NFHS) were used in the analysis. The NFHS was a nationally-representative survey of ever-married women aged 13-49 years, conducted across 25 states of India. Of the initial 9845 respondents, 8436 were included in the final weighted analysis sample. Overall, 22.0% of marriages were found to be contracted between spouses related as second cousins or closer, ranging from 15.9% in the eastern states to 32.9% in the western states of India. In all parts of the country first cousin marriages were the preferred form of consanguineous union, and in four of the five regions paternal first cousin marriages predominated. Despite predictions to the contrary, there was no evidence of a significant change in the prevalence of consanguineous unions over the course of the study period, which extended from the late 1950s to the early 1990s. PMID:10768421

  3. From new genetics to everyday knowledge: Ideas about how genetic diseases are transmitted in two large Brazilian families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Silvana; Bizzo, Nelio

    2005-07-01

    This study focuses on everyday or lay understandings of inheritance. In the northeastern Brazil, 100 individuals were interviewed in order to describe how they explain the origin of genetic disorders affecting their relatives for several generations. There were involved 60 individuals from a large consanguineous family with many members affected with a neurodegenerative disorder, SPOAN syndrome (spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy and neuropathy), and 40 individuals of another family living with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The results indicate that families here studied have built narratives to explain the origin of genetic diseases, saying that an ancestor infected with syphilis gave rise to disorders and birthmarks transmitted to descendents.

  4. Consanguinity, human evolution, and complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bittles, A. H.; Black, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    There is little information on inbreeding during the critical early years of human existence. However, given the small founding group sizes and restricted mate choices it seems inevitable that intrafamilial reproduction occurred and the resultant levels of inbreeding would have been substantial. Currently, couples related as second cousins or closer (F ≥ 0.0156) and their progeny account for an estimated 10.4% of the global population. The highest rates of consanguineous marriage occur in north and sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and west, central, and south Asia. In these regions even couples who regard themselves as unrelated may exhibit high levels of homozygosity, because marriage within clan, tribe, caste, or biraderi boundaries has been a long-established tradition. Mortality in first-cousin progeny is ≈3.5% higher than in nonconsanguineous offspring, although demographic, social, and economic factors can significantly influence the outcome. Improving socioeconomic conditions and better access to health care will impact the effects of consanguinity, with a shift from infant and childhood mortality to extended morbidity. At the same time, a range of primarily social factors, including urbanization, improved female education, and smaller family sizes indicate that the global prevalence of consanguineous unions will decline. This shift in marriage patterns will initially result in decreased homozygosity, accompanied by a reduction in the expression of recessive single-gene disorders. Although the roles of common and rare gene variants in the etiology of complex disease remain contentious, it would be expected that declining consanguinity would also be reflected in reduced prevalence of complex diseases, especially in population isolates. PMID:19805052

  5. NKX2-5 mutations in an inbred consanguineous population: genetic and phenotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Abou Hassan, Ossama K; Fahed, Akl C; Batrawi, Manal; Arabi, Mariam; Refaat, Marwan M; DePalma, Steven R; Seidman, J G; Seidman, Christine E; Bitar, Fadi F; Nemer, Georges M

    2015-01-01

    NKX2-5 mutations are associated with different forms of congenital heart disease. Despite the knowledge gained from molecular and animal studies, genotype-phenotype correlations in humans are limited by the lack of large cohorts and the incomplete assessment of family members. We hypothesized that studying the role of NKX2-5 in inbred populations with homogeneous genetic backgrounds and high consanguinity rates such as Lebanon could help closing this gap. We sequenced NKX2-5 in 188 index CHD cases (25 with ASD). Five variants (three segregated in families) were detected in eleven families including the previously documented p.R25C variant, which was found in seven patients from different families, and in one healthy individual. In 3/5 familial dominant ASD cases, we identified an NKX2-5 mutation. In addition to the heterogeneity of NKX2-5 mutations, a diversity of phenotypes occurred within the families with predominant ASD and AV block. We did in fact identify a large prevalence of Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) in families with truncating mutations, and two patients with coronary sinus disease. NKX2-5 is thus responsible for dominant familial ASD even in consanguineous populations, and a wide genetic and phenotypic diversity is characteristic of NKX2-5 mutations in the Lebanese population. PMID:25742962

  6. NKX2-5 Mutations in an Inbred Consanguineous Population: Genetic and Phenotypic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Abou Hassan, Ossama K.; Fahed, Akl C.; Batrawi, Manal; Arabi, Mariam; Refaat, Marwan M.; DePalma, Steven R.; Seidman, J. G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Bitar, Fadi F.; Nemer, Georges M.

    2015-01-01

    NKX2-5 mutations are associated with different forms of congenital heart disease. Despite the knowledge gained from molecular and animal studies, genotype-phenotype correlations in humans are limited by the lack of large cohorts and the incomplete assessment of family members. We hypothesized that studying the role of NKX2-5 in inbred populations with homogeneous genetic backgrounds and high consanguinity rates such as Lebanon could help closing this gap. We sequenced NKX2-5 in 188 index CHD cases (25 with ASD). Five variants (three segregated in families) were detected in eleven families including the previously documented p.R25C variant, which was found in seven patients from different families, and in one healthy individual. In 3/5 familial dominant ASD cases, we identified an NKX2-5 mutation. In addition to the heterogeneity of NKX2-5 mutations, a diversity of phenotypes occurred within the families with predominant ASD and AV block. We did in fact identify a large prevalence of Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) in families with truncating mutations, and two patients with coronary sinus disease. NKX2-5 is thus responsible for dominant familial ASD even in consanguineous populations, and a wide genetic and phenotypic diversity is characteristic of NKX2-5 mutations in the Lebanese population. PMID:25742962

  7. Effects of parental consanguinity on mortality and reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Lindelius, R

    1980-01-01

    A study of consanguinity effects on mortality and fertility was performed. The original series consisted of families selected on the basis of the birth of at least one child with a congenital, monohybrid, autosomal recessive disease. Biologically related families were compared with unrelated ones, the latter group being used as a natural control group. The results are discussed. PMID:7358407

  8. Novel homozygous, heterozygous and hemizygous FRMD7 gene mutations segregated in the same consanguineous family with congenital X-linked nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishna, Uppala; Ratnamala, Uppala; Deutsch, Samuel; Bartoloni, Lucia; Kuracha, Murali R; Singh, Raminder; Banwait, Jasjit; Bastola, Dhundy K; Johar, Kaid; Nath, Swapan K; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2012-01-01

    Congenital nystagmus (NYS) is characterized by bilateral, spontaneous, and involuntary movements of the eyeballs that most commonly presents between 2 and 6 months of life. To date, 44 different FRMD7 gene mutations have been found to be etiological factors for the NYS1 locus at Xq26-q27. The aim of this study was to find the FRMD7 gene mutations in a large eleven-generation Indian pedigree with 71 members who are affected by NYS. Mutation analysis of the entire coding region and splice junctions of the FRMD7 gene revealed a novel missense mutation, c.A917G, predicts a substitution of Arg for Gln at codon 305 (Q305R) within exon 10 of FRMD7. The mutation was detected in hemizygous males, and in homozygous and heterozygous states in affected female members of the family. This mutation was not detected in unaffected members of the family or in 100 unrelated control subjects. This mutation was found to be at a highly conserved residue within the FERM-adjacent domain in affected members of the family. Structure prediction and energetic analysis of wild-type FRMD7 compared with mutant (Q305R) revealed that this change in amino acid led to a change in secondary structure predicted to be an energetically unstable protein. The present study represents the first confirmation of FRMD7 gene mutations in a multigenerational Indian family and expands the mutation spectrum for this locus. PMID:22490987

  9. The frequency and effecting factors of consanguineous marriage in a group of soldiers in Ankara.

    PubMed

    Kir, Tayfun; Güleç, Mahir; Bakir, Bilal; Hoşjgönül, Esat; Tümerdem, Nazmi

    2005-07-01

    This cross-sectional study was carried out to investigate the frequency of consanguineous marriage in a group of army conscripts in Ankara and the factors affecting this. Of 4153 soldiers, 387 were married. The rate of marriage between first cousins was found to be 19.1%, and the overall rate of consanguineous marriage was 24.1%. Consanguineous marriage was found to be significantly prevalent among soldiers who were born in and still living in the Eastern region; among those who lived in villages; among those whose parents as well as themselves had low educational levels; and among those whose marriages were arranged by their families. Neither the payment of bride-price nor the presence of consanguinity between parents was a significant factor for consanguineous marriage. In addition, the age of the soldier and the age at marriage were significantly lower among soldiers married to first cousins than among soldiers whose marriages were not consanguineous. PMID:16082860

  10. Association studies in consanguineous populations

    SciTech Connect

    Genin, E.; Clerget-Darpous, F.

    1996-04-01

    To study the genetic determinism of multifactorial diseases in large panmictic populations, a strategy consists in looking for an association with markers closely linked to candidate genes. A distribution of marker genotypes different in patients and controls may indicate that the candidate gene is involved in the disease. In panmictic populations, the power to detect the role of a candidate gene depends on the gametic disequilibrium with the marker locus. In consanguineous populations, we show that it depends on the inbreeding coefficient F as well. Inbreeding increases the power to detect the role of a recessive or quasi-recessive disease-susceptibility factor. The gain in power turns out to be greater for small values of the gametic disequilibrium. Moreover, even in the absence of gametic disequilibrium, the presence of inbreeding may allow to detect the role of a recessive factor. Ignoring inbreeding when it exists may lead to reject falsely a recessive model if the mode of inheritance is inferred on the distribution of genotypes among patients. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Genetics and psychotic disorders: A fresh look at consanguinity.

    PubMed

    Guermouche, Aicha Dahdouh; Taleb, Mohammed; Blecha, Lisa; Benyamina, Amine

    2016-02-01

    Consanguineous unions refer to marriages between related individuals who share a common ancestor. These unions are still commonplace in certain regions of the world such as the southern coast of the Mediterranean, throughout the Middle East and South-East Asia. According to available data, couples of second cousins or closer and their offspring currently represent 10.4% of the world's population, thus resulting in increased frequencies of autosomal recessive disorders. Furthermore, consanguinity may be implicated in the increased frequency of multifactorial pathologies such as mental disorders. The few existing epidemiological studies in consanguineous and/or geographically isolated populations confirm that there is a significant association between consanguinity and mental disorders and a higher risk of schizophrenia or bipolar disorders among offspring from consanguineous couples. There exists a strong and complex genetic component in the predisposition to psychotic disorders that has been confirmed in numerous studies. However, the genetic basis of these disorders remains poorly understood. GWAS studies (Genome Wide Association Studies) over the past 10 years have identified a few weak associations, thus refuting the "common diseases-common variants" hypothesis. A model implicating numerous rare variants has been supported by the recent discovery of CNVs (Copy Number Variants) and their statistically significant association with psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorders and autism. The study of consanguineous families may contribute to identifying rare variants in homogenous populations who have conserved certain alleles. Major developments in molecular biology techniques would facilitate these studies as well as contributing to identifying major genes. These results emphasize the need for genetic counseling in high-risk communities and the importance of implementing preventive actions and raising awareness concerning the risk of consanguineous unions. PMID:26721321

  12. Clinical and genetic investigation of a large Tunisian family with complete achromatopsia: identification of a new nonsense mutation in GNAT2 gene.

    PubMed

    Ouechtati, Farah; Merdassi, Ahlem; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Largueche, Leila; Derouiche, Kaouther; Ouragini, Houyem; Nouira, Sonia; Tiab, Leila; Baklouti, Karim; Rebai, Ahmed; Schorderet, Daniel F; Munier, Francis L; Zografos, Leonidas; Abdelhak, Sonia; El Matri, Leila

    2011-01-01

    Complete achromatopsia is a rare autosomal recessive disease associated with CNGA3, CNGB3, GNAT2 and PDE6C mutations. This retinal disorder is characterized by complete loss of color discrimination due to the absence or alteration of the cones function. The purpose of the present study was the clinical and the genetic characterization of achromatopsia in a large consanguineous Tunisian family. Ophthalmic evaluation included a full clinical examination, color vision testing and electroretinography. Linkage analysis using microsatellite markers flanking CNGA3, CNGB3, GNAT2 and PDE6C genes was performed. Mutations were screened by direct sequencing. A total of 12 individuals were diagnosed with congenital complete achromatopsia. They are members of six nuclear consanguineous families belonging to the same large consanguineous family. Linkage analysis revealed linkage to GNAT2. Mutational screening of GNAT2 revealed three intronic variations c.119-69G>C, c.161+66A>T and c.875-31G>C that co-segregated with a novel mutation p.R313X. An identical GNAT2 haplotype segregating with this mutation was identified, indicating a founder mutation. All patients were homozygous for the p.R313X mutation. This is the first report of the clinical and genetic investigation of complete achromatopsia in North Africa and the largest family with recessive achromatopsia involving GNAT2; thus, providing a unique opportunity for genotype-phenotype correlation for this extremely rare condition. PMID:21107338

  13. [Frequency of consanguineous unions in the Tlemcen area (West Algeria)].

    PubMed

    Zaoui, Salah; Biémont, Christian

    2002-01-01

    In order to describe consanguineous unions and their effects in a sample of the Algerian population, we interviewed 3,983 couples in a hospital and from urban and rural areas near Tlemcen. We observed that unions between cousins represented 34.0% of the marriages. The frequency of unions between relatives was lower in the urban (30.6%) than in the rural areas (40.5%). This difference can be explained by changing custom and family relationships in urban areas, and is evidenced by social and anthropologic factors and the attitude towards consanguineous unions. PMID:12473522

  14. A Novel Aberrant Splice Site Mutation in RAB23 Leads to an Eight Nucleotide Deletion in the mRNA and Is Responsible for Carpenter Syndrome in a Consanguineous Emirati Family

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Salem, S.; Begum, M.A.; Ali, B.R.; Al-Gazali, L.

    2013-01-01

    Carpenter syndrome is caused by mutations in the RAB23 gene that encodes a small GTPase of the Rab subfamily of proteins. Rab proteins are known to be involved in the regulation of cellular trafficking and signal transduction. Currently, only few mutations in RAB23 have been reported in patients with Carpenter syndrome. In this paper, we report the clinical features, molecular and functional analysis of 2 children from an Emirati consanguineous family with this syndrome. The affected children exhibit the typical features including craniosynostosis, typical facial appearance, polysyndactyly, and obesity. Molecular analysis of the RAB23 gene revealed a homozygous mutation affecting the first nucleotide of the acceptor splice site of exon 5 (c.482-1G>A). This mutation affects the authentic mRNA splicing and activates a cryptic acceptor site within exon 5. Thus, the erroneous splicing results in an eight nucleotide deletion, followed by a frameshift and premature termination codon at position 161 (p.V161fsX3). Due to the loss of the C-terminally prenylatable cysteine residue, the truncated protein will probably fail to associate with the target cellular membranes due to the absence of the necessary lipid modification. The p.V161fsX3 extends the spectrum of RAB23 mutations and points to the crucial role of prenylation in the pathogenesis of Carpenter syndrome within this family. PMID:23599695

  15. Consanguineous marriages in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    al-Gazali, L I; Bener, A; Abdulrazzaq, Y M; Micallef, R; al-Khayat, A I; Gaber, T

    1997-10-01

    This study examines the frequency of consanguineous marriage and the coefficient of inbreeding in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The study was conducted in Al Ain and Dubai cities between October 1994 and March 1995. A sample of 2033 married UAE females aged 15 years and over participated. The degree of consanguinity between each female and her spouse, and the degree of consanguinity between their parents were recorded. The rate of consanguinity in the present generation was high (50.5%) with a coefficient of inbreeding of 0.0222. The commonest type of consanguineous marriage was between first cousins (26.2%). Double first cousin marriages were common (3.5%) compared to other populations. The consanguinity rate in the UAE has increased from 39% to 50.5% in one generation. The level of consanguinity was higher in Al Ain (54.2%) than in Dubai (40%). PMID:9881148

  16. Exome sequencing reveals a novel mutation, p.L325H, in the KRT5 gene associated with autosomal dominant Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex Koebner type in a large family from western India

    PubMed Central

    Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen K; Patowary, Ashok; Singh, Meghna; Kumari, Renu; Faruq, Mohammed; Master, Dilip C; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Scaria, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    We report a large, non-consanguineous family comprising five generations of individuals residing in Gujarat, India affected with localized Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex (EBS) Koebner type. We analyzed 14 individuals including 9 affected individuals from this family. Exome sequencing in two cases suggested a novel non-synonymous variation, p.L325H, in the KRT5 gene. The present analysis also reports the first causative mutation of EBS Koebner type from India.

  17. Consanguinity and reproductive health among Arabs.

    PubMed

    Tadmouri, Ghazi O; Nair, Pratibha; Obeid, Tasneem; Al Ali, Mahmoud T; Al Khaja, Najib; Hamamy, Hanan A

    2009-01-01

    Consanguineous marriages have been practiced since the early existence of modern humans. Until now consanguinity is widely practiced in several global communities with variable rates depending on religion, culture, and geography. Arab populations have a long tradition of consanguinity due to socio-cultural factors. Many Arab countries display some of the highest rates of consanguineous marriages in the world, and specifically first cousin marriages which may reach 25-30% of all marriages. In some countries like Qatar, Yemen, and UAE, consanguinity rates are increasing in the current generation. Research among Arabs and worldwide has indicated that consanguinity could have an effect on some reproductive health parameters such as postnatal mortality and rates of congenital malformations. The association of consanguinity with other reproductive health parameters, such as fertility and fetal wastage, is controversial. The main impact of consanguinity, however, is an increase in the rate of homozygotes for autosomal recessive genetic disorders. Worldwide, known dominant disorders are more numerous than known recessive disorders. However, data on genetic disorders in Arab populations as extracted from the Catalogue of Transmission Genetics in Arabs (CTGA) database indicate a relative abundance of recessive disorders in the region that is clearly associated with the practice of consanguinity. PMID:19811666

  18. Consanguinity and reproductive health among Arabs

    PubMed Central

    Tadmouri, Ghazi O; Nair, Pratibha; Obeid, Tasneem; Al Ali, Mahmoud T; Al Khaja, Najib; Hamamy, Hanan A

    2009-01-01

    Consanguineous marriages have been practiced since the early existence of modern humans. Until now consanguinity is widely practiced in several global communities with variable rates depending on religion, culture, and geography. Arab populations have a long tradition of consanguinity due to socio-cultural factors. Many Arab countries display some of the highest rates of consanguineous marriages in the world, and specifically first cousin marriages which may reach 25-30% of all marriages. In some countries like Qatar, Yemen, and UAE, consanguinity rates are increasing in the current generation. Research among Arabs and worldwide has indicated that consanguinity could have an effect on some reproductive health parameters such as postnatal mortality and rates of congenital malformations. The association of consanguinity with other reproductive health parameters, such as fertility and fetal wastage, is controversial. The main impact of consanguinity, however, is an increase in the rate of homozygotes for autosomal recessive genetic disorders. Worldwide, known dominant disorders are more numerous than known recessive disorders. However, data on genetic disorders in Arab populations as extracted from the Catalogue of Transmission Genetics in Arabs (CTGA) database indicate a relative abundance of recessive disorders in the region that is clearly associated with the practice of consanguinity. PMID:19811666

  19. Consanguinity and Birth Defects in the Jerusalem Perinatal Study Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Harlap, S.; Kleinhaus, K.; Perrin, M.C.; Calderon-Margalit, R.; Paltiel, O.; Deutsch, L.; Manor, O.; Tiram, E.; Yanetz, R.; Friedlander, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Background While parental consanguinity is known to increase the risk of birth defects in offspring, it is hard to quantify this risk in populations where consanguinity is prevalent. Methods To support ongoing studies of cancer and of psychiatric disease, we studied relationships of consanguinity to 1,053 major birth defects in 29,815 offspring, born in 1964–1976. To adjust for confounding variables (geographic origin, social class and hospital), we constructed logistic regression models, using GEE to take into account correlations between sibs. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence limits were estimated in comparison to a reference group of offspring with grandfathers born in different countries. Results With 10.1% of offspring having consanguineous parents, the adjusted OR for major birth defect was 1.41 (1.12–1.74). Offspring of marriages between uncles-nieces, first cousins and more distant relatives showed adjusted ORs of 2.36 (0.98–5.68), 1.59 (1.22–2.07) and 1.20 (0.89–1.59) respectively. For descendents of grandfathers born in the same country, but not known to be related, the OR was 1.05 (0.91–1.21); these showed increased risk associated with ancestries in Western Asia (1.27, 1.04–1.55, p < 0.02) or Europe (1.13, 0.79–1.80). Conclusions A strong association of consanguinity with poverty and low education points to the need to avoid exposure to environmental hazards in these families. PMID:18493143

  20. Consanguinity and Neonatal Death: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaman, Reza; Gholami Taramsari, Mahshid; Khosravi, Ahmad; Amiri, Mohammad; Holakouie Naieni, Kourosh; Yunesian, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Although numerous studies have found higher rates of abortion and still births following consanguinity (familial marriages), the question of whether consanguinity significantly increases the risk of neonatal death has inadequately been addressed.This study aims to evaluate familial marriage effects on neonatal death in rural areas in Iran. Materials and methods: In this nested case-control study, 6900 newbornswho were born in rural areas of Kohgiluyeh and Boyerahmad Province (South-West of Iran)were followed till the end of neonatal period, and neonatal death was the outcome of interest. Subsequently 97 cases and 97 controls were selected in study cohort by using risk set sampling model. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) were estimated by usinga conditional logistic regression model. Results: In the final model, prematurity (OR = 5.57), low birthweight (LBW) (OR = 7.68), consanguinity (first cousins) (OR = 5.23), C-section (OR = 7.27), birth rank more than 3 (OR = 6.95) and birthsinterval less than 24 months (OR = 4.65) showed significant statistical association with neonatal mortality (p < 0.05). Conclusion: According to our findings, after adjusting the effects of other significant risk factors, familial marriageto first cousins is considered asan important risk factor for neonatal death. PMID:25530772

  1. Consanguinity and prereproductive mortality in the Utah Mormon population.

    PubMed

    Jorde, L B

    2001-01-01

    To test the effects of parental consanguinity on mortality among offspring, inbreeding coefficients were estimated for 303,675 members of the Utah Mormon population who were born between 1847 and 1945. Although consanguinity has been relatively rare in this population, the large sample size permitted the identification of more than 3,500 inbred offspring. Among the offspring of unrelated parents, 13.2% died before the age of 16. Significant elevations in prereproductive mortality were seen among the offspring of first-cousin marriages (22%) and among the offspring of closer unions (32%). The cor- responding relative risks are 1.70 (95% confidence limits = 1.52, 1.91) and 2.41 (95% confidence limits = 1.59, 3.41), respectively. Other categories of relationship did not produce significant elevations in offspring mortality. Similar results were obtained when a case-control approach was used to remove the effects of socioeconomic variation. Consistent with many other studies of populations with low consanguinity rates, this population experienced a relatively high absolute increase in mortality among the offspring of first-cousin marriages (9%). Preliminary evidence is offered for the hypothesis that mortality differentials are larger in populations with low inbreeding and low mortality because nongenetic causes of death do not obscure the effects of consanguinity. PMID:11474206

  2. Consanguineous marriage and reproductive risk: attitudes and understanding of ethnic groups practising consanguinity in Western society.

    PubMed

    Teeuw, Marieke E; Loukili, Ghariba; Bartels, Edien Ac; ten Kate, Leo P; Cornel, Martina C; Henneman, Lidewij

    2014-04-01

    Consanguineous couples should be adequately informed about their increased reproductive risk and possibilities for genetic counselling. Information may only be effective if it meets the needs of the target group. This study aimed to gain more insight into: (1) attitudes of people belonging to ethnic groups in Western society towards consanguinity and their understanding of risk for offspring; and (2) their attitudes regarding reproductive information targeted at consanguineous couples. Dutch Moroccans and Turks were invited to complete an online questionnaire by snowball sampling and by placing a link on two popular Dutch Moroccan/Turkish forum websites between September and October 2011. The questionnaire was completed by 201 individuals who were, on average, neither positive nor negative towards consanguinity. Respondents with a consanguineous partner were more positive, estimated the risk for the offspring lower and were less positive about the provision of risk information to consanguineous couples when compared with respondents without a consanguineous partner. Participants of Turkish origin had a more negative attitude towards consanguinity and estimated the reproductive risk higher than Moroccan participants. More than half of the respondents thought that information should be given before marriage, whereas only 10% thought it should never be provided. The general practitioner was most often mentioned (54%) as the designated professional to inform people. Information about genetic risks related to consanguinity should be offered early, preferably before marriage. The diversity of the target population requires various strategies to disseminate information and reach consanguineous couples with the offer of genetic counselling. PMID:23921534

  3. Consanguineous marriage and reproductive risk: attitudes and understanding of ethnic groups practising consanguinity in Western society

    PubMed Central

    Teeuw, Marieke E; Loukili, Ghariba; Bartels, Edien AC; ten Kate, Leo P; Cornel, Martina C; Henneman, Lidewij

    2014-01-01

    Consanguineous couples should be adequately informed about their increased reproductive risk and possibilities for genetic counselling. Information may only be effective if it meets the needs of the target group. This study aimed to gain more insight into: (1) attitudes of people belonging to ethnic groups in Western society towards consanguinity and their understanding of risk for offspring; and (2) their attitudes regarding reproductive information targeted at consanguineous couples. Dutch Moroccans and Turks were invited to complete an online questionnaire by snowball sampling and by placing a link on two popular Dutch Moroccan/Turkish forum websites between September and October 2011. The questionnaire was completed by 201 individuals who were, on average, neither positive nor negative towards consanguinity. Respondents with a consanguineous partner were more positive, estimated the risk for the offspring lower and were less positive about the provision of risk information to consanguineous couples when compared with respondents without a consanguineous partner. Participants of Turkish origin had a more negative attitude towards consanguinity and estimated the reproductive risk higher than Moroccan participants. More than half of the respondents thought that information should be given before marriage, whereas only 10% thought it should never be provided. The general practitioner was most often mentioned (54%) as the designated professional to inform people. Information about genetic risks related to consanguinity should be offered early, preferably before marriage. The diversity of the target population requires various strategies to disseminate information and reach consanguineous couples with the offer of genetic counselling. PMID:23921534

  4. Bleeding disorders in the tribe: result of consanguineous in breeding

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency and clinical features of bleeding disorders in the tribe as a result of consanguineous marriages. Design Cross Sectional Study Introduction Countries in which consanguinity is a normal practice, these rare autosomal recessive disorders run in close families and tribes. Here we describe a family, living in village Ali Murad Chandio, District Badin, labeled as haemophilia. Patients & Methods Our team visited the village & developed the pedigree of the whole extended family, up to seven generations. Performa was filled by incorporating patients, family history of bleeding, signs & symptoms, and bleeding from any site. From them 144 individuals were screened with CBC, bleeding time, platelet aggregation studies & RiCoF. While for PT, APTT, VWF assay and Factor VIII assay, samples were kept frozen at -70 degrees C until tested. Results The family tree of the seven generations comprises of 533 individuals, 63 subjects died over a period of 20 years and 470 were alive. Out of all those 144 subjects were selected on the basis of the bleeding history. Among them 98(68.1%) were diagnosed to have a bleeding disorder; 44.9% patients were male and 55.1% patients were female. Median age of all the patients was 20.81, range (4 months- 80 yrs). The results of bleeding have shown that majority had gum bleeding, epistaxis and menorrhagia. Most common bleeding disorder was Von Willebrand disease and Platelet functional disorders. Conclusion Consanguineous marriages keep all the beneficial and adversely affecting recessive genes within the family; in homozygous states. These genes express themselves and result in life threatening diseases. Awareness, education & genetic counseling will be needed to prevent the spread of such common occurrence of these bleeding disorders in the community. PMID:20822539

  5. [Consanguinity and public health in Morocco].

    PubMed

    Lamdouar Bouazzaoui, N

    1994-06-01

    This study concerns the evolution of consanguinity in Morocco in its historical, religious, legal, and sociological context with regards to Moroccan customs and undertakes to evaluate its relationship to public health. Thus it attempts to specify if consanguinity, in its present state in Morocco, poses a problem for public health. With this goal in mind, methodology has been concentrated on two approaches. The first, based upon examination of documents and oral research interviews, has made theoretical assessment possible. The second, substantiated by the study of notarial marriage acts and the analysis of 4773 medical files concerning consanguineous marriages compiled throughout the seven regions of Morocco, has enabled us to specify the importance and the evolution of consanguinity and its impact on health. This study shows a marked decrease in consanguineous unions predominantly found in rural and mountainous zones and frequent between first cousins, especially the paternal cousin. From the medical standpoint, our study has revealed the absence of pathology in 97.13% of cases studied, the transmission of various gifts in 1.08% and that of degenerative traits in 1.79% of the descendants. Consequently, in our country, a country in perpetual evolution and in contact with the outside world, consanguinity which is disappearing of its own accord does not present a preoccupying problem for public health. Its future would seem to be limited to the relation between the physician and marriage partners in search of genetic counsel. PMID:7994577

  6. On some novel aspects of consanguineous marriages.

    PubMed

    Denic, S; Nagelkerke, N; Agarwal, M M

    2011-01-01

    Consanguineous marriages, often viewed as incestuous and objectionable, are more widespread than commonly perceived. They integrate multiple facets of human adaptation: economic, cultural and genetic. The widely touted explanation for the origin and persistence of consanguinity is that it provides many socioeconomic benefits; however, this view may be too simplistic. The bias against consanguinity may preclude an objective understanding of this sociobiological puzzle. Inbreeding increases the speed of selection of beneficial recessive and co-dominant alleles, e.g. those that protect against diseases. In populations endemic with malaria, the prevalence of consanguineous marriages and the frequency of alleles protective against malaria are both very high. Thus, consanguinity could theoretically increase the relative fitness of a population under specific ecological conditions; sometimes, the overall genetic benefits may exceed genetic costs of inbreeding. We discuss some recent evidence from studies on inbreeding along with the reasons responsible for the mating strategy found in some human populations. We contend that a better appreciation of our inherent biases and potential genetic benefits of inbreeding in specific ecological conditions would help us to appreciate the wider picture of consanguinity. PMID:21150168

  7. First steps in exploring prospective exome sequencing of consanguineous couples.

    PubMed

    Teeuw, Marieke; Waisfisz, Quinten; Zwijnenburg, Petra J G; Sistermans, Erik A; Weiss, Marjan M; Henneman, Lidewij; ten Kate, Leo P; Cornel, Martina C; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Consanguinity is one of the most frequent risk factors for congenital disorders. In theory, prospective exome sequencing of consanguineous couples could identify couples who both are carriers of autosomal recessive diseases, and empower such couples to make informed reproductive decisions. To investigate this, we sent blood samples to our laboratory of four pairs of consanguineous parents having one or more children affected by an autosomal recessive disorder, without revealing any diagnostic information. The study was restricted to find identical, previously described, or evidently pathogenic mutations in both parents of each couple, in over 400 genes known to result in severe autosomal recessive disorders. Out of the six autosomal recessive disorders known to the four couples studied, two were correctly identified. Carrier status of one not previously known autosomal recessive disorder was discovered. As expected, given the pipeline used, large deletions, mutations in genes not present in the gene list, mutations outside the exons and consensus splice sites, and mutations that were not evidently pathogenic and previously not reported, were not identified. The restriction to detecting only couples with identical mutations diminishes the risk of revealing unsolicited findings and shortens the time needed for analysis, but also results in missing couples with different mutations in the same gene. In addition to the proposed pipeline, couples should be offered testing for carrier status of frequent disorders that can present themselves by large deletions, non-exonic mutations or compound heterozygous mutations (e.g. thalassemia, spinal muscular atrophy, cystic fibrosis). Even though sensitivity is reduced, offering exome sequencing prospectively will increase reproductive options for consanguineous couples. PMID:25281896

  8. Consanguinity and spousal concordance in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    al-Kandari, Y; Crews, D E; Poirier, F E

    2002-12-01

    Consanguineous marriage is favored in Kuwait. This research focuses on the relationship of physical and cultural traits to marriage types in Kuwait and examines concordance as a function of consanguinity and marriage duration. In a nonrandom opportunistic sample of 242 couples anthropometric and blood pressure data have been collected as well as data on acculturation, religiosity, Farsi proficiency, level of education, occupation, and attitudes regarding fertility. Significant concordances occur in cultural characteristics among couples in all three types of marriages with respect to the degree of religiosity, acculturation, language similarity, education, and occupation. Non-consanguineous spouses have the highest concordance in educational level, occupation, and degree of acculturation, but the lowest for religiosity and Farsi proficiency. Nonkin marriages seem to be based on personal preferences. In the wider potential nonkin marriage pool spouses show more concordance in stature and education indicating the positive assortative mating for those traits. Non-consanguineous spouses show a significant association for triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses hip and waist circumferences, and body fat distribution. Unrelated spouses exhibit more concordance for physical traits than do related spouses. There is a significant correlation between spouses in first and double cousin marriages as well as in spouses in second and less than second cousin unions for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, while non-consanguineous spouses show a significant association in diastolic blood pressure only. PMID:12674831

  9. Large Constituent Families Help Children Parse Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krott, Andrea; Nicoladis, Elena

    2005-01-01

    The family size of the constituents of compound words, or the number of compounds sharing the constituents, has been shown to affect adults' access to compound words in the mental lexicon. The present study was designed to see if family size would affect children's segmentation of compounds. Twenty-five English-speaking children between 3;7 and…

  10. Large Constituent Families Help Children Parse Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krott, Andrea; Nicoladis, Elena

    2005-01-01

    The family size of the constituents of compound words, or the number of compounds sharing the constituents, has been shown to affect adults' access to compound words in the mental lexicon. The present study was designed to see if family size would affect children's segmentation of compounds. Twenty-five English-speaking children between 3;7 and

  11. Is parental consanguinity associated with reduced ovarian reserve?

    PubMed

    Seher, Tanja; Thiering, Elisabeth; Al Azemi, Majdah; Heinrich, Joachim; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Kivlahan, Coleen; Gutermuth, Jan; Fatemi, Human M

    2015-09-01

    This observational study assessed whether women descending from consanguineous unions have reduced ovarian reserve compared with daughters of non-consanguine couples. Two hundred and ninety-one women (≤39 years) were treated in a tertiary care centre in Kuwait. Women underwent a complete anamnesis, including an evaluation of the possible presence of parental consanguinity, transvaginal ultrasound on day 2/3 of the cycle to obtain the antral follicle count (AFC), determination of serum concentrations of FSH, LH, oestradiol and in case of low ovarian reserve (AFC < 9) anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH). The median AFC of non-consanguineous daughters was 11, while daughters from consanguineous parents displayed a significantly lower median AFC (7; P < 0⋅0001). FSH was slightly higher in the consanguineous patients, while LH and oestradiol concentrations did not vary between groups. In total, 29.9% of consanguineous patients had an AFC ≥ 9, compared with 63.9% of non-consanguineous patients. Consanguineous patients did not exhibit an age-dependent AFC-decline and displayed reduced AFC and AMH concentrations. The multivariate analysis revealed female consanguinity, as well as surgical history in non-consanguineous women, as strong positive predictors of low ovarian reserve. Parental consanguinity is strongly associated with reduced ovarian reserve. Future studies should evaluate a possible association between parental consanguinity and infertility. PMID:26206281

  12. Prevalence of consanguineous marriages in Syria.

    PubMed

    Othman, Hasan; Saadat, Mostafa

    2009-09-01

    Consanguineous marriage is the union of individuals having at least one common ancestor. The present cross-sectional study was done in order to illustrate the prevalence and types of consanguineous marriages in the Syrian Arab Republic. Data on consanguineous marriages were collected using a simple questionnaire. The total number of couples in this study was 67,958 (urban areas: 36,574 couples; rural areas: 31,384 couples) from the following provinces: Damascus, Hamah, Tartous, Latakia, Al Raqa, Homs, Edlep and Aleppo. In each province urban and rural areas were surveyed. Consanguineous marriage was classified by the degree of relationship between couples: double first cousins (F=1/8), first cousins (F=1/16), second cousins (F=1/64) and beyond second cousins (F<1/64). The coefficient of inbreeding (F) was calculated for each couple and the mean coefficient of inbreeding (alpha) estimated for the population of each province, stratified by rural and urban areas. The results showed that the overall frequency of consanguinity was 30.3% in urban and 39.8% in rural areas. Total rate of consanguinity was found to be 35.4%. The equivalent mean inbreeding coefficient (alpha) was 0.0203 and 0.0265 in urban and rural areas, respectively. The mean proportion of consanguineous marriages ranged from 67.5% in Al Raqa province to 22.1% in Latakia province. The alpha-value ranged from 0.0358 to 0.0127 in these two provinces, respectively. The western and north-western provinces (including Tartous, Lattakia and Edlep) recorded lower levels of inbreeding than the central, northern and southern provinces. The overall alpha-value was estimated to be about 0.0236 for the studied populations. First cousin marriages (with 20.9%) were the most common type of consanguineous marriages, followed by double first cousin (with 7.8%) and second cousin marriages (with 3.3%), and beyond second cousin was the least common type. PMID:19433003

  13. Consanguinity and its sociodemographic differentials in Bhimber District, Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Nazish; Malik, Sajid

    2014-06-01

    Kashmiri population in the northeast of Pakistan has strong historical, cultural and linguistic affinities with the neighbouring populations of upper Punjab and Potohar region of Pakistan. However, the study of consanguineous unions, which are customarily practised in many populations of Pakistan, revealed marked differences between the Kashmiris and other populations of northern Pakistan with respect to the distribution of marriage types and inbreeding coefficient (F). The current descriptive epidemiological study carried out in Bhimber district of Mirpur division, Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan, demonstrated that consanguineous marriages were 62% of the total marriages (F=0.0348). First-cousin unions were the predominant type of marriages and constituted 50.13% of total marital unions. The estimates of inbreeding coefficient were higher in the literate subjects, and consanguinity was witnessed to be rising with increasing literacy level. Additionally, consanguinity was observed to be associated with ethnicity, family structure, language, and marriage arrangements. Based upon these data, a distinct sociobiological structure, with increased stratification and higher genomic homozygosity, is expected for this Kashmiri population. In this communication, we present detailed distribution of the types of marital unions and the incidences of consanguinity and inbreeding coefficient (F) across various sociodemographic strata of Bhimber/Mirpuri population. The results of this study would have implication not only for other endogamous populations of Pakistan but also for the sizeable Kashmiri community immigrated to Europe. PMID:25076667

  14. Consanguinity and Its Sociodemographic Differentials in Bhimber District, Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Nazish

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kashmiri population in the northeast of Pakistan has strong historical, cultural and linguistic affinities with the neighbouring populations of upper Punjab and Potohar region of Pakistan. However, the study of consanguineous unions, which are customarily practised in many populations of Pakistan, revealed marked differences between the Kashmiris and other populations of northern Pakistan with respect to the distribution of marriage types and inbreeding coefficient (F). The current descriptive epidemiological study carried out in Bhimber district of Mirpur division, Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan, demonstrated that consanguineous marriages were 62% of the total marriages (F=0.0348). First-cousin unions were the predominant type of marriages and constituted 50.13% of total marital unions. The estimates of inbreeding coefficient were higher in the literate subjects, and consanguinity was witnessed to be rising with increasing literacy level. Additionally, consanguinity was observed to be associated with ethnicity, family structure, language, and marriage arrangements. Based upon these data, a distinct sociobiological structure, with increased stratification and higher genomic homozygosity, is expected for this Kashmiri population. In this communication, we present detailed distribution of the types of marital unions and the incidences of consanguinity and inbreeding coefficient (F) across various sociodemographic strata of Bhimber/Mirpuri population. The results of this study would have implication not only for other endogamous populations of Pakistan but also for the sizeable Kashmiri community immigrated to Europe. PMID:25076667

  15. Consanguineous marriage and reproduction in Beirut, Lebanon.

    PubMed Central

    Khlat, M

    1988-01-01

    Effects of consanguineous marriages on couples' fertility and on offspring mortality were investigated in Beirut through a population-based health survey of 2,752 households. A multistage random sampling procedure was used, and information was obtained from all ever-married women in the household about their reproductive performance and genealogical relationship with spouse; demographic and socioeconomic information was also recorded. Twenty-five percent of all marriages were between relatives, and the spouses were first cousins in approximately 57% of all consanguineous marriages. Total pregnancies, live births, and living children were significantly higher among consanguineous couples than among nonconsanguineous ones, as was the proportion dead among children ever born. However, no difference remained in either fertility or mortality, when allowance was made for socioeconomic status, religious affiliation, and marriage duration. The issue of confounding is discussed, and the lack of significant pattern in the final analysis is interpreted as resulting from a long-term practice of consanguineous marriages. PMID:3400644

  16. Ectrodactyly with aplasia of long bones (OMIM; 119100) in a large inbred Arab family with an apparent autosomal dominant inheritance and reduced penetrance: clinical and genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Naveed, Mohammed; Al-Ali, Mahmoud T; Murthy, Sabita K; Al-Hajali, Sarah; Al-Khaja, Najib; Deutsch, Samuel; Bottani, Armand; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Nath, Swapan K; Radhakrishna, Uppala

    2006-07-01

    Ectrodactyly with aplasia of long bones syndrome is one of the most recognizable defects involving the extremities. We have studied a very large eight-generation consanguineous Arab family from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) with multiple severe limb anomalies resembling this condition (OMIM; 119100), for which the affected gene is unknown. The pedigree consists of 145 individuals including 23 affected (14 males/9 females) with limb anomalies. Of these, 18 had tibial aplasia (TA) usually on the right side. The expression of the phenotype was variable and ranged from bilateral to unilateral TA with ectrodactyly and other defects of the extremities. The mode of inheritance appears to be autosomal dominant with reduced penetrance. There were 10 consanguineous marriages observed in this pedigree. This could suggest possible pseudodominance due to high frequency of the mutant allele. Candidate loci for the described syndrome include GLI3 (OMIM: 165240) on 7p13, sonic hedgehog; (OMIM: 600725) on 7q36, Langer-Giedion syndrome (OMIM: 150230) on 8q24.1 and split-hand/foot malformation 3 (OMIM: 600095) on 10q24. In addition, bilateral tibial hemimelia and unilateral absence of the ulna was previously observed to co-segregate with deletion of 8q24.1. Two-point linkage and haplotype analyses did not show the involvement of the above regions in this family. PMID:16688753

  17. Does consanguinity increase the risk of schizophrenia? Study based on primary health care centre visits

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Consanguinity has been suggested as a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia in offspring in some Middle Eastern countries. Aim The purpose of this study was to review the frequency, pattern of parental consanguinity, and family history of schizophrenia among schizophrenia patients in Qatar, and to determine their impact on the associated risk factors. Design This is a cross-sectional study which was conducted between January 2009 and December 2010, in the setting of primary health care (PHC) centres of the Supreme Council of Health, State of Qatar. Subjects A total of 1491 patients aged 18–55 years were approached, of whom 1184 individuals agreed to participate in the study, giving a response rate of 79.4%. Methods The study was based on face-to-face interviews using a specially designed questionnaire that covered sociodemographic characteristics and genetic and other biological factors (e.g. obstetric complications), and a diagnostic screening questionnaire which consisted of six questions about the symptoms of schizophrenia. The diagnostic screening questionnaire was reviewed and used to calculate the final score, which determined a provisional diagnosis. The psychiatrists discussed the psychiatric diagnosis and confirmed it using DSM-IV criteria. The degree of consanguinity between the patient's parents was recorded. Consanguinity was evaluated based on the coefficient of inbreeding (F), which is the probability of homozygosity. Results More than half of the schizophrenia patients were female (57.1%) and over 45 years of age (62.5%). A family history of schizophrenia was significantly more common in parents of schizophrenia patients than in the Arab population without schizophrenia (24.6% vs. 17.1%; P = 0.038). Parental consanguinity was elevated among the patients with schizophrenia (41.3%) with a higher mean coefficient of inbreeding (0.04356 ± 0.028) than in non-schizophrenic subjects (28.7%) with a lower mean coefficient of inbreeding (0.0298 ± 0.035). Schizophrenia diagnoses were more frequent among the offspring of consanguineous parents than among the offspring of non-consanguineous parents. Conclusion The substantial risk observed in the present study reveals that consanguinity is an important risk factor for schizophrenia in Qatar. In addition, the study confirms that the higher familial risks provide strong genetic epidemiological evidence for the overall heritable effects in the aetiology of schizophrenia. PMID:24294299

  18. Attitude of Saudi Arabian adults towards consanguineous marriage

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, Omar A.; Al-Shaia, Walaa A.; Al-Hamam, Abdulaziz A.; Al-Marzoug, Hala M.; Ahmed, Anwar E.; Bagha, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research on the attitudes of Saudi adults towards consanguinity is scarce. The study aimed to explore the attitudes towards consanguinity and its associations with socio-demographic characteristics in a sample of Saudi adults. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 386 outpatient waiting-area attendees at King Abdul-Aziz Medical City-Riyadh were included. Participants were asked about their socio-demographic characteristics, attitude towards consanguinity and the reasons behind this. Results: The positive attitude towards consanguinity among the study respondents was 48.1% with 95% confidence interval (42.91–53.33%). Social and traditional culture (59.9%) were found to be the predominant reasons for favoring consanguinity in Saudi Arabia. Evidence against a positive attitude towards consanguinity was noted in respondents who received medical information about consanguinity versus those who had not received medical information (42.3% vs. 57%, p-value = 0.008). According to the multivariate logistic model, the odds of a positive attitude towards consanguinity were 2 times higher for males (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.147, 4.290) and 4.1 times higher in respondents in consanguineous marriages (aOR: 4.1; 95% CI: 2.350, 7.156). The odds of a positive attitude towards consanguinity were 50% less in respondents who received health information on consanguinity compared to those who had not received health information about consanguinity (aOR: 0.50; 95% CI: 0.253, 0.863). Conclusion: One in every two Saudi adults favors consanguinity however, Saudi men and women differ in their attitudes towards consanguinity. Receiving health information on consanguinity was associated with a negative attitude towards this practice. PMID:26835408

  19. A study of possible deleterious effects of consanguinity.

    PubMed

    Abdulrazzaq, Y M; Bener, A; al-Gazali, L I; al-Khayat, A I; Micallef, R; Gaber, T

    1997-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether consanguineous marriages result in reproductive wastage and an increased incidence of illness in the offspring in a community with a long history of inbreeding and an expected high rate of consanguineous marriage. A representative sample of 2200 women aged > or = 15 years from Dubai and Al Ain, two cities in the United Arab Emirates, representing on the one hand a modern metropolis and on the other a traditional society, were studied. A questionnaire, which included questions on age, parity, gravidity, number of stillbirths, number of abortions, number of children alive, neonatal deaths and specific illnesses in children, was administered by nurses in antenatal and gynaecological clinics in the two cities. The rate of consanguineous marriage was 50.5% and parity, gravidity, ages and number of children were similar in consanguineous and non-consanguineous groups. There was no significant difference in rates of abortion, stillbirth and neonatal death between the two groups. Overall, there was statistically significant higher reproductive wastage in consanguineous couples, but when the category of less than second cousins was excluded from the consanguineous group no difference was found in reproductive wastage between consanguineous and non-consanguineous marriages. Children born to consanguineous unions also had significantly higher incidences of illnesses (37.1%) than those of non-consanguineous unions (29%). The occurrence of malignancies, congenital abnormalities, mental retardation and physical handicap was significantly higher in offspring of consanguineous than non-consanguineous marriages. In conclusion, consanguinity did not result in reproductive wastage, but was found to be an important factor in the causation of specific illnesses in offspring. PMID:9137881

  20. Race, consanguinity and social features in Birmingham babies: a basis for prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Bundey, S; Alam, H; Kaur, A; Mir, S; Lancashire, R J

    1990-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of consanguinity on children's health. DESIGN--The study is a prospective survey from birth to five years of a cohort of babies born in a multiracial community. This report details the initial findings on consanguinity. SETTING--Participating families live predominantly in three health districts of Birmingham, and were recruited in three local maternity hospitals. PARTICIPANTS--Babies of 2432 European mothers, 509 Afro-Caribbean mothers, 625 Indian mothers, 956 Pakistani mothers, and 216 Bangladeshi mothers have been enrolled in the study. Eighty mothers refused to participate. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS--Sociodemographic information was obtained using a structured questionnaire administered at interview. Interview data were supplemented with obstetric information from the medical records. The highest prevalence of parental consanguinity was in Pakistani Muslims (69%), whereas in Muslims from other countries it was 23%, and it was less than 1% in non-Muslims. In the majority of consanguineous Muslim pedigrees the degree of inbreeding was greater than that for first cousin parents. CONCLUSIONS--This prospective study will allow an assessment to be made about any ill health in childhood arising from parental consanguinity, about whether screening programmes are indicated for particular autosomal recessive diseases, and about whether premarital health education might be beneficial. The study has also documented parental ages in different races and this, together with the levels of parental consanguinity in all races, will be useful in genetic methods for assessing the frequency of recessive genes, the possibility of genetic heterogeneity, and whether or not parental age effect exists for new mutations of specific genetic disorders. PMID:2370500

  1. The influence of past endogamy and consanguinity on genetic disorders in northern Sweden.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H; Egerbladh, I

    2005-09-01

    It has been widely believed that consanguineous marriage was infrequent in northern Europe. As part of ongoing studies into the population structure of northern Sweden, the Demographic DataBase of Umeå University has undertaken digitization of the parish record books of the Swedish Lutheran Church, which date back to the late 17th century. To examine the prevalence and patterns of consanguineous marriage, information from the DataBase was abstracted for the Skellefteå region during the period 1720-1899 and extended family pedigrees constructed. Of the 14,639 marriages recorded, 3,043 (20.8%) were between couples related as sixth cousins or closer. Following changes in the Swedish civil law in 1844 that removed the requirement of royal dispensation for first cousin unions, a significant increase in first cousin marriages occurred during the next two generations, even though the total population of the region grew significantly. There was also strong evidence that consanguineous marriages were favoured within particular families. The findings of the study are consistent with the patterns of single gene disorders reported in specific communities in the region, and they suggest that founder effect, drift and consanguinity all were important influences on population genetic structure in previous generations. PMID:16138913

  2. Consanguinity-related hyperdontia: An orthopantomographic study

    PubMed Central

    Shokry, Shereen M.; Alenazy, Mohammed S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this retrospective study was to describe the distribution of the non-syndromal supernumerary teeth (NSST) in a population of patients who attended the clinics of Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy (RCsDP), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: The study reviewed 1521 panoramic radiographs of Saudi and non-Saudi subjects who attended RCsDP clinic from November 2009 to November 2010. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences, utilizing Chi-square. Results: Eighteen (1.2%) patients were found to have NSST, comprising twelve males (66.7%), and six females (33.3%). The most common supernumerary teeth (ST) were the pre-molars six cases (33.3%), followed by the mesiodens, five cases (27.8%). The canines and distomolars three cases (16.6%) each respectively, while the least were the lateral incisors and paramolars of the two cases (11.1%) each. Conclusion: Consanguinity appeared to have a role in the development of hyperdontia in Saudi population because 13 cases (72.2%) out of 18 cases had consanguineous parents, while all patients having consanguineous parents had eumorphic ST. PMID:24379860

  3. Addressing key issues in the consanguinity-related risk of autosomal recessive disorders in consanguineous communities: lessons from a qualitative study of British Pakistanis.

    PubMed

    Darr, A; Small, N; Ahmad, W I U; Atkin, K; Corry, P; Modell, B

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no consensus regarding services required to help families with consanguineous marriages manage their increased genetic reproductive risk. Genetic services for communities with a preference for consanguineous marriage in the UK remain patchy, often poor. Receiving two disparate explanations of the cause of recessive disorders (cousin marriage and recessive inheritance) leads to confusion among families. Further, the realisation that couples in non-consanguineous relationships have affected children leads to mistrust of professional advice. British Pakistani families at-risk for recessive disorders lack an understanding of recessive disorders and their inheritance. Such an understanding is empowering and can be shared within the extended family to enable informed choice. In a three-site qualitative study of British Pakistanis, we explored family and health professional perspectives on recessively inherited conditions. Our findings suggest, firstly, that family networks hold strong potential for cascading genetic information, making the adoption of a family-centred approach an efficient strategy for this community. However, this is dependent on provision of high-quality and timely information from health care providers. Secondly, families' experience was of ill-coordinated and time-starved services, with few having access to specialist provision from Regional Genetics Services; these perspectives were consistent with health professionals' views of services. Thirdly, we confirm previous findings that genetic information is difficult to communicate and comprehend, further complicated by the need to communicate the relationship between cousin marriage and recessive disorders. A communication tool we developed and piloted is described and offered as a useful resource for communicating complex genetic information. PMID:26363620

  4. Consanguinity among the Arab and Jewish populations in Israel.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Lutfi; Halpern, Gabrielle J

    2006-08-01

    Consanguineous marriages are associated with many problems, although the prevailing opinion is that the advantages outweigh the disadvantages. This explains why the custom is still extremely prevalent, particularly in Arab countries, India and small isolated communities. Among Israeli Arabs there has been a reduction in the rate of such marriages, although it is still sufficiently high to cause medical problems. Among Israeli Jews, the rate has always been much lower. Future goals are to expand the educational programs aimed at the Israeli Arab community and to promote the uptake of genetic counseling and prenatal testing where available in order to reduce the health problems even further. Ongoing research in order to identify specific genes will enable more conditions to be detectable early in pregnancy. We expect that the willingness of families to agree to termination of affected pregnancies will reduce the number of babies born with these conditions. PMID:17551463

  5. Little Brother Joins the Large Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    On the night of 15 December 2006, the fourth and last-to-be-installed VLTI Auxiliary Telescope (AT4) obtained its 'First Light'. The first images demonstrate that AT4 will be able to deliver the excellent image quality already delivered by the first three ATs. It will soon join its siblings to perform routinely interferometric measurements. ESO PR Photo 51a/06 ESO PR Photo 51a/06 VLT Auxiliary Telescope The VLT is composed of four 8.2-m Unit Telescope (Antu, Kueyen, Melipal and Yepun). They have been progressively put into service together with a vast suite of the most advanced astronomical instruments and are operated every night in the year. Contrary to other large astronomical telescopes, the VLT was designed from the beginning with the use of interferometry as a major goal. The VLT Interferometer (VLTI) combines starlight captured by two or three 8.2- VLT Unit Telescopes, dramatically increasing the spatial resolution and showing fine details of a large variety of celestial objects. ESO PR Photo 51b/06 ESO PR Photo 51b/06 One AT Under the Sky However, most of the time the large telescopes are used for other research purposes. They are therefore only available for interferometric observations during a limited number of nights every year. Thus, in order to exploit the VLTI each night and to achieve the full potential of this unique setup, some other (smaller), dedicated telescopes were included into the overall VLT concept. These telescopes, known as the VLTI Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs), are mounted on tracks and can be placed at precisely defined "parking" observing positions on the observatory platform. From these positions, their light beams are fed into the same common focal point via a complex system of reflecting mirrors mounted in an underground system of tunnels. The Auxiliary Telescopes are real technological jewels. They are placed in ultra-compact enclosures, complete with all necessary electronics, an air conditioning system and cooling liquid for thermal control, compressed air for enclosure seals, a hydraulic plant for opening the dome shells, etc. Each AT is also fitted with a transporter that lifts the telescope and relocates it from one station to another. It moves around with its own housing on the top of Paranal, almost like a snail. The VLTI is arguably the world's most advanced optical device of this type. It has already demonstrated its powerful capabilities by addressing several key scientific issues, such as determining the size and the shape of a variety of stars (ESO PR 22/02, PR 14/03, PR 31/03, and PR 09/06), measuring distances to stars (ESO PR 25/04), probing the innermost regions of the proto-planetary discs around young stars (ESO PR 27/04 and PR 35/06) or making the first detection by infrared interferometry of an extragalactic object (ESO PR 17/03).

  6. Autosomal dominant stationary night-blindness. A large family rediscovered.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, T; Haim, M; Piczenik, Y; Simonsen, S E

    1991-12-01

    In 1909, 2 years after the famous publication by Nettleship, a large family with congenital stationary night-blindness of the 'Nougaret type' was published by the Danish district surgeon, Sigurd Rambusch. In 1990 the 'Rambusch family', still resident in the original area, was sought out and rediscovered, at which time the reconstructed part of the pedigree comprised more than 200 affected persons in 11 generations. Dark adaptometry and electroretinography were performed on a few affected family members, including a descendant with a uniocular affection. The pedigree is presented and recordings of dark adaptation courses and electroretinographical responses from a few family members are demonstrated. PMID:1789082

  7. The changing profile of consanguinity rates in Bahrain, 1990-2009.

    PubMed

    Al-Arrayed, Shaikha; Hamamy, Hanan

    2012-05-01

    Consanguineous marriage is traditional and respected in most communities of North Africa, the Middle East and West Asia, including Bahrain, with intra-familial unions accounting for 20-50+% of all marriages. Significant secular changes in consanguinity rates have been reported in recent decades in different populations. Among parents of 14,237 newborns in Bahrain in 2008-2009, the total consanguinity and first cousin marriage rates over a period of four months in 2008 were 10.9% and 6.9% respectively, while during all of 2009 the rates were 11.4% and 6.8% respectively. The study confirms that over a ten-year period first cousin marriage rates in Bahrain have declined from 24% to nearly 7%. Although advice against cousin marriages was not attempted at any stage in the comprehensive community genetics programmes in Bahrain, increasing the literacy of the public and of the health care providers on prevention strategies for genetic diseases could have contributed to this decline in consanguinity rate in Bahrain. PMID:22123433

  8. Consanguineous unions and child health in the State of Qatar.

    PubMed

    Bener, Abdulbari; Hussain, Rafat

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence and sociodemographic predictors of consanguineous unions in the State of Qatar and to assess the association between consanguinity, fertility and child health. A representative sample of 1800 Qatari women aged > or =15 years was approached for the study. Of these, 1515 (84.2%) women agreed to participate. The consanguineous marriage rate was 54.0% with estimated population confidence limits of 52.3-55.7%. First cousin unions were the most common form of cousin marriage. The level of parental consanguinity (both in the respondent's parents and her parents-in-law) was quite high. In a multivariable analysis, both education of the respondent and her husband as well as parental consanguinity were found to be strong predictors of consanguineous unions in the index generation. Although fertility was high in both groups, the mean number of pregnancies was somewhat higher in respondents with first cousin unions. Concomitantly they also had a slighter higher rate of livebirths than women in non-consanguineous unions. The occurrence of asthma, mental retardation, epilepsy and diabetes was significantly more common in offspring of all consanguineous than non-consanguineous couples. PMID:16911015

  9. Consanguinity as an Adjunct Diagnostic Tool.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Priyanka; Saxena, Deepti; Joshi, Stephen; Phadke, Shubha R

    2016-03-01

    History of consanguinity is important in monogenic disorders as it supports autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. This case report illustrates the use of homozygosity mapping using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray data to identify the causative gene in a case with Warburg Micro syndrome (WARBM). This syndrome has non-specific features like microcephaly and cataract; etiological diagnosis based on clinical features is not possible. Four causative genes are known for WARBM syndrome. In such a situation of autosomal recessive disorders of heterogeneous etiologies, SNP microarray and homozygosity mapping is a useful and cost effective strategy. PMID:26138576

  10. Consanguinity and the Risk of Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Joseph T.C.; Bittles, Alan H.; Hudgins, Louanne

    2012-01-01

    Consanguineous unions have been associated with an increased susceptibility to various forms of inherited disease. Although consanguinity is known to contribute to recessive diseases, the potential role of consanguinity in certain common birth defects is less clear, particularly since the disease pathophysiology may involve genetic and environmental/epigenetic factors. In this study we ask whether consanguinity affects one of the most common birth defects, congenital heart disease, and identify areas for further research into these birth defects, since consanguinity may now impact health on a near-global basis. A systematic review of consanguinity in congenital heart disease was performed, focusing on non-syndromic disease, with the methodologies and results from studies of different ethnic populations compared. The risks for congenital heart disease have been assessed and summarized collectively and by individual lesion. The majority of studies support the view that consanguinity increases the prevalence of congenital heart disease, however the study designs differed dramatically. Only a few (n = 3) population-based studies that controlled for potential sociodemographic confounding were identified, and data on individual cardiac lesions were limited by case numbers. Overall the results suggest that the risk for congenital heart disease is increased in consanguineous unions in the studied populations, principally at first cousin level and closer, a factor that should be considered in empiric risk estimates in genetic counseling. However, for more precise risk estimates a better understanding of the underlying disease factors is needed. PMID:22488956

  11. Consanguinity and the risk of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Joseph T C; Bittles, Alan H; Hudgins, Louanne

    2012-05-01

    Consanguineous unions have been associated with an increased susceptibility to various forms of inherited disease. Although consanguinity is known to contribute to recessive diseases, the potential role of consanguinity in certain common birth defects is less clear, particularly since the disease pathophysiology may involve genetic and environmental/epigenetic factors. In this study, we ask whether consanguinity affects one of the most common birth defects, congenital heart disease, and identify areas for further research into these birth defects, since consanguinity may now impact health on a near-global basis. A systematic review of consanguinity in congenital heart disease was performed, focusing on non-syndromic disease, with the methodologies and results from studies of different ethnic populations compared. The risks for congenital heart disease have been assessed and summarized collectively and by individual lesion. The majority of studies support the view that consanguinity increases the prevalence of congenital heart disease, however, the study designs differed dramatically. Only a few (n = 3) population-based studies that controlled for potential sociodemographic confounding were identified, and data on individual cardiac lesions were limited by case numbers. Overall the results suggest that the risk for congenital heart disease is increased in consanguineous unions in the studied populations, principally at first-cousin level and closer, a factor that should be considered in empiric risk estimates in genetic counseling. However, for more precise risk estimates a better understanding of the underlying disease factors is needed. PMID:22488956

  12. Assessment of association between consanguinity and fertility in Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rafat; Bittles, Alan H

    2004-03-01

    Although a high proportion of marriages in Asia are consanguineous (i.e. contracted between close biological relatives), with some notable exceptions, there is a death of demographic and anthropological literature on the association between consanguinity and fertility. This paper presents an overview of the prevalence of consanguineous marriages in selected South and Southeast Asian countries, followed by an assessment of the association between consanguinity and fertility. The association between consanguinity and fertility was assessed reviewing published literature and analyzing demographic and health survey (DHS) data from Pakistan and India. Results of the review of published literature showed higher fertility among women in the first-cousin unions compared to those married to non-relatives. In the DHS analyses, consanguinity was found to be associated with a number of direct and indirect determinants of fertility, including lower maternal education, lower maternal age at marriage, lower contraceptive use, and rural residence. At the multivariate level, adjusted mean fertility was found to be lower among women in the first-cousin unions in the Pakistani DHS data, while for the Indian DHS, adjusted mean fertility levels were similar in the first-cousin and non-consanguineous marriages. The pathways through which consanguinity affects fertility in Asian populations are evaluated and discussed. PMID:15190806

  13. Consanguinity trends and correlates in the Palestinian Territories.

    PubMed

    Assaf, Shireen; Khawaja, Marwan

    2009-01-01

    Secondary analysis of the trends and correlates of consanguinity in the Palestinian Territories was conducted using data from two separate surveys in 1995 and 2004. The analysis was conducted on ever-married women aged 15-54 who were asked about their relation to their husband in both surveys. A total of 16,197 women in 1995 and 4971 women in 2004 were successfully interviewed. Consanguinity was found to be widely practised in the Palestinian Territories with rates of total consanguinity reaching 45% of all marriages in 2004. Analysis was conducted with the data from the two surveys combined and this indicated that consanguinity was significantly decreasing with time after controlling for other variables. Age of the women, their age at marriage, region and locality type they lived in and their standard of living were all found to be significant predictors of consanguinity. The education level of the women was not found to be significant. After controlling for the survey year, women's labour force status was also found to be a non-significant predictor of consanguinity. Although consanguinity was found to be significantly decreasing slowly with time after controlling for other variables, the future trends of consanguinity are not known due to the unstable political situation in the territories, which could have a direct effect on marriage patterns. PMID:18549512

  14. A large family characterised by nocturnal sudden death

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, M.P.; Viersma, J.W.; Beaufort-Krol, G.C.M.; Bink-Boelkens, M.Th.E.; Bezzina, C.R.; Veldkamp, M.W.; Brouwer, J.; Haaksma, J.; van Tintelen, J.P.; van Langen, I.M.; Wouda, A.A.; Wilde, A.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Background We recently identified a novel mutation in large family characterised by premature nocturnal sudden death. In the present paper we provide an overview of the findings in this family. Methods From 1958 onwards, when the first patient presented, we collected clinical data on as many family members as possible. After identification in 1998 of the underlying genetic disorder (SCN5A, 1795insD), genotyping was performed diagnostically. Results Since 1905 unexplained sudden death occurred in 26 family members, 17 of whom died during the night. Besides sudden death, symptomatology was rather limited; only six patients reported syncopal attacks. In one of them, a 13-year-old boy, asystolic episodes up to nine seconds were documented. Until now, the mutation has been found in 114 family members (57 males, 57 females). Carriers of the mutant gene exhibited bradycardia-dependent QT-prolongation, intrinsic sinus node dysfunction, generalised conduction abnormalities, a paucity of ventricular ectopy, and the Brugada sign. Cardiomyopathy or other structural abnormalities were not found in any of the carriers. Electrophysiological studies showed that mutant channels were characterised by markedly reduced INa amplitude, a positive shift of voltage-dependence of activation and a substantial negative shift of voltage-dependence of inactivation of INa. From 1978 onwards, a pacemaker for anti-brady pacing was implanted for prevention of sudden death. In patients in whom a prophylactic pacemaker was implanted no unexplained sudden death occurred, whereas 5 sudden deaths occurred in the group of patients who did not receive a pacemaker. Conclusion We have described a large family with a SCN5A-linked disorder (1795insD) with features of LQT3, Brugada syndrome and familial conduction system disease. Anti-brady pacing was successful in preventing sudden death. The mode of death is possibly bradycardic. ImagesFigure 5 PMID:25696119

  15. Consanguineous marriages in the province of Antalya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Alper, O M; Erengin, H; Manguoğlu, A E; Bilgen, T; Cetin, Z; Dedeoğlu, N; Lüleci, G

    2004-01-01

    To assess the trends in the frequency and the medical effects of consanguinity in the south coast of Turkish population using local and national data in the last 11 years. This cross-sectional study was carried out in Manavgat province, which is a major tourism center on the Mediterranean coast of Turkey. The authors studied consanguineous marriages in rural and urban population in the Mediterranean coast, Manavgat province, Turkey, via a 1500 random survey sample of married couples. There has been a significant increase in the incidence of consanguineous marriages in rural areas (40.7%) since 1989 in the southern population of Turkey. The results showed that the most frequent type of marriage was between the first cousins. It is found that there is no statistically significant difference between the consanguineous and non-consanguineous marriages in the different age groups. The results were discussed on the basis of educational status, reasons for having consanguineous marriages and the general medical effects as well as with the relation of congenital malformations. The custom of consanguineous unions in the Mediterranean population of Turkey is still extremely high, and preventive measures should be done to decrease its frequency and associated complications. PMID:15183745

  16. Consanguineous marriage and its clinical consequences in migrants to Australia.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J; Smith, M; Bittles, A H

    1997-09-01

    Marriage between close biological relatives is strongly favoured in many countries in Asia and Africa. Although substantial numbers of migrants from these regions are now living in Australia, little information is available either on the prevalence of consanguineous unions among migrants or on their clinical outcome. Data are presented on a range of generally rare autosomal recessive genetic disorders diagnosed in the children of parents of Eastern Mediterranean origin who attended Westmead Hospital, Sydney for genetic counselling during the period 1990 to 1994. The effects of parental consanguinity are assessed both in terms of the specific recessive disorders detected, and the perceived role of consanguineous marriage in the communities investigated. PMID:9377802

  17. Prevalence of consanguineous marriages in South Sinai, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Yamamah, G; Abdel-Raouf, E; Talaat, A; Saad-Hussein, A; Hamamy, H; Meguid, N A

    2013-01-01

    A total of 3961 married couples from six major geographical areas representing the South Sinai governorates in Egypt were studied to assess the rate of consanguineous marriage. The population of six selected areas (St Catherines, Nuweiba, Abu Rudeis, Ras Sudr, El Tor and Abu Zenima) were subdivided into Bedouin, urban and mixed populations. A questionnaire-based interview was conducted showing that the consanguinity rate in this region is 37.5%, with the highest rate recorded in Abu Rudeis (52.3%) and lowest rate in Nuweiba (24.1%). Consanguinity was significantly higher among the Bedouin population compared with the urban population in Abu Rudeis, Ras Sudr, El Tor and Abu Zenima, while in St Catherines and Nuweiba there was no statistically significant difference. Among consanguineous couples, 5%, 60% and 35% were double first cousins, first cousins and second cousins respectively. The mean inbreeding coefficient α of the studied population was 0.01845. PMID:22583662

  18. New Sequences with Low Correlation and Large Family Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fanxin

    In direct-sequence code-division multiple-access (DS-CDMA) communication systems and direct-sequence ultra wideband (DS-UWB) radios, sequences with low correlation and large family size are important for reducing multiple access interference (MAI) and accepting more active users, respectively. In this paper, a new collection of families of sequences of length pn-1, which includes three constructions, is proposed. The maximum number of cyclically distinct families without GMW sequences in each construction is φ(pn-1)/n·φ(pm-1)/m, where p is a prime number, n is an even number, and n=2m, and these sequences can be binary or polyphase depending upon choice of the parameter p. In Construction I, there are pn distinct sequences within each family and the new sequences have at most d+2 nontrivial periodic correlation {-pm-1, -1, pm-1, 2pm-1,…,dpm-1}. In Construction II, the new sequences have large family size p2n and possibly take the nontrivial correlation values in {-pm-1, -1, pm-1, 2pm-1,…,(3d-4)pm-1}. In Construction III, the new sequences possess the largest family size p(d-1)n and have at most 2d correlation levels {-pm-1, -1,pm-1, 2pm-1,…,(2d-2)pm-1}. Three constructions are near-optimal with respect to the Welch bound because the values of their Welch-Ratios are moderate, WR_??_d, WR_??_3d-4 and WR_??_2d-2, respectively. Each family in Constructions I, II and III contains a GMW sequence. In addition, Helleseth sequences and Niho sequences are special cases in Constructions I and III, and their restriction conditions to the integers m and n, pm≠2 (mod 3) and n≅0 (mod 4), respectively, are removed in our sequences. Our sequences in Construction III include the sequences with Niho type decimation 3·2m-2, too. Finally, some open questions are pointed out and an example that illustrates the performance of these sequences is given.

  19. The prevalence and demographic characteristics of consanguineous marriages in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hussain, R; Bittles, A H

    1998-04-01

    Consanguineous marriages are strongly preferred in much of West and South Asia. This paper examines the prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of consanguineous unions in Pakistan using local and national data. Information from 1011 ever-married women living in four multi-ethnic and multi-lingual squatter settlements of Karachi, the main commercial centre of the country, are compared with data from the national 1990/91 Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey (PDHS), based on information provided by 6611 women. Both sets of results indicate that approximately 60% of marriages were consanguineous, over 80% of which were between first cousins. The mean coefficients of inbreeding (F) in the present generation were 0.0316 and 0.0331 for the Karachi and PDHS data respectively. In both surveys the prevalence of consanguineous unions appeared to be unchanged over the past three to four decades. Consanguineous unions were more common among women who were illiterate or had only primary level education, were first or second generation migrants from rural areas of Pakistan or, in the PDHS, lived in rural areas, and whose parents were also consanguineously married. PMID:9746828

  20. Evolution in health and medicine Sackler colloquium: Consanguinity, human evolution, and complex diseases.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H; Black, M L

    2010-01-26

    There is little information on inbreeding during the critical early years of human existence. However, given the small founding group sizes and restricted mate choices it seems inevitable that intrafamilial reproduction occurred and the resultant levels of inbreeding would have been substantial. Currently, couples related as second cousins or closer (F >or= 0.0156) and their progeny account for an estimated 10.4% of the global population. The highest rates of consanguineous marriage occur in north and sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and west, central, and south Asia. In these regions even couples who regard themselves as unrelated may exhibit high levels of homozygosity, because marriage within clan, tribe, caste, or biraderi boundaries has been a long-established tradition. Mortality in first-cousin progeny is approximately 3.5% higher than in nonconsanguineous offspring, although demographic, social, and economic factors can significantly influence the outcome. Improving socioeconomic conditions and better access to health care will impact the effects of consanguinity, with a shift from infant and childhood mortality to extended morbidity. At the same time, a range of primarily social factors, including urbanization, improved female education, and smaller family sizes indicate that the global prevalence of consanguineous unions will decline. This shift in marriage patterns will initially result in decreased homozygosity, accompanied by a reduction in the expression of recessive single-gene disorders. Although the roles of common and rare gene variants in the etiology of complex disease remain contentious, it would be expected that declining consanguinity would also be reflected in reduced prevalence of complex diseases, especially in population isolates. PMID:19805052

  1. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.; San Miguel, U.

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design, compatibility for the different airfoil family members, etc.) and with the ultimate objective that the airfoils will reduce the blade loads. In this paper the whole airfoil design process and the main characteristics of the airfoil family are described. Some force coefficients for the design Reynolds number are also presented. The new designed airfoils have been studied with computational calculations (panel method code and CFD) and also in a wind tunnel experimental campaign. Some of these results will be also presented in this paper.

  2. Complex genetic background in a large family with Brugada syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Siamak; Amarouch, Mohamed?Yassine; Fazelifar, Amir?Farjam; Haghjoo, Majid; Emkanjoo, Zahra; Alizadeh, Abolfath; Houshmand, Massoud; Gavrilenko, Alexander V.; Abriel, Hugues; Zaklyazminskaya, Elena V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited arrhythmia characterized by ST?segment elevation in V1V3 leads and negative T wave on standard ECG. BrS patients are at risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) due to ventricular tachyarrhythmia. At least 17 genes have been proposed to be linked to BrS, although recent findings suggested a polygenic background. Mutations in SCN5A, the gene coding for the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5, have been found in 1530% of index cases. Here, we present the results of clinical, genetic, and expression studies of a large Iranian family with BrS carrying a novel genetic variant (p.P1506S) in SCN5A. By performing whole?cell patch?clamp experiments using HEK293 cells expressing wild?type (WT) or p.P1506S Nav1.5 channels, hyperpolarizing shift of the availability curve, depolarizing shift of the activation curve, and hastening of the fast inactivation process were observed. These mutant?induced alterations lead to a loss of function of Nav1.5 and thus suggest that the p.P1506S variant is pathogenic. In addition, cascade familial screening found a family member with BrS who did not carry the p.P1506S mutation. Additional next generation sequencing analyses revealed the p.R25W mutation in KCNH2 gene in SCN5A?negative BrS patients. These findings illustrate the complex genetic background of BrS found in this family and the possible pathogenic role of a new SCN5A genetic variant. PMID:25626866

  3. Complex genetic background in a large family with Brugada syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saber, Siamak; Amarouch, Mohamed-Yassine; Fazelifar, Amir-Farjam; Haghjoo, Majid; Emkanjoo, Zahra; Alizadeh, Abolfath; Houshmand, Massoud; Gavrilenko, Alexander V; Abriel, Hugues; Zaklyazminskaya, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    The Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited arrhythmia characterized by ST-segment elevation in V1-V3 leads and negative T wave on standard ECG. BrS patients are at risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) due to ventricular tachyarrhythmia. At least 17 genes have been proposed to be linked to BrS, although recent findings suggested a polygenic background. Mutations in SCN5A, the gene coding for the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5, have been found in 15-30% of index cases. Here, we present the results of clinical, genetic, and expression studies of a large Iranian family with BrS carrying a novel genetic variant (p.P1506S) in SCN5A. By performing whole-cell patch-clamp experiments using HEK293 cells expressing wild-type (WT) or p.P1506S Nav1.5 channels, hyperpolarizing shift of the availability curve, depolarizing shift of the activation curve, and hastening of the fast inactivation process were observed. These mutant-induced alterations lead to a loss of function of Nav1.5 and thus suggest that the p.P1506S variant is pathogenic. In addition, cascade familial screening found a family member with BrS who did not carry the p.P1506S mutation. Additional next generation sequencing analyses revealed the p.R25W mutation in KCNH2 gene in SCN5A-negative BrS patients. These findings illustrate the complex genetic background of BrS found in this family and the possible pathogenic role of a new SCN5A genetic variant. PMID:25626866

  4. The impact of consanguinity on neonatal and infant health.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H; Black, M L

    2010-11-01

    Marriage between biological relatives is widely popular in many parts of the world, with over 1000 million people living in countries where 20-50+% of unions are contracted between couples related as second cousins or closer. Consanguinity is, however, a controversial topic, in part due to public misunderstanding, complicated by often exaggerated past estimates of the adverse health outcomes. While some consanguineous couples are at high risk of conceiving a child with a genetic disorder, they are a small minority. Thus a multi-population meta-analysis has indicated an excess infant death rate of 1.1% in the progeny of first cousins, and even this figure may be compromised by inadequate control for non-genetic variables. The benefits as well as the disadvantages of consanguineous marriage are assessed and discussed, with specific consideration given to the health of migrant communities in Western countries, among whom first cousin marriage remains preferential. PMID:20832202

  5. Consanguinity and susceptibility to infectious diseases in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Emily J.; Frodsham, Angela J.; Zhang, Lyna; Hill, Adrian V.S.; Amos, William

    2009-01-01

    Studies of animal populations suggest that low genetic heterozygosity is an important risk factor for infection by a diverse range of pathogens, but relatively little research has looked to see whether similar patterns exist in humans. We have used microsatellite genome screen data for tuberculosis (TB), hepatitis and leprosy to test the hypothesis that inbreeding depression increases risk of infection. Our results indicate that inbred individuals are more common among our infected cases for TB and hepatitis, but only in populations where consanguineous marriages are common. No effect was found either for leprosy, which is thought to be oligogenic, or for hepatitis in Italy where consanguineous marriages are rare. Our results suggest that consanguinity is an important risk factor in susceptibility to infectious diseases in humans. PMID:19324620

  6. KIC 8462852: Transit of a Large Comet Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodman, Eva H. L.; Quillen, Alice

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the plausibility of a cometary source of the unusual transits observed in the KIC 8462852 light curve. A single comet of similar size to those in our solar system produces a transit depth of the order of 10-3 lasting less than a day which is much smaller and shorter than the largest dip observed (˜ 20% for ˜3 days), but a large, closely traveling cluster of comets can fit the observed depths and durations. We find that a series of large comet swarms, with all except one on the same orbit, provides a good fit for the KIC 8462852 data during Quarters 16 and 17, but does not explain the large dip observed during Quarter 8. However, the transit dips only loosely constrain the orbits and can be fit by swarms with periastrons differing by a factor of 10. To reach a transit depth of ˜0.2, the comets need to be in a close group of ˜30, if they are ˜100 km in radius or in a group of ˜300 if they are ˜10 km in radius. The total number of comets required to fit all of the dips is ˜70 ˜ 100 km or ˜700 ˜ 10 km comets. A single comet family from a tidally disrupted Ceres-sized progenitor or the start of a Late Heavy Bombardment period explains the last ˜60 days of the unusual KIC 8462852 light curve.

  7. Effects of consanguinity on pre-reproductive mortality: does demographic transition matter?

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Sánchez, Miguel A; Peña, José A

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is an increase on premature deaths due to genetically determined factors at the beginning of a demographic transition. We also analyzed the effects of parental consanguinity on offspring mortality from an epidemiological viewpoint, using parish records for family reconstitution in a Basque population (1800-1990). Among the offspring of unrelated parents, 13.1% died before their first year of life (infant mortality), and 22.8% died before the age of 16 (pre-reproductive mortality). Significant increases in both infant (23.6%) and pre-reproductive (38.5%) deaths were found among the progeny of first cousins or closer relatives, 1C (F > or = 0.0625). The corresponding relative risks of mortality were 1.79 (95% confidence limits: 1.37-2.28) and 1.68 (1.38-2.01), respectively. Estimates of the population attributable risks indicate that 4% of pre-reproductive mortality is ascribable to consanguineous unions, although kinships other than 1C produced only slight increases in offspring mortality. Evidence on the relationship between the demographic transition and the increase in premature deaths due to genetic factors was obtained through a principal component analysis (95.1% of variance accounted for). During the initial stages of the demographic transition, the population experienced substantial elevations in mean family size, natural increase of the population, frequency of close consanguineous matings (1C), and death rate due to congenital anomalies and perinatal diseases. These findings are of interest for the health services of many developing societies in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, which are nowadays immersed in the demographic transition process. PMID:16254904

  8. Familial pattern of large vestibular aqueduct syndrome in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Hazmi, Mohd; Ab Aziz, A.; Asma, A.

    2013-01-01

    Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome (LVAS) is the most common radiographic malformation in children with early onset of hearing loss. Usually its occurrence is non-familial, however intriguingly a portion of patients with LVAS is found to have evidence of genetic predisposition. We described cases of LVAS in two siblings of a Chinese family. The elder sister first presented with reduced hearing since childhood and her brother has a similar complaint upon further questioning. Their hearing test showed bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and computed tomography (CT) of temporal bone showed enlarged vestibular aqueduct in both patients. We described an approach to diagnosis of LVAS and highlight the importance of hearing assessment in genetic link hearing loss. PMID:27034633

  9. Kenny-Caffey syndrome in two sibs born to consanguineous parents: evidence for an autosomal recessive variant.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, P; Testa, A; Bogetti, G; Girardo, E; Guala, A; Lopez-Bell, G; Buzio, G; Ferrario, E; Piccato, E

    1992-01-01

    We report on 2 sibs with manifestations of the Kenny-Caffey syndrome born to normal, consanguineous parents. Clinical manifestations included dwarfism, internal cortical thickening and medullary stenosis of tubular bones, poorly ossified skull bones, and hypocalcemia. The younger of the two died during a tonic convulsion. The older had neonatal hypoparathyroidism and is now a short intelligent, 1-year-old child. This family gives new support to the existence of an autosomal recessive variant of the syndrome. PMID:1308349

  10. The Perceptions and Views on Family Interaction and Relationships of Middle Children from Large Families: An Informal Mini Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Elena C. Thomas

    In Adler's Theory of Individual Psychology the significance of birth order position in the family constellation depends on the interpretation given to it by the child, which in turn influences his character. This study surveyed the perceptions of middle children in large families. Subjects (N=13) were middle children in families of more than five…

  11. Consanguinity and other marriage market effects of a wealth shock in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Mobarak, Ahmed Mushfiq; Kuhn, Randall; Peters, Christina

    2013-10-01

    This paper uses a wealth shock from the construction of a flood protection embankment in rural Bangladesh coupled with data on the universe of all 52,000 marriage decisions between 1982 and 1996 to examine changes in marital prospects for households protected by the embankment relative to unprotected households living on the other side of the river. We use difference-in-difference specifications to document that brides from protected households commanded larger dowries, married wealthier households, and became less likely to marry biological relatives. Financial liquidity-constrained households appear to use within-family marriage (in which one can promise ex-post payments) as a form of credit to meet up-front dowry demands, but the resultant wealth shock for households protected by the embankment relaxed this need to marry consanguineously. Our results shed light on the socioeconomic roots of consanguinity, which carries health risks for offspring but can also carry substantial benefits for the families involved. PMID:23619998

  12. Are families poor because they are large or are they large because they are poor?

    PubMed

    Pernia, E M

    1982-01-01

    In the Philippines time allocation studies suggest that children cost considerable amounts of time and energy on the part of the mother and other siblings in addition to direct financial outlays which figure prominently. Yet, these costs seem to be compensated for by economic and noneconomic benefits. The time costs of children are moderated to the extent that mother's time has a low opportunity cost, given lack of marketable skills or sheer absence of employment opportunities. It is at the expense of investment in human capital (in terms of education and health) that economic benefits from child labor are forthcoming. As neither unemployment of the mother nor child labor is desirable, it would seem that economic benefits from children are expensive. The child's mental and physical development tends to be impaired due to deficient health, nutrition, and education inputs because family resources and parental care have to be spread so thinly among the many competing demands of the large family. Mother's health is negatively affected by frequent and closely spaced pregnancies, and she is effectively prevented from actual or potential participation in development. It is to these less immediate and not directly observable disadvantages of a large family that parents must be sensitized so that they will realize the need to limit family size. From the social perspective, the population program may be viewed as a strategy for human resource development. The challenge to policymakers has become formidable. Due to rapidly increasing population, the need to telescope the reduction of income inequality and poverty has become urgent. Continuing population growth tends to nullify whatever advances are made toward the distributional objective. Population and development policy needs to be directed to the poor in rural areas in general and more specifically to the rural poor in the backward regions of the Visayas, Bicol, Bocos, and Northern Mindanao. Given the extreme poverty of these groups, the family planning programs would seem to require complementary development inputs such as health, nutrition, and education. A less expensive strategy may be sufficient for the comparatively better off regions and social groups. PMID:12279386

  13. A family of dynamic models for large-eddy simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, D.; Jansen, K.; Lund, T.

    1995-01-01

    Since its first application, the dynamic procedure has been recognized as an effective means to compute rather than prescribe the unknown coefficients that appear in a subgrid-scale model for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). The dynamic procedure is usually used to determine the nondimensional coefficient in the Smagorinsky (1963) model. In reality the procedure is quite general and it is not limited to the Smagorinsky model by any theoretical or practical constraints. The purpose of this note is to consider a generalized family of dynamic eddy viscosity models that do not necessarily rely on the local equilibrium assumption built into the Smagorinsky model. By invoking an inertial range assumption, it will be shown that the coefficients in the new models need not be nondimensional. This additional degree of freedom allows the use of models that are scaled on traditionally unknown quantities such as the dissipation rate. In certain cases, the dynamic models with dimensional coefficients are simpler to implement, and allow for a 30% reduction in the number of required filtering operations.

  14. Measuring Family Outcomes Early Intervention: Findings from a Large-Scale Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raspa, Melissa; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.; Olmsted, Murrey G.; Nelson, Robin; Robinson, Nyle; Simpson, Mary Ellen; Guillen, Chelsea; Houts, Renate

    2010-01-01

    This article reports data from a large-scale assessment using the Family Outcomes Survey with families participating in early intervention. The study was designed to determine how families describe themselves with regard to outcomes achieved, the extent to which outcomes are interrelated, and the extent to which child, family, and program factors…

  15. Consanguinity and early mortality in the Muslim populations of India and Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hussain, R; Bittles, A H; Sullivan, S

    2001-01-01

    Empirical information from studies conducted in Pakistan has indicated a high level of offspring mortality that can be attributed to parental consanguinity even when non-biological variables are controlled. However, with the exception of some small and geographically restricted studies, few comparable data are available on the influence of inbreeding in child survival among the Muslim population of India, which numbers between 100 and 120 million. The present study compares deaths during the first 5 years of life among the offspring of first cousin (F = 0.0625) and non-consanguineous unions (F = 0), using data collected in the 1992-1993 Indian National Family Health Survey (NFHS) and the 1990-1991 Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey (PDHS). The focus was on determinants of mortality in live-born children to age 5 years. In both countries, bivariate analyses indicated that mortality was significantly increased in the offspring of first cousin unions during the neonatal and post-neonatal, total infant, and under-5 year periods. The findings were confirmed by multivariate regression, which incorporated control for a range of biological and demographic factors. PMID:11748817

  16. Consanguinity and genetic diseases in North Africa and immigrants to Europe.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Wagida A; Khyatti, Meriem; Hemminki, Kari

    2014-08-01

    Endemic diseases are caused by environmental and genetic factors. While in this special issue several chapters deal with environmental factors, including infections, the present focus is on genetic causes of disease clustering due to inbreeding and recessive disease mechanisms. Consanguinity is implying sharing of genetic heritage because of marriage between close relatives originating from a common ancestor. With limited natural selection, recessive genes may become more frequent in an inbred compared with an outbred population. Consanguinity is common in North Africa (NA), and the estimates range from 40 to 49% of all marriages in Tunisia and 29-33% in Morocco. As a consequence, recessive disorders are common in the NA region, and we give some examples. Thalassaemia and sickle cell disease/anaemia constitute the most common inherited recessive disorders globally and they are common in NA, but with immigration they have spread to Europe and to other parts of the world. Another example is familial Mediterranean fever, which is common in the Eastern Mediterranean area. With immigrantion from that area to Sweden, it has become the most common hereditary autoinflammatory disease in that country, and there is no evidence that any native Swede would have been diagnosed with this disease. The examples discussed in this chapter show that the historic movement of populations and current immigration are influencing the concept of 'endemic' disease. PMID:25107999

  17. Mismatches in genetic markers in a large family study.

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, G C

    1980-01-01

    The Hawaii Family Study of Cognition provided an opportunity to investigate the frequency and implications of non-agreement, or mismatches, between observed and expected genetic marker phenotypes of husbands, wives, and children. Mismatch data from 68 families in which one or both spouses were known not to be a biological parent were used to determine the rate of undeclared nonparentage in 1,748 families in which conventional relationships were claimed. Two independent approaches gave consistent estimates, suggesting that approximately 2.3% of the 2,839 tested children from these families were probably the result of infidelity, concealed adoption, or another event. About two-thirds of the mismatches detected were probably due to properties of the techniques employed. PMID:6930820

  18. Assessing the influence of consanguinity on congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Bittles, Alan H.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous articles have been published linking consanguineous marriage to an elevated prevalence of congenital heart disease, with ventricular septal defects and atrial septal defects the most commonly cited disorders. While initially persuasive, on closer examination many of these studies have fundamental shortcomings in their design and in the recruitment of study subjects and controls. Improved matching of cases and controls, to include recognition of the long-established community boundaries within which most marriages are contracted, and the assessment of consanguinity within specific levels and types of marital union would improve and help to focus the study outcomes. At the same time, major discrepancies between studies in their reported prevalence and types of congenital heart disease suggest an urgent need for greater standardization in the classification and reporting of these disorders. PMID:21976867

  19. Assessing the influence of consanguinity on congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bittles, Alan H

    2011-07-01

    Numerous articles have been published linking consanguineous marriage to an elevated prevalence of congenital heart disease, with ventricular septal defects and atrial septal defects the most commonly cited disorders. While initially persuasive, on closer examination many of these studies have fundamental shortcomings in their design and in the recruitment of study subjects and controls. Improved matching of cases and controls, to include recognition of the long-established community boundaries within which most marriages are contracted, and the assessment of consanguinity within specific levels and types of marital union would improve and help to focus the study outcomes. At the same time, major discrepancies between studies in their reported prevalence and types of congenital heart disease suggest an urgent need for greater standardization in the classification and reporting of these disorders. PMID:21976867

  20. CONSANGUINITY AND INBREEDING COEFFICIENT IN TRIBAL PASHTUNS INHABITING THE TURBULENT AND WAR-AFFECTED TERRITORY OF BAJAUR AGENCY, NORTH-WEST PAKISTAN.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Bashir; Rehman, Atta Ur; Malik, Sajid

    2016-01-01

    The north-western populations of Pakistan in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) adjoining the Pakistan-Afghanistan border are an amalgamation of native and migrated Pashtun tribes. These tribal populations are in transition due to war conditions and geo-political turmoil on both sides of the border since the Soviet invasion in 1979. Bio-demographic and epidemiological data for these tribes are scarce. A prospective cross-sectional sample of 967 males was selected from a representative Pashtun population of Bajaur Agency, and information obtained on bio-demographic variables and marital union types. Analysis of these data revealed that consanguinity was 22.34% and the inbreeding coefficient F was calculated to be 0.0134. The inbreeding coefficient was observed to be higher in subjects who were illiterate, had unskilled jobs and who belonged to younger age categories, extended families and the Tarkalani tribe. Further analyses with respect to temporal variables like subject's age, year of marriage and age at marriage revealed that after a transition in marital union types in the early 80s, there has been a declining trend in the rate of consanguineous unions. Further, consanguineous unions in the parental generation were only 5%, but parental marriage types were predictors of subjects' marital union types. The data further establish that, contrary to a general notion about a high consanguinity rate in Pakistan, consanguineous unions are not common in Bajaur Agency and first cousin marriage is not the preferred type. Furthermore, this research shows that there is a great regional variation in the pattern of consanguinity in Pakistan that needs to be documented in order to draw a more comprehensive picture of the inbreeding coefficient in the country. PMID:26627887

  1. Consanguinity and late fertility: spatial analysis reveals positive association patterns.

    PubMed

    Lisa, Antonella; Astolfi, Paola; Zei, Gianna; Tentoni, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The role of consanguinity on human complex traits is an important and controversial issue. In this work we focused on the Sardinian population and examined the effect of consanguineous unions on late female fertility. During the last century the island has been characterized by a high incidence of marriages between relatives, favoured by socio economic conditions and geographical isolation, and by high fertility despite a widespread tendency to delay reproduction. Through spatial analysis techniques, we explored the geographical heterogeneity of consanguinity and late fertility, and identified in Central-Eastern Sardinia a common area with an excess of both traits, where the traits are positively associated. We found that their association did not significantly affect women's fertility in the area, despite the expected negative role of both traits. Intriguingly, this critical zone corresponds well to areas reported by previous studies as being peculiar for a high frequency of centenarians and for lower risk in pregnancy outcome. The proposed approach can be generally exploited to identify target populations on which socioeconomic, biodemographic and genetic data can be collected at the individual level, and deeper analyses carried out to disentangle the determinants of complex biological traits and to investigate their association. PMID:25441534

  2. Digenic inheritance of an autosomal recessive hypotrichosis in two consanguineous pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Basit, S; Wali, A; Aziz, A; Muhammad, N; Jelani, M; Ahmad, W

    2011-03-01

    Hypotrichosis is a human hereditary hair loss disorder in which affected individuals show sparse to complete absence of hair on scalp and/or on different body parts. To date, at least eight isolated autosomal recessive and dominant forms of hypotrichosis loci have been mapped on different human chromosomes, and the corresponding genes have been identified. Detailed clinical and molecular studies were undertaken of the hereditary hypotrichosis observed in the two consanguineous families (A and B) presented here. Human genome scan, using >500 highly polymorphic microsatellite markers, identified equal evidence of linkage of the hypotrichosis phenotype on chromosomes 12q21.2-q22 and 16q21-q23.1 in both the families. The novel hypotrichosis locus on chromosome 12q21.2-q22 spans 16.3 cM (17.62 Mb), flanked by markers D12S326 and D12S101. At this locus, maximum multipoint logarithm of the odds ratio (LOD) scores of 3.68 and 3.31 were obtained in families A and B, respectively. The second hypotrichosis locus on chromosome 16q21-q23.1, identified in the two families, spans 5.58 cM (8.28 Mb) and is flanked by markers D16S3031 and D16S512. Maximum multipoint LOD scores of 3.17 and 3.31 were obtained with markers mapped at this locus in families A and B, respectively. DNA sequence analysis of six candidate genes (PLEKHG7, SLC6A15, VEZT, DUSP6, KERA and KITLG), located in the linkage interval on chromosome 12q21.2-q22, failed to detect potential sequence variants in the affected individuals of the two families. However, DNA sequence analysis of CDH3 gene, located on chromosome 16q21-q23.1, detected a single base pair homozygous insertion (c.1024_1025insG and p.342insGfsX345) in exon 9 in family A and deletion of four base pair (c.1859_1862delCTCT and p.620delSfsX629) in exon 13 in family B. We described for the first time digenic inheritance of an autosomal recessive hypotrichosis phenotype in two unlinked loci on chromosomes 12q21.2-q22 and 16q21-q23.1 in two unrelated consanguineous Pakistani families. PMID:20528890

  3. Inheritance of quantitative dermatoglyphic traits with asymmetry and diversity in Muzeina Bedouin tribe: a small isolated and consanguineous population from South Sinai.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Bibha; Malkin, Ida; Kobyliansky, Eugene

    2014-06-01

    The genetic factors contribute significantly to the determination of dermatoglyphic traits is well established. However, the controversies in views and findings of this issue are still inconclusive. The present study is an attempt to evaluate the inheritance of quantitative dermatoglyphic traits with asymmetry (DA and FA) and diversity (Div) through sibling correlations. Data include 218 individuals from (88 families) in a small isolate, the nomadic tribe Muzeina with a high degree of consanguinity (0.09) from South Sinai. Statistical analyses include sibling correlations, cross-correlations and genetic correlation (GC)--a ratio of sibling cross-correlation between traits divided on square root of the both traits sibling correlation product. The familial correlation coefficients for quantitative dermatoglyphic traits are perhaps expected lower in such a small isolated and consanguineous population than our previous studied in Indian populations and Chuvashian populations from Russia. These results indicate a simpler genetic basis due to high degree (0.09 inbreeding coefficient) of consanguinity in Muzeina Bedouin tribe. There is no evidence of major gene involvement, although a little genetic effect obtained from familial correlations on asymmetry (DA and FA) and diversity (Div) traits through sibling correlations. The significant interaction between sexes was found, which contradicts with the other populations perhaps due to high level of consanguinity. Lower correlation coefficients than in other non-consanguineous populations for quantitative dermatoglyphic traits indicate a simpler genetic basis due to high degree of inbreeding coefficient (0.09) in Muzeina. Dermatoglyphic asymmetry and diversity traits may be due to environmental factors rather than dominance in Bedouins, although a little genetic effect was found suggests a measure of developmental instability in human (FA). PMID:25144975

  4. Interplay of Socio-economic Factors, Consanguinity, Fertility, and Offspring Mortality in Monastir, Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Kerkeni, Emna; Monastiri, Kamel; Seket, Besma; Guediche, Mohamed Neji; Ben Cheikh, Hassen

    2007-01-01

    Aim To assess the association among social status, prevalence of consanguineous marriages, and the effects of consanguinity on reproductive behavior and mortality in Tunisia. Methods The study included data on a total of 1741 live-births born from November 1989 to October 1990 in the maternity ward of the University-Hospital Fattouma Bourguiba of Monastir, Tunisia. After delivery, women filled out a questionnaire on the age of the parents at marriage, the number of pregnancies and abortions, the number of neonatal and post-neonatal deaths, and deaths of children under 5 years. Three categories of marriages were distinguished as follows: marriages between first cousins, marriages between cousins of other degree, and non consanguineous marriages. Results Consanguineous marriages represented 432 (24.81%) of the unions. Most consanguineous marriages were contracted between first cousins (n = 303; 70.13%). Consanguineous couples had a lower age at marriage and a higher fertility index than non-consanguineous couples. The rates of spontaneous abortions and stillbirths were not correlated with consanguinity. However, higher rates of neonatal and post-neonatal deaths, and deaths of children younger than 5 years were observed in consanguineous couples. Conclusion Fertility index and mortality, especially in the first year of life, were significantly higher in consanguineous marriages. This important socio-economical factor needs to be considered in assessing equity on health in specific social and cultural contexts. PMID:17948956

  5. Hurler disease (mucopolysaccharidosis type IH): clinical features and consanguinity in Tunisian population

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) was a group of rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme, alpha -L -iduronidase, and the resulting accumulation of undergraded dematan sulfate and heparan sulfate. MPS I patients have a wide range of clinical presentations, that makes it difficult to predict patient phenotype which is needed for genetic counseling and also impedes the selection and evaluation of patients undergoing therapy bone marrow transplantation. Aim of the study consanguinity rates have been determined among 14 families with mucopolysaccharidosis type I, seen in the pediatric departments of different geographic areas of Tunisia (Central and Southern areas) for the period August 2004 - August 2011 in order to investigate the relation between consanguinity and this disorder. Patients and methods Clinical and molecular analyses confirmed the diagnosis for MPS type I in the studied families. Results Most of the Tunisian MPS I patients have been identified at the homozygous status: p.P533R mutation (7 homozygous and one double heterozygous p.L578Q/p.P533R patients; 41.66% of all the investigated MPSI patients), p.F177S (1 homozygous patient; 5.55%), p.L530fs (1 patient; 5.55%), p.Y581X (2 patients; 11.11%), p.F602X (3 patients; 16.66%), p.R628X (1 patient; 5.55%). Another mutation: p.L578Q has been identified at the heterozygous status in the only double heterozygous p.L578Q/p.P533R case. Part of the mutations was the result of a founder effect. These described points are the consequences of the high rate of consanguinity. Conclusion The high frequency of p.P533R mutation could be explained by the high degree of inbreeding. This is due to the richness of the genetic background of the studied population. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to develop adequate preventive program adapted to the social, cultural, and economic context. PMID:22074387

  6. The practice of consanguineous marriage in Oman: prevalence, trends and determinants.

    PubMed

    Islam, M Mazharul

    2012-09-01

    The practice of consanguineous marriage has been the culturally preferred form of marriage in most Arab and the Middle Eastern countries, including Oman, but due to a paucity of population-based data in the past there is a dearth of information about its form and dynamics in Oman. Recent national-level surveys allow this gap to be filled. This paper examines the prevalence, trends and determinants of consanguineous marriages in Oman using data from the 2000 Oman National Health Survey. The results indicate a very high prevalence of consanguineous marriage in Oman, as more than half (52%) of marriages are consanguineous. First cousin unions are the most common type of consanguineous unions, constituting 39% of all marriages and 75% of all consanguineous marriages. The study observed various patterns of consanguinity, some of them common with other Arab nations, and some unique in nature. Women's age at marriage, employment, place of childhood residence and geographical region appear to be significant determinants of consanguineous marriages. Consanguineous marriage shows a strong association with marital stability, early age at marriage and early-age childbearing. There has been no appreciable change in the prevalence of consanguineous unions in Oman over the last four decades despite massive socioeconomic development and modernization. However, recent marriage cohorts show slight declining trends. The results suggest that consanguinity is likely to remain stable in the future or decline at a slow rate. Specific health education and genetic counselling should be followed in line with WHO recommendations to minimize the negative health consequences of consanguinity for child health. PMID:22317781

  7. Frontotemporal dementia parkinsonism: Clinical findings in a large Iranian family.

    PubMed

    Basiri, Keivan; Ansari, Behnaz; Meamar, Rokhsareh

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes. Clinical features suggestive of FTD include pre-senile onset before the age of 65, behavioral changes, social and interpersonal disinhibition, fluent and nonfluent aphasia, and loss of insight. FTD and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) was defined during the International Consensus Conference in Ann Arbor, Michigan in 1996. FTDP-17 is an autosomally dominant inherited condition. Most genotypic alterations do not correlate with clinical phenotypes. However, mutations affecting exon 10 splicing are associated with parkinsonism. In the present study, a male case with FTDP who presented with insidious onset of speech difficulty at a young age that was associated with signs of parkinsonism and a positive family history of FTD with MAPT gene mutation at exon 13 has been reported. PMID:25789263

  8. Broad scan linkage analysis in a large Tourette family pedigree

    SciTech Connect

    Peiffer, A.; Leppert, M.; Wetering, B.J.M. van der

    1994-09-01

    Attempts to find a gene causing Tourette syndrome (TS) using linkage analysis have been unsuccessful even though as much as 65% of the autosomal genetic map has been excluded by the pooled results from several laboratories collaborating worldwide. One reason for this failure may be the misclassification of affection status of marry-in spouses. Specifically, we have found that six unrelated spouses in our Utah TS pedigree suffer from TS, obsessive-compulsive disorder or chronic motor tics. In light of these findings we decided to conduct a complete genomic scan from this Utah kindred with polymorphic markers in three related sibships in which there was no assortative mating. A linkage study assuming autosomal dominant inheritance was done using tetranucleotide repeat markers developed at the University of Utah. We selected markers that were less than 300 bp in size and that gave a heterozygosity of over 70% upon analysis in 4 CEPH families. Results to date with 95 markers run at an interval of 30 cM (covering 61% of the genome) show no evidence of linkage. We intend to extend the coverage to 100% of the genome. Pending completion of this scan, failure to provide evidence of linkage in our TS pedigree might then be attributed to phenotypic misclassification or erroneous assumptions regarding the genetic model of transmission.

  9. FamAgg: an R package to evaluate familial aggregation of traits in large pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Rainer, Johannes; Taliun, Daniel; D’Elia, Yuri; Pattaro, Cristian; Domingues, Francisco S.; Weichenberger, Christian X.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Familial aggregation analysis is the first fundamental step to perform when assessing the extent of genetic background of a disease. However, there is a lack of software to analyze the familial clustering of complex phenotypes in very large pedigrees. Such pedigrees can be utilized to calculate measures that express trait aggregation on both the family and individual level, providing valuable directions in choosing families for detailed follow-up studies. We developed FamAgg, an open source R package that contains both established and novel methods to investigate familial aggregation of traits in large pedigrees. We demonstrate its use and interpretation by analyzing a publicly available cancer dataset with more than 20 000 participants distributed across approximately 400 families. Availability and implementation: The FamAgg package is freely available at the Bioconductor repository, http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/FamAgg. Contact: Christian.Weichenberger@eurac.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26803158

  10. Do consanguineous parents of a child affected by an autosomal recessive disease have more DNA identical-by-descent than similarly-related parents with healthy offspring? Design of a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The offspring of consanguineous relations have an increased risk of congenital/genetic disorders and early mortality. Consanguineous couples and their offspring account for approximately 10% of the global population. The increased risk for congenital/genetic disorders is most marked for autosomal recessive disorders and depends on the degree of relatedness of the parents. For children of first cousins the increased risk is 2-4%. For individual couples, however, the extra risk can vary from zero to 25% or higher, with only a minority of these couples having an increased risk of at least 25%. It is currently not possible to differentiate between high-and low-risk couples. The quantity of DNA identical-by-descent between couples with the same degree of relatedness shows a remarkable variation. Here we hypothesize that consanguineous partners with children affected by an autosomal recessive disease have more DNA identical-by-descent than similarly-related partners who have only healthy children. The aim of the study is thus to establish whether the amount of DNA identical-by-descent in consanguineous parents of children with an autosomal recessive disease is indeed different from its proportion in consanguineous parents who have healthy children only. Methods/Design This project is designed as a case-control study. Cases are defined as consanguineous couples with one or more children with an autosomal recessive disorder and controls as consanguineous couples with at least three healthy children and no affected child. We aim to include 100 case couples and 100 control couples. Control couples are matched by restricting the search to the same family, clan or ethnic origin as the case couple. Genome-wide SNP arrays will be used to test our hypothesis. Discussion This study contains a new approach to risk assessment in consanguineous couples. There is no previous study on the amount of DNA identical-by-descent in consanguineous parents of affected children compared to the consanguineous parents of healthy children. If our hypothesis proves to be correct, further studies are needed to obtain different risk figure estimates for the different proportions of DNA identical-by-descent. With more precise information about their risk status, empowerment of couples can be improved when making reproductive decisions. PMID:20637082

  11. Fertility Related Attitudes of Minority Mothers with Large and Small Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Margaret W.; And Others

    The relationship between certain attitudes and the levels of fertility in five cultural groups was explored in this study. The group studied were blacks, Cubans, American Indians, migrant Chicanos, and white Protestants. Mothers, aged 35-45, with one or two children (small family) or five children (large family) were compared. Attitudes measured…

  12. A Mitochondrial DNA A8701G Mutation Associated with Maternally Inherited Hypertension and Dilated Cardiomyopathy in a Chinese Pedigree of a Consanguineous Marriage

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ye; Gu, Xiang; Xu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases, including dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and hypertension, are the leading cause of death worldwide. The role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the pathogenesis of these diseases has not been completely clarified. In this study, we evaluate whether A8701G mutation is associated with maternally inherited hypertension and DCM in a Chinese pedigree of a consanguineous marriage. Methods: Fourteen subjects in a three-generation Han Chinese family with hypertension and DCM, in which consanguineous marriage was present in the parental generation, were interviewed. We divided all the family members into case (7 maternal members) and control group (7 nonmaternal members) for comparison. Clinical evaluations and sequence analysis of mtDNA were obtained from all participants. Frequency differences between maternal and nonmaternal members were tested to locate the disease-associated mutations. Results: The majority of the family members presented with a maternal inheritance of hypertension and DCM. Sequence analysis of mtDNA in this pedigree identified eight mtDNA mutations. Among the mutations identified, there was only one significant mutation: A8701G (P = 0.005), which is a homoplasmic mitochondrial missense mutation in all the matrilineal relatives. There was no clear evidence for any synergistic effects between A8701G and other mutations. Conclusions: A8701G mutation may act as an inherited risk factor for the matrilineal transmission of hypertension and DCM in conjunction with genetic disorders caused by consanguineous marriage. PMID:26831225

  13. Malaysia: where big is still better. For Malays, large families are part of the plan.

    PubMed

    1993-11-01

    The benefits of various-sized families in Malaysia were discussed by several women and supplemented with official statements on family planning (FP). The Director of the National Population and Family Development, Dr. Raj Karim, advised that maternal health is jeopardized when women have more than five children. About 30% of reproductive age women in Malaysia have five or more children. A Federation of FP Associations spokesperson agreed that women should be advised of the dangers of bearing over five children, of the importance of spacing births two to four years apart, and of the ideal age of childbearing (21-39 years). The government lacks an official policy on family size. The government position is, however, compatible with Islamic teachings on spacing in order to protect the health of the mother and child. Islamic law does not permit sterilization or abortion. The "fatwas" of Islamic teaching may have been misconstrued by those not using any form of contraception. Dr. Karim, who has five children, reported that having a large family can be difficult for a woman with a job, a career, and a husband or when both parents work. Most Malays desire large families. The average Malay family size was 4.1 children in 1990; Malaysian Chinese have fertility of 2.3 children and Malaysian Indians have 2.6 children. People say that the benefits outweigh the hardships of a large family. PMID:12287219

  14. PATTERN OF CONSANGUINITY AND INBREEDING COEFFICIENT IN SARGODHA DISTRICT, PUNJAB, PAKISTAN.

    PubMed

    Hina, Saira; Malik, Sajid

    2015-11-01

    Consanguinity is widespread in Pakistan. The majority of studies on consanguinity in Pakistan have been carried out in urban metropolitan areas, and data on rural populations are scarce. The present cross-sectional study was conducted in Sargodha district, upper Punjab, Pakistan where the majority of the population reside in rural areas. A random sample of 1800 married females belonging to six tehsils of Sargodha district was obtained and differentials in consanguinity rates and inbreeding coefficient (F) were investigated. The consanguinity rate was calculated to be 56.72% and the inbreeding coefficient was 0.0348. First cousin unions had the highest representation (49.11% of all marriages), and marriages up to distantly related/Biradari constituted 67.94% of all marriages. Among the six tehsils, consanguinity rates ranged from 50.38% in Bhalwal to 62.88% in Sillanwali. A high rate of consanguinity was observed in subjects speaking the Punjabi language, those with self-arranged/arranged-love marriages and those engaged in professional jobs. With respect to the occupation of husbands the highest consanguinity rate was found among landowners (77.59%; F=0.0539) and businessmen (62.62%; F=0.0377). However, consanguinity did not appear to be associated with rural/urban origin or literacy level. The data showed a wide variation in consanguinity rate and inbreeding coefficient across socio-demographic strata in the Sargodha district population. A comparison of Sargodha with other populations of Punjab also showed regional heterogeneity in the pattern of consanguinity, warranting further studies. PMID:25299747

  15. Genomic Runs of Homozygosity Record Population History and Consanguinity

    PubMed Central

    Kirin, Mirna; McQuillan, Ruth; Franklin, Christopher S.; Campbell, Harry; McKeigue, Paul M.; Wilson, James F.

    2010-01-01

    The human genome is characterised by many runs of homozygous genotypes, where identical haplotypes were inherited from each parent. The length of each run is determined partly by the number of generations since the common ancestor: offspring of cousin marriages have long runs of homozygosity (ROH), while the numerous shorter tracts relate to shared ancestry tens and hundreds of generations ago. Human populations have experienced a wide range of demographic histories and hold diverse cultural attitudes to consanguinity. In a global population dataset, genome-wide analysis of long and shorter ROH allows categorisation of the mainly indigenous populations sampled here into four major groups in which the majority of the population are inferred to have: (a) recent parental relatedness (south and west Asians); (b) shared parental ancestry arising hundreds to thousands of years ago through long term isolation and restricted effective population size (Ne), but little recent inbreeding (Oceanians); (c) both ancient and recent parental relatedness (Native Americans); and (d) only the background level of shared ancestry relating to continental Ne (predominantly urban Europeans and East Asians; lowest of all in sub-Saharan African agriculturalists), and the occasional cryptically inbred individual. Moreover, individuals can be positioned along axes representing this demographic historic space. Long runs of homozygosity are therefore a globally widespread and under-appreciated characteristic of our genomes, which record past consanguinity and population isolation and provide a distinctive record of the demographic history of an individual's ancestors. Individual ROH measures will also allow quantification of the disease risk arising from polygenic recessive effects. PMID:21085596

  16. Internal organization of large protein families: relationship between the sequence, structure and function based clustering

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiao-hui; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Wooley, John; Godzik, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The protein universe can be organized in families that group proteins sharing common ancestry. Such families display variable levels of structural and functional divergence, from homogenous families, where all members have the same function and very similar structure, to very divergent families, where large variations in function and structure are observed. For practical purposes of structure and function prediction, it would be beneficial to identify sub-groups of proteins with highly similar structures (iso-structural) and/or functions (iso-functional) within divergent protein families. We compared three algorithms in their ability to cluster large protein families and discuss whether any of these methods could reliably identify such iso-structural or iso-functional groups. We show that clustering using profile-sequence and profile-profile comparison methods closely reproduces clusters based on similarities between 3D structures or clusters of proteins with similar biological functions. In contrast, the still commonly used sequence-based methods with fixed thresholds result in vast overestimates of structural and functional diversity in protein families. As a result, these methods also overestimate the number of protein structures that have to be determined to fully characterize structural space of such families. The fact that one can build reliable models based on apparently distantly related templates is crucial for extracting maximal amount of information from new sequencing projects. PMID:21671455

  17. Marfan syndrome in a large family: response of family members to a screening programme.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, A B; Faed, M; Boxer, M; Gray, J R; Bundy, C; Murray, A

    1992-01-01

    Reaction to medical, social, and genetic implications of Marfan syndrome was evaluated by means of two questionnaires, the first after various tests before discussion of the diagnosis, the second after full discussion of the patient's diagnosis. Thirty-seven members of a family known to be at risk for Marfan syndrome attended for both questionnaires. All patients claimed to be satisfied with the way they were informed of the results of screening; 41% of patients were more worried about their health and 48% were more worried about the future after diagnosis. Apart from 50% of the smokers reducing or stopping their intake of cigarettes there were only very minor changes in lifestyle over the first month despite the increased level of expressed anxiety. If a definitive screening test was available, 96% of patients claimed they would have chosen it, 45% felt it would have an influence on their future plans, and 78% would choose to use a method of prenatal diagnosis for Marfan syndrome if it were available. PMID:1613770

  18. Multistep method to deal with large datasets in asteroid family classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knežević, Z.; Milani, A.; Cellino, A.; Novaković, B.; Spoto, F.; Paolicchi, P.

    2014-07-01

    A fast increase in the number of asteroids with accurately determined orbits and with known physical properties makes it more and more challenging to perform, maintain, and update a classification of asteroids into families. We have therefore developed a new approach to the family classification by combining the Hierarchical Clustering Method (HCM) [1] to identify the families with an automated method to add members to already known families. This procedure makes use of the maximum available information, in particular, of that contained in the proper elements catalog [2]. The catalog of proper elements and absolute magnitudes used in our study contains 336 319 numbered asteroids with an information content of 16.31 Mb. The WISE catalog of albedos [3] and SDSS catalog of color indexes [4] contain 94 632 and 59 975 entries, respectively, with a total amount of information of 0.93 Mb. Our procedure makes use of the segmentation of the proper elements catalog by semimajor axis, to deal with a manageable number of objects in each zone, and by inclination, to account for lower density of high-inclination objects. By selecting from the catalog a much smaller number of large asteroids, in the first step, we identify a number of core families; to these, in the second step, we attribute the next layer of smaller objects. In the third step, we remove all the family members from the catalog, and reapply the HCM to the rest; this gives both satellite families which extend the core families and new independent families, consisting mainly of small asteroids. These two cases are separated in the fourth step by attribution of another layer of new members and by merging intersecting families. This leads to a classification with 128 families and 87 095 members. The list of members is updated automatically with each update of the proper elements catalog, and this represents the final and repetitive step of the procedure. Changes in the list of families are not automated.

  19. Consanguinity as a determinant of reproductive behaviour and mortality in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H; Grant, J C; Shami, S A

    1993-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of consanguineous marriages and estimate the effects of consanguinity on reproductive behaviour and mortality, household and hospital-based surveys were conducted in 11 cities in the Pakistan province of Punjab between 1979 and 1985. The 9520 women interviewed reported 44,474 pregnancies, with data collected on maternal and paternal ages at marriage, abortions/miscarriages, stillbirths and deaths in the first month, at 2-12 months and 2-8/10 years. Six categories of consanguineous marriage were included: double first cousin, first cousin, first cousin once removed/double second cousin, second cousin, bradari (brotherhood) and non-consanguineous. Marriages contracted between spouses related as second cousins or closer accounted for 50.3% of the total, equivalent to an average coefficient of kinship (alpha = sigma piFi) of 0.0280. Unions between close biological relatives were characterized by younger maternal and paternal ages at marriage and reduced spousal age difference, but a longer time to first delivery. Overall, they exhibited greater fertility than non-consanguineous couples. Antenatal and postnatal mortality were assessed by consanguinity and age interval. Consanguinity-associated deaths were consistently higher in the neonatal, infant and childhood periods. The consequences of these outcomes on the health of the present and future generations is assessed. PMID:8359962

  20. Consanguineous marriage and differentials in age at marriage, contraceptive use and fertility in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hussain, R; Bittles, A H

    1999-01-01

    Fertility rates in Pakistan have remained consistently high over the past three decades. While numerous studies have examined sociodemographic determinants, the role of biological factors, and particularly consanguinity, has received little attention, even though marriage between close biological relatives continues to be the norm in Pakistan. Reproductive behaviour among women in consanguineous (first cousin) and non-consanguineous unions was compared, using data from a 1995 study of multi-ethnic communities in Karachi and the 1990-91 Pakistan Demographic & Health Survey (PDHS). The results show that, although female age at first marriage has been gradually rising in both study samples, women in consanguineous unions married at younger ages and were less likely to use modern contraceptive methods. In the Karachi sample, women in first cousin unions experienced a higher mean number of pregnancies and also reported a higher mean number of children ever born (CEB). However, their mean number of surviving children did not differ from those born to women in non-consanguineous unions, implying higher prenatal and/or postnatal losses in couples related as first cousins. On the other hand, the PDHS showed both lower CEB values for women in consanguineous marriages and a lower number of surviving children. Given the continuing popularity of consanguineous marriage, these findings have important implications for future fertility reduction in Pakistan. PMID:10081242

  1. A large gene family for putative variant antigens shared by human and rodent malaria parasites.

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Christoph S; Barrett, Michael P; Turner, C Michael R; Phillips, R Stephen

    2002-01-01

    A major mechanism whereby malaria parasites evade the host immune response to give chronic infections in patients' blood for months, or even years, is antigenic variation. In order to generate variant antigens, parasites require large multigene families. Although several gene families involved in these phenomena have been identified in the human malaria Plasmodium falciparum, to date no variant antigen gene families have been identified in malaria species that will infect widely used rodent laboratory hosts. Here we present, for the first time, to our knowledge, a large multigene family conserved in both rodent and human malarias, which is a strong candidate as a major variant antigen gene family. In each of four species of Plasmodium, three rodent malarias and the human pathogen P. vivax, homologues of the gene family were found to have a conserved three-exon structure. In the rodent malaria P. chabaudi, transcription of members of the gene family was developmentally regulated with maximum expression in late trophozoite stages, which is the developmental stage known to express variant antigen proteins. PMID:11886633

  2. Structure and evolutionary history of a large family of NLR proteins in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Julia; Kondrashov, Fyodor

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular eukaryotes have evolved a range of mechanisms for immune recognition. A widespread family involved in innate immunity are the NACHT-domain and leucine-rich-repeat-containing (NLR) proteins. Mammals have small numbers of NLR proteins, whereas in some species, mostly those without adaptive immune systems, NLRs have expanded into very large families. We describe a family of nearly 400 NLR proteins encoded in the zebrafish genome. The proteins share a defining overall structure, which arose in fishes after a fusion of the core NLR domains with a B30.2 domain, but can be subdivided into four groups based on their NACHT domains. Gene conversion acting differentially on the NACHT and B30.2 domains has shaped the family and created the groups. Evidence of positive selection in the B30.2 domain indicates that this domain rather than the leucine-rich repeats acts as the pathogen recognition module. In an unusual chromosomal organization, the majority of the genes are located on one chromosome arm, interspersed with other large multigene families, including a new family encoding zinc-finger proteins. The NLR-B30.2 proteins represent a new family with diversity in the specific recognition module that is present in fishes in spite of the parallel existence of an adaptive immune system.

  3. Evidence for ASD recurrence rates and reproductive stoppage from large UK ASD research family databases.

    PubMed

    Wood, Claire L; Warnell, Frances; Johnson, Mary; Hames, Annette; Pearce, Mark S; McConachie, Helen; Parr, Jeremy R

    2015-02-01

    Following a diagnosis of a developmental disorder such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in early childhood, parents may decide to have fewer children than previously planned. The tendency for families to halt reproduction after receiving a diagnosis for one child is known as reproductive stoppage. Stoppage may lead to an underestimate of recurrence risk estimates of parents having more than one child with ASD. Using two large UK ASD family databases, we investigated recurrence rates for ASD and evidence for reproductive stoppage for both ASD and undiagnosed ASD/broader autism phenotype in a subgroup of families. Reproductive stoppage was tested for using the Mann-Whitney U-test to disprove the null hypothesis that affected and nonaffected children were distributed randomly by birth order. Dahlberg's later-sib method was used to estimate recurrence risk and take stoppage into account. Data were available from 299 families (660 children) including 327 with ASD. Ten percent of the complete families had more than one child with an ASD. Using Dahlberg's later-sib method, the recurrence risk for ASD was 24.7% overall and 50.0% in families with two or more older siblings with ASD. Children with ASD were born significantly later in families than those without ASD in all sibship combinations. This study shows strong evidence that ASD is associated with reproductive stoppage. These data have important implications for family planning and genetic counseling. PMID:25273900

  4. Awareness of folic acid for prevention of neural tube defects in a community with high prevalence of consanguineous marriages.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Lutfi; Karim, Igbaria A; Jawdat, Abu Moch; Fausi, Mawasi; Merlob, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe congenital malformations and can be fatal. Intake of 0.4 mg folic in the periconceptional period reduces the risk of NTD by 50-70%. Consanguinity in the Arab population in Israel is a prevalent custom. The aim of this study was to assess the level of awareness regarding folic acid and its effect in the prevention of NTD among Arab Israeli women of childbearing age. We conducted a cross-sectional study. Of the 653 women (18-45 years) who were randomly selected for interview while visiting their family physician or well-baby clinic, 624 women completed the questionnaire. Fifty-three percent (n = 333) of the respondents had heard of folic acid; 14% (n = 89) were familiar with the protective effect of NTD and 3% (n = 18) had taken folic acid in the first months of pregnancy whereas none of them had used it in the preconception period. Highly educated women, women with one or two children, paramedics, and women of high socioeconomic status were more knowledgeable about the protective effects of folic acid (P < 0.001). Age and religion had no significant effect. An urgent need exists to improve the awareness of this population to the protective effect of folic acid. Daily supplementation and fertification of food with folic acid should be considered as the best way to improve the balance of folic acid in women of childbearing age of this special population (high prevalence of consanguinity). PMID:15050876

  5. Creating a Family-Like Atmosphere in Child Care Settings: All the More Difficult in Large Child Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Linda C.; Ginsberg, Stacey I.

    1999-01-01

    Presents suggestions for creating family-like programs in large child-care centers in three areas: (1) physical environment, incorporating cozy spaces, beauty, and space for family interaction; (2) caregiving climate, such as sharing home photographs, and serving meals family style; and (3) family involvement, including regular conversations with…

  6. Consanguinity and endogamy in the Netherlands: demographic and medical genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Ten Kate, Leo P; Teeuw, Marieke E; Henneman, Lidewij; Cornel, Martina C

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews what is currently known about the presence of consanguinity and endogamy in the Netherlands, in the past and today, and concludes with a discussion of medical genetic aspects. First geographic characteristics, the demographic history, the genetic make-up of the native population, legal aspects and the public opinion are reviewed. Then data on the prevalence of consanguinity in the native population are presented for marriages since 1840, followed by data on consanguineous marriages among immigrants from countries with a tradition of close-kin marriages. It is estimated that approximately 1% of at-risk consanguineous couples are referred to clinical genetic centres for prospective genetic counselling in the Netherlands. This picture will change dramatically if and when next-generation sequencing is introduced to identify couples at ≥ 25% risk prospectively. PMID:25060279

  7. Classic Kaposi sarcoma in 3 unrelated Turkish children born to consanguineous kindreds.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Grses; Palanduz, Ayse; Aydogan, Gonul; Cassar, Olivier; Ertem, A Ulya; Telhan, Leyla; Canpolat, Nur; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Picard, Capucine; Gessain, Antoine; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Plancoulaine, Sabine

    2010-03-01

    Infection by human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) in childhood is common in the Mediterranean basin; however, classic Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is exceedingly rare in children not infected with HIV and not receiving immunosuppression, with only 30 cases having been reported since 1960. We recently reported 2 children with autosomal and X-linked recessive primary immunodeficiencies underlying KS in a context of multiple clinical manifestations. These reports suggested that classic KS in otherwise healthy children might also result from inborn errors of immunity more specific to HHV-8. In this article, we describe 3 unrelated Turkish children with classic KS born to first-cousin parents. The first patient, a girl, developed KS at 2 years of age with disseminated cutaneous and mucosal lesions. The clinical course progressed rapidly, and the patient died within 3 months despite treatment with vincristine. The other 2 children developed a milder form of KS at the age of 9 years, with multiple cutaneous lesions. A boy treated with interferon alpha therapy for 12 months is now in full remission at the age of 14, 2 years after treatment. The second girl is currently stabilized with etoposide, which was begun 4 months ago. None of the 3 children had any relevant familial history or other clinical features. The occurrence of classic KS in 3 unrelated Turkish children, each born to consanguineous parents, strongly suggests that autosomal recessive predisposition may drive the rare occurrence of HHV-8-associated classic KS in children. PMID:20156905

  8. Large-scale mitochondrial DNA deletion underlying familial multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar subtype.

    PubMed

    Alsemari, Abdulaziz; Al-Hindi, Hindi Nasser

    2016-02-01

    A family with mitochondrial inheritance of multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar subtype. MRI brain shows significant cerebellar atrophy with mild pontine atrophy and the classical hot cross bun sign in Pons. The muscle biopsy was indicative of mitochondrial myopathy. Mitochondrial DNA analysis revealed a low-level large mtDNA deletion, m.3264_1607del12806bp. PMID:26862402

  9. Consanguineous marriage in PR China: a study in rural Man (Manchu) communities.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Qian, Cong; Bittles, A H

    2002-01-01

    Although there is a long history of consanguineous marriage in China, information on its prevalence is very limited. The Man (Qing) dynasty ruled China for over 250 years, but no consanguinity studies have been reported on this important population. The objective of the present investigation was to determine the present-day level of consanguineous marriage in the Man community, and to compare the data with existing consanguinity information on other Chinese populations. The study was conducted in a group of 11 rural Man communities in the north-eastern Chinese province of Liaoning. Household-based interviews were conducted by local staff on 513 couples, 418 of whom were Man with another 95 Man-Han inter-ethnic marriages. Basic pedigrees were constructed to determine the biological relationship between each set of spouses. Thirty of the 418 couples were in a consanguineous union, with a mean coefficient of inbreeding alpha = 0.0012. The small population sizes of the study may have contributed to the spatial variation in the patterns of inbreeding. Across generations there was a reduction in consanguineous marriages and an increase in inter-ethnic unions, which paralleled changes in civil marriage regulations. PMID:12573085

  10. Combined genetic and imaging diagnosis for two large Chinese families affected with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease.

    PubMed

    Lv, Y; Cao, L H; Pang, H; Lu, L N; Li, J L; Fu, Y; Qi, S L; Luo, Y; Li-Ling, J

    2012-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is a rare X-linked recessive disorder characterized by nystagmus, impaired motor development, ataxia, and progressive spasticity. Genetically defective or altered levels of proteolipid protein (PLP1) or gap-junction alpha protein 12 gene have been found to be a common cause. Here we report on two large Han Chinese families affected with this disease. The probands of both families had produced sons featuring cerebral palsy that had never been correctly diagnosed. PMD was suspected after careful analysis of family history and clinical features. Three rounds of molecular testing, including RT-PCR, genetics linkage and SRY sequence analyses, in combination with fetal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, confirmed the diagnosis. In Family 1, in addition to two patients, three carriers were identified, including one who was not yet married. Genetic testing indicated that a fetus did not have the disease. A healthy girl was born later. In Family 2, two patients and two carriers were identified, while a fetus was genetically normal. A healthy girl was born later. We concluded that by combining genetic testing and imaging, awareness of the symptoms of PMD and understanding of its molecular biology, there is great benefit for families that are at risk for producing offspring affected with this severe disease. PMID:22911587

  11. Identification of a novel FBN1 gene mutation in a large Pakistani family with Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Micheal, Shazia; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Akhtar, Farah; Weiss, Marjan M.; Islam, Farah; Ali, Mehmood; Qamar, Raheel; Maugeri, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To describe a novel mutation in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene in a large Pakistani family with autosomal dominant Marfan syndrome (MFS). Methods Blood samples were collected of 11 family members affected with Marfan syndrome, and DNA was isolated by phenol-extraction. The coding exons of FBN1 were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing. One hundred-thirty controls were screened for a mutation in the FBN1 gene that was identified in this family by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results A novel heterozygous missense mutation c.2368T>A; p.Cys790Ser was observed in exon 19. This mutation substitutes a highly conserved cysteine residue by serine in a calcium binding epidermal growth factor-like domain (cbEGF) of FBN1. This mutation was present in all affected members and absent from unaffected individuals of the family in addition to 130 healthy Pakistani controls. Interestingly all affected family members presented with ectopia lentis, myopia and glaucoma, but lacked the cardinal cardiovascular features of MFS. Conclusions This is a first report of a mutation in FBN1 in MFS patients of Pakistani origin. The identification of a FBN1 mutation in this family confirms the diagnosis of MFS patients and expands the worldwide spectrum of FBN1 mutations. PMID:22876116

  12. Genetic heterogeneity in psoriasis vulgaris based on linkage analyses of a large family material

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlstroem, J.; Swanbeck, G.; Inerot, A.

    1994-09-01

    Information on psoriasis among parents and siblings in 14,008 families has been collected. On the basis of this material, evidence for monogenetic autosomal recessive inheritance of psoriasis has recently been presented. Indications from more than one type of non-pustular psoriasis has been obtained from the population genetic data. Molecular genetic linkage analysis of psoriasis to a number of polymorphic genetic markers for a large number of families has been made. It is apparent that there is genetic heterogeneity in a psoriasis population with regard to psoriasis genes. Using the computer program Linkage 5.0 and a formula for heterogeneity, a lodscore over 3.0 for one locus has been obtained. This locus has further been confirmed by several other markers in the vicinity. The locus found is linked to slightly over half of the families, indicating that there are more genetically independent types of psoriasis. The age at onset of those families that are apparently linked to this locus have a slightly higher age at onset than those not linked to that locus but with a considerable overlap. In spite of close coverage of the whole chromosomes number 6 and 17, no linkage has been found in this regions. This indicates that neither the HLA region nor the region earlier found to be involved in one family with psoriasis are primarily involved in our families.

  13. Large, rapidly evolving gene families are at the forefront of host-parasite interactions in Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Reid, Adam J

    2015-02-01

    The Apicomplexa is a phylum of parasitic protozoa, which includes the malaria parasite Plasmodium, amongst other species that can devastate human and animal health. The past decade has seen the release of genome sequences for many of the most important apicomplexan species, providing an excellent basis for improving our understanding of their biology. One of the key features of each genome is a unique set of large, variant gene families. Although closely related species share the same families, even different types of malaria parasite have distinct families. In some species they tend to be found at the ends of chromosomes, which may facilitate aspects of gene expression regulation and generation of sequence diversity. In others they are scattered apparently randomly across chromosomes. For some families there is evidence they are involved in antigenic variation, immune regulation and immune evasion. For others there are no known functions. Even where function is unknown these families are most often predicted to be exposed to the host, contain much sequence diversity and evolve rapidly. Based on these properties it is clear that they are at the forefront of host-parasite interactions. In this review I compare and contrast the genomic context, gene structure, gene expression, protein localization and function of these families across different species. PMID:25257746

  14. Evaluating the feasibility of using candidate DNA barcodes in discriminating species of the large Asteraceae family

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Five DNA regions, namely, rbcL, matK, ITS, ITS2, and psbA-trnH, have been recommended as primary DNA barcodes for plants. Studies evaluating these regions for species identification in the large plant taxon, which includes a large number of closely related species, have rarely been reported. Results The feasibility of using the five proposed DNA regions was tested for discriminating plant species within Asteraceae, the largest family of flowering plants. Among these markers, ITS2 was the most useful in terms of universality, sequence variation, and identification capability in the Asteraceae family. The species discriminating power of ITS2 was also explored in a large pool of 3,490 Asteraceae sequences that represent 2,315 species belonging to 494 different genera. The result shows that ITS2 correctly identified 76.4% and 97.4% of plant samples at the species and genus levels, respectively. In addition, ITS2 displayed a variable ability to discriminate related species within different genera. Conclusions ITS2 is the best DNA barcode for the Asteraceae family. This approach significantly broadens the application of DNA barcoding to resolve classification problems in the family Asteraceae at the genera and species levels. PMID:20977734

  15. [Family investigation and clinical genetic analysis of a large pedigree with congenital stationary night blindness].

    PubMed

    Fei, Y J

    1992-05-01

    A large pedigree of congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) was investigated by both the family method and the family history method, and the diagnosis was confirmed by dark adaptation and full-field electroretinogram tests. There were 57 affected members of 7 successive generations in the pedigree which showed typical autosomal dominant inheritance with a complete gene penetrance. Based on this study and other sources, the genetic aspect and the clinical manifestations of CSNB, especially the characteristics of dark adaptation and electroretinogram, were discussed. PMID:1286605

  16. Consanguinity in Qatar: knowledge, attitude and practice in a population born between 1946 and 1991.

    PubMed

    Sandridge, A L; Takeddin, J; Al-Kaabi, E; Frances, Y

    2010-01-01

    From March 2007 to March 2008 a cross-sectional study was conducted in Qatar to estimate the prevalence of consanguinity among Qataris and to assess their knowledge of the risks and their attitudes towards the practice. A secondary objective was to test the acceptability of sixteen Likert-style questions within the Qatari population. Face-to-face interviews using a 70-item structured questionnaire were conducted by three native Arabic-speaking medical students with 362 Qatari employees. Where consanguinity existed between the employee's parents, a diagram of the consanguinal relationship (phylogram) was completed. The response rate was 93%. By phylogram, 22% of participants reported a cousin relationship between their parents (consanguinal relationship) and another 15% reported that their parents were from the same tribe (affinal relationship). With respect to their own marital decision, 68% of the respondents had been married at least once. By phylogram, 35% of these reported a consanguineous relationship (first marriage), 9% reported only an affinal relationship and 56% reported that they were not married to a blood relative. Results on the sixteen Likert-style attitude questions were stratified by consanguinity status of parents and of self. In the stratification by consanguinity status of parents the top five attitudes differed by group but there appeared to be more similarity between the consanguinal and only tribal groups. Attitudinal results were stratified by sex. Results showed that the males had a stronger belief in several of the attitudes than females with the exception of causation of genetic abnormalities and health problems. The phylogram was shown to collect more detailed and explicit data than hard-coding. With respect to knowledge, the results showed that knowledge was imperfect with high proportions of participants not knowing that consanguinity has been implicated in autosomal recessive diseases such as thalassaemia, inborn errors of metabolism, deafness, anomalies of the extremities and specific congenital heart defects. Additionally, a sizeable proportion of the participants did not know that a more distant cousin marriage (e.g. third cousin) theoretically could be a less genetically risky choice to potential offspring than a closer cousin marriage (half-first cousin). These results indicate that more effort needs to be made in developing public health strategies to improve the population's understanding of the cost-benefit analysis involved in contracting consanguineous marriages given the goal of healthy offspring. PMID:19895726

  17. Bombay blood group: Is prevalence decreasing with urbanization and the decreasing rate of consanguineous marriage

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Sujata; Kotasthane, Dhananjay S.; Chowdhury, Puskar S.; Sarkar, Sonali

    2015-01-01

    Context: Bombay blood group although rare is found to be more prevalent in the Western and Southern states of India, believed to be associated with consanguineous marriage. Aims: To estimate the prevalence of the Bombay blood group (Oh) in the urban population of Puducherry. To find the effect of urbanization on consanguineous marriage and to establish whether consanguinity plays a part in the prevalence of Oh group. To compare Oh group prevalence with that of other neighboring states, where population is not predominantly urban. Settings and Design: This is a descriptive study in a tertiary care hospital in Puducherry, over a period of 6 years. Materials and Methods: All blood samples showing O group were tested with anti-H lectin. Specialized tests like Adsorption Elution Technique, inhibition assay for determination of secretor status were performed on Oh positive cases. Any history of consanguineous marriage was recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: All variables were categorical variable and percentage and proportions were calculated manually. Results: Analysis of the results of 35,497 study subjects showed that the most common group was O group constituting 14,164 (39.90%) of subjects. Only three Oh that is, Bombay phenotype (0.008%) were detected. Consanguinity was observed in two cases (66.66%). Conclusions: This study shows the prevalence of Bombay blood group representing the urban population of Puducherry, to be high (0.008%) and associated with consanguineous marriage (66.66%). Thus, consanguinity is still an important risk factor present, even in an urban population in Southern India. PMID:26420929

  18. Risk Selection into Consumer-Directed Health Plans: An Analysis of Family Choices within Large Employers

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, Roland D; Haviland, Amelia M; Lore, Ryan; Laudenberger, Laura; Eisenberg, Matthew; Sood, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the degree of selection into consumer-directed health plans (CDHPs) versus traditional plans over time, and factors that influence choice and temper risk selection. Data Sources/Study Setting Sixteen large employers offering both CDHP and traditional plans during the 2004–2007 period, more than 200,000 families. Study Design We model CDHP choice with logistic regression; predictors include risk scores, in addition to family, choice setting, and plan characteristics. Additional models stratify by account type or single enrollee versus family. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Risk scores, family characteristics, and enrollment decisions are derived from medical claims and enrollment files. Interviews with human resources executives provide additional data. Principal Findings CDHP risk scores were 74 percent of traditional plan scores in the first year, and this difference declined over time. Employer contributions to accounts and employee premium savings fostered CDHP enrollment and reduced risk selection. Having to make an active choice of plan increased CDHP enrollment but also increased risk selection. Risk selection was greater for singles than families and did not differ between HRA and HSA-based CDHPs. Conclusions Risk selection was not severe and it was well managed. Employers have effective methods to encourage CDHP enrollment and temper selection against traditional plans. PMID:24800305

  19. Clinical and linkage study of a large family with simple ectopia lentis linked to FBN1

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M.J.; Roberts, J.; Partington, M.W.; Colley, P.W.; Hollway, G.E.; Kozman, H.M.; Mulley, J.C.

    1994-10-15

    Simple ectopia lentis (EL) was studied in a large family, by clinical examination and analysis of linkage to markers in the region of FBN1, the gene for fibrillin which causes Marfan syndrome on chromosome 15. No patient had clinical or echocardiographic evidence of Marfan syndrome, although there was a trend towards relatively longer measurements of height; lower segment; arm span; middle finger, hand, and foot length in the affected members of the family, compared with unaffected sibs of the same sex. Analysis of linkage to intragenic FBN1 markers was inconclusive because they were relatively uninformative. Construction of a multipoint background map from the CEPH reference families identified microsatellite markers linked closely to FBN1 which could demonstrate linkage of EL in this family to the FBN1 region. LINKMAP analysis detected a multipoint lod score of 5.68 at D15S119, a marker approximately 6 cM distal to FBN1, and a multipoint lod score of 5.04 at FBN1. The EL gene in this family is likely to be allelic to Marfan syndrome, and molecular characterization of the FBN1 mutation should now be possible. 25 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Identification of a rhodopsin gene mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinping; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Chen, Ding; Hu, Xuting; Xu, Jinling; Xu, Limin; Wu, Yaming; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically highly heterogeneous retinal disease and one of the leading causes of blindness in the world. Next-generation sequencing technology has enormous potential for determining the genetic etiology of RP. We sought to identify the underlying genetic defect in a 35-year-old male from an autosomal-dominant RP family with 14 affected individuals. By capturing next-generation sequencing (CNGS) of 144 genes associated with retinal diseases, we identified eight novel DNA variants; however, none of them cosegregated for all the members of the family. Further analysis of the CNGS data led to identification of a recurrent missense mutation (c.403C?>?T, p.R135W) in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, which cosegregated with all affected individuals in the family and was not observed in any of the unaffected family members. The p.R135W mutation has a reference single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ID (rs104893775), and it appears to be responsible for the disease in this large family. This study highlights the importance of examining NGS data with reference SNP IDs. Thus, our study is important for data analysis of NGS-based clinical genetic diagnoses. PMID:26794436

  1. A large multigene family codes for the polypeptides of the crystalline trichocyst matrix in Paramecium.

    PubMed Central

    Madeddu, L; Gautier, M C; Vayssié, L; Houari, A; Sperling, L

    1995-01-01

    The secretory granules (trichocysts) of Paramecium are characterized by a highly constrained shape that reflects the crystalline organization of their protein contents. Yet the crystalline trichocyst content is composed not of a single protein but of a family of related polypeptides that derive from a family of precursors by protein processing. In this paper we show that a multigene family, of unusually large size for a unicellular organism, codes for these proteins. The family is organized in subfamilies; each subfamily codes for proteins with different primary structures, but within the subfamilies several genes code for nearly identical proteins. For one subfamily, we have obtained direct evidence that the different members are coexpressed. The three subfamilies we have characterized are located on different macronuclear chromosomes. Typical 23-29 nucleotide Paramecium introns are found in one of the regions studied and the intron sequences are more variable than the surrounding coding sequences, providing gene-specific markers. We suggest that this multigene family may have evolved to assure a microheterogeneity of structural proteins necessary for morphogenesis of a complex secretory granule core with a constrained shape and dynamic properties: genetic analysis has shown that correct assembly of the crystalline core is necessary for trichocyst function. Images PMID:7579685

  2. Identification of a rhodopsin gene mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinping; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Chen, Ding; Hu, Xuting; Xu, Jinling; Xu, Limin; Wu, Yaming; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically highly heterogeneous retinal disease and one of the leading causes of blindness in the world. Next-generation sequencing technology has enormous potential for determining the genetic etiology of RP. We sought to identify the underlying genetic defect in a 35-year-old male from an autosomal-dominant RP family with 14 affected individuals. By capturing next-generation sequencing (CNGS) of 144 genes associated with retinal diseases, we identified eight novel DNA variants; however, none of them cosegregated for all the members of the family. Further analysis of the CNGS data led to identification of a recurrent missense mutation (c.403C > T, p.R135W) in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, which cosegregated with all affected individuals in the family and was not observed in any of the unaffected family members. The p.R135W mutation has a reference single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ID (rs104893775), and it appears to be responsible for the disease in this large family. This study highlights the importance of examining NGS data with reference SNP IDs. Thus, our study is important for data analysis of NGS-based clinical genetic diagnoses. PMID:26794436

  3. Challenges in the care for consanguineous couples: an exploratory interview study among general practitioners and midwives

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is often suggested that an effort must be made to increase awareness among consanguineous couples of their reproductive risk, and to refer them for genetic counseling if needed. Primary care professionals are considered most appropriate for addressing the subject and identifying couples at risk during consultations in their practice. This Dutch study aims to explore the experiences, attitudes and beliefs of such professionals regarding their care for consanguineous couples. Methods Sixteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with midwives and general practitioners. Results Although most primary care professionals considered it their task to inform couples about the risks of consanguinity, during consultations the topic was generally only briefly touched upon and quickly abandoned. Important reasons for this were professionals’ beliefs about religious and social values of couples, their low perception of the couples’ reproductive risk and expected limited feasibility of referral. Feelings of embarrassment regarding addressing consanguinity did not seem to play a significant role. Conclusions Primary care professional beliefs about their clients’ religious and social values, their attitudes toward the risk, and perceived limited options for referral seem to conflict with the professional norm to address the topic of consanguinity. PMID:23102514

  4. Genome-scale phylogenetic function annotation of large and diverse protein families.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Barbara E; Jordan, Michael I; Srouji, John R; Brenner, Steven E

    2011-11-01

    The Statistical Inference of Function Through Evolutionary Relationships (SIFTER) framework uses a statistical graphical model that applies phylogenetic principles to automate precise protein function prediction. Here we present a revised approach (SIFTER version 2.0) that enables annotations on a genomic scale. SIFTER 2.0 produces equivalently precise predictions compared to the earlier version on a carefully studied family and on a collection of 100 protein families. We have added an approximation method to SIFTER 2.0 and show a 500-fold improvement in speed with minimal impact on prediction results in the functionally diverse sulfotransferase protein family. On the Nudix protein family, previously inaccessible to the SIFTER framework because of the 66 possible molecular functions, SIFTER achieved 47.4% accuracy on experimental data (where BLAST achieved 34.0%). Finally, we used SIFTER to annotate all of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe proteins with experimental functional characterizations, based on annotations from proteins in 46 fungal genomes. SIFTER precisely predicted molecular function for 45.5% of the characterized proteins in this genome, as compared with four current function prediction methods that precisely predicted function for 62.6%, 30.6%, 6.0%, and 5.7% of these proteins. We use both precision-recall curves and ROC analyses to compare these genome-scale predictions across the different methods and to assess performance on different types of applications. SIFTER 2.0 is capable of predicting protein molecular function for large and functionally diverse protein families using an approximate statistical model, enabling phylogenetics-based protein function prediction for genome-wide analyses. The code for SIFTER and protein family data are available at http://sifter.berkeley.edu. PMID:21784873

  5. Hereditary coproporphyria: comparison of molecular and biochemical investigations in a large family.

    PubMed

    Allen, K R; Whatley, S D; Degg, T J; Barth, J H

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) is the least common of the three autosomal dominant acute porphyrias. To compare the sensitivity of metabolite measurements for the identification of asymptomatic HCP, we carried out a molecular and biochemical investigation of a large family in which HCP is caused by a previously unreported frameshift mutation (c.119delA). Thirteen of 19 asymptomatic family members, aged 10-72 years, were shown by mutational analysis to have HCP. The faecal coproporphyrin isomer III:I ratio was increased in all of these 13 family members; faecal total porphyrin concentration and urinary porphyrin excretion were increased in 11 and 8 of them, respectively. Plasma porphyrin concentrations were marginally increased in three individuals and plasma fluorescence emission scanning showed a porphyrin peak at 618 nm in two of these. Our results add to the evidence that an increased faecal porphyrin coproporphyrin III:I ratio is a highly sensitive test for the detection of clinically latent HCP in individuals over the age of 10 years; its sensitivity below this age remains uncertain. They also show that plasma fluorescence emission scanning is not useful for the investigation of families with HCP. PMID:16151909

  6. Higher than expected frequencies of non-ovarian cancers within a large familial ovarian cancer registry

    PubMed Central

    Brightwell, Rachel M; Grzankowski, Kassondra S; Kaur, Jasmine; Poblete, Samantha; Miller, Austin; Lele, Shashikant B; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Moysich, Kirsten; Odunsi, Kunle O

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether the frequencies of non-ovarian cancers (NOC) within families in a large Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry (FOCR) are significantly different from the frequencies listed in the SEER database. The FOCR was established in 1981. Registry members are families with two or more first degree relatives who have a diagnosis of ovarian cancer, three or more cases of cancer on one side of the family with at least one being ovarian, at least one female with two or more primary cancers in which one is ovary, or a history of two or more cancers in the family with at least one being ovarian cancer diagnosed before the age of 45. The data was analyzed to find relative rates of 10 of the most common cancers found within the database, with the exception of ovarian and breast. These include bladder, CNS, cervical, colorectal, liver, lung, pancreas, prostate, stomach, and uterine. Cancers were further stratified by age at diagnosis, and compared to information in the SEER database. There are 2,671 pedigrees and a total of 50,454 individuals within the FOCR. There are 1,938 families with two or more relatives with ovarian cancer, accounting for 4,816 individuals with ovarian cancer. The total number of individuals with ovarian cancer is 5,421. Of these individuals with ovarian cancer, 2,249 have been verified with testing or physician correspondence. The frequencies of the NOCs within the registry were higher than that of the general population as described in the SEER database. In particular, the overall frequencies of cancers of the bladder, cervix, prostate, and uterus were higher within the FOCR at 2.3, 7.4, 25.2, and 11.9 per 1,000 respectively. Furthermore, diagnoses of both cervical and uterine cancers tended to occur at an earlier age within the FOCR. The overall frequencies of cancers of the bladder, cervix, prostate, and uterus are higher in the FOCR compared with a general population database. Future studies on segregation analysis and genome-wide linkage studies are warranted on families with NOC within the Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry. PMID:26605374

  7. Towards identification of an epilepsy gene in a large family with idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Roussear, M.; Lopes-Cendes, I.; Berkovic, S.F.

    1994-09-01

    To identify the disease gene in a large, multiplex family segregating an autosomal dominant form of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). The IGEs have been recognized for several decades as being genetically determined. However, large pedigrees with a clear Mendelian inheritance are not commonly available. This, and the presence of locus heterogeneity have been obstacles to the identification of linkage in several IGE syndromes. We have identified a large IGE kindred with fifty-eight living individuals, including 26 affecteds, showing a clear autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Forty-fur informative individuals, including 23 affecteds, were selected for the linkage studies. We have chosen 200 polymorphic microsatellite markers, about 20 cM apart, throughout the human autosomes as a genome-search linkage strategy. To date, 47 markers, representing 30% of the human genome, have been excluded for linkage in the Australian kindred. As our study progresses, we will report up-to-date results.

  8. The changing pattern of consanguinity in a selected region of the Israeli Arab community.

    PubMed

    Sharkia, Rajach; Zaid, Muhamad; Athamna, Abed; Cohen, Dani; Azem, Abdussalam; Zalan, Abdelnaser

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of consanguinity within the Israeli Arab community is relatively high, and is associated with high rates of inherited disorders that lead to a high frequency of morbidity and mortality. Data on consanguinity between couples were recorded during two periods (1980-1985 and 2000-2004) in relation to socioeconomic status of 4 selected villages. Two of the villages (A and B) are known to have high socioeconomic status, and the other two (C and D) are known to have low socioeconomic status. The average incidence of consanguineous marriages has slightly decreased from 33.1% in the first period to 25.9% in the second period (P = 0.0218) in all of the 4 villages. Marriages between first cousins showed a more significant decrease, from 23.9% in the first period to 13.6% in the second period (P < 0.0001). The average consanguinity rates of villages A and B were found to decrease from 22.3 to 16.2% respectively (P < 0.001) between the two observation periods, whereas those of villages C and D were found to decrease from 42.3 to 37.2%, (P < 0.001) during the same two periods. Thus, there has been a change in the pattern of consanguinity within the selected Israeli Arab villages, between the two study periods. This change seems to correlate with the sociodemographic status of the villages. Therefore, improving the socioeconomic status of the villages, as well as implementation of proper health education programs, is expected to have a positive effect in reducing consanguinity. PMID:17941037

  9. UGT2B17 copy number gain in a large ankylosing spondylitis multiplex family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this study is to identify novel copy number variations (CNVs) associated with familial ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A customized genome-wide microarray was designed to detect CNVs and applied to a multiplex AS family with six (6) affected family members. CNVs were detected using the built-in DNA analytics aberration detection method-2 (ADM-2) algorithm. Gene enrichment analysis was performed to observe the segregation. Subsequent validation was performed using real time quantitative fluorescence polymerase reaction (QF-PCR). The frequency of copy number variation for the UGT2B17 gene was then performed on two well-defined AS cohorts. Fisher exact test was performed to quantify the association. Results Our family-based analysis revealed ten gene-enriched CNVs that segregate with all six family members affected with AS. Based on the proposed function and the polymorphic nature of the UGT2B17 gene, the UGT2B17 gene CNV was selected for validation using real time QF-PCR with full concordance. The frequency of two copies of the UGT2B17 gene CNV was 0.41 in the Newfoundland AS cases and 0.35 in the Newfoundland controls (OR = 1.26(0.99-1.59); p < 0.05)), whereas the frequency of two (2) copies of the UGT2B17 gene CNV was 0.40 in the Alberta AS cases and 0.39 in the Alberta controls (OR = 1.05(95% CI: 0.83-1.33); p < 0.71)). Conclusions A genome-wide microarray interrogation of a large multiplex AS family revealed segregation of the UGT2B17 gene CNV among all affected family members. The association of the UGT2B17 CNV with AS is particularly interesting given the recent association of this CNV with osteoporosis and the proposed function as it encodes a key enzyme that inhibits androgens. However, two copies of the UGT2B17 gene CNV were only marginally significant in a uniplex AS cohort from Newfoundland but not in a uniplex AS cohort from Alberta. PMID:23927372

  10. Consanguineous marriage in Turkey and its impact on fertility and mortality.

    PubMed

    Tunçbílek, E; Koc, I

    1994-10-01

    Turkey has a high rate of consanguineous marriage (21.1%), indicating strong preference for this traditional form of marital union. Social and cultural factors are especially important in marriages between first and second cousins. Fertility is high, the closed birth interval is long, and the sterility rate is low among these couples. Post-neonatal, infant and under-5 mortalities are high in first cousin unions by comparison with non-consanguineous marriages. According to the results of the study, first cousin marriage is a significant determinant underlying the high total fertility and infant mortality rates in Turkey. PMID:7864588

  11. Penetrance and clinical consequences of a gross SDHB deletion in a large family.

    PubMed

    Solis, D C; Burnichon, N; Timmers, H J L M; Raygada, M J; Kozupa, A; Merino, M J; Makey, D; Adams, K T; Venisse, A; Gimenez-Roqueplo, A-P; Pacak, K

    2009-04-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding subunit B of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB) are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and are associated with hereditary paraganglioma (PGL) and pheochromocytoma. The phenotype of patients with SDHB point mutations has been previously described. However, the phenotype and penetrance of gross SDHB deletions have not been well characterized as they are rarely described. The objective was to describe the phenotype and estimate the penetrance of an exon 1 large SDHB deletion in one kindred. A retrospective and prospective study of 41 relatives across five generations was carried out. The main outcome measures were genetic testing, clinical presentations, plasma catecholamines and their O-methylated metabolites. Of the 41 mutation carriers identified, 11 were diagnosed with PGL, 12 were found to be healthy carriers after evaluation, and 18 were reportedly healthy based on family history accounts. The penetrance of PGL related to the exon 1 large SDHB deletion in this family was estimated to be 35% by age 40. Variable expressivity of the phenotype associated with a large exon 1 SDHB deletion was observed, including low penetrance, diverse primary PGL tumor locations, and malignant potential. PMID:19389109

  12. Penetrance and clinical consequences of a gross SDHB deletion in a large family

    PubMed Central

    Solis, DC; Burnichon, N; Timmers, HJLM; Raygada, MJ; Kozupa, A; Merino, MJ; Makey, D; Adams, KT; Venisse, A; Gimenez-Roqueplo, A-P; Pacak, K

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding subunit B of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB) are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and are associated with hereditary paraganglioma (PGL) and pheochromocytoma. The phenotype of patients with SDHB point mutations has been previously described. However, the phenotype and penetrance of gross SDHB deletions have not been well characterized as they are rarely described. The objective was to describe the phenotype and estimate the penetrance of an exon 1 large SDHB deletion in one kindred. A retrospective and prospective study of 41 relatives across five generations was carried out. The main outcome measures were genetic testing, clinical presentations, plasma catecholamines and their O-methylated metabolites. Of the 41 mutation carriers identified, 11 were diagnosed with PGL, 12 were found to be healthy carriers after evaluation, and 18 were reportedly healthy based on family history accounts. The penetrance of PGL related to the exon 1 large SDHB deletion in this family was estimated to be 35% by age 40. Variable expressivity of the phenotype associated with a large exon 1 SDHB deletion was observed, including low penetrance, diverse primary PGL tumor locations, and malignant potential. PMID:19389109

  13. A Novel SIX3 Mutation Segregates With Holoprosencephaly in a Large Family

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Benjamin D.; Lacbawan, Felicitas; Jain, Mahim; Domené, Sabina; Roessler, Erich; Moore, Cynthia; Dobyns, William B.; Muenke, Maximilian

    2009-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly is the most common structural malformation of the forebrain in humans and has a complex etiology including chromosomal aberrations, single gene mutations and environmental components. Here we present the pertinent clinical findings among members of an unusually large kindred ascertained over 15 years ago following the evaluation and subsequent genetic work-up of a female infant with congenital anomalies. A genome-wide scan and linkage analysis showed only suggestive evidence of linkage to markers on chromosome 2 among the most likely of several pedigree interpretations. We now report that a novel missense mutation in the SIX3 holoprosencephaly gene is the likely cause in this family. Molecular genetic analysis and/or clinical characterization now show that at least 15 members of this family are presumed SIX3 mutation gene carriers, with clinical manifestations ranging from phenotypically normal adults (non-penetrance) to alobar holoprosencephaly incompatible with postnatal life. This particular family represents a seminal example of the variable manifestations of gene mutations in holoprosencephaly and difficulties encountered in their elucidation. PMID:19353631

  14. A novel SIX3 mutation segregates with holoprosencephaly in a large family.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Benjamin D; Lacbawan, Felicitas; Jain, Mahim; Domené, Sabina; Roessler, Erich; Moore, Cynthia; Dobyns, William B; Muenke, Maximilian

    2009-05-01

    Holoprosencephaly is the most common structural malformation of the forebrain in humans and has a complex etiology including chromosomal aberrations, single gene mutations and environmental components. Here we present the pertinent clinical findings among members of an unusually large kindred ascertained over 15 years ago following the evaluation and subsequent genetic work-up of a female infant with congenital anomalies. A genome-wide scan and linkage analysis showed only suggestive evidence of linkage to markers on chromosome 2 among the most likely of several pedigree interpretations. We now report that a novel missense mutation in the SIX3 holoprosencephaly gene is the likely cause in this family. Molecular genetic analysis and/or clinical characterization now show that at least 15 members of this family are presumed SIX3 mutation gene carriers, with clinical manifestations ranging from phenotypically normal adults (non-penetrance) to alobar holoprosencephaly incompatible with postnatal life. This particular family represents a seminal example of the variable manifestations of gene mutations in holoprosencephaly and difficulties encountered in their elucidation. PMID:19353631

  15. Identification of a GJA3 Mutation in a Large Family with Bilateral Congenital Cataract.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Liu, Yuying; Liu, Yaning; Guo, Hui; Hu, Zhengmao; Xia, Kun; Jin, Xuemin

    2016-03-01

    The congenital cataract has been a clinically important cause of impaired vision development, making up about 10% of the cases of childhood blindness. Mutations of more than 40 genes have been identified causing congenital cataract with Mendelian inheritance, which indicated that it has an extremely high genetic heterogeneity. In this study, we recruited a large congenital cataract family and identified a missense mutation (c.143A>G: p.E48G) within gap junction protein alpha-3 (GJA3) gene in the proband using whole exome sequencing. Subsequent Sanger sequencing of this mutation in all family members revealed that this mutation cosegregated with the phenotype in the family with full penetrance. Our study identified a mutation in GJA3 that correlated with congenital cataract phenotype, which was not reported previously, and would be of benefit to the diagnosis of this genetic disorder. This finding expands the mutation spectrum of GJA3 and provides useful information for further study of the molecular pathogenesis of congenital cataract. PMID:26683566

  16. Ocular and craniofacial phenotypes in a large Brazilian family with congenital aniridia.

    PubMed

    Fernandes-Lima, Z S; Paixão-Côrtes, V R; Andrade, A K M de; Fernandes, A S; Coronado, B N L; Monte Filho, H P; Santos, M J; Omena Filho, R L de; Biondi, F C; Ruiz-Linares, A; Ramallo, V; Hünemeier, T; Schuler-Faccini, L; Monlleó, I L

    2015-01-01

    Congenital aniridia is a rare genetic disorder characterized by varying degrees of iris hypoplasia that are associated with additional ocular abnormalities. More than 90% of the causal mutations identified are found in the PAX6 gene, a transcription factor of critical importance in the process of neurogenesis and ocular development. Here, we investigate clinical, molecular, and craniofacial features of a large Brazilian family with congenital aniridia. Among the 56 eyes evaluated, phenotype variation encompassed bilateral total aniridia to mild iris defects with extensive variation between eyes of the same individual. PAX6 molecular screening indicated a heterozygous splice mutation (c.141 + 1G>A). Thus, we hypothesize that this splicing event may cause variation in the expression of the wild-type transcript, which may lead to the observed variation in phenotype. Affected individuals were more brachycephalic, even though their face height and cephalic circumference were not significantly different when compared to those of non-affected relatives. From this, we infer that the head shape of affected subjects may also be a result of the PAX6 splice-site mutation. Our data summarize the clinical variability associated with the ocular phenotype in a large family with aniridia, and help shed light on the role of PAX6 in neurocranial development. PMID:24266705

  17. Consanguinity: A Risk Factor for Preterm Birth at Less Than 33 Weeks’ Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Ghina; Nassar, Anwar H.; Mahfoud, Ziyad; El-Khamra, Akaber; Al-Choueiri, Nathalie; Adra, Abdallah; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Zalloua, Pierre; Yunis, Khalid A.

    2010-01-01

    Consanguinity promotes homozygosity of recessive susceptibility gene variants and can be used to investigate a recessive component in diseases whose inheritance is uncertain. The objective of this study was to assess the association between consanguinity and preterm birth (PTB), stratified by gestational age and clinical presentation (spontaneous vs. medically indicated). Data were collected on 39,745 singleton livebirths without major birth defects, admitted to 19 hospitals in Lebanon, from September 2003 to December 2007. Deliveries before completed 33 weeks’ gestation and deliveries at 33–36 weeks’ gestation were compared, with respect to cousin marriage, with those after completed 36 weeks’ gestation by using multinomial multiple logistic regression. Overall, infants of consanguineous parents had a statistically significant 1.6-fold net increased risk of being born at less than 33 weeks’ gestation compared with infants of unrelated parents. This association was statistically significant only with spontaneous PTB. There was no increased risk of being born at 33–36 weeks’ gestation associated with consanguinity for both clinical presentations of PTB. Our findings support a genetic contribution to early onset PTB and suggest that early PTB should be targeted in future genetic studies rather than the classic lumping of all births less than 37 weeks’ gestation. PMID:20978088

  18. The DnaJ domain of polyomavirus large T antigen is required to regulate Rb family tumor suppressor function.

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Q; Denis, D; Ratnofsky, M; Roberts, T M; DeCaprio, J A; Schaffhausen, B

    1997-01-01

    Tumor suppressors of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene family regulate cell growth and differentiation. Polyomavirus large T antigens (large T) bind Rb family members and block their function. Mutations of large T sequences conserved with the DnaJ family affect large T binding to a cellular DnaK, heat shock protein 70. The same mutations abolish large T activation of E2F-containing promoters and Rb binding-dependent large T activation of cell cycle progression. Cotransfection of a cellular DnaJ domain blocks wild-type large T action, showing that the connection between the chaperone system and tumor suppressors is direct. Although they are inactive in assays dependent on Rb family binding, mutants in the J region retain the ability to associate with pRb, p107, and p130. This suggests that binding of Rb family members by large T is not sufficient for their inactivation and that a functional J domain is required as well. This work connects the DnaJ and DnaK molecular chaperones to regulation of tumor suppressors by polyomavirus large T. PMID:9371601

  19. A large and functionally diverse family of Fad2 genes in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The application and nutritional value of vegetable oil is highly dependent on its fatty acid composition, especially the relative proportion of its two major fatty acids, i.e oleic acid and linoleic acid. Microsomal oleoyl phosphatidylcholine desaturase encoded by FAD2 gene is known to introduce a double bond at the ?12 position of an oleic acid on phosphatidylcholine and convert it to linoleic acid. The known plant FAD2 enzymes are encoded by small gene families consisting of 1-4 members. In addition to the classic oleate ?12-desaturation activity, functional variants of FAD2 that are capable of undertaking additional or alternative acyl modifications have also been reported in a limited number of plant species. In this study, our objective was to identify FAD2 genes from safflower and analyse their differential expression profile and potentially diversified functionality. Results We report here the characterization and functional expression of an exceptionally large FAD2 gene family from safflower, and the temporal and spatial expression profiles of these genes as revealed through Real-Time quantitative PCR. The diversified functionalities of some of the safflower FAD2 gene family members were demonstrated by ectopic expression in yeast and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. CtFAD2-1 and CtFAD2-10 were demonstrated to be oleate desaturases specifically expressed in developing seeds and flower head, respectively, while CtFAD2-2 appears to have relatively low oleate desaturation activity throughout the plant. CtFAD2-5 and CtFAD2-8 are specifically expressed in root tissues, while CtFAD2-3, 4, 6, 7 are mostly expressed in the cotyledons and hypocotyls in young safflower seedlings. CtFAD2-9 was found to encode a novel desaturase operating on C16:1 substrate. CtFAD2-11 is a tri-functional enzyme able to introduce a carbon double bond in either cis or trans configuration, or a carbon triple (acetylenic) bond at the ?12 position. Conclusions In this study, we isolated an unusually large FAD2 gene family with 11 members from safflower. The seed expressed FAD2 oleate ?12 desaturase genes identified in this study will provide candidate targets to manipulate the oleic acid level in safflower seed oil. Further, the divergent FAD2 enzymes with novel functionality could be used to produce rare fatty acids, such as crepenynic acid, in genetically engineered crop plants that are precursors for economically important phytoalexins and oleochemical products. PMID:23289946

  20. Transcriptome Sequencing of a Large Human Family Identifies the Impact of Rare Noncoding Variants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Battle, Alexis; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Zappala, Zach; Knowles, David A.; Smith, Kevin S.; Kukurba, Kim R.; Wu, Eric; Simon, Noah; Montgomery, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Recent and rapid human population growth has led to an excess of rare genetic variants that are expected to contribute to an individual’s genetic burden of disease risk. To date, much of the focus has been on rare protein-coding variants, for which potential impact can be estimated from the genetic code, but determining the impact of rare noncoding variants has been more challenging. To improve our understanding of such variants, we combined high-quality genome sequencing and RNA sequencing data from a 17-individual, three-generation family to contrast expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) and splicing quantitative trait loci (sQTLs) within this family to eQTLs and sQTLs within a population sample. Using this design, we found that eQTLs and sQTLs with large effects in the family were enriched with rare regulatory and splicing variants (minor allele frequency < 0.01). They were also more likely to influence essential genes and genes involved in complex disease. In addition, we tested the capacity of diverse noncoding annotation to predict the impact of rare noncoding variants. We found that distance to the transcription start site, evolutionary constraint, and epigenetic annotation were considerably more informative for predicting the impact of rare variants than for predicting the impact of common variants. These results highlight that rare noncoding variants are important contributors to individual gene-expression profiles and further demonstrate a significant capability for genomic annotation to predict the impact of rare noncoding variants. PMID:25192044

  1. Serrated polyposis: Colonic phenotype, extra-colonic features and familial risk in a large cohort

    PubMed Central

    Jasperson, Kory W.; Kanth, Priyanka; Kirchhoff, Anne C.; Huismann, Darcy; Gammon, Amanda; Kohlmann, Wendy; Burt, Randall W.; Samadder, N. Jewel

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Serrated polyposis is a poorly understood and likely under-diagnosed condition. Little is known regarding the colorectal cancer risk, extra-colonic phenotype, and etiology of serrated polyposis. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to describe the clinical and family history features of a large cohort of individuals with serrated polyposis. DESIGN This is a retrospective cohort study from two prospectively collected registries. PATIENTS Patients meeting the updated 2010 World Health Organization criteria for serrated polyposis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES We report descriptive statistics for clinical and family history factors. RESULTS A total of 52 individuals met criteria for serrated polyposis. Of these, one had Lynch syndrome and was not included in the statistical analyses. Median age at serrated polyposis diagnosis was 51 years (range 18–77). Twenty four (47%) were male and 25 (49%) had a history of smoking. Two-hundred sixty-eight lower endoscopic procedures were performed; 42 (82%) had colorectal adenomas, 8 (16%) had a personal history of colorectal cancer (only one was diagnosed during follow-up), 12 (24%) had extra-colonic tumors (4 had more than one primary tumor), and 19 (37%) reported a family history of colorectal cancer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy in 30 individuals revealed only one (3%) with unexplained gastroduodenal polyps. No association was found between colorectal cancer diagnosis and sex, age at serrated polyposis diagnosis, extra-colonic tumor, history of adenoma, or smoking status. LIMITATIONS This was a retrospective study with no comparison groups. CONCLUSIONS Gastroduodenal polyps are uncommon and likely not associated with serrated polyposis. Although extra-colonic tumors were common in our cohort, it is still unclear whether these are associated with serrated polyposis. Our data, along with previous studies, support an association between serrated polyposis and smoking. Further work is still needed to clarify the effect of smoking on polyp development/progression in serrated polyposis. PMID:24104994

  2. Members of a Large Retroposon Family Are Determinants of Post-Transcriptional Gene Expression in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Gustavo Coutinho; Smith, Martin; Rochette, Annie; El-Sayed, Najib M. A; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Ghedin, Elodie

    2007-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are unicellular protists that include the human pathogens Leishmania spp. (leishmaniasis), Trypanosoma brucei (sleeping sickness), and Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease). Analysis of their recently completed genomes confirmed the presence of non–long-terminal repeat retrotransposons, also called retroposons. Using the 79-bp signature sequence common to all trypanosomatid retroposons as bait, we identified in the Leishmania major genome two new large families of small elements—LmSIDER1 (785 copies) and LmSIDER2 (1,073 copies)—that fulfill all the characteristics of extinct trypanosomatid retroposons. LmSIDERs are ∼70 times more abundant in L. major compared to T. brucei and are found almost exclusively within the 3′-untranslated regions (3′UTRs) of L. major mRNAs. We provide experimental evidence that LmSIDER2 act as mRNA instability elements and that LmSIDER2-containing mRNAs are generally expressed at lower levels compared to the non-LmSIDER2 mRNAs. The considerable expansion of LmSIDERs within 3′UTRs in an organism lacking transcriptional control and their role in regulating mRNA stability indicate that Leishmania have probably recycled these short retroposons to globally modulate the expression of a number of genes. To our knowledge, this is the first example in eukaryotes of the domestication and expansion of a family of mobile elements that have evolved to fulfill a critical cellular function. PMID:17907803

  3. Members of a large retroposon family are determinants of post-transcriptional gene expression in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Bringaud, Frédéric; Müller, Michaela; Cerqueira, Gustavo Coutinho; Smith, Martin; Rochette, Annie; El-Sayed, Najib M A; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Ghedin, Elodie

    2007-09-01

    Trypanosomatids are unicellular protists that include the human pathogens Leishmania spp. (leishmaniasis), Trypanosoma brucei (sleeping sickness), and Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease). Analysis of their recently completed genomes confirmed the presence of non-long-terminal repeat retrotransposons, also called retroposons. Using the 79-bp signature sequence common to all trypanosomatid retroposons as bait, we identified in the Leishmania major genome two new large families of small elements--LmSIDER1 (785 copies) and LmSIDER2 (1,073 copies)--that fulfill all the characteristics of extinct trypanosomatid retroposons. LmSIDERs are approximately 70 times more abundant in L. major compared to T. brucei and are found almost exclusively within the 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of L. major mRNAs. We provide experimental evidence that LmSIDER2 act as mRNA instability elements and that LmSIDER2-containing mRNAs are generally expressed at lower levels compared to the non-LmSIDER2 mRNAs. The considerable expansion of LmSIDERs within 3'UTRs in an organism lacking transcriptional control and their role in regulating mRNA stability indicate that Leishmania have probably recycled these short retroposons to globally modulate the expression of a number of genes. To our knowledge, this is the first example in eukaryotes of the domestication and expansion of a family of mobile elements that have evolved to fulfill a critical cellular function. PMID:17907803

  4. A dominant form of congenital stationary night blindness (adCSNB) in a large Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Zhuang, S; Hu, S; Zhang, F; Lin, B; Li, X; Xu, D; Chen, S-H

    2005-05-01

    Summary A pedigree of congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is described in a large Chinese family. The clinical description, pedigree, dark adaptation and elctroretinogram (ERG) studies indicate that the patients have an autosomal dominant form (ad) of CSNB. The disorder has been transmitted through at least 12 generations with over 40 affected individuals identified. The ERG data reveal that affected persons have severely diminished b-wave responses to dim light, but normal a-wave and subnormal b-wave responses to maximum light stimuli. The dark adaptation curves of three patients show a monophase curve, typical for night blindness. We have excluded the five previously known mutations in the three genes (RHO, PDE6B and GNAT1) associated with adCSNB, and linkage studies have excluded tight linkage between the disease locus and markers associated with these three genes. Thus, this family has adCSNB caused by a different gene from the previously identified RHO, PDE6B, and GNAT1. PMID:15845035

  5. Segregation of FRAXE in a large family: Clinical, psychometric, cytogenetic, and molecular data

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, B.C.J.; Smits, A.P.T.; Smeets, F.C.M.; Schoute, F.; Assman-Hulsmans, C.F.C.H.; Graaff, E. de; Eussen, B.H.J.; Oostra, B.A.; Knight, S.J.L.

    1994-11-01

    During an ongoing study on X-linked mental retardation, we ascertained a large family in which mild mental retardation was cosegregating with a fragile site at Xq27-28. Clinical, psychometric, cytogenetic, and molecular studies were performed. Apart from mild mental retardation, affected males and females did not show a specific clinical phenotype. Psychometric assessment of four representative affected individuals revealed low academic achievements, with verbal and performance IQs of 61-75 and 70-82, respectively. Cytogenetically the fragile site was always present in affected males and was not always present in affected females. With FISH the fragile site was located within the FRAXE region. The expanded GCC repeat of FRAXE was seen in affected males and females either as a discrete band or as a broad smear. No expansion was seen in unaffected males, whereas three unaffected females did have an enlarged GCC repeat. Maternal transmission of FRAXE may lead to expansion or contraction of the GCC repeat length, whereas in all cases of paternal transmission contraction was seen. In striking contrast to the situation in fragile X syndrome, affected males may have affected daughters. In addition, there appears to be no premutation of the FRAXE GCC repeat, since in the family studied here all males lacking the normal allele were found to be affected. 41 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Large scale in silico identification of MYB family genes from wheat expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hongsheng; Tian, Shan; Dong, Hansong

    2012-10-01

    The MYB proteins constitute one of the largest transcription factor families in plants. Much research has been performed to determine their structures, functions, and evolution, especially in the model plants, Arabidopsis, and rice. However, this transcription factor family has been much less studied in wheat (Triticum aestivum), for which no genome sequence is yet available. Despite this, expressed sequence tags are an important resource that permits opportunities for large scale gene identification. In this study, a total of 218 sequences from wheat were identified and confirmed to be putative MYB proteins, including 1RMYB, R2R3-type MYB, 3RMYB, and 4RMYB types. A total of 36 R2R3-type MYB genes with complete open reading frames were obtained. The putative orthologs were assigned in rice and Arabidopsis based on the phylogenetic tree. Tissue-specific expression pattern analyses confirmed the predicted orthologs, and this meant that gene information could be inferred from the Arabidopsis genes. Moreover, the motifs flanking the MYB domain were analyzed using the MEME web server. The distribution of motifs among wheat MYB proteins was investigated and this facilitated subfamily classification. PMID:22187170

  7. Identification of a FUS splicing mutation in a large family with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Belzil, Véronique V; St-Onge, Judith; Daoud, Hussein; Desjarlais, Anne; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Dupré, Nicolas; Camu, William; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2011-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe neurodegenerative disease characterized by the degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. Genetic studies have led, thus far, to the identification of 12 loci and 9 genes for familial ALS (FALS). Although the distribution and impact of superoxide dismutase 1 mutations has been extensively examined for over a decade, the recently identified FALS-associated FUS gene has been less studied. Therefore, we set out to screen our collection of FALS cases for FUS mutations. All 15 exons of FUS were amplified and sequenced in 154 unrelated FALS cases and 475 ethnically matched healthy individuals. One substitution located in the acceptor splice site of intron 14 was identified in all affected members of a large family, causing the skipping of the last 13 amino acids of the protein and the translation of 7 novel amino acids, resulting from the new translation of a part of the 3' untranslated region. Our study identified a new splicing mutation in the highly conserved C-terminal of the FUS protein. Thus far most FUS mutations are missenses, and our findings, combined with those of others, confirm the importance of the C-terminal portion of the protein, adding additional support for FUS mutations having a critical role in ALS. PMID:21160488

  8. Frequent detection of parental consanguinity in children with developmental disorders by a combined CGH and SNP microarray

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genomic microarrays have been used as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders and/or multiple congenital anomalies. The use of SNP arrays has revealed regions of homozygosity in the genome which can lead to identification of uniparental disomy and parental consanguinity in addition to copy number variations. Consanguinity is associated with an increased risk of birth defects and autosomal recessive disorders. However, the frequency of parental consanguinity in children with developmental disabilities is unknown, and consanguineous couples may not be identified during doctor’s visit or genetic counseling without microarray. Results We studied 607 proband pediatric patients referred for developmental disorders using a 4 × 180 K array containing both CGH and SNP probes. Using 720, 360, 180, and 90 Mb as the expected sizes of homozygosity for an estimated coefficient of inbreeding (F) 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, parental consanguinity was detected in 21cases (3.46%). Conclusion Parental consanguinity is not uncommon in children with developmental problems in our study population, and can be identified by use of a combined CGH and SNP chromosome microarray. Identification of parental consanguinity in such cases can be important for further diagnostic testing. PMID:24053112

  9. Functional Divergence of the Glutathione S-Transferase Supergene Family in Physcomitrella patens Reveals Complex Patterns of Large Gene Family Evolution in Land Plants1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Jing; Han, Xue-Min; Ren, Lin-Ling; Yang, Hai-Ling; Zeng, Qing-Yin

    2013-01-01

    Plant glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional proteins encoded by a large gene family that play major roles in the detoxification of xenobiotics and oxidative stress metabolism. To date, studies on the GST gene family have focused mainly on vascular plants (particularly agricultural plants). In contrast, little information is available on the molecular characteristics of this large gene family in nonvascular plants. In addition, the evolutionary patterns of this family in land plants remain unclear. In this study, we identified 37 GST genes from the whole genome of the moss Physcomitrella patens, a nonvascular representative of early land plants. The 37 P. patens GSTs were divided into 10 classes, including two new classes (hemerythrin and iota). However, no tau GSTs were identified, which represent the largest class among vascular plants. P. patens GST gene family members showed extensive functional divergence in their gene structures, gene expression responses to abiotic stressors, enzymatic characteristics, and the subcellular locations of the encoded proteins. A joint phylogenetic analysis of GSTs from P. patens and other higher vascular plants showed that different class GSTs had distinct duplication patterns during the evolution of land plants. By examining multiple characteristics, this study revealed complex patterns of evolutionary divergence among the GST gene family in land plants. PMID:23188805

  10. Consanguineous Marital Union Resulting in a Progeny of Whistling-face Syndrome and Hemophilia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gurjar, Vivek; Gurjar, Minal

    2015-01-01

    Many different types of genetic disorders are noted to be prevalent among consanguineous progeny. Although the most common type of consanguineous union in all major societies is between first cousins, the importance of customary influences is apparent from variations in the specific types of first-cousin marriages contracted. Epidemiological data for the prevalence of whistling-face syndrome (WFS) are not available, but less than a hundred cases reported in the literature are noted. We are presenting a case where a consanguineous marriage resulted in two of their children presenting with WFS and one with hemophilia. PMID:25954077

  11. The Role of Family Environment in Depressive Symptoms among University Students: A Large Sample Survey in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanjie; Chen, Lu; Qiu, Xiaohui; Qiao, Zhengxue; Zhou, Jiawei; Pan, Hui; Ban, Bo; Zhu, Xiongzhao; He, Jincai; Ding, Yongqing; Bai, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between family environment and depressive symptoms and to evaluate the influence of hard and soft family environmental factors on depression levels in a large sample of university students in China. Methods A multi-stage stratified sampling procedure was used to select 6,000 participants. The response rate was 88.8%, with 5,329 students completing the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Family Environment Scale Chinese Version (FES-CV), which was adapted for the Chinese population. Differences between the groups were tested for significance by the Student’s t-test; ANOVA was used to test continuous variables. The relationship between soft family environmental factors and BDI were tested by Pearson correlation analysis. Hierarchical linear regression analysis was conducted to model the effects of hard environmental factors and soft environmental factors on depression in university students. Results A total of 11.8% of students scored above the threshold of moderate depression(BDI≧14). Hard family environmental factors such as parent relationship, family economic status, level of parental literacy and non-intact family structure were associated with depressive symptoms. The soft family environmental factors—conflict and control—were positively associated with depression, while cohesion was negatively related to depressive symptom after controlling for other important associates of depression. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that the soft family environment correlates more strongly with depression than the hard family environment. Conclusions Soft family environmental factors—especially cohesion, conflict and control—appeared to play an important role in the occurrence of depressive symptoms. These findings underline the significance of the family environment as a source of risk factors for depression among university students in China and suggest that family-based interventions and improvement are very important to reduce depression among university students. PMID:26629694

  12. Several Families of Sequences with Low Correlation and Large Linear Span

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fanxin; Zhang, Zhenyu

    In DS-CDMA systems and DS-UWB radios, low correlation of spreading sequences can greatly help to minimize multiple access interference (MAI) and large linear span of spreading sequences can reduce their predictability. In this letter, new sequence sets with low correlation and large linear span are proposed. Based on the construction Trm1[Trnm(αbt+γiαdt)]r for generating p-ary sequences of period pn-1, where n=2m, d=upm±v, b=u±v, γi∈GF(pn), and p is an arbitrary prime number, several methods to choose the parameter d are provided. The obtained sequences with family size pn are of four-valued, five-valued, six-valued or seven-valued correlation and the maximum nontrivial correlation value is (u+v-1)pm-1. The simulation by a computer shows that the linear span of the new sequences is larger than that of the sequences with Niho-type and Welch-type decimations, and similar to that of [10].

  13. Stimulation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysis by proteins of glycoside hydrolase family 61: structure and function of a large, enigmatic family.

    PubMed

    Harris, Paul V; Welner, Ditte; McFarland, K C; Re, Edward; Navarro Poulsen, Jens-Christian; Brown, Kimberly; Salbo, Rune; Ding, Hanshu; Vlasenko, Elena; Merino, Sandy; Xu, Feng; Cherry, Joel; Larsen, Sine; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2010-04-20

    Currently, the relatively high cost of enzymes such as glycoside hydrolases that catalyze cellulose hydrolysis represents a barrier to commercialization of a biorefinery capable of producing renewable transportable fuels such as ethanol from abundant lignocellulosic biomass. Among the many families of glycoside hydrolases that catalyze cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis, few are more enigmatic than family 61 (GH61), originally classified based on measurement of very weak endo-1,4-beta-d-glucanase activity in one family member. Here we show that certain GH61 proteins lack measurable hydrolytic activity by themselves but in the presence of various divalent metal ions can significantly reduce the total protein loading required to hydrolyze lignocellulosic biomass. We also solved the structure of one highly active GH61 protein and find that it is devoid of conserved, closely juxtaposed acidic side chains that could serve as general proton donor and nucleophile/base in a canonical hydrolytic reaction, and we conclude that the GH61 proteins are unlikely to be glycoside hydrolases. Structure-based mutagenesis shows the importance of several conserved residues for GH61 function. By incorporating the gene for one GH61 protein into a commercial Trichoderma reesei strain producing high levels of cellulolytic enzymes, we are able to reduce by 2-fold the total protein loading (and hence the cost) required to hydrolyze lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:20230050

  14. A 5-year survey of biopsy proven kidney diseases in Lebanon: significant variation in prevalence of primary glomerular diseases by age, population structure and consanguinity

    PubMed Central

    Karnib, Hussein H.; Gharavi, Ali G.; Aftimos, Georges; Mahfoud, Ziyad; Saad, Reem; Gemayel, Elias; Masri, Badiaa; Assaad, Shafika; Badr, Kamal F.; Ziyadeh, Fuad N.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Differences in epidemiology of kidney disease across the Middle East may arise from variations in indication for biopsy, environmental exposure and socio-economic status. The Lebanese population is composed of different ethnicities, with distinct ancestry and religion, enabling comparison of their effect on the prevalence of kidney disease within a confined geographic setting and uniform practices. Here we report 5 years’ detailed epidemiology of renal diseases, based on histological diagnosis, in a sample from three large pathology centres in Lebanon. Methods. Records of renal biopsies analysed at the American University of Beirut Medical Center, Hotel Dieu de France Hospital and the Institut National de Pathologie from January 2003 till December 2007 were retrospectively examined. We recorded the following data for each patient: age, gender, indication for renal biopsy and histopathological diagnosis. Religious affiliation and parents’ consanguinity were recorded when feasible. Results. The mean age at renal biopsy was 36.76 ± 20 years (range 1–84). The most common diagnosis was mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis (GN; 20%), followed by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (13.2%). While there were no differences in age, gender or indications for biopsy among different religious affiliations, mesangioproliferative GN was significantly more frequent among Muslims (P = 0.039) and offspring of consanguineous unions (P = 0.036). On the other hand, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was most prevalent in Christians (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Variation in the distribution of diagnoses between Muslim and Christian groups likely reflects differences in population structure and ancestry. In particular, the increased prevalence of mesangioproliferative GN among offspring of consanguineous unions in Muslims suggests a recessive genetic component to this disease which may be identified via homozygosity mapping. These findings have important implications for formulating renal health policies and designing research studies in this population. PMID:20525974

  15. Large BRCA1 and BRCA2 genomic rearrangements in Malaysian high risk breast-ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed

    Kang, Peter; Mariapun, Shivaani; Phuah, Sze Yee; Lim, Linda Shushan; Liu, Jianjun; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Yip, Cheng Har; Teo, Soo-Hwang

    2010-11-01

    Early studies of genetic predisposition due to the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have focused largely on sequence alterations, but it has now emerged that 4-28% of inherited mutations in the BRCA genes may be due to large genomic rearrangements of these genes. However, to date, there have been relatively few studies of large genomic rearrangements in Asian populations. We have conducted a full sequencing and large genomic rearrangement analysis (using Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification, MLPA) of 324 breast cancer patients who were selected from a multi-ethnic hospital-based cohort on the basis of age of onset of breast cancer and/or family history. Three unrelated individuals were found to have large genomic rearrangements: 2 in BRCA1 and 1 in BRCA2, which accounts for 2/24 (8%) of the total mutations detected in BRCA1 and 1/23 (4%) of the mutations in BRCA2 detected in this cohort. Notably, the family history of the individuals with these mutations is largely unremarkable suggesting that family history alone is a poor predictor of mutation status in Asian families. In conclusion, this study in a multi-ethnic (Malay, Chinese, Indian) cohort suggests that large genomic rearrangements are present at a low frequency but should nonetheless be included in the routine testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2. PMID:20617377

  16. Clinical variation of Aarskog syndrome in a large family with 2189delA in the FGD1 gene.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Stavit A; Chervinski, Elana; Weiner, Ehud; Mazor, Galia; Friez, Michael J; Schwartz, Charles E

    2006-01-15

    The clinical diagnosis of ASS (Aarskog-Scott syndrome or Faciogenital Dysplasia) was made in seven individuals belonging to a large Arabic family, which was supported by molecular studies revealing a 2189delA mutation in exon 15 of the FDG1 gene. The affected individuals in this family demonstrated clinical variability particularly in their cognitive skills, raising the question whether other genetic factors might be involved in the phenotypic evolution of ASS. PMID:16353258

  17. Screening for large rearrangements of the BRCA2 gene in Spanish families with breast/ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; de la Hoya, Miguel; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Sanchez de Abajo, Ana; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Llort, Gemma; Blanco, Ignacio; Beristain, Elena; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Alonso, Carmen; Tejada, María-Isabel; Caldés, Trinidad; Diez, Orland

    2007-05-01

    Germ-line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are responsible for about 30-60% of the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). A large number of point mutations have been described in both genes. However, large deletions and duplications that disrupt one or more exons are overlooked by point mutation detection approaches. Over the past years several rearrangements have been identified in BRCA1, while few studies have been designed to screen this type of mutations in BRCA2. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of large genomic rearrangements in the BRCA2 gene in Spanish breast/ovarian cancer families. The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) was employed to search gross deletions or duplications of BRCA2 in 335 Spanish moderate to high-risk breast/ovarian cancer families previously screened negative for point mutations by conventional methods. Four different and novel large genomic alterations were consistently identified by MLPA in five families, respectively: deletions of exon 2, exons 10-12 and exons 15-16 and duplication of exon 20 (in two families). RT-PCR experiments confirmed the deletion of exons 15-16. All patients harbouring a genomic rearrangement were members of high-risk families, with three or more breast/ovarian cancer cases or the presence of breast cancer in males. We provide evidence that the BRCA2 rearrangements seem to account for a relatively small proportion of familial breast cancer cases in Spanish population. The screening for these alterations as part of the comprehensive genetic testing can be recommended, especially in multiple case breast/ovarian families and families with male breast cancer cases. PMID:17063271

  18. Consanguinity in Saudi Arabia: a unique opportunity for pediatric kidney research.

    PubMed

    Kari, Jameela A; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Stanescu, Horia; Gari, Mamdooh; Kleta, Robert; Singh, Ajay K

    2014-02-01

    Identification of disease-related genes is a critical step in understanding the molecular basis of disease and developing targeted therapies. The genetic study of diseases occurring in the offspring of consanguineous unions is a powerful way to discover new disease genes. Pediatric nephrology provides an excellent example because ∼70% of cases of kidney disease in childhood are congenital with a likely genetic basis. This percentage is likely to be even higher in countries with a high consanguinity rate, such as the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. However, there are a number of challenges, such as cultural, legal, and religious restrictions, that should be appreciated before carrying out genetic research in a tradition-bound country. In this article, we discuss the background, opportunities, and challenges involved with this unique opportunity to conduct studies of such genetic disorders. Keys to success include collaboration and an understanding of local traditions and laws. PMID:24239020

  19. Institutional Protocol to Manage Consanguinity Detected by Genetic Testing in Pregnancy in a Minor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Laura P.; Beck, Anita E.; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Chow, Penny M.; Mirzaa, Ghayda M.; Wiester, Rebecca T.

    2015-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays and other types of genetic tests have the potential to detect first-degree consanguinity and uncover parental rape in cases of minor teenage pregnancy. We present 2 cases in which genetic testing identified parental rape of a minor teenager. In case 1, single-nucleotide polymorphism array in a patient with multiple developmental abnormalities demonstrated multiple long stretches of homozygosity, revealing parental rape of a teenage mother. In case 2, a vague maternal sexual assault history and diagnosis of Pompe disease by direct gene sequencing identified parental rape of a minor. Given the medical, legal, and ethical implications of such revelations, a protocol was developed at our institution to manage consanguinity identified via genetic testing. PMID:25687148

  20. CONSANGUINITY AND HOMOZYGOSITY AMONG TUNISIAN PATIENTS WITH AN AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE DISORDER.

    PubMed

    Kelmemi, Wided; Chelly, Imene; Kharrat, Maher; Chaabouni-Bouhamed, Habiba

    2015-11-01

    Consanguineous unions are a deeply rooted social practice among traditional societies. Despite their presumed social advantages, they can result in several health conditions. The aim of this study was: i) to compare consanguinity levels between Tunisian patients affected with autosomal recessive disorders (ARDs) and those with a chromosomal abnormality; and ii) to gain more insight into the mutational status of patients affected with ARDs. Data were collected from 290 files of patients affected by one of five ARDs confirmed by molecular analysis and 248 files of patients with confirmed Down syndrome. Information on the disease, mutation defining the disease, parents' relatedness and geographical origin was gathered. Consanguinity was found among 58% of the ARD patients and among 22% of Down syndrome patients, and a homozygous status was found in 90% of the patients born to related parents and in 70% of patients born to unrelated parents. Also, children from unrelated parents from the same geographical background were found to be more frequently affected by homozygous mutations than those from unrelated parents from different geographical backgrounds. The present study shows how marriage practices affect patterns of genetic variations and how they can lead to homogenization in the genetic pool. PMID:25630711

  1. Consanguinity and endogamy in Northern Tunisia and its impact on non-syndromic deafness.

    PubMed

    Ben Arab, Saida; Masmoudi, Saber; Beltaief, Najeh; Hachicha, Slah; Ayadi, Hammadi

    2004-07-01

    Deafness is an important health problem in the Tunisian population, especially in isolates where the prevalence ranges from 2 to 8%. To evaluate the effect of inbred unions on deafness, a study was conducted on 5,020 individuals (160 are deaf) between 2000 and 2002 in the North of Tunisia. The coefficient of inbreeding for all individuals and the levels of inbreeding in ten districts were computed. The higher levels were obtained in the rural districts. Our study revealed that geographic isolation, social traditions, and parental involvement in mode selection all contribute to increase consanguinity in these regions. The mean inbreeding seems to be similar to those estimated in highly inbred isolates in the world. The relative risk of the 35delG mutation, the single most frequent allele for non-syndromic recessive deafness in Tunisia, was estimated from the observed inbreeding coefficient and found to be 10.76 (SD 7.74) for first-cousin marriages, which are the most common form of consanguineous marriage encountered. Our knowledge of the risk rate of deafness and our understanding of consanguinity is required for the prevention of genetic deafness in the Tunisian population. PMID:15185405

  2. The impact of consanguinity and inbreeding on perinatal mortality in Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hussain, R

    1998-10-01

    Close consanguineous unions continue to be extremely common in much of West Asia, including Pakistan. However, the impact of inbreeding on offspring mortality, particularly perinatal mortality, remains poorly documented. This paper attempts to measure the mortality risks associated with consanguinity and inbreeding while controlling for the effects of other potential confounders. The study sample comprises a multi-ethnic population residing in selected squatter settlements of Karachi. The adjusted odds ratio for perinatal mortality in the offspring of women married to their first cousins was 2.0 [95% CI 1.5, 2.6]. When parental inbreeding was also taken into account, the adjusted odds ratio for perinatal mortality increased further. Analysis of a subsample of data limited to pregnancies to women aged 35 years or above (at the time of the survey) showed that, despite adjustment for important biological and socio-demographic factors, both consanguinity and inbreeding remained important predictors of perinatal mortality in the offspring. Implications of the present study for further research are highlighted. PMID:9805711

  3. [Information should be given on consanguinity as a risk factor for congenital malformations].

    PubMed

    Cornel, Martina C; Houwink, Elisa J F; Houwink, Pieter E F

    2014-01-01

    In the Born in Bradford study, an increased risk for congenital anomalies was found in the Pakistani subpopulation of Bradford, where cousin marriage is relatively frequent. While consanguinity may be associated with a risk for congenital malformations, it does not prove a causal relationship. Whatever the case, high perinatal mortality as well as the high prevalence of congenital anomalies are good reasons for implementing the knowledge on reproductive risks that has been available for many years. Well-known risk factors include higher maternal age, that was associated with congenital anomalies in the British mothers. Further research in an intervention study may provide more data on whether the associations found are causal. Implementing preconception care should involve primary care physicians, who need both facilities and training. In the Netherlands, the high perinatal mortality, especially in some big cities, could profit from similar interventions. Dutch primary care physicians consider it their responsibility to discuss consanguinity with patients, although there is some reluctance because of anticipated religious and social value conflicts. Without information reaching the target populations, they may lack awareness and will not ask for information themselves. People from Dutch migrant groups would prefer to be informed about reproductive risks of consanguinity by their primary care physicians. PMID:24397975

  4. Contribution of large genomic BRCA1 alterations to early-onset breast cancer selected for family history and tumour morphology: a report from The Breast Cancer Family Registry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Selecting women affected with breast cancer who are most likely to carry a germline mutation in BRCA1 and applying the most appropriate test methodology remains challenging for cancer genetics services. We sought to test the value of selecting women for BRCA1 mutation testing on the basis of family history and/or breast tumour morphology criteria as well as the value of testing for large genomic alterations in BRCA1. Methods We studied women participating in the Breast Cancer Family Registry (BCFR), recruited via population-based sampling, who had been diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40 years who had a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer (n = 187) and/or a first primary breast tumour with morphological features consistent with carrying a BRCA1 germline mutation (n = 133; 37 met both criteria). An additional 184 women diagnosed before the age of 40 years who had a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer and who were not known to carry a germline BRCA1 mutation were selected from among women who had been recruited into the BCFR from clinical genetics services. These 467 women had been screened for BRCA1 germline mutations, and we expanded this testing to include a screen for large genomic BRCA1 alterations using Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification. Results Twelve large genomic BRCA1 alterations were identified, including 10 (4%) of the 283 women selected from among the population-based sample. In total, 18 (12%), 18 (19%) and 16 (43%) BRCA1 mutations were identified in the population-based groups selected on the basis of family history only (n = 150), the group selected on the basis of tumour morphology only (n = 96) and meeting both criteria (n = 37), respectively. Conclusions Large genomic alterations accounted for 19% of all BRCA1 mutations identified. This study emphasises the value of combining information about family history, age at diagnosis and tumour morphology when selecting women for germline BRCA1 mutation testing as well as including a screen for large genomic alterations. PMID:21281505

  5. Atrial fibrillation anticoagulation care in a large urban family medicine practice

    PubMed Central

    Valentinis, Alissia; Ivers, Noah; Bhatia, Sacha; Meshkat, Nazanin; Leblanc, Kori; Ha, Andrew; Morra, Dante

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the proportion of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in primary care achieving guideline-concordant stroke prevention treatment based on both the previous (2010) and the updated (2012) Canadian guideline recommendations. Design Retrospective chart review. Participants Primary care patients (N = 204) with AF. The mean age was 71.3 years and 53.4% were women. Setting Large urban community family practice in Toronto, Ont. Main outcome measures Patient demographic characteristics such as sex and age; a list of current cardiac medications including anticoagulants and antiplatelets; the total number of medications; relevant current and past medical history including presence of diabetes, stroke or transient ischemic attack, hypertension, and vascular disease; number of visits to the family physician and cardiologist in the past year and past 5 years, and how many of these were for AF; the number of visits to the emergency department or hospitalizations for AF, congestive heart failure, or stroke; if patients were taking warfarin, how often their international normalized ratios were recorded, and how many times they were in the reference range; CHADS2 (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥ 75, diabetes mellitus, and stroke or transient ischemic attack) score, if recorded; and reason for not taking oral anticoagulants when they should have been, if recorded. Results Among those who had CHADS2 scores of 0, 64 patients (97.0%) were receiving appropriate stroke prevention in AF (SPAF) treatment according to the 2010 guidelines. When the 2012 guidelines were applied, 39 patients (59.1%) were receiving appropriate SPAF treatment (P < .001). For those with CHADS2 scores of 1, 88.4% of patients had appropriate SPAF treatment according to the 2010 guidelines, but only 55.1% were adequately treated according to the 2012 guidelines (P < .001). Of the patients at the highest risk (CHADS2 score > 1), 68.1% were adequately treated with anticoagulation and an additional 8.7% (6 of 69) had documented reasons why they were not taking anticoagulants. Conclusion When assessed using the 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society AF guidelines, the proportion of patients receiving appropriate SPAF therapy in this primary care setting decreased substantially. All patients with CHADS2 scores of 0 or 1 should be reassessed to ensure that they are receiving optimal stroke prevention treatment. PMID:24627401

  6. Moxidectin and the avermectins: Consanguinity but not identity

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, Roger; Ménez, Cécile; Lespine, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The avermectins and milbemycins contain a common macrocyclic lactone (ML) ring, but are fermentation products of different organisms. The principal structural difference is that avermectins have sugar groups at C13 of the macrocyclic ring, whereas the milbemycins are protonated at C13. Moxidectin (MOX), belonging to the milbemycin family, has other differences, including a methoxime at C23. The avermectins and MOX have broad-spectrum activity against nematodes and arthropods. They have similar but not identical, spectral ranges of activity and some avermectins and MOX have diverse formulations for great user flexibility. The longer half-life of MOX and its safety profile, allow MOX to be used in long-acting formulations. Some important differences between MOX and avermectins in interaction with various invertebrate ligand-gated ion channels are known and could be the basis of different efficacy and safety profiles. Modelling of IVM interaction with glutamate-gated ion channels suggest different interactions will occur with MOX. Similarly, profound differences between MOX and the avermectins are seen in interactions with ABC transporters in mammals and nematodes. These differences are important for pharmacokinetics, toxicity in animals with defective transporter expression, and probable mechanisms of resistance. Resistance to the avermectins has become widespread in parasites of some hosts and MOX resistance also exists and is increasing. There is some degree of cross-resistance between the avermectins and MOX, but avermectin resistance and MOX resistance are not identical. In many cases when resistance to avermectins is noticed, MOX produces a higher efficacy and quite often is fully effective at recommended dose rates. These similarities and differences should be appreciated for optimal decisions about parasite control, delaying, managing or reversing resistances, and also for appropriate anthelmintic combination. PMID:24533275

  7. Family Size, Birth Order, and Intelligence in a Large South American Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velandia, Wilson; And Others

    1978-01-01

    According to confluence theory, a child is helped or hindered in intellectual development according to the average absolute intelligence (mental age) in the family when the child is born. An analysis of test scores, family information, and socioeconomic data of 36,000 college applicants in Colombia failed to support this theory. (Author/CP)

  8. Nuclear DNA content of medullary thyroid carcinoma in a large family with the MEN-2A syndrome.

    PubMed

    Haak, H R; Cornelisse, C J; Goslings, B M; Fleuren, G J

    1991-04-01

    Flow cytometry of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MCT) was performed in a large family with the MEN-2A syndrome. Of 15 family members with MCT five patients (10-27 yr) were without lymph node metastases. Six patients had a normal pentagastrin test after operation. All patients are alive and free of symptoms of MCT 6-9 yr after total thyroidectomy and an ablative dose of 131-I. In 12 of the 15 patients with MCT flowcytometry of paraffin-embedded tissue could be performed. The majority of all tumors (n = 9) were classified as peridiploid. Metastatic tumor, 6 years after thyroidectomy, in one of the patients was diploid. Only two MCT were clearly aneuploid. In one patient the tumor was tetraploid. We conclude that the majority of the MCT patients in this family with the MEN-2A syndrome have no or limited ploidy aberrations in their tumors, which correlates well with the favourable prognosis of familial MCT. PMID:1677951

  9. Characterization of the p16 gene in the mouse: Evidence for a large gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, J.W.; Giendening, J.M.; Flores, J.F.

    1994-09-01

    The p16 gene product is an inhibitor of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4)/cyclin D complex. When uninhibited, the CDK4/cyclin D complex participates in the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein and renders it inactive. Upon inactivation of the RB protein, transition from the G{sub 1} to the S phase of mitosis occurs and results in cellular proliferation. Thus, p16 is presumed to act as a negative regulator of cell growth by preventing the phosphorylation, and thereby subsequent inactivation, of RB by CDK4/cyclin D. Recently, the p16 gene (also known as the multiple tumor suppressor 1 (MTS1) gene) has been mapped to chromosome 9p21 and found to be deleted or mutated in a number of tumor cell lines. These findings support the role of p16 as a growth inhibitor or tumor suppressor gene and suggest that the mutation of this gene may have global implications in carcinogenesis. We have chosen to test the functional significance of p16 mutations in vivo through the generation of a mouse mutant for p16. In preparation for this undertaking, eight apparently independent (as judged by restriction enzyme digestion and differential hybridization) mouse genomic embryonic stem cell clones have been identified using exon 2 from the human p16 gene as a probe. The identification of these multiple nonoverlapping clones was not entirely surprising since the reduced stringency hybridization of a zoo blot with the same probe also revealed 10-15 positive EcoRI fragments in all species tested, including human, monkey, cow, dog, cat, rabbit, hamster, mouse, chicken and D. melanogaster. Taken together, these findings suggest that the p16 gene is a member of a large gene family. The location of these genomic clones, as well as their potential expression in the mouse, is currently under investigation.

  10. Family dinner and disordered eating behaviors in a large cohort of adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Jess; Gillman, Matthew W.; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl; Field, Alison E.; Austin, S. Bryn

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to examine longitudinal associations between family dinner and disordered eating behaviors among adolescents. We studied 7535 females and 5913 males, 9 to 14 years of age in 1996. We performed multivariable logistic regression to assess the associations of previous year family dinner with 1-year incidence of each of 3 outcomes: purging, binge eating, and frequent dieting. Compared to those who ate family dinner “never or some days,” female adolescents who ate family dinner at least most days were less likely to initiate purging, binge eating, and frequent dieting. Estimates of association among males were similar in direction and magnitude, although lower frequency of the outcomes resulted in less precise estimates and fewer statistically significant results. PMID:20390605

  11. Achieving patient and family engagement through the implementation and evolution of advisory councils across a large health care system.

    PubMed

    Haycock, Camille; Wahl, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, hospitals and health care systems have responded to the call for increased patient engagement and person-centered care. Organizations across the country have developed models and tools to assist in the effort toward patient and family engagement in health care delivery. In addition, current literature and trends suggest that patient satisfaction and quality outcomes are improved when patients and families become partners in their own health care and the delivery of that care. However, to formalize a patient-centric structure and process across a large health care system that is aimed at patient and family engagement can be a daunting activity. Utilizing well-established tools, Catholic Health Initiatives was successful in implementing the structures to deploy the ideas of patients and families in multiple facilities and care settings across 19 states. Nursing leaderships, in partnership with patients and their families within this health care delivery system, were the key contributors to the implementation of formalized patient and family advisory councils in hospitals across the enterprise. PMID:23744470

  12. Structural, Functional, and Evolutionary Analysis of the Unusually Large Stilbene Synthase Gene Family in Grapevine1[W

    PubMed Central

    Parage, Claire; Tavares, Raquel; Réty, Stéphane; Baltenweck-Guyot, Raymonde; Poutaraud, Anne; Renault, Lauriane; Heintz, Dimitri; Lugan, Raphaël; Marais, Gabriel A.B.; Aubourg, Sébastien; Hugueney, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Stilbenes are a small family of phenylpropanoids produced in a number of unrelated plant species, including grapevine (Vitis vinifera). In addition to their participation in defense mechanisms in plants, stilbenes, such as resveratrol, display important pharmacological properties and are postulated to be involved in the health benefits associated with a moderate consumption of red wine. Stilbene synthases (STSs), which catalyze the biosynthesis of the stilbene backbone, seem to have evolved from chalcone synthases (CHSs) several times independently in stilbene-producing plants. STS genes usually form small families of two to five closely related paralogs. By contrast, the sequence of grapevine reference genome (cv PN40024) has revealed an unusually large STS gene family. Here, we combine molecular evolution and structural and functional analyses to investigate further the high number of STS genes in grapevine. Our reannotation of the STS and CHS gene families yielded 48 STS genes, including at least 32 potentially functional ones. Functional characterization of nine genes representing most of the STS gene family diversity clearly indicated that these genes do encode for proteins with STS activity. Evolutionary analysis of the STS gene family revealed that both STS and CHS evolution are dominated by purifying selection, with no evidence for strong selection for new functions among STS genes. However, we found a few sites under different selection pressures in CHS and STS sequences, whose potential functional consequences are discussed using a structural model of a typical STS from grapevine that we developed. PMID:22961129

  13. Reconstruction of Oomycete Genome Evolution Identifies Differences in Evolutionary Trajectories Leading to Present-Day Large Gene Families

    PubMed Central

    Seidl, Michael F.; Van den Ackerveken, Guido; Govers, Francine; Snel, Berend

    2012-01-01

    The taxonomic class of oomycetes contains numerous pathogens of plants and animals but is related to nonpathogenic diatoms and brown algae. Oomycetes have flexible genomes comprising large gene families that play roles in pathogenicity. The evolutionary processes that shaped the gene content have not yet been studied by applying systematic tree reconciliation of the phylome of these species. We analyzed evolutionary dynamics of ten Stramenopiles. Gene gains, duplications, and losses were inferred by tree reconciliation of 18,459 gene trees constituting the phylome with a highly supported species phylogeny. We reconstructed a strikingly large last common ancestor of the Stramenopiles that contained ∼10,000 genes. Throughout evolution, the genomes of pathogenic oomycetes have constantly gained and lost genes, though gene gains through duplications outnumber the losses. The branch leading to the plant pathogenic Phytophthora genus was identified as a major transition point characterized by increased frequency of duplication events that has likely driven the speciation within this genus. Large gene families encoding different classes of enzymes associated with pathogenicity such as glycoside hydrolases are formed by complex and distinct patterns of duplications and losses leading to their expansion in extant oomycetes. This study unveils the large-scale evolutionary dynamics that shaped the genomes of pathogenic oomycetes. By the application of phylogenetic based analyses methods, it provides additional insights that shed light on the complex history of oomycete genome evolution and the emergence of large gene families characteristic for this important class of pathogens. PMID:22230142

  14. Retrospective analysis of cohort database: Phenotypic variability in a large dataset of patients confirmed to have homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Raal, Frederick J.; Sjouke, Barbara; Hovingh, G. Kees; Isaac, Barton F.

    2016-01-01

    These data describe the phenotypic variability in a large cohort of patients confirmed to have homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Herein, we describe the observed relationship of treated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with age. We also overlay the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene (LDLR) functional status with these phenotypic data. A full description of these data is available in our recent study published in Atherosclerosis, “Phenotype Diversity Among Patients With Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia: A Cohort Study” (Raal et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27182539

  15. No evidence of genetic anticipation in a large family with Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stupart, D; Goldberg, P; Algar, U; Vorster, A; Ramesar, R

    2014-03-01

    Lynch syndrome is the commonest inherited cause of colorectal cancer (CRC). Genetic anticipation occurs when the age of onset of a disorder decreases in successive generations. It is controversial whether this occurs in Lynch syndrome. Previous studies have included heterogenous groups of subjects from multiple families, including subjects with a clinical diagnosis (based on family history) as well as those with proven germline mismatch repair gene mutations. The purpose of this study was to determine whether genetic anticipation occurs in mismatch repair gene carriers from a single Lynch syndrome family. This study includes members of a single family known to carry an MLH1 gene mutation who are proven germline mutation carriers or obligate carriers (based on their offspring's mutation status). Evidence of genetic anticipation (determined by age of onset of first CRC) was sought in two ways: Firstly, subjects were grouped as parent-child pairs and individuals were compared with their own offspring; secondly they were grouped by generation within the family tree. The Kaplan-Meier technique was used to adjust for variable follow up times. The family tree consisted of 714 subjects. Ninety-two subjects over five generations were included in the study. There was no evidence of genetic anticipation over the generations. (P = 0.37). Similarly, in the 75 parent-child pairs identified, age of onset of CRC was similar for parents and children (P = 0.51). We could not identify any evidence of genetic anticipation in mutation carriers from a single family with Lynch syndrome. PMID:23771324

  16. Genome-wide search for breast cancer linkage in large Icelandic non-BRCA1/2 families

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: A significant proportion of high-risk breast cancer families are not explained by mutations in known genes. Recent genome-wide searches (GWS) have not revealed any single major locus reminiscent of BRCA1 and BRCA2, indicating that still unidentified genes may explain relatively few families each or interact in a way obscure to linkage analyses. This has drawn attention to possible benefits of studying populations where genetic heterogeneity might be reduced. We thus performed a GWS for linkage on nine Icelandic multiple-case non-BRCA1/2 families of desirable size for mapping highly penetrant loci. To follow up suggestive loci, an additional 13 families from other Nordic countries were genotyped for selected markers. Methods: GWS was performed using 811 microsatellite markers providing about five centiMorgan (cM) resolution. Multipoint logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated using parametric and nonparametric methods. For selected markers and cases, tumour tissue was compared to normal tissue to look for allelic loss indicative of a tumour suppressor gene. Results: The three highest signals were located at chromosomes 6q, 2p and 14q. One family contributed suggestive LOD scores (LOD 2.63 to 3.03, dominant model) at all these regions, without consistent evidence of a tumour suppressor gene. Haplotypes in nine affected family members mapped the loci to 2p23.2 to p21, 6q14.2 to q23.2 and 14q21.3 to q24.3. No evidence of a highly penetrant locus was found among the remaining families. The heterogeneity LOD (HLOD) at the 6q, 2p and 14q loci in all families was 3.27, 1.66 and 1.24, respectively. The subset of 13 Nordic families showed supportive HLODs at chromosome 6q (ranging from 0.34 to 1.37 by country subset). The 2p and 14q loci overlap with regions indicated by large families in previous GWS studies of breast cancer. Conclusions: Chromosomes 2p, 6q and 14q are candidate sites for genes contributing together to high breast cancer risk. A polygenic model is supported, suggesting the joint effect of genes in contributing to breast cancer risk to be rather common in non-BRCA1/2 families. For genetic counselling it would seem important to resolve the mode of genetic interaction. PMID:20637093

  17. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Genetic Predisposition in a Large Family with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Juan; Chen, Lijia; Tam, Oi Sin; Huang, Xiu-Feng; Pang, Chi-Pui; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has become more widely used to reveal genetic defect in monogenic disorders. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the leading cause of hereditary blindness worldwide, has been attributed to more than 67 disease-causing genes. Due to the extreme genetic heterogeneity, using general molecular screening alone is inadequate for identifying genetic predispositions in susceptible individuals. In order to identify underlying mutation rapidly, we utilized next-generation sequencing in a four-generation Chinese family with RP. Two affected patients and an unaffected sibling were subjected to whole exome sequencing. Through bioinformatics analysis and direct sequencing confirmation, we identified p.R135W transition in the rhodopsin gene. The mutation was subsequently confirmed to cosegregate with the disease in the family. In this study, our results suggest that whole exome sequencing is a robust method in diagnosing familial hereditary disease. PMID:25101269

  18. On the genetics of mandibular prognathism: analysis of large European noble families.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, G; Wienker, T F; Sander, H

    1993-01-01

    Mandibular prognathism is assumed to be a polygenic trait in the vast majority of cases. In a few families, this phenotype and perhaps a syndrome with a broader spectrum of facial anomalies seems to be determined by a single dominant gene of very low frequency (McKusick No *176700). The phenotype is known to have occurred independently in several European noble families. We constructed a pedigree comprising 13 of these families with 409 members in 23 generations in which mandibular prognathism has been segregating. Obviously, the presumed dominant gene is not fully penetrant in the heterozygous state. Pedigree analysis using the Elston-Stewart algorithm yields a maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) of p = 0.955 (SE 0.038) of the penetrance parameter. Images PMID:8445614

  19. Medullary cystic kidney disease with hyperuricemia and gout in a large Cypriot family: no allelism with nephronophthisis type 1.

    PubMed

    Stavrou, C; Pierides, A; Zouvani, I; Kyriacou, K; Antignac, C; Neophytou, P; Christodoulou, K; Deltas, C C

    1998-05-01

    We describe a large Cypriot family with an interstitial type of nephropathy, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait that led to end stage renal failure between 51 to 78 years of age (mean 62.2 years). Twenty-three people are known to be affected, but several younger relatives with normal renal function may remain undiagnosed because of the absence of precise clinical and laboratory diagnostic criteria. This nephropathy is associated with medullary renal cysts, hypertension, hyperuricemia, and gout. Several relatives have typical medullary cystic disease (MCD), while in the others the findings are compatible with this diagnosis. Due to the similarity of clinical and pathologic findings, earlier reports had suggested that MCD may be allelic to autosomal recessive familial juvenile nephronophthisis, which was mapped recently to chromosome band 2q13. Linkage analysis of the present family with a closely linked marker excluded linkage to the above locus. Linkage was also excluded to the PKD1 locus of adult polycystic kidney disease type 1, and up to 5 cM on either side, on chromosome 16. We suggest that because of the element of hyperuricemia and gout found in this family, although with reduced penetrance, it may represent a variant of autosomal dominant MCD of the adult type. This variability may be the result of allelic or locus heterogeneity. Molecular genetic approaches including linkage analysis on appropriate families will certainly assist in classifying such related genetically heterogeneous disorders. PMID:9605289

  20. A Consanguinity Related Autosomal Translocation which Leads to Premature Ovarian Failure

    PubMed Central

    Yik, Mot Yee; Zain, Murizah Mohd; Zakaria, Zubaidah; Yusoff, Narazah Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The premature ovarian failures with underlying chromosomal abnormalities are normally X-linked, although their associations with the autosomal and the Robertsonian translocations are also possible. Here, we are reporting a case of premature ovarian failure which was associated with a translocation between the long arm of chromosome 7 at q11.23 and the short arm of chromosome 5 at p15.3. The proband was a 26-year-old Malay woman who presented with premature ovarian failure, who was referred for cytogenetic testing due to the suspicion of a chromosomal anomaly. Her physical examination revealed that she had no abdominal or pelvic masses and that she had normal secondary sexual characteristics. Her medical history as well, revealed no points for concern. However, a consanguineous relationship existed, as the patient’s paternal grandmother and maternal grandfather were biological cousins. Our present case indicated that region p15.3 of chromosome 5 and region q11.23 of chromosome 7 possibly carried essential genes for the ovarian function and that they postulated a link between the consanguinity and the chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:23543039

  1. Consanguinity and rare mutations outside of MCCC genes underlie nonspecific phenotypes of MCCD

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Peter J.; Barshop, Bruce A.; Baumgartner, Matthias R.; Hansen, John-Bjarne; Jepsen, Kristen; Smith, Erin N.; Frazer, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose 3-Methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency (MCCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of leucine catabolism that has a highly variable clinical phenotype, ranging from acute metabolic acidosis to nonspecific symptoms such as developmental delay, failure to thrive, hemiparesis, muscular hypotonia, and multiple sclerosis. Implementation of newborn screening for MCCD has resulted in broadening the range of phenotypic expression to include asymptomatic adults. The purpose of this study was to identify factors underlying the varying phenotypes of MCCD. Methods We performed exome sequencing on DNA from 33 cases and 108 healthy controls. We examined these data for associations between either MCC mutational status, genetic ancestry, or consanguinity and the absence or presence/specificity of clinical symptoms in MCCD cases. Results We determined that individuals with nonspecific clinical phenotypes are highly inbred compared with cases that are asymptomatic and healthy controls. For 5 of these 10 individuals, we discovered a homozygous damaging mutation in a disease gene that is likely to underlie their nonspecific clinical phenotypes previously attributed to MCCD. Conclusion Our study shows that nonspecific phenotypes attributed to MCCD are associated with consanguinity and are likely not due to mutations in the MCC enzyme but result from rare homozygous mutations in other disease genes. PMID:25356967

  2. A method for distinguishing consanguinity and population substructure using multilocus genotype data.

    PubMed

    Overall, A D; Nichols, R A

    2001-11-01

    We use the patterns of homozygosity at multiple loci to distinguish between excess homozygosity caused by consanguineous mating and that due to undetected population subdivision (the Wahlund effect). Clarification of the underlying causes of excess homozygosity is of practical importance in explaining the occurrence of recessive genetic disorders and in forensic match probability calculations. We calculated a likelihood surface for two parameters: C, the proportion of the population practicing consanguinity, and theta, the genetic correlation due population subdivision. To illustrate the method, we applied it to multilocus genotypic data of two U.K. Asian populations, one practicing a high frequency of cousin marriage, and another in which caste endogamy was suspected. The method was able to successfully distinguish the different patterns of relatedness. The method also returned accurate estimates of C and theta using simulated data sets. We show how our method can be extended to allow for degrees of inbreeding closer than cousin unions, including selfing. With closer inbreeding, the relatedness of recent ancestors beyond the parents becomes an issue. PMID:11606701

  3. Heritability of X chromosome-inactivation phenotype in a large family

    SciTech Connect

    Naumova, A.K.; Sapienca, C.; Plenge, R.M.; Willard, H.F.

    1996-06-01

    One of the two X chromosomes in each somatic cell of normal human females becomes inactivated very early in embryonic development. Although the inactivation of an X chromosome in any particular somatic cell of the embryonic lineage is thought to be a stochastic and epigenetic event, a strong genetic influence on this process has been described in the mouse. We have attempted to uncover evidence for genetic control of X-chromosome inactivation in the human by examining X-chromosome inactivation patterns in 255 females from 36 three-generation pedigrees, to determine whether this quantitative character exhibits evidence of heritability. We have found one family in which all seven daughters of one male and the mother of this male have highly skewed patterns of X-chromosome inactivation, suggesting strongly that this quantitative character is controlled by one or more X-linked genes in some families. 48 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolaemia in a Morrocan family due to a mutation of the G266C LDL receptor

    PubMed Central

    El Aziz, Siham; Chadli, Asma; El Ghomari, Hassan; Farouqi, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is quite common genetic disorder resulting in high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, but homozygous FH is rare. The authors describe a Moroccan family where a 24-year-old man and his 13-year-old brother, born from a consanguineous union, showed characteristics of FH with large tendon, tuberous and planar xanthomas. They had already five deaths in the sibship before the age of 15 years. Blood analysis found high LDL cholesterol levels. Arterial assessment showed diffuse atherosis. Genetic study found that patients are homozygous for the mutation of G266C LDL receptor. Treatment with high doses of statins and ezetimibe was introduced reducing cholesterol up to 70%. Large xanthomas were removed surgically. The G266C mutation has been previously identified in Morocco. Early identification and adequate treatment of individuals with hypercholesterolaemia and their relatives are essential for prevention of early death in these populations. PMID:22669020

  5. Lifestyle, family history, and risk of idiopathic Parkinson disease: a large Danish case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kenborg, Line; Lassen, Christina F; Ritz, Beate; Andersen, Klaus K; Christensen, Jane; Schernhammer, Eva S; Hansen, Johnni; Wermuth, Lene; Rod, Naja H; Olsen, Jørgen H

    2015-05-15

    The relationship between Parkinson disease (PD) and smoking has been examined in several studies, but little is known about smoking in conjunction with other behaviors and a family history of PD. Using unconditional logistic regression analysis, we studied individual and joint associations of these factors with idiopathic PD among 1,808 Danish patients who were diagnosed in 1996-2009 and matched to 1,876 randomly selected population controls. Although there was a downward trend in duration of smoking, this was not observed for daily tobacco consumption. A moderate intake of caffeine (3.1-5 cups/day) was associated with a lower odds ratio for PD (0.45, 95% confidence interval: 0.34, 0.62), as was a moderate intake of alcohol (3.1-7 units/week) (odds ratio = 0.60, 95% confidence interval: 0.58, 0.84); a higher daily intake did not reduce the odds further. When these behaviors were studied in combination with smoking, the odds ratios were lower than those for each one alone. Compared with never smokers with no family history of PD, never smokers who did have a family history had an odds ratio of 2.81 (95% confidence interval: 1.91, 4.13); for smokers with a family history, the odds ratio was 1.60 (95% confidence interval: 1.15, 2.23). In conclusion, duration of smoking seems to be more important than intensity in the relationship between smoking and idiopathic PD. The finding of lower risk estimates for smoking in combination with caffeine or alcohol requires further confirmation. PMID:25925389

  6. bZIPs and WRKYs: two large transcription factor families executing two different functional strategies

    PubMed Central

    Llorca, Carles M.; Potschin, Maren; Zentgraf, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    bZIPs and WRKYs are two important plant transcription factor (TF) families regulating diverse developmental and stress-related processes. Since a partial overlap in these biological processes is obvious, it can be speculated that they fulfill non-redundant functions in a complex regulatory network. Here, we focus on the regulatory mechanisms that are so far described for bZIPs and WRKYs. bZIP factors need to heterodimerize for DNA-binding and regulation of transcription, and based on a bioinformatics approach, bZIPs can build up more than the double of protein interactions than WRKYs. In contrast, an enrichment of the WRKY DNA-binding motifs can be found in WRKY promoters, a phenomenon which is not observed for the bZIP family. Thus, the two TF families follow two different functional strategies in which WRKYs regulate each other’s transcription in a transcriptional network whereas bZIP action relies on intensive heterodimerization. PMID:24817872

  7. Dividing the Large Glycoside Hydrolase Family 43 into Subfamilies: a Motivation for Detailed Enzyme Characterization.

    PubMed

    Mewis, Keith; Lenfant, Nicolas; Lombard, Vincent; Henrissat, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The rapid rise in DNA sequencing has led to an expansion in the number of glycoside hydrolase (GH) families. The GH43 family currently contains α-l-arabinofuranosidase, β-d-xylosidase, α-l-arabinanase, and β-d-galactosidase enzymes for the debranching and degradation of hemicellulose and pectin polymers. Many studies have revealed finer details about members of GH43 that necessitate the division of GH43 into subfamilies, as was done previously for the GH5 and GH13 families. The work presented here is a robust subfamily classification that assigns over 91% of all complete GH43 domains into 37 subfamilies that correlate with conserved sequence residues and results of biochemical assays and structural studies. Furthermore, cooccurrence analysis of these subfamilies and other functional modules revealed strong associations between some GH43 subfamilies and CBM6 and CBM13 domains. Cooccurrence analysis also revealed the presence of proteins containing up to three GH43 domains and belonging to different subfamilies, suggesting significant functional differences for each subfamily. Overall, the subfamily analysis suggests that the GH43 enzymes probably display a hitherto underestimated variety of subtle specificity features that are not apparent when the enzymes are assayed with simple synthetic substrates, such as pNP-glycosides. PMID:26729713

  8. Assessment of amyloid β-protein precursor gene mutations in a large set of familial and sporadic Alzheimer disease cases

    PubMed Central

    Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Vaula, Giovanna; Romano, Donna M.; Mortilla, Marzia; Huang, Tricia L.; Tupler, Rossella G.; Wasco, Wilma; Hyman, Bradley T.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Jenkins, Barbara J.; Kalaitsidaki, Marianna; Warren, Andrew C.; McInnis, Melvin C.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Karlinsky, Harry; Percy, Maire E.; Connor, Linda; Growdon, John; Crapper-McIachlan, Donald R.; Gusella, James F.; George-Hyslop, Peter H. St

    1992-01-01

    A genetic locus associated with familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and a candidate gene, APP, encoding the amyloid protein precursor have both been assigned previously to chromosome 21, and, in a few FAD families, mutations of APP have been detected. However, obligate crossovers between APP and FAD have also been reported in several FAD pedigrees, including FAD4, a large kindred showing highly suggestive evidence for linkage of the disorder to chromosome 21. In case the apparent APP crossover in FAD4 actually represented an intragenic recombination event or segregation of different mutations in different family branches, we have performed a more detailed assessment of APP as a candidate gene in this family. The entire coding region of the APP gene was sequenced for FAD4 and for FAD1, a second large kindred. No mutations were found, indicating that, in at least one chromosome 21–linked FAD pedigree, the gene defect is not accounted for by a mutation in the known coding region of the APP gene. A total of 25 well-characterized early- and late-onset FAD pedigrees were typed for genetic linkage to APP, to assess the percentage of FAD families predicted to carry mutations in the APP gene. None of the FAD families yielded positive lod scores at a recombination fraction of 0.0. To estimate the overall prevalence of FAD-associated mutations in the βA4 domain of APP, we sequenced exons 16 and 17 in 30 (20 early- and 10 late-onset) FAD kindreds and in 11 sporadic AD cases, and we screened 56 FAD kindreds and 81 cases of sporadic AD for the presence of the originally reported FAD-associated mutation, APP717 Val→Ile (by BclI digestion). No APP gene mutations were found in any of the FAD families or sporadic-AD samples examined in this study, suggesting that the mutations in exons 16 and 17 are a rare cause of FAD. Overall, these data suggest that APP gene mutations account for a very small portion of FAD. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:1642228

  9. Ovarian dysfunction and FMR1 alleles in a large Italian family with POF and FRAXA disorders: case report

    PubMed Central

    Miano, Maria Giuseppina; Laperuta, Carmela; Chiurazzi, Pietro; D'Urso, Michele; Ursini, Matilde Valeria

    2007-01-01

    Background The association between premature ovarian failure (POF) and the FMR1 repeat number (41> CGGn< 200) has been widely investigated. Current findings suggest that the risk estimation for POF can be calculated in the offspring of women with pre-mutated FMR1 alleles. Case presentation We describe the coexistence in a large Italian kindred of Fragile X syndrome and familial POF in females with ovarian dysfunctions who carried normal or expanded FMR1 alleles. Genetic analysis of the FMR1 gene in over three generations of females revealed that six carried pre-mutated alleles (61–200), of which two were also affected by POF. However a young woman, who presented a severe ovarian failure with early onset, carried normal FMR1 alleles (<40). The coexistence within the same family of two dysfunctional ovarian conditions, one FMR1-related and one not FMR1-related, suggests that the complexity of familial POF conditions is larger than expected. Conclusion Our case study represents a helpful observation and will provide familial cases with heterogeneous etiology that could be further studied when candidate genes in addition to the FMR1 premutation will be available. PMID:17428316

  10. Classic Case Report of Donohue Syndrome (Leprechaunism; OMIM *246200): The Impact of Consanguineous Mating.

    PubMed

    Nijim, Yousif; Awni, Youssef; Adawi, Amin; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2016-02-01

    Donohue syndrome ([DS]; leprechaunism) describes a genetic autosomal recessive disorder that results from the presence of homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the insulin receptor gene (INSR; 19p13.3-p13.2).Donohue syndrome is associated with a fatal congenital form of dwarfism with features of intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, exaggerated hyperglycemia with hyperinsulinism and dysmorphic abnormalities.We present a case of DS owing to the rarity of this syndrome (1 case in every million births). We discuss how the disease presents, its genetic underpinning, and its prevention.The case was encountered in an Arab male born on 1 September, 2014, for consanguineous parents. The delivery was via cesarean section at 37 weeks gestation due to severe intrauterine growth restriction and nonprogress labor term. The patient was admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit due to infection, and jaundice. Dysmorphic features, abnormalities of the craniofacial region, low birth weight, skin abnormalities, abdominal distension and hypertrichosis were observed. Laboratory examinations showed, hyperinsulinism, increased C-peptide, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, and anemia.The diagnosis of DS was done based on the combinations of typical dysmorphic characteristics, clinical evaluation, supported by genetic analysis and exaggerated biochemical results. Genetic diagnosis of DS was performed through analysis of DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A qualitative real-time PCR was used, to monitor the amplification of a targeted DNA molecule during the PCR. Other technique using sequencing of the INSR gene, which permits genetic diagnosis, counseling, and antenatal diagnoses in subsequent pregnancies, were also performed.Treatment of DS is supportive and requires the combined efforts of a multidisciplinary team, which include pediatricians, endocrinologists, dermatologists, and other health care professionals. Currently, treatment with recombinant insulin-like growth factor 1 demonstrates effectiveness, and a combination treatment with insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 resulted in an increased lifespan.There is a scarcity of genetic information on DS among the Arab population. Consanguinity is one of underlying reasons for the appearance of rare genetic disorders. Inbreeding has long been considered a controversial phenomenon. Genetic counseling and overwhelming the alertness of the negative consequences of consanguinity on public health are warranted. PMID:26871809

  11. Description of a large family with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia associated with the APOE p.Leu167del mutation

    PubMed Central

    Marduel, Marie; Ouguerram, Khadija; Serre, Valérie; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Marques-Pinheiro, Alice; Berge, Knut Erik; Devillers, Martine; Luc, Gérald; Lecerf, Jean-Michel; Tosolini, Laurent; Erlich, Danièle; Peloso, Gina M.; Stitziel, Nathan; Nitchké, Patrick; Jaïs, Jean-Philippe; Abifadel, Marianne; Kathiresan, Sekar; Leren, Trond Paul; Rabès, Jean-Pierre; Boileau, Catherine; Varret, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    Apo E mutants are associated with type III hyperlipoproteinemia characterized by high cholesterol and triglycerides levels. Autosomal Dominant Hypercholesterolemia (ADH), due to mutations in the LDLR, APOB or PCSK9 genes, is characterized by an isolated elevation of cholesterol due to high levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDL). We now report an exceptionally large family including 14 members with ADH. Through genome wide mapping, analysis of regional/functional candidate genes and whole exome sequencing, we identified a mutation in the APOE gene, p.Leu167del previously reported associated with sea-blue histiocytosis and familial combined hyperlipidemia. We confirmed the involvement of the APOE p.Leu167del in ADH, with (1) a predicted destabilization of an alpha-helix in the binding domain; (2) a decreased apo E level in LDL; and (3) a decreased catabolism of LDL. Our results show that mutations in the APOE gene can be associated with bona fide ADH. PMID:22949395

  12. Study of large inbred Friedreich ataxia families reveals a recombination between D9S15 and the disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Belal, S.; Ben Hamida, C.; Hentati, F.; Ben Hamida, M. ); Panayides, K.; Ioannou, P.; MIddleton, L.T. ); Sirugo, G.; Koenig, S.; Mandel, J.L ); Beckmann, J. )

    1992-12-01

    Friedreich ataxia is a neurodegenerative disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance. Precise linkage mapping of the Friedreich ataxia locus (FRDA) in 9q13-q21 should lead to the isolation of the defective gene by positional cloning. The two closest DNA markers, D9S5 and D9S15, show very tight linkage to FRDA, making difficult the ordering of the three loci. The authors present a linkage study of three large Friedreich ataxia families of Tunisian origin, with several multiallelic markers around D9S5 and D9S15. Haplotype data were used to investigate genetic homogeneity of the disease in these geographically related families. A meiotic recombination was found in a nonaffected individual, which excludes a 150-kb segment, including D9S15, as a possible location for the Freidreich ataxia gene and which should orient the search in the D9S5 region. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Large distribution and high sequence identity of a Copia-type retrotransposon in angiosperm families.

    PubMed

    Dias, Elaine Silva; Hatt, Clmence; Hamon, Serge; Hamon, Perla; Rigoreau, Michel; Crouzillat, Dominique; Carareto, Claudia Marcia Aparecida; de Kochko, Alexandre; Guyot, Romain

    2015-09-01

    Retrotransposons are the main component of plant genomes. Recent studies have revealed the complexity of their evolutionary dynamics. Here, we have identified Copia25 in Coffea canephora, a new plant retrotransposon belonging to the Ty1-Copia superfamily. In the Coffea genomes analyzed, Copia25 is present in relatively low copy numbers and transcribed. Similarity sequence searches and PCR analyses show that this retrotransposon with LTRs (Long Terminal Repeats) is widely distributed among the Rubiaceae family and that it is also present in other distantly related species belonging to Asterids, Rosids and monocots. A particular situation is the high sequence identity found between the Copia25 sequences of Musa, a monocot, and Ixora, a dicot species (Rubiaceae). Our results reveal the complexity of the evolutionary dynamics of the ancient element Copia25 in angiosperm, involving several processes including sequence conservation, rapid turnover, stochastic losses and horizontal transfer. PMID:26245353

  14. Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy II, a rare disease in a large Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Arain, Fazal Manzoor; Chand, Prem

    2015-10-01

    Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy II (HSAN II) is a rare genetic disorder, characterized by severe loss of pain, temperature and touch sensation. Injuries in these patients can progress to necrosis and shedding of digits and limbs. Here we report two cases of HSAN II belonging to a Pakistani family. Individual 1, a forty five year old man, had complete loss of pain sensation since birth. Self-mutilation and complication of injuries resulted in the shedding of all the digits and right foot and surgical amputation of left leg. Individual 2, a five year old girl,had delay in healing of wounds and self-mutilation. Examination showed a complete lack of pain sensation throughout her body and hyporeflexia. As the genetic cause of HSAN II is unknown, identification of more patients will allow further research on this disease and possibly develop a cure. PMID:26440849

  15. Exome Sequencing of 75 Individuals from Multiply Affected Coeliac Families and Large Scale Resequencing Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Vanisha; Bockett, Nicholas A.; Levine, Adam P.; Mirza, Muddassar M.; Hunt, Karen A.; Ciclitira, Paul J.; Hummerich, Holger; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Simpson, Michael A.; Plagnol, Vincent; van Heel, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CeD) is a highly heritable common autoimmune disease involving chronic small intestinal inflammation in response to dietary wheat. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, and 40 newer regions identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS) and dense fine mapping, account for ∼40% of the disease heritability. We hypothesized that in pedigrees with multiple individuals with CeD rare [minor allele frequency (MAF) <0.5%] mutations of larger effect size (odds ratios of ∼ 2–5) might exist. We sequenced the exomes of 75 coeliac individuals of European ancestry from 55 multiply affected families. We selected interesting variants and genes for further follow up using a combination of: an assessment of shared variants between related subjects, a model-free linkage test, and gene burden tests for multiple, potentially causal, variants. We next performed highly multiplexed amplicon resequencing of all RefSeq exons from 24 candidate genes selected on the basis of the exome sequencing data in 2,248 unrelated coeliac cases and 2,230 controls. 1,335 variants with a 99.9% genotyping call rate were observed in 4,478 samples, of which 939 were present in coding regions of 24 genes (Ti/Tv 2.99). 91.7% of coding variants were rare (MAF <0.5%) and 60% were novel. Gene burden tests performed on rare functional variants identified no significant associations (p<1×10−3) in the resequenced candidate genes. Our strategy of sequencing multiply affected families with deep follow up of candidate genes has not identified any new CeD risk mutations. PMID:25635822

  16. Birth prevalence of non-syndromic orofacial clefts in Saudi Arabia and the effects of parental consanguinity

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Heba J.; Innes, Nicola P.; Sallout, Bahauddin I.; Alamoudi, Najlaa M.; Hamdan, Mustafa A.; Alhamlan, Nasir; Al-Khozami, Amaal I.; Abdulhameed, Fatma D.; Al-Aama, Jumana Y.; Mossey, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the characteristics and prevalence of non-syndromic orofacial clefting (NSOFC) and assess the effects of parental consanguinity on NSOFC phenotypes in the 3 main cities of Saudi Arabia. Methods: All infants (114,035) born at 3 referral centers in Riyadh, and 6 hospitals in Jeddah and Madinah between January 2010 and December 2011 were screened. The NSOFC cases (n=133) were identified and data was collected through clinical examination and records, and information on consanguinity through parent interviews. The diagnosis was confirmed by reviewing medical records and contacting the infants’ pediatricians. Control infants (n=233) matched for gender and born in the same hospitals during the same period, were selected. Results: The prevalence of NSOFC was 1.07/1000 births in Riyadh, and 1.17/1000 births overall; cleft lip (CL) was 0.47/1000 births, cleft lip and palate (CLP) was 0.42/1000 births, and cleft palate (CP) was 0.28/1000 births. Cleft palate was significantly associated with consanguinity (p=0.047, odds ratio: 2.5, 95% confidence interval: 1 to 6.46), particularly for first cousin marriages. Conclusion: The birth prevalence of NSOFC in Riyadh alone, and in the 3 main cities of Saudi Arabia were marginally lower than the mean global prevalence. While birth prevalence for CLP was comparable to global figures, the CL:CLP ratio was high, and only CP was significantly associated with consanguinity. PMID:26318465

  17. Age distribution of human gene families shows significant roles of both large- and small-scale duplications in vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xun; Wang, Yufeng; Gu, Jianying

    2002-06-01

    The classical (two-round) hypothesis of vertebrate genome duplication proposes two successive whole-genome duplication(s) (polyploidizations) predating the origin of fishes, a view now being seriously challenged. As the debate largely concerns the relative merits of the 'big-bang mode' theory (large-scale duplication) and the 'continuous mode' theory (constant creation by small-scale duplications), we tested whether a significant proportion of paralogous genes in the contemporary human genome was indeed generated in the early stage of vertebrate evolution. After an extensive search of major databases, we dated 1,739 gene duplication events from the phylogenetic analysis of 749 vertebrate gene families. We found a pattern characterized by two waves (I, II) and an ancient component. Wave I represents a recent gene family expansion by tandem or segmental duplications, whereas wave II, a rapid paralogous gene increase in the early stage of vertebrate evolution, supports the idea of genome duplication(s) (the big-bang mode). Further analysis indicated that large- and small-scale gene duplications both make a significant contribution during the early stage of vertebrate evolution to build the current hierarchy of the human proteome. PMID:12032571

  18. A systematic search for linkage with nonsyndromic recessive deafness in two large Middle Eastern inbred kindreds excludes more than 30% of the genome

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, S.; Korostishevsky, M.; Frydman, M.

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that as many as 35 loci may individually cause autosomal recessive non-syndromic deafness. The extreme genetic heterogeneity, limited clinical differentiation and phenotypic assortative mating in many western countries make many families unsuitable for genetic linkage studies. Recently the first of those loci was mapped (to 13q) in two consanguineous families from northern Tunisia. We are studying two large highly consanguineous Middle Eastern kindreds (a total of 26 deaf in 98 sampled individuals). Examination in each family showed no evidence of clinical heterogeneity and indicated an uncomplicated profound bilateral sensorineural deafness. We have been able to exclude the 13q locus as the cause of deafness in each kindred and have also excluded such `candidate` loci as regions as those causing Usher`s syndrome type 1 (11q13)(11p), Usher`s syndrome type II (1q32-q41), Waardenburg syndrome type I (2q37), branchio-oto-renal syndrome (8q12-q13), Monge`s deafness (5q31), and Treacher Collins syndrome (5q31.3-q33.3). To date, no lod scores greater than 1 have been obtained in either kindred using 150 RFLT`s, VNTR`s and highly polymorphic microsatellite markers (CA repeats and tetranucleotides). By Morton`s criterion a minimum of 30% of the autosomal genome can be excluded for each kindred separately.

  19. A family of derivative-free conjugate gradient methods for large-scale nonlinear systems of equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wanyou; Xiao, Yunhai; Hu, Qing-Jie

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a family of derivative-free conjugate gradient methods for large-scale nonlinear systems of equations. They come from two modified conjugate gradient methods [W.Y. Cheng, A two term PRP based descent Method, Numer. Funct. Anal. Optim. 28 (2007) 1217-1230; L. Zhang, W.J. Zhou, D.H. Li, A descent modified Polak-Ribiére-Polyak conjugate gradient method and its global convergence, IMA J. Numer. Anal. 26 (2006) 629-640] recently proposed for unconstrained optimization problems. Under appropriate conditions, the global convergence of the proposed method is established. Preliminary numerical results show that the proposed method is promising.

  20. Syndrome Keratitis-Ichtyosis-Deafness (KID) chez un enfant togolais issu d'un mariage consanguin

    PubMed Central

    Kombaté, Koussak; Saka, Bayaki; Landoh, Dadja Essoya; Mouhari-Toure, Abass; Akakpo, Séfako; Belei, Eric; Gnassingbé, Wanguena; Djibril, Mohaman Awalou; Tchangaï-Walla, Kissem; Pitché, Palokinam

    2015-01-01

    Le syndrome KID est une affection génétique rare associant kératite, ichtyose et surdité. Nous rapportons un cas dont la surdité s'est compliquée de mutisme chez un enfant togolais issu d'un mariage consanguin.Il s'agissait d'une fillette de 9 ans admise en dermatologie pour une peau sèche et une kératodermie palmoplantaire évoluant depuis l'enfance, une surdité sévère et un mutisme total évoluant depuis la naissance. Il n'y avait pas d'histoire familiale connue de syndrome KID. Les parents de cet enfant sont des cousins germains. A l'examen, on notait une kératodermie palmoplantaire typique en cuir grossier, une peau sèche ichtyosiforme finement squameuse avec un aspect pachydermique aux genoux et un aspect arlequin aux jambes. L'examen ophtalmologique avait noté une blépharo-conjonctivite, une xérophtalmie, une photophobie et une absence de sourcils. L'examen ORL avait objectivé une hypotrophie des pavillons des oreilles, une surdité sévère et un mutisme total. La particularité de cette observation réside dans la sévérité de l'atteinte auditive qui s'est compliquée de mutisme. Notre enfant étant née de parents consanguins sains, sans histoire familiale de KID, nous pensons que le mode de transmission est probablement sporadique. Une étude moléculaire du cas index et de ses parents, non réalisée à cause de notre plateau technique limité aurait pu le confirmer. PMID:26664520

  1. Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a large pericentric X chromosome inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; Allinson, P.S.

    1996-06-01

    It has been demonstrated in animal studies that, in animals heterozygous for pericentric chromosomal inversions, loop formation is greatly reduced during meiosis. This results in absence of recombination within the inverted segment, with recombination seen only outside the inversion. A recent study in yeast has shown that telomeres, rather than centromeres, lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may be involved in promoting recombination. We studied by cytogenetic analysis and DNA polymorphisms the nature of meiotic recombination in a three-generation family with a large pericentric X chromosome inversion, inv(X)(p21.1q26), in which Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was cosegregating with the inversion. On DNA analysis there was no evidence of meiotic recombination between the inverted and normal X chromosomes in the inverted segment. Recombination was seen at the telomeric regions, Xp22 and Xq27-28. No deletion or point mutation was found on analysis of the DMD gene. On the basis of the FISH results, we believe that the X inversion is the mutation responsible for DMD in this family. Our results indicate that (1) pericentric X chromosome inversions result in reduction of recombination between the normal and inverted X chromosomes; (2) meiotic X chromosome pairing in these individuals is likely initiated at the telomeres; and (3) in this family DMD is caused by the pericentric inversion. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a large pericentric X chromosome inversion.

    PubMed Central

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W. L.; Allinson, P. S.; Blanton, S. H.; von Kap-Herr, C.; Kelly, T. E.

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated in animal studies that, in animals heterozygous for pericentric chromosomal inversions, loop formation is greatly reduced during meiosis. This results in absence of recombination within the inverted segment, with recombination seen only outside the inversion. A recent study in yeast has shown that telomeres, rather than centromeres, lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may be involved in promoting recombination. We studied by cytogenetic analysis and DNA polymorphisms the nature of meiotic recombination in a three-generation family with a large pericentric X chromosome inversion, inv(X)(p21.1q26), in which Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was cosegregating with the inversion. On DNA analysis there was no evidence of meiotic recombination between the inverted and normal X chromosomes in the inverted segment. Recombination was seen at the telomeric regions, Xp22 and Xq27-28. No deletion or point mutation was found on analysis of the DMD gene. On the basis of the FISH results, we believe that the X inversion is the mutation responsible for DMD in this family. Our results indicate that (1) pericentric X chromosome inversions result in reduction of recombination between the normal and inverted X chromosomes; (2) meiotic X chromosome pairing in these individuals is likely initiated at the telomeres; and (3) in this family DMD is caused by the pericentric inversion. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8651300

  3. A large family of Dscam genes with tandemly arrayed 5′ cassettes in Chelicerata

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yuan; Meng, Yijun; Ma, Hongru; Hou, Shouqing; Cao, Guozheng; Hong, Weiling; Shi, Yang; Guo, Pengjuan; Liu, Baoping; Shi, Feng; Yang, Yun; Jin, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila Dscam1 (Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecules) and vertebrate clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs) are two classic examples of the extraordinary isoform diversity from a single genomic locus. Dscam1 encodes 38,016 distinct isoforms via mutually exclusive splicing in D. melanogaster, while the vertebrate clustered Pcdhs utilize alternative promoters to generate isoform diversity. Here we reveal a shortened Dscam gene family with tandemly arrayed 5′ cassettes in Chelicerata. These cassette repeats generally comprise two or four exons, corresponding to variable Immunoglobulin 7 (Ig7) or Ig7–8 domains of Drosophila Dscam1. Furthermore, extraordinary isoform diversity has been generated through a combination of alternating promoter and alternative splicing. These sDscams have a high sequence similarity with Drosophila Dscam1, and share striking organizational resemblance to the 5′ variable regions of vertebrate clustered Pcdhs. Hence, our findings have important implications for understanding the functional similarities between Drosophila Dscam1 and vertebrate Pcdhs, and may provide further mechanistic insights into the regulation of isoform diversity. PMID:27080167

  4. A large family of Dscam genes with tandemly arrayed 5' cassettes in Chelicerata.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuan; Meng, Yijun; Ma, Hongru; Hou, Shouqing; Cao, Guozheng; Hong, Weiling; Shi, Yang; Guo, Pengjuan; Liu, Baoping; Shi, Feng; Yang, Yun; Jin, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila Dscam1 (Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecules) and vertebrate clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs) are two classic examples of the extraordinary isoform diversity from a single genomic locus. Dscam1 encodes 38,016 distinct isoforms via mutually exclusive splicing in D. melanogaster, while the vertebrate clustered Pcdhs utilize alternative promoters to generate isoform diversity. Here we reveal a shortened Dscam gene family with tandemly arrayed 5' cassettes in Chelicerata. These cassette repeats generally comprise two or four exons, corresponding to variable Immunoglobulin 7 (Ig7) or Ig7-8 domains of Drosophila Dscam1. Furthermore, extraordinary isoform diversity has been generated through a combination of alternating promoter and alternative splicing. These sDscams have a high sequence similarity with Drosophila Dscam1, and share striking organizational resemblance to the 5' variable regions of vertebrate clustered Pcdhs. Hence, our findings have important implications for understanding the functional similarities between Drosophila Dscam1 and vertebrate Pcdhs, and may provide further mechanistic insights into the regulation of isoform diversity. PMID:27080167

  5. Evolutionary expansion and divergence in a large family of primate-specific zinc finger transcription factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, A T; Huntley, S; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Baggott, D; Gordon, L; Stubbs, L

    2005-09-28

    Although most genes are conserved as one-to-one orthologs in different mammalian orders, certain gene families have evolved to comprise different numbers and types of protein-coding genes through independent series of gene duplications, divergence and gene loss in each evolutionary lineage. One such family encodes KRAB-zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF) genes, which are likely to function as transcriptional repressors. One KRAB-ZNF subfamily, the ZNF91 clade, has expanded specifically in primates to comprise more than 110 loci in the human genome, yielding large gene clusters in human chromosomes 19 and 7 and smaller clusters or isolated copies at other chromosomal locations. Although phylogenetic analysis indicates that many of these genes arose before the split between old world monkeys and new world monkeys, the ZNF91 subfamily has continued to expand and diversify throughout the evolution of apes and humans. The paralogous loci are distinguished by sequence divergence within their zinc finger arrays indicating a selection for proteins with different DNA binding specificities. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization data show that some of these ZNF genes can have tissue-specific expression patterns, however many KRAB-ZNFs that are near-ubiquitous could also be playing very specific roles in halting target pathways in all tissues except for a few, where the target is released by the absence of its repressor. The number of variant KRAB-ZNF proteins is increased not only because of the large number of loci, but also because many loci can produce multiple splice variants, which because of the modular structure of these genes may have separate and perhaps even conflicting regulatory roles. The lineage-specific duplication and rapid divergence of this family of transcription factor genes suggests a role in determining species-specific biological differences and the evolution of novel primate traits.

  6. R47H Variant of TREM2 Associated With Alzheimer Disease in a Large Late-Onset Family

    PubMed Central

    Korvatska, Olena; Leverenz, James B.; Jayadev, Suman; McMillan, Pamela; Kurtz, Irina; Guo, Xindi; Rumbaugh, Malia; Matsushita, Mark; Girirajan, Santhosh; Dorschner, Michael O.; Kiianitsa, Kostantin; Yu, Chang-En; Brkanac, Zoran; Garden, Gwenn A.; Raskind, Wendy H.; Bird, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    Importance The R47H variant in the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 gene (TREM2), a modulator of the immune response of microglia, is a strong genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD) and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders. Objective To investigate a large family with late-onset AD (LOAD), in which R47H cosegregated with 75% of cases. Design, Setting, and Participants This study includes genetic and pathologic studies of families with LOAD from 1985 to 2014. A total of 131 families with LOAD (751 individuals) were included from the University of Washington Alzheimer Disease Research Center. To identify LOAD genes/risk factors in the LOAD123 family with 21 affected members and 12 autopsies, we sequenced 4 exomes. Candidate variants were tested for cosegregation with the disease. TREM2 R47H was genotyped in an additional 130 families with LOAD. We performed clinical and neuropathological assessments of patients with and without R47H and evaluated the variant's effect on brain pathology, cellular morphology, and expression of microglial markers. Main Outcomes and Measures We assessed the effect of TREM2 genotype on age at onset and disease duration. We compared Braak and Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease scores, presence of α-synuclein and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 aggregates, and additional vascular or Parkinson pathology in TREM2 R47H carriers vs noncarriers. Microglial activation was assessed by quantitative immunohistochemistry and morphometry. Results Twelve of 16 patients with AD in the LOAD123 family carried R47H. Eleven patients with dementia had apolipoprotein E 4 (ApoE4) and R47H genotypes. We also found a rare missense variant, D353N, in a nominated AD risk gene, unc-5 homolog C (UNC5C), in 5 affected individuals in the LOAD123 family. R47H carriers demonstrated a shortened disease duration (mean [SD], 6.7 [2.8] vs 11.1 [6.6] years; 2-tailed t test; P = .04) and more frequent α-synucleinopathy. The panmicroglial marker ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 was decreased in all AD cases and the decrease was most pronounced in R47H carriers (mean [SD], in the hilus: 0.114 [0.13] for R47H_AD vs 0.574 [0.26] for control individuals; 2-tailed t test; P = .005 and vs 0.465 [0.32] for AD; P = .02; in frontal cortex gray matter: 0.006 [0.004] for R47H_AD vs 0.016 [0.01] for AD; P = .04 and vs 0.033 [0.013] for control individuals; P < .001). Major histocompatibility complex class II, a marker of microglial activation, was increased in all patients with AD (AD: 2.5, R47H_AD: 2.7, and control: 1.0; P < .01). Conclusions and Relevance Our results demonstrate a complex genetic landscape of LOAD, even in a single pedigree with an apparent autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. ApoE4, TREM2 R47H, and rare variants in other genes, such as UNC5C D353N, are likely responsible for the notable occurrence of AD in this family. Our findings support the role of the TREM2 receptor in microglial clearance of aggregation-prone proteins that is compromised in R47H carriers and may accelerate the course of disease. PMID:26076170

  7. Protein-bound molecules: a large family with a bad character.

    PubMed

    Sirich, Tammy L; Meyer, Timothy W; Gondouin, Bertrand; Brunet, Philippe; Niwa, Toshimitsu

    2014-03-01

    Many small solutes excreted by the kidney are bound to plasma proteins, chiefly albumin, in the circulation. The combination of protein binding and tubular secretion allows the kidney to reduce the free, unbound concentrations of such solutes to lower levels than could be obtained by tubular secretion alone. Protein-bound solutes accumulate in the plasma when the kidneys fail, and the free, unbound levels of these solutes increase more than their total plasma levels owing to competition for binding sites on plasma proteins. Given the efficiency by which the kidney can clear protein-bound solutes, it is tempting to speculate that some compounds in this class are important uremic toxins. Studies to date have focused largely on two specific protein-bound solutes: indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate. The largest body of evidence suggests that both of these compounds contribute to cardiovascular disease, and that indoxyl sulfate contributes to the progression of chronic kidney disease. Other protein-bound solutes have been investigated to a much lesser extent, and could in the future prove to be even more important uremic toxins. PMID:24780467

  8. A global assessment of a large monocot family highlights the need for group-specific analyses of invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Desika; Procheş, Şerban; Wilson, John R U

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding biological invasions recently, and one of the key findings is that the determinants of naturalization and invasion success vary from group to group. Here, we explore this variation for one of the largest plant families in the world, the Araceae. This group provides an excellent opportunity for identifying determinants of invasiveness in herbaceous plants, since it is one of the families most popular with horticulturalists, with species occupying various habitats and comprising many different life forms. We first developed a checklist of 3494 species of Araceae using online databases and literature sources. We aimed to determine whether invasiveness across the introduction-naturalization-invasion continuum is associated to particular traits within the family, and whether analyses focussed on specific life forms can reveal any mechanistic correlates. Boosted regression tree models were based on species invasion statuses as the response variables, and traits associated with human use, biological characteristics and distribution as the explanatory variables. The models indicate that biological traits such as plant life form and pollinator type are consistently strong correlates of invasiveness. Additionally, large-scale correlates such as the number of native floristic regions and number of introduced regions are also influential at particular stages in the invasion continuum. We used these traits to build a phenogram showing groups defined by the similarity of characters. We identified nine groups that have a greater tendency to invasiveness (includingAlocasia, the Lemnoideae andEpipremnum). From this, we propose a list of species that are not currently invasive for which we would recommend a precautionary approach to be taken. The successful management of plant invasions will depend on understanding such context-dependent effects across taxonomic groups, and across the different stages of the invasion process. PMID:26873404

  9. A global assessment of a large monocot family highlights the need for group-specific analyses of invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Desika; Procheş, Şerban; Wilson, John R. U.

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding biological invasions recently, and one of the key findings is that the determinants of naturalization and invasion success vary from group to group. Here, we explore this variation for one of the largest plant families in the world, the Araceae. This group provides an excellent opportunity for identifying determinants of invasiveness in herbaceous plants, since it is one of the families most popular with horticulturalists, with species occupying various habitats and comprising many different life forms. We first developed a checklist of 3494 species of Araceae using online databases and literature sources. We aimed to determine whether invasiveness across the introduction–naturalization–invasion continuum is associated to particular traits within the family, and whether analyses focussed on specific life forms can reveal any mechanistic correlates. Boosted regression tree models were based on species invasion statuses as the response variables, and traits associated with human use, biological characteristics and distribution as the explanatory variables. The models indicate that biological traits such as plant life form and pollinator type are consistently strong correlates of invasiveness. Additionally, large-scale correlates such as the number of native floristic regions and number of introduced regions are also influential at particular stages in the invasion continuum. We used these traits to build a phenogram showing groups defined by the similarity of characters. We identified nine groups that have a greater tendency to invasiveness (including Alocasia, the Lemnoideae and Epipremnum). From this, we propose a list of species that are not currently invasive for which we would recommend a precautionary approach to be taken. The successful management of plant invasions will depend on understanding such context-dependent effects across taxonomic groups, and across the different stages of the invasion process. PMID:26873404

  10. A de novo mutation of the MYH7 gene in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Tetsuya; Xiong, Hui; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Wang, Shuo; Satake, Wataru; Jiao, Hui; Yang, Yanling; Cha, Pei-Chieng; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Wu, Xiru; Toda, Tatsushi

    2015-01-01

    Laing distal myopathy (LDM) is an autosomal dominant myopathy that is caused by mutations in the slow/beta cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MYH7) gene. It has been recently reported that LDM presents with a wide range of clinical manifestations. We herein report a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy. The affected individuals in the family presented with foot drop in early childhood, along with progressive distal and proximal limb weakness. Their characteristic symptoms include scapular winging and scoliosis in the early disease phase and impairment of ambulation in the advanced phase. Although limb-girdle muscle dystrophy (LGMD) was suspected initially, a definite diagnosis could not be reached. As such, we performed linkage analysis and detected four linkage regions, namely 1q23.2-24.1, 14q11.2-12, 15q26.2-26.3 and 17q24.3. Through subsequent whole exome sequencing, we found a de novo p.K1617del causative mutation in the MYH7 gene and diagnosed the disease as LDM. This is the first LDM case in China. Our patients have severe clinical manifestations that mimic LGMD in comparison with the patients with the same mutation reported elsewhere.

  11. Assessment of individuals with BRCA1 and BRCA2 large rearrangements in high-risk breast and ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Angela G; Otegbeye, Ebunoluwa; Fleischut, Megan Harlan; Glogowski, Emily A; Siegel, Beth; Boyar, Sherry R; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Amoroso, Kim; Sheehan, Margaret; Berliner, Janice L; Stadler, Zsofia K; Kauff, Noah D; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark E; Zhang, Liying

    2014-06-01

    BRCA1/2 large rearrangement (LR) testing has been available to patients since 2006. Three existing models commonly used in cancer genetics clinical and research settings (BRCAPRO, Penn II and Myriad II) have not been assessed for their performance in predicting the presence of BRCA1/2 large genomic rearrangements in patients who do not have mutations detectable by the traditional Sanger sequencing approach. This study sought to determine if there is an optimal pre-test probability "cut off" value, calculated using these models, to optimize detection of large rearrangements (LRs). Our cohort consisted of 3,301 probands seen for genetic counseling and BRCA1/2 clinical testing from September 2006 to September 2011. A detailed personal and three-generation family history, including self-reported ethnicity, was taken as part of our standard clinical practice. We applied the BRCAPRO, Penn II, and Myriad II models to the probands with LRs. In our cohort of 3,301 probands, 150 carried a non-Ashkenazi mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Seventeen unrelated probands carried a private BRCA1/2 LR (17/150, 11.3 % of all detectable non-AJ mutations). At a pre-test probability cutoff of 10 %, all three empiric risk models would have failed to identify almost 30 % of probands with LRs. Our study shows that BRCA1/2 LR testing should be offered to all women who meet criteria for BRCA1/2 sequence analysis. PMID:24825132

  12. Improved white spruce (Picea glauca) genome assemblies and annotation of large gene families of conifer terpenoid and phenolic defense metabolism.

    PubMed

    Warren, René L; Keeling, Christopher I; Yuen, Macaire Man Saint; Raymond, Anthony; Taylor, Greg A; Vandervalk, Benjamin P; Mohamadi, Hamid; Paulino, Daniel; Chiu, Readman; Jackman, Shaun D; Robertson, Gordon; Yang, Chen; Boyle, Brian; Hoffmann, Margarete; Weigel, Detlef; Nelson, David R; Ritland, Carol; Isabel, Nathalie; Jaquish, Barry; Yanchuk, Alvin; Bousquet, Jean; Jones, Steven J M; MacKay, John; Birol, Inanc; Bohlmann, Joerg

    2015-07-01

    White spruce (Picea glauca), a gymnosperm tree, has been established as one of the models for conifer genomics. We describe the draft genome assemblies of two white spruce genotypes, PG29 and WS77111, innovative tools for the assembly of very large genomes, and the conifer genomics resources developed in this process. The two white spruce genotypes originate from distant geographic regions of western (PG29) and eastern (WS77111) North America, and represent elite trees in two Canadian tree-breeding programs. We present an update (V3 and V4) for a previously reported PG29 V2 draft genome assembly and introduce a second white spruce genome assembly for genotype WS77111. Assemblies of the PG29 and WS77111 genomes confirm the reconstructed white spruce genome size in the 20 Gbp range, and show broad synteny. Using the PG29 V3 assembly and additional white spruce genomics and transcriptomics resources, we performed MAKER-P annotation and meticulous expert annotation of very large gene families of conifer defense metabolism, the terpene synthases and cytochrome P450s. We also comprehensively annotated the white spruce mevalonate, methylerythritol phosphate and phenylpropanoid pathways. These analyses highlighted the large extent of gene and pseudogene duplications in a conifer genome, in particular for genes of secondary (i.e. specialized) metabolism, and the potential for gain and loss of function for defense and adaptation. PMID:26017574

  13. A large deletion encompassing the entire alpha-like globin gene cluster in a family of northern European extraction.

    PubMed Central

    Fortina, P; Delgrosso, K; Rappaport, E; Poncz, M; Ballas, S K; Schwartz, E; Surrey, S

    1988-01-01

    We describe a new deletional form of alpha thalassemia segregating in three generations of a family of northern European origin. A full-term female girl had hypochromic, microcytic anemia since early infancy associated with delayed language development, slow growth and weight gain. Hematologic studies suggested the presence of alpha thalassemia. Gene-blotting studies showed no abnormal alpha-like globin gene fragments; however, studies of inheritance of informative polymorphic restriction fragments using zeta, alpha and 3'-alpha-hypervariable region (3'-HVR) probes showed evidence for an extensive deletion encompassing the entire alpha-like globin gene cluster. The 3' breakpoint of this deletion maps beyond the 3'-HVR, a region implicated as a hot spot for the generation of other large deletional events within the alpha-like cluster. The 5' breakpoint maps at least 10 kilobases (kb) 5' to the zeta-globin gene. The minimum size estimate for this deletion is greater than 47 kilobases. Images PMID:2905048

  14. Waardenburg syndrome type I: Dental phenotypes and genetic analysis of an extended family

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino, Sibele-Nascimento; Paranaíba, Lívia-Maris-R.; Gomes, Andreia; dos-Santos-Neto, Pedro; Coletta, Ricardo-D.; Cardoso, Aline-Francoise; Frota, Ana-Cláudia; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of inheritance and the clinical features in a large family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1), detailing the dental abnormalities and screening for PAX3 mutations. Material and Methods To characterize the pattern of inheritance and clinical features, 29 family members were evaluated by dermatologic, ophthalmologic, otorhinolaryngologic and orofacial examination. Molecular analysis of the PAX3 gene was performed. Results The pedigree of the family,including the last four generations, was constructed and revealed non-consanguineous marriages. Out of 29 descendants, 16 family members showed features of WS1, with 9 members showing two major criteria indicative of WS1. Five patients showed white forelock and iris hypopigmentation, and four showed dystopia canthorum and iris hypopigmentation. Two patients had hearing loss. Dental abnormalities were identified in three family members, including dental agenesis, conical teeth and taurodontism. Sequencing analysis failed to identify mutations in the PAX3 gene. Conclusions These results confirm that WS1 was transmitted in this family in an autosomal dominant pattern with variable expressivity and high penetrance. The presence of dental manifestations, especially tooth agenesis and conical teeth which resulted in considerable aesthetic impact on affected individuals was a major clinical feature. Clinical relevance: This article reveals the presence of well-defined dental changes associated with WS1 and tries to establish a possible association between these two entities showing a new spectrum of WS1. Key words:Waardenburg syndrome, hearing loss, oral manifestations, mutation. PMID:27031059

  15. New Family of Quantum Spin Hall Insulators in Two-dimensional Transition-Metal Halide with Large Nontrivial Band Gaps.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liujiang; Kou, Liangzhi; Sun, Yan; Felser, Claudia; Hu, Feiming; Shan, Guangcun; Smith, Sean C; Yan, Binghai; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are promising for achieving dissipationless transport devices due to the robust gapless states inside the insulating bulk gap. However, currently realized two-dimensional (2D) TIs, quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulators, suffer from ultrahigh vacuum and extremely low temperature. Thus, seeking for desirable QSH insulators with high feasibility of experimental preparation and large nontrivial gap is of great importance for wide applications in spintronics. On the basis of the first-principles calculations, we predict a novel family of 2D QSH insulators in transition-metal halide MX (M = Zr, Hf; X = Cl, Br, and I) monolayers, especially, which is the first case based on transition-metal halide-based QSH insulators. MX family has the large nontrivial gaps of 0.12-0.4 eV, comparable with bismuth (111) bilayer (0.2 eV), stanene (0.3 eV), and larger than ZrTe5 (0.1 eV) monolayers and graphene-based sandwiched heterstructures (30-70 meV). Their corresponding 3D bulk materials are weak topological insulators from stacking QSH layers, and some of bulk compounds have already been synthesized in experiment. The mechanism for 2D QSH effect in this system originates from a novel d-d band inversion, significantly different from conventional band inversion between s-p, p-p, or d-p orbitals. The realization of pure layered MX monolayers may be prepared by exfoliation from their 3D bulk phases, thus holding great promise for nanoscale device applications and stimulating further efforts on transition metal-based QSH materials. PMID:26524118

  16. A Novel Locus Harbouring a Functional CD164 Nonsense Mutation Identified in a Large Danish Family with Nonsyndromic Hearing Impairment.

    PubMed

    Nyegaard, Mette; Rendtorff, Nanna D; Nielsen, Morten S; Corydon, Thomas J; Demontis, Ditte; Starnawska, Anna; Hedemand, Anne; Buniello, Annalisa; Niola, Francesco; Overgaard, Michael T; Leal, Suzanne M; Ahmad, Wasim; Wikman, Friedrik P; Petersen, Kirsten B; Crüger, Dorthe G; Oostrik, Jaap; Kremer, Hannie; Tommerup, Niels; Frödin, Morten; Steel, Karen P; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Børglum, Anders D

    2015-07-01

    Nonsyndromic hearing impairment (NSHI) is a highly heterogeneous condition with more than eighty known causative genes. However, in the clinical setting, a large number of NSHI families have unexplained etiology, suggesting that there are many more genes to be identified. In this study we used SNP-based linkage analysis and follow up microsatellite markers to identify a novel locus (DFNA66) on chromosome 6q15-21 (LOD 5.1) in a large Danish family with dominantly inherited NSHI. By locus specific capture and next-generation sequencing, we identified a c.574C>T heterozygous nonsense mutation (p.R192*) in CD164. This gene encodes a 197 amino acid transmembrane sialomucin (known as endolyn, MUC-24 or CD164), which is widely expressed and involved in cell adhesion and migration. The mutation segregated with the phenotype and was absent in 1200 Danish control individuals and in databases with whole-genome and exome sequence data. The predicted effect of the mutation was a truncation of the last six C-terminal residues of the cytoplasmic tail of CD164, including a highly conserved canonical sorting motif (YXXФ). In whole blood from an affected individual, we found by RT-PCR both the wild-type and the mutated transcript suggesting that the mutant transcript escapes nonsense mediated decay. Functional studies in HEK cells demonstrated that the truncated protein was almost completely retained on the plasma cell membrane in contrast to the wild-type protein, which targeted primarily to the endo-lysosomal compartments, implicating failed endocytosis as a possible disease mechanism. In the mouse ear, we found CD164 expressed in the inner and outer hair cells of the organ of Corti, as well as in other locations in the cochlear duct. In conclusion, we have identified a new DFNA locus located on chromosome 6q15-21 and implicated CD164 as a novel gene for hearing impairment. PMID:26197441

  17. The Crystal Structure of Bacteriophage HK97 gp6: Defining a Large Family of Head-Tail Connector Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, Lia; Lam, Robert; Tuite, Ashleigh; Baker, Lindsay A; Sadowski, Paul D; Radford, Devon R; Rubinstein, John L; Battaile, Kevin P; Chirgadze, Nickolay; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2010-08-17

    The final step in the morphogenesis of long-tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages is the joining of the DNA-filled head to the tail. The connector is a specialized structure of the head that serves as the interface for tail attachment and the point of egress for DNA from the head during infection. Here, we report the determination of a 2.1 {angstrom} crystal structure of gp6 of bacteriophage HK97. Through structural comparisons, functional studies, and bioinformatic analysis, gp6 has been determined to be a component of the connector of phage HK97 that is evolutionarily related to gp15, a well-characterized connector component of bacteriophage SPP1. Whereas the structure of gp15 was solved in a monomeric form, gp6 crystallized as an oligomeric ring with the dimensions expected for a connector protein. Although this ring is composed of 13 subunits, which does not match the symmetry of the connector within the phage, sequence conservation and modeling of this structure into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the SPP1 connector indicate that this oligomeric structure represents the arrangement of gp6 subunits within the mature phage particle. Through sequence searches and genomic position analysis, we determined that gp6 is a member of a large family of connector proteins that are present in long-tailed phages. We have also identified gp7 of HK97 as a homologue of gp16 of phage SPP1, which is the second component of the connector of this phage. These proteins are members of another large protein family involved in connector assembly.

  18. The Crystal Structure of Bacteriophage HK97 gp6: Defining a Large Family of Head-Tail Connector Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, Lia; Lam, Robert; Tuite, Ashleigh; Baker, Lindsay A; Sadowski, Paul D; Radford, Devon R; Rubinstein, John L; Battaile, Kevin P; Chirgadze, Nickolay; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2011-11-23

    The final step in the morphogenesis of long-tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages is the joining of the DNA-filled head to the tail. The connector is a specialized structure of the head that serves as the interface for tail attachment and the point of egress for DNA from the head during infection. Here, we report the determination of a 2.1 Å crystal structure of gp6 of bacteriophage HK97. Through structural comparisons, functional studies, and bioinformatic analysis, gp6 has been determined to be a component of the connector of phage HK97 that is evolutionarily related to gp15, a well-characterized connector component of bacteriophage SPP1. Whereas the structure of gp15 was solved in a monomeric form, gp6 crystallized as an oligomeric ring with the dimensions expected for a connector protein. Although this ring is composed of 13 subunits, which does not match the symmetry of the connector within the phage, sequence conservation and modeling of this structure into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the SPP1 connector indicate that this oligomeric structure represents the arrangement of gp6 subunits within the mature phage particle. Through sequence searches and genomic position analysis, we determined that gp6 is a member of a large family of connector proteins that are present in long-tailed phages. We have also identified gp7 of HK97 as a homologue of gp16 of phage SPP1, which is the second component of the connector of this phage. These proteins are members of another large protein family involved in connector assembly.

  19. The crystal structure of bacteriophage HK97 gp6: defining a large family of head-tail connector proteins.

    PubMed

    Cardarelli, Lia; Lam, Robert; Tuite, Ashleigh; Baker, Lindsay A; Sadowski, Paul D; Radford, Devon R; Rubinstein, John L; Battaile, Kevin P; Chirgadze, Nickolay; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2010-01-29

    The final step in the morphogenesis of long-tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages is the joining of the DNA-filled head to the tail. The connector is a specialized structure of the head that serves as the interface for tail attachment and the point of egress for DNA from the head during infection. Here, we report the determination of a 2.1 A crystal structure of gp6 of bacteriophage HK97. Through structural comparisons, functional studies, and bioinformatic analysis, gp6 has been determined to be a component of the connector of phage HK97 that is evolutionarily related to gp15, a well-characterized connector component of bacteriophage SPP1. Whereas the structure of gp15 was solved in a monomeric form, gp6 crystallized as an oligomeric ring with the dimensions expected for a connector protein. Although this ring is composed of 13 subunits, which does not match the symmetry of the connector within the phage, sequence conservation and modeling of this structure into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the SPP1 connector indicate that this oligomeric structure represents the arrangement of gp6 subunits within the mature phage particle. Through sequence searches and genomic position analysis, we determined that gp6 is a member of a large family of connector proteins that are present in long-tailed phages. We have also identified gp7 of HK97 as a homologue of gp16 of phage SPP1, which is the second component of the connector of this phage. These proteins are members of another large protein family involved in connector assembly. PMID:19895817

  20. A Novel Locus Harbouring a Functional CD164 Nonsense Mutation Identified in a Large Danish Family with Nonsyndromic Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten S.; Corydon, Thomas J.; Demontis, Ditte; Starnawska, Anna; Hedemand, Anne; Buniello, Annalisa; Niola, Francesco; Overgaard, Michael T.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Ahmad, Wasim; Wikman, Friedrik P.; Petersen, Kirsten B.; Crüger, Dorthe G.; Oostrik, Jaap; Kremer, Hannie; Tommerup, Niels; Frödin, Morten; Steel, Karen P.; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Børglum, Anders D.

    2015-01-01

    Nonsyndromic hearing impairment (NSHI) is a highly heterogeneous condition with more than eighty known causative genes. However, in the clinical setting, a large number of NSHI families have unexplained etiology, suggesting that there are many more genes to be identified. In this study we used SNP-based linkage analysis and follow up microsatellite markers to identify a novel locus (DFNA66) on chromosome 6q15-21 (LOD 5.1) in a large Danish family with dominantly inherited NSHI. By locus specific capture and next-generation sequencing, we identified a c.574C>T heterozygous nonsense mutation (p.R192*) in CD164. This gene encodes a 197 amino acid transmembrane sialomucin (known as endolyn, MUC-24 or CD164), which is widely expressed and involved in cell adhesion and migration. The mutation segregated with the phenotype and was absent in 1200 Danish control individuals and in databases with whole-genome and exome sequence data. The predicted effect of the mutation was a truncation of the last six C-terminal residues of the cytoplasmic tail of CD164, including a highly conserved canonical sorting motif (YXXФ). In whole blood from an affected individual, we found by RT-PCR both the wild-type and the mutated transcript suggesting that the mutant transcript escapes nonsense mediated decay. Functional studies in HEK cells demonstrated that the truncated protein was almost completely retained on the plasma cell membrane in contrast to the wild-type protein, which targeted primarily to the endo-lysosomal compartments, implicating failed endocytosis as a possible disease mechanism. In the mouse ear, we found CD164 expressed in the inner and outer hair cells of the organ of Corti, as well as in other locations in the cochlear duct. In conclusion, we have identified a new DFNA locus located on chromosome 6q15-21 and implicated CD164 as a novel gene for hearing impairment. PMID:26197441

  1. Lack of Evidence for Increased Genetic Loading for Autism among Families of Affected Females: A Replication from Family History Data in Two Large Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goin-Kochel, Robin P.; Abbacchi, Anna; Constantino, John N.

    2007-01-01

    Both the broad and narrow phenotypes of autism have been consistently observed in family members of affected individuals. Additionally, autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) present four times more often in males than in females, for reasons that are currently unknown. In this study, we examined whether there were differences in familial loading of ASD…

  2. The Value of Family History in Diagnosing Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Alhammadi, Ahmad; Al-Yafei, Fawzia

    2014-01-01

    Eliciting proper family medical history is critical in decreasing morbidity and mortality in patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs). Communities with a common practice of consanguinity have a high rate of PIDs. We are presenting 2 cases where digging deeply into the family medical history resulted in the diagnosis of Omenn syndrome, a possibly fatal entity if not managed in a reasonable period. PMID:25161792

  3. Identification of two new mutations in the GPR98 and the PDE6B genes segregating in a Tunisian family

    PubMed Central

    Hmani-Aifa, Mounira; Benzina, Zeineb; Zulfiqar, Fareeha; Dhouib, Houria; Shahzadi, Amber; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Rebaï, Ahmed; Söderkvist, Peter; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Kimberling, William J; Ayadi, Hammadi

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. ARRP could be associated with extraocular manifestations that define specific syndromes such as Usher syndrome (USH) characterized by retinal degeneration and congenital hearing loss (HL). The USH type II (USH2) associates RP and mild-to-moderate HL with preserved vestibular function. At least three genes USH2A, the very large G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR98, and DFNB31 are responsible for USH2 syndrome. Here, we report on the segregation of non-syndromic ARRP and USH2 syndrome in a consanguineous Tunisian family, which was previously used to define USH2B locus. With regard to the co-occurrence of these two different pathologies, clinical and genetic reanalysis of the extended family showed (i) phenotypic heterogeneity within USH2 patients and (ii) excluded linkage to USH2B locus. Indeed, linkage analysis disclosed the cosegregation of the USH2 phenotype with the USH2C locus markers, D5S428 and D5S618, whereas the ARRP perfectly segregates with PDE6B flanking markers D4S3360 and D4S2930. Molecular analysis revealed two new missense mutations, p.Y6044C and p.W807R, occurring in GPR98 and PDE6B genes, respectively. In conclusion, our results show that the USH2B locus at chromosome 3p23–24.2 does not exist, and we therefore withdraw this locus designation. The combination of molecular findings for GPR98 and PDE6B genes enable us to explain the phenotypic heterogeneity and particularly the severe ocular affection first observed in one USH2 patient. This report presents an illustration of how consanguinity could increase familial clustering of multiple hereditary diseases within the same family. PMID:18854872

  4. Issues and Methodologies in Large-Scale Assessments. Special Issue 2: Measuring Students' Family Background in Large-Scale International Education Studies. IERI Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brese, Falk; Mirazchiyski, Plamen

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between students' family background and achievement is often seen as an important topic in regard to equality and equity of educational provision. The results of various education studies show that the family background of students correlates with students' academic achievement at school. This paper focuses on the measurement of…

  5. [Interview. Mgr. Henry Harry: "The reticence of men with regard to family planning has been based largely..."].

    PubMed

    Kpatoukpa, L

    1993-01-01

    In an interview for the newsletter of the Association for Family Promotion (ABPF) of Benin, ABPF's honorary president Henry Harry, a Christian pastor, explains why men have been silent about family planning. The president of Benin reflected the view of many people when he said to ABPF that it is tolerated but not accepted. But the fact is that family planning gives mothers excellent health; a flourishing, prosperous, and happy family; and healthy children. A family in which the father has all responsibility provides an adequate education for its children and saves money for difficult days. It is for all these reasons that government began to be interested in family planning in the framework of promotion of the family and social welfare. Women should participate in the family planning movement because family planning helps their health and family. One of the principle causes for men being reluctant about family planning is hypocrisy. Some speak about sexual abstinence with their wife but have 3-5 women who can satisfy them when they want. According to men, family planning opens the door for their wives to be unfaithful. ABPF strategies to reduce adolescent pregnancies and abortion include family life education, establishment of dialogue at the heart of the family, and communication of the dangers of too close pregnancies, of unwanted pregnancies, and of uncontrolled sexual pleasures. Family planning is an apostolic work, a work of sacrifice, and a work of self-control. Those who work for the development of family planning must sacrifice themselves and help others without waiting for material returns for the well-being and prosperity of our populations. PMID:12318555

  6. High proportion of large genomic deletions and a genotype–phenotype update in 80 unrelated families with juvenile polyposis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aretz, S; Stienen, D; Uhlhaas, S; Stolte, M; Entius, M M; Loff, S; Back, W; Kaufmann, A; Keller, K‐M; Blaas, S H; Siebert, R; Vogt, S; Spranger, S; Holinski‐Feder, E; Sunde, L; Propping, P; Friedl, W

    2007-01-01

    Background In patients with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) the frequency of large genomic deletions in the SMAD4 and BMPR1A genes was unknown. Methods Mutation and phenotype analysis was used in 80 unrelated patients of whom 65 met the clinical criteria for JPS (typical JPS) and 15 were suspected to have JPS. Results By direct sequencing of the two genes, point mutations were identified in 30 patients (46% of typical JPS). Using MLPA, large genomic deletions were found in 14% of all patients with typical JPS (six deletions in SMAD4 and three deletions in BMPR1A). Mutation analysis of the PTEN gene in the remaining 41 mutation negative cases uncovered a point mutation in two patients (5%). SMAD4 mutation carriers had a significantly higher frequency of gastric polyposis (73%) than did patients with BMPR1A mutations (8%) (p<0.001); all seven cases of gastric cancer occurred in families with SMAD4 mutations. SMAD4 mutation carriers with gastric polyps were significantly older at gastroscopy than those without (p<0.001). In 22% of the 23 unrelated SMAD4 mutation carriers, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) was also diagnosed clinically. The documented histologic findings encompassed a wide distribution of different polyp types, comparable with that described in hereditary mixed polyposis syndromes (HMPS). Conclusions Screening for large deletions raised the mutation detection rate to 60% in the 65 patients with typical JPS. A strong genotype‐phenotype correlation for gastric polyposis, gastric cancer, and HHT was identified, which should have implications for counselling and surveillance. Histopathological results in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes must be critically interpreted. PMID:17873119

  7. New Family of Quantum Spin Hall Insulators in Two-dimensional Transition-Metal Halide with Large Nontrivial Band Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liujiang; Kou, Liangzhi; Sun, Yan; Felser, Claudia; Hu, Feiming; Shan, Guangcun; Smith, Sean C.; Yan, Binghai; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are promising for achieving dissipationless transport devices due to the robust gapless states inside the insulating bulk gap. However, currently realized 2D TIs, quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulators, suffer from ultra-high vacuum and extremely low temperature. Thus, seeking for desirable QSH insulators with high feasibility of experimental preparation and large nontrivial gap is of great importance for wide applications in spintronics. Based on the first-principles calculations, we predict a novel family of two-dimensional (2D) QSH insulators in transition-metal halide MX (M = Zr, Hf; X = Cl, Br, and I) monolayers with large nontrivial gaps of 0.12$-$0.4 eV, comparable with bismuth (111) bilayer (0.2 eV), stanene (0.3 eV) and larger than ZrTe$_5$ (0.1 eV) monolayers and graphene-based sandwiched heterstructures (30$-$70 meV). Their corresponding 3D bulk materials are weak topological insulators from stacking QSH layers, and some of bulk compounds have already been synthesized in experiment. The mechanism for 2D QSH effect in this system originates from a novel d$-$d band inversion, which is different from conventional band inversion between s$-$s orbitals, or p$-$p orbitals. The realization of pure layered MX monolayers may be prepared by exfoliation from their 3D bulk phases, thus holding great promise for nanoscale device applications and stimulating further efforts on transition metal-based QSH materials.

  8. [Organization of traditional Primary Health Care and the Family Health Program in large cities in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Machado, Cristiani Vieira; Lima, Luciana Dias de; Silva Viana, Ludmilla da

    2008-01-01

    This article analyzes the organization of traditional Primary Health Care and the Family Health Program (FHP) in the 22 municipalities of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, with more than 100,000 inhabitants each in 2005. The methodology included visits to the municipalities, interviews with health managers, and analysis of national databases. Four summary variables were defined: the Primary Health Care model and inclusion of the FHP; institutionalization of the FHP; organization of traditional primary care; and organization of the FHP. Classification of the municipalities according to the four variables showed widely diverse situations and the predominance of a parallel model for inclusion of the FHP. The municipalities with the best structural conditions for primary care are located in the interior of the State, besides those that have had the FHP implemented for more than six years and that practice various modalities of Primary Health Care organization. The majority of the municipalities with the worst situation in relation to the FHP are located in Greater Metropolitan Rio de Janeiro. In light of the results, the article discusses the challenges facing the FHP as a strategy for structuring primary health care in large cities, particularly in metropolitan areas. PMID:18660912

  9. Familial chondrocalcinosis in the Chiloe Islands, Chile.

    PubMed Central

    Reginato, A J; Hollander, J L; Martinez, V; Valenzuela, F; Schiapachasse, V; Covarrubias, E; Jacobelli, S; Arinoviche, R; Silcox, D; Ruiz, F

    1975-01-01

    Studies about chondrocalcinosis in the Chiloe Islands (Chile) showed the high frequency of the disease there and how most of it is aggregated in a few highly involved families. Pedigrees and the high degree of consanguinity among parents of index cases pointed to a recessive inheritance. The presence of common Caucasian anthropological features of genetic value in the patients and the lack of Indian mixture in three of the involved families, documented back to 1600, suggest a Caucasian origin of the mutation. Biochemical studies of the patients' synovial fluid showed a significant rise in pyrophosphate concentration. Calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase concentrations were not different from a control group. PMID:168817

  10. Living in a Large Family does Something for You: Influence of Family on the Achievement of African and Caribbean Women in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beoku-Betts, Josephine A.

    This article examines the influence of the family on women's achievement in scientific careers in the sub-Saharan African and Caribbean regions. It is based on semistructured interviews with 20 doctoral-level African and Caribbean women scientists working in research and academic institutions in these societies. Given the diversity of structural conditions, and economic, geopolitical, and sociocultural experiences, it is argued that the road to success in the pursuance of a scientific career are not the same, although there are areas of common ground. The study shows that when compared with their North American and European counterparts, there are significant differences in the family experiences of African and Caribbean women scientists that must be made visible and pursued more rigorously in further studies.

  11. Sifting through genomes with iterative-sequence clustering produces a large, phylogenetically diverse protein-family resource

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background New computational resources are needed to manage the increasing volume of biological data from genome sequencing projects. One fundamental challenge is the ability to maintain a complete and current catalog of protein diversity. We developed a new approach for the identification of protein families that focuses on the rapid discovery of homologous protein sequences. Results We implemented fully automated and high-throughput procedures to de novo cluster proteins into families based upon global alignment similarity. Our approach employs an iterative clustering strategy in which homologs of known families are sifted out of the search for new families. The resulting reduction in computational complexity enables us to rapidly identify novel protein families found in new genomes and to perform efficient, automated updates that keep pace with genome sequencing. We refer to protein families identified through this approach as “Sifting Families,” or SFams. Our analysis of ~10.5 million protein sequences from 2,928 genomes identified 436,360 SFams, many of which are not represented in other protein family databases. We validated the quality of SFam clustering through statistical as well as network topology–based analyses. Conclusions We describe the rapid identification of SFams and demonstrate how they can be used to annotate genomes and metagenomes. The SFam database catalogs protein-family quality metrics, multiple sequence alignments, hidden Markov models, and phylogenetic trees. Our source code and database are publicly available and will be subject to frequent updates (http://edhar.genomecenter.ucdavis.edu/sifting_families/). PMID:23061897

  12. Development and Two-Year Follow-Up Evaluation of a Training Workshop for the Large Preventive Positive Psychology Happy Family Kitchen Project in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lai, Agnes Y; Mui, Moses W; Wan, Alice; Stewart, Sunita M; Yew, Carol; Lam, Tai-Hing; Chan, Sophia S

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice and capacity-building approaches are essential for large-scale health promotion interventions. However, there are few models in the literature to guide and evaluate training of social service workers in community settings. This paper presents the development and evaluation of the "train-the-trainer" workshop (TTT) for the first large scale, community-based, family intervention projects, entitled "Happy Family Kitchen Project" (HFK) under the FAMILY project, a Hong Kong Jockey Club Initiative for a Harmonious Society. The workshop aimed to enhance social workers' competence and performance in applying positive psychology constructs in their family interventions under HFK to improve family well-being of the community they served. The two-day TTT was developed and implemented by a multidisciplinary team in partnership with community agencies to 50 social workers (64% women). It focused on the enhancement of knowledge, attitude, and practice of five specific positive psychology themes, which were the basis for the subsequent development of the 23 family interventions for 1419 participants. Acceptability and applicability were enhanced by completing a needs assessment prior to the training. The TTT was evaluated by trainees' reactions to the training content and design, changes in learners (trainees) and benefits to the service organizations. Focus group interviews to evaluate the workshop at three months after the training, and questionnaire survey at pre-training, immediately after, six months, one year and two years after training were conducted. There were statistically significant increases with large to moderate effect size in perceived knowledge, self-efficacy and practice after training, which sustained to 2-year follow-up. Furthermore, there were statistically significant improvements in family communication and well-being of the participants in the HFK interventions they implemented after training. This paper offers a practical example of development, implementation and model-based evaluation of training programs, which may be helpful to others seeking to develop such programs in diverse communities. PMID:26808541

  13. Development and Two-Year Follow-Up Evaluation of a Training Workshop for the Large Preventive Positive Psychology Happy Family Kitchen Project in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Agnes Y.; Mui, Moses W.; Wan, Alice; Stewart, Sunita M.; Yew, Carol; Lam, Tai-hing; Chan, Sophia S.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice and capacity-building approaches are essential for large-scale health promotion interventions. However, there are few models in the literature to guide and evaluate training of social service workers in community settings. This paper presents the development and evaluation of the “train-the-trainer” workshop (TTT) for the first large scale, community-based, family intervention projects, entitled “Happy Family Kitchen Project” (HFK) under the FAMILY project, a Hong Kong Jockey Club Initiative for a Harmonious Society. The workshop aimed to enhance social workers’ competence and performance in applying positive psychology constructs in their family interventions under HFK to improve family well-being of the community they served. The two-day TTT was developed and implemented by a multidisciplinary team in partnership with community agencies to 50 social workers (64% women). It focused on the enhancement of knowledge, attitude, and practice of five specific positive psychology themes, which were the basis for the subsequent development of the 23 family interventions for 1419 participants. Acceptability and applicability were enhanced by completing a needs assessment prior to the training. The TTT was evaluated by trainees’ reactions to the training content and design, changes in learners (trainees) and benefits to the service organizations. Focus group interviews to evaluate the workshop at three months after the training, and questionnaire survey at pre-training, immediately after, six months, one year and two years after training were conducted. There were statistically significant increases with large to moderate effect size in perceived knowledge, self-efficacy and practice after training, which sustained to 2-year follow-up. Furthermore, there were statistically significant improvements in family communication and well-being of the participants in the HFK interventions they implemented after training. This paper offers a practical example of development, implementation and model-based evaluation of training programs, which may be helpful to others seeking to develop such programs in diverse communities. PMID:26808541

  14. Evaluation of the Genetic Basis of Familial Aggregation of Pacemaker Implantation by a Large Next Generation Sequencing Panel

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Hillel A.; Uradu, Andrea; Lynnes, Ty C.; Groh, William J.; Miller, John M.; Lin, Hai; Gao, Hongyu; Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Yunlong; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Vatta, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Background The etiology of conduction disturbances necessitating permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation is often unknown, although familial aggregation of PPM (faPPM) suggests a possible genetic basis. We developed a pan-cardiovascular next generation sequencing (NGS) panel to genetically characterize a selected cohort of faPPM. Materials and Methods We designed and validated a custom NGS panel targeting the coding and splicing regions of 246 genes with involvement in cardiac pathogenicity. We enrolled 112 PPM patients and selected nine (8%) with faPPM to be analyzed by NGS. Results Our NGS panel covers 95% of the intended target with an average of 229x read depth at a minimum of 15-fold depth, reaching a SNP true positive rate of 98%. The faPPM patients presented with isolated cardiac conduction disease (ICCD) or sick sinus syndrome (SSS) without overt structural heart disease or identifiable secondary etiology. Three patients (33.3%) had heterozygous deleterious variants previously reported in autosomal dominant cardiac diseases including CCD: LDB3 (p.D117N) and TRPM4 (p.G844D) variants in patient 4; TRPM4 (p.G844D) and ABCC9 (p.V734I) variants in patient 6; and SCN5A (p.T220I) and APOB (p.R3527Q) variants in patient 7. Conclusion FaPPM occurred in 8% of our PPM clinic population. The employment of massive parallel sequencing for a large selected panel of cardiovascular genes identified a high percentage (33.3%) of the faPPM patients with deleterious variants previously reported in autosomal dominant cardiac diseases, suggesting that genetic variants may play a role in faPPM. PMID:26636822

  15. Mapping of a possible X-linked form of familial developmental dysphasia (FDD) in a single large pedigree

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, P.W.; Doody, R.S.; Epstein, H.F.

    1994-09-01

    Children diagnosed with developmental dysphasia develop speech very late without exhibiting sensory or motor dysfunction, and when they do begin to speak their grammar is abnormal. A large three-generation British pedigree was recently identified in which 16 out of 30 members were diagnosed as dysphasic. Assuming a dominant mode of inheritance with homogeneous phenotypic expression and complete penetrance among affected members, we showed by simulation analysis that this pedigree has the power to detect linkage to marker loci with an average maximum LOD score of 3.67 at {theta}=0.1. Given the absence of male-to-male transmission and a ratio of female to male affecteds (10/6) in this pedigree within the expected range for an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance, we decided to begin a genome-wide linkage analysis with microsatellite markers on the human X chromosome. Fifteen individuals (10 affected) from three generations were genotyped with 35 polymorphic STS`s (Research Genetics) which were approximately uniformly distributed along the X chromosome. Two-point linkage was assessed using the MLINK and ILINK programs from the LINKAGE package. Markers DXS1223, DXS987, DXS996 and DXS1060 on Xp22 showed consistent linkage to the disease locus with a maximum LOD score of 0.86 at a distance of 22 cM for DXS1060. If further analysis with additional markers and additional family members confirms X-linkage, such a localization would provide support for Lehrke`s hypothesis for X-linkage of major intellectual traits including verbal functioning.

  16. Mutational analysis of the neuronal cadherin gene CELSR1 and exclusion as a candidate for catatonic schizophrenia in a large family.

    PubMed

    Gross, J; Grimm, O; Ortega, G; Teuber, I; Lesch, K P; Meyer, J

    2001-12-01

    The cadherin gene CELSR1 is specifically expressed in the brain and located on chromosome 22q13.33, a region that has recently been shown to be involved in the etiopathogenesis of familial catatonic schizophrenia. The gene is a strong positional candidate and was considered for mutational analysis. A total of 17 allelic variants of CELSR1 was found by sequencing all 35 exons, intron-exon junctions, and the putative promoter region by screening two patients from a large family mainly supporting this locus, and three control subjects in a first step. No variant exclusively co-segregates with the disease in the large pedigree, providing evidence that CELSR1 is not causative for the pathogenesis of catatonic schizophrenia in this family. PMID:11807409

  17. Diagnostic Yield of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in a Cohort of Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders from a Highly Consanguineous Population.

    PubMed

    Al-Mamari, Watfa; Al-Saegh, Abeer; Al-Kindy, Adila; Bruwer, Zandre; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Al-Thihli, Khalid

    2015-08-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders are a complicated group of disorders characterized with heterogeneous genetic etiologies. The genetic investigations for this group of disorders have expanded considerably over the past decade. In our study we designed a tired approach and studied the diagnostic yield of chromosomal microarray analysis on patients referred to the Genetic and Developmental Medicine clinic in Sultan Qaboos University in Oman for autism spectrum disorders in a highly consanguineous population. Copy number variants were seen in 27% of our studied cohort of patients and it was strongly associated with dysmorphic features and congenital anomalies. PMID:25703031

  18. Consanguinity and founder effect for Gaucher disease mutation G377S in a population from Tabuleiro do Norte, Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chaves, R G; Pereira, L da Veiga; de Araújo, F T; Rozenberg, R; Carvalho, M D F; Coelho, J C; Michelin-Tirelli, K; Chaves, M de Freitas; Cavalcanti, G B

    2015-10-01

    Gaucher's disease (GD) is caused by a β-glucocerebrosidase deficiency, leading to the accumulation of glucocerebroside in the reticuloendothelial system. The prevalence of GD in Tabuleiro do Norte (TN) (1:4000) is the highest in Brazil. The purpose of this study was to present evidence of consanguinity and founder effect for the G377S mutation (c.1246G>A) among GD patients in TN based on enzyme, molecular and genealogical studies. Between March 2009 and December 2010, 131 subjects at risk for GD (GC in dried blood ≤2.19 nmol/h/ml) and 5 confirmed GD patients from the same community were submitted for molecular analysis to characterize the genetic profile of the population. Based on the enzymatic and molecular analysis, the subjects were classified into three categories: affected (n = 5), carrier (n = 20) and non-carrier (n = 111). All carriers were (G377S/wt). Affected subjects were homozygous (G377S/G377S). The identification of a single mutation in carriers and homozygotes from different generations, the history of the community and the genealogy study suggest that the high prevalence of GD in this population may be due to a combination of consanguinity and founder effect for the G377S mutation. PMID:25287185

  19. Early prenatal diagnosis of familial intestinal polyatresia (FIPA) in a 19 weeks old fetus with sonographic and postmortem findings.

    PubMed

    Balci, S; Bostanoğlu, S; Altinok, G; Beksaç, M S

    2003-01-01

    Familial intestinal polyatresia (FIPA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. In this article we present a new prenatally diagnosed case with FIPA from consanguineous parents with two affected daughters. The fourth pregnancy was diagnosed prenatally with FIPA at 18 weeks sonographically and these findings were confirmed by postmortem examination. PMID:14738109

  20. Familial Gigantiform Cementoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chunyue; Wang, Hongwei; He, Guang; Qin, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Familial gigantiform cementoma is an exceedingly rare but distinct subtype of cemento-osseous-fibrous lesion. Undocumented radiographic changes and related bone metabolism disorder are herein hypothesized and discussed. We present an adolescent case with recurrent familial gigantiform cementoma who received surgical intervention in our hospital. Apart from typical multiquadrant and expansile abnormalies involving both jaws, he also suffered from several times of fractures in lower extremity. Furthermore, radiographic examinations of calvaria, pelvis, femoris, tibia, and fibula all revealed radiolucent areas signifying diffuse osteopenic bone losses. Some of his consanguineous relatives bore the same burden of fractures during pubertal period. Considering these polyostotic conditions, a correlation of congenital bone metabolism disorder in cases with familial gigantiform cementoma, named “calcium steal disorder,” was thus proposed. Familial gigantiform cementoma is closely associated with “calcium steal disorder.” Whole-body dual-energy absorptiometry should be considered as a routine examination for fracture-related risk prediction. PMID:26945411

  1. A Novel Syntaxin 11 Gene (STX11) Mutation c.650T>C, p.Leu217Pro, in a Korean Child With Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Sultanova, Ardak K; Kim, Seong Koo; Lee, Jae Wook; Jang, Pil Sang; Chung, Nack Gyun; Cho, Bin; Park, Joonhong; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Myungshin

    2016-03-01

    We report the first Far Eastern case of a Korean child with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) caused by a novel syntaxin 11 (STX11) mutation. A 33-month-old boy born to non-consanguineous Korean parents was admitted for intermittent fever lasting one week, pancytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and HLH in the bone marrow. Under the impression of HLH, genetic study revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation of STX11: c.650T>C, p.Leu217Pro. Although no large deletion or allele drop was identified, genotype analysis demonstrated that the homozygous c.650T>C may have resulted from the duplication of a maternal (unimaternal) chromosomal region and concurrent loss of the other paternal allele, likely caused by meiotic errors such as two crossover events. A cumulative study of such novel mutations and their effects on specific protein interactions may deepen the understanding of how abnormal STX1 expression results in deficient cytotoxic function. PMID:26709266

  2. Hereditary motor neuron disease in a large Norwegian family with a "H46R" substitution in the superoxide dismutase 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Østern, Rune; Fagerheim, Toril; Ørstavik, Kristin; Holmøy, Trygve; Heiberg, Arvid; Lund-Petersen, Inger; Strom, Tim M; Nilssen, Øivind; Dahl, Arve

    2012-06-01

    Mutant genes associated with Charcot Marie Tooth type 2, distal hereditary motor neuropathy and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis may cause overlapping clinical phenotypes. We performed whole genome linkage analysis, haplotype analysis, sequencing and detailed clinical and neurophysiological investigations in a large Norwegian kindred with a condition that clinically had been classified as Charcot Marie Tooth type 2. The mutation c.140A>G, p.His47Arg (alias p.His46Arg or H46R) in the superoxide dismutase 1 gene (SOD1) segregated with the disease. The patients present a hereditary motor neuropathy-like clinical picture and long survival (mean 29years). To our knowledge, this is the first extensive report describing a large non-Japanese kindred. The prognostic implications of the condition seen in this family have little in common with what is normally associated with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and illustrates the complexity of the genetic etiology of lower motor neuron disease. PMID:22475618

  3. Affinal and Consanguineal Kin as a Social Support for the Rural Elderly. Paper of the Journal Series of the North Carolina Agricultural Research Service, Raleigh, NC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kivett, Vira R.

    Although the support network of elderly individuals has received increased attention recently, most research has focused on the parent child relationship without examining other levels of kin interrelations. To examine the help received by rural-transitional older adults from their consanguineous kin (adult children, grandchildren, siblings,…

  4. A large deletion in the LDL receptor gene--the cause of familial hypercholesterolemia in three Italian families: a study that dates back to the 17th century (FH-Pavia).

    PubMed Central

    Bertolini, S; Lelli, N; Coviello, D A; Ghisellini, M; Masturzo, P; Tiozzo, R; Elicio, N; Gaddi, A; Calandra, S

    1992-01-01

    In the LDL-receptor gene, a large rearrangement causing hypercholesterolemia was detected in three apparently unrelated families living in northern Italy. In all probands, binding, internalization, and degradation of 125I-LDL measured in skin fibroblasts were found to be 40%-50% of control values, indicative of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Southern blot analysis revealed that the probands were heterozygous for a large (25-kb) deletion of the LDL-receptor gene eliminating exons 2-12. The affected subjects possessed two LDL-receptor mRNA species: one of normal size (5.3 kb) and one of smaller size (3.5 kb). In the latter mRNA, the coding sequence of exon 1 is joined to the coding sequence of exon 13, causing a change in the reading frame and thereby giving rise to a premature stop codon. The receptor protein deduced from the sequence of the defective mRNA is a short polypeptide of 29 amino acids, devoid of any function. Tracing these three families back to the 17th century, we found both their common ancestor and the possible origin of the mutation, in a region which is called "Lomellina" and which is located in southwest Lombardy, near the old city of Pavia. Therefore we named the mutation "FH-Pavia." Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1609792

  5. Does anonymous sperm donation increase the risk for unions between relatives and the incidence of autosomal recessive diseases due to consanguinity?

    PubMed

    Serre, Jean-Louis; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Bernheim, Alain; Fellous, Marc; Rouen, Alexandre; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre

    2014-03-01

    In France gamete donation and notably sperm donation are anonymous. It has been claimed that anonymous artificial insemination by donor (AID) could highly contribute to an increase in the level of consanguinity and the incidence of autosomal recessive diseases, due to the unions between offspring of anonymous donors, unaware of their biological kinship, with the special case of unions between half-siblings. The actual incidence of consanguinity due to AID was compared with that resulting from the two other main sources of consanguinity and recessive diseases, i.e. voluntary unions between related individuals or inadvertent unions between the offspring of a common unknown male ancestor (false paternity). From these data, we estimated that expected unions in France between half sibs per year are 0.12 between offspring of sperm donors (1.2 every 10 years) and 0.5 between offspring of common male ancestors through false paternity (5 every 10 years). More generally, the inadvertent unions between false paternity offspring are roughly four times more frequent than those resulting from anonymous AID. We estimated that in the future, when AID has been in practice for several generations, out the 820 000 annual births in France, respectively, 6 and 25 births will be consanguineous through an unknown common ancestor related to anonymous AID and to a false paternity, both of which are negligible when compared with the 1256 children born from first-degree cousins. About 672 children per year are born with a recessive genetic disease due to the panmictic risk and additional affected cases due to consanguinity would be 34.54 for first-cousin offspring, 0.33 for offspring of individuals related due to false paternity and 0.079 for offspring of individuals related due to anonymous AID. Anonymous AID would therefore be responsible for 0.46% of consanguineous births and for 0.01% of recessive diseases. Therefore, the effect of anonymous AID on half-sibling unions, consanguinity and recessive disease incidence can be regarded as marginal. PMID:24345578

  6. Hurler-Scheie phenotype with parental consanguinity. Report of an additional case supporting the concept of genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Kaibara, N; Katsuki, I; Hotokebuchi, T; Takagishi, K; Kure, T

    1983-05-01

    The Hurler-Scheie phenotype in a 27-year-old woman of first-cousin parentage is possibly the first reported in the orthopedic literature. The patient exhibited short stature, coarse facies, corneal clouding, multiple stiff joints, normal intelligence, and a long history of bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome, which has not been relieved after operation. The irreversible nerve damage was apparently produced by the marked thickening of the transverse carpal ligament. Surgical findings in this case and data from published reports emphasize the need for early surgical treatment of the associated carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with the Hurler-Scheie phenotype. Parental consanguinity present in this patient is further evidence supporting the concept of a third mutant allele different from both the Hurler gene and the Scheie gene. PMID:6404579

  7. A Family-Wide RT-PCR Assay for Detection of Paramyxoviruses and Application to a Large-Scale Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    van Boheemen, Sander; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Verhagen, Josanne H.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Pas, Suzan D.; Herfst, Sander; Fouchier, Ron A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Family-wide molecular diagnostic assays are valuable tools for initial identification of viruses during outbreaks and to limit costs of surveillance studies. Recent discoveries of paramyxoviruses have called for such assay that is able to detect all known and unknown paramyxoviruses in one round of PCR amplification. We have developed a RT-PCR assay consisting of a single degenerate primer set, able to detect all members of the Paramyxoviridae family including all virus genera within the subfamilies Paramyxovirinae and Pneumovirinae. Primers anneal to domain III of the polymerase gene, with the 3′ end of the reverse primer annealing to the conserved motif GDNQ, which is proposed to be the active site for nucleotide polymerization. The assay was fully optimized and was shown to indeed detect all available paramyxoviruses tested. Clinical specimens from hospitalized patients that tested positive for known paramyxoviruses in conventional assays were also detected with the novel family-wide test. A high-throughput fluorescence-based RT-PCR version of the assay was developed for screening large numbers of specimens. A large number of samples collected from wild birds was tested, resulting in the detection of avian paramyxoviruses type 1 in both barnacle and white-fronted geese, and type 8 in barnacle geese. Avian metapneumovirus type C was found for the first time in Europe in mallards, greylag geese and common gulls. The single round family-wide RT-PCR assay described here is a useful tool for the detection of known and unknown paramyxoviruses, and screening of large sample collections from humans and animals. PMID:22496880

  8. Identification of rare DNA sequence variants in high-risk autism families and their prevalence in a large case/control population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetics clearly plays a major role in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), but studies to date are only beginning to characterize the causal genetic variants responsible. Until recently, studies using multiple extended multi-generation families to identify ASD risk genes had not been undertaken. Methods We identified haplotypes shared among individuals with ASDs in large multiplex families, followed by targeted DNA capture and sequencing to identify potential causal variants. We also assayed the prevalence of the identified variants in a large ASD case/control population. Results We identified 584 non-conservative missense, nonsense, frameshift and splice site variants that might predispose to autism in our high-risk families. Eleven of these variants were observed to have odds ratios greater than 1.5 in a set of 1,541 unrelated children with autism and 5,785 controls. Three variants, in the RAB11FIP5, ABP1, and JMJD7-PLA2G4B genes, each were observed in a single case and not in any controls. These variants also were not seen in public sequence databases, suggesting that they may be rare causal ASD variants. Twenty-eight additional rare variants were observed only in high-risk ASD families. Collectively, these 39 variants identify 36 genes as ASD risk genes. Segregation of sequence variants and of copy number variants previously detected in these families reveals a complex pattern, with only a RAB11FIP5 variant segregating to all affected individuals in one two-generation pedigree. Some affected individuals were found to have multiple potential risk alleles, including sequence variants and copy number variants (CNVs), suggesting that the high incidence of autism in these families could be best explained by variants at multiple loci. Conclusions Our study is the first to use haplotype sharing to identify familial ASD risk loci. In total, we identified 39 variants in 36 genes that may confer a genetic risk of developing autism. The observation of 11 of these variants in unrelated ASD cases further supports their role as ASD risk variants. PMID:24467814

  9. Familial extensive idiopathic bilateral pleural fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Azoulay, E; Paugam, B; Heymann, M F; Kambouchner, M; Haloun, A; Valeyre, D; Battesti, J P; Tazi, A

    1999-10-01

    The authors report three sisters with bilateral isolated apical pleural fibrosis of unknown origin, which did not respond to empirical antituberculosis therapy and oral corticosteroids. The disease evolved in an unrelenting fashion producing pleural fibrosis at the lung bases and leading to the death of two sisters and to lung transplantation in the other one. There was no history of other familial disease or consanguinity. The particular features of these cases and the differences from other reports of apparently cryptogenic pleural fibrosis are outlined. PMID:10573252

  10. Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Alicezah, M K; Razali, R; Rahman, T; Hoh, B P; Suhana, N H; Muid, S; Nawawi, H M; Koshy, M

    2014-08-01

    We report a rare case of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), a 22-year-old Malay woman who presented initially with minor soft tissue injury due to a cycling accident. She was then incidentally found to have severe xanthelasma and hypercholesterolemia (serum TC 15.3 mmol/L and LDL-C 13.9 mmol/L). She was referred to the Specialized Lipid Clinic and was diagnosed with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) based on the Simon Broome (SB) diagnostic criteria. There was a family history of premature coronary heart disease (CHD) in that three siblings had sudden cardiac death, and of consanguineous marriage in that her parents are cousins. DNA screening of LDLR and APOB genes was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), followed by Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (DHPLC). Homozygous mutation C255S in Exon 5 of her LDLR gene was found. There was no mutation was found in Exon 26 and Exon 29 of the APOB gene. This report is to emphasize the importance of identifying patients with FH and cascade screening through established diagnostic criteria and genetic studies in order to ensure early detection and early treatment intervention to minimize the risk of developing CHD and related complications. PMID:25194536

  11. Large group community-based parenting programs for families of preschoolers at risk for disruptive behaviour disorders: utilization, cost effectiveness, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, C E; Bremner, R; Boyle, M

    1995-10-01

    A significant percentage of children with disruptive behavior disorders do not receive mental health assistance. Utilization is lowest among groups whose children are at greatest risk. To increase the availability, accessibility, and cost efficacy of parent training programs, this prospective randomized trial compared a large group community-based parent training program to a clinic-based individual parent training (PT) programs. All families of junior kindergartners in the Hamilton public and separate school boards were sent a checklist regarding problems at home. Those returning questionnaires above the 90th percentile were block randomly assigned to: (1) a 12-week clinic-based individual parent training (Clinic/Individual), (2) a 12-week community-based large group parent training (Community/Group), or (3) a waiting list control condition. Immigrant families, those using English as a second language, and parents of children with severe behaviour problems were significantly more likely to enroll in Community/Groups than Clinic/Individual PT. Parents in Community/Groups reported greater improvements in behaviour problems at home and better maintenance of these gains at 6-month follow-up. A cost analysis showed that, with groups of 18 families, Community/Groups are more than six times as cost effective as Clinic/Individual programs. PMID:8847377

  12. Regulatory Patterns of a Large Family of Defensin-Like Genes Expressed in Nodules of Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Nallu, Sumitha; Silverstein, Kevin A. T.; Samac, Deborah A.; Bucciarelli, Bruna; Vance, Carroll P.; VandenBosch, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    Root nodules are the symbiotic organ of legumes that house nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Many genes are specifically induced in nodules during the interactions between the host plant and symbiotic rhizobia. Information regarding the regulation of expression for most of these genes is lacking. One of the largest gene families expressed in the nodules of the model legume Medicago truncatula is the nodule cysteine-rich (NCR) group of defensin-like (DEFL) genes. We used a custom Affymetrix microarray to catalog the expression changes of 566 NCRs at different stages of nodule development. Additionally, bacterial mutants were used to understand the importance of the rhizobial partners in induction of NCRs. Expression of early NCRs was detected during the initial infection of rhizobia in nodules and expression continued as nodules became mature. Late NCRs were induced concomitantly with bacteroid development in the nodules. The induction of early and late NCRs was correlated with the number and morphology of rhizobia in the nodule. Conserved 41 to 50 bp motifs identified in the upstream 1,000 bp promoter regions of NCRs were required for promoter activity. These cis-element motifs were found to be unique to the NCR family among all annotated genes in the M. truncatula genome, although they contain sub-regions with clear similarity to known regulatory motifs involved in nodule-specific expression and temporal gene regulation. PMID:23573247

  13. Utility of STR markers for the molecular diagnosis of a large Brazilian family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Possamai, C O; Carvalho, F M; Silva, M F C; Wolfgramm, E V; Sartori, M P N; Malta, F S V; Ribeiro, V P; Spina, V P; Gomes, K B; Ferreira, A C S; Louro, I D

    2008-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A disease (CMT1A) is most frequently caused by a tandem DNA duplication of a 1.4-Mb genomic fragment in the 17p11.2-12 chromosomal region. The disease is probably the product of a dosage effect of the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene located within the duplicated segment. We sought to study the largest reported Brazilian family with suspected diagnosis of CMT1A using eight short tandem repeat microsatellite markers. In addition, we analyzed the informativeness of these markers in the normal Brazilian population. The duplication was found in 12 members of the family. In two patients with CMT1A symptoms, the duplication was not detected, and one asymptomatic subject showed the duplication. D17S2230, D17S9B, D17S2220, D17S2227, D17S9A, and D17S4A markers showed the highest heterozygosity rates, and D17S2228 and D17S2224 markers were the least informative in our analysis. PMID:19048496

  14. Patterns of divergence of a large family of nodule cysteine-rich peptides in accessions of Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Nallu, Sumitha; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Zhou, Peng; Young, Nevin D; VandenBosch, Kathryn A

    2014-01-01

    The nodule cysteine-rich (NCR) groups of defensin-like (DEFL) genes are one of the largest gene families expressed in the nodules of some legume plants. They have only been observed in the inverted repeat loss clade (IRLC) of legumes, which includes the model legume Medicago truncatula. NCRs are reported to play an important role in plant–microbe interactions. To understand their diversity we analyzed their expression and sequence polymorphisms among four accessions of M. truncatula. A significant expression and nucleotide variation was observed among the genes. We then used 26 accessions to estimate the selection pressures shaping evolution among the accessions by calculating the nucleotide diversity at non-synonymous and synonymous sites in the coding region. The mature peptides of the orthologous NCRs had signatures of both purifying and diversifying selection pressures, unlike the seed DEFLs, which predominantly exhibited purifying selection. The expression, sequence variation and apparent diversifying selection in NCRs within the Medicago species indicates rapid and recent evolution, and suggests that this family of genes is actively evolving to adapt to different environments and is acquiring new functions. PMID:24635121

  15. Topological properties of large-scale structural brain networks in children with familial risk for reading difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, S.M. Hadi; Black, Jessica M.; Soriano, Teresa; Bugescu, Nicolle; Martinez, Rociel; Raman, Mira M.; Kesler, Shelli R.; Hoeft, Fumiko

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is a neurobiological deficit characterized by persistent difficulty in learning to read in children and adults who otherwise possess normal intelligence. Functional and structural connectivity data suggest that developmental dyslexia could be a disconnection syndrome. However, whether abnormalities in connectivity exist in beginning readers at-risk for reading difficulties is unknown. Using graphtheoretical analysis, we investigated differences in global and regional topological properties of structural brain networks in 42 beginning readers with (FH+) and without (FH−) familial risk for reading difficulties. We constructed separate structural correlation networks based on measures of surface area and cortical thickness. Results revealed changes in topological properties in brain regions known to be abnormal in dyslexia (left supramarginal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus) in the FH+ group mainly in the network constructed from measures of cortical surface area. We also found alterations in topological properties in regions that are not often advertised as dyslexia but nonetheless play important role in reading (left posterior cingulate, hippocampus, and left precentral gyrus). To our knowledge, this is the first report of altered topological properties of structural correlation networks in children at risk for reading difficulty, and motivates future studies that examine the mechanisms underlying how these brain networks may mediate the influences of family history on reading outcome. PMID:23333415

  16. Isolation of a gene (DLG3) encoding a second member of the discs-large family on chromosome 17q12-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.A.; Holik, P.; Stevens, J.

    1996-01-15

    The discs-large family is a collection of proteins that have a common structural organization and are thought to be involved in signal transduction and mediating protein-protein interactions at the cytoplasmic surface of the cell membrane. The defining member of this group of proteins is the gene product of the Drosophila lethal (1) discs large (dlg) 1 locus, which was originally identified by the analysis of recessive lethal mutants. Germline mutations in dlg result in loss of apical-basolateral polarity, disruption of normal cell-cell adhesion, and neoplastic overgrowth of the imaginal disc epithelium. We have isolated and characterized a novel human gene, DLG3, that encodes a new member of the discs-large family of proteins. The putative DLG3 gene product has a molecular weight of 66 kDa and contains a discs-large homologous region, an src oncogene homology motif 3, and a domain with homology to guanylate kinase. The DLG3 gene is located on chromosome 17, in the same segment, 17q12-q21, as the related gene, DLG2. The products of the DLG2 and DLG3 genes show 36% identity and 58% similarity to each other, and both show nearly 60% sequence similarity to p55, an erythroid phosphoprotein that is a component of the red cell membrane. We suggest that p55, DLG2, and DLG3 are closely related members of a gene family, whose protein products have a common structural organization and probably a similar function. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Variable Region and Major Histocompatibility Region Genes Are Linked to Induced Graves' Disease in Females From Two Very Large Families of Recombinant Inbred Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aliesky, Holly; Banuelos, Bianca; Magana, Jessica; Williams, Robert W.; Rapoport, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Graves' hyperthyroidism is caused by antibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR) that mimic thyroid stimulation by TSH. Stimulating TSHR antibodies and hyperthyroidism can be induced by immunizing mice with adenovirus expressing the human TSHR A-subunit. Prior analysis of induced Graves' disease in small families of recombinant inbred (RI) female mice demonstrated strong genetic control but did not resolve trait loci for TSHR antibodies or elevated serum T4. We investigated the genetic basis for induced Graves' disease in female mice of two large RI families and combined data with earlier findings to provide phenotypes for 178 genotypes. TSHR antibodies measured by inhibition of TSH binding to its receptor were highly significantly linked in the BXD set to the major histocompatibility region (chromosome 17), consistent with observations in 3 other RI families. In the LXS family, we detected linkage between T4 levels after TSHR-adenovirus immunization and the Ig heavy chain variable region (Igvh, chromosome 12). This observation is a key finding because components of the antigen binding region of Igs determine antibody specificity and have been previously linked to induced thyroid-stimulating antibodies. Data from the LXS family provide the first evidence in mice of a direct link between induced hyperthyroidism and Igvh genes. A role for major histocompatibility genes has now been established for genetic susceptibility to Graves' disease in both humans and mice. Future studies using arrays incorporating variation in the complex human Ig gene locus will be necessary to determine whether Igvh genes are also linked to Graves' disease in humans. PMID:25051451

  18. The crystal structure of M. leprae ML2640c defines a large family of putative S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Graña, Martin; Haouz, Ahmed; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Miras, Isabelle; Wehenkel, Annemarie; Bondet, Vincent; Shepard, William; Schaeffer, Francis; Cole, Stewart T; Alzari, Pedro M

    2007-09-01

    Mycobacterium leprae protein ML2640c belongs to a large family of conserved hypothetical proteins predominantly found in mycobacteria, some of them predicted as putative S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyltransferases (MTase). As part of a Structural Genomics initiative on conserved hypothetical proteins in pathogenic mycobacteria, we have determined the structure of ML2640c in two distinct crystal forms. As expected, ML2640c has a typical MTase core domain and binds the methyl donor substrate AdoMet in a manner consistent with other known members of this structural family. The putative acceptor substrate-binding site of ML2640c is a large internal cavity, mostly lined by aromatic and aliphatic side-chain residues, suggesting that a lipid-like molecule might be targeted for catalysis. A flap segment (residues 222-256), which isolates the binding site from the bulk solvent and is highly mobile in the crystal structures, could serve as a gateway to allow substrate entry and product release. The multiple sequence alignment of ML2640c-like proteins revealed that the central alpha/beta core and the AdoMet-binding site are very well conserved within the family. However, the amino acid positions defining the binding site for the acceptor substrate display a higher variability, suggestive of distinct acceptor substrate specificities. The ML2640c crystal structures offer the first structural glimpses at this important family of mycobacterial proteins and lend strong support to their functional assignment as AdoMet-dependent methyltransferases. PMID:17660248

  19. The crystal structure of M. leprae ML2640c defines a large family of putative S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases in mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Graña, Martin; Haouz, Ahmed; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Miras, Isabelle; Wehenkel, Annemarie; Bondet, Vincent; Shepard, William; Schaeffer, Francis; Cole, Stewart T.; Alzari, Pedro M.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae protein ML2640c belongs to a large family of conserved hypothetical proteins predominantly found in mycobacteria, some of them predicted as putative S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyltransferases (MTase). As part of a Structural Genomics initiative on conserved hypothetical proteins in pathogenic mycobacteria, we have determined the structure of ML2640c in two distinct crystal forms. As expected, ML2640c has a typical MTase core domain and binds the methyl donor substrate AdoMet in a manner consistent with other known members of this structural family. The putative acceptor substrate-binding site of ML2640c is a large internal cavity, mostly lined by aromatic and aliphatic side-chain residues, suggesting that a lipid-like molecule might be targeted for catalysis. A flap segment (residues 222–256), which isolates the binding site from the bulk solvent and is highly mobile in the crystal structures, could serve as a gateway to allow substrate entry and product release. The multiple sequence alignment of ML2640c-like proteins revealed that the central α/β core and the AdoMet-binding site are very well conserved within the family. However, the amino acid positions defining the binding site for the acceptor substrate display a higher variability, suggestive of distinct acceptor substrate specificities. The ML2640c crystal structures offer the first structural glimpses at this important family of mycobacterial proteins and lend strong support to their functional assignment as AdoMet-dependent methyltransferases. PMID:17660248

  20. Analysis of two Arab families reveals additional support for a DFNB2 nonsyndromic phenotype of MYO7A.

    PubMed

    Ben-Salem, Salma; Rehm, Heidi L; Willems, Patrick J; Tamimi, Zakaria A; Ayadi, Hammadi; Ali, Bassam R; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2014-01-01

    Variants in the head and tail domains of the MYO7A gene, encoding myosin VIIA, cause Usher syndrome type 1B (USH1B) and nonsyndromic deafness (DFNB2, DFNA11). In order to identify the genetic defect(s) underling profound deafness in two consanguineous Arab families living in UAE, we have sequenced a panel of 19 genes involved in Usher syndrome and nonsyndromic deafness in the index cases of the two families. This analysis revealed a novel homozygous insertion of AG (c.1952_1953insAG/p.C652fsX11) in exon 17 of the MYO7A gene in an Iraqi family, and a homozygous point mutation (c.5660C>T/p.P1887L) in exon 41 affecting the same gene in a large Palestinian family. Moreover, some individuals from the Palestinian family also harbored a novel heterozygous truncating variant (c.1267C>T/p.R423X) in the DFNB31 gene, which is involved in autosomal recessive nonsyndromic deafness type DFNB31 and Usher syndrome type II. Assuming an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance in the two inbred families, we conclude that the homozygous variants in the MYO7A gene are the disease-causing mutations in these families. Furthermore, given the absence of retinal disease in all affected patients examined, particularly a 28 year old patient, suggests that at least one family may segregate a DFNB2 presentation rather than USH1B. This finding further supports the premise that the MYO7A gene is responsible for two distinct diseases and gives evidence that the p.P1887L mutation in a homozygous state may be responsible for nonsyndromic hearing loss. PMID:24194196

  1. Families in the Military

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACAP Facts for Families Guide Skip breadcrumb navigation Military Families Quick Links Facts For Families Guide Facts ... have led to deployment of large numbers of military personnel (active duty, Reserves, National Guard). As a ...

  2. Inheritance of skewed X chromosome inactivation in a large family with an X-linked recessive deafness syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Orstavik, K.H.; Orstavik, R.E.; Eiklid, K.; Tranebjaerg, L.

    1996-07-12

    A new X-linked recessive deafness syndrome was recently reported and mapped to Xq22 (Mohr-Tranebjaeerg syndrome). In addition to deafness, the patients had visual impairment, dystonia, fractures, and mental deterioration. The female carriers did not have any significant manifestations of the syndrome. We examined X chromosome inactivation in 8 obligate and 12 possible carriers by using a polymerase chain reaction analysis of the methylation-dependent amplification of the polymorphic triplet repeat at the androgen receptor locus. Seven of 8 obligate carriers and 1 of 5 carriers by linkage analysis had an extremely skewed pattern in blood DNA not found in 30 normal females. The X inactivation pattern in fibroblast DNA from 2 of the carriers with the extremely skewed pattern was also skewed but to a lesser degree than in blood DNA. One obligate carrier had a random X inactivation pattern in both blood and fibroblast DNA. A selection mechanism for the skewed pattern is therefore not likely. The extremely skewed X inactivation in 8 females of 3 generations in this family may be caused by a single gene that influences skewing of X chromosome inactivation. 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Xq21.31-q21.32 duplication underlies intellectual disability in a large family with five affected males.

    PubMed

    Basit, Sulman; Malibari, Omhani I; Al-Balawi, Alia M; Afzal, Sibtain; Eldardear, Amr Elsayed Mohamed; Ramzan, Khushnooda

    2016-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability is the most common form of neurological disorder in male and accounts for 5-10% of incidence in the population. Copy number variants (CNVs) have been studied extensively to identify genomic regions responsible for neurological disorders. Array CGH and SNP genotyping have identified several CNVs on X-chromosome in patients with X-linked intellectual disability. We genotyped 2.5 million SNPs in 10 individuals of a 4 generation family segregating X-linked intellectual disability using Illumina Infinium BeadChip assay. Whole genome genotyping data analysis identified a single duplication of 3.95 Mb on X-chromosome in all five affected male individuals. This CNV is inherited from a healthy mother. All five affected individuals manifest moderate to severe intellectual disability, seizures and behavioral abnormalities. X-chromosome inactivation analysis showed that X-chromosome of the mother with duplication is completely inactivated which has also been found in daughters. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26358363

  4. A large family of putative transmembrane receptors homologous to the product of the Drosophila tissue polarity gene frizzled.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Macke, J P; Abella, B S; Andreasson, K; Worley, P; Gilbert, D J; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A; Nathans, J

    1996-02-23

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the frizzled gene plays an essential role in the development of tissue polarity as assessed by the orientation of cuticular structures. Through a combination of random cDNA sequencing, degenerate polymerase chain reaction amplification, and low stringency hybridization we have identified six novel frizzled homologues from mammals, at least 11 from zebrafish, several from chicken and sea urchin, and one from Caenorhabditis elegans. The complete deduced amino acid sequences of the mammalian and nematode homologues share with the Drosophila frizzled protein a conserved amino-terminal cysteine-rich domain and seven putative transmembrane segments. Each of the mammalian homologues is expressed in a distinctive set of tissues in the adult, and at least three are expressed during embryogenesis. As hypothesized for the Drosophila frizzled protein, the frizzled homologues are likely to act as transmembrane receptors for as yet unidentified ligands. These observations predict the existence of a family of signal transduction pathways that are homologous to the pathway that determines tissue polarity in Drosophila. PMID:8626800

  5. Extending the spectrum of Ellis van Creveld syndrome: a large family with a mild mutation in the EVC gene

    PubMed Central

    Ulucan, Hakan; Gül, Davut; Sapp, Julie C; Cockerham, John; Johnston, Jennifer J; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2008-01-01

    Background Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails and teeth and is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We report a family with complex septal cardiac defects, rhizomelic limb shortening, and polydactyly, without the typical lip, dental, and nail abnormalities of EvC. The phenotype was inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, with one instance of pseudodominant inheritance. Methods Because of the phenotypic overlap with EvC, microsatellite markers were used to test for linkage to the EVC/EVC2 locus. The results did not exclude linkage, so samples were sequenced for mutations. Results We identified a c.1868T>C mutation in EVC, which predicts p.L623P, and was homozygous in affected individuals. Conclusion We conclude that this EVC mutation is hypomorphic and that such mutations can cause a phenotype of cardiac and limb defects that is less severe than typical EvC. EVC mutation analysis should be considered in patients with cardiac and limb malformations, even if they do not manifest typical EvC syndrome. PMID:18947413

  6. Correlated Si isotope anomalies and large C-13 enrichments in a family of exotic SiC grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Epstein, S.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    A hypothesis is presented to the effect that the distinctive morphological characteristics and comparatively simple Si isotope systematics identify the platy SiC crystals as a genetically related family, formed around a single isotopically heterogeneous presolar star on an association of related stars. The enrichments in C-13 and the Si isotope systematics of the platy SiC are broadly consistent with theoretical models of nucleosynthesis in low-mass, carbon stars on the ASG. The Si isotope array most plausibly reflects mixing between (Si-28)-rich material, inherited from a previous generation of stars, and material enriched in Si-29 and Si-30, produced in intershell regions by neutron capture during He-burning. The absence of a correlation between the Si and C isotopic compositions of the SiC suggests either episodic condensation of SiC, extending over several thermal pulses, in the atmosphere of a single star, or the derivation of the SiC from several stars characterized by different rates of C-13 production.

  7. NLRP3 E311K mutation in a large family with Muckle-Wells syndrome - description of a heterogeneous phenotype and response to treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) is an inherited autoinflammatory disease characterized by fever, rash, arthralgia, conjunctivitis, sensorineural deafness and potentially life-threatening amyloidosis. The NLRP3/CIAS1 E311K mutation caused a heterogeneous phenotype of MWS in a large family. This study analyzes the clinical spectrum, patterns of inflammatory parameters and reports on response to treatment. Methods A total of 42 patients and family members were screened for the presence of the NLRP3 mutation. Clinical symptoms were reviewed in all family members. Classical (erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP)) and novel MWS inflammatory markers (serum amyloid A (SAA), cytokines, cytokine receptor levels) were determined. Patients were treated with the IL-1 inhibitors Anakinra or Canakinumab. Results All 13 clinically affected patients were heterozygous carriers of the amino acid substitution p.Glu311Lys/E311K encoded by exon 3 of the NLRP3 gene, but none of the healthy family members. Disease manifestations varied widely. Except for one child, all carriers suffered from hearing loss and severe fatigue. TNF-α, IL-6, TNF-RI, and TNF-RII levels as well as SAA were elevated in three, two, one, six and ten patients, respectively. Both clinical and laboratory parameters responded quickly and sustainedly to treatment with Anakinra or Canakinumab. Conclusion The NLRP3 E311K mutation is associated with a heterogeneous clinical spectrum, which may expand the view on MWS presentation. The leading symptom was hearing loss. Pericarditis, a rare but severe clinical feature of MWS, was diagnosed in three patients. One patient had a severe course, which led to renal failure secondary to amyloidosis. IL-1 inhibition leads to rapid and sustained improvement of symptoms. PMID:22146561

  8. Inherited Mutations in 17 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Genes Among a Large Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cohort Unselected for Family History of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Hart, Steven N.; Sharma, Priyanka; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Wang, Xianshu; Miron, Penelope; Olson, Janet E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Olswold, Curtis; Slettedahl, Seth; Hallberg, Emily; Guidugli, Lucia; Davila, Jaime I.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Janni, Wolfgang; Rack, Brigitte; Ekici, Arif B.; Slamon, Dennis J.; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fostira, Florentia; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fountzilas, George; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Tapper, William J.; Durcan, Lorraine; Cross, Simon S.; Pilarski, Robert; Shapiro, Charles L.; Klemp, Jennifer; Yao, Song; Garber, Judy; Cox, Angela; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ambrosone, Christine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Slager, Susan L.; Vachon, Celine M.; Eccles, Diana M.; Fasching, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent advances in DNA sequencing have led to the development of breast cancer susceptibility gene panels for germline genetic testing of patients. We assessed the frequency of mutations in 17 predisposition genes, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, in a large cohort of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) unselected for family history of breast or ovarian cancer to determine the utility of germline genetic testing for those with TNBC. Patients and Methods Patients with TNBC (N = 1,824) unselected for family history of breast or ovarian cancer were recruited through 12 studies, and germline DNA was sequenced to identify mutations. Results Deleterious mutations were identified in 14.6% of all patients. Of these, 11.2% had mutations in the BRCA1 (8.5%) and BRCA2 (2.7%) genes. Deleterious mutations in 15 other predisposition genes were detected in 3.7% of patients, with the majority observed in genes involved in homologous recombination, including PALB2 (1.2%) and BARD1, RAD51D, RAD51C, and BRIP1 (0.3% to 0.5%). Patients with TNBC with mutations were diagnosed at an earlier age (P < .001) and had higher-grade tumors (P = .01) than those without mutations. Conclusion Deleterious mutations in predisposition genes are present at high frequency in patients with TNBC unselected for family history of cancer. Mutation prevalence estimates suggest that patients with TNBC, regardless of age at diagnosis or family history of cancer, should be considered for germline genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Although mutations in other predisposition genes are observed among patients with TNBC, better cancer risk estimates are needed before these mutations are used for clinical risk assessment in relatives. PMID:25452441

  9. A single, large deletion accounts for all the beta-globin gene mutations in twenty families from Sabah (North Borneo), Malaysia. Mutation in brief no. 240. Online.

    PubMed

    Thong, M K; Rudzki, Z; Hall, J; Tan, J A; Chan, L L; Yap, S F

    1999-01-01

    Beta-thalassemia major is one of the commonest genetic disorders in South-East Asia. The spectrum of beta-thalassemia mutations in the various ethnic sub-populations on the island of Borneo is unknown. We studied 20 Dusun children from the East Malaysian state of Sabah (North Borneo) with a severe beta-thalassemia major phenotype, using a combination of Southern analysis, polymerase chain reaction analysis and direct sequencing. We found the children to be homozygous for a large deletion, which has a 5' breakpoint at position -4279 from the cap site of the beta-globin gene (HBB) with the 3' breakpoint located in a L1 family of repetitive sequences at an unknown distance from the beta-globin gene. This was similar to a recent finding of a large deletion causing beta-thalassemia first described in unrelated beta-thalassemia heterozygotes of Filipino descent. This report describes the first 20 families with homozygosity of the deletion causing a severe phenotype. It provides the first information on the molecular epidemiology of beta-thalassemia in Sabah. This finding has implications for the population genetics and preventative strategies for beta-thalassemia major for nearly 300 million individuals in South-East Asia. PMID:10338100

  10. A clinical evaluation tool for SNP arrays, especially for autosomal recessive conditions in offspring of consanguineous parents

    PubMed Central

    Wierenga, Klaas J.; Jiang, Zhijie; Yang, Amy C.; Mulvihill, John J.; Tsinoremas, Nicholas F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This report describes a fast online tool to accelerate and improve clinical interpretation of single nucleotide polymorphism array results for diagnostic purposes, when consanguinity or inbreeding is identified. Methods: We developed a web-based program that permits entry of regions of homozygosity and, using OMIM, UCSC, and NCBI databases, retrieves genes within these regions as well as their associated autosomal recessive disorders. Relevant OMIM Clinical Synopses can be searched, using key clinical terms permitting further filtering for candidate genes and disorders. Results: The tool aids the clinician by arriving at a short list of relevant candidate disorders, guiding the continued diagnostic work-up. Its efficacy is illustrated by presenting seven patients who were diagnosed using this tool. Conclusion: The online single nucleotide polymorphism array evaluation tool rapidly and systematically identifies relevant genes and associated conditions mapping to identified regions of homozygosity. The built-in OMIM clinical feature search allows the user to further filter to reach a short list of candidate conditions relevant for the diagnosis, making it possible to strategize more focused diagnostic testing. The tabulated results can be downloaded and saved to the desktop in an Excel format. Its efficacy is illustrated by providing a few clinical examples. PMID:23100014

  11. HERV-K113 is not associated with multiple sclerosis in a large family-based study.

    PubMed

    Moyes, David L; Goris, An; Ban, Maria; Compston, Alistair; Griffiths, David J; Sawcer, Stephen; Venables, Patrick J

    2008-03-01

    Numerous studies have invoked a role for retroviruses in multiple sclerosis (MS). Most have identified human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) as possible etiological agents. The majority of HERVs originate from ancestral infection and then become progressively disabled by mutations over millions of years of primate evolution. Their presence in 100% of healthy humans, together with the paucity of functional retroviral genes, argues strongly against a causal role in disease. Recently, a new class of insertionally polymorphic HERVs has been described that is present in only a proportion of the population. One of them, HERV-K113, is notable for open reading frames for all of its genes and is found in 0-28% of humans with widespread geographic and racial variation. Thus HERV-K113 is a credible candidate for causing disease in a manner comparable to infectious retroviruses. Genomic DNA samples from 951 patients with MS were tested for the presence of the HERV-K113 allele by PCR, with their unaffected parents (n = 1902) acting as controls. HERV-K113 provirus was found in 70 out of 951 (7.36%) patients with MS and was not significantly increased compared to the combined parent group (6.52%). The results do not support an association between this endogenous retrovirus and MS. This study also emphasizes the need for large cohorts with controls for race and geographic location when examining possible links between polymorphic HERVs and disease. PMID:18327982

  12. Identification of Rare Recurrent Copy Number Variants in High-Risk Autism Families and Their Prevalence in a Large ASD Population

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, G. Bryce; Kim, Cecilia; Frackelton, Edward; Thomas, Kelly; da Silva, Renata Pellegrino; Stevens, Jeff; Baird, Lisa; Otterud, Brith; Ho, Karen; Varvil, Tena; Leppert, Tami; Lambert, Christophe G.; Leppert, Mark; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2013-01-01

    Structural variation is thought to play a major etiological role in the development of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), and numerous studies documenting the relevance of copy number variants (CNVs) in ASD have been published since 2006. To determine if large ASD families harbor high-impact CNVs that may have broader impact in the general ASD population, we used the Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0 to identify 153 putative autism-specific CNVs present in 55 individuals with ASD from 9 multiplex ASD pedigrees. To evaluate the actual prevalence of these CNVs as well as 185 CNVs reportedly associated with ASD from published studies many of which are insufficiently powered, we designed a custom Illumina array and used it to interrogate these CNVs in 3,000 ASD cases and 6,000 controls. Additional single nucleotide variants (SNVs) on the array identified 25 CNVs that we did not detect in our family studies at the standard SNP array resolution. After molecular validation, our results demonstrated that 15 CNVs identified in high-risk ASD families also were found in two or more ASD cases with odds ratios greater than 2.0, strengthening their support as ASD risk variants. In addition, of the 25 CNVs identified using SNV probes on our custom array, 9 also had odds ratios greater than 2.0, suggesting that these CNVs also are ASD risk variants. Eighteen of the validated CNVs have not been reported previously in individuals with ASD and three have only been observed once. Finally, we confirmed the association of 31 of 185 published ASD-associated CNVs in our dataset with odds ratios greater than 2.0, suggesting they may be of clinical relevance in the evaluation of children with ASDs. Taken together, these data provide strong support for the existence and application of high-impact CNVs in the clinical genetic evaluation of children with ASD. PMID:23341896

  13. A novel single-base deletion in ROR2 causes atypical brachydactyly type B1 with cutaneous syndactyly in a large Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Lv, Dan; Luo, Yang; Yang, Wei; Cao, Lihua; Wen, Yaran; Zhao, Xiuli; Sun, Miao; Lo, Wilson H-Y; Zhang, Xue

    2009-07-01

    Mutations in ROR2, encoding the receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 2, cause two distinct skeletal diseases: autosomal dominant brachydactyly type B1 (BDB1) and autosomal recessive Robinow syndrome. In a large Chinese family with a limb phenotype, consisting of atypical BDB1 and cutaneous syndactyly of varying degrees, we performed a two-point linkage analysis using microsatellite markers on 2q33-q37 and 9q22.31, and found a significant linkage to the ROR2 locus. We identified a novel single-base deletion in ROR2, c.2243delC (p.W749fsX24), and confirmed its segregation with the limb phenotype in the family. This deletion is predicted to produce a truncated ROR2 protein with an additional C-terminal polypeptide of 24 amino-acid residues. To the best of our knowledge, the deletion represents the second ROR2 mutation associated with a BDB1-syndactyly phenotype. PMID:19461659

  14. A Large Family of AvrLm6-like Genes in the Apple and Pear Scab Pathogens, Venturia inaequalis and Venturia pirina.

    PubMed

    Shiller, Jason; Van de Wouw, Angela P; Taranto, Adam P; Bowen, Joanna K; Dubois, David; Robinson, Andrew; Deng, Cecilia H; Plummer, Kim M

    2015-01-01

    Venturia inaequalis and V. pirina are Dothideomycete fungi that cause apple scab and pear scab disease, respectively. Whole genome sequencing of V. inaequalis and V. pirina isolates has revealed predicted proteins with sequence similarity to AvrLm6, a Leptosphaeria maculans effector that triggers a resistance response in Brassica napus and B. juncea carrying the resistance gene, Rlm6. AvrLm6-like genes are present as large families (>15 members) in all sequenced strains of V. inaequalis and V. pirina, while in L. maculans, only AvrLm6 and a single paralog have been identified. The Venturia AvrLm6-like genes are located in gene-poor regions of the genomes, and mostly in close proximity to transposable elements, which may explain the expansion of these gene families. An AvrLm6-like gene from V. inaequalis with the highest sequence identity to AvrLm6 was unable to trigger a resistance response in Rlm6-carrying B. juncea. RNA-seq and qRT-PCR gene expression analyses, of in planta- and in vitro-grown V. inaequalis, has revealed that many of the AvrLm6-like genes are expressed during infection. An AvrLm6 homolog from V. inaequalis that is up-regulated during infection was shown (using an eYFP-fusion protein construct) to be localized to the sub-cuticular stroma during biotrophic infection of apple hypocotyls. PMID:26635823

  15. A Large Family of AvrLm6-like Genes in the Apple and Pear Scab Pathogens, Venturia inaequalis and Venturia pirina

    PubMed Central

    Shiller, Jason; Van de Wouw, Angela P.; Taranto, Adam P.; Bowen, Joanna K.; Dubois, David; Robinson, Andrew; Deng, Cecilia H.; Plummer, Kim M.

    2015-01-01

    Venturia inaequalis and V. pirina are Dothideomycete fungi that cause apple scab and pear scab disease, respectively. Whole genome sequencing of V. inaequalis and V. pirina isolates has revealed predicted proteins with sequence similarity to AvrLm6, a Leptosphaeria maculans effector that triggers a resistance response in Brassica napus and B. juncea carrying the resistance gene, Rlm6. AvrLm6-like genes are present as large families (>15 members) in all sequenced strains of V. inaequalis and V. pirina, while in L. maculans, only AvrLm6 and a single paralog have been identified. The Venturia AvrLm6-like genes are located in gene-poor regions of the genomes, and mostly in close proximity to transposable elements, which may explain the expansion of these gene families. An AvrLm6-like gene from V. inaequalis with the highest sequence identity to AvrLm6 was unable to trigger a resistance response in Rlm6-carrying B. juncea. RNA-seq and qRT-PCR gene expression analyses, of in planta- and in vitro-grown V. inaequalis, has revealed that many of the AvrLm6-like genes are expressed during infection. An AvrLm6 homolog from V. inaequalis that is up-regulated during infection was shown (using an eYFP-fusion protein construct) to be localized to the sub-cuticular stroma during biotrophic infection of apple hypocotyls. PMID:26635823

  16. A novel transthyretin variant p.H110D (H90D) as a cause of familial amyloid polyneuropathy in a large Irish kindred.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Zepeda, Victor H; Bahlis, Nizar J; Gilbertson, Janet; Rendell, Nigel; Porcari, Riccardo; Lachmann, Helen J; Gillmore, Julian D; Hawkins, Philip N; Rowczenio, Dorota M

    2015-03-01

    Hereditary transthyretin (ATTR) amyloidosis is caused by inheritance of an abnormal TTR gene in an autosomal dominant fashion. In its native state, TTR is a homotetramer consisting of four identical polypeptides. Mutations in the TTR gene contribute to destabilization and dissociation of the TTR tetramer, enabling abnormally folded monomers to self-assemble as amyloid fibrils. Currently, over 120 TTR variants have been described, with varying geographic distributions, degrees of amyloidogenicity and organ involvement. We report here a large Irish family with familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP), consisting of multiple affected generations, caused by a novel TTR mutation; p.H110D (H90D). The demonstration, by immunohistochemistry and laser micro dissection-mass spectrometry (LMD/MS) that the amyloid fibrils were composed of TTR, in conjunction with a typical FAP phenotype, indicates that the novel TTR mutation was the cause of amyloidosis. We used a molecular visualization tool PyMOL to analyze the effect of the p.H110D (H90D) replacement on the stability of the TTR molecule. Our data suggest that the loss of two hydrogen bonds and the presence of an additional negative charge in the core of a cluster of acidic residues significantly perturb the tetramer stability and likely contribute to the pathogenic role of this variant. PMID:25430583

  17. The vertebrate makorin ubiquitin ligase gene family has been shaped by large-scale duplication and retroposition from an ancestral gonad-specific, maternal-effect gene

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Members of the makorin (mkrn) gene family encode RING/C3H zinc finger proteins with U3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Although these proteins have been described in a variety of eukaryotes such as plants, fungi, invertebrates and vertebrates including human, almost nothing is known about their structural and functional evolution. Results Via partial sequencing of a testis cDNA library from the poeciliid fish Xiphophorus maculatus, we have identified a new member of the makorin gene family, that we called mkrn4. In addition to the already described mkrn1 and mkrn2, mkrn4 is the third example of a makorin gene present in both tetrapods and ray-finned fish. However, this gene was not detected in mouse and rat, suggesting its loss in the lineage leading to rodent murids. Mkrn2 and mkrn4 are located in large ancient duplicated regions in tetrapod and fish genomes, suggesting the possible involvement of ancestral vertebrate-specific genome duplication in the formation of these genes. Intriguingly, many mkrn1 and mkrn2 intronless retrocopies have been detected in mammals but not in other vertebrates, most of them corresponding to pseudogenes. The nature and number of zinc fingers were found to be conserved in Mkrn1 and Mkrn2 but much more variable in Mkrn4, with lineage-specific differences. RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated a highly gonad-biased expression pattern for makorin genes in medaka and zebrafish (ray-finned fishes) and amphibians, but a strong relaxation of this specificity in birds and mammals. All three mkrn genes were maternally expressed before zygotic genome activation in both medaka and zebrafish early embryos. Conclusion Our analysis demonstrates that the makorin gene family has evolved through large-scale duplication and subsequent lineage-specific retroposition-mediated duplications in vertebrates. From the three major vertebrate mkrn genes, mkrn4 shows the highest evolutionary dynamics, with lineage-specific loss of zinc fingers and even complete gene elimination from certain groups of vertebrates. Comparative expression analysis strongly suggests that the ancestral E3 ubiquitin ligase function of the single copy mkrn gene before duplication in vertebrates was gonad-specific, with maternal expression in early embryos. PMID:21172006

  18. Large linkage analysis in 100 families with autosomal recessive spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and 11 EPH families using 15 polymorphic loci in the region 5q11. 2-q13. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, B.; Pick, E.; Leutner, A.; Dadze, A.; Voosen, B.; Piechaczek-Wappenschmidt, B.; Rudnik-Schoeneborn, S.; Schoenling, J.; Zerres, K. ); Knapp, M. )

    1994-03-01

    The autosomal recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) gene was mapped to the region 5q11.2-q.13.3 in 1990. Here, the authors present a large genetic linkage study of 100 SMA families and 11 CEPH families using 14 polymorphic simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and one RFLP in the region 5q11.2-q.13.3. The genetic interval between the closest SMA flanking loci D5S435 and D5S557 comprises 1 cM at z[sub max] = 27.94. Two recombinants were identified between the SMA gene and the closest telomeric marker D5S557. The first places the SMA gene centromeric to this marker; the second suggests a double recombinant at D5S557, which is very unlikely. More likely explanations are discussed in the paper. No recombinant was found between D5S435 and the SMA gene. They localized a recently described polymorphic marker, D5S351, close to the SMA. Due to its high PIC value of 0.70, it represents a very useful marker for prenatal diagnosis. In addition, they developed a new reverse primer for the nearest centromeric locus D5S435, a useful marker for prenatal diagnosis, which has been very difficult to amplify in the past. Three of the markers presented here are newly developed polymorphic SSRs (one tetranucleotide repeat, D5s507/W15CATT, and two dinucleotide repeats, D5S544/C88.2GT and D5S682/C88.3GT). These markers are too far from the SMA gene to be relevant for cloning; nevertheless, as part of the human genome project, they are contributing to the fine genetic mapping of the region 5q11.2-q.13.3. The most likely order of the loci based on two-point and multipoint linkage analyses as well as on specific recombination events and physical mapping studies is D5S76-D5S507-D5S6-D5S125-D5S680-D5S435-SMA-D5S557-D5S35 -15[prime]MAP1B-3[prime]MAP1B-JK53CA1/2-(D5S127-D5S39)-(D5S544-D5S682). In general, the genetic distances obtained from the SMA and CEPH families are comparable. 25 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Familial short fifth metacarpals and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Hyari, Muwafag; Hamamy, Hanan; Barham, Muries; Al-Hadidy, Azmy; Ajlouni, Kamel

    2006-09-01

    Very few reports on the phenotype of short fifth metacarpals have been published in the medical literature. We report a Jordanian family in which three sisters aged 15, 13 and 8 years revealed bilateral shortening of the fifth fingers and radiological shortening of the fifth metacarpals. The father had unilateral short fifth metacarpal. The elder two sisters, their father as well as their brother and another sister manifested insulin resistance. Spherocytosis was diagnosed in one of the girls and her father. The parents are non-consanguineous. This constellation of findings has not been previously reported and could point to the presence of two disorders segregating in the family or to a novel syndrome with autosomal dominant inheritance and variable expressivity. PMID:16132981

  20. A Single Nucleotide Variant in HNF-1β is Associated with Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young in a Large Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, Peng; WEI, Ran; GUO, Zhenkui; ZHU, Haining; CAMPBELL, Desmond; LI, Qi; XU, Xiaoqun; WANG, Junfu; LUAN, Meng; CHEN, Xing; CHEN, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a heterogeneous entity of monogenic disorders characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance. Eleven genes were related, including HNF4α, GCK, HNF1α, IPF1, and HNF-1β, and various mutations are being reported. Methods: To help the overall understanding of MODY-related pathologic mutations, we studied a large MODY family found in 2012, in Shandong, China, which contained 9 patients over 3 generations. DNA was extracted from the periphery blood samples of (i) 9 affected members, (ii) 17 unaffected members, and (iii) 1000 healthy controls. Three pooled samples were obtained by mixing equal quantity of DNA of each individual within the each group. Totally 400 microsatellite markers across the whole genome were genotyped by capillary electrophoresis. The known MODY-related gene near the identified marker was sequenced to look for putative risk variants. Results: Allelic frequency of marker D17S798 on chromosome 17q11.2 were significantly different (P<0.001) between the affected vs. unaffected members and the affected vs. healthy controls, but not between the unaffected members vs. healthy controls. MODY5-related gene, hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β (HNF-1β) on 17q12 near D17S798 became the candidate gene. A single nucleotide variant (SNV) of C77T in the non-coding area of exon 1 of HNF-1β was found to be related to MODY5. Conclusion: This novel SNV of HNF-1β contributes to the diabetes development in the family through regulating gene expression most likely. The findings help presymptomatic diagnosis, and imply that mutations in the non-coding areas, as well as in the exons, play roles in the etiology of MODY.

  1. Low prevalence of Connexin 26 (GJB2) variants in Pakistani families with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    Santos, RLP; Wajid, M; Pham, TL; Hussan, J; Ali, G; Ahmad, W; Leal, SM

    2010-01-01

    The Pakistani population has become an important resource for research on autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI) due to the availability of large extended and highly consanguineous pedigrees. Here is presented the first report on the prevalence of gap junction beta-2 (GJB2) variants in Pakistan. One hundred and ninety-six unrelated Pakistani families with ARNSHI were recruited for a study on the genetics of NSHI. DNA sequencing of the GJB2 coding region was done on two affected individuals per family. Evolutionary conservation and predicted effect on the protein product were studied in order to hypothesize whether or not a variant was potentially deleterious. Homozygous putatively functional GJB2 variants were identified in 6.1% of families. None of the putatively functional GJB2 variants were observed in the compound heterozygous state. The six putatively causative variants noted were 231G > A(W77X), 71G > A(W24X), 167delT, 95G > A(R32H), 358360delGAG(delE120), and 269T > C(L90P), with 231G > A(W77X) and 71G > A(W24X) being the most common. In addition, five benign polymorphisms, 380G > A(R127H), 457G > A(V153I), 493C > T(R165W), 79G > A(V27I), and 341A > G(E114G), were identified within this population. In a few individuals, benign polymorphisms were observed to occur on the same haplotype, namely [457G > A(V153I); 493C > T(R165W)] and [79G > A(V27I); 341A > G(E114G)]. The spectrum of GJB2 sequence variants in Pakistan may reflect shared origins of hearing impairment alleles within the Indian subcontinent. The high degree of consanguinity within Pakistan may have maintained the GJB2 prevalence at a much lower rate than within India and other populations. PMID:15617550

  2. Identification of mutation c.632G>A (p.G211D) in the ATP2A2 gene and genotype-phenotype correlation in a large Chinese family with Darier's disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Feng-Yan; Xu, Ling; Yin, Xun-Guo; Wan, Ping; Zhang, Xiao-De; Chen, Wei-Wen; Ding, Shao-Ping; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2011-11-01

    Darier's disease (DD, MIM 124200) is an autosomal dominant inherited skin disease. Mutations in the ATP2A2 gene, which encoded the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) -ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2), are responsible for this skin disorder. Here we report the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of a large Chinese family with DD. We identified mutation c.632G>A (p.G211D) in the ATP2A2 gene in this family. Genotype-phenotype correlation in available family members provided helpful genetic counseling information for mutation carriers. PMID:22004489

  3. Comparative Analysis of P450 Signature Motifs EXXR and CXG in the Large and Diverse Kingdom of Fungi: Identification of Evolutionarily Conserved Amino Acid Patterns Characteristic of P450 Family

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Khajamohiddin; Mashele, Samson Sitheni

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are heme-thiolate proteins distributed across the biological kingdoms. P450s are catalytically versatile and play key roles in organisms primary and secondary metabolism. Identification of P450s across the biological kingdoms depends largely on the identification of two P450 signature motifs, EXXR and CXG, in the protein sequence. Once a putative protein has been identified as P450, it will be assigned to a family and subfamily based on the criteria that P450s within a family share more than 40% homology and members of subfamilies share more than 55% homology. However, to date, no evidence has been presented that can distinguish members of a P450 family. Here, for the first time we report the identification of EXXR- and CXG-motifs-based amino acid patterns that are characteristic of the P450 family. Analysis of P450 signature motifs in the under-explored fungal P450s from four different phyla, ascomycota, basidiomycota, zygomycota and chytridiomycota, indicated that the EXXR motif is highly variable and the CXG motif is somewhat variable. The amino acids threonine and leucine are preferred as second and third amino acids in the EXXR motif and proline and glycine are preferred as second and third amino acids in the CXG motif in fungal P450s. Analysis of 67 P450 families from biological kingdoms such as plants, animals, bacteria and fungi showed conservation of a set of amino acid patterns characteristic of a particular P450 family in EXXR and CXG motifs. This suggests that during the divergence of P450 families from a common ancestor these amino acids patterns evolve and are retained in each P450 family as a signature of that family. The role of amino acid patterns characteristic of a P450 family in the structural and/or functional aspects of members of the P450 family is a topic for future research. PMID:24743800

  4. Comparative analysis of P450 signature motifs EXXR and CXG in the large and diverse kingdom of fungi: identification of evolutionarily conserved amino acid patterns characteristic of P450 family.

    PubMed

    Syed, Khajamohiddin; Mashele, Samson Sitheni

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are heme-thiolate proteins distributed across the biological kingdoms. P450s are catalytically versatile and play key roles in organisms primary and secondary metabolism. Identification of P450s across the biological kingdoms depends largely on the identification of two P450 signature motifs, EXXR and CXG, in the protein sequence. Once a putative protein has been identified as P450, it will be assigned to a family and subfamily based on the criteria that P450s within a family share more than 40% homology and members of subfamilies share more than 55% homology. However, to date, no evidence has been presented that can distinguish members of a P450 family. Here, for the first time we report the identification of EXXR- and CXG-motifs-based amino acid patterns that are characteristic of the P450 family. Analysis of P450 signature motifs in the under-explored fungal P450s from four different phyla, ascomycota, basidiomycota, zygomycota and chytridiomycota, indicated that the EXXR motif is highly variable and the CXG motif is somewhat variable. The amino acids threonine and leucine are preferred as second and third amino acids in the EXXR motif and proline and glycine are preferred as second and third amino acids in the CXG motif in fungal P450s. Analysis of 67 P450 families from biological kingdoms such as plants, animals, bacteria and fungi showed conservation of a set of amino acid patterns characteristic of a particular P450 family in EXXR and CXG motifs. This suggests that during the divergence of P450 families from a common ancestor these amino acids patterns evolve and are retained in each P450 family as a signature of that family. The role of amino acid patterns characteristic of a P450 family in the structural and/or functional aspects of members of the P450 family is a topic for future research. PMID:24743800

  5. Human KZNF Gene Catalog - A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors

    DOE Data Explorer

    Huntley, S; Baggott, D. M.; Hamilton, A. T.; Tran-Gyamfi, M.; Yang, S.; Kim, J.; Gordon, L.; Branscomb, E.; Stubbs, L.

    Kruppel-type zinc finger (ZNF) motifs are prevalent components of transcription factor proteins in all eukaryotes. KRAB-ZNF proteins, in which a potent repressor domain is attached to a tandem array of DNA-binding zinc-finger motifs, are specific to tetrapod vertebrates and represent the largest class of ZNF proteins in mammals. To define the full repertoire of human KRAB-ZNF proteins, we searched the genome sequence for key motifs and then constructed and manually curated gene models incorporating those sequences. The resulting gene catalog contains 423 KRAB-ZNF protein-coding loci, yielding alternative transcripts that altogether predict at least 742 structurally distinct proteins. Active rounds of segmental duplication, involving single genes or larger regions and including both tandem and distributed duplication events, have driven the expansion of this mammalian gene family. Comparisons between the human genes and ZNF loci mined from the draft mouse, dog, and chimpanzee genomes not only identified 103 KRAB-ZNF genes that are conserved in mammals but also highlighted a substantial level of lineage-specific change; at least 136 KRAB-ZNF coding genes are primate specific, including many recent duplicates. KRAB-ZNF genes are widely expressed and clustered genes are typically not coregulated, indicating that paralogs have evolved to fill roles in many different biological processes. To facilitate further study, we have developed a Web-based public resource with access to gene models, sequences, and other data, including visualization tools to provide genomic context and interaction with other public data sets. [This abstract was copied from: S Huntley, DM Baggott, AT Hamilton, M Tran-Gyamfi, S Yang, J Kim, L Gordon, E Branscomb, and L Stubbs. 2006. A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors, Genome Research 16(5):669 - 677] The website provides the ability to search the online catalog by genomic coordinates, name, locus type, and motifs, to utilize a graphical browser and to download data files.

  6. A Novel Mutation of LAMB2 in a Multi-Generational Mennonite Family Reveals a New Phenotypic Variant of Pierson Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mohney, Brian G.; Pulido, Jose S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Hogan, Marie C.; Consugar, Mark B.; Peters, Justin; Pankratz, V. Shane; Nasr, Samih H.; Smith, Stephen J.; Gloor, James; Kubly, Vickie; Spencer, Dorothy; Nielson, Rebecca; Puffenberger, Erik G.; Strauss, Kevin A.; Morton, D. Holmes; Eldahdah, Lama; Harris, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe a novel laminin beta-2 (LAMB2) mutation associated with nephritic syndrome and severe retinal disease without microcoria in a large, multi-generational family with Pierson syndrome. Design Retrospective chart review and prospective family examination. Participants An extended consanguineous family of 52 members. Methods The eyes, urine, and serum DNA were evaluated in all family members after discovering 2 patients, both less than 10 years of age, with bilateral retinal detachments and concurrent renal dysfunction. Linkage analysis was performed in the 9 living affected individuals, 7 using the Illumina Human Hap370 Duo Bead Array and 2 using GeneChip 10K mapping arrays. Main Outcome Measures The prevalence and severity of ocular and kidney involvement and genetic findings. Results Eleven affected family members were identified (9 living), all manifesting chronic kidney disease and bilateral chrioretinal pigmentary changes, with or without retinal detachments, but without microcoria or neurodevelopmental deficits, segregating in an autosomal recessive pattern. The causative gene was localized to a 9Mb region on chromosome 3. Comprehensive gene sequencing revealed a novel LAMB2 variant (c. 440A>G; His147R) that was homozygous in the 9 living, affected family members, observed at a frequency of 2.1% in the Old Order Mennonite population, and absent in 91 non-Mennonite controls. The mutation is located in a highly conserved site in the N-terminal domain VI of LAMB2. Conclusions This study describes a novel mutation of LAMB2 and further expands the spectrum of eye and renal manifestations associated with defects in the laminin beta-2 chain. PMID:21236492

  7. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Kricker, Anne; Paltiel, Ora; Flowers, Christopher R.; Wang, Sophia S.; Monnereau, Alain; Blair, Aaron; Maso, Luigino Dal; Kane, Eleanor V.; Nieters, Alexandra; Foran, James M.; Miligi, Lucia; Clavel, Jacqueline; Bernstein, Leslie; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Skibola, Christine F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although risk factors for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) have been suggested, their independent effects, modification by sex, and association with anatomical sites are largely unknown. Methods In a pooled analysis of 4667 cases and 22639 controls from 19 studies, we used stepwise logistic regression to identify the most parsimonious multivariate models for DLBCL overall, by sex, and for selected anatomical sites. Results DLBCL was associated with B-cell activating autoimmune diseases (odds ratio [OR] = 2.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.80 to 3.09), hepatitis C virus seropositivity (OR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.47 to 2.76), family history of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.54 to 2.47), higher young adult body mass index (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.12 to 2.23, for 35+ vs 18.5 to 22.4 kg/m2), higher recreational sun exposure (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.69 to 0.89), any atopic disorder (OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.76 to 0.89), and higher socioeconomic status (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.79 to 0.94). Additional risk factors for women were occupation as field crop/vegetable farm worker (OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.22 to 2.60), hairdresser (OR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.12 to 2.41), and seamstress/embroider (OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.13 to 1.97), low adult body mass index (OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.29 to 0.74, for <18.5 vs 18.5 to 22.4 kg/m2), hormone replacement therapy started age at least 50 years (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.52 to 0.88), and oral contraceptive use before 1970 (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.62 to 1.00); and for men were occupation as material handling equipment operator (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.02 to 2.44), lifetime alcohol consumption (OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.44 to 0.75, for >400kg vs nondrinker), and previous blood transfusion (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.57 to 0.83). Autoimmune disease, atopy, and family history of non-Hodgkin lymphoma showed similar associations across selected anatomical sites, whereas smoking was associated with central nervous system, testicular and cutaneous DLBCLs; inflammatory bowel disease was associated with gastrointestinal DLBCL; and farming and hair dye use were associated with mediastinal DLBCL. Conclusion Our results support a complex and multifactorial etiology for DLBCL with some variation in risk observed by sex and anatomical site. PMID:25174023

  8. An unusual case of familial hyperlipidaemia.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Renu; Arora, Uma

    2008-07-01

    A 40 days old male baby born to a consanguineous couple was found to have highly viscous and milky serum with caking of chylomicrons on refrigeration of serum. Cholesterol was 889.5 mg/dl (23.04mmol/L) and Triglycerides 12881 mg/dl (141.69mmol/L). He was active and did not have any hepatospleenomegaly, xanthomas or dysmorphic features. Thyroid functions were normal. Lipid electrophoresis showed thick chylomicron band. There was positive family history of hypertriglyceridemia in a first cousin. Both siblings and both parents of the index case had normal lipid profiles. This child was referred to higher centre where he was put on Lipid lowering drugs (Gemfibrozil), Iron drops and special formula for feeding containing medium chain fatty acids. PMID:23105777

  9. Identification and Clinical Implications of Novel MYO15A Mutations in a Non-consanguineous Korean Family by Targeted Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mun Young; Kim, Ah Reum; Kim, Nayoung K.D.; Lee, Chung; Lee, Kyoung Yeul; Jeon, Woo-Sung; Koo, Ja-Won; Oh, Seung Ha; Park, Woong-Yang; Kim, Dongsup; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of MYO15A are generally known to cause severe to profound hearing loss throughout all frequencies. Here, we found two novel MYO15A mutations, c.3871C>T (p.L1291F) and c.5835T>G (p.Y1945X) in an affected individual carrying congenital profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) through targeted resequencing of 134 known deafness genes. The variant, p.L1291F and p.Y1945X, resided in the myosin motor and IQ2 domains, respectively. The p.L1291F variant was predicted to affect the structure of the actin-binding site from three-dimensional protein modeling, thereby interfering with the correct interaction between actin and myosin. From the literature analysis, mutations in the N-terminal domain were more frequently associated with residual hearing at low frequencies than mutations in the other regions of this gene. Therefore we suggest a hypothetical genotype-phenotype correlation whereby MYO15A mutations that affect domains other than the N-terminal domain, lead to profound SNHL throughout all frequencies and mutations that affect the N-terminal domain, result in residual hearing at low frequencies. This genotype-phenotype correlation suggests that preservation of residual hearing during auditory rehabilitation like cochlear implantation should be intended for those who carry mutations in the N-terminal domain and that individuals with mutations elsewhere in MYO15A require early cochlear implantation to timely initiate speech development. PMID:26242193

  10. Autosomal dominant Kufs` disease: Clinical heterogeneity in nine families, and exclusion of linkage to CLN1 and CLN3 markers in a large American kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Andermann, F.; Andermann, E.; Carpenter, S.

    1994-09-01

    Most forms of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) are autosomal recessive, and three genes have already been mapped: the infantile form (CLN 1); the juvenile form (CLN 3); and the early juvenile variant (CLN 5) on chromosomes 1, 16 and 13, respectively. Kufs` disease or adolescent-adult onset NCL is usually inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, and presents as three distinct clinical syndromes: progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME) with onset in the early teens or around age 30; and onset of dementia with motor disability in the 30s. We have studied three families originating from different parts of the USA manifesting dominantly inherited Kufs` disease. Granular osmophilic deposits (GROD) were found in brain, but storage in skin was not an obligatory feature. Six dominantly inherited PME families have been ascertained from three different regions of Spain. No storage was found in skin or muscle in any of these families. The mean age of onset in the American families is earlier, the clinical manifestations more severe, and the progression much more rapid that in the Spanish families. These findings would suggest the possibility of genetic heterogeneity involving two or more loci, or different mutations at the same gene locus. Genetic linkage studies have been carried out in a six-generation New Jersey family in an attempt to characterize the gene(s) responsible for this disorder. The infantile NCL locus on chromosome 1p (CLN1) and the juvenile NCL locus on chromosome 16p (CLN 3) have been excluded in this family. Further clinical, pathological and molecular genetic studies should lead to the clarification of the diagnostic approaches in this disorder.

  11. Cloning and sequencing of thiol-specific antioxidant from mammalian brain: Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase and thiol-specific antioxidant define a large family of antioxidant enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, H.Z; Storz, G.; Rhee, S.G.; Robison, K.; Church, G.; Poole, L.B.

    1994-07-19

    A cDNA corresponding to a thiol-specific antioxidant enzyme (TSA) was isolated from a rat brain cDNA library with the use of antibodies to bovine TSA. The cDNA clone encoded an open reading frame capable of encoding a 198-residue polypeptide. The rat and yeast TSA proteins show significant sequence homology to the 21-kDa component (AhpC) of Salmonella typhimurium alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, and we have found that AhpC exhibits TSA activity. AhpC and TSA define a family of >25 different proteins present in organisms from all kingdoms. The similarity among the family members extends over the entire sequence and ranges between 23% and 98% identity. A majority of the members of the AhpC/TSA family contain two conserved cysteines. At least eight of the genes encoding AhpC/TSA-like polypeptides are found in proximity to genes encoding other oxidoreductase activities, and the expression of several of the homologs has been correlated with pathogenicity. The authors suggest that the AhpC/TSA family represents a widely distributed class of antioxidant enzymes. They also report that a second family of proteins, defined by the 57-kDa component (AhpF) of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase and by thioredoxin reductase, has expanded to include six additional members.

  12. Prevalence and Healthcare Actions of Women in a Large Health System with a Family History Meeting the 2005 USPSTF Recommendation for BRCA Genetic Counseling Referral

    PubMed Central

    Bellcross, Cecelia A.; Leadbetter, Steven; Alford, Sharon Hensley; Peipins, Lucy A.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2005, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released guidelines which outlined specific family history patterns associated with an increased risk for BRCA1/2 mutations, and recommended at-risk individuals be referred for genetic counseling and evaluation for BRCA testing. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of individuals with a USPSTF increased-risk family history pattern, the frequency with which specific patterns were met, and resulting healthcare actions among women from the Henry Ford Health System. Methods As part of a study evaluating ovarian cancer risk perception and screening, 2,524 randomly selected participants completed a detailed interview (response rate 76%) from an initial eligible cohort of 16,720 women. Results Approximately 6% of participants had a family history fulfilling one or more of the USPSTF patterns. Although 90% of these women had shared their family history with their provider, less than 20% had been referred for genetic counseling and only 8% had undergone genetic testing. Caucasian women with higher income and education levels were more likely to receive referrals. Among the 95 participants in the total study cohort who reported BRCA testing, 78% did not have a family history that met one of the USPSTF patterns. Conclusions These results suggest a higher prevalence of women with an increased-risk family history than originally predicted by the USPSTF, and lack of provider recognition and referral for genetic services. Impact Improvements in healthcare infrastructure and clinician education will be required to realize population level benefits from BRCA genetic counseling and testing. PMID:23371291

  13. Inbreeding coefficients for X-linked and autosomal genes in consanguineous marriages in Spanish populations: the case of Guipúzcoa (Basque Country).

    PubMed

    Calderón, R; Aresti, U; Ambrosio, B; González-Martín, A

    2009-03-01

    Inbreeding patterns over the past two centuries have been studied more extensively in Spain and Italy than anywhere else in Europe. Consanguinity studies in mainland Spain have shown that populations settled along the Cantabrian cornice share inbreeding patterns that distinguish them from other populations further south. A visual representation of spatial variations of two key inbreeding variables is presented here for the first time via contour maps. This paper also analyzes time trends of mean inbreeding coefficients for X-linked (F(x)) and autosomal genes (F) (1862-1995) together with variations in F(x)/F ratios in Guipúzcoa, the most autochthonous Spanish Basque province. Because close cousin marriages are a mark of identity of the study population, we evaluated the contribution of uncle-niece/aunt-nephew (M12) and first cousin (M22) marriages to F(x) and F values and compared the frequencies of M12 and M22 pedigree subtypes and their corresponding F(x)/F ratios to those found in other Spanish populations. The mean Fx and F inbreeding levels in Guipúzcoa for the 134-year period analyzed were 1.51 x 10(-3) and 1.04 x 10(-3), respectively, and the F(x)/F ratio was seen to be very stable over time. Our findings show that major similarities exist for close consanguineous marriage subtypes between Basque and non-Basque Spanish populations, despite significant geographic variability in terms of first cousin pedigrees. The distortion seems to be caused by Guipúzcoa. The F(x)/F ratios for first cousins in Spanish populations were higher than expected (1.25), with values ranging from 1.34 to 1.48. The findings of the present study may be useful for advancing knowledge on the effects of the interaction between biology and culture and for exploring associations between mating patterns and the prevalence of certain diseases. PMID:19133940

  14. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: Tight linkage to chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Wu, C.T.B.; Jones, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) (MIM No.18260) constitutes a clinically and genetically diverse group of disorders that share the primary feature of progressive, severe, lower extremity spasticity. FSP is classified according to the mode of inheritance and whether progressive spasticity occurs in isolation ({open_quotes}uncomplicated FSP{close_quotes}) or with other neurologic abnormalities ({open_quotes}complicated FSP{close_quotes}), including optic neuropathy, retinopathy, extrapyramidal disturbance, dementia, ataxia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, or deafness. Recently, autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP was shown to be genetically heterogeneous and tightly linked to a group of microsatellite markers on chromosome 14q in one large kindred. We examined 126 members of a non-consanguineous North American kindred of Irish descent. FSP was diagnosed in 31 living subjects who developed insidiously progressive gait disturbance between ages 12 and 35 years. Using genetic linkage analysis to microsatellite DNA polymorphisms, we showed that the FSP locus on chromosome 14q was exluded from linkage with the disorder in our family. Subsequently, we searched for genetic linkage between the disorder and microsatellite DNA polymorphisms spanning approximately 50% of the genome. We observed significantly positive, two-point maximum lod scores (Z) for markers on chromosome 15q: D15S128 (Z=9.70, {theta}=0.05), D15S165 (Z=3.30, {theta}=0.10), and UT511 (Z=3.86, {theta}=0.10). Our data clearly establishes that one locus for autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP is mapped to the pericentric region of chromosome 15q. Identifying genes responsible for chromosome 15q-linked and chromosome 14q-linked FSP will greatly advance our understanding of this condition and hopefully other inherited and degenerative brain and spinal cord disorders that are also characterized by axonal degeneration.

  15. Sfr13, a member of a large family of asymmetrically localized Sfi1-repeat proteins, is important for basal body separation and stability in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Stemm-Wolf, Alexander J.; Meehl, Janet B.; Winey, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Summary Directed fluid flow, which is achieved by the coordinated beating of motile cilia, is required for processes as diverse as cellular swimming, developmental patterning and mucus clearance. Cilia are nucleated, anchored and aligned at the plasma membrane by basal bodies, which are cylindrical microtubule-based structures with ninefold radial symmetry. In the unicellular ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, two centrin family members associated with the basal body are important for both basal body organization and stabilization. We have identified a family of 13 proteins in Tetrahymena that contain centrin-binding repeats related to those identified in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sfi1 protein. We have named these proteins Sfr1–Sfr13 (for Sfi1-repeat). Nine of the Sfr proteins localize in unique polarized patterns surrounding the basal body, suggesting non-identical roles in basal body organization and association with basal body accessory structures. Furthermore, the Sfr proteins are found in distinct basal body populations in Tetrahymena cells, indicating that they are responsive to particular developmental programs. A complete genetic deletion of one of the family members, Sfr13, causes unstable basal bodies and defects in daughter basal body separation from the mother, phenotypes also observed with centrin disruption. It is likely that the other Sfr family members are involved in distinct centrin functions, providing specificity to the tasks that centrins perform at basal bodies. PMID:23426847

  16. Sfr13, a member of a large family of asymmetrically localized Sfi1-repeat proteins, is important for basal body separation and stability in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Stemm-Wolf, Alexander J; Meehl, Janet B; Winey, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Directed fluid flow, which is achieved by the coordinated beating of motile cilia, is required for processes as diverse as cellular swimming, developmental patterning and mucus clearance. Cilia are nucleated, anchored and aligned at the plasma membrane by basal bodies, which are cylindrical microtubule-based structures with ninefold radial symmetry. In the unicellular ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, two centrin family members associated with the basal body are important for both basal body organization and stabilization. We have identified a family of 13 proteins in Tetrahymena that contain centrin-binding repeats related to those identified in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sfi1 protein. We have named these proteins Sfr1-Sfr13 (for Sfi1-repeat). Nine of the Sfr proteins localize in unique polarized patterns surrounding the basal body, suggesting non-identical roles in basal body organization and association with basal body accessory structures. Furthermore, the Sfr proteins are found in distinct basal body populations in Tetrahymena cells, indicating that they are responsive to particular developmental programs. A complete genetic deletion of one of the family members, Sfr13, causes unstable basal bodies and defects in daughter basal body separation from the mother, phenotypes also observed with centrin disruption. It is likely that the other Sfr family members are involved in distinct centrin functions, providing specificity to the tasks that centrins perform at basal bodies. PMID:23426847

  17. Familiality of Tourette Syndrome, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Heritability Analysis in a Large Sib-Pair Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Carol A.; Grados, Marco A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with a genetic component that is highly comorbid with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic relations between these disorders have not been clearly elucidated. This study examined the familial relations among TS,

  18. Familiality of Tourette Syndrome, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Heritability Analysis in a Large Sib-Pair Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Carol A.; Grados, Marco A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with a genetic component that is highly comorbid with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic relations between these disorders have not been clearly elucidated. This study examined the familial relations among TS,…

  19. The Quality of Teachers' Interactive Conversations with Preschool Children from Low-Income Families during Small-Group and Large-Group Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jennifer J.; de Groot Kim, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the quality of preschool teachers' interactive conversations with three- and four-year-olds in two Head Start classrooms serving children from low-income families in the United States. Over a period of 20?weeks, 10 bi-weekly observations of conversations (totaling 15?h per classroom) were conducted in one small-group (Play…

  20. A Novel GCAP1 Missense Mutation (L151F) in a Large Family with Autosomal Dominant Cone-Rod Dystrophy (adCORD)

    PubMed Central

    Sokal, Izabela; Dupps, William J.; Grassi, Michael A.; Brown, Jeremiah; Affatigato, Louisa M.; Roychowdhury, Nirmalya; Yang, Lili; Filipek, Slawomir; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Stone, Edwin M.; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the phenotypic and biochemical characteristics of a novel mutation associated with autosomal dominant cone–rod dystrophy (adCORD). Methods Twenty-three family members of a CORD pedigree underwent clinical examinations, including visual acuity tests, standardized full-field ERG, and fundus photography. Genomic DNA was screened for mutations in GCAP1 exons using DNA sequencing and single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Function and stability of recombinant GCAP1-L151F were tested as a function of [Ca2+], and its structure was probed by molecular dynamics. Results Affected family members experienced dyschromatopsia, hemeralopia, and reduced visual acuity by the second to third decade of life. Electrophysiology revealed a nonrecordable photopic response with later attenuation of the scotopic response. Affected family members harbored a C→T transition in exon 4 of the GCAP1 gene, resulting in an L151F missense mutation affecting the EF hand motif 4 (EF4). This change was absent in 11 unaffected family members and in 100 unrelated normal subjects. GCAP1-L151F stimulation of photoreceptor guanylate cyclase was not completely inhibited at high physiological [Ca2+], consistent with a lowered affinity for Ca2+-binding to EF4. Conclusions A novel L151F mutation in the EF4 hand domain of GCAP1 is associated with adCORD. The clinical phenotype is characterized by early cone dysfunction and a progressive loss of rod function. The biochemical phenotype is best described as persistent stimulation of photoreceptor guanylate cyclase, representing a gain of function of mutant GCAP1. Although a conservative substitution, molecular dynamics suggests a significant change in Ca2+-binding to EF4 and EF2 and changes in the shape of L151F-GCAP1. PMID:15790869

  1. A Novel Splice-Site Mutation in ALS2 Establishes the Diagnosis of Juvenile Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in a Family with Early Onset Anarthria and Generalized Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Anthony; Azim, Saad; Silver, David L.; Mansoor, Atika; Tay, Stacey Kiat Hong; Abbasi, Sumiya; Hashmi, Asraf Hussain; Janjua, Jamal; Khalid, Sumbal; Tai, E. Shyong; Yeo, Gene W.; Khor, Chiea Chuen

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of childhood neurological disorders remains challenging given the overlapping clinical presentation across subgroups and heterogeneous presentation within subgroups. To determine the underlying genetic cause of a severe neurological disorder in a large consanguineous Pakistani family presenting with severe scoliosis, anarthria and progressive neuromuscular degeneration, we performed genome-wide homozygosity mapping accompanied by whole-exome sequencing in two affected first cousins and their unaffected parents to find the causative mutation. We identified a novel homozygous splice-site mutation (c.3512+1G>A) in the ALS2 gene (NM_020919.3) encoding alsin that segregated with the disease in this family. Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in ALS2 are known to cause juvenile-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), one of the many neurological conditions having overlapping symptoms with many neurological phenotypes. RT-PCR validation revealed that the mutation resulted in exon-skipping as well as the use of an alternative donor splice, both of which are predicted to cause loss-of-function of the resulting proteins. By examining 216 known neurological disease genes in our exome sequencing data, we also identified 9 other rare nonsynonymous mutations in these genes, some of which lie in highly conserved regions. Sequencing of a single proband might have led to mis-identification of some of these as the causative variant. Our findings established a firm diagnosis of juvenile ALS in this family, thus demonstrating the use of whole exome sequencing combined with linkage analysis in families as a powerful tool for establishing a quick and precise genetic diagnosis of complex neurological phenotypes. PMID:25474699

  2. Hereditary palmoplantar (epidermolytic) keratoderma: illustration through a familial report.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Sardana, Kabir; Sharma, Sonal; Raut, Dharmendra

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary palmoplantar keratoderma, a well-known clinical entity, is illustrated through a familial report of an unmarried young man who is the product of a consanguineous marriage (paternal and maternal grandmothers were sisters). The lesions were characterized by immense yellow waxy thickening of the skin surrounded by erythematous border (halo) and fissures/cracks associated with extensive scaling of the palms and soles. The lesions were bilateral and symmetrical. These features were supported by orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis hypergranulosis and acanthosis in hematoxylin-eosin stained tissue sections prepared from the soles. Mycelia/spores could not be identified on Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reaction. An autosomal dominant trait was revealed through family pedigree. An abridged update to recap the current status is highlighted. PMID:15538081

  3. A new locus for autosomal recessive congenital cataract identified in a Pakistani family

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Haiba; Riazuddin, S. Amer; Yasmeen, Afshan; Mohsin, Sadia; Khan, Mohsin; Nasir, Idrees A.; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Akram, Javed; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To identify the disease locus for autosomal recessive congenital cataract in a consanguineous Pakistani family. Methods All affected individuals underwent detailed ophthalmologic and medical examination. Blood samples were collected and DNA was extracted. A genome-wide scan was performed with polymorphic microsatellite markers on genomic DNA from affected and unaffected family members, and logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. Results The clinical records and ophthalmological examinations suggested that all affected individuals have nuclear cataracts. Maximum LOD scores of 5.01, 4.38, and 4.17 at ?=0 were obtained with markers D7630, D7S657, and D7S515, respectively. Fine mapping refined the critical interval and suggested that markers in a 27.78 cM (27.96 Mb) interval are flanked by markers D7S660 and D7S799, which co-segregate with the disease phenotype in family PKCC108. Conclusions We have identified a new locus for autosomal recessive congenital cataract, localized to chromosome 7q21.11-q31.1 in a consanguineous Pakistani family. PMID:20161816

  4. Challenges and solutions for gene identification in the presence of familial locus heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Atteeq U; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Drummond, Meghan C; Shahzad, Mohsin; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Morell, Robert J; Ansar, Muhammad; Jan, Abid; Wang, Xin; Aziz, Abdul; Riazuddin, Saima; Smith, Joshua D; Wang, Gao T; Ahmed, Zubair M; Gul, Khitab; Shearer, A Eliot; Smith, Richard J H; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Hinnant, John; Khan, Shaheen N; Fisher, Rachel A; Ahmad, Wasim; Friderici, Karen H; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B; Wilch, Ellen S; Leal, Suzanne M

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of exomes and genomes has accelerated the identification of genes involved in Mendelian phenotypes. However, many NGS studies fall short of identifying causal variants, with estimates for success rates as low as 25% for uncovering the pathological variant underlying disease etiology. An important reason for such failures is familial locus heterogeneity, where within a single pedigree causal variants in two or more genes underlie Mendelian trait etiology. As examples of intra- and inter-sibship familial locus heterogeneity, we present 10 consanguineous Pakistani families segregating hearing impairment due to homozygous variants in two different hearing impairment genes and a European-American pedigree in which hearing impairment is caused by four variants in three different genes. We have identified 41 additional pedigrees with syndromic and nonsyndromic hearing impairment for which a single previously reported hearing impairment gene has been identified but only segregates with the phenotype in a subset of affected pedigree members. We estimate that locus heterogeneity occurs in 15.3% (95% confidence interval: 11.9%, 19.9%) of the families in our collection. We demonstrate novel approaches to apply linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping (for autosomal recessive consanguineous pedigrees), which can be used to detect locus heterogeneity using either NGS or SNP array data. Results from linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping can also be used to group sibships or individuals most likely to be segregating the same causal variants and thereby increase the success rate of gene identification. PMID:25491636

  5. Family size effects: a review.

    PubMed

    Wagner, M E; Schubert, H J; Schubert, D S

    1985-03-01

    Larger families are more frequent with early marriage and rapid birth of the first child. In larger families, child rearing becomes more rule ridden, less individualized, with corporal punishment and less investment of resources. Smaller families tend to result in higher IQ, academic achievement, and occupational performance. Large families produce more delinquents and alcoholics. Perinatal morbidity and mortality rates are higher in large families as birth weights decrease. Mothers of large families are at higher risk of several physical diseases. Common methodological errors are indicated and exemplary studies are described. PMID:3900289

  6. High use of complementary and alternative medicine among a large cohort of women with a family history of breast cancer: the Sister Study.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Heather; Sardo Molmenti, Christine L; Falci, Laura; Ulmer, Ross; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; DeRoo, Lisa A; Sandler, Dale P

    2016-04-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is high among U.S. women, yet information is limited on use among women at increased breast cancer risk. We analyzed CAM use among women with a family history of breast cancer. CAM use was analyzed among women enrolled 2003-2009 in the Sister Study cohort. Eligible women were aged 35-74, U.S. or Puerto Rican residents, no personal history of breast cancer, and had ≥1 sister with breast cancer. Baseline data on CAM use in the past year were available for 49,734 women. Logistic regression models examined the association between CAM use and Gail Model breast cancer risk score. Results were compared to female participants in the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (n = 7965). Among Sister Study participants, there was high use of vitamin/mineral supplements (79 %), mind-body practices (41 %), manipulative/body-based practices (32 %), and botanicals (23 %). Overall use was higher than the U.S. female population. No association was observed between familial breast cancer risk and CAM use. Black women were more likely to use spirituality/meditation-based CAM modalities, while non-Hispanic white and Asian women were high users of dietary supplements. In a cohort of women with increased breast cancer risk due to family history, CAM use is higher than women in the general U.S. population and is associated with race/ethnicity. Use was not associated with breast cancer risk. Given the high prevalence of CAM use among women at risk for breast caner, research on the effectiveness of CAM use for disease prevention is needed. PMID:27017506

  7. A Case of Nasu-Hakola Disease without Fractures or Consanguinity Diagnosed Using Exome Sequencing and Treated with Sodium Valproate

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Kiyohiro; Yoshino, Yuta; Mori, Yoko; Ochi, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Taku; Ishimaru, Takashi; Ueno, Shu-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Nasu-Hakola disease (NHD) is a rare autosomal recessive neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by bone cysts, fractures, and cognitive impairment. Two genes are responsible for the development of NHD; TYROBP and TREM2. Although it presents with typical signs and symptoms, diagnosing this disease remains difficult. This case report describes a male with NHD with no family or past history of bone fractures who was diagnosed using exome sequencing. His frontal lobe psychiatric symptoms recovered partially following treatment with sodium valproate, but not with an antipsychotic. PMID:26598595

  8. A Case of Nasu-Hakola Disease without Fractures or Consanguinity Diagnosed Using Exome Sequencing and Treated with Sodium Valproate.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Kiyohiro; Yoshino, Yuta; Mori, Yoko; Ochi, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Taku; Ishimaru, Takashi; Ueno, Shu-Ichi

    2015-12-31

    Nasu-Hakola disease (NHD) is a rare autosomal recessive neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by bone cysts, fractures, and cognitive impairment. Two genes are responsible for the development of NHD; TYROBPand TREM2. Although it presents with typical signs and symptoms, diagnosing this disease remains difficult. This case report describes a male with NHD with no family or past history of bone fractures who was diagnosed using exome sequencing. His frontal lobe psychiatric symptoms recovered partially following treatment with sodium valproate, but not with an antipsychotic. PMID:26598595

  9. Large-Scale, Lineage-Specific Expansion of a Bric-a-Brac/Tramtrack/Broad Complex Ubiquitin-Ligase Gene Family in Rice[W

    PubMed Central

    Gingerich, Derek J.; Hanada, Kousuke; Shiu, Shin-Han; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Selective ubiquitination of proteins is directed by diverse families of ubiquitin-protein ligases (or E3s) in plants. One important type uses Cullin-3 as a scaffold to assemble multisubunit E3 complexes containing one of a multitude of bric-a-brac/tramtrack/broad complex (BTB) proteins that function as substrate recognition factors. We previously described the 80-member BTB gene superfamily in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we describe the complete BTB superfamily in rice (Oryza sativa spp japonica cv Nipponbare) that contains 149 BTB domain–encoding genes and 43 putative pseudogenes. Amino acid sequence comparisons of the rice and Arabidopsis superfamilies revealed a near equal repertoire of putative substrate recognition module types. However, phylogenetic comparisons detected numerous gene duplication and/or loss events since the rice and Arabidopsis BTB lineages split, suggesting possible functional specialization within individual BTB families. In particular, a major expansion and diversification of a subset of BTB proteins containing Meprin and TRAF homology (MATH) substrate recognition sites was evident in rice and other monocots that likely occurred following the monocot/dicot split. The MATH domain of a subset appears to have evolved significantly faster than those in a smaller core subset that predates flowering plants, suggesting that the substrate recognition module in many monocot MATH-BTB E3s are diversifying to ubiquitinate a set of substrates that are themselves rapidly changing. Intriguing possibilities include pathogen proteins attempting to avoid inactivation by the monocot host. PMID:17720868

  10. High proportion of large genomic rearrangements in hMSH2 in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families of the Basque Country.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Ojembarrena, Enrique; Beristain, Elena; Errasti, Javier; Viguera, Noelia; Tejada Minguéz, Maria-Isabel

    2007-10-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), which represents the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer, results from germline alterations of the mismatch repair genes MSH2, MLH1 and MSH6. Rearrangements of MSH2 and MLH1 are involved in at least 10% and 4.3%, respectively, of the HNPCC families fulfilling the Amsterdam (AMS) criteria. We applied a recently developed method, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), to study MLH1/MSH2 copy number changes in 29 unrelated Basque Country HNPCC families. We detected six different genomic rearrangements in total (6/29=20.69%), four in MSH2 gene (13.79%), and two in MLH1 gene. All of the MSH2 rearrangements were genomic deletions involving several exons. The MLH1 rearrangements were initially detected as one deletion of exon 18 and one deletion of exon 19, but after sequencing analysis, these deletions were not confirmed and corresponded to base pair mutations. We conclude that MLPA is an excellent tool for detecting exon copy number changes in MLH1 and MSH2 in the DNA from HNPCC patients, although all detected rearrangements should be confirmed by an independent molecular methodology. Furthermore, our results in the Basque Country show higher percentages of rearrangements than previously published by other authors. PMID:17582678

  11. A Novel von Hippel Lindau Gene Intronic Variant and Its Reclassification from VUS to Pathogenic: the Impact on a Large Family.

    PubMed

    Sexton, A; Rawlings, L; McKavanagh, G; Simons, K; Winship, I

    2015-12-01

    We present a case where a variant of uncertain significance in the von Hippel Lindau syndrome gene (VHL) was identified in a proband with haemangioblastoma, and in a second degree relative with phaeochromocytoma. Initial uncertainty due to the unclear nature of the variant created psychosocial challenges for this family, in which four other genetic conditions were also present. Subsequent RNA studies confirmed this as a novel pathogenic mutation affecting splicing of exon 2. A third relative has since been diagnosed with haemangioblastoma. We suggest that this mutation possibly has reduced penetrance as there was no history of haemangioblastoma, renal tumours (apart from small cysts) or other VHL tumours among five mutation positive and seven untested adult relatives at 50 % risk of the VHL mutation (average age 46 years, range 18-70 years). This case presents a novel VHL splicing mutation and highlights the psychosocial and medical value of additional laboratory studies on uncertain variants for individuals, their families and for the health professionals providing advice and counseling. PMID:26323595

  12. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  13. Family Meals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Family Meals KidsHealth > For Parents > Family Meals Print A ... even more important as kids get older. Making Family Meals Happen It can be a big challenge ...

  14. Family Arguments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Arguments Page Content Article Body We seem to ...

  15. Whole-genome sequencing identifies a novel ABCB7 gene mutation for X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia in a large family of Mongolian ancestry.

    PubMed

    Protasova, Maria S; Grigorenko, Anastasia P; Tyazhelova, Tatiana V; Andreeva, Tatiana V; Reshetov, Denis A; Gusev, Fedor E; Laptenko, Alexander E; Kuznetsova, Irina L; Goltsov, Andrey Y; Klyushnikov, Sergey A; Illarioshkin, Sergey N; Rogaev, Evgeny I

    2016-04-01

    X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia is a heterogeneous nonprogressive neurodevelopmental disorder with onset in early childhood. We searched for a genetic cause of this condition, previously reported in a Buryat pedigree of Mongolian ancestry from southeastern Russia. Using whole-genome sequencing on Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, we found a missense mutation in the ABCB7 (ABC-binding cassette transporter B7) gene, encoding a mitochondrial transporter, involved in heme synthesis and previously associated with sideroblastic anemia and ataxia. The mutation resulting in a substitution of a highly conserved glycine to serine in position 682 is apparently a major causative factor of the cerebellar hypoplasia/atrophy found in affected individuals of a Buryat family who had no evidence of sideroblastic anemia. Moreover, in these affected men we also found the genetic defects in two other genes closely linked to ABCB7 on chromosome X: a deletion of a genomic region harboring the second exon of copper-transporter gene (ATP7A) and a complete deletion of PGAM4 (phosphoglycerate mutase family member 4) retrogene located in the intronic region of the ATP7A gene. Despite the deletion, eliminating the first of six metal-binding domains in ATP7A, no signs for Menkes disease or occipital horn syndrome associated with ATP7A mutations were found in male carriers. The role of the PGAM4 gene has been previously implicated in human reproduction, but our data indicate that its complete loss does not disrupt male fertility. Our finding links cerebellar pathology to the genetic defect in ABCB7 and ATP7A structural variant inherited as X-linked trait, and further reveals the genetic heterogeneity of X-linked cerebellar disorders. PMID:26242992

  16. A non-sense MCM9 mutation in a familial case of primary ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Fauchereau, F; Shalev, S; Chervinsky, E; Beck-Fruchter, R; Legois, B; Fellous, M; Caburet, S; Veitia, R A

    2016-05-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) results in an early loss of ovarian function, and remains idiopathic in about 80% of cases. Here, we have performed a complete genetic study of a consanguineous family with two POI cases. Linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping identified 12 homozygous regions with linkage, totalling 84 Mb. Whole-exome sequencing of the two patients and a non-affected sister allowed us to detect a homozygous causal variant in the MCM9 gene. The variant c.1483G>T [p.E495*], confirmed using Sanger sequencing, introduced a premature stop codon in coding exon 8 and is expected to lead to the loss of a functional protein. MCM9 belongs to a complex required for DNA repair by homologous recombination, and its impairment in mouse is known to induce meiotic recombination defects and oocyte degeneration. A previous study recently described two consanguineous families in which homozygous mutations of MCM9 were responsible for POI and short stature. Interestingly, the affected sisters in the family described here had a normal height. Altogether, our results provide the confirmation of the implication of MCM9 variants in POI and expand their phenotypic spectrum. PMID:26771056

  17. Family study of pediatric patients with primary antibody deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Nima; Abolhassani, Hassan; Kasraian, Amir; Mohammadinejad, Payam; Sadeghi, Bamdad; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2013-12-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) and selective IgA deficiency (SIGAD) are the most common primary antibody deficiencies. These two diseases may have coincidence in one family and SIGAD can progress to CVID which suggest common underlying genetic defects between SIGAD and CVID. This study was designed to find the prevalence of multiple cases in families of Iranian patients with CVID or SIGAD.Serum samples were collected from all available first-degree relatives of 37 patients (23 patients with CVID and 14 with SIGAD) to check the levels of immunoglobulin and their subclasses and detect antibody deficiencies.First degree family members of 37 patients (106 individuals) were enrolled in this study. Thirty two percent of patients had multiple cases in their families. The frequency of primary antibody deficiency in the first relatives of the patients was estimated to be one per 9 family members. Most of the patients found among family members were siblings of the primary patients. Analysis in SIGAD family members showed that IgG and IgA levels in families with multiple cases were significantly lower than family members without multiple cases (p values of 0.048 and 0.021, respectively).Rate of families with multiple cases in Iran is more than the previous studies in other countries. This rate was not affected by the consanguinity of parents (p=0.081) or immunoglobulin level of the patients. Because of higher risk for the prevalence of these disorders in those with a positive family history of immunodeficiency, family screening programs in the patients with CVID and SIGAD can be suggested to be prioritized.. PMID:23996714

  18. Identification of an extensive gene cluster among a family of PPOs in Trifolium pratense L. (red clover) using a large insert BAC library

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in plants is a trait with potential economic, agricultural and environmental impact. In relation to the food industry, PPO-induced browning causes unacceptable discolouration in fruit and vegetables: from an agriculture perspective, PPO can protect plants against pathogens and environmental stress, improve ruminant growth by increasing nitrogen absorption and decreasing nitrogen loss to the environment through the animal's urine. The high PPO legume, red clover, has a significant economic and environmental role in sustaining low-input organic and conventional farms. Molecular markers for a range of important agricultural traits are being developed for red clover and improved knowledge of PPO genes and their structure will facilitate molecular breeding. Results A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library comprising 26,016 BAC clones with an average 135 Kb insert size, was constructed from Trifolium pratense L. (red clover), a diploid legume with a haploid genome size of 440–637 Mb. Library coverage of 6–8 genome equivalents ensured good representation of genes: the library was screened for polyphenol oxidase (PPO) genes. Two single copy PPO genes, PPO4 and PPO5, were identified to add to a family of three, previously reported, paralogous genes (PPO1–PPO3). Multiple PPO1 copies were identified and characterised revealing a subfamily comprising three variants PPO1/2, PPO1/4 and PPO1/5. Six PPO genes clustered within the genome: four separate BAC clones could be assembled onto a predicted 190–510 Kb single BAC contig. Conclusion A PPO gene family in red clover resides as a cluster of at least 6 genes. Three of these genes have high homology, suggesting a more recent evolutionary event. This PPO cluster covers a longer region of the genome than clusters detected in rice or previously reported in tomato. Full-length coding sequences from PPO4, PPO5, PPO1/5 and PPO1/4 will facilitate functional studies and provide genetic markers for plant breeding. PMID:19619287

  19. Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a

  20. Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  1. Putting the "family" back into family therapy.

    PubMed

    Breunlin, Douglas C; Jacobsen, Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    In this article, we examine the field of family therapy by drawing a distinction between two forms of practice: Whole Family Therapy (WFT), defined as treating the whole family, and Relational Family Therapy (RFT), defined as working with a subsystem of the family or an individual while retaining a systemic lens. Our thesis is that the practice of WFT has been in decline for some time and steps must be taken to keep it from becoming a defunct practice. We consider the trajectory of WFT and RFT throughout the development of family therapy through reference to the people, the literature, training, and practice patterns associated with family therapy. We remind the reader of the many benefits of WFT and suggest that today WFT is likely to be practiced in conjunction with RFT and individual therapy. Since training of family therapists today is largely located in degree-granting programs, we identify constraints to including WFT in such programs. We conclude by offering suggestions that can enhance a program's ability to train students in WFT. PMID:24948531

  2. Two novel mutations in myosin binding protein C slow causing distal arthrogryposis type 2 in two large Han Chinese families may suggest important functional role of immunoglobulin domain C2.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuefu; Zhong, Bomeng; Han, Weitian; Zhao, Ning; Liu, Wei; Sui, Yu; Wang, Yawen; Lu, Yongping; Wang, Hong; Li, Jianxin; Jiang, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Distal arthrogryposes (DAs) are a group of disorders that mainly involve the distal parts of the limbs and at least ten different DAs have been described to date. DAs are mostly described as autosomal dominant disorders with variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance, but recently autosomal recessive pattern was reported in distal arthrogryposis type 5D. Mutations in the contractile genes are found in about 50% of all DA patients. Of these genes, mutations in the gene encoding myosin binding protein C slow MYBPC1 were recently identified in two families with distal arthrogryposis type 1B. Here, we described two large Chinese families with autosomal dominant distal arthrogryposis type 2(DA2) with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Some unique overextension contractures of the lower limbs and some distinctive facial features were present in our DA2 pedigrees. We performed follow-up DNA sequencing after linkage mapping and first identified two novel MYBPC1 mutations (c.1075G>A [p.E359K] and c.956C>T [p.P319L]) responsible for these Chinese DA2 families of which one introduced by germline mosacism. Each mutation was found to cosegregate with the DA2 phenotype in each family but not in population controls. Both substitutions occur within C2 immunoglobulin domain, which together with C1 and the M motif constitute the binding site for the S2 subfragment of myosin. Our results expand the phenotypic spectrum of MYBPC1-related arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). We also proposed the possible molecular mechanisms that may underlie the pathogenesis of DA2 myopathy associated with these two substitutions in MYBPC1. PMID:25679999

  3. Reading Comprehension in a Large Cohort of French First Graders from Low Socio-Economic Status Families: A 7-Month Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Gentaz, Edouard; Sprenger-Charolles, Liliane; Theurel, Anne; Colé, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Background The literature suggests that a complex relationship exists between the three main skills involved in reading comprehension (decoding, listening comprehension and vocabulary) and that this relationship depends on at least three other factors orthographic transparency, children’s grade level and socioeconomic status (SES). This study investigated the relative contribution of the predictors of reading comprehension in a longitudinal design (from beginning to end of the first grade) in 394 French children from low SES families. Methodology/Principal findings Reading comprehension was measured at the end of the first grade using two tasks one with short utterances and one with a medium length narrative text. Accuracy in listening comprehension and vocabulary, and fluency of decoding skills, were measured at the beginning and end of the first grade. Accuracy in decoding skills was measured only at the beginning. Regression analyses showed that listening comprehension and decoding skills (accuracy and fluency) always significantly predicted reading comprehension. The contribution of decoding was greater when reading comprehension was assessed via the task using short utterances. Between the two assessments, the contribution of vocabulary, and of decoding skills especially, increased, while that of listening comprehension remained unchanged. Conclusion/Significance These results challenge the ‘simple view of reading’. They also have educational implications, since they show that it is possible to assess decoding and reading comprehension very early on in an orthography (i.e., French), which is less deep than the English one even in low SES children. These assessments, associated with those of listening comprehension and vocabulary, may allow early identification of children at risk for reading difficulty, and to set up early remedial training, which is the most effective, for them. PMID:24250802

  4. Sugar beet contains a large CONSTANS-LIKE gene family including a CO homologue that is independent of the early-bolting (B) gene locus

    PubMed Central

    Chia, T. Y. P.; Müller, A.; Jung, C.; Mutasa-Göttgens, E. S.

    2008-01-01

    Floral transition in the obligate long-day (LD) plant sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) is tightly linked to the B gene, a dominant early-bolting quantitative trait locus, the expression of which is positively regulated by LD photoperiod. Thus, photoperiod regulators like CONSTANS (CO) and CONSTANS-LIKE (COL) genes identified in many LD and short-day (SD)-responsive plants have long been considered constituents and/or candidates for the B gene. Until now, the photoperiod response pathway of sugar beet (a Caryophyllid), diverged from the Rosids and Asterids has not been identified. Here, evidence supporting the existence of a COL gene family is provided and the presence of Group I, II, and III COL genes in sugar beet, as characterized by different zinc-finger (B-box) and CCT (CO, CO-like, TOC) domains is demonstrated. BvCOL1 is identified as a close-homologue of Group 1a (AtCO, AtCOL1, AtCOL2) COL genes, hence a good candidate for flowering time control and it is shown that it maps to chromosome II but distant from the B gene locus. The late-flowering phenotype of A. thaliana co-2 mutants was rescued by over-expression of BvCOL1 thereby suggesting functional equivalence with AtCO, and it is shown that BvCOL1 interacts appropriately with the endogenous downstream genes, AtFT and AtSOC1 in the transgenic plants. Curiously, BvCOL1 has a dawn-phased diurnal pattern of transcription, mimicking that of AtCOL1 and AtCOL2 while contrasting with AtCO. Taken together, these data suggest that BvCOL1 plays an important role in the photoperiod response of sugar beet. PMID:18495636

  5. Deep RNA-Seq profile reveals biodiversity, plant-microbe interactions and a large family of NBS-LRR resistance genes in walnut (Juglans regia) tissues.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Britton, Monica; Martínez-García, P J; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2016-03-01

    Deep RNA-Seq profiling, a revolutionary method used for quantifying transcriptional levels, often includes non-specific transcripts from other co-existing organisms in spite of stringent protocols. Using the recently published walnut genome sequence as a filter, we present a broad analysis of the RNA-Seq derived transcriptome profiles obtained from twenty different tissues to extract the biodiversity and possible plant-microbe interactions in the walnut ecosystem in California. Since the residual nature of the transcripts being analyzed does not provide sufficient information to identify the exact strain, inferences made are constrained to the genus level. The presence of the pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora was detected in the root through the presence of a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Cryptococcus, the causal agent of cryptococcosis, was found in the catkins and vegetative buds, corroborating previous work indicating that the plant surface supported the sexual cycle of this human pathogen. The RNA-Seq profile revealed several species of the endophytic nitrogen fixing Actinobacteria. Another bacterial species implicated in aerobic biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (Methylibium petroleiphilum) is also found in the root. RNA encoding proteins from the pea aphid were found in the leaves and vegetative buds, while a serine protease from mosquito with significant homology to a female reproductive tract protease from Drosophila mojavensis in the vegetative bud suggests egg-laying activities. The comprehensive analysis of RNA-seq data present also unraveled detailed, tissue-specific information of ~400 transcripts encoded by the largest family of resistance (R) genes (NBS-LRR), which possibly rationalizes the resistance of the specific walnut plant to the pathogens detected. Thus, we elucidate the biodiversity and possible plant-microbe interactions in several walnut (Juglans regia) tissues in California using deep RNA-Seq profiling. PMID:26883051

  6. RNA interference suppression of genes in glycosyl transferase families 43 and 47 in wheat starchy endosperm causes large decreases in arabinoxylan content.

    PubMed

    Lovegrove, Alison; Wilkinson, Mark D; Freeman, Jackie; Pellny, Till K; Tosi, Paola; Saulnier, Luc; Shewry, Peter R; Mitchell, Rowan A C

    2013-09-01

    The cell walls of wheat (Triticum aestivum) starchy endosperm are dominated by arabinoxylan (AX), accounting for 65% to 70% of the polysaccharide content. Genes within two glycosyl transferase (GT) families, GT43 (IRREGULAR XYLEM9 [IRX9] and IRX14) and GT47 (IRX10), have previously been shown to be involved in the synthesis of the xylan backbone in Arabidopsis, and close homologs of these have been implicated in the synthesis of xylan in other species. Here, homologs of IRX10 TaGT47_2 and IRX9 TaGT43_2, which are highly expressed in wheat starchy endosperm cells, were suppressed by RNA interference (RNAi) constructs driven by a starchy endosperm-specific promoter. The total amount of AX was decreased by 40% to 50% and the degree of arabinosylation was increased by 25% to 30% in transgenic lines carrying either of the transgenes. The cell walls of starchy endosperm in sections of grain from TaGT43_2 and TaGT47_2 RNAi transgenics showed decreased immunolabeling for xylan and arabinoxylan epitopes and approximately 50% decreased cell wall thickness compared with controls. The proportion of AX that was water soluble was not significantly affected, but average AX polymer chain length was decreased in both TaGT43_2 and TaGT47_2 RNAi transgenics. However, the long AX chains seen in controls were absent in TaGT43_2 RNAi transgenics but still present in TaGT47_2 RNAi transgenics. The results support an emerging picture of IRX9-like and IRX10-like proteins acting as key components in the xylan synthesis machinery in both dicots and grasses. Since AX is the main component of dietary fiber in wheat foods, the TaGT43_2 and TaGT47_2 genes are of major importance to human nutrition. PMID:23878080

  7. Obsessive-compulsive symptoms in a large population-based twin-family sample are predicted by clinically based polygenic scores and by genome-wide SNPs.

    PubMed

    den Braber, A; Zilho, N R; Fedko, I O; Hottenga, J-J; Pool, R; Smit, D J A; Cath, D C; Boomsma, D I

    2016-01-01

    Variation in obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) has a heritable basis, with genetic association studies starting to yield the first suggestive findings. We contribute to insights into the genetic basis of OCS by performing an extensive series of genetic analyses in a homogeneous, population-based sample from the Netherlands. First, phenotypic and genetic longitudinal correlations over a 6-year period were estimated by modeling OCS data from twins and siblings. Second, polygenic risk scores (PRS) for 6931 subjects with genotype and OCS data were calculated based on meta-analysis results from IOCDF-GC, to investigate their predictive value. Third, the contribution of measured single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to the heritability was estimated using random-effects modeling. Last, we performed an exploratory genome-wide association study (GWAS) of OCS, testing for SNP- and for gene-based associations. Stability in OCS (test-retest correlation 0.63) was mainly explained by genetic stability. The PRS based on clinical samples predicted OCS in our population-based twin-family sample. SNP-based heritability was estimated at 14%. GWAS revealed one SNP (rs8100480), located within the MEF2BNB gene, associated with OCS (P=2.56 10(-8)). Additional gene-based testing resulted in four significantly associated genes, which are located in the same chromosomal region on chromosome 19p13.11: MEF2BNB, RFXANK, MEF2BNB-MEF2B and MEF2B. Thus, common genetic variants explained a significant proportion of OCS trait variation. Genes significantly associated with OCS are expressed in the brain and involved in development and control of immune system functions (RFXANK) and regulation of gene expression of muscle-specific genes (MEF2BNB). MEF2BNB also showed a suggestive association with OCD in an independent case-control study, suggesting a role for this gene in the development of OCS. PMID:26859814

  8. Cancer, Families, and Family Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Maureen; Gillig, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Examines the role of the family counselor in working with cancer patients and their families. Suggests ways in which the family counselor can work proactively with families in the area of cancer prevention and helping them cope more effectively with its impact on their lives. Uses a clinical case example to illustrate intervention with cancer…

  9. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Constitutes a Large and Diverse Family of Proteins Involved in Development and Abiotic Stress Responses in Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb.)

    PubMed Central

    Pedrosa, Andresa Muniz; Martins, Cristina de Paula Santos; Gonçalves, Luana Pereira; Costa, Marcio Gilberto Cardoso

    2015-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are an ubiquitous group of polypeptides that were first described to accumulate during plant seed dehydration, at the later stages of embryogenesis. Since then they have also been recorded in vegetative plant tissues experiencing water limitation and in anhydrobiotic bacteria and invertebrates and, thereby, correlated with the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. This study provides the first comprehensive study about the LEA gene family in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb.), the most important and widely grown fruit crop around the world. A surprisingly high number (72) of genes encoding C. sinensis LEAs (CsLEAs) were identified and classified into seven groups (LEA_1, LEA_2, LEA_3 and LEA_4, LEA_5, DEHYDRIN and SMP) based on their predicted amino acid sequences and also on their phylogenetic relationships with the complete set of Arabidopsis thaliana LEA proteins (AtLEAs). Approximately 60% of the CsLEAs identified in this study belongs to the unusual LEA_2 group of more hydrophobic LEA proteins, while the other LEA groups contained a relatively small number of members typically hydrophilic. A correlation between gene structure and motif composition was observed within each LEA group. Investigation of their chromosomal localizations revealed that the CsLEAs were non-randomly distributed across all nine chromosomes and that 33% of all CsLEAs are segmentally or tandemly duplicated genes. Analysis of the upstream sequences required for transcription revealed the presence of various stress-responsive cis-acting regulatory elements in the promoter regions of CsLEAs, including ABRE, DRE/CRT, MYBS and LTRE. Expression analysis using both RNA-seq data and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR) revealed that the CsLEA genes are widely expressed in various tissues, and that many genes containing the ABRE promoter sequence are induced by drought, salt and PEG. These results provide a useful reference for further exploration of the CsLEAs functions and applications on crop improvement. PMID:26700652

  10. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Constitutes a Large and Diverse Family of Proteins Involved in Development and Abiotic Stress Responses in Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb.).

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Andresa Muniz; Martins, Cristina de Paula Santos; Gonçalves, Luana Pereira; Costa, Marcio Gilberto Cardoso

    2015-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are an ubiquitous group of polypeptides that were first described to accumulate during plant seed dehydration, at the later stages of embryogenesis. Since then they have also been recorded in vegetative plant tissues experiencing water limitation and in anhydrobiotic bacteria and invertebrates and, thereby, correlated with the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. This study provides the first comprehensive study about the LEA gene family in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb.), the most important and widely grown fruit crop around the world. A surprisingly high number (72) of genes encoding C. sinensis LEAs (CsLEAs) were identified and classified into seven groups (LEA_1, LEA_2, LEA_3 and LEA_4, LEA_5, DEHYDRIN and SMP) based on their predicted amino acid sequences and also on their phylogenetic relationships with the complete set of Arabidopsis thaliana LEA proteins (AtLEAs). Approximately 60% of the CsLEAs identified in this study belongs to the unusual LEA_2 group of more hydrophobic LEA proteins, while the other LEA groups contained a relatively small number of members typically hydrophilic. A correlation between gene structure and motif composition was observed within each LEA group. Investigation of their chromosomal localizations revealed that the CsLEAs were non-randomly distributed across all nine chromosomes and that 33% of all CsLEAs are segmentally or tandemly duplicated genes. Analysis of the upstream sequences required for transcription revealed the presence of various stress-responsive cis-acting regulatory elements in the promoter regions of CsLEAs, including ABRE, DRE/CRT, MYBS and LTRE. Expression analysis using both RNA-seq data and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR) revealed that the CsLEA genes are widely expressed in various tissues, and that many genes containing the ABRE promoter sequence are induced by drought, salt and PEG. These results provide a useful reference for further exploration of the CsLEAs functions and applications on crop improvement. PMID:26700652

  11. Premutation for the Martin-Bell syndrome analyzed in a large Sardinian family: III. Molecular analysis with the StB12.3 probe

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, M.; Perroni, L.; Dagna-Bricarelli, F.

    1996-08-09

    This report complements a series of clinical, cytogenetical, and psychological studies previously reported on a large Sardinian pedigree segregating for premutations and full mutations associated with the Martin-Bell syndrome (MBS). Using the StB12.3 probe, we report now the molecular classification of all of the critical members of the pedigree. These molecular findings are evaluated against the variable phenotypic manifestations of the disease in the course of a six-generation segregation of an MBS premutation allegedly present in a common female progenitor of 14 MBS male patients and 9 female MBS heterozygotes seen in the last two generations. The nature and stepwise progression of MBS-premutations toward the fully manifested Martin-Bell syndrome and the possibility of reverse mutational events toward the normal allele are discussed with respect to the application of the presently available diagnostic tools in genetic counseling. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Family Violence and Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Carol P.

    1991-01-01

    The acronym IDEALS summarizes family physicians' obligations when violence is suspected: to identify family violence; document injuries; educate families and ensure safety for victims; access resources and coordinate care; co-operate in the legal process; and provide support for families. Failure to respond reflects personal and professional experience and attitudes, fear of legal involvement, and lack of knowledge. Risks of intervention include physician burnout, physician overfunctioning, escalation of violence, and family disruption. PMID:21228987

  13. FAMILIAL SUICIDE

    PubMed Central

    Unni, K.E. Sadanaandan

    1996-01-01

    Seven completed suicides in a family of lower socioeconomic status and suburban domicile in Pondicherry are reported. The presence of bipolar affective disorder in the family members and the absence of exogenous factors are illustrated by utilising both family history method and family study method. The details collected formed the basis for the terminology ‘familial suicide’. The management of the index case, one of the only three surviving male members of the family, who presented with suicidal ruminations and depressive features, is described. PMID:21584122

  14. Heterogeneous growth hormone (GH) gene mutations in familial GH deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Cogan, J.D.; Phillips, J.A. III; Sakati, N.; Frisch, H.; Schober, E.; Milner, R.D.G. )

    1993-05-01

    The GH1 genes of probands of two families with familial isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) were sequenced. Double stranded sequencing of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification products from genomic DNA of two affected cousins in a consanguineous Turkish family revealed a G[yields]A transition in the 20th codon of the GH1 signal peptide. This substitution converts a TGG (Trp) to a TAG (stop) codon and generates a new AluI recognition site. PCR amplification of the GH1 alleles of family members, followed by AluI digestion, revealed that the G[yields]A transition segregated with the IGHD phenotype. In a Saudi Arabian family, a G[yields]C transversion was found that alters the first base of the donor splice site of intron IV. This substitution should perturb mRNA splicing, resulting in an altered protein product which should be unstable or bioinactive. This transversion also destroys an HphI site, which was used to assay samples from relatives. Digestion of PCR amplification products with HphI demonstrated cosegregation of the G[yields]C transversion with IGHD. These results demonstrate that in the expression of the GH1 gene. 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Homozygosity mapping reveals novel and known mutations in Pakistani families with inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Saqib, Muhammad Arif Nadeem; Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Ullah, Ehsan; Sher Khan, Falak; Iqbal, Jamila; Bibi, Rabia; Jarral, Afeefa; Sajid, Sundus; Nishiguchi, Koji M; Venturini, Giulia; Ansar, Muhammad; Rivolta, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous. This extensive heterogeneity poses a challenge when performing molecular diagnosis of patients, especially in developing countries. In this study, we applied homozygosity mapping as a tool to reduce the complexity given by genetic heterogeneity and identify disease-causing variants in consanguineous Pakistani pedigrees. DNA samples from eight families with autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies were subjected to genome wide homozygosity mapping (seven by SNP arrays and one by STR markers) and genes comprised within the detected homozygous regions were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. All families displayed consistent autozygous genomic regions. Sequence analysis of candidate genes identified four previously-reported mutations in CNGB3, CNGA3, RHO, and PDE6A, as well as three novel mutations: c.2656C > T (p.L886F) in RPGRIP1, c.991G > C (p.G331R) in CNGA3, and c.413-1G > A (IVS6-1G > A) in CNGB1. This latter mutation impacted pre-mRNA splicing of CNGB1 by creating a -1 frameshift leading to a premature termination codon. In addition to better delineating the genetic landscape of inherited retinal dystrophies in Pakistan, our data confirm that combining homozygosity mapping and candidate gene sequencing is a powerful approach for mutation identification in populations where consanguineous unions are common. PMID:25943428

  16. Homozygosity mapping reveals novel and known mutations in Pakistani families with inherited retinal dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Saqib, Muhammad Arif Nadeem; Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Ullah, Ehsan; Sher Khan, Falak; Iqbal, Jamila; Bibi, Rabia; Jarral, Afeefa; Sajid, Sundus; Nishiguchi, Koji M.; Venturini, Giulia; Ansar, Muhammad; Rivolta, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous. This extensive heterogeneity poses a challenge when performing molecular diagnosis of patients, especially in developing countries. In this study, we applied homozygosity mapping as a tool to reduce the complexity given by genetic heterogeneity and identify disease-causing variants in consanguineous Pakistani pedigrees. DNA samples from eight families with autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies were subjected to genome wide homozygosity mapping (seven by SNP arrays and one by STR markers) and genes comprised within the detected homozygous regions were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. All families displayed consistent autozygous genomic regions. Sequence analysis of candidate genes identified four previously-reported mutations in CNGB3, CNGA3, RHO, and PDE6A, as well as three novel mutations: c.2656C > T (p.L886F) in RPGRIP1, c.991G > C (p.G331R) in CNGA3, and c.413-1G > A (IVS6-1G > A) in CNGB1. This latter mutation impacted pre-mRNA splicing of CNGB1 by creating a -1 frameshift leading to a premature termination codon. In addition to better delineating the genetic landscape of inherited retinal dystrophies in Pakistan, our data confirm that combining homozygosity mapping and candidate gene sequencing is a powerful approach for mutation identification in populations where consanguineous unions are common. PMID:25943428

  17. Gaspra and Ida in families

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James G.

    1992-01-01

    The Galileo flyby candidates 951 Gaspra and 243 Ida are both in families. The former is in a complex of families associated with 8 Flora and the latter is in the Koronis family. The Flora and the Koronis families are described. The Galileo spacecraft will have the opportunity to sample fragments from two types of impacts; one impact totally destroyed the parent body and the other left a large body behind. The types of Ss are also different, the colors of Gaspra and the other Ss in the complex of families near 8 Flora are much redder in U-V than Ida and the Ss of the Koronis family.

  18. Familial Gigantiform Cementoma: Case Report of an Unusual Clinical Manifestation and Possible Mechanism Related To "Calcium Steal Disorder".

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunyue; Wang, Hongwei; He, Guang; Qin, Xingjun

    2016-03-01

    Familial gigantiform cementoma is an exceedingly rare but distinct subtype of cemento-osseous-fibrous lesion. Undocumented radiographic changes and related bone metabolism disorder are herein hypothesized and discussed.We present an adolescent case with recurrent familial gigantiform cementoma who received surgical intervention in our hospital. Apart from typical multiquadrant and expansile abnormalies involving both jaws, he also suffered from several times of fractures in lower extremity. Furthermore, radiographic examinations of calvaria, pelvis, femoris, tibia, and fibula all revealed radiolucent areas signifying diffuse osteopenic bone losses. Some of his consanguineous relatives bore the same burden of fractures during pubertal period.Considering these polyostotic conditions, a correlation of congenital bone metabolism disorder in cases with familial gigantiform cementoma, named "calcium steal disorder," was thus proposed.Familial gigantiform cementoma is closely associated with "calcium steal disorder." Whole-body dual-energy absorptiometry should be considered as a routine examination for fracture-related risk prediction. PMID:26945411

  19. Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This "special focus" journal issue consists of 13 individual articles on the theme of rural family programs relating to school, health services, church, and other institutions. It includes: (1) "Towards a Rural Family Policy" (Judith K. Chynoweth and Michael D. Campbell); (2) "Montana: Council for Families Collaborates for Prevention (Jean…

  20. Family therapy.

    PubMed

    Altamash, Shaikh

    2013-10-01

    Another major force not letting us succeed in the treatment of diabetes remains right inside the patients home, their family members. Hence, it is important to know the perception of the close family members about this simple and strong tool in diabetes, 'insulin'. The drug is nearing its century, it has not fully being accepted gracefully even in todays electronic savvy society. So, we need to strongly discover the reason for its non-acceptance, while trials are out inventing new drugs. One vital thing that can change this attitude is increasing the understanding of this drug, insulin in depth to close people around the patient, the 'family'. Underestimating family's perception about disease and treatment for diabetes is detrimental to both diseased and the doctor. This consists of a biopsychosocial model; biological, psychological and social factors. Family forms the most important part of it. The strategies in family therapy include psychodynamic, structural, strategic, and cognitive-behavioral component. Diabetes has and will continue to rise, so will be the treatment options. From the clinicians side its to fix fasting first but from patients its fix family first. Family therapy demonstrates the importance of insulin initiation and maintenance in insulin naive patients, and continuation for others. The specific needs of such patients and their impact on family life are met with family therapy. Who needs family therapy? Benefits of family therapy and a case based approach is covered. PMID:24251191

  1. Family Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liontos, Lynn Balster

    1992-01-01

    Family involvement in schools will work only when perceived as an enlarged concept focusing on all children, including those from at-risk families. Each publication reviewed here is specifically concerned with family involvement strategies concerned with all children or targeted at primarily high risk students. Susan McAllister Swap looks at three…

  2. Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, Colleen, Ed.; McBride, Marijo, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This "Feature Issue" of the quarterly journal "Impact" presents 19 brief articles on family support systems in the United States for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. Emphasis is on provisions of Public Law 99-457. Articles include: "Family Support in the United States: Setting a Course for the 1990s" (James Knoll);…

  3. Cancerous leptomeningitis and familial congenital hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Vujovic, S; Vujosevic, S; Kavaric, S; Sopta, J; Ivovic, M; Saveanu, A; Brue, T; Korbonits, M; Popovic, V

    2016-05-01

    People are at higher risk of cancer as they get older or have a strong family history of cancer. The potential influence of environmental and behavioral factors remains poorly understood. Earlier population and case control studies reported that upper quartile of circulating IGF-I is associated with a higher risk of developing cancer suggesting possible involvement of the growth hormone (GH)/IGF system in initiation or progression of cancer. Since GH therapy increases IGF-1 levels, there have been concerns that GH therapy in hypopituitarism might increase the risk of cancer. We report a 42-year-old female patient who presented with subacute onset of symptoms of meningitis and with the absence of fever which resulted in death 70 days after the onset of symptoms. The patient together with her younger brother was diagnosed at the age of 5 years with familial congenital hypopituitarism, due to homozygous mutation c.150delA in PROP1 gene. Due to evolving hypopituitarism, she was replaced with thyroxine (from age 5), hydrocortisone (from age 13), GH (from age 13 until 17), and sex steroids in adolescence and adulthood. Her consanguineous family has a prominent history of malignant diseases. Six close relatives had malignant disease including her late maternal aunt with breast cancer. BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutational analysis in the patient's mother was negative. Histology after autopsy disclosed advanced ovarian cancer with multiple metastases to the brain, leptomeninges, lungs, heart, and adrenals. Low circulating IGF-1 did not seem to protect this patient from cancer initiation and progression in the context of strong family history of malignancies. PMID:26886902

  4. Synthesis, structure, and magnetism of a family of heterometallic {Cu2Ln7} and {Cu4Ln12} (Ln = Gd, Tb, and Dy) complexes: the Gd analogues exhibiting a large magnetocaloric effect.

    PubMed

    Langley, Stuart K; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Tomasi, Corrado; Evangelisti, Marco; Brechin, Euan K; Murray, Keith S

    2014-12-15

    The syntheses, structures, and magnetic properties of two heterometallic Cu(II)-Ln(III) (Ln(III) = Gd, Tb, and Dy) families, utilizing triethanolamine and carboxylate ligands, are reported. The first structural motif displays a nonanuclear {Cu(II)2Ln(III)7} metallic core, while the second reveals a hexadecanuclear {Cu(II)4Ln(III)12} core. The differing nuclearities of the two families stem from the choice of carboxylic acid used in the synthesis. Magnetic studies show that the most impressive features are displayed by the {Cu(II)2Gd(III)7} and {Cu(II)4Gd(III)12} complexes, which display a large magnetocaloric effect, with entropy changes -ΔSm = 34.6 and 33.0 J kg(-1) K(-1) at T = 2.7 and 2.9 K, respectively, for a 9 T applied field change. It is also found that the {Cu(II)4Dy(III)12} complex displays single-molecule magnet behavior, with an anisotropy barrier to magnetization reversal of 10.1 K. PMID:25494949

  5. Novel mutations of MYO7A and USH1G in Israeli Arab families with Usher syndrome type 1

    PubMed Central

    Rizel, Leah; Safieh, Christine; Shalev, Stavit A.; Mezer, Eedy; Jabaly-Habib, Haneen; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Chervinsky, Elena; Briscoe, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the genetic basis for Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) in four consanguineous Israeli Arab families. Methods Haplotype analysis for all known USH1 loci was performed in each family. In families for which haplotype analysis was inconclusive, we performed genome-wide homozygosity mapping using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. For mutation analysis, specific primers were used to PCR amplify the coding exons of the MYO7A, USH1C, and USH1G genes including intron-exon boundaries. Mutation screening was performed with direct sequencing. Results A combination of haplotype analysis and genome-wide homozygosity mapping indicated linkage to the USH1B locus in two families, USH1C in one family and USH1G in another family. Sequence analysis of the relevant genes (MYO7A, USH1C, and USH1G) led to the identification of pathogenic mutations in all families. Two of the identified mutations are novel (c.1135–1147dup in MYO7A and c.206–207insC in USH1G). Conclusions USH1 is a genetically heterogenous condition. Of the five USH1 genes identified to date, USH1C and USH1G are the rarest contributors to USH1 etiology worldwide. It is therefore interesting that two of the four Israeli Arab families reported here have mutations in these two genes. This finding further demonstrates the unique genetic structure of the Israeli population in general, and the Israeli Arab population in particular, which due to high rates of consanguinity segregates many rare autosomal recessive genetic conditions. PMID:22219650

  6. A new family programme in Zhejiang province.

    PubMed

    Xu, B

    1994-04-01

    Zhejiang Province in China has promoted a new family planning program since April 1993. The program stresses delayed marriage and childbearing, fewer and healthier births, modernization of family life, and prosperity through hard work. The people are receptive to the new program out of a desire for an improved standard of living. The objective is to build small, modern families who 1) practice deferred marriage and childbearing; 2) voluntarily practice family planning and have no unplanned births; 3) practice avoidance of consanguineous marriage, become sterilized if a carrier of a hereditary disease of chromosomal abnormality, and use premarital education and counseling and proper prenatal care; 4) uphold the laws and maintain discipline in action to avoid criminal behavior; 5) establish families that respect the old, care for children, and help their neighbors; 6) complete 9 years of compulsory education; and 7) create well being through hard work. The program is compatible with the strategy of the "three stresses" and an integrated approach. IEC and service provision are important components in program implementation. The target population are the masses and grassroots cadres, particularly those in the childbearing ages. IEC will be directed in different ways to different groups. Those aged 18-35 years will receive education. Face to face interaction with family planning workers and lectures will be directed to grassroots cadres. The mass media will be employed to reach the masses. The messages will include information and persuasion to adopt new families, accept family planning regulations, and learn about contraceptive use, healthy births and childrearing, education, health care, sex education, and income generation skills. Classes will be conducted for groups, such as teenagers, unmarried youth, pregnant women, and lactating women. Priority will be given to couples that accept the certificates for one child; favoritism will be granted for allocation of housing; acceptance in kindergartens and schools, employment, and military positions; and receipt of business licenses and poverty aide. Sterilization will be rewarded with longer paid leave and subsidies. Services will include contraceptive provision and follow-up, infertility treatment, gynecological check-ups, sex education, old age pensions, premarital counseling, and other quality services. PMID:12346835

  7. What makes a family reliable?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James G.

    1992-01-01

    Asteroid families are clusters of asteroids in proper element space which are thought to be fragments from former collisions. Studies of families promise to improve understanding of large collision events and a large event can open up the interior of a former parent body to view. While a variety of searches for families have found the same heavily populated families, and some searches have found the same families of lower population, there is much apparent disagreement between proposed families of lower population of different investigations. Indicators of reliability, factors compromising reliability, an illustration of the influence of different data samples, and a discussion of how several investigations perceived families in the same region of proper element space are given.

  8. Molecular analysis reveals a high mutation frequency in the first untranslated exon of the PPOX gene and largely excludes variegate porphyria in a subset of clinically affected Afrikaner families.

    PubMed

    Kotze, M J; De Villiers, J N; Groenewald, J Z; Rooney, R N; Loubser, O; Thiart, R; Oosthuizen, C J; van Niekerk, M M; Groenewald, I M; Retief, A E; Warnich, L

    1998-10-01

    A subset of probands from 11 South African families with clinical and/or biochemical features of variegate porphyria (VP), but without the known protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX) gene defects identified previously in the South African population, were subjected to mutation analysis. Disease-related mutation(s) could not be identified after screening virtually the entire PPOX gene by heteroduplex single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis (HEX-SSCP), although three new sequence variants were detected in exon 1 of the gene in three normal controls. The presence of these single base changes at nucleotide positions 22 (C/G), 27 (C/A) and 127 (C/A), in addition to the known exon 1 polymorphisms I-26 and I-150, indicates that this untranslated region of the PPOX gene is particularly mutation-prone. Furthermore, microsatellite markers flanking the PPOX and alpha-1 antitrypsin (PI) gene, on chromosomes 1 and 14, respectively, were used to assess the probability of involvement of these loci in disease presentation. Common alleles transmitted from affected parent to affected child were determined where possible in the mutation-negative index cases. Allelic frequencies of these alleles were compared to findings in the normal population, but no predominant disease-associated allele could be identified. Co-segregation of a specific haplotype with the disease phenotype could also not be demonstrated in a large Afrikaner family. It is concluded that further studies are warranted to determine the genetic factor(s) underlying the autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance in molecularly uncharacterized cases showing clinical symptoms of an acute porphyria. PMID:9778454

  9. Exploring the genetic basis of 3MC syndrome: Findings in 12 further families.

    PubMed

    Urquhart, Jill; Roberts, Rebecca; de Silva, Deepthi; Shalev, Stavit; Chervinsky, Elena; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Sznajer, Yves; Revencu, Nicole; Gunasekera, Romesh; Suri, Mohnish; Ellingford, Jamie; Williams, Simon; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Clayton-Smith, Jill

    2016-05-01

    The 3MC syndromes are a group of rare autosomal recessive disorders where the main clinical features are cleft lip and palate, hypertelorism, highly arched eyebrows, caudal appendage, postnatal growth deficiency, and genitourinary tract anomalies. Ophthalmological abnormalities, most notably anterior chamber defects may also be seen. We describe the clinical and molecular findings in 13 individuals with suspected 3MC syndrome from 12 previously unreported families. The exclusion of the MASP1 and COLEC11 Loci in two individuals from different consanguineous families and the absence of mutations in four further individuals sequenced for both genes raises the possibility that that there is further genetic heterogeneity of 3MC syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26789649

  10. Rare intracranial cholesterol deposition and a homozygous mutation of LDLR in a familial hypercholesterolemia patient.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoxian; Zhang, Yanghui; Wei, Xianda; Peng, Ying; Yang, Pu; Tan, Hu; Chen, Chen; Pan, Qian; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-09-15

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH MIM# 143890) is one of the most common autosomal inherited diseases. FH is characterized by elevated plasma levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Mutation in the LDLR gene, which encodes the LDL receptor protein, is responsible for most of the morbidity of FH. The incidence of heterozygous FH is about 1/500, whereas the incidence of homozygous FH is only 1/1,000,000 in Caucasian population. In this study, we report a homozygous LDLR mutation (c.298G>A) in a familial hypercholesterolemia patient, who exhibited intracranial cholesterol deposition, which is a rare addition to the common FH phenotypes. The proband's consanguineous parents have the same heterozygous mutation with elevated concentrations of LDL-C but no xanthoma. PMID:25936346

  11. Mariage consanguin et morbi-mortalité, courte revue de la littérature à partir d'une association exceptionnelle: syndrome de Usher et Neurofibromatose de Von Recklinghausen

    PubMed Central

    Atipo-Tsiba, Pépin-Williams

    2016-01-01

    Le syndrome de Usher est défini par l'association d'une surdité de perception congénitale de sévérité variable évolutive ou non et d'une rétinopathie pigmentaire progressivement cécitante. La Neurofibromatose de Von Recklinghausen ou Neurofibromatose de type I est la principale forme clinique des neurofibromatoses avec environ 90% des cas. Ces deux maladies sont d'origine génétique avec des prévalences très basses. La probabilité pour qu'un seul et même individu souffre à la fois de ces maladies est exceptionnelle. Comme toutes les maladies génétiques, la consanguinité augmente de façon assez sensible la probabilité de leur apparition. Le mariage consanguin est encore largement répondu au Maghreb et dans certaines régions d'Afrique de l'Ouest. Cette observation rapporte un cas exceptionnel de cette association chez un homme de 40 ans originaire de la Mauritanie né d'une union consanguine. PMID:27231508

  12. Cerebrofaciothoracic dysplasia: a new family.

    PubMed Central

    Philip, N; Guala, A; Moncla, A; Monlouis, M; Aymé, S; Giraud, F

    1992-01-01

    We describe two brothers, born to consanguineous parents, who had facial dysmorphism, complex anomalies of the vertebrae and ribs, enlarged cerebral ventricles and septum pellucidum, mental retardation, and affable behaviour. The features are similar to those previously described in three unrelated children and may represent new cases of cerebrofaciothoracic dysplasia. Images PMID:1640432

  13. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  14. FAMILY GEMINIVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses geminivirus study group has revised the description of the family Geminiviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 8th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of vi...

  15. Family Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This feature issue of IMPACT focuses on the empowerment of families with a member who has a developmental disability. It presents strategies and models for a collaborative, respectful approach to service provision, and presents the experiences of families in seeking support and assistance. Feature articles include "Two Generations of Disability: A…

  16. FAMILY POTYVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses potyvirus study group has revised the description of the family Geminiviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 8th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of vira...

  17. Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on various aspects of mammal family life ranging from ways different species are born to how different mammals are raised. Learning activities include making butter from cream, creating birth announcements for mammals, and playing a password game on family life. (ML)

  18. Family, Extended

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Jessica Rae

    2006-01-01

    Parents are a child's first and most influential teacher. People hear this truism often, yet nowhere has the author seen it more taken to heart than at Tower Street Elementary School. The school's efforts to form a true partnership with students' families--from involving families in the first day of school, to the principal making home visits, to…

  19. Family Potyviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses potyvirus study group has revised the description of the family Potyviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 9th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of viral sp...

  20. Family Theory and Family Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Different family theories can be applied to different aspects of how families experience health and illness. The family health and illness cycle describes the phases of a family's experience, beginning with health promotion and risk reduction, then family vulnerability and disease onset or relapse, family illness appraisal, family acute response, and finally family adaptation to illness and recovery. For each phase, specific family theories that are most appropriate for guiding family and health research are discussed. PMID:21229056

  1. Family Health and Family Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This document is made up of a selection of some of the papers distributed to participants in courses on "Family Health and Family Planning" which have been organized each year since 1973 by the International Children's Center and the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. Six courses, held between 1973 and 1978, brought together a

  2. Family Health and Family Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This document is made up of a selection of some of the papers distributed to participants in courses on "Family Health and Family Planning" which have been organized each year since 1973 by the International Children's Center and the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. Six courses, held between 1973 and 1978, brought together a…

  3. Relationship between apolipoprotein(a) phenotype, lipoprotein(a) concentration in plasma, and low density lipoprotein receptor function in a large kindred with familial hypercholesterolemia due to the pro664----leu mutation in the LDL receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Soutar, A K; McCarthy, S N; Seed, M; Knight, B L

    1991-01-01

    In a large kindred of 66 individuals, 22 were identified as heterozygous and 3 as homozygous for a mutation (pro664----leu) in the LDL-receptor gene that gives rise to familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). All the heterozygotes had a raised level of plasma total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol, but were remarkably free from premature coronary disease. Determination of apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) phenotype and lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) concentration in plasma revealed that in many instances, involving individuals with various apo(a) phenotypes, there was no difference in plasma Lp(a) concentration between an FH heterozygote and an unaffected sibling with the same apo(a) phenotype. No significant difference in Lp(a) concentration was observed between groups of FH and non-FH of the same apo(a) phenotype, although in each case the mean value for the FH group was greater than that for the non-FH group. There was also evidence for an inherited trait that markedly increased Lp(a) concentration, which did not segregate with apo(a) phenotype or the defective LDL-receptor allele. The data provide no evidence for a strong multiplicative interaction between the gene loci for apo(a) and the LDL receptor. Images PMID:1830890

  4. Family acholeplasmataceae (including phytoplasmas)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family Acholeplasmataceae was originally established to accommodate the genus Acholeplasma, comprising the mollicutes that could be cultivated without the supplement of cholesterol and that use UGA as a stop codon instead of coding for tryptophan. It was later shown that the phytoplasmas, a larg...

  5. Family Issues

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips for Working with Individuals on the Autism Spectrum Residential/Housing Social/Relationships Self-Advocacy Navigating Services Autism Source Legal Resources Treatment Options Nonmedical Interventions Related Approaches Evaluating Options Family Issues Stress Siblings ...

  6. Family Issues

    MedlinePlus

    ... can lead to conflict, such as illness, disability, addiction, job loss, school problems, and marital issues. Listening to each other and working to resolve conflicts are important in strengthening the family.

  7. Importance of Family Routines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families ...

  8. Roles within the Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families ...

  9. A complex microcephaly syndrome in a Pakistani family associated with a novel missense mutation in RBBP8 and a heterozygous deletion in NRXN1.

    PubMed

    Agha, Zehra; Iqbal, Zafar; Azam, Maleeha; Siddique, Maimoona; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Zweier, Christiane; de Leeuw, Nicole; Qamar, Raheel; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2014-03-15

    We report on a consanguineous Pakistani family with a severe congenital microcephaly syndrome resembling the Seckel syndrome and Jawad syndrome. The affected individuals in this family were born to consanguineous parents of whom the mother presented with mild intellectual disability (ID), epilepsy and diabetes mellitus. The two living affected brothers presented with microcephaly, white matter disease of the brain, hyponychia, dysmorphic facial features with synophrys, epilepsy, diabetes mellitus and ID. Genotyping with a 250K SNP array in both affected brothers revealed an 18 MB homozygous region on chromosome 18 p11.21-q12.1 encompassing the SCKL2 locus of the Seckel and Jawad syndromes. Sequencing of the RBBP8 gene, underlying the Seckel and Jawad syndromes, identified the novel mutation c.919A>G, p.Arg307Gly, segregating in a recessive manner in the family. In addition, in the two affected brothers and their mother we have also found a heterozygous 607kb deletion, encompassing exons 13-19 of NRXN1. Bidirectional sequencing of the coding exons of NRXN1 did not reveal any other mutation on the other allele. It thus appears that the phenotype of the mildly affected mother can be explained by the NRXN1 deletion, whereas the more severe and complex microcephalic phenotype of the two affected brothers is due to the simultaneous deletion in NRXN1 and the homozygous missense mutation affecting RBBP8. PMID:24440292

  10. Family Treatment for Bipolar Disorder: Family Impairment by Treatment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ivan W.; Keitner, Gabor I.; Ryan, Christine E.; Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Johnson, Sheri L.; Solomon, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective There is a clear need for psychosocial treatments to supplement pharmacotherapy for bipolar disorder. In this study, the efficacy of 2 forms of adjunctive family intervention were compared to pharmacotherapy alone. In addition to evaluating overall differences between treatments, a chief goal was to examine whether family impairment levels moderated the effects of family intervention on outcome. Method Ninety-two patients diagnosed with bipolar I disorder (according to DSM-III-R) were randomly assigned to receive (1) pharmacotherapy alone, (2) family therapy + pharmacotherapy, or (3) multi-family psychoeducational group + pharmacotherapy. Treatments and assessments continued for up to 28 months. Primary outcome measures were number of episodes per year and percentage of time symptomatic throughout the entire follow-up period. The study was conducted from September 1992 through March 1999. Results No significant main effects were found for treatment condition. Thus, for the total sample, the addition of a family intervention did not improve outcome. However, there were significant treatment condition by family impairment interactions (p < .05). In patients from families with high levels of impairment, the addition of a family intervention (family therapy or psychoeducational group) resulted in a significantly improved course of illness, particularly the number of depressive episodes (p <.01) and proportion of time spent in a depressive episode (p <.01). These effects were relatively large (Cohen d = 0.7–1.0), with patients receiving either family intervention having roughly half the number of depressive episodes and amount of time spent depressed as those receiving pharmacotherapy alone. In contrast, for patients from low-impairment families, the addition of a family intervention did not improve course of illness. Conclusions Our findings build on previous literature suggesting the importance of treatment matching within the mood disorders and suggest that the utility of adding family interventions for bipolar patients and their families may depend upon the family’s level of impairment. PMID:18363424

  11. Turkish families with juvenile motor neuron disease broaden the phenotypic spectrum of SPG11

    PubMed Central

    Iskender, Ceren; Kartal, Ece; Akcimen, Fulya; Kocoglu, Cemile; Ozoguz, Aslihan; Kotan, Dilcan; Eraksoy, Mefkure; Parman, Yesim G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Identification of causative mutations in 3 consanguineous families (with 4 affected members) referred to our center with young-onset motor neuron disease and overlapping phenotypes resembling autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ARJALS) and autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia (ARHSP). Methods: Patients have a slowly progressive motor neuron disease with upper and lower motor neuron dysfunction. There is distal muscle weakness and atrophy associated with pyramidal signs. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on the patients and the unaffected parent samples to identify disease-causing mutations. Variants were prioritized according to their predicted pathogenicity and their relevance to the clinical phenotypes. Results: Five distinct homozygous mutations within the SPG11 gene were identified, 3 of which were novel and truncating: c.7155T>G/p.Tyr2385Ter, c.2250delT/p.Phe750Leufs*3, and c.1966_1967delAA/p.Lys656Valfs*11. The copresence of 2 distinct homozygous missense variations was observed in 2 families: c.6224A>G/p.Asn2075Ser and c.7132T>C/p.Phe2378Leu. The segregation of these variations in the family members was validated by Sanger sequencing. Conclusions: Four patients with juvenile-onset motor neuron disease with consanguineous parents were found to carry homozygous mutations in the SPG11 gene. Our findings confirm the overlapping phenotypes of SPG11-based ARJALS and ARHSP, indicating that these 2 entities may be the extreme phenotypes of the same disease continuum with many common features. This, in turn, confirms the difficult differential diagnosis of these 2 diseases in the clinic. PMID:27066562

  12. The Caenorhabditis chemoreceptor gene families

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, James H; Robertson, Hugh M

    2008-01-01

    Background Chemoreceptor proteins mediate the first step in the transduction of environmental chemical stimuli, defining the breadth of detection and conferring stimulus specificity. Animal genomes contain families of genes encoding chemoreceptors that mediate taste, olfaction, and pheromone responses. The size and diversity of these families reflect the biology of chemoperception in specific species. Results Based on manual curation and sequence comparisons among putative G-protein-coupled chemoreceptor genes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified approximately 1300 genes and 400 pseudogenes in the 19 largest gene families, most of which fall into larger superfamilies. In the related species C. briggsae and C. remanei, we identified most or all genes in each of the 19 families. For most families, C. elegans has the largest number of genes and C. briggsae the smallest number, suggesting changes in the importance of chemoperception among the species. Protein trees reveal family-specific and species-specific patterns of gene duplication and gene loss. The frequency of strict orthologs varies among the families, from just over 50% in two families to less than 5% in three families. Several families include large species-specific expansions, mostly in C. elegans and C. remanei. Conclusion Chemoreceptor gene families in Caenorhabditis species are large and evolutionarily dynamic as a result of gene duplication and gene loss. These dynamics shape the chemoreceptor gene complements in Caenorhabditis species and define the receptor space available for chemosensory responses. To explain these patterns, we propose the gray pawn hypothesis: individual genes are of little significance, but the aggregate of a large number of diverse genes is required to cover a large phenotype space. PMID:18837995

  13. Unusual evolutionary conservation and further species-specific adaptations of a large family of Nonclassical MHC class Ib genes across different degrees of genome ploidy in the amphibian subfamily Xenopodinae

    PubMed Central

    Edholm, Eva-Stina; Goyos, Ana; Taran, Joseph; De Jess Andino, Francisco; Ohta, Yuko; Robert, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Nonclassical MHC class Ib (class Ib) genes are a family of highly diverse and rapidly evolving genes wherein gene numbers, organization and expression markedly differ even among closely related species rendering class Ib phylogeny difficult to establish. Whereas among mammals there are few unambiguous class Ib gene orthologs, different amphibian species belonging to the anuran subfamily Xenopodinae exhibit an unusually high degree of conservation among multiple class Ib gene lineages. Comparative genomic analysis of class Ib gene loci of two divergent (~65 million years) Xenopodinae subfamily members X. laevis (allotetraploid) and X. tropicalis (diploid) shows that both species possess a large cluster of class Ib genes denoted as Xenopus/Silurana nonclassical (XNC/SNC). Our study reveals two distinct phylogenetic patterns among these genes: some gene lineages display a high degree of flexibility, as demonstrated by species-specific expansion and contractions, whereas other class Ib gene lineages have been maintained as monogenic subfamilies with very few changes in their nucleotide sequence across divergent species. In this second category, we further investigated the XNC/SNC10 gene lineage that in X. laevis is required for the development of a distinct semi-invariant T cell population. We report compelling evidence of the remarkable high degree of conservation of this gene lineage that is present in all 12 species of the Xenopodinae examined, including species with different degrees of ploidy ranging from 2, 4, 8 to 12N. This suggests that the critical role of XNC10 during early T cell development is conserved in amphibians. PMID:24771209

  14. Homozygosity mapping in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa families detects novel mutations

    PubMed Central

    Marzouka, Nour al Dain; Hebrard, Maxime; Manes, Gaël; Sénéchal, Audrey; Meunier, Isabelle; Hamel, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease resulting in progressive loss of photoreceptors that leads to blindness. To date, 36 genes are known to cause arRP, rendering the molecular diagnosis a challenge. The aim of this study was to use homozygosity mapping to identify the causative mutation in a series of inbred families with arRP. Methods arRP patients underwent standard ophthalmic examination, Goldman perimetry, fundus examination, retinal OCT, autofluorescence measurement, and full-field electroretinogram. Fifteen consanguineous families with arRP excluded for USH2A and EYS were genotyped on 250 K SNP arrays. Homozygous regions were listed, and known genes within these regions were PCR sequenced. Familial segregation and mutation analyzes were performed. Results We found ten mutations, seven of which were novel mutations in eight known genes, including RP1, IMPG2, NR2E3, PDE6A, PDE6B, RLBP1, CNGB1, and C2ORF71, in ten out of 15 families. The patients carrying RP1, C2ORF71, and IMPG2 mutations presented with severe RP, while those with PDE6A, PDE6B, and CNGB1 mutations were less severely affected. The five families without mutations in known genes could be a source of identification of novel genes. Conclusions Homozygosity mapping combined with systematic screening of known genes results in a positive molecular diagnosis in 66.7% of families. PMID:24339724

  15. Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Bouhairie, Victoria Enchia; Goldberg, Anne Carol

    2016-03-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a common, inherited disorder of cholesterol metabolism that leads to early cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Statins, ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, niacin, lomitapide, mipomersen, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis are treatments that can lower LDL cholesterol levels. Early treatment can lead to substantial reduction of cardiovascular events and death in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. It is important to increase awareness of this disorder in physicians and patients to reduce the burden of this disorder. PMID:26892994

  16. Familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Bouhairie, Victoria Enchia; Goldberg, Anne Carol

    2015-05-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a common, inherited disorder of cholesterol metabolism that leads to early cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Statins, ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, niacin, lomitapide, mipomersen, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis are treatments that can lower LDL cholesterol levels. Early treatment can lead to substantial reduction of cardiovascular events and death in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. It is important to increase awareness of this disorder in physicians and patients to reduce the burden of this disorder. PMID:25939291

  17. Homozygosity Mapping and Targeted Sanger Sequencing Reveal Genetic Defects Underlying Inherited Retinal Disease in Families from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Siddiqui, Sorath Noorani; Mustafa, Bilal; Ayub, Humaira; Ali, Liaqat; Ahmad, Shakeel; Micheal, Shazia; Hussain, Alamdar; Shah, Syed Tahir Abbas; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Ahmed, Waqas; Khan, Yar Muhammad; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Collin, Rob W. J.; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Qamar, Raheel; Cremers, Frans P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Homozygosity mapping has facilitated the identification of the genetic causes underlying inherited diseases, particularly in consanguineous families with multiple affected individuals. This knowledge has also resulted in a mutation dataset that can be used in a cost and time effective manner to screen frequent population-specific genetic variations associated with diseases such as inherited retinal disease (IRD). Methods We genetically screened 13 families from a cohort of 81 Pakistani IRD families diagnosed with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), retinitis pigmentosa (RP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), or cone dystrophy (CD). We employed genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis to identify homozygous regions shared by affected individuals and performed Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes located in the sizeable homozygous regions. In addition, based on population specific mutation data we performed targeted Sanger sequencing (TSS) of frequent variants in AIPL1, CEP290, CRB1, GUCY2D, LCA5, RPGRIP1 and TULP1, in probands from 28 LCA families. Results Homozygosity mapping and Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes revealed the underlying mutations in 10 families. TSS revealed causative variants in three families. In these 13 families four novel mutations were identified in CNGA1, CNGB1, GUCY2D, and RPGRIP1. Conclusions Homozygosity mapping and TSS revealed the underlying genetic cause in 13 IRD families, which is useful for genetic counseling as well as therapeutic interventions that are likely to become available in the near future. PMID:25775262

  18. Multiracial Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Kelley

    The multiracial population is one of the fastest growing segments of the U. S. population. In discussing the multiracial population it is first important to identify and define the groups that are under the heading of multiracial. The literature has included interracial couples, multiracial individuals, and families in which a cross-racial or…

  19. FAMILY TYMOVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article provides a brief review of the taxonomic structure, virion properties, genome organization and replication strategy, antigenic properties, and biological properties of viruses in the family Tymoviridae. Criteria for demarcation of genus and species are provided. A brief review of each...

  20. Family Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorgen, Carol, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This quarterly publication, issued by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), contains articles dealing with family violence and alcohol abuse, children of alcoholic parents, training programs for counselors, and confidentiality of client records. The three articles on alcohol abuse suggest that: (1) there is a clear…

  1. Serving Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Geoffrey; Beggs, Marjorie; Seiderman, Ethel

    Parent Services Project (PSP), the first comprehensive program of resources and mental health activities for parents offered at child care centers in the San Francisco Bay Area (California), has expanded to centers in six states, serving over 19,000 families. This report describes the program's history, aims, and achievements, along with specific…

  2. Family Hypnotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araoz, Daniel L.; Negley-Parker, Esther

    1985-01-01

    A therapeutic model to help families activate experiential and right hemispheric functioning through hypnosis is presented in detail, together with a clinical illustration. Different situations in which this model is effective are mentioned and one such set of circumstances is described. (Author)

  3. Family Disruptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... is happening and how it might affect her relationship with her cousins. She also might ask you: "Are you and Dad going to get a divorce too?" It is unwise to protect your child from these kinds of family problems. Keep in mind that if she sees you becoming anxious, without ...

  4. Family Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This periodical issue focuses on the theme of involvement of families in the education of their children with disabilities. It includes papers with the following titles and authors: "A Message from the Assistant Secretary: Developing Successful Partnerships between Parents and Service Providers" (Robert R. Davila); "Parent Advocacy and Children…

  5. Homolog of the polymorphic 4q35 FSHD locus (p13E-11; D4F104S1) maps to 10qter; exclusion as a second FSHD locus in a large Danish family

    SciTech Connect

    Frants, R.R.; Bakker, E.; Vossen, R.H.A.M.

    1994-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) has been mapped to 4q35 and shown to be associated with deletions that are detectable using probe p13E-11 (D4104S1). These deletions reside within highly polymorphic restriction fragments (20-300 kb) which can normally only be resolved completely using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Family studies showed that p13E-11 detects two non-allelic loci, only one of which originates from 4q35 origin. In 20 CEPH families, 8 individuals were identified showing a `small` EcoRI fragment detectable by conventional Southern blotting. Linkage analysis allowed assignment of these fragments to 10qter (D10S212 and D10S180) in all families tested. Since FSHD shows genetic heterogeneity, this second p13E-11 locus on 10qter became an interesting candidate as a second FSHD family did not provide evidence for linkage on chromosome 10qter.

  6. Resolving the Debate over Birth Order, Family Size, and Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Joseph Lee; Cleveland, H. Harrington; van den Oord, Edwin; Rowe, David C.

    2000-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between birth order, family size, and intelligence quotient (IQ), evaluating sibling data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and comparing results with those from other studies using within-family data. Results indicated that although low IQ parents were making large families, large families were not…

  7. Familial pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Vandeva, S; Vasilev, V; Vroonen, L; Naves, L; Jaffrain-Rea, M-L; Daly, A F; Zacharieva, S; Beckers, A

    2010-12-01

    Pituitary adenomas are benign intracranial neoplasms that present a major clinical concern because of hormonal overproduction or compression symptoms of adjacent structures. Most arise in a sporadic setting with a small percentage developing as a part of familial syndromes such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), Carney complex (CNC), and the recently described familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) and MEN-4. While the genetic alterations responsible for the formation of sporadic adenomas remain largely unknown, considerable advances have been made in defining culprit genes in these familial syndromes. Mutations in MEN1 and PRKAR1A genes are found in the majority of MEN1 and CNC patients, respectively. About 15% of FIPA kindreds present with mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene. Mutations in the CDKN1B gene, encoding p27(Kip)¹ were identified in MEN4 cases. Familial tumours appear to differ from their sporadic counterparts not only in genetic basis but also in clinical characteristics. Evidence suggests that, especially in MEN1 and FIPA, they are more aggressive and affect patients at younger age, therefore justifying the importance of early diagnosis. In this review, we summarize the genetic and clinical characteristics of these familial pituitary adenomas. PMID:20961530

  8. Rapid multipoint linkage analysis of recessive traits in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglyak, L.; Daly, M.J.; Lander, E.S. |

    1995-02-01

    Homozygosity mapping is a powerful strategy for mapping rare recessive traits in children of consanguineous marriages. Practical applications of this strategy are currently limited by the inability of conventional linkage analysis software to compute, in reasonable time, multipoint LOD scores for pedigrees with inbreeding loops. We have developed a new algorithm for rapid multipoint likelihood calculations in small pedigrees, including those with inbreeding loops. The running time of the algorithm grows, at most, linearly with the number of loci considered simultaneously. The running time is not sensitive to the presence of inbreeding loops, missing genotype information, and highly polymorphic loci. We have incorporated this algorithm into a software package, MAPMAKER/HOMOZ, that allows very rapid multipoint mapping of disease genes in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping. Multipoint analysis with dozens of markers can be carried out in minutes on a personal workstation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Filling the Glass: Gender Perspectives on Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferree, Myra Marx

    2010-01-01

    The challenge feminist scholarship posed to family studies has been largely met through the incorporation of research on gender dynamics within families and intersectional differences among them. Despite growing attention to gender as performance and power in more diverse families, the more difficult work of understanding the dynamics of change…

  10. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollestelle, Kay; Koch, Pauline D.

    This report presents the findings of the 2003 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 2002 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized into the following 23 categories: (1) number of regulated…

  11. Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Pejic, Rade N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant-inherited genetic disorder that leads to elevated blood cholesterol levels. FH may present as severely elevated total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels or as premature coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods This review presents information on the disease and on the effects of drug treatment and lifestyle changes. Results Routine lipid testing should identify most patients with FH. Once an index case is identified, testing should be offered to family members. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment with therapeutic lifestyle changes and statins can prevent premature CHD and other atherosclerotic sequelae in patients with FH. Conclusion Emerging therapies such as LDL apheresis and novel therapeutic agents may be useful in patients with homozygous FH or treatment-resistant FH. Liver transplantation is the only effective therapy for severe cases of homozygous FH. PMID:25598733

  12. Familial hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Ricky D.; Barry, Arden R.; Pearson, Glen J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize the pathophysiology, epidemiology, screening, diagnosis, and treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Quality of evidence A PubMed search was conducted (inception to July 2014) for articles on pathophysiology, screening, diagnosis, and management of FH, supplemented with hand searches of bibliographies of guidelines and reviews. A supporting level of evidence for each recommendation was categorized as level I (randomized controlled trial or systematic review of randomized controlled trials), level II (observational study), or level III (expert opinion). The best available evidence is mostly level II or III. Main message Familial hypercholesterolemia affects 1 in 500 Canadians. Risk of a coronary event is high in these patients and is underestimated by risk calculators (eg, Framingham). Clinicians should screen patients according to guidelines and suspect FH in any patient with a premature cardiovascular event, physical stigmata of hypercholesterolemia, or an elevated plasma lipid level. Physicians should diagnose FH using either the Simon Broome or Dutch Lipid Network criteria. Management of heterozygous FH includes reducing low-density lipoprotein levels by 50% or more from baseline with high-dose statins and other lipid-lowering agents. Clinicians should refer any patient with homozygous FH to a specialized centre. Conclusion Familial hypercholesterolemia represents an important cause of premature cardiovascular disease in Canadians. Early identification and aggressive treatment of individuals with FH reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26796832

  13. Dual Career Families: A Family Therapy Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Nicole R.

    This literature review provides an overview of the impact of dual careers on family and family therapy. The dual career family currently represents the most common married unit. Because both work and family stress impact psychological well-being variables such as depression and self-esteem, family and work can not be understood as two separate and…

  14. Genetic analysis of Chinese families reveals a novel truncation allele of the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator gene

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fang; Zeng, Xiang-Yun; Liu, Lin-Lin; Luo, Yao-Ling; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Wang, Hui; Xie, Jing; Hu, Cheng-Quan; Gan, Lin; Huang, Liang

    2014-01-01

    AIM To make comprehensive molecular diagnosis for retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients in a consanguineous Han Chinese family using next generation sequencing based Capture-NGS screen technology. METHODS A five-generation Han Chinese family diagnosed as non-syndromic X-linked recessive RP (XLRP) was recruited, including four affected males, four obligate female carriers and eleven unaffected family members. Capture-NGS was performed using a custom designed capture panel covers 163 known retinal disease genes including 47 RP genes, followed by the validation of detected mutation using Sanger sequencing in all recruited family members. RESULTS Capture-NGS in one affected 47-year-old male reveals a novel mutation, c.2417_2418insG:p.E806fs, in exon ORF15 of RP GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene results in a frameshift change that results in a premature stop codon and a truncated protein product. The mutation was further validated in three of four affected males and two of four female carriers but not in the other unaffected family members. CONCLUSION We have identified a novel mutation, c.2417_2418insG:p.E806fs, in a Han Chinese family with XLRP. Our findings expand the mutation spectrum of RPGR and the phenotypic spectrum of XLRP in Han Chinese families, and confirms Capture-NGS could be an effective and economic approach for the comprehensive molecular diagnosis of RP. PMID:25349787

  15. Identification of a novel LCA5 mutation in a Pakistani family with Leber congenital amaurosis and cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Adeel; Daud, Shakeela; Kakar, Naseebullah; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Babar, Masroor Ellahi; Thoenes, Michaela; Kubisch, Christian; Ahmad, Jamil

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the cause of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and developmental cataracts in a consanguineous Pakistani family. Methods The diagnosis was established in all affected individuals of a Pakistani LCA family by medical history, funduscopy, and standard ERG. We performed genome-wide linkage analysis for mapping the disease locus in this family. Results Congenitally severely reduced visual acuity and nystagmus were reported for all patients who, in the later phase of the disease, also developed cataracts. LCA in the family cosegregated with homozygosity for a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype on chromosome 6p14.1. The respective candidate region contained Leber congenital amaurosis 5 (LCA5), a gene previously reported to underlie LCA. We subsequently identified a novel truncating mutation in exon 4 of LCA5, c.642delC, in homozygous state in all affected persons of the family. Conclusions We report a novel LCA5 mutation causing LCA in a Pakistani family. Developmental cataracts were present in two of the four patients, raising the possibility that LCA5 mutations may predispose to this additional ocular pathology. PMID:21850168

  16. Genetics of familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Brautbar, Ariel; Leary, Emili; Rasmussen, Kristen; Wilson, Don P; Steiner, Robert D; Virani, Salim

    2015-04-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder characterized by elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and premature cardiovascular disease, with a prevalence of approximately 1 in 200-500 for heterozygotes in North America and Europe. Monogenic FH is largely attributed to mutations in the LDLR, APOB, and PCSK9 genes. Differential diagnosis is critical to distinguish FH from conditions with phenotypically similar presentations to ensure appropriate therapeutic management and genetic counseling. Accurate diagnosis requires careful phenotyping based on clinical and biochemical presentation, validated by genetic testing. Recent investigations to discover additional genetic loci associated with extreme hypercholesterolemia using known FH families and population studies have met with limited success. Here, we provide a brief overview of the genetic determinants, differential diagnosis, genetic testing, and counseling of FH genetics. PMID:25712136

  17. Reclaiming Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John

    2012-01-01

    The pull for family is strong, almost primeval, most likely it is evolutionary, and for those lacking the benefit of family or Family Privilege, the loss of family is painful and profoundly sad. Young people who struggle to cope without stable family connections are profoundly aware of their lack of "Family Privilege." In this article, the author

  18. Reclaiming Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John

    2012-01-01

    The pull for family is strong, almost primeval, most likely it is evolutionary, and for those lacking the benefit of family or Family Privilege, the loss of family is painful and profoundly sad. Young people who struggle to cope without stable family connections are profoundly aware of their lack of "Family Privilege." In this article, the author…

  19. India's misconceived family plan.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J L

    1991-01-01

    India's goal of reducing the national birth rate by 50% by the year 2000 is destined to failure in the absence of attention to poverty, social inequality, and women's subordination--the factors that serve to perpetuate high fertility. There is a need to shift the emphasis of the population control effort from the obligation of individual women to curtail childbearing to the provision of the resources required for poor women to meet their basic needs. Female children are less likely to be educated or taken for medical care than their male counterparts and receive a lower proportion of the family's food supply. This discrimination stems, in large part, from parents' view that daughters will not be able to remunerate their families in later life for such investments. The myth of female nonproductivity that leads to the biased allocation of family resources overlooks the contribution of adult women's unpaid domestic labor and household production. Although government statistics state that women comprise 46% of India's agricultural labor force (and up to 90% of rural women participate in this sector on some basis), women have been excluded systematically from agricultural development schemes such as irrigation projects, credit, and mechanization. In the field of family planning, the Government's virtually exclusive focus on sterilization has excluded younger women who are not ready to terminate childbearing but would like methods such as condoms, diaphragms, IUDs, and oral contraceptives to space births. More general maternal-child health services are out of reach of the majority of poor rural women due to long distances that must be travelled to clinics India's birth rate could be reduced by 25% by 2000 just by filling the demand for quality voluntary family planning services. Without a sustained political commitment to improve the status of women in India, however, such gains will not be sustainable. PMID:12284385

  20. [Family planning in China].

    PubMed

    Suyin, H

    1972-01-01

    Family planning in People's Republic of China between 1956 to 1970 has been marked by rapid change and total interrelation with the political and social developments. Since 1949, the Communist government has taken several measures to protect the mother and child. The campaign for family planning was started in 1956 by public meetings, posters, lectures with films, and an extensive distribution of contraceptive means. However, in 1965 there were still 2 trends among women: 1, based on tradition, supported the idea that a large number of children was a source of honor, prosperity and security; the other taking hold among younger women was in favor of family planning. The rural population was the latest to start practicing family planning. In 1963 a movement of socialist education was launched together with the formation of mobile medical teams to inform and educate people all over the country and to make known the various forms available for family planning. The contraceptive methods used included: male and female sterilisation (vasectomy for men and tube ligation for women), IUD, and condom; abortion, legal for women who already had children or if it was necessary for the mother's health; and oral contraceptives, which were produced in China. Medical services were reorganized and teams of "bare-foot doctors" were sent all over China. They lectured on health measures and fertility regulation. Intellectuals were sent to live in villages and exchange their knowledge with that of the peasants and workers. The tendency has been to limit the number of children to 2 or 3. The young people are recommended to postpone their marriage, women till they are 25, men till later. Nationally produced contraceptive means are being experimented with such as herbs, or a new intrauterine plastic device called "flower". The regions with national minorities like Tibet, the Inner Mongolia and Sinkiang had been under underpopulated and therefore population growth has been encouraged mainly by trying to irradicate diseases. PMID:12306192

  1. Integrating Family Resilience and Family Stress Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Joan M.

    2002-01-01

    The construct, family resilience, is defined differently by practitioners and researchers. This study tries to clarify the concept of family resilience. The foundation is family stress and coping theory, particularly the stress models that emphasize adaptation processes in families exposed to major adversities. (JDM)

  2. Family Law and Family Studies: Professor's Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Mary W.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The results of a survey of family studies faculty concerning the inclusion of family law topics in family studies courses are discussed. The professor's needs for training and resources in the area of family and the law are identified and recommendations for meeting these needs are suggested. (Author)

  3. Family Orientation in Family Medicine Training

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Yves R.; Tannenbaum, David

    1990-01-01

    Teaching about the family has become an important part of the family medicine curriculum. The family orientation index, a 39-item questionnaire, was designed to evaluate the family orientation of services and care provided as well as the teaching and research. The questionnaire was distributed to 55 program directors at 16 Canadian universities. The response rate was 84%. The results indicate that the family orientation of services is less than optimal. PMID:21233938

  4. First report of a novel missense CLDN19 mutations causing familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tao; Pang, Qianqian; Xing, Xiaoping; Wang, Xi; Li, Yuhui; Li, Jingjun; Wu, Xueyan; Li, Mei; Wang, Ou; Jiang, Yan; Dong, Jin; Xia, Weibo

    2015-04-01

    Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the CLDN16 or CLDN19 genes, encoding claudin-16 and claudin-19 in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop. In patients with claudin-19 mutations, severe ocular involvement (macular coloboma, pigmentary retinitis, nystagmus, or visual loss) has been described. In this report, we presented a 12-year-old girl with rickets, polyuria, and polydipsia. She was the daughter of consanguineous parents, and she had a history of recurred hypocalcemic and hypomagnesemic tetany. On physical examination, bilateral horizontal nystagmus and severe myopia were detected. Laboratory examination revealed hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, and renal stone. A clinical diagnosis of FHHNC caused possibly by claudin-19 mutation was decided with the ocular findings. DNA analysis revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation c.241C>T in the CLDN19 gene. In conclusion, in a patient with hypomagnesemia, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, and ocular findings, a diagnosis of FHHNC caused by claudin-19 mutation should be considered. This is the first study of FHHNC in Chinese population. Our findings of the novel mutation c.241C>T in exon 2 add to the list of more than 16 mutations of CLDN19 gene reported. PMID:25555744

  5. Thankful for Family and Foods! (An ABLE Teaching Unit).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barringer, Mary Dean; And Others

    The teaching unit focuses on a month (November) of primary grade learning activities which focus on being thankful for food, family, and friends. Concepts stressed throughout the unit include: We are all part of the large family of Americans; Families are made up of a variety of people and our families are usually different from each other;…

  6. The Hansa Family: A New High-Inclination Asteroid Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergenrother, C. W.; Larson, S. M.; Spahr, T. B.

    1996-09-01

    At present, there are only two widely recognized high-inclination (> 20 degrees) asteroid families. The (2) Pallas family was one of the seven original Hirayama families (Hirayama. 1928; Japan J. of Astron. Geophys. 5,137-162) and a second family associated with (434) Hungaria has also been noted (Williams. 1992; Icarus 96,251-280). We present a third high-inclination family which includes as its highest numbered member (480) Hansa. Using a semi-analytical method for the determination of proper elements (Lemaitre and Morbidelli. 1994; Celest. Mech. and Dyn. Astr. 60,29-56) and the D-criterion for the identification of asteroid families (Lindblad. 1994; Seventy-Five Years of Hirayama Asteroid Families, ASP Conf. Ser. 63,62-75), we have identified 14 probable members including the two large S-class, H=8 asteroids, (480) Hansa and (925) Alphonsina. The present osculating elements are centered at a=2.66 au, e=0.06 and i=22.0deg . We will also analyze peculiarities among the osculating orbital elements.

  7. Familial hyperargininaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Terheggen, H G; Lowenthal, A; Lavinha, F; Colombo, J P

    1975-01-01

    A third case of hyperargininaemia occurring in one family was studied from birth. In cord blood serum arginine concentration was only slightly raised, but arginase activity in red blood cell haemolysates was very low. In the urine on day 2 a typical cystinuria pattern was present. Arginine concentration in serum increased to 158 mumol/100 ml on the 41st day of life. Later determinations of the arginase activity in peripheral blood showed values below the sensitivity of the method. Blood ammonia was consistently high, and cystinuria was present. The enzymatic defect was further displayed by intravenous loading tests with arginine. Serum urea values were predominantly normal or near the lower limit of normal, suggesting the presence of other metabolic pathways of urea synthesis. In urine there was no excretion of guanidinosuccinic acid, while the excretion of other monosubstituted guanidine derivatives was increased, pointing to a connexion with hyperargininaemia. Owing to parental attitude, a low protein diet (1-5 g/kg) was introduced only late. The infant developed severe mental retardation, athetosis, and spasticity. PMID:1124944

  8. A novel mutation in the TMC1 gene causes non-syndromic hearing loss in a Moroccan family.

    PubMed

    Bakhchane, Amina; Charoute, Hicham; Nahili, Halima; Roky, Rachida; Rouba, Hassan; Charif, Majida; Lenaers, Guy; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2015-12-10

    Autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) is one of the most common genetic diseases in human and is subject to important genetic heterogeneity, rendering molecular diagnosis difficult. Whole-exome sequencing is thus a powerful strategy for this purpose. After excluding GJB2 mutation and other common mutations associated with hearing loss in Morocco, whole-exome sequencing was performed to study the genetic causes of one sibling with ARSHNL in a consanguineous Moroccan family. After filtering data and Sanger sequencing validation, one novel pathogenic homozygous mutation c.1810C>G (p.Arg604Gly) was identified in TMC1, a gene reported to cause deafness in various populations. Thus, we identified here the first mutation in the TMC1 gene in the Moroccan population causing non-syndromic hearing loss. PMID:26226225

  9. Thinking large.

    PubMed

    Devries, Egbert

    2016-05-01

    Egbert Devries was brought up on a farm in the Netherlands and large animal medicine has always been his area of interest. After working in UK practice for 12 years he joined CVS and was soon appointed large animal director with responsibility for building a stronger large animal practice base. PMID:27154956

  10. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from non-sibling matched family donors for patients with thalassemia major in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Ayad Ahmed; Al-Zaben, Abdulhadi; Khattab, Eman; Haroun, Anas; Frangoul, Haydar

    2016-02-01

    There are limited data on the outcome of patients with thalassemia receiving HSCT from non-sibling matched family donors. Of the 341 patients with thalassemia major that underwent donor search at our center from January 2003 to December 2011, 236 (69.2%) had fully matched family donor of which 28 patients (8.2%) had non-sibling matched family donors identified. We report on seven patients with a median age of eight yr (4-21) who underwent myeloablative (n = 4) or RIC (n = 3) HSCT. The median age of the donors was 33 yr (4-47), three were parents, two first cousins, one paternal uncle, and one paternal aunt. All patients achieved primary neutrophil and platelet engraftment at a median of 18 (13-20) and 16 days (11-20), respectively. One patient developed grade II acute GVHD, and two patients developed limited chronic GVHD. One patient experienced secondary GF requiring a second transplant. At a median follow-up of 69 months (7-110), all patients are alive and thalassemia free. Our data emphasize the need for extended family HLA typing for patients with thalassemia major in regions where there is high rate of consanguinity. Transplant from non-sibling matched family donor can result in excellent outcome. PMID:26493691

  11. Family Reading Night

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Darcy; Greenfeld, Marsha; Epstein, Joyce

    2007-01-01

    This book offers clear and practical guidelines to help engage families in student success. It shows families how to conduct a successful Family Reading Night at their school. Family Night themes include Scary Stories, Books We Love, Reading Olympics, Dr. Seuss, and other themes. Family reading nights invite parents to come to school with their…

  12. The Changing Family Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter issue contains feature articles and short reports on how and why family structures are undergoing substantial change in many parts of the world. These articles include: (1) "The Changing Family Structure," a review of how families are changing and why; (2) "Peru: Families in the Andes"; (3) "Thailand: Families of the Garbage Dump";…

  13. Exome sequencing reveals a nonsense mutation in TEX15 causing spermatogenic failure in a Turkish family.

    PubMed

    Okutman, Ozlem; Muller, Jean; Baert, Yoni; Serdarogullari, Munevver; Gultomruk, Meral; Piton, Amélie; Rombaut, Charlotte; Benkhalifa, Moncef; Teletin, Marius; Skory, Valerie; Bakircioglu, Emre; Goossens, Ellen; Bahceci, Mustafa; Viville, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    Infertility is a global healthcare problem, and despite long years of assisted reproductive activities, a significant number of cases remain idiopathic. Our currently restricted understanding of basic mechanisms driving human gametogenesis severely limits the improvement of clinical care for infertile patients. Using exome sequencing, we identified a nonsense mutation leading to a premature stop in the TEX15 locus (c.2130T>G, p.Y710*) in a consanguineous Turkish family comprising eight siblings in which three brothers were identified as infertile. TEX15 displays testis-specific expression, maps to chromosome 8, contains four exons and encodes a 2789-amino acid protein with uncertain function. The mutation, which should lead to early translational termination at the first exon of TEX15, co-segregated with the infertility phenotype, and our data strongly suggest that it is the cause of spermatogenic defects in the family. All three affected brothers presented a phenotype reminiscent of the one observed in KO mice. Indeed, previously reported results demonstrated that disruption of the orthologous gene in mice caused a drastic reduction in testis size and meiotic arrest in the first wave of spermatogenesis in males while female KO mice were fertile. The data from our study of one Turkish family suggested that the identified mutation correlates with a decrease in sperm count over time. A diagnostic test identifying the mutation in man could provide an indication of spermatogenic failure and prompt patients to undertake sperm cryopreservation at an early age. PMID:26199321

  14. Homozygous TREM2 mutation in a family with atypical frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bras, José; Camuzat, Agnès; Caroppo, Paola; Lattante, Serena; Couarch, Philippe; Kabashi, Edor; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Dubois, Bruno; Brice, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    TREM2 mutations were first identified in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent fractures because of bone cysts and presenile dementia. Recently, homozygous and compound heterozygous TREM2 mutations were identified in rare families with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) but without bone involvement. We identified a p.Thr66Met heterozygous mutation in a new consanguineous Italian family. Two sibs had early onset autosomal recessive FTLD without severe bone disorders. Atypical signs were present in this family: early parietal and hippocampus involvement, parkinsonism, epilepsy, and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. This study further demonstrates the implication of TREM2 mutations in FTLD phenotypes. It illustrates the variability of bone phenotype and underlines the frequency of atypical signs in TREM2 carriers. This and previous studies evidence that TREM2 mutation screening should be limited to autosomal recessive FTLD with atypical phenotypes characterized by: (1) a very young age at onset (20–50 years); (2) early parietal and hippocampal deficits; (3) the presence of seizures and parkinsonism; (4) suggestive extensive white matter lesions and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:24910390

  15. Homozygous TREM2 mutation in a family with atypical frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Le Ber, Isabelle; De Septenville, Anne; Guerreiro, Rita; Bras, José; Camuzat, Agnès; Caroppo, Paola; Lattante, Serena; Couarch, Philippe; Kabashi, Edor; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Dubois, Bruno; Brice, Alexis

    2014-10-01

    TREM2 mutations were first identified in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent fractures because of bone cysts and presenile dementia. Recently, homozygous and compound heterozygous TREM2 mutations were identified in rare families with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) but without bone involvement. We identified a p.Thr66Met heterozygous mutation in a new consanguineous Italian family. Two sibs had early onset autosomal recessive FTLD without severe bone disorders. Atypical signs were present in this family: early parietal and hippocampus involvement, parkinsonism, epilepsy, and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. This study further demonstrates the implication of TREM2 mutations in FTLD phenotypes. It illustrates the variability of bone phenotype and underlines the frequency of atypical signs in TREM2 carriers. This and previous studies evidence that TREM2 mutation screening should be limited to autosomal recessive FTLD with atypical phenotypes characterized by: (1) a very young age at onset (20-50 years); (2) early parietal and hippocampal deficits; (3) the presence of seizures and parkinsonism; (4) suggestive extensive white matter lesions and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:24910390

  16. Linkage disequilibrium mapping places the gene causing familial Mediterranean fever close to D16S246.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, E. N.; Shen, Y.; Kupelian, A.; Kruglyak, L.; Aksentijevich, I.; Pras, E.; Balow, J. E.; Linzer, B.; Chen, X.; Shelton, D. A.; Gumucio, D.; Pras, M.; Shohat, M.; Rotter, J. I.; Fischel-Ghodsian, N.; Richards, R. I.; Kastner, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents refined genetic mapping data for the gene causing familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), a recessively inherited disorder of inflammation. We sampled 65 Jewish, Armenian, and Arab families and typed them for eight markers from chromosome 16p. Using a new algorithm that permits multipoint calculations for a dense map of markers in consanguineous families, we obtained a maximal LOD score of 49.2 at a location 1.6 cM centromeric to D16S246. A specific haplotype at D16S283-D16S94-D16S246 was found in 76% of Moroccan and 32% of non-Moroccan Jewish carrier chromosomes, but this haplotype was not overrepresented in Armenian or Arab FMF carriers. Moreover, the 2.5-kb allele at D16S246 was significantly associated with FMF in Moroccan and non-Moroccan Jews but not in Armenians or Arabs. Since the Moroccan Jewish community represents a relatively recently established and genetically isolated founder population, we analyzed the Moroccan linkage-disequilibrium data by using Luria-Delbrück formulas and simulations based on a Poisson branching process. These methods place the FMF susceptibility gene within 0.305 cM of D16S246 (2-LOD-unit range 0.02-0.64 cM). PMID:8644712

  17. [Extreme degree familial hypobetalipoproteinemia caused by hypothetic double heterozygosity in a subject with severe mental deficiency].

    PubMed

    Acocella, M; Cossio, M; Barucci, M; Ciardetti, A; Archi, G; Rossini, R; Bassini, E; Lusetti, W

    1984-01-01

    We described the case of an adult male patient, seriously mentally deficient, hospitalised in Psychiatric Hospital for a period of many years, suffering from a familial hypobetalipoproteinemia with extremely low levels of plasmatic betalipoproteins. The patient has been followed and tested several times over a period of six years. Numerous members of his family, which is part of a restricted ethnic nucleus in a locality (Iolo) of the Comune of Prato in the Provincia of Florence, were examined and tested too. Consanguinity between his parents is not demonstrable. The diagnosis of homozygous hypobetalipoproteinemia is discarded, but it does not seem that the heterozygous one is to be accepted as weel. On the ground of the existence of two syndromes which are quite unlike each other, but both explainable as form of familial heterozygous hypobetalipoproteinemia, one of them present in his father, the other one in his mother and in the maternal relatives as in the patient's brother respectively, a hypothesis of a double heterozygosis could be formulated. Extant is the support of the recent literature data, depending on them the possibility of making the hypothesis of a multiplicity of the genes regulating the apolipoprotein B synthesis. We do not exclude that the peculiarity of the event of a double heterozygosis can also be directly responsible of the patient's serious mental deficiency, being at the same time more supportable the hypothesis of a encephalopathy in his early childhood. PMID:6545600

  18. Glycogenosis type II: protein and DNA analysis in five South African families from various ethnic origins.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Ploeg, A T; Hoefsloot, L H; Hoogeveen-Westerveld, M; Petersen, E M; Reuser, A J

    1989-01-01

    The molecular nature of lysosomal alpha-glucosidase deficiency was studied in five South African families with glycogenosis type II. Distinct ethnic origins were represented. Two new mutant acid alpha-glucosidase alleles were discovered. In two infantile patients from a consanguineous Indian family we found for the first time an acid alpha-glucosidase precursor of reduced size. The mutant precursor appeared normally glycosylated and phosphorylated but was not processed to mature enzyme. Abnormalities of the mRNA were not obvious, but digestion of genomic DNA with HindIII, BglII, and StuI revealed for each enzyme a fragment of increased length. Heterozygosity was demonstrated in the parents. Complete lack of acid alpha-glucosidase mRNA, as well as deficiency of precursor synthesis, was observed in two black baby girls from unrelated families. In these cases the length of all restriction-enzyme fragments was normal. Reduced enzyme synthesis but normal processing was registered in juvenile and young adult Cape colored patients. The extensive heterogeneity of glycogenosis type II is emphasized in these studies on various ethnic groups. The newly discovered mutants are valuable for the understanding of clinical diversity as a result of allelic variation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2658562

  19. A Mutation in CTSK Gene in an Autosomal Recessive Pycnodysostosis Family of Chinese Origin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xianglan; Qi, Xuan; Li, Mei; Wang, Ou; Jiang, Yan; Xing, Xiaoping; Hu, Ying Ying; Xia, Weibo

    2015-05-01

    Pycnodysostosis is a rare autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature, osteosclerosis, acro-osteolysis, frequent fractures, and skull deformities. Mutation in the gene encoding cathepsin K (CTSK), which is a lysosomal cysteine protease, has been found to be responsible for this disease. Here we reported a consanguineous Chinese family with 1 affected individual demonstrating autosomal recessive pycnodysostosis with recurrent kidney stone, a new clinical manifestation which has not been reported in patients of pycnodysostosis before. To identify the pathogenic mutation, we evaluated the patient clinically, biochemically, and radiographically. To screen for mutations in the CTSK gene of the patient and his family members, all of its exons and exon-intron junctions were PCR amplified from genomic DNA and sequenced. Sequence analysis of the patient's CTSK gene revealed homozygosity for a missense mutation (c.746T>C) in exon 6, which leads to amino change (p.Ile249Thr) in the mature CTSK protein. This mutation was firstly reported by Michela Donnarumma and his colleagues in 2007 in a Spanish family. Our study strengthens the role of this particular mutation in the pathogenesis of pycnodysostosis. PMID:25725806

  20. Genetic homogeneity in Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome: Linkage to chromosome 17p in families of different non-Swedish ethnic origins

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, G.R.; Lee, M.; Compton, J.G.

    1995-11-01

    Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by congenital ichthyosis, mental retardation, and spastic diplegia or tetraplegia. Three United States families, three Egyptian families, and one Israeli Arab family were investigated for linkage of the SLS gene to a region of chromosome 17. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis with nine markers mapped the SLS gene to the same region of the genome as that reported in Swedish SLS pedigrees. Examination of recombinants by haplotype analysis showed that the gene lies in the region containing the markers D17S953, D17S805, D17S689, and D17S842. D17S805 is pericentromeric on 17p. Patients in two consanguineous Egyptian families were homozygous at the nine marker loci tested, and another patient from a third family was homozygous for eight of the nine, suggesting that within each of these families the region of chromosome 17 carrying the SLS gene is identical by descent. Linkage of the SLS gene to chromosome 17p in families of Arabic, mixed European, Native American, and Swedish descent provides evidence for a single SLS locus and should prove useful for diagnosis and carrier detection in worldwide cases. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Revamping Family Preservation Services for Native Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Heather; Unrau, Yvonne A.; Manyfingers, Brenda

    2001-01-01

    Examines the philosophy and program structures of family preservation services (FPS) in the context of providing services to Native American families with child welfare issues. Explores Native cultural concepts of family, child rearing, time, and spirituality. Outlines cross-cultural training needs for FPS workers related to cultural awareness,…

  2. Family Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  3. Family Reunion Health Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... Phone (Continued) 1. Send a Kidney Health Message Hi Family, I came across this information and thought ... mails to family members. Before the Reunion 1. Hi family! Taking care of your kidneys is important. ...

  4. Family members' influence on family meal vegetable choices

    PubMed Central

    Wenrich, Tionni R.; Brown, J. Lynne; Miller-Day, Michelle; Kelley, Kevin J.; Lengerich, Eugene J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Characterize the process of family vegetable selection (especially cruciferous, deep orange, and dark green leafy vegetables); demonstrate the usefulness of Exchange Theory (how family norms and past experiences interact with rewards and costs) for interpreting the data. Design Eight focus groups, two with each segment (men/women vegetable-likers/dislikers based on a screening form). Participants completed a vegetable intake form. Setting Rural Appalachian Pennsylvania. Participants 61 low-income, married/cohabiting men (n=28) and women (n=33). Analysis Thematic analysis within Exchange Theory framework for qualitative data. Descriptive analysis, t-tests and chi-square tests for quantitative data. Results Exchange Theory proved useful for understanding that regardless of sex or vegetable-liker/disliker status, meal preparers see more costs than rewards to serving vegetables. Past experience plus expectations of food preparer role and of deference to family member preferences supported a family norm of serving only vegetables acceptable to everyone. Emphasized vegetables are largely ignored due to unfamiliarity; family norms prevented experimentation and learning through exposure. Conclusions and Implications Interventions to increase vegetable consumption of this audience could 1) alter family norms about vegetables served, 2) change perceptions of past experiences, 3) reduce social and personal costs of serving vegetables and 4) increase tangible and social rewards of serving vegetables. PMID:20452288

  5. Family boundary characteristics, work-family conflict and life satisfaction: A moderated mediation model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lin; Fan, Jinyan

    2015-10-01

    Although work-family border and boundary theory suggest individuals' boundary characteristics influence their work-family relationship, it is largely unknown how boundary flexibility and permeability mutually influence work-family conflict and subsequent employee outcomes. Moreover, the existing work-family conflict research has been mainly conducted in the United States and other Western countries. To address these gaps in the work-family literature, the present study examines a moderated mediation model regarding how family boundary characteristics may influence individuals' work-family conflict and life satisfaction with a sample of 278 Chinese full-time employees. Results showed that employees' family flexibility negatively related to their perceived work interference with family (WIF) and family interference with work (FIW), and both these two relationships were augmented by individuals' family permeability. In addition, WIF mediated the relationship between family flexibility and life satisfaction; the indirect effect of family flexibility on life satisfaction via WIF was stronger for individuals with higher family permeability. The theoretical and managerial implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25331584

  6. Characterization of familial breast cancer in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The contribution of genetic factors to the development of breast cancer in the admixed and consanguineous population of the western region of Saudi Arabia is thought to be significant as the disease is early onset. The current protocols of continuous clinical follow-up of relatives of such patients are costly and cause a burden on the usually over-stretched medical resources. Discovering the significant contribution of BRCA1/2 mutations to breast cancer susceptibility allowed for the design of genetic tests that allows the medical practitioner to focus the care for those who need it most. However, BRCA1/2 mutations do not account for all breast cancer susceptibility genes and there are other genetic factors, known and unknown that may play a role in the development of such disease. The advent of whole-exome sequencing is offering a unique opportunity to identify the breast cancer susceptibility genes in each family of sufferers. The polymorphisms/mutations identified will then allow for personalizing the genetic screening tests accordingly. To this end, we have performed whole-exome sequencing of seven breast cancer patients with positive family history of the disease using the Agilent SureSelect Whole-Exome Enrichment kit and sequencing on the SOLiD platform. Results We have identified several coding single nucleotide variations that were either novel or rare affecting genes controlling DNA repair in the BRCA1/2 pathway. Conclusion The disruption of DNA repair pathways is very likely to contribute to breast cancer susceptibility in the Saudi population. PMID:25923920

  7. Familial mesothelioma: a report of two families

    SciTech Connect

    Hammar, S.P.; Bockus, D.; Remington, F.; Freidman, S.; LaZerte, G.

    1989-02-01

    Five reports of familial mesothelioma in which mesotheliomas occurred in two or more family members have been recorded in the medical literature. In this report, we describe two examples of familial mesothelioma. In one family, three brothers who worked in the asbestos insulation industry developed mesothelioma. In the second