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Sample records for large consanguineous family

  1. A novel HSF4 gene mutation (p.R405X) causing autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in a large consanguineous family from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Sajjad, Naheed; Goebel, Ingrid; Kakar, Naseebullah; Cheema, Abdul Majeed; Kubisch, Christian; Ahmad, Jamil

    2008-01-01

    Background Hereditary cataracts are most frequently inherited as autosomal dominant traits, but can also be inherited in an autosomal recessive or X-linked fashion. To date, 12 loci for autosomal recessive cataracts have been mapped including a locus on chromosome 16q22 containing the disease-causing gene HSF4 (Genbank accession number NM_001040667). Here, we describe a family from Pakistan with the first nonsense mutation in HSF4 thus expanding the mutational spectrum of this heat shock transcription factor gene. Methods A large consanguineous Pakistani family with autosomal recessive cataracts was collected from Quetta. Genetic linkage analysis was performed for the common known autosomal recessive cataracts loci and linkage to a locus containing HSF4 (OMIM 602438) was found. All exons and adjacent splice sites of the heat shock transcription factor 4 gene (HSF4) were sequenced. A mutation-specific restriction enzyme digest (HphI) was performed for all family members and unrelated controls. Results The disease phenotype perfectly co-segregated with markers flanking the known cataract gene HSF4, whereas other autosomal recessive loci were excluded. A maximum two-point LOD score with a Zmax = 5.6 at ? = 0 was obtained for D16S421. Direct sequencing of HSF4 revealed the nucleotide exchange c.1213C > T in this family predicting an arginine to stop codon exchange (p.R405X). Conclusion We identified the first nonsense mutation (p.R405X) in exon 11 of HSF4 in a large consanguineous Pakistani family with autosomal recessive cataract. PMID:19014451

  2. A missense mutation in the PISA domain of HsSAS-6 causes autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in a large consanguineous Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muzammil A; Rupp, Verena M; Orpinell, Meritxell; Hussain, Muhammad S; Altmüller, Janine; Steinmetz, Michel O; Enzinger, Christian; Thiele, Holger; Höhne, Wolfgang; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Baig, Shahid M; Ansar, Muhammad; Nürnberg, Peter; Vincent, John B; Speicher, Michael R; Gönczy, Pierre; Windpassinger, Christian

    2014-11-15

    Asymmetric cell division is essential for normal human brain development. Mutations in several genes encoding centrosomal proteins that participate in accurate cell division have been reported to cause autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH). By homozygosity mapping including three affected individuals from a consanguineous MCPH family from Pakistan, we delineated a critical region of 18.53 Mb on Chromosome 1p21.3-1p13.1. This region contains the gene encoding HsSAS-6, a centrosomal protein primordial for seeding the formation of new centrioles during the cell cycle. Both next-generation and Sanger sequencing revealed a homozygous c.185T>C missense mutation in the HsSAS-6 gene, resulting in a p.Ile62Thr substitution within a highly conserved region of the PISA domain of HsSAS-6. This variant is neither present in any single-nucleotide polymorphism or exome sequencing databases nor in a Pakistani control cohort. Experiments in tissue culture cells revealed that the Ile62Thr mutant of HsSAS-6 is substantially less efficient than the wild-type protein in sustaining centriole formation. Together, our findings demonstrate a dramatic impact of the mutation p.Ile62Thr on HsSAS-6 function and add this component to the list of genes mutated in primary microcephaly. PMID:24951542

  3. Moroccan consanguineous family with Becker myotonia and review.

    PubMed

    Ratbi, Ilham; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Escudero, Adela; Kriouile, Yamina; Molano, Jesus; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2011-10-01

    Myotonia congenita is a genetic muscle disorder characterized by clinical and electrical myotonia, muscle hypertrophy, and stiffness. It is inherited as either autosomal-dominant or -recessive, known as Thomsen and Becker diseases, respectively. These diseases are distinguished by the severity of their symptoms and their patterns of inheritance. Becker disease usually appears later in childhood than Thomsen disease and causes more severe muscle stiffness and pain. Mutations in the muscular voltage-dependent chloride channel gene (CLCN1), located at 7q35, have been found in both types. We report here the case of a Moroccan consanguineous family with a myotonic autosomal-recessive condition in two children. The molecular studies showed that the patients reported here are homozygous for mutation p.Gly482Arg in the CLCN1 gene. The parents were heterozygote carriers for mutation p.Gly482Arg. This diagnosis allowed us to provide an appropriate management to the patients and to make a genetic counselling to their family. PMID:22346025

  4. Wolcott-Rallison Syndrome Is the Most Common Genetic Cause of Permanent Neonatal Diabetes in Consanguineous Families

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Patch, Ann-Marie; Minton, Jayne A. L.; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Edghill, Emma L.; Hussain, Khalid; Balafrej, Amina; Deeb, Asma; Buchanan, Charles R.; Jefferson, Ian G.; Mutair, Angham; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Ellard, Sian

    2009-01-01

    Context and Objective: Mutations in EIF2AK3 cause Wolcott-Rallison syndrome (WRS), a rare recessive disorder characterized by early-onset diabetes, skeletal abnormalities, and liver dysfunction. Although early diagnosis is important for clinical management, genetic testing is generally performed after the full clinical picture develops. We aimed to identify patients with WRS before any other abnormalities apart from diabetes are present and study the overall frequency of WRS among patients with permanent neonatal diabetes. Research Design and Methods: The coding regions of EIF2AK3 were sequenced in 34 probands with infancy-onset diabetes with a clinical phenotype suggestive of WRS (n = 28) or homozygosity at the WRS locus (n = 6). Results: Twenty-five probands (73.5%) were homozygous or compound heterozygous for mutations in EIF2AK3. Twenty of the 26 mutations identified were novel. Whereas a diagnosis of WRS was suspected before genetic testing in 22 probands, three patients with apparently isolated diabetes were diagnosed after identifying a large homozygous region encompassing EIF2AK3. In contrast to nonconsanguineous pedigrees, mutations in EIF2AK3 are the most common known genetic cause of diabetes among patients born to consanguineous parents (24 vs. < 2%). Age at diabetes onset and birth weight might be used to prioritize genetic testing in the latter group. Conclusions: WRS is the most common cause of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus in consanguineous pedigrees. In addition to testing patients with a definite clinical diagnosis, EIF2AK3 should be tested in patients with isolated neonatal diabetes diagnosed after 3 wk of age from known consanguineous families, isolated populations, or countries in which inbreeding is frequent. PMID:19837917

  5. Splice-site mutations identified in PDE6A responsible for retinitis pigmentosa in consanguineous Pakistani families

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahid Y.; Ali, Shahbaz; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Butt, Nadeem H.; Qazi, Zaheeruddin A.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to localize and identify causal mutations associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in consanguineous familial cases of Pakistani origin. Methods Ophthalmic examinations that included funduscopy and electroretinography (ERG) were performed to confirm the affectation status. Blood samples were collected from all participating individuals, and genomic DNA was extracted. A genome-wide scan was performed, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. Sanger sequencing was performed to identify the causative variants. Subsequently, we performed whole exome sequencing to rule out the possibility of a second causal variant within the linkage interval. Sequence conservation was performed with alignment analyses of PDE6A orthologs, and in silico splicing analysis was completed with Human Splicing Finder version 2.4.1. Results A large multigenerational consanguineous family diagnosed with early-onset RP was ascertained. An ophthalmic clinical examination consisting of fundus photography and electroretinography confirmed the diagnosis of RP. A genome-wide scan was performed, and suggestive two-point LOD scores were observed with markers on chromosome 5q. Haplotype analyses identified the region; however, the region did not segregate with the disease phenotype in the family. Subsequently, we performed a second genome-wide scan that excluded the entire genome except the chromosome 5q region harboring PDE6A. Next-generation whole exome sequencing identified a splice acceptor site mutation in intron 16: c.2028–1G>A, which was completely conserved in PDE6A orthologs and was absent in ethnically matched 350 control chromosomes, the 1000 Genomes database, and the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project. Subsequently, we investigated our entire cohort of RP familial cases and identified a second family who harbored a splice acceptor site mutation in intron 10: c.1408–2A>G. In silico analysis suggested that these mutations will result in the elimination of wild-type splice acceptor sites that would result in either skipping of the respective exon or the creation of a new cryptic splice acceptor site; both possibilities would result in retinal photoreceptor cells that lack PDE6A wild-type protein. Conclusions we report two splice acceptor site variations in PDE6A in consanguineous Pakistani families who manifested cardinal symptoms of RP. Taken together with our previously published work, our data suggest that mutations in PDE6A account for about 2% of the total genetic load of RP in our cohort and possibly in the Pakistani population as well. PMID:26321862

  6. Mutations in GRM6 identified in consanguineous Pakistani families with congenital stationary night blindness

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Gottsch, Alexander D. H.; Ullah, Inayat; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Butt, Nadeem H.; Qazi, Zaheeruddin A.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to investigate the causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) in consanguineous Pakistani families. Methods Two consanguineous families with multiple individuals manifesting symptoms of stationary night blindness were recruited. Affected individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmological examination, including fundus examination and electroretinography. Blood samples were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. Exclusion analyses were completed by genotyping closely spaced microsatellite markers, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. All coding exons, along with the exon–intron boundaries of GRM6, were sequenced bidirectionally. Results According to the medical history available to us, affected individuals in both families had experienced night blindness from the early years of their lives. Fundus photographs of affected individuals in both the families appeared normal, with no signs of attenuated arteries or bone spicule pigmentation. The scotopic electroretinogram (ERG) response were absent in all of the affected individuals, while the photopic measurements show reduced b-waves. During exclusion analyses, both families localized to a region on chromosome 5q that harbors GRM6, a gene previously associated with autosomal recessive CSNB. Bidirectional sequencing of GRM6 identified homozygous single base pair changes, specifically c.1336C>T (p.R446X) and c.2267G>A (p.G756D) in families PKRP170 and PKRP172, respectively. Conclusions We identified a novel nonsense and a previously reported missense mutation in GRM6 that were responsible for autosomal recessive CSNB in patients of Pakistani decent. PMID:26628857

  7. Novel C8orf37 mutations cause retinitis pigmentosa in consanguineous families of Pakistani origin

    PubMed Central

    Ravesh, Zeinab; El Asrag, Mohammed E.; Weisschuh, Nicole; McKibbin, Martin; Reuter, Peggy; Watson, Christopher M.; Baumann, Britta; Poulter, James A.; Sajid, Sundus; Panagiotou, Evangelia S.; O’Sullivan, James; Abdelhamed, Zakia; Bonin, Michael; Soltanifar, Mehdi; Black, Graeme C.M.; Din, Muhammad Amin-ud; Toomes, Carmel; Ansar, Muhammad; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Wissinger, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the molecular basis of retinitis pigmentosa in two consanguineous families of Pakistani origin with multiple affected members. Methods Homozygosity mapping and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes were performed in one family while the other was analyzed with whole exome next-generation sequencing. A minigene splicing assay was used to confirm the splicing defects. Results In family MA48, a novel homozygous nucleotide substitution in C8orf37, c.244–2A>C, that disrupted the consensus splice acceptor site of exon 3 was found. The minigene splicing assay revealed that this mutation activated a cryptic splice site within exon 3, causing a 22 bp deletion in the transcript that is predicted to lead to a frameshift followed by premature protein truncation. In family MA13, a novel homozygous null mutation in C8orf37, c.555G>A, p.W185*, was identified. Both mutations segregated with the disease phenotype as expected in a recessive manner and were absent in 8,244 unrelated individuals of South Asian origin. Conclusions In this report, we describe C8orf37 mutations that cause retinal dystrophy in two families of Pakistani origin, contributing further data on the phenotype and the spectrum of mutations in this form of retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:25802487

  8. Consanguineous marriage in Iran.

    PubMed

    Saadat, M; Ansari-Lari, M; Farhud, D D

    2004-01-01

    Consanguineous marriage is a major feature of family systems in south-west Asia. The aim of the present study was to determine the current prevalence and patterns of consanguinity in Iran as a means of assessing the associated requirement for genetic counselling services. Consanguinity was studied in 12 ethnic/religious populations, the Persians (Shi'a and Sunni), Kurds (Shi'a and Sunni), Lurs, Azaris, Baluchis, Zabolis, Turkamans, Bakhtiaris, Ghashghais and Arabs. A multi-stage sampling design was used with a representative total sample of 306 343 couples. The overall rate of consanguineous marriage was 38.6% with a mean inbreeding coefficient (alpha) of 0.0185. First cousin marriages (27.9%) were the most common form of consanguineous union, with parallel patrilateral marriage especially favoured. Statistically significant differences were observed in the prevalence and patterns of consanguinity between ethnic/religious populations and geographical regions. There also were significant differences for proportions of consanguineous marriages between Shi'a and Sunni populations within the same ethnic group. The highest rates of consanguineous union were in the least affluent sections of the population. PMID:15204368

  9. Autosomal recessive congenital cataract, intellectual disability phenotype linked to STX3 in a consanguineous Tunisian family.

    PubMed

    Chograni, M; Alkuraya, F S; Ourteni, I; Maazoul, F; Lariani, I; Chaabouni, H B

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the genetic basis of autosomal recessive congenital cataract and intellectual disability phenotype in a consanguineous Tunisian family. The whole genome scan of the studied family was performed with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The resulted runs of homozygosity (ROH) were analyzed through the integrated Systems Tool for Eye gene discovery (iSyTE) in order to prioritize candidate genes associated with congenital cataract. Selected genes were amplified and sequenced. Bioinformatic analysis was conducted to predict the function of the mutant gene. We identified a new specific lens gene named syntaxin 3 linked to the studied phenotype. The direct sequencing of this gene revealed a novel missense mutation c.122A>G which results in p.E41G. Bioinformatic analysis suggested a deleterious effect of this mutation on protein structure and function. Here, we report for the first time a missense mutation of a novel lens specific gene STX3 in a phenotype associating autosomal recessive congenital cataract and intellectual disability. PMID:25358429

  10. A novel homozygous ISPD gene mutation causing phenotype variability in a consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Baranello, Giovanni; Saredi, Simona; Sansanelli, Serena; Savadori, Paolo; Canioni, Eleonora; Chiapparini, Luisa; Balestri, Paolo; Malandrini, Alessandro; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Morandi, Lucia; Mora, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Within the group of muscular dystrophies, dystroglycanopathies represent an important subgroup of recessively inherited disorders. Their severity varies from the relatively mild forms of adult-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD), to the severe congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) with cerebral and ocular involvement. We describe 2 consanguineous children of Pakistani origin, carrying a new homozygous missense mutation c.367G>A (p.Gly123Arg) in the ISPD gene. Mutations in this gene have been recently reported as a common cause of congenital and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Patient 1 is an 8-year-old female with an intermediate phenotype between CMD and early LGMD; patient 2 is a 20-month-old male and second cousin of patient 1, showing a CMD phenotype. Cognitive development, brain MRI, eye examination, electrocardiogram and echocardiogram were normal in both patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the co-occurrence of both a CMD/early LGMD intermediate phenotype and a CMD within the same family carrying a homozygous ISPD mutation. PMID:25444434

  11. Down syndrome and consanguinity

    PubMed Central

    Rezayat, Amir Akhavan; Nazarabadi, Mohammad Hassanzadeh; Andalibi, Mohammad Sobhan Sheikh; Ardabili, Hossein Mohaddes; Shokri, Maryam; Mirzaie, Salmeh; Jarahi, Lida

    2013-01-01

    Background: Among the genetics disorders, Down syndrome (DS) is the major cause of mental retardation, congenital heart and intestinal disease. So far, no certain therapeutic method has been suggested for the treatment of this syndrome. The aim of the current survey was to investigate the frequency of parental consanguinity, maternal age in the patients with DS. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 38 consecutive patients with clinically and laboratory confirmed DS who referred to the genetic lab of a referral University Hospital. The G-banding method for karyotyping was employed. Results: The patients were 21 males and 17 females within the age of 16 days to 28 years old. Free trisomy (92.1%, n = 35) was the most common chromosomal abnormality. The frequency of DS was higher among the non-consanguine marriages (71.1%) in comparison with the consanguine marriages (28.9%). Mean age of the mothers in the consanguine marriages (mean = 27.1 ± 6.3) was lower than in the non-consanguine marriages (mean = 31.1 ± 7.7). Conclusion: Higher frequency of DS among the non-consanguine marriages in comparison with the consanguine marriages, may suggest that DS diagnostic tests might be done on all embryos regardless of the parents’ familial relationship. PMID:24523787

  12. A novel DFNB31 mutation associated with Usher type 2 syndrome showing variable degrees of auditory loss in a consanguineous Portuguese family.

    PubMed Central

    Bujakowska, Kinga; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Tronche, Sophie; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Antonio, Aline; Germain, Aurore; Lonjou, Christine; Carpentier, Wassila; Sahel, José-Alain; Bhattacharya, Shomi; Zeitz, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To identify the genetic defect of a consanguineous Portuguese family with rod-cone dystrophy and varying degrees of decreased audition. Methods A detailed ophthalmic and auditory examination was performed on a Portuguese patient with severe autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy. Known genetic defects were excluded by performing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) genotyping microarray analysis and by Sanger sequencing of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions of eyes shut homolog–drosophila (EYS) and chromosome 2 open reading frame 71 (C2orf71). Subsequently, genome-wide homozygosity mapping was performed in DNA samples from available family members using a 700K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray. Candidate genes present in the significantly large homozygous regions were screened for mutations using Sanger sequencing. Results The largest homozygous region (~11 Mb) in the affected family members was mapped to chromosome 9, which harbors deafness, autosomal recessive 31 (DFNB31; a gene previously associated with Usher syndrome). Mutation analysis of DFNB31 in the index patient identified a novel one-base-pair deletion (c.737delC), which is predicted to lead to a truncated protein (p.Pro246HisfsX13) and co-segregated with the disease in the family. Ophthalmic examination of the index patient and the affected siblings showed severe rod-cone dystrophy. Pure tone audiometry revealed a moderate hearing loss in the index patient, whereas the affected siblings were reported with more profound and early onset hearing impairment. Conclusions We report a novel truncating mutation in DFNB31 associated with severe rod-cone dystrophy and varying degrees of hearing impairment in a consanguineous family of Portuguese origin. This is the second report of DFNB31 implication in Usher type 2. PMID:21738389

  13. Identification of two novel mutations in CDHR1 in consanguineous Spanish families with autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Avila-Fernandez, Almudena; Corton, Marta; Lopez-Molina, Maria Isabel; Perez-Carro, Raquel; Bontadelli, Lara; Di Gioia, Silvio Alessandro; Zurita, Olga; Garcia-Sandoval, Blanca; Rivolta, Carlo; Ayuso, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies present extensive phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity, posing a challenge for patients’ molecular and clinical diagnoses. In this study, we wanted to clinically characterize and investigate the molecular etiology of an atypical form of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy in two consanguineous Spanish families. Affected members of the respective families exhibited an array of clinical features including reduced visual acuity, photophobia, defective color vision, reduced or absent ERG responses, macular atrophy and pigmentary deposits in the peripheral retina. Genetic investigation included autozygosity mapping coupled with exome sequencing in the first family, whereas autozygome-guided candidate gene screening was performed by means of Sanger DNA sequencing in the second family. Our approach revealed nucleotide changes in CDHR1; a homozygous missense variant (c.1720C?>?G, p.P574A) and a homozygous single base transition (c.1485?+?2T?>?C) affecting the canonical 5’ splice site of intron 13, respectively. Both changes co-segregated with the disease and were absent among cohorts of unrelated control individuals. To date, only five mutations in CDHR1 have been identified, all resulting in premature stop codons leading to mRNA nonsense mediated decay. Our work reports two previously unidentified homozygous mutations in CDHR1 further expanding the mutational spectrum of this gene. PMID:26350383

  14. Novel missense mutations of TMPRSS3 in two consanguineous Tunisian families with non-syndromic autosomal recessive deafness.

    PubMed

    Masmoudi, S; Antonarakis, S E; Schwede, T; Ghorbel, A M; Gratri, M; Pappasavas, M P; Drira, M; Elgaied-Boulila, A; Wattenhofer, M; Rossier, C; Scott, H S; Ayadi, H; Guipponi, M

    2001-08-01

    Recently the TMPRSS3 gene, which encodes a transmembrane serine protease, was found to be responsible for two non-syndromic recessive deafness loci located on human chromosome 21q22.3, DFNB8 and DFNB10. We found evidence for linkage to the DFNB8/10 locus in two unrelated consanguineous Tunisian families segregating congenital autosomal recessive sensorineural deafness. The audiometric tests showed a loss of hearing greater than 70 dB, in all affected individuals of both families. Mutation screening of TMPRSS3 revealed two novel missense mutations, W251C and P404L, altering highly conserved amino acids of the serine protease domain. Both mutations were not found in 200 control Tunisian chromosomes. The detection of naturally-occurring TMPRSS3 missense mutations in deafness families identifies functionally important amino acids. Comparative protein modeling of the TMPRSS3 protease domain predicted that W251C might lead to a structural rearrangement affecting the active site H257 and that P404L might alter the geometry of the active site loop and therefore affect the serine protease activity. PMID:11462234

  15. Novel nonsense mutation in the PTRF gene underlies congenital generalized lipodystrophy in a consanguineous Saudi family.

    PubMed

    Jelani, Musharraf; Ahmed, Saleem; Almramhi, Mona Mohammad; Mohamoud, Hussein Sheikh Ali; Bakur, Khadijah; Anshasi, Waseem; Wang, Jun; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf

    2015-04-01

    Congenital generalized lipodystrophies (CGLs) are a heterogeneous group of rare, monogenic disorders characterized by loss of sub-cutaneous fat, muscular hypertrophy, acanthosis nigricans, hepatomegaly, cardiac arrhythmias, impaired metabolism and mental retardation. Four different but overlapping phenotypes (CGL1-4) have been identified, which are caused by mutations in AGPAT2 at 9q34.3, BSCL2 at 11q13, CAV1 at 7q31.1, and PTRF at 17q21.2. In this study, we performed genome-wide homozygosity mapping of two affected and one unaffected subject in a Saudi family using a 300K HumanCytoSNPs12v12.1 array with the Illumina iScan system. A common homozygous region at chromosome 17q22.1, from 34.4 to 45.3 Mb, was identified in both the affected individuals. The region is flanked by SNPs rs139433362 and rs185263326, which encompass the PTRF gene. Bidirectional DNA sequencing of the PTRF gene covering all of the coding exons and exon-intron boundaries was performed in all family members. Sequencing analysis identified a novel homozygous nonsense mutation in the PTRF gene (c.550G>T; p.Glu184*), leading to a premature stop codon. To the best of our knowledge, we present a novel mutation of PTRF from Saudi Arabia and our findings broaden the mutation spectrum of PTRF in the familial CGL4 phenotype. Homozygosity mapping coupled with candidate gene sequencing is an effective tool for identifying the causative pathogenic variants in familial cases. PMID:25721873

  16. Trends in consanguinity in South India.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, S; Audinarayana, N

    2001-04-01

    This study uses data from the 1992-93 National Family Health Survey to assess trends in consanguinity in the South Indian states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu. In Kerala, the frequency of consanguineous marriages is very low and one type of preferred marriage of the Dravidian marriage system uncle niece marriage--is conspicuously absent. In the other states of South India, consanguinity and the coefficient of inbreeding are high. While no change in consanguinity is observed during the past three to four decades in Karnataka, a definite decline is observed in Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu. Due to recent changes in the demographic and social situation in these states, this decline in consanguinity is likely to continue. PMID:11284626

  17. Novel homozygous mutations in the EVC and EVC2 genes in two consanguineous families segregating autosomal recessive Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Abdul; Raza, Syed I; Ali, Salman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a rare developmental disorder characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails, teeth, oral and cardiac abnormalities. It is caused by biallelic mutations in the EVC or EVC2 gene, separated by 2.6?kb of genomic sequence on chromosome 4p16. In the present study, we have investigated two consanguineous families of Pakistani origin, segregating EVC in autosomal recessive manner. Linkage in the families was established to chromosome 4p16. Subsequently, sequence analysis identified a novel nonsense mutation (p.Trp234*) in exon 8 of the EVC2 gene and 15?bp duplication in exon 14 of the EVC gene in the two families. This further expands the mutations in the EVC or EVC2 genes resulting in the EVC syndrome. PMID:26580685

  18. The Use of High-Density SNP Array to Map Homozygosity in Consanguineous Families to Efficiently Identify Candidate Genes: Application to Woodhouse-Sakati Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Molly B.; Wohler, Elizabeth; Batista, Denise A. S.; Applegate, Carolyn; Hoover-Fong, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Two consanguineous Qatari siblings presented for evaluation: a 17-4/12-year-old male with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, alopecia, intellectual disability, and microcephaly and his 19-year-old sister with primary amenorrhea, alopecia, and normal cognition. Both required hormone treatment to produce secondary sex characteristics and pubertal development beyond Tanner 1. SNP array analysis of both probands was performed to detect shared regions of homozygosity which may harbor homozygous mutations in a gene causing their common features of abnormal pubertal development, alopecia, and variable cognitive delay. Our patients shared multiple homozygous genomic regions; ten shared regions were >1?Mb in length and constituted 0.99% of the genome. DCAF17, encoding a transmembrane nuclear protein of uncertain function, was the only gene identified in a homozygous region known to cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. DCAF17 mutations are associated with Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome, a rare disorder characterized by alopecia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, sensorineural hearing loss, diabetes mellitus, and extrapyramidal movements. Sequencing of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions of DCAF17 in the proband revealed homozygosity for a previously described founder mutation (c.436delC). Targeted DCAF17 sequencing of his affected sibling revealed the same homozygous mutation. This family illustrates the utility of SNP array testing in consanguineous families to efficiently and inexpensively identify regions of genomic homozygosity in which genetic candidates for recessive conditions can be identified. PMID:26664771

  19. The Economics of Consanguinity

    E-print Network

    Do, Quy-Toan; Iyer, Sriya; Joshi, Shareen

    (Bittles, 2001). The existing research on consanguinity also shows that different kinds of consanguineous unions are favoured by different sub-populations: for example, while Hindu women in South India typically marry their maternal uncles, Muslim... Europe, only 0.6 percent of marriages occur between first cousins (Coleman, 1980). Although in overall terms the influence of consanguineous marriage in the world is declining over time, it is particularly popular in Islamic societies and among the poor...

  20. E-Mail karger@karger.com Population Aspects of Consanguinity

    E-print Network

    Rosenberg, Noah

    estimates in populations and geographic regions with known high levels of consanguinity or genetic isolation ­ intra-familial unions of individuals related as second cousins or closer. A large body of ethno- graphic processes in shaping patterns of human genetic varia- tion, producing, for example, increased identity

  1. From "New Genetics" to Everyday Knowledge: Ideas about How Genetic Diseases Are Transmitted in Two Large Brazilian Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Silvana; Bizzo, Nelio

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on everyday or lay understandings of inheritance. In the northeastern Brazil, 100 individuals were interviewed in order to describe how they explain the origin of genetic disorders affecting their relatives for several generations. There were involved 60 individuals from a large consanguineous family with many members affected…

  2. Integration of Sequence Data from a Consanguineous Family with Genetic Data from an Outbred Population Identifies PLB1 as a Candidate Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Gene

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yukinori; Diogo, Dorothee; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Mouassess, Faten; Achkar, Walid A. L.; Fulton, Robert S.; Denny, Joshua C.; Gupta, Namrata; Mirel, Daniel; Gabriel, Stacy; Li, Gang; Kremer, Joel M.; Pappas, Dimitrios A.; Carroll, Robert J.; Eyler, Anne E.; Trynka, Gosia; Stahl, Eli A.; Cui, Jing; Saxena, Richa; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Dieudé, Philippe; Mariette, Xavier; Barton, Anne; Canhão, Helena; Fonseca, João E.; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P.; Moreland, Larry W.; Bridges, S. Louis; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Choi, Hyon K.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Galan, Pilar; Lathrop, Mark; Raj, Towfique; De Jager, Philip L.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Worthington, Jane; Padyukov, Leonid; Klareskog, Lars; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Arayssi, Thurayya; Kazkaz, Layla A.; Plenge, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Integrating genetic data from families with highly penetrant forms of disease together with genetic data from outbred populations represents a promising strategy to uncover the complete frequency spectrum of risk alleles for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we demonstrate that rare, low-frequency and common alleles at one gene locus, phospholipase B1 (PLB1), might contribute to risk of RA in a 4-generation consanguineous pedigree (Middle Eastern ancestry) and also in unrelated individuals from the general population (European ancestry). Through identity-by-descent (IBD) mapping and whole-exome sequencing, we identified a non-synonymous c.2263G>C (p.G755R) mutation at the PLB1 gene on 2q23, which significantly co-segregated with RA in family members with a dominant mode of inheritance (P?=?0.009). We further evaluated PLB1 variants and risk of RA using a GWAS meta-analysis of 8,875 RA cases and 29,367 controls of European ancestry. We identified significant contributions of two independent non-coding variants near PLB1 with risk of RA (rs116018341 [MAF?=?0.042] and rs116541814 [MAF?=?0.021], combined P?=?3.2×10?6). Finally, we performed deep exon sequencing of PLB1 in 1,088 RA cases and 1,088 controls (European ancestry), and identified suggestive dispersion of rare protein-coding variant frequencies between cases and controls (P?=?0.049 for C-alpha test and P?=?0.055 for SKAT). Together, these data suggest that PLB1 is a candidate risk gene for RA. Future studies to characterize the full spectrum of genetic risk in the PLB1 genetic locus are warranted. PMID:24520335

  3. Profiling ? Thalassemia Mutations in Consanguinity and Nonconsanguinity for Prenatal Screening and Awareness Programme

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravindra; Arya, Vandana; Agarwal, Sarita

    2015-01-01

    Mutation spectrum varies significantly in different parts and different ethnic groups of India. Social factors such as preference to marry within the community and among 1st degree relatives (consanguinity) play an important role in impeding the gene pool of the disease within the community and so in society by and large. The present paper discusses the role of consanguinity in profiling of beta thalassemia mutation, and thus the approach for prenatal screening and prevention based awareness programme. Clinically diagnosed 516 cases of beta thalassemia were screened at molecular level. A detailed clinical Proforma was recorded with the information of origin of the family, ethnicity, and consanguinity. The present study reports that subjects originating from Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Bihar, and Jharkhand have c.92+5G>C and c.124_127delTTCT mutation as the commonest mutation compared to the subjects hailing from Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh and Nepal where sickle mutation was found more common. In 40 consanguineous unions more common and specific beta mutations with higher rate of homozygosity have been reported. This consanguinity-based data helps not only in deciding target oriented prenatal diagnostic strategies but also in objective based awareness programmes in prevention of thalassemia major birth. PMID:26576156

  4. Consanguinity, human evolution, and complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bittles, A. H.; Black, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    There is little information on inbreeding during the critical early years of human existence. However, given the small founding group sizes and restricted mate choices it seems inevitable that intrafamilial reproduction occurred and the resultant levels of inbreeding would have been substantial. Currently, couples related as second cousins or closer (F ? 0.0156) and their progeny account for an estimated 10.4% of the global population. The highest rates of consanguineous marriage occur in north and sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and west, central, and south Asia. In these regions even couples who regard themselves as unrelated may exhibit high levels of homozygosity, because marriage within clan, tribe, caste, or biraderi boundaries has been a long-established tradition. Mortality in first-cousin progeny is ?3.5% higher than in nonconsanguineous offspring, although demographic, social, and economic factors can significantly influence the outcome. Improving socioeconomic conditions and better access to health care will impact the effects of consanguinity, with a shift from infant and childhood mortality to extended morbidity. At the same time, a range of primarily social factors, including urbanization, improved female education, and smaller family sizes indicate that the global prevalence of consanguineous unions will decline. This shift in marriage patterns will initially result in decreased homozygosity, accompanied by a reduction in the expression of recessive single-gene disorders. Although the roles of common and rare gene variants in the etiology of complex disease remain contentious, it would be expected that declining consanguinity would also be reflected in reduced prevalence of complex diseases, especially in population isolates. PMID:19805052

  5. Large Families of Mutually Embeddable

    E-print Network

    Bonato, Anthony

    Large Families of Mutually Embeddable Vertex-Transitive Graphs Anthony Bonato1 and Claude Tardif2 Cartesian product; mutually embeddable graphs; infinite random graph; universal graphs 1. INTRODUCTION All (see [1]) proves that mutual embeddings of sets imply the existence of a bijection between the sets

  6. Association studies in consanguineous populations

    SciTech Connect

    Genin, E.; Clerget-Darpous, F.

    1996-04-01

    To study the genetic determinism of multifactorial diseases in large panmictic populations, a strategy consists in looking for an association with markers closely linked to candidate genes. A distribution of marker genotypes different in patients and controls may indicate that the candidate gene is involved in the disease. In panmictic populations, the power to detect the role of a candidate gene depends on the gametic disequilibrium with the marker locus. In consanguineous populations, we show that it depends on the inbreeding coefficient F as well. Inbreeding increases the power to detect the role of a recessive or quasi-recessive disease-susceptibility factor. The gain in power turns out to be greater for small values of the gametic disequilibrium. Moreover, even in the absence of gametic disequilibrium, the presence of inbreeding may allow to detect the role of a recessive factor. Ignoring inbreeding when it exists may lead to reject falsely a recessive model if the mode of inheritance is inferred on the distribution of genotypes among patients. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. From new genetics to everyday knowledge: Ideas about how genetic diseases are transmitted in two large Brazilian families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Silvana; Bizzo, Nelio

    2005-07-01

    This study focuses on everyday or lay understandings of inheritance. In the northeastern Brazil, 100 individuals were interviewed in order to describe how they explain the origin of genetic disorders affecting their relatives for several generations. There were involved 60 individuals from a large consanguineous family with many members affected with a neurodegenerative disorder, SPOAN syndrome (spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy and neuropathy), and 40 individuals of another family living with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The results indicate that families here studied have built narratives to explain the origin of genetic diseases, saying that an ancestor infected with syphilis gave rise to disorders and birthmarks transmitted to descendents.

  8. Consanguinity on Robinson Crusoe Island, an isolated Chilean population.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Pia; Fernández, Maria A; De Barbieri, Zulema; Palomino, Hernán

    2014-07-01

    The population of Robinson Crusoe Island is estimated at 633 inhabitants. The current population has a common origin from the first eight families who colonized the island at the end of the 19th century. The objective of this study was to determine the rates of consanguinity, the average coefficients of inbreeding, the types of consanguineous marriages and the inbreeding evolution between 1900 and 2000 on the island. All marriages registered on the island, from the last colonization until 2000 (417 in total), were included in the analysis. In addition, extended genealogies were obtained. The consanguinity rate was 14.9% and the average coefficient of inbreeding (?) 54.05 × 10(-4). The most frequent type of consanguineous marriages was between second cousins, followed by first cousins. The average value of the first/second cousin ratio was 1.11. The population of Robinson Crusoe Island has a high rate of inbreeding. The unique characteristic of the island - its small current population, originating from just a few families, with small rate of gene flow - could explain the observed high and increasing consanguinity. PMID:23931260

  9. Consanguineous marriage and reproductive risk: attitudes and understanding of ethnic groups practising consanguinity in Western society.

    PubMed

    Teeuw, Marieke E; Loukili, Ghariba; Bartels, Edien Ac; ten Kate, Leo P; Cornel, Martina C; Henneman, Lidewij

    2014-04-01

    Consanguineous couples should be adequately informed about their increased reproductive risk and possibilities for genetic counselling. Information may only be effective if it meets the needs of the target group. This study aimed to gain more insight into: (1) attitudes of people belonging to ethnic groups in Western society towards consanguinity and their understanding of risk for offspring; and (2) their attitudes regarding reproductive information targeted at consanguineous couples. Dutch Moroccans and Turks were invited to complete an online questionnaire by snowball sampling and by placing a link on two popular Dutch Moroccan/Turkish forum websites between September and October 2011. The questionnaire was completed by 201 individuals who were, on average, neither positive nor negative towards consanguinity. Respondents with a consanguineous partner were more positive, estimated the risk for the offspring lower and were less positive about the provision of risk information to consanguineous couples when compared with respondents without a consanguineous partner. Participants of Turkish origin had a more negative attitude towards consanguinity and estimated the reproductive risk higher than Moroccan participants. More than half of the respondents thought that information should be given before marriage, whereas only 10% thought it should never be provided. The general practitioner was most often mentioned (54%) as the designated professional to inform people. Information about genetic risks related to consanguinity should be offered early, preferably before marriage. The diversity of the target population requires various strategies to disseminate information and reach consanguineous couples with the offer of genetic counselling. PMID:23921534

  10. Bleeding disorders in the tribe: result of consanguineous in breeding

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency and clinical features of bleeding disorders in the tribe as a result of consanguineous marriages. Design Cross Sectional Study Introduction Countries in which consanguinity is a normal practice, these rare autosomal recessive disorders run in close families and tribes. Here we describe a family, living in village Ali Murad Chandio, District Badin, labeled as haemophilia. Patients & Methods Our team visited the village & developed the pedigree of the whole extended family, up to seven generations. Performa was filled by incorporating patients, family history of bleeding, signs & symptoms, and bleeding from any site. From them 144 individuals were screened with CBC, bleeding time, platelet aggregation studies & RiCoF. While for PT, APTT, VWF assay and Factor VIII assay, samples were kept frozen at -70 degrees C until tested. Results The family tree of the seven generations comprises of 533 individuals, 63 subjects died over a period of 20 years and 470 were alive. Out of all those 144 subjects were selected on the basis of the bleeding history. Among them 98(68.1%) were diagnosed to have a bleeding disorder; 44.9% patients were male and 55.1% patients were female. Median age of all the patients was 20.81, range (4 months- 80 yrs). The results of bleeding have shown that majority had gum bleeding, epistaxis and menorrhagia. Most common bleeding disorder was Von Willebrand disease and Platelet functional disorders. Conclusion Consanguineous marriages keep all the beneficial and adversely affecting recessive genes within the family; in homozygous states. These genes express themselves and result in life threatening diseases. Awareness, education & genetic counseling will be needed to prevent the spread of such common occurrence of these bleeding disorders in the community. PMID:20822539

  11. Effects of Consanguinity, Exposure to Pregnant

    E-print Network

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    Effects of Consanguinity, Exposure to Pregnant Females, and Stimulation from Young on Male Gerbils experiments investigating variables affecting responses of male Mongolian gerbils to conspeci®c young, we; paternal behavior; Mongolian gerbils; exposure effects; induction Male Mongolian gerbils (Meriones

  12. Consanguinity and spousal concordance in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    al-Kandari, Y; Crews, D E; Poirier, F E

    2002-12-01

    Consanguineous marriage is favored in Kuwait. This research focuses on the relationship of physical and cultural traits to marriage types in Kuwait and examines concordance as a function of consanguinity and marriage duration. In a nonrandom opportunistic sample of 242 couples anthropometric and blood pressure data have been collected as well as data on acculturation, religiosity, Farsi proficiency, level of education, occupation, and attitudes regarding fertility. Significant concordances occur in cultural characteristics among couples in all three types of marriages with respect to the degree of religiosity, acculturation, language similarity, education, and occupation. Non-consanguineous spouses have the highest concordance in educational level, occupation, and degree of acculturation, but the lowest for religiosity and Farsi proficiency. Nonkin marriages seem to be based on personal preferences. In the wider potential nonkin marriage pool spouses show more concordance in stature and education indicating the positive assortative mating for those traits. Non-consanguineous spouses show a significant association for triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses hip and waist circumferences, and body fat distribution. Unrelated spouses exhibit more concordance for physical traits than do related spouses. There is a significant correlation between spouses in first and double cousin marriages as well as in spouses in second and less than second cousin unions for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, while non-consanguineous spouses show a significant association in diastolic blood pressure only. PMID:12674831

  13. Large families of mutually singular Radon measures

    E-print Network

    Plebanek, Grzegorz

    Large families of mutually singular Radon measures David H. Fremlin & Grzegorz Plebanek \\Lambda Abstract We investigate how many mutually singular measures one can define on a given space. In particular mutually singular Radon probability measures. 1. Introduction. We present here a partial answer

  14. Consanguinity and Its Sociodemographic Differentials in Bhimber District, Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Nazish

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kashmiri population in the northeast of Pakistan has strong historical, cultural and linguistic affinities with the neighbouring populations of upper Punjab and Potohar region of Pakistan. However, the study of consanguineous unions, which are customarily practised in many populations of Pakistan, revealed marked differences between the Kashmiris and other populations of northern Pakistan with respect to the distribution of marriage types and inbreeding coefficient (F). The current descriptive epidemiological study carried out in Bhimber district of Mirpur division, Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan, demonstrated that consanguineous marriages were 62% of the total marriages (F=0.0348). First-cousin unions were the predominant type of marriages and constituted 50.13% of total marital unions. The estimates of inbreeding coefficient were higher in the literate subjects, and consanguinity was witnessed to be rising with increasing literacy level. Additionally, consanguinity was observed to be associated with ethnicity, family structure, language, and marriage arrangements. Based upon these data, a distinct sociobiological structure, with increased stratification and higher genomic homozygosity, is expected for this Kashmiri population. In this communication, we present detailed distribution of the types of marital unions and the incidences of consanguinity and inbreeding coefficient (F) across various sociodemographic strata of Bhimber/Mirpuri population. The results of this study would have implication not only for other endogamous populations of Pakistan but also for the sizeable Kashmiri community immigrated to Europe. PMID:25076667

  15. Race, consanguinity and social features in Birmingham babies: a basis for prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Bundey, S; Alam, H; Kaur, A; Mir, S; Lancashire, R J

    1990-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of consanguinity on children's health. DESIGN--The study is a prospective survey from birth to five years of a cohort of babies born in a multiracial community. This report details the initial findings on consanguinity. SETTING--Participating families live predominantly in three health districts of Birmingham, and were recruited in three local maternity hospitals. PARTICIPANTS--Babies of 2432 European mothers, 509 Afro-Caribbean mothers, 625 Indian mothers, 956 Pakistani mothers, and 216 Bangladeshi mothers have been enrolled in the study. Eighty mothers refused to participate. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS--Sociodemographic information was obtained using a structured questionnaire administered at interview. Interview data were supplemented with obstetric information from the medical records. The highest prevalence of parental consanguinity was in Pakistani Muslims (69%), whereas in Muslims from other countries it was 23%, and it was less than 1% in non-Muslims. In the majority of consanguineous Muslim pedigrees the degree of inbreeding was greater than that for first cousin parents. CONCLUSIONS--This prospective study will allow an assessment to be made about any ill health in childhood arising from parental consanguinity, about whether screening programmes are indicated for particular autosomal recessive diseases, and about whether premarital health education might be beneficial. The study has also documented parental ages in different races and this, together with the levels of parental consanguinity in all races, will be useful in genetic methods for assessing the frequency of recessive genes, the possibility of genetic heterogeneity, and whether or not parental age effect exists for new mutations of specific genetic disorders. PMID:2370500

  16. Parental consanguinity and the Majewski syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Black, I L; Fitzsimmons, J; Fitzsimmons, E; Thomas, A J

    1982-01-01

    We report a female infant with the Majewski syndrome, one of a group of conditions characterised by short ribs, polydactyly, dwarfism, and early neonatal death. This syndrome seems to be extremely rare, with only five well documented cases reported and, including this case, nine recorded in all. The Majewski syndrome is considered to be recessively inherited, and this report adds further support to this hypothesis, as the infant was born to consanguineous parents. Images PMID:7077625

  17. Consanguineous marriages in the province of Antalya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Alper, O M; Erengin, H; Manguo?lu, A E; Bilgen, T; Cetin, Z; Dedeo?lu, N; Lüleci, G

    2004-01-01

    To assess the trends in the frequency and the medical effects of consanguinity in the south coast of Turkish population using local and national data in the last 11 years. This cross-sectional study was carried out in Manavgat province, which is a major tourism center on the Mediterranean coast of Turkey. The authors studied consanguineous marriages in rural and urban population in the Mediterranean coast, Manavgat province, Turkey, via a 1500 random survey sample of married couples. There has been a significant increase in the incidence of consanguineous marriages in rural areas (40.7%) since 1989 in the southern population of Turkey. The results showed that the most frequent type of marriage was between the first cousins. It is found that there is no statistically significant difference between the consanguineous and non-consanguineous marriages in the different age groups. The results were discussed on the basis of educational status, reasons for having consanguineous marriages and the general medical effects as well as with the relation of congenital malformations. The custom of consanguineous unions in the Mediterranean population of Turkey is still extremely high, and preventive measures should be done to decrease its frequency and associated complications. PMID:15183745

  18. INTRODUCTION The fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) constitute a large family

    E-print Network

    Perrimon, Norbert

    INTRODUCTION The fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) constitute a large family of proteins that act glycosaminoglycans are involved in signaling by fibroblast growth factor receptors, but evidence. Consistent with an involvement of Sulfateless and Sugarless in fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling

  19. Consanguinity and other marriage market effects of a wealth shock in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Mobarak, Ahmed Mushfiq; Kuhn, Randall; Peters, Christina

    2013-10-01

    This paper uses a wealth shock from the construction of a flood protection embankment in rural Bangladesh coupled with data on the universe of all 52,000 marriage decisions between 1982 and 1996 to examine changes in marital prospects for households protected by the embankment relative to unprotected households living on the other side of the river. We use difference-in-difference specifications to document that brides from protected households commanded larger dowries, married wealthier households, and became less likely to marry biological relatives. Financial liquidity-constrained households appear to use within-family marriage (in which one can promise ex-post payments) as a form of credit to meet up-front dowry demands, but the resultant wealth shock for households protected by the embankment relaxed this need to marry consanguineously. Our results shed light on the socioeconomic roots of consanguinity, which carries health risks for offspring but can also carry substantial benefits for the families involved. PMID:23619998

  20. A large family characterised by nocturnal sudden death

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, M.P.; Viersma, J.W.; Beaufort-Krol, G.C.M.; Bink-Boelkens, M.Th.E.; Bezzina, C.R.; Veldkamp, M.W.; Brouwer, J.; Haaksma, J.; van Tintelen, J.P.; van Langen, I.M.; Wouda, A.A.; Wilde, A.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Background We recently identified a novel mutation in large family characterised by premature nocturnal sudden death. In the present paper we provide an overview of the findings in this family. Methods From 1958 onwards, when the first patient presented, we collected clinical data on as many family members as possible. After identification in 1998 of the underlying genetic disorder (SCN5A, 1795insD), genotyping was performed diagnostically. Results Since 1905 unexplained sudden death occurred in 26 family members, 17 of whom died during the night. Besides sudden death, symptomatology was rather limited; only six patients reported syncopal attacks. In one of them, a 13-year-old boy, asystolic episodes up to nine seconds were documented. Until now, the mutation has been found in 114 family members (57 males, 57 females). Carriers of the mutant gene exhibited bradycardia-dependent QT-prolongation, intrinsic sinus node dysfunction, generalised conduction abnormalities, a paucity of ventricular ectopy, and the Brugada sign. Cardiomyopathy or other structural abnormalities were not found in any of the carriers. Electrophysiological studies showed that mutant channels were characterised by markedly reduced INa amplitude, a positive shift of voltage-dependence of activation and a substantial negative shift of voltage-dependence of inactivation of INa. From 1978 onwards, a pacemaker for anti-brady pacing was implanted for prevention of sudden death. In patients in whom a prophylactic pacemaker was implanted no unexplained sudden death occurred, whereas 5 sudden deaths occurred in the group of patients who did not receive a pacemaker. Conclusion We have described a large family with a SCN5A-linked disorder (1795insD) with features of LQT3, Brugada syndrome and familial conduction system disease. Anti-brady pacing was successful in preventing sudden death. The mode of death is possibly bradycardic. ImagesFigure 5 PMID:25696119

  1. Letters to the Editor CONSANGUINITY AND HETEROGENEITY: CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    E-print Network

    Botstein, David

    Letters to the Editor CONSANGUINITY AND HETEROGENEITY: CYSTIC FIBROSIS NEED NOT BE HOMOGENEOUS, ET AL.: Incidence in Italy, genetic heterogeneity, and segregation analysis of cystic fibrosis. Am J Hum Genet 37:338-349, 1985 2. Tsui LC, BUCHWALD M, BARKER D, ET AL.: Cystic fibrosis locus defined

  2. Recessive versus imprinted disorder: consanguinity can impede establishing the diagnosis of autosomal dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Serap; Akin, Leyla; Akcay, Teoman; Adal, Erdal; Sarikaya, Sevil; Bastepe, Murat; Jüppner, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia with low/normal parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels can be observed in hypoparathyroidism (HP), a disorder that may follow an autosomal dominant (AD) or autosomal recessive (AR) mode of inheritance. Similar biochemical changes are also observed in pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) type Ia and Ib, but affected patients usually show elevated PTH levels indicative of hormonal resistance. Features of Albright’s hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) are typically not observed in patients affected by familial forms of PHP-Ib, which are most frequently caused by maternally inherited, heterozygous microdeletions within STX16 and are associated with isolated loss of methylation at GNAS exon A/B. We established the molecular defect in two children of consanguineous Turkish parents, who presented with hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and low 25-OH vitamin D levels, but initially normal or only mildly elevated PTH levels, i.e. findings that do not readily exclude HP. After normalizing serum magnesium levels, hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia persisted, and PTH levels increased, suggesting PTH-resistance rather than PTH-deficiency. Because of the absence of AHO and parental consanguinity, an AR form of PHP-Ib appeared plausible, which had previously been suggested for sporadic cases. However, loss of GNAS methylation was restricted to exon A/B, which led to the identification of the 3-kb STX16 microdeletion. The same mutation was also detected in the healthy mother, who did not show any GNAS methylation abnormality, indicating that her deletion resides on the paternal allele. Our findings emphasize the importance of considering a parentally imprinted, autosomal dominant disorder even if consanguinity suggests an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. PMID:20538864

  3. Consanguinity and genetic diseases in North Africa and immigrants to Europe.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Wagida A; Khyatti, Meriem; Hemminki, Kari

    2014-08-01

    Endemic diseases are caused by environmental and genetic factors. While in this special issue several chapters deal with environmental factors, including infections, the present focus is on genetic causes of disease clustering due to inbreeding and recessive disease mechanisms. Consanguinity is implying sharing of genetic heritage because of marriage between close relatives originating from a common ancestor. With limited natural selection, recessive genes may become more frequent in an inbred compared with an outbred population. Consanguinity is common in North Africa (NA), and the estimates range from 40 to 49% of all marriages in Tunisia and 29-33% in Morocco. As a consequence, recessive disorders are common in the NA region, and we give some examples. Thalassaemia and sickle cell disease/anaemia constitute the most common inherited recessive disorders globally and they are common in NA, but with immigration they have spread to Europe and to other parts of the world. Another example is familial Mediterranean fever, which is common in the Eastern Mediterranean area. With immigrantion from that area to Sweden, it has become the most common hereditary autoinflammatory disease in that country, and there is no evidence that any native Swede would have been diagnosed with this disease. The examples discussed in this chapter show that the historic movement of populations and current immigration are influencing the concept of 'endemic' disease. PMID:25107999

  4. CONSANGUINITY AND INBREEDING COEFFICIENT IN TRIBAL PASHTUNS INHABITING THE TURBULENT AND WAR-AFFECTED TERRITORY OF BAJAUR AGENCY, NORTH-WEST PAKISTAN.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Bashir; Rehman, Atta Ur; Malik, Sajid

    2016-01-01

    The north-western populations of Pakistan in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) adjoining the Pakistan-Afghanistan border are an amalgamation of native and migrated Pashtun tribes. These tribal populations are in transition due to war conditions and geo-political turmoil on both sides of the border since the Soviet invasion in 1979. Bio-demographic and epidemiological data for these tribes are scarce. A prospective cross-sectional sample of 967 males was selected from a representative Pashtun population of Bajaur Agency, and information obtained on bio-demographic variables and marital union types. Analysis of these data revealed that consanguinity was 22.34% and the inbreeding coefficient F was calculated to be 0.0134. The inbreeding coefficient was observed to be higher in subjects who were illiterate, had unskilled jobs and who belonged to younger age categories, extended families and the Tarkalani tribe. Further analyses with respect to temporal variables like subject's age, year of marriage and age at marriage revealed that after a transition in marital union types in the early 80s, there has been a declining trend in the rate of consanguineous unions. Further, consanguineous unions in the parental generation were only 5%, but parental marriage types were predictors of subjects' marital union types. The data further establish that, contrary to a general notion about a high consanguinity rate in Pakistan, consanguineous unions are not common in Bajaur Agency and first cousin marriage is not the preferred type. Furthermore, this research shows that there is a great regional variation in the pattern of consanguinity in Pakistan that needs to be documented in order to draw a more comprehensive picture of the inbreeding coefficient in the country. PMID:26627887

  5. Assessing the influence of consanguinity on congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Bittles, Alan H.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous articles have been published linking consanguineous marriage to an elevated prevalence of congenital heart disease, with ventricular septal defects and atrial septal defects the most commonly cited disorders. While initially persuasive, on closer examination many of these studies have fundamental shortcomings in their design and in the recruitment of study subjects and controls. Improved matching of cases and controls, to include recognition of the long-established community boundaries within which most marriages are contracted, and the assessment of consanguinity within specific levels and types of marital union would improve and help to focus the study outcomes. At the same time, major discrepancies between studies in their reported prevalence and types of congenital heart disease suggest an urgent need for greater standardization in the classification and reporting of these disorders. PMID:21976867

  6. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.; San Miguel, U.

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design, compatibility for the different airfoil family members, etc.) and with the ultimate objective that the airfoils will reduce the blade loads. In this paper the whole airfoil design process and the main characteristics of the airfoil family are described. Some force coefficients for the design Reynolds number are also presented. The new designed airfoils have been studied with computational calculations (panel method code and CFD) and also in a wind tunnel experimental campaign. Some of these results will be also presented in this paper.

  7. Inheritance of quantitative dermatoglyphic traits with asymmetry and diversity in Muzeina Bedouin tribe: a small isolated and consanguineous population from South Sinai.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Bibha; Malkin, Ida; Kobyliansky, Eugene

    2014-06-01

    The genetic factors contribute significantly to the determination of dermatoglyphic traits is well established. However, the controversies in views and findings of this issue are still inconclusive. The present study is an attempt to evaluate the inheritance of quantitative dermatoglyphic traits with asymmetry (DA and FA) and diversity (Div) through sibling correlations. Data include 218 individuals from (88 families) in a small isolate, the nomadic tribe Muzeina with a high degree of consanguinity (0.09) from South Sinai. Statistical analyses include sibling correlations, cross-correlations and genetic correlation (GC)--a ratio of sibling cross-correlation between traits divided on square root of the both traits sibling correlation product. The familial correlation coefficients for quantitative dermatoglyphic traits are perhaps expected lower in such a small isolated and consanguineous population than our previous studied in Indian populations and Chuvashian populations from Russia. These results indicate a simpler genetic basis due to high degree (0.09 inbreeding coefficient) of consanguinity in Muzeina Bedouin tribe. There is no evidence of major gene involvement, although a little genetic effect obtained from familial correlations on asymmetry (DA and FA) and diversity (Div) traits through sibling correlations. The significant interaction between sexes was found, which contradicts with the other populations perhaps due to high level of consanguinity. Lower correlation coefficients than in other non-consanguineous populations for quantitative dermatoglyphic traits indicate a simpler genetic basis due to high degree of inbreeding coefficient (0.09) in Muzeina. Dermatoglyphic asymmetry and diversity traits may be due to environmental factors rather than dominance in Bedouins, although a little genetic effect was found suggests a measure of developmental instability in human (FA). PMID:25144975

  8. Complex genetic background in a large family with Brugada syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Siamak; Amarouch, Mohamed?Yassine; Fazelifar, Amir?Farjam; Haghjoo, Majid; Emkanjoo, Zahra; Alizadeh, Abolfath; Houshmand, Massoud; Gavrilenko, Alexander V.; Abriel, Hugues; Zaklyazminskaya, Elena V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited arrhythmia characterized by ST?segment elevation in V1–V3 leads and negative T wave on standard ECG. BrS patients are at risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) due to ventricular tachyarrhythmia. At least 17 genes have been proposed to be linked to BrS, although recent findings suggested a polygenic background. Mutations in SCN5A, the gene coding for the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5, have been found in 15–30% of index cases. Here, we present the results of clinical, genetic, and expression studies of a large Iranian family with BrS carrying a novel genetic variant (p.P1506S) in SCN5A. By performing whole?cell patch?clamp experiments using HEK293 cells expressing wild?type (WT) or p.P1506S Nav1.5 channels, hyperpolarizing shift of the availability curve, depolarizing shift of the activation curve, and hastening of the fast inactivation process were observed. These mutant?induced alterations lead to a loss of function of Nav1.5 and thus suggest that the p.P1506S variant is pathogenic. In addition, cascade familial screening found a family member with BrS who did not carry the p.P1506S mutation. Additional next generation sequencing analyses revealed the p.R25W mutation in KCNH2 gene in SCN5A?negative BrS patients. These findings illustrate the complex genetic background of BrS found in this family and the possible pathogenic role of a new SCN5A genetic variant. PMID:25626866

  9. The Perceptions and Views on Family Interaction and Relationships of Middle Children from Large Families: An Informal Mini Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Elena C. Thomas

    In Adler's Theory of Individual Psychology the significance of birth order position in the family constellation depends on the interpretation given to it by the child, which in turn influences his character. This study surveyed the perceptions of middle children in large families. Subjects (N=13) were middle children in families of more than five…

  10. A large family of filled skutterudites stabilized by electron count.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huixia; Krizan, Jason W; Muechler, Lukas; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Klimczuk, Tomasz; Xie, Weiwei; Fuccillo, Michael K; Felser, Claudia; Cava, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The Zintl concept is important in solid-state chemistry to explain how some compounds that combine electropositive and main group elements can be stable at formulas that at their simplest level do not make any sense. The electronegative elements in such compounds form a polyatomic electron-accepting molecule inside the solid, a 'polyanion', that fills its available energy states with electrons from the electropositive elements to obey fundamental electron-counting rules. Here we use this concept to discover a large family of filled skutterudites based on the group 9 transition metals Co, Rh, and Ir, the alkali, alkaline-earth, and rare-earth elements, and Sb4 polyanions. Forty-three new filled skutterudites are reported, with 63 compositional variations--results that can be extended to the synthesis of hundreds of additional new compounds. Many interesting electronic and magnetic properties can be expected in future studies of these new compounds. PMID:25744553

  11. Kirstin Knox Biochem 218 An Introduction To Motif Based Functional Classification of Large Protein Families

    E-print Network

    An alternative method of discovering similarity of function between proteins within large multidomain families Protein Families Many methods of clustering proteins within large protein families either build up from proteins, and they may miss functional similarities that arose due to domain shuffling or convergent

  12. PATTERN OF CONSANGUINITY AND INBREEDING COEFFICIENT IN SARGODHA DISTRICT, PUNJAB, PAKISTAN.

    PubMed

    Hina, Saira; Malik, Sajid

    2015-11-01

    Consanguinity is widespread in Pakistan. The majority of studies on consanguinity in Pakistan have been carried out in urban metropolitan areas, and data on rural populations are scarce. The present cross-sectional study was conducted in Sargodha district, upper Punjab, Pakistan where the majority of the population reside in rural areas. A random sample of 1800 married females belonging to six tehsils of Sargodha district was obtained and differentials in consanguinity rates and inbreeding coefficient (F) were investigated. The consanguinity rate was calculated to be 56.72% and the inbreeding coefficient was 0.0348. First cousin unions had the highest representation (49.11% of all marriages), and marriages up to distantly related/Biradari constituted 67.94% of all marriages. Among the six tehsils, consanguinity rates ranged from 50.38% in Bhalwal to 62.88% in Sillanwali. A high rate of consanguinity was observed in subjects speaking the Punjabi language, those with self-arranged/arranged-love marriages and those engaged in professional jobs. With respect to the occupation of husbands the highest consanguinity rate was found among landowners (77.59%; F=0.0539) and businessmen (62.62%; F=0.0377). However, consanguinity did not appear to be associated with rural/urban origin or literacy level. The data showed a wide variation in consanguinity rate and inbreeding coefficient across socio-demographic strata in the Sargodha district population. A comparison of Sargodha with other populations of Punjab also showed regional heterogeneity in the pattern of consanguinity, warranting further studies. PMID:25299747

  13. A large scale, cross-disease family health history data set Hong Yu, George Hripcsak, MD

    E-print Network

    Yu, Hong

    A large scale, cross-disease family health history data set Hong Yu, George Hripcsak, MD Department to be evaluated before applying to the study of genetic diseases, genetic counseling, and epidemiological studies. We have obtained a large scale, cross-disease family health history data set (FhhDS) from electronic

  14. Rate matrices for analyzing large families of protein sequences

    E-print Network

    Torrésani, Bruno

    in phylogenetic reconstructions; it can be viewed as an attempt to embed these distances into a multi with simple models (in particular, continuous reversible Markov models) and to test the adequacy test this prediction on a family of proteins encoded by the mito­ chondrial genome of 26 multicellular

  15. Consanguinity and endogamy in the Netherlands: demographic and medical genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Ten Kate, Leo P; Teeuw, Marieke E; Henneman, Lidewij; Cornel, Martina C

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews what is currently known about the presence of consanguinity and endogamy in the Netherlands, in the past and today, and concludes with a discussion of medical genetic aspects. First geographic characteristics, the demographic history, the genetic make-up of the native population, legal aspects and the public opinion are reviewed. Then data on the prevalence of consanguinity in the native population are presented for marriages since 1840, followed by data on consanguineous marriages among immigrants from countries with a tradition of close-kin marriages. It is estimated that approximately 1% of at-risk consanguineous couples are referred to clinical genetic centres for prospective genetic counselling in the Netherlands. This picture will change dramatically if and when next-generation sequencing is introduced to identify couples at ? 25% risk prospectively. PMID:25060279

  16. Large, Rapidly Evolving Intergenic Spacers in the Mitochondrial DNA of the Salamander Family Ambystomatidae (Amphibia: Caudata)

    E-print Network

    Shaffer, H. Bradley

    Large, Rapidly Evolving Intergenic Spacers in the Mitochondrial DNA of the Salamander Family, in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of all of the sexual species of the salamander family Ambystomatidae, of a shared 240 variation in mitochondrial genome size. In a study of the relationship between endothermy and mtDNA size

  17. Bombay blood group: Is prevalence decreasing with urbanization and the decreasing rate of consanguineous marriage

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Sujata; Kotasthane, Dhananjay S.; Chowdhury, Puskar S.; Sarkar, Sonali

    2015-01-01

    Context: Bombay blood group although rare is found to be more prevalent in the Western and Southern states of India, believed to be associated with consanguineous marriage. Aims: To estimate the prevalence of the Bombay blood group (Oh) in the urban population of Puducherry. To find the effect of urbanization on consanguineous marriage and to establish whether consanguinity plays a part in the prevalence of Oh group. To compare Oh group prevalence with that of other neighboring states, where population is not predominantly urban. Settings and Design: This is a descriptive study in a tertiary care hospital in Puducherry, over a period of 6 years. Materials and Methods: All blood samples showing ‘O’ group were tested with anti-H lectin. Specialized tests like Adsorption Elution Technique, inhibition assay for determination of secretor status were performed on Oh positive cases. Any history of consanguineous marriage was recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: All variables were categorical variable and percentage and proportions were calculated manually. Results: Analysis of the results of 35,497 study subjects showed that the most common group was ‘O’ group constituting 14,164 (39.90%) of subjects. Only three “Oh” that is, Bombay phenotype (0.008%) were detected. Consanguinity was observed in two cases (66.66%). Conclusions: This study shows the prevalence of Bombay blood group representing the urban population of Puducherry, to be high (0.008%) and associated with consanguineous marriage (66.66%). Thus, consanguinity is still an important risk factor present, even in an urban population in Southern India. PMID:26420929

  18. Broad scan linkage analysis in a large Tourette family pedigree

    SciTech Connect

    Peiffer, A.; Leppert, M.; Wetering, B.J.M. van der

    1994-09-01

    Attempts to find a gene causing Tourette syndrome (TS) using linkage analysis have been unsuccessful even though as much as 65% of the autosomal genetic map has been excluded by the pooled results from several laboratories collaborating worldwide. One reason for this failure may be the misclassification of affection status of marry-in spouses. Specifically, we have found that six unrelated spouses in our Utah TS pedigree suffer from TS, obsessive-compulsive disorder or chronic motor tics. In light of these findings we decided to conduct a complete genomic scan from this Utah kindred with polymorphic markers in three related sibships in which there was no assortative mating. A linkage study assuming autosomal dominant inheritance was done using tetranucleotide repeat markers developed at the University of Utah. We selected markers that were less than 300 bp in size and that gave a heterozygosity of over 70% upon analysis in 4 CEPH families. Results to date with 95 markers run at an interval of 30 cM (covering 61% of the genome) show no evidence of linkage. We intend to extend the coverage to 100% of the genome. Pending completion of this scan, failure to provide evidence of linkage in our TS pedigree might then be attributed to phenotypic misclassification or erroneous assumptions regarding the genetic model of transmission.

  19. KIC 8462852: Transit of a Large Comet Family

    E-print Network

    Bodman, Eva H L

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the plausibility of a cometary source of the unusual transits observed in the KIC 8462852 light curve. A single comet of similar size to those in our solar system produces transit dips of order $10^{-3}$ having a duration of less than a day which are much smaller and shorter than the largest dip observed ($\\sim20\\%$ for $\\sim3$ days) but a large ($>$10), closely traveling cluster of comets can fit the observed depths and durations. We find that a series of large comet clusters with all but one on the same orbit provides a good fit for the KIC 8462852 data during Quarters 16 and 17 but not the large dip observed during Quarter 8. However, the transit dips only loosely constrain the orbits and can be fit by clusters with periastrons differing by an order of magnitude. To reach a transit depth of $\\sim0.2$, the comets need to be in a close group of $\\sim30$ if $\\sim100$ km in radius or in a group of $\\sim300$ if $\\sim10$ km. The total number of comets required to fit all the dips is 73 $\\sim$100 k...

  20. Finnish type of familial amyloidosis: cosegregation of Asp187----Asn mutation of gelsolin with the disease in three large families.

    PubMed Central

    Hiltunen, T; Kiuru, S; Hongell, V; Heliö, T; Palo, J; Peltonen, L

    1991-01-01

    Familial amyloidosis of Finnish type (FAF) is one of the familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) syndromes, a group of inherited disorders characterized by extracellular accumulation of amyloid and by clinical symptoms and signs of polyneuropathy. FAF, an autosomal dominant trait, belongs to those rare monogenic disorders which occur with increased frequency in the Finnish population: only single FAF cases have been reported from other populations. In most types of FAP syndromes the accumulating protein is a transthyretin variant. However, recent evidence has suggested that the amyloid peptides in FAF are related to gelsolin, an actin modulating protein. The gelsolin fragments isolated from at least one patient with amyloidosis have been reported to have an amino acid substitution, with asparagine replacing aspartic acid at position 187 of the plasma gelsolin. In this study allele-specific oligonucleotides were used to analyze three large FAF families with multiple affected individuals as well as healthy family members. We found the corresponding G-A mutation in nucleotide 654 of the plasma gelsolin gene to cosegregate with the disease. The result was confirmed by sequencing and strongly suggests that the mutation has caused all the FAF cases of these families. Since the disease is clustered in restricted areas on the southern coast of Finland, this mutation most probably causes the majority, if not all, of FAF cases in Finland. Images Figure 2 PMID:1652889

  1. An analysis of consanguinity and social structure within the UK Asian population using microsatellite data.

    PubMed

    Overall, A D J; Ahmad, M; Thomas, M G; Nichols, R A

    2003-11-01

    We analysed microsatellite genotypes sampled from the Pakistani and Indian communities in Nottingham, UK, to investigate the genetic consequences of substructuring mediated by traditional marriage customs. The application of a recently developed likelihood approach identified significant levels of population substructure within the Pakistani community as a whole, as well as within the finer divisions of castes and biradheri. In addition, high levels of cryptic or unacknowledged consanguinity were detected within subgroups of this community, including biradheri. The Indian sample showed no significant evidence of either substructure or consanguinity. We demonstrate that estimates of disease gene frequencies can be inaccurate unless they are made jointly with estimates of population substructure and consanguinity ((theta congruent to FST) and C). The magnitude of these estimates also highlights the importance of accounting for the finer scale of social structuring when making decisions regarding the risk of recessive disorders in offspring. PMID:14641240

  2. Impact of consanguinity on cardio-metabolic health and other diseases: findings from an Afro-Indian tribal community.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Prerna; Kapoor, Satwanti

    2015-04-01

    Numerous anthropological reports have indicated consanguineous marriage in populous Asian countries, but the overall impact of first cousin marriage on survival and health of specific communities has rarely been reported. The aim of the study was to estimate risks for various complex diseases in the progeny of consanguineous parents. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 222 women among Siddis, a particularly vulnerable tribal group in the state of Gujarat, India, who are Sunni Muslims by faith. The Siddis are not part of the original Negrito element of India. They are descendants of Africans from Northeast and East Africa who were brought to India as slaves, soldiers, or servants. The degree of consanguinity between each female and her spouse and the degree of consanguinity between their parents and proband's grandparents were recorded with the help of pedigrees. The results showed that the rate of consanguinity in the present generation was 49 % (N?=?109), higher than preceding generations. A significant association was observed between women's age, educational level, occupational status, consanguineous parents, and consanguinity. Socioeconomic status and consanguinity showed U-shaped associations. Nearly three times odds for cardio-metabolic risks (2.65 odds ratio (OR) for heart diseases, 2.44 OR for diabetes mellitus, and 2.62 OR for hypertension) have been contracted in the progeny of consanguineous marriage in the parental generation. The risk of cardio-metabolic diseases is higher in offspring of consanguineous couples, and there is a significant increase in the prevalence of common adult diseases. PMID:25524067

  3. The multiple occurrence of myeloma and asymptomatic paraproteinaemia within one family

    PubMed Central

    Meijers, Katharina A. E.; de Leeuw, B.; Voormolen-Kálova, Milena

    1972-01-01

    Case histories are described of three patients who died of myeloma and of three persons with asymptomatic paraproteinaemia. They were first and second degree relatives in two generations of a Dutch family without consanguinity. PMID:4567645

  4. The Effect of Consanguineous Marriage on Reading Disability in the Arab Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Rabia, Salim; Maroun, Lateefeh

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of consanguineous marriage in the Arab community on reading disabilities of offspring. It examined whether the rate of reading disabilities was higher among offspring of first-cousin parents than offspring of unrelated parents; and whether reading-disabled children of first-cousin parents were more disabled in…

  5. The mushroom family Psathyrellaceae: Evidence for large-scale polyphyly of the genus Psathyrella

    E-print Network

    Matheny, P. Brandon

    The mushroom family Psathyrellaceae: Evidence for large-scale polyphyly of the genus Psathyrella 2007 Abstract Psathyrella is the archetypal little brown mushroom genus with few easily discernable­600 species of mushrooms (Hawksworth et al., 1995; Kirk et al., 2001; Vasutova´, 2006). Species of Psathyrella

  6. Adaptive evolution in two large families of ubiquitin-ligase adapters in nematodes and plants

    E-print Network

    Thomas, James H.

    ", "ubiquitin ligase", "proteolysis", "innate immunity", "C. elegans", "Arabidopsis". #12;2 Abstract From1 Adaptive evolution in two large families of ubiquitin-ligase adapters in nematodes and plants: Adaptive evolution in ubiquitin-ligase adapters Key words: "adaptive evolution", "positive selection

  7. The influence of admixture and consanguinity on population genetic diversity in Middle East.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiong; Al-Bustan, Suzanne; Feng, Qidi; Guo, Wei; Ma, Zhiming; Marafie, Makia; Jacob, Sindhu; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Xu, Shuhua

    2014-11-01

    The Middle East (ME) is an important crossroad where modern humans migrated 'out of Africa' and spread into Europe and Asia. After the initial peopling and long-term isolation leading to well-differentiated populations, the ME also had a crucial role in subsequent human migrations among Africa, Europe and Asia; thus, recent population admixture has been common in the ME. On the other hand, consanguinity, a well-known practice in the ME, often reduces genetic diversity and works in opposition to admixture. Here, we explored the degree to which admixture and consanguinity jointly affected genetic diversity in ME populations. Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data were generated in two representative ME populations (Arabian and Iranian), with comparisons made with populations worldwide. Our results revealed an overall higher genetic diversity in both ME populations relative to other non-African populations. We identified a much larger number of long runs of homozygosity in ME populations than in any other populations, which was most likely attributed to high levels of consanguineous marriages that significantly decreased both individual and population heterozygosity. Additionally, we were able to distinguish African, European and Asian ancestries in ME populations and quantify the impact of admixture and consanguinity with statistical approaches. Interestingly, genomic regions with significantly excessive ancestry from individual source populations are functionally enriched in olfactory pathways, which were suspected to be under natural selection. Our findings suggest that genetic admixture, consanguinity and natural selection have collectively shaped the genetic diversity of ME populations, which has important implications in both evolutionary studies and medical practices. PMID:25253659

  8. Frequent detection of parental consanguinity in children with developmental disorders by a combined CGH and SNP microarray

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genomic microarrays have been used as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders and/or multiple congenital anomalies. The use of SNP arrays has revealed regions of homozygosity in the genome which can lead to identification of uniparental disomy and parental consanguinity in addition to copy number variations. Consanguinity is associated with an increased risk of birth defects and autosomal recessive disorders. However, the frequency of parental consanguinity in children with developmental disabilities is unknown, and consanguineous couples may not be identified during doctor’s visit or genetic counseling without microarray. Results We studied 607 proband pediatric patients referred for developmental disorders using a 4?×?180 K array containing both CGH and SNP probes. Using 720, 360, 180, and 90 Mb as the expected sizes of homozygosity for an estimated coefficient of inbreeding (F) 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, parental consanguinity was detected in 21cases (3.46%). Conclusion Parental consanguinity is not uncommon in children with developmental problems in our study population, and can be identified by use of a combined CGH and SNP chromosome microarray. Identification of parental consanguinity in such cases can be important for further diagnostic testing. PMID:24053112

  9. Genetic heterogeneity in psoriasis vulgaris based on linkage analyses of a large family material

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlstroem, J.; Swanbeck, G.; Inerot, A.

    1994-09-01

    Information on psoriasis among parents and siblings in 14,008 families has been collected. On the basis of this material, evidence for monogenetic autosomal recessive inheritance of psoriasis has recently been presented. Indications from more than one type of non-pustular psoriasis has been obtained from the population genetic data. Molecular genetic linkage analysis of psoriasis to a number of polymorphic genetic markers for a large number of families has been made. It is apparent that there is genetic heterogeneity in a psoriasis population with regard to psoriasis genes. Using the computer program Linkage 5.0 and a formula for heterogeneity, a lodscore over 3.0 for one locus has been obtained. This locus has further been confirmed by several other markers in the vicinity. The locus found is linked to slightly over half of the families, indicating that there are more genetically independent types of psoriasis. The age at onset of those families that are apparently linked to this locus have a slightly higher age at onset than those not linked to that locus but with a considerable overlap. In spite of close coverage of the whole chromosomes number 6 and 17, no linkage has been found in this regions. This indicates that neither the HLA region nor the region earlier found to be involved in one family with psoriasis are primarily involved in our families.

  10. Evaluating the feasibility of using candidate DNA barcodes in discriminating species of the large Asteraceae family

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Five DNA regions, namely, rbcL, matK, ITS, ITS2, and psbA-trnH, have been recommended as primary DNA barcodes for plants. Studies evaluating these regions for species identification in the large plant taxon, which includes a large number of closely related species, have rarely been reported. Results The feasibility of using the five proposed DNA regions was tested for discriminating plant species within Asteraceae, the largest family of flowering plants. Among these markers, ITS2 was the most useful in terms of universality, sequence variation, and identification capability in the Asteraceae family. The species discriminating power of ITS2 was also explored in a large pool of 3,490 Asteraceae sequences that represent 2,315 species belonging to 494 different genera. The result shows that ITS2 correctly identified 76.4% and 97.4% of plant samples at the species and genus levels, respectively. In addition, ITS2 displayed a variable ability to discriminate related species within different genera. Conclusions ITS2 is the best DNA barcode for the Asteraceae family. This approach significantly broadens the application of DNA barcoding to resolve classification problems in the family Asteraceae at the genera and species levels. PMID:20977734

  11. Clinical and linkage study of a large family with simple ectopia lentis linked to FBN1

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M.J.; Roberts, J.; Partington, M.W.; Colley, P.W.; Hollway, G.E.; Kozman, H.M.; Mulley, J.C.

    1994-10-15

    Simple ectopia lentis (EL) was studied in a large family, by clinical examination and analysis of linkage to markers in the region of FBN1, the gene for fibrillin which causes Marfan syndrome on chromosome 15. No patient had clinical or echocardiographic evidence of Marfan syndrome, although there was a trend towards relatively longer measurements of height; lower segment; arm span; middle finger, hand, and foot length in the affected members of the family, compared with unaffected sibs of the same sex. Analysis of linkage to intragenic FBN1 markers was inconclusive because they were relatively uninformative. Construction of a multipoint background map from the CEPH reference families identified microsatellite markers linked closely to FBN1 which could demonstrate linkage of EL in this family to the FBN1 region. LINKMAP analysis detected a multipoint lod score of 5.68 at D15S119, a marker approximately 6 cM distal to FBN1, and a multipoint lod score of 5.04 at FBN1. The EL gene in this family is likely to be allelic to Marfan syndrome, and molecular characterization of the FBN1 mutation should now be possible. 25 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. A novel mutation in the C7orf11 gene causes nonphotosensitive trichothiodystrophy in a multiplex highly consanguineous kindred.

    PubMed

    Pode-Shakked, Ben; Marek-Yagel, Dina; Greenberger, Shoshana; Pode-Shakked, Naomi; Pras, Elon; Barzilai, Aviv; Yassin, Saeed; Sidi, Yechezkel; Anikster, Yair

    2015-12-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD), also known as sulfur-deficient brittle hair syndrome, is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder, which manifests with brittle hair, mental retardation, ichthyosis and decreased fertility. Mutations in the TTDN1 (C7orf11) gene have been shown to cause a nonphotosensitive type of trichothiodystrophy. We report of a 19 years old male, born to consanguineous parents of Arab-Muslim descent, who presented due to severe renal failure, but exhibited additional unique features, including developmental delay, mental retardation, splenomegaly, pancytopenia, hypogonadism and brittle hair. Following the clinical diagnosis of nonphotosensitive TTD, sequencing of the coding exons of C7orf11 was performed and revealed the patient to be homozygous for a novel c.505dupA mutation. As the severe renal failure following which the proband was referred to our care is not typically characteristic of this disorder, its significance is discussed. Molecular diagnosis of this highly affected family should enable genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis for future pregnancies. PMID:26518168

  13. CONSANGUINITY AND HOMOZYGOSITY AMONG TUNISIAN PATIENTS WITH AN AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE DISORDER.

    PubMed

    Kelmemi, Wided; Chelly, Imene; Kharrat, Maher; Chaabouni-Bouhamed, Habiba

    2015-11-01

    Consanguineous unions are a deeply rooted social practice among traditional societies. Despite their presumed social advantages, they can result in several health conditions. The aim of this study was: i) to compare consanguinity levels between Tunisian patients affected with autosomal recessive disorders (ARDs) and those with a chromosomal abnormality; and ii) to gain more insight into the mutational status of patients affected with ARDs. Data were collected from 290 files of patients affected by one of five ARDs confirmed by molecular analysis and 248 files of patients with confirmed Down syndrome. Information on the disease, mutation defining the disease, parents' relatedness and geographical origin was gathered. Consanguinity was found among 58% of the ARD patients and among 22% of Down syndrome patients, and a homozygous status was found in 90% of the patients born to related parents and in 70% of patients born to unrelated parents. Also, children from unrelated parents from the same geographical background were found to be more frequently affected by homozygous mutations than those from unrelated parents from different geographical backgrounds. The present study shows how marriage practices affect patterns of genetic variations and how they can lead to homogenization in the genetic pool. PMID:25630711

  14. [Information should be given on consanguinity as a risk factor for congenital malformations].

    PubMed

    Cornel, Martina C; Houwink, Elisa J F; Houwink, Pieter E F

    2014-01-01

    In the Born in Bradford study, an increased risk for congenital anomalies was found in the Pakistani subpopulation of Bradford, where cousin marriage is relatively frequent. While consanguinity may be associated with a risk for congenital malformations, it does not prove a causal relationship. Whatever the case, high perinatal mortality as well as the high prevalence of congenital anomalies are good reasons for implementing the knowledge on reproductive risks that has been available for many years. Well-known risk factors include higher maternal age, that was associated with congenital anomalies in the British mothers. Further research in an intervention study may provide more data on whether the associations found are causal. Implementing preconception care should involve primary care physicians, who need both facilities and training. In the Netherlands, the high perinatal mortality, especially in some big cities, could profit from similar interventions. Dutch primary care physicians consider it their responsibility to discuss consanguinity with patients, although there is some reluctance because of anticipated religious and social value conflicts. Without information reaching the target populations, they may lack awareness and will not ask for information themselves. People from Dutch migrant groups would prefer to be informed about reproductive risks of consanguinity by their primary care physicians. PMID:24397975

  15. Higher than expected frequencies of non-ovarian cancers within a large familial ovarian cancer registry

    PubMed Central

    Brightwell, Rachel M; Grzankowski, Kassondra S; Kaur, Jasmine; Poblete, Samantha; Miller, Austin; Lele, Shashikant B; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Moysich, Kirsten; Odunsi, Kunle O

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether the frequencies of non-ovarian cancers (NOC) within families in a large Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry (FOCR) are significantly different from the frequencies listed in the SEER database. The FOCR was established in 1981. Registry members are families with two or more first degree relatives who have a diagnosis of ovarian cancer, three or more cases of cancer on one side of the family with at least one being ovarian, at least one female with two or more primary cancers in which one is ovary, or a history of two or more cancers in the family with at least one being ovarian cancer diagnosed before the age of 45. The data was analyzed to find relative rates of 10 of the most common cancers found within the database, with the exception of ovarian and breast. These include bladder, CNS, cervical, colorectal, liver, lung, pancreas, prostate, stomach, and uterine. Cancers were further stratified by age at diagnosis, and compared to information in the SEER database. There are 2,671 pedigrees and a total of 50,454 individuals within the FOCR. There are 1,938 families with two or more relatives with ovarian cancer, accounting for 4,816 individuals with ovarian cancer. The total number of individuals with ovarian cancer is 5,421. Of these individuals with ovarian cancer, 2,249 have been verified with testing or physician correspondence. The frequencies of the NOCs within the registry were higher than that of the general population as described in the SEER database. In particular, the overall frequencies of cancers of the bladder, cervix, prostate, and uterus were higher within the FOCR at 2.3, 7.4, 25.2, and 11.9 per 1,000 respectively. Furthermore, diagnoses of both cervical and uterine cancers tended to occur at an earlier age within the FOCR. The overall frequencies of cancers of the bladder, cervix, prostate, and uterus are higher in the FOCR compared with a general population database. Future studies on segregation analysis and genome-wide linkage studies are warranted on families with NOC within the Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry.

  16. Moxidectin and the avermectins: Consanguinity but not identity

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, Roger; Ménez, Cécile; Lespine, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The avermectins and milbemycins contain a common macrocyclic lactone (ML) ring, but are fermentation products of different organisms. The principal structural difference is that avermectins have sugar groups at C13 of the macrocyclic ring, whereas the milbemycins are protonated at C13. Moxidectin (MOX), belonging to the milbemycin family, has other differences, including a methoxime at C23. The avermectins and MOX have broad-spectrum activity against nematodes and arthropods. They have similar but not identical, spectral ranges of activity and some avermectins and MOX have diverse formulations for great user flexibility. The longer half-life of MOX and its safety profile, allow MOX to be used in long-acting formulations. Some important differences between MOX and avermectins in interaction with various invertebrate ligand-gated ion channels are known and could be the basis of different efficacy and safety profiles. Modelling of IVM interaction with glutamate-gated ion channels suggest different interactions will occur with MOX. Similarly, profound differences between MOX and the avermectins are seen in interactions with ABC transporters in mammals and nematodes. These differences are important for pharmacokinetics, toxicity in animals with defective transporter expression, and probable mechanisms of resistance. Resistance to the avermectins has become widespread in parasites of some hosts and MOX resistance also exists and is increasing. There is some degree of cross-resistance between the avermectins and MOX, but avermectin resistance and MOX resistance are not identical. In many cases when resistance to avermectins is noticed, MOX produces a higher efficacy and quite often is fully effective at recommended dose rates. These similarities and differences should be appreciated for optimal decisions about parasite control, delaying, managing or reversing resistances, and also for appropriate anthelmintic combination. PMID:24533275

  17. Towards identification of an epilepsy gene in a large family with idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Roussear, M.; Lopes-Cendes, I.; Berkovic, S.F.

    1994-09-01

    To identify the disease gene in a large, multiplex family segregating an autosomal dominant form of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). The IGEs have been recognized for several decades as being genetically determined. However, large pedigrees with a clear Mendelian inheritance are not commonly available. This, and the presence of locus heterogeneity have been obstacles to the identification of linkage in several IGE syndromes. We have identified a large IGE kindred with fifty-eight living individuals, including 26 affecteds, showing a clear autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Forty-fur informative individuals, including 23 affecteds, were selected for the linkage studies. We have chosen 200 polymorphic microsatellite markers, about 20 cM apart, throughout the human autosomes as a genome-search linkage strategy. To date, 47 markers, representing 30% of the human genome, have been excluded for linkage in the Australian kindred. As our study progresses, we will report up-to-date results.

  18. UGT2B17 copy number gain in a large ankylosing spondylitis multiplex family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this study is to identify novel copy number variations (CNVs) associated with familial ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A customized genome-wide microarray was designed to detect CNVs and applied to a multiplex AS family with six (6) affected family members. CNVs were detected using the built-in DNA analytics aberration detection method-2 (ADM-2) algorithm. Gene enrichment analysis was performed to observe the segregation. Subsequent validation was performed using real time quantitative fluorescence polymerase reaction (QF-PCR). The frequency of copy number variation for the UGT2B17 gene was then performed on two well-defined AS cohorts. Fisher exact test was performed to quantify the association. Results Our family-based analysis revealed ten gene-enriched CNVs that segregate with all six family members affected with AS. Based on the proposed function and the polymorphic nature of the UGT2B17 gene, the UGT2B17 gene CNV was selected for validation using real time QF-PCR with full concordance. The frequency of two copies of the UGT2B17 gene CNV was 0.41 in the Newfoundland AS cases and 0.35 in the Newfoundland controls (OR = 1.26(0.99-1.59); p < 0.05)), whereas the frequency of two (2) copies of the UGT2B17 gene CNV was 0.40 in the Alberta AS cases and 0.39 in the Alberta controls (OR = 1.05(95% CI: 0.83-1.33); p < 0.71)). Conclusions A genome-wide microarray interrogation of a large multiplex AS family revealed segregation of the UGT2B17 gene CNV among all affected family members. The association of the UGT2B17 CNV with AS is particularly interesting given the recent association of this CNV with osteoporosis and the proposed function as it encodes a key enzyme that inhibits androgens. However, two copies of the UGT2B17 gene CNV were only marginally significant in a uniplex AS cohort from Newfoundland but not in a uniplex AS cohort from Alberta. PMID:23927372

  19. Clinical presentation and mutation analysis of VHL disease in a large Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Li, De-Ling; Kang, Peng; Ji, Nan; Yang, Jun; Liu, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Li-Wei; Jia, Gui-Jun

    2015-11-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal dominantly inherited neoplastic disorder characterized by marked phenotypic variability and age-dependent penetrance. This disease is caused by germline mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene. Systematic physical examinations, imaging assessments and molecular genetic tests for the VHL gene were performed in a large Chinese VHL family. The examined Chinese VHL family, which has 25 members from four generations, including 7 diagnosed VHL patients and 2 asymptomatic mutation carriers. The average ages of first onset for generations I, II, and III were 37, 30 and 16, respectively. The male:female ratio among VHL patients was 6:1. Molecular genetic investigations detected the c.433C>T [p.Q145X] nonsense mutation in the VHL gene. Molecular modeling of the VHL-ElonginC- ElonginB-HIF-1? complex predicted that the p.Q145X mutation markedly alters the L7 loop structure of the ?-domain of the VHL protein (pVHL), destabilizes the VHL-HIF-1?complex, and induces the truncation of pVHL. We speculate that the p.Q145X nonsense mutation leads to relatively obvious familial aggregation. This mutation causes the type I phenotype of VHL disease and is associated with a high risk of retinal and central nervous system (CNS) hemangioblastomas (HGBs) and visceral cysts, but a low risk of renal cell carcinoma. Moreover, within a VHL family, the average ages of first onset became younger in successive generations, and the CNS HGBs are more likely to occur in male patients. PMID:26341373

  20. Evolutionary mechanisms driving the evolution of a large polydnavirus gene family coding for protein tyrosine phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene duplications have been proposed to be the main mechanism involved in genome evolution and in acquisition of new functions. Polydnaviruses (PDVs), symbiotic viruses associated with parasitoid wasps, are ideal model systems to study mechanisms of gene duplications given that PDV genomes consist of virulence genes organized into multigene families. In these systems the viral genome is integrated in a wasp chromosome as a provirus and virus particles containing circular double-stranded DNA are injected into the parasitoids’ hosts and are essential for parasitism success. The viral virulence factors, organized in gene families, are required collectively to induce host immune suppression and developmental arrest. The gene family which encodes protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) has undergone spectacular expansion in several PDV genomes with up to 42 genes. Results Here, we present strong indications that PTP gene family expansion occurred via classical mechanisms: by duplication of large segments of the chromosomally integrated form of the virus sequences (segmental duplication), by tandem duplications within this form and by dispersed duplications. We also propose a novel duplication mechanism specific to PDVs that involves viral circle reintegration into the wasp genome. The PTP copies produced were shown to undergo conservative evolution along with episodes of adaptive evolution. In particular recently produced copies have undergone positive selection in sites most likely involved in defining substrate selectivity. Conclusion The results provide evidence about the dynamic nature of polydnavirus proviral genomes. Classical and PDV-specific duplication mechanisms have been involved in the production of new gene copies. Selection pressures associated with antagonistic interactions with parasitized hosts have shaped these genes used to manipulate lepidopteran physiology with evidence for positive selection involved in adaptation to host targets. PMID:23270369

  1. A large and functionally diverse family of Fad2 genes in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The application and nutritional value of vegetable oil is highly dependent on its fatty acid composition, especially the relative proportion of its two major fatty acids, i.e oleic acid and linoleic acid. Microsomal oleoyl phosphatidylcholine desaturase encoded by FAD2 gene is known to introduce a double bond at the ?12 position of an oleic acid on phosphatidylcholine and convert it to linoleic acid. The known plant FAD2 enzymes are encoded by small gene families consisting of 1-4 members. In addition to the classic oleate ?12-desaturation activity, functional variants of FAD2 that are capable of undertaking additional or alternative acyl modifications have also been reported in a limited number of plant species. In this study, our objective was to identify FAD2 genes from safflower and analyse their differential expression profile and potentially diversified functionality. Results We report here the characterization and functional expression of an exceptionally large FAD2 gene family from safflower, and the temporal and spatial expression profiles of these genes as revealed through Real-Time quantitative PCR. The diversified functionalities of some of the safflower FAD2 gene family members were demonstrated by ectopic expression in yeast and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. CtFAD2-1 and CtFAD2-10 were demonstrated to be oleate desaturases specifically expressed in developing seeds and flower head, respectively, while CtFAD2-2 appears to have relatively low oleate desaturation activity throughout the plant. CtFAD2-5 and CtFAD2-8 are specifically expressed in root tissues, while CtFAD2-3, 4, 6, 7 are mostly expressed in the cotyledons and hypocotyls in young safflower seedlings. CtFAD2-9 was found to encode a novel desaturase operating on C16:1 substrate. CtFAD2-11 is a tri-functional enzyme able to introduce a carbon double bond in either cis or trans configuration, or a carbon triple (acetylenic) bond at the ?12 position. Conclusions In this study, we isolated an unusually large FAD2 gene family with 11 members from safflower. The seed expressed FAD2 oleate ?12 desaturase genes identified in this study will provide candidate targets to manipulate the oleic acid level in safflower seed oil. Further, the divergent FAD2 enzymes with novel functionality could be used to produce rare fatty acids, such as crepenynic acid, in genetically engineered crop plants that are precursors for economically important phytoalexins and oleochemical products. PMID:23289946

  2. The Role of Family Environment in Depressive Symptoms among University Students: A Large Sample Survey in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanjie; Chen, Lu; Qiu, Xiaohui; Qiao, Zhengxue; Zhou, Jiawei; Pan, Hui; Ban, Bo; Zhu, Xiongzhao; He, Jincai; Ding, Yongqing; Bai, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between family environment and depressive symptoms and to evaluate the influence of hard and soft family environmental factors on depression levels in a large sample of university students in China. Methods A multi-stage stratified sampling procedure was used to select 6,000 participants. The response rate was 88.8%, with 5,329 students completing the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Family Environment Scale Chinese Version (FES-CV), which was adapted for the Chinese population. Differences between the groups were tested for significance by the Student’s t-test; ANOVA was used to test continuous variables. The relationship between soft family environmental factors and BDI were tested by Pearson correlation analysis. Hierarchical linear regression analysis was conducted to model the effects of hard environmental factors and soft environmental factors on depression in university students. Results A total of 11.8% of students scored above the threshold of moderate depression(BDI?14). Hard family environmental factors such as parent relationship, family economic status, level of parental literacy and non-intact family structure were associated with depressive symptoms. The soft family environmental factors—conflict and control—were positively associated with depression, while cohesion was negatively related to depressive symptom after controlling for other important associates of depression. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that the soft family environment correlates more strongly with depression than the hard family environment. Conclusions Soft family environmental factors—especially cohesion, conflict and control—appeared to play an important role in the occurrence of depressive symptoms. These findings underline the significance of the family environment as a source of risk factors for depression among university students in China and suggest that family-based interventions and improvement are very important to reduce depression among university students. PMID:26629694

  3. Syndrome Keratitis-Ichtyosis-Deafness (KID) chez un enfant togolais issu d'un mariage consanguin

    PubMed Central

    Kombaté, Koussak; Saka, Bayaki; Landoh, Dadja Essoya; Mouhari-Toure, Abass; Akakpo, Séfako; Belei, Eric; Gnassingbé, Wanguena; Djibril, Mohaman Awalou; Tchangaï-Walla, Kissem; Pitché, Palokinam

    2015-01-01

    Le syndrome KID est une affection génétique rare associant kératite, ichtyose et surdité. Nous rapportons un cas dont la surdité s'est compliquée de mutisme chez un enfant togolais issu d'un mariage consanguin.Il s'agissait d'une fillette de 9 ans admise en dermatologie pour une peau sèche et une kératodermie palmoplantaire évoluant depuis l'enfance, une surdité sévère et un mutisme total évoluant depuis la naissance. Il n'y avait pas d'histoire familiale connue de syndrome KID. Les parents de cet enfant sont des cousins germains. A l'examen, on notait une kératodermie palmoplantaire typique en cuir grossier, une peau sèche ichtyosiforme finement squameuse avec un aspect pachydermique aux genoux et un aspect arlequin aux jambes. L'examen ophtalmologique avait noté une blépharo-conjonctivite, une xérophtalmie, une photophobie et une absence de sourcils. L'examen ORL avait objectivé une hypotrophie des pavillons des oreilles, une surdité sévère et un mutisme total. La particularité de cette observation réside dans la sévérité de l'atteinte auditive qui s'est compliquée de mutisme. Notre enfant étant née de parents consanguins sains, sans histoire familiale de KID, nous pensons que le mode de transmission est probablement sporadique. Une étude moléculaire du cas index et de ses parents, non réalisée à cause de notre plateau technique limité aurait pu le confirmer.

  4. Members of a large retroposon family are determinants of post-transcriptional gene expression in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Bringaud, Frédéric; Müller, Michaela; Cerqueira, Gustavo Coutinho; Smith, Martin; Rochette, Annie; El-Sayed, Najib M A; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Ghedin, Elodie

    2007-09-01

    Trypanosomatids are unicellular protists that include the human pathogens Leishmania spp. (leishmaniasis), Trypanosoma brucei (sleeping sickness), and Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease). Analysis of their recently completed genomes confirmed the presence of non-long-terminal repeat retrotransposons, also called retroposons. Using the 79-bp signature sequence common to all trypanosomatid retroposons as bait, we identified in the Leishmania major genome two new large families of small elements--LmSIDER1 (785 copies) and LmSIDER2 (1,073 copies)--that fulfill all the characteristics of extinct trypanosomatid retroposons. LmSIDERs are approximately 70 times more abundant in L. major compared to T. brucei and are found almost exclusively within the 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of L. major mRNAs. We provide experimental evidence that LmSIDER2 act as mRNA instability elements and that LmSIDER2-containing mRNAs are generally expressed at lower levels compared to the non-LmSIDER2 mRNAs. The considerable expansion of LmSIDERs within 3'UTRs in an organism lacking transcriptional control and their role in regulating mRNA stability indicate that Leishmania have probably recycled these short retroposons to globally modulate the expression of a number of genes. To our knowledge, this is the first example in eukaryotes of the domestication and expansion of a family of mobile elements that have evolved to fulfill a critical cellular function. PMID:17907803

  5. Evidence of association between FKBP1B and thyroid autoimmune disorders in a large Tunisian family.

    PubMed

    Maalej, Abdellatif; Mbarki, Fadhila; Rebai, Ahmed; Karray, Foued; Jouida, Jomaa; Abid, Mohamed; Ayadi, Hammadi

    2004-05-01

    FKBP1B belongs to immunophilins superfamily and functions as a cytosolic receptor protein of FK506. The role of FKBP1B in the immunosuppressive pathway of FK506 is well established. Previously, we reported a strong evidence of linkage between D2S171 microsatellite marker (located in vicinity of FKBP1B gene) and susceptibility to autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs). In this study, we report linkage disequilibrium between the dimorphism (C/T) in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of FKBP1B gene and susceptibility to AITDs. DNAs were extracted from a large Tunisian family affected with Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and analysed by PCR-RFLP using DraIII restriction enzyme. Our results showed an excess of transmission of the allele C from heterozygous parents to affected offspring (transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) = 4.76; p = 0.012). This suggests a linkage disequilibrium of 3' UTR (C/T) SNP with AITDs. Moreover, The FBAT analysis gives a significant association with the C allele under the recessive model (chi2 = 5.50; p = 0.018). These results support the involvement of FKBP1B gene in the genetic susceptibility to the AITDs development in the studied family. PMID:15497458

  6. Family Strengthening Writ Large: On becoming a Nation that Promotes Strong Families and Successful Youth. Policy Brief No. 24

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Submission, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Culture and systemic change are paramount to achieving significant and long-lasting gains in child and youth wellbeing and, in time, securing the future of our nation. This brief, based on a high-level synthesis of eight years of experience and research in place-based family strengthening, makes the case for a national transformation to a society…

  7. A second family with autosomal recessive spondylometaphyseal dysplasia and early death.

    PubMed

    Mégarbané, André; Mehawej, Cybel; El Zahr, Amir; Haddad, Soha; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2014-04-01

    We report on a consanguineous Lebanese family in which two sibs had pre- and post-natal growth retardation, developmental delay, large anterior fontanel, prominent forehead, low-set ears, depressed nasal bridge, short nose, anteverted nares, increased nasal width, prominent abdomen, and short limbs. Radiographs disclosed the presence of wormian bones, platyspondyly, decreased interpedicular distance at the lumbar vertebrae, square iliac bones, horizontal acetabula, trident acetabula, hypoplastic ischia, partial agenesis of the sacrum, ribs with cupped ends, short long bones with abnormal modeling, slight widening of the distal femoral metaphyses, and delayed epiphyseal ossification. Both sibs had a severe cardiomegaly and died at around 24 months from a heart failure. Differential diagnosis suggests that this is a second family presenting a newly described early lethal chondrodysplasia first reported by [Mégarbané et al. (2008); Am J Med Genet Part A 146A:2916-2919]. PMID:24458487

  8. Novel mutation of GLRA1 in Omani families with hyperekplexia and mild mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Al-Futaisi, Amna Mohammed; Al-Kindi, Mohammed Nasser; Al-Mawali, Al-Mundher; Koul, Roshan Lal; Al-Adawi, Samir; Al-Yahyaee, Said Ali

    2012-02-01

    Hyperekplexia is characterized by neonatal hypertonia and exaggerated startle reflex in response to loud noise or tactile stimuli. Mutations in patients with hyperekplexia were evident in several genes encoding proteins involved in glycinergic neurotransmission, i.e., glycine receptor ? and ? subunits, collybistin, gephyrin, and glycine transporter 2. We clinically and genetically characterized two large, unrelated consanguineous families with hyperekplexia. Affected members of the two families manifested hyperekplexia with mild mental retardation. Patients exhibited a novel homozygote c.593G>C missense mutation in GLRA1, resulting in amino acid substitution p.W170S in the corresponding mature glycine receptor ?1 subunit. This mutation was absent in 400 randomly selected chromosomes in the same population. In conclusion, a novel p.W170S mutation in the extracellular ligand binding domain of glycine receptor ?1 subunit was detected in patients with hyperekplexia and mild mental retardation. PMID:22264702

  9. Family 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    (ADJFAT) and actual(ACTFAT)), intramuscular fat (MARB), and Warner-Bratzler shear force tenderness (WBSF). Family types with a greater proportion of Bos indicus in the sire in relation to the amount in the dam (F1 x A and B x F1) averaged longer GL... between males and females. Further examination within each sex showed a difference between male reciprocals that was two times that of females. iv Calves with a higher percentage of Bos indicus in the sire compared to the proportion in the dam showed...

  10. Birth prevalence of non-syndromic orofacial clefts in Saudi Arabia and the effects of parental consanguinity

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Heba J.; Innes, Nicola P.; Sallout, Bahauddin I.; Alamoudi, Najlaa M.; Hamdan, Mustafa A.; Alhamlan, Nasir; Al-Khozami, Amaal I.; Abdulhameed, Fatma D.; Al-Aama, Jumana Y.; Mossey, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the characteristics and prevalence of non-syndromic orofacial clefting (NSOFC) and assess the effects of parental consanguinity on NSOFC phenotypes in the 3 main cities of Saudi Arabia. Methods: All infants (114,035) born at 3 referral centers in Riyadh, and 6 hospitals in Jeddah and Madinah between January 2010 and December 2011 were screened. The NSOFC cases (n=133) were identified and data was collected through clinical examination and records, and information on consanguinity through parent interviews. The diagnosis was confirmed by reviewing medical records and contacting the infants’ pediatricians. Control infants (n=233) matched for gender and born in the same hospitals during the same period, were selected. Results: The prevalence of NSOFC was 1.07/1000 births in Riyadh, and 1.17/1000 births overall; cleft lip (CL) was 0.47/1000 births, cleft lip and palate (CLP) was 0.42/1000 births, and cleft palate (CP) was 0.28/1000 births. Cleft palate was significantly associated with consanguinity (p=0.047, odds ratio: 2.5, 95% confidence interval: 1 to 6.46), particularly for first cousin marriages. Conclusion: The birth prevalence of NSOFC in Riyadh alone, and in the 3 main cities of Saudi Arabia were marginally lower than the mean global prevalence. While birth prevalence for CLP was comparable to global figures, the CL:CLP ratio was high, and only CP was significantly associated with consanguinity. PMID:26318465

  11. Intense paramagnon excitations in a large family of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Tacon, Mathieu

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by the search for the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity, an intense research effort has been focused on the evolution of the spin excitation spectrum upon doping from the antiferromagnetic insulating to the superconducting states of the cuprates. Because of technical limitations, however, the experimental investigation of doped cuprates has been largely focused on excitations with energies <=100 meV in a small range of momentum space [1]. Here we take advantage of the recent developments of high-resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering [2,3] to show that a large family of superconductors, encompassing the model compounds YBa2Cu4O8 and YBa2Cu3O7, exhibits damped spin excitations - or paramagnons - with dispersions and spectral weights closely similar to those of magnons in undoped, antiferromagnetically ordered cuprates over much of the Brillouin zone. The results are in excellent agreement with the spin excitations obtained by exact diagonalization of the t-J Hamiltonian on finite-sized clusters. A numerical solution of the Eliashberg equations based on the experimental spin excitation spectrum of YBa2Cu3O7 reproduces its superconducting transition temperature Tc within a factor of two. The discovery of a well-defined, surprisingly simple spin excitation branch over a wide range of doping levels thus strongly supports magnetic Cooper pairing models for the cuprates [4]. [4pt] [1] M. Fujita et al. arXiv/condmat:1108.4431[0pt] [2] G. Ghiringhelli et al., Review of Scientific Instruments, 77, (2006).[0pt] [3] L. Braicovich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 104, 077002 (2010).[0pt] [4] M. Le Tacon et al., Nature Physics 7, 725 (2011).

  12. Hyperekplexia in Kurdish families: a possible GLRA1 founder mutation.

    PubMed

    Sirén, A; Legros, B; Chahine, L; Misson, J-P; Pandolfo, M

    2006-07-11

    Autosomal recessive hyperekplexia is due to loss-of-function mutations in the GLRA1 gene. The authors describe six patients from two consanguineous families with a homozygous deletion of the first seven GLRA1 exons and provide evidence of a founder effect in Kurds from Turkey. Hyperekplexia may be misdiagnosed as epilepsy. PMID:16832093

  13. By: Leif Karlsson, ESAB AB, Gothenburg. The large and steadily growing family of stainless steels can offer unique combina-

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    By: Leif Karlsson, ESAB AB, Gothenburg. The large and steadily growing family of stainless steels into an increasing number of applications. This review briefly summarises the history of stainless steel development and discusses selected weldability aspects. Examples from ESAB's long history of stainless steel welding

  14. Chemosensory systems employ large families of genes whose products receive and process diverse chemical signals

    E-print Network

    Vogt, Richard G.

    . In insects these gene families include odorant binding proteins (OBPs), odor receptors (ORs) and odor et al., 1991a, 1999; Pelosi and Maida, 1995; Steinbrecht, 1999; Rogers et al., 1999). Insect OBPs degrading enzymes (ODEs). Moderate-sized families of homologous but divergent OBPs have been identified

  15. Characterization of the p16 gene in the mouse: Evidence for a large gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, J.W.; Giendening, J.M.; Flores, J.F.

    1994-09-01

    The p16 gene product is an inhibitor of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4)/cyclin D complex. When uninhibited, the CDK4/cyclin D complex participates in the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein and renders it inactive. Upon inactivation of the RB protein, transition from the G{sub 1} to the S phase of mitosis occurs and results in cellular proliferation. Thus, p16 is presumed to act as a negative regulator of cell growth by preventing the phosphorylation, and thereby subsequent inactivation, of RB by CDK4/cyclin D. Recently, the p16 gene (also known as the multiple tumor suppressor 1 (MTS1) gene) has been mapped to chromosome 9p21 and found to be deleted or mutated in a number of tumor cell lines. These findings support the role of p16 as a growth inhibitor or tumor suppressor gene and suggest that the mutation of this gene may have global implications in carcinogenesis. We have chosen to test the functional significance of p16 mutations in vivo through the generation of a mouse mutant for p16. In preparation for this undertaking, eight apparently independent (as judged by restriction enzyme digestion and differential hybridization) mouse genomic embryonic stem cell clones have been identified using exon 2 from the human p16 gene as a probe. The identification of these multiple nonoverlapping clones was not entirely surprising since the reduced stringency hybridization of a zoo blot with the same probe also revealed 10-15 positive EcoRI fragments in all species tested, including human, monkey, cow, dog, cat, rabbit, hamster, mouse, chicken and D. melanogaster. Taken together, these findings suggest that the p16 gene is a member of a large gene family. The location of these genomic clones, as well as their potential expression in the mouse, is currently under investigation.

  16. Copy number variations in endoglin locus: mapping of large deletions in Spanish families with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia type 1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome (HHT), also known as the Rendu–Osler-Weber syndrome is a multiorganic vascular disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Diagnostic clinical criteria include: epistaxis, telangiectases in mucocutaneous and gastrointestinal sites, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) most commonly found in pulmonary, hepatic and cerebral circulations, and familial inheritance. HHT is transmitted in 90% of the cases as an autosomal dominant condition due to mutations in either endoglin (ENG), or activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ACVRL1/ALK1) genes (HHT type 1 and 2, respectively). Methods We have carried out a genetic analysis of four independent Spanish families with HHT clinical criteria, which has permitted the identification of new large deletions in ENG. These mutations were first detected using the MLPA technique and subsequently, the deletion breakpoints were mapped using a customized copy number variation (CNV) microarray. The array was designed to cover the ENG gene and surrounding areas. Results All tested families carried large deletions ranging from 3-kb to 100-kb, involving the ENG gene promoter, several ENG exons, and the two downstream genes FGSH and CDK9. Interestingly, common breakpoints coincident with Alu repetitive sequences were found among these families. Conclusions The systematic hybridization of DNA from HHT families, with deletions or duplications, to custom designed microarrays, could allow the mapping of breakpoints, coincident with repetitive Alu sequences that might act as “hot spots” in the development of chromosomal anomalies. PMID:24267784

  17. A FAMILY OF 6-TO-4-BIT S-BOXES WITH LARGE LINEAR BRANCH NUMBER

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    are actually talking about a family of 266! · 244! S-boxes when looking at the high level conditions listed). In this text, we do not treat properties like most of the DES design properties in Coppersmith (1994

  18. A large duplication in LIPH underlies autosomal recessive hypotrichosis simplex in four Middle Eastern families.

    PubMed

    Nahum, Sagi; Pasternack, Sandra M; Pforr, Jana; Indelman, Margarita; Wollnik, Bernd; Bergman, Reuven; Nöthen, Markus M; König, Arne; Khamaysi, Ziyad; Betz, Regina C; Sprecher, Eli

    2009-06-01

    Autosomal recessive hypotrichosis simplex (ARHS) manifests with paucity of hair appearing during early childhood. We assessed four affected families. We initially genotyped three of these families for a panel of microsatellite markers spanning all ARHS-associated loci and obtained data suggesting linkage to 3q27, encompassing LIPH, which had previously been shown to be associated with ARHS. Accordingly, a homozygous duplication mutation in exon 2 of this gene (c.280_369dup; p.Gly94_Lys123dup) was found to segregate with the disease in all the families. Through the identification of the first duplication mutation in the human LIPH gene, we provide further evidence supporting a role for the phospholipase signalling pathway in hair growth and differentiation. PMID:18820939

  19. On the genetics of mandibular prognathism: analysis of large European noble families.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, G; Wienker, T F; Sander, H

    1993-01-01

    Mandibular prognathism is assumed to be a polygenic trait in the vast majority of cases. In a few families, this phenotype and perhaps a syndrome with a broader spectrum of facial anomalies seems to be determined by a single dominant gene of very low frequency (McKusick No *176700). The phenotype is known to have occurred independently in several European noble families. We constructed a pedigree comprising 13 of these families with 409 members in 23 generations in which mandibular prognathism has been segregating. Obviously, the presumed dominant gene is not fully penetrant in the heterozygous state. Pedigree analysis using the Elston-Stewart algorithm yields a maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) of p = 0.955 (SE 0.038) of the penetrance parameter. Images PMID:8445614

  20. Screening of 38 genes identifies mutations in 62% of families with nonsyndromic deafness in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Duman, Duygu; Sirmaci, Asli; Cengiz, F Basak; Ozdag, Hilal; Tekin, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    More than 60% of prelingual deafness is genetic in origin, and of these up to 95% are monogenic autosomal recessive traits. Causal mutations have been identified in 1 of 38 different genes in a subset of patients with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive deafness. In this study, we screened 49 unrelated Turkish families with at least three affected children born to consanguineous parents. Probands from all families were negative for mutations in the GJB2 gene, two large deletions in the GJB6 gene, and the 1555A>G substitution in the mitochondrial DNA MTRNR1 gene. Each family was subsequently screened via autozygosity mapping with genomewide single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays. If the phenotype cosegregated with a haplotype flanking one of the 38 genes, mutation analysis of the gene was performed. We identified 22 different autozygous mutations in 11 genes, other than GJB2, in 26 of 49 families, which overall explains deafness in 62% of families. Relative frequencies of genes following GJB2 were MYO15A (9.9%), TMIE (6.6%), TMC1 (6.6%), OTOF (5.0%), CDH23 (3.3%), MYO7A (3.3%), SLC26A4 (1.7%), PCDH15 (1.7%), LRTOMT (1.7%), SERPINB6 (1.7%), and TMPRSS3 (1.7%). Nineteen of 22 mutations are reported for the first time in this study. Unknown rare genes for deafness appear to be present in the remaining 23 families. PMID:21117948

  1. Association between Secondary and Primary Sjögren's Syndrome in a Large Collection of Lupus Families

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Rachna; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Koelsch, Kristi A.; Kurien, Biji T.; Scofield, R. Hal

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) share clinical and immunogenetic features and may occur together. We undertook this study to determine the risk of primary SS among SLE-unaffected relatives of SLE patients and whether or not primary and secondary SS tended to occur in the same families. Methods. We collected clinical and serological data on 2694 SLE patients, 7390 SLE-unaffected relatives of the SLE patients, and 1470 matched controls. Results. Of the 2694 subjects with SLE, 548 had secondary SS, while 71 of their 7390 SLE-unaffected relatives had primary SS. None of the 1470 controls had SS as defined herein (p = 5 × 10?5 compared to SLE-unaffected relatives). Of the 71 SLE-unaffected relatives with primary SS, 18 (25.3%) had an SLE-affected family member with secondary SS, while only 530 of the 7319 (7.2%) SLE-unaffected relatives without SS did so (p = 1 × 10?8). Conclusion. Among families identified for the presence of SLE, primary and secondary SS tend to occur within the same families. These results highlight the commonalities between these two forms of SS, which in fact correspond to the same disease. PMID:26246904

  2. Association between Secondary and Primary Sjögren's Syndrome in a Large Collection of Lupus Families.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rachna; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Koelsch, Kristi A; Kurien, Biji T; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) share clinical and immunogenetic features and may occur together. We undertook this study to determine the risk of primary SS among SLE-unaffected relatives of SLE patients and whether or not primary and secondary SS tended to occur in the same families. Methods. We collected clinical and serological data on 2694 SLE patients, 7390 SLE-unaffected relatives of the SLE patients, and 1470 matched controls. Results. Of the 2694 subjects with SLE, 548 had secondary SS, while 71 of their 7390 SLE-unaffected relatives had primary SS. None of the 1470 controls had SS as defined herein (p = 5 × 10(-5) compared to SLE-unaffected relatives). Of the 71 SLE-unaffected relatives with primary SS, 18 (25.3%) had an SLE-affected family member with secondary SS, while only 530 of the 7319 (7.2%) SLE-unaffected relatives without SS did so (p = 1 × 10(-8)). Conclusion. Among families identified for the presence of SLE, primary and secondary SS tend to occur within the same families. These results highlight the commonalities between these two forms of SS, which in fact correspond to the same disease. PMID:26246904

  3. Assessment of amyloid ?-protein precursor gene mutations in a large set of familial and sporadic Alzheimer disease cases

    PubMed Central

    Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Vaula, Giovanna; Romano, Donna M.; Mortilla, Marzia; Huang, Tricia L.; Tupler, Rossella G.; Wasco, Wilma; Hyman, Bradley T.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Jenkins, Barbara J.; Kalaitsidaki, Marianna; Warren, Andrew C.; McInnis, Melvin C.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Karlinsky, Harry; Percy, Maire E.; Connor, Linda; Growdon, John; Crapper-McIachlan, Donald R.; Gusella, James F.; George-Hyslop, Peter H. St

    1992-01-01

    A genetic locus associated with familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and a candidate gene, APP, encoding the amyloid protein precursor have both been assigned previously to chromosome 21, and, in a few FAD families, mutations of APP have been detected. However, obligate crossovers between APP and FAD have also been reported in several FAD pedigrees, including FAD4, a large kindred showing highly suggestive evidence for linkage of the disorder to chromosome 21. In case the apparent APP crossover in FAD4 actually represented an intragenic recombination event or segregation of different mutations in different family branches, we have performed a more detailed assessment of APP as a candidate gene in this family. The entire coding region of the APP gene was sequenced for FAD4 and for FAD1, a second large kindred. No mutations were found, indicating that, in at least one chromosome 21–linked FAD pedigree, the gene defect is not accounted for by a mutation in the known coding region of the APP gene. A total of 25 well-characterized early- and late-onset FAD pedigrees were typed for genetic linkage to APP, to assess the percentage of FAD families predicted to carry mutations in the APP gene. None of the FAD families yielded positive lod scores at a recombination fraction of 0.0. To estimate the overall prevalence of FAD-associated mutations in the ?A4 domain of APP, we sequenced exons 16 and 17 in 30 (20 early- and 10 late-onset) FAD kindreds and in 11 sporadic AD cases, and we screened 56 FAD kindreds and 81 cases of sporadic AD for the presence of the originally reported FAD-associated mutation, APP717 Val?Ile (by BclI digestion). No APP gene mutations were found in any of the FAD families or sporadic-AD samples examined in this study, suggesting that the mutations in exons 16 and 17 are a rare cause of FAD. Overall, these data suggest that APP gene mutations account for a very small portion of FAD. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:1642228

  4. Heritability of X chromosome-inactivation phenotype in a large family

    SciTech Connect

    Naumova, A.K.; Sapienca, C.; Plenge, R.M.; Willard, H.F.

    1996-06-01

    One of the two X chromosomes in each somatic cell of normal human females becomes inactivated very early in embryonic development. Although the inactivation of an X chromosome in any particular somatic cell of the embryonic lineage is thought to be a stochastic and epigenetic event, a strong genetic influence on this process has been described in the mouse. We have attempted to uncover evidence for genetic control of X-chromosome inactivation in the human by examining X-chromosome inactivation patterns in 255 females from 36 three-generation pedigrees, to determine whether this quantitative character exhibits evidence of heritability. We have found one family in which all seven daughters of one male and the mother of this male have highly skewed patterns of X-chromosome inactivation, suggesting strongly that this quantitative character is controlled by one or more X-linked genes in some families. 48 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Age distribution of human gene families shows significant roles of both large- and small-scale duplications in vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xun; Wang, Yufeng; Gu, Jianying

    2002-06-01

    The classical (two-round) hypothesis of vertebrate genome duplication proposes two successive whole-genome duplication(s) (polyploidizations) predating the origin of fishes, a view now being seriously challenged. As the debate largely concerns the relative merits of the 'big-bang mode' theory (large-scale duplication) and the 'continuous mode' theory (constant creation by small-scale duplications), we tested whether a significant proportion of paralogous genes in the contemporary human genome was indeed generated in the early stage of vertebrate evolution. After an extensive search of major databases, we dated 1,739 gene duplication events from the phylogenetic analysis of 749 vertebrate gene families. We found a pattern characterized by two waves (I, II) and an ancient component. Wave I represents a recent gene family expansion by tandem or segmental duplications, whereas wave II, a rapid paralogous gene increase in the early stage of vertebrate evolution, supports the idea of genome duplication(s) (the big-bang mode). Further analysis indicated that large- and small-scale gene duplications both make a significant contribution during the early stage of vertebrate evolution to build the current hierarchy of the human proteome. PMID:12032571

  6. Large distribution and high sequence identity of a Copia-type retrotransposon in angiosperm families.

    PubMed

    Dias, Elaine Silva; Hatt, Clémence; Hamon, Serge; Hamon, Perla; Rigoreau, Michel; Crouzillat, Dominique; Carareto, Claudia Marcia Aparecida; de Kochko, Alexandre; Guyot, Romain

    2015-09-01

    Retrotransposons are the main component of plant genomes. Recent studies have revealed the complexity of their evolutionary dynamics. Here, we have identified Copia25 in Coffea canephora, a new plant retrotransposon belonging to the Ty1-Copia superfamily. In the Coffea genomes analyzed, Copia25 is present in relatively low copy numbers and transcribed. Similarity sequence searches and PCR analyses show that this retrotransposon with LTRs (Long Terminal Repeats) is widely distributed among the Rubiaceae family and that it is also present in other distantly related species belonging to Asterids, Rosids and monocots. A particular situation is the high sequence identity found between the Copia25 sequences of Musa, a monocot, and Ixora, a dicot species (Rubiaceae). Our results reveal the complexity of the evolutionary dynamics of the ancient element Copia25 in angiosperm, involving several processes including sequence conservation, rapid turnover, stochastic losses and horizontal transfer. PMID:26245353

  7. Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a large pericentric X chromosome inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; Allinson, P.S.

    1996-06-01

    It has been demonstrated in animal studies that, in animals heterozygous for pericentric chromosomal inversions, loop formation is greatly reduced during meiosis. This results in absence of recombination within the inverted segment, with recombination seen only outside the inversion. A recent study in yeast has shown that telomeres, rather than centromeres, lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may be involved in promoting recombination. We studied by cytogenetic analysis and DNA polymorphisms the nature of meiotic recombination in a three-generation family with a large pericentric X chromosome inversion, inv(X)(p21.1q26), in which Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was cosegregating with the inversion. On DNA analysis there was no evidence of meiotic recombination between the inverted and normal X chromosomes in the inverted segment. Recombination was seen at the telomeric regions, Xp22 and Xq27-28. No deletion or point mutation was found on analysis of the DMD gene. On the basis of the FISH results, we believe that the X inversion is the mutation responsible for DMD in this family. Our results indicate that (1) pericentric X chromosome inversions result in reduction of recombination between the normal and inverted X chromosomes; (2) meiotic X chromosome pairing in these individuals is likely initiated at the telomeres; and (3) in this family DMD is caused by the pericentric inversion. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The contribution of large genomic deletions at the CDKN2A locus to the burden of familial melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Lesueur, F; de Lichy, M; Barrois, M; Durand, G; Bombled, J; Avril, M-F; Chompret, A; Boitier, F; Lenoir, G M; Bressac-de Paillerets, B

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in two genes encoding cell cycle regulatory proteins have been shown to cause familial cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). About 20% of melanoma-prone families bear a point mutation in the CDKN2A locus at 9p21, which encodes two unrelated proteins, p16INK4a and p14ARF. Rare mutations in CDK4 have also been linked to the disease. Although the CDKN2A gene has been shown to be the major melanoma predisposing gene, there remains a significant proportion of melanoma kindreds linked to 9p21 in which germline mutations of CDKN2A have not been identified through direct exon sequencing. The purpose of this study was to assess the contribution of large rearrangements in CDKN2A to the disease in melanoma-prone families using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. We examined 214 patients from independent pedigrees with at least two CMM cases. All had been tested for CDKN2A and CDK4 point mutation, and 47 were found positive. Among the remaining 167 negative patients, one carried a novel genomic deletion of CDKN2A exon 2. Overall, genomic deletions represented 2.1% of total mutations in this series (1 of 48), confirming that they explain a very small proportion of CMM susceptibility. In addition, we excluded a new gene on 9p21, KLHL9, as being a major CMM gene. PMID:18612309

  9. The contribution of large genomic deletions at the CDKN2A locus to the burden of familial melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lesueur, F; de Lichy, M; Barrois, M; Durand, G; Bombled, J; Avril, M-F; Chompret, A; Boitier, F; Lenoir, G M; Bressac-de Paillerets, B; Baccard, Monique; Bachollet, Bertrand; Berthet, Pascaline; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonnetblanc, Jean-Marie; Caron, Olivier; Chevrant-Breton, Jacqueline; Cuny, Jean-François; Dalle, Stéphane; Delaunay, Michèle; Demange, Liliane; De Quatrebarbes, Julie; Doré, Jean-François; Frénay, Marc; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gesta, Paul; Giraud, Sophie; Gorry, Philippe; Grange, Florent; Green, Andrew; Huiart, Laetitia; Janin, Nicolas; Joly, Pascal; Kérob, Delphine; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Limacher, Jean-Marc; Longy, Michel; Mansard, Sandrine; Marrou, Karine; Martin-Denavit, Tanguy; Mateus, Christine; Maubec, Eve; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; Orlandini, Vincent; Pujol, Pascal; Sassolas, Bruno; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Luc; Vabres, Pierre; Venat, Laurence; Wierzbicka, Ewa; Zattara, Hélène

    2008-07-22

    Mutations in two genes encoding cell cycle regulatory proteins have been shown to cause familial cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). About 20% of melanoma-prone families bear a point mutation in the CDKN2A locus at 9p21, which encodes two unrelated proteins, p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF). Rare mutations in CDK4 have also been linked to the disease. Although the CDKN2A gene has been shown to be the major melanoma predisposing gene, there remains a significant proportion of melanoma kindreds linked to 9p21 in which germline mutations of CDKN2A have not been identified through direct exon sequencing. The purpose of this study was to assess the contribution of large rearrangements in CDKN2A to the disease in melanoma-prone families using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. We examined 214 patients from independent pedigrees with at least two CMM cases. All had been tested for CDKN2A and CDK4 point mutation, and 47 were found positive. Among the remaining 167 negative patients, one carried a novel genomic deletion of CDKN2A exon 2. Overall, genomic deletions represented 2.1% of total mutations in this series (1 of 48), confirming that they explain a very small proportion of CMM susceptibility. In addition, we excluded a new gene on 9p21, KLHL9, as being a major CMM gene. PMID:18612309

  10. Exome Sequencing of 75 Individuals from Multiply Affected Coeliac Families and Large Scale Resequencing Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Vanisha; Bockett, Nicholas A.; Levine, Adam P.; Mirza, Muddassar M.; Hunt, Karen A.; Ciclitira, Paul J.; Hummerich, Holger; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Simpson, Michael A.; Plagnol, Vincent; van Heel, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CeD) is a highly heritable common autoimmune disease involving chronic small intestinal inflammation in response to dietary wheat. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, and 40 newer regions identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS) and dense fine mapping, account for ?40% of the disease heritability. We hypothesized that in pedigrees with multiple individuals with CeD rare [minor allele frequency (MAF) <0.5%] mutations of larger effect size (odds ratios of ? 2–5) might exist. We sequenced the exomes of 75 coeliac individuals of European ancestry from 55 multiply affected families. We selected interesting variants and genes for further follow up using a combination of: an assessment of shared variants between related subjects, a model-free linkage test, and gene burden tests for multiple, potentially causal, variants. We next performed highly multiplexed amplicon resequencing of all RefSeq exons from 24 candidate genes selected on the basis of the exome sequencing data in 2,248 unrelated coeliac cases and 2,230 controls. 1,335 variants with a 99.9% genotyping call rate were observed in 4,478 samples, of which 939 were present in coding regions of 24 genes (Ti/Tv 2.99). 91.7% of coding variants were rare (MAF <0.5%) and 60% were novel. Gene burden tests performed on rare functional variants identified no significant associations (p<1×10?3) in the resequenced candidate genes. Our strategy of sequencing multiply affected families with deep follow up of candidate genes has not identified any new CeD risk mutations. PMID:25635822

  11. Five novel loci for inherited hearing loss mapped by SNP-based homozygosity profiles in Palestinian families.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Hashem; Walsh, Tom; Rayyan, Amal Abu; Lee, Ming K; Higgins, Jake; Dickel, Diane; Lewis, Kristen; Thompson, James; Baker, Carl; Nord, Alex S; Stray, Sunday; Gurwitz, David; Avraham, Karen B; King, Mary-Claire; Kanaan, Moien

    2010-04-01

    In communities with high rates of consanguinity and consequently high prevalence of recessive phenotypes, homozygosity mapping with SNP arrays is an effective approach for gene discovery. In 20 Palestinian kindreds with prelingual nonsyndromic hearing loss, we generated homozygosity profiles reflecting linkage to the phenotype. Family sizes ranged from small nuclear families with two affected children, one unaffected sibling, and parents to multigenerational kindreds with 12 affected relatives. By including unaffected parents and siblings and screening 250 K SNP arrays, even small nuclear families yielded informative profiles. In 14 families, we identified the allele responsible for hearing loss by screening a single candidate gene in the longest homozygous region. Novel alleles included missense, nonsense, and splice site mutations of CDH23, MYO7A, MYO15A, OTOF, PJVK, Pendrin/SLC26A4, TECTA, TMHS, and TMPRSS3, and a large genomic deletion of Otoancorin (OTOA). All point mutations were rare in the Palestinian population (zero carriers in 288 unrelated controls); the carrier frequency of the OTOA genomic deletion was 1%. In six families, we identified five genomic regions likely to harbor novel genes for human hearing loss on chromosomes 1p13.3 (DFNB82), 9p23-p21.2/p13.3-q21.13 (DFNB83), 12q14.3-q21.2 (DFNB84; two families), 14q23.1-q31.1, and 17p12-q11.2 (DFNB85). PMID:19888295

  12. Evolutionary expansion and divergence in a large family of primate-specific zinc finger transcription factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, A T; Huntley, S; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Baggott, D; Gordon, L; Stubbs, L

    2005-09-28

    Although most genes are conserved as one-to-one orthologs in different mammalian orders, certain gene families have evolved to comprise different numbers and types of protein-coding genes through independent series of gene duplications, divergence and gene loss in each evolutionary lineage. One such family encodes KRAB-zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF) genes, which are likely to function as transcriptional repressors. One KRAB-ZNF subfamily, the ZNF91 clade, has expanded specifically in primates to comprise more than 110 loci in the human genome, yielding large gene clusters in human chromosomes 19 and 7 and smaller clusters or isolated copies at other chromosomal locations. Although phylogenetic analysis indicates that many of these genes arose before the split between old world monkeys and new world monkeys, the ZNF91 subfamily has continued to expand and diversify throughout the evolution of apes and humans. The paralogous loci are distinguished by sequence divergence within their zinc finger arrays indicating a selection for proteins with different DNA binding specificities. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization data show that some of these ZNF genes can have tissue-specific expression patterns, however many KRAB-ZNFs that are near-ubiquitous could also be playing very specific roles in halting target pathways in all tissues except for a few, where the target is released by the absence of its repressor. The number of variant KRAB-ZNF proteins is increased not only because of the large number of loci, but also because many loci can produce multiple splice variants, which because of the modular structure of these genes may have separate and perhaps even conflicting regulatory roles. The lineage-specific duplication and rapid divergence of this family of transcription factor genes suggests a role in determining species-specific biological differences and the evolution of novel primate traits.

  13. Large plasmids of Escherichia coli and Salmonella encode highly diverse arrays of accessory genes on common replicon families.

    PubMed

    Williams, Laura E; Wireman, Joy; Hilliard, Valda C; Summers, Anne O

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids are important in evolution and adaptation of host bacteria, yet we lack a comprehensive picture of their own natural variation. We used replicon typing and RFLP analysis to assess diversity and distribution of plasmids in the ECOR, SARA, SARB and SARC reference collections of Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Plasmids, especially large (?30 kb) plasmids, are abundant in these collections. Host species and genotype clearly impact plasmid prevalence; plasmids are more abundant in ECOR than SAR, but, within ECOR, subgroup B2 strains have the fewest large plasmids. The majority of large plasmids have unique RFLP patterns, suggesting high variation, even within dominant replicon families IncF and IncI1. We found only four conserved plasmid types within ECOR, none of which are widely distributed. Within SAR, conserved plasmid types are primarily serovar-specific, including a pSLT-like plasmid in 13 Typhimurium strains. Conservation of pSLT contrasts with variability of other plasmids, suggesting evolution of serovar-specific virulence plasmids is distinct from that of most enterobacterial plasmids. We sequenced a conserved serovar Heidelberg plasmid but did not detect virulence or antibiotic resistance genes. Our data illustrate the high degree of natural variation in large plasmids of E. coli and Salmonella, even among plasmids sharing backbone genes. PMID:22939841

  14. Genome-Wide Linkage Analysis of Cardiovascular Disease Biomarkers in a Large, Multigenerational Family

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Elizabeth; Li, Yi-Ju; Thompson, Dana K.; Johnson, Jessica; Chen, Hsiang-Cheng; Nelson, Sarah; Haynes, Carol; Gregory, Simon G.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Shah, Svati H.

    2013-01-01

    Given the importance of cardiovascular disease (CVD) to public health and the demonstrated heritability of both disease status and its related risk factors, identifying the genetic variation underlying these susceptibilities is a critical step in understanding the pathogenesis of CVD and informing prevention and treatment strategies. Although one can look for genetic variation underlying susceptibility to CVD per se, it can be difficult to define the disease phenotype for such a qualitative analysis and CVD itself represents a convergence of diverse etiologic pathways. Alternatively, one can study the genetics of intermediate traits that are known risk factors for CVD, which can be measured quantitatively. Using the latter strategy, we have measured 21 cardiovascular-related biomarkers in an extended multigenerational pedigree, the CARRIAGE family (Carolinas Region Interaction of Aging, Genes, and Environment). These biomarkers belong to inflammatory and immune, connective tissue, lipid, and hemostasis pathways. Of these, 18 met our quality control standards. Using the pedigree and biomarker data, we have estimated the broad sense heritability (H2) of each biomarker (ranging from 0.09–0.56). A genome-wide panel of 6,015 SNPs was used subsequently to map these biomarkers as quantitative traits. Four showed noteworthy evidence for linkage in multipoint analysis (LOD score ? 2.6): paraoxonase (chromosome 8p11, 21), the chemokine RANTES (22q13.33), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3, 17p13.3), and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF, 8q22.1). Identifying the causal variation underlying each linkage score will help to unravel the genetic architecture of these quantitative traits and, by extension, the genetic architecture of cardiovascular risk. PMID:23936524

  15. Consanguinity and founder effect for Gaucher disease mutation G377S in a population from Tabuleiro do Norte, Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chaves, R G; Pereira, L da Veiga; de Araújo, F T; Rozenberg, R; Carvalho, M D F; Coelho, J C; Michelin-Tirelli, K; Chaves, M de Freitas; Cavalcanti, G B

    2015-10-01

    Gaucher's disease (GD) is caused by a ?-glucocerebrosidase deficiency, leading to the accumulation of glucocerebroside in the reticuloendothelial system. The prevalence of GD in Tabuleiro do Norte (TN) (1:4000) is the highest in Brazil. The purpose of this study was to present evidence of consanguinity and founder effect for the G377S mutation (c.1246G>A) among GD patients in TN based on enzyme, molecular and genealogical studies. Between March 2009 and December 2010, 131 subjects at risk for GD (GC in dried blood ?2.19?nmol/h/ml) and 5 confirmed GD patients from the same community were submitted for molecular analysis to characterize the genetic profile of the population. Based on the enzymatic and molecular analysis, the subjects were classified into three categories: affected (n?=?5), carrier (n?=?20) and non-carrier (n?=?111). All carriers were (G377S/wt). Affected subjects were homozygous (G377S/G377S). The identification of a single mutation in carriers and homozygotes from different generations, the history of the community and the genealogy study suggest that the high prevalence of GD in this population may be due to a combination of consanguinity and founder effect for the G377S mutation. PMID:25287185

  16. MPI-PHYLIP: Parallelizing Computationally Intensive Phylogenetic Analysis Routines for the Analysis of Large Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Ropelewski, Alexander J.; Nicholas, Hugh B.; Gonzalez Mendez, Ricardo R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic study of protein sequences provides unique and valuable insights into the molecular and genetic basis of important medical and epidemiological problems as well as insights about the origins and development of physiological features in present day organisms. Consensus phylogenies based on the bootstrap and other resampling methods play a crucial part in analyzing the robustness of the trees produced for these analyses. Methodology Our focus was to increase the number of bootstrap replications that can be performed on large protein datasets using the maximum parsimony, distance matrix, and maximum likelihood methods. We have modified the PHYLIP package using MPI to enable large-scale phylogenetic study of protein sequences, using a statistically robust number of bootstrapped datasets, to be performed in a moderate amount of time. This paper discusses the methodology used to parallelize the PHYLIP programs and reports the performance of the parallel PHYLIP programs that are relevant to the study of protein evolution on several protein datasets. Conclusions Calculations that currently take a few days on a state of the art desktop workstation are reduced to calculations that can be performed over lunchtime on a modern parallel computer. Of the three protein methods tested, the maximum likelihood method scales the best, followed by the distance method, and then the maximum parsimony method. However, the maximum likelihood method requires significant memory resources, which limits its application to more moderately sized protein datasets. PMID:21085574

  17. Improved white spruce (Picea glauca) genome assemblies and annotation of large gene families of conifer terpenoid and phenolic defense metabolism.

    PubMed

    Warren, René L; Keeling, Christopher I; Yuen, Macaire Man Saint; Raymond, Anthony; Taylor, Greg A; Vandervalk, Benjamin P; Mohamadi, Hamid; Paulino, Daniel; Chiu, Readman; Jackman, Shaun D; Robertson, Gordon; Yang, Chen; Boyle, Brian; Hoffmann, Margarete; Weigel, Detlef; Nelson, David R; Ritland, Carol; Isabel, Nathalie; Jaquish, Barry; Yanchuk, Alvin; Bousquet, Jean; Jones, Steven J M; MacKay, John; Birol, Inanc; Bohlmann, Joerg

    2015-07-01

    White spruce (Picea glauca), a gymnosperm tree, has been established as one of the models for conifer genomics. We describe the draft genome assemblies of two white spruce genotypes, PG29 and WS77111, innovative tools for the assembly of very large genomes, and the conifer genomics resources developed in this process. The two white spruce genotypes originate from distant geographic regions of western (PG29) and eastern (WS77111) North America, and represent elite trees in two Canadian tree-breeding programs. We present an update (V3 and V4) for a previously reported PG29 V2 draft genome assembly and introduce a second white spruce genome assembly for genotype WS77111. Assemblies of the PG29 and WS77111 genomes confirm the reconstructed white spruce genome size in the 20 Gbp range, and show broad synteny. Using the PG29 V3 assembly and additional white spruce genomics and transcriptomics resources, we performed MAKER-P annotation and meticulous expert annotation of very large gene families of conifer defense metabolism, the terpene synthases and cytochrome P450s. We also comprehensively annotated the white spruce mevalonate, methylerythritol phosphate and phenylpropanoid pathways. These analyses highlighted the large extent of gene and pseudogene duplications in a conifer genome, in particular for genes of secondary (i.e. specialized) metabolism, and the potential for gain and loss of function for defense and adaptation. PMID:26017574

  18. A Novel Locus Harbouring a Functional CD164 Nonsense Mutation Identified in a Large Danish Family with Nonsyndromic Hearing Impairment.

    PubMed

    Nyegaard, Mette; Rendtorff, Nanna D; Nielsen, Morten S; Corydon, Thomas J; Demontis, Ditte; Starnawska, Anna; Hedemand, Anne; Buniello, Annalisa; Niola, Francesco; Overgaard, Michael T; Leal, Suzanne M; Ahmad, Wasim; Wikman, Friedrik P; Petersen, Kirsten B; Crüger, Dorthe G; Oostrik, Jaap; Kremer, Hannie; Tommerup, Niels; Frödin, Morten; Steel, Karen P; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Børglum, Anders D

    2015-07-01

    Nonsyndromic hearing impairment (NSHI) is a highly heterogeneous condition with more than eighty known causative genes. However, in the clinical setting, a large number of NSHI families have unexplained etiology, suggesting that there are many more genes to be identified. In this study we used SNP-based linkage analysis and follow up microsatellite markers to identify a novel locus (DFNA66) on chromosome 6q15-21 (LOD 5.1) in a large Danish family with dominantly inherited NSHI. By locus specific capture and next-generation sequencing, we identified a c.574C>T heterozygous nonsense mutation (p.R192*) in CD164. This gene encodes a 197 amino acid transmembrane sialomucin (known as endolyn, MUC-24 or CD164), which is widely expressed and involved in cell adhesion and migration. The mutation segregated with the phenotype and was absent in 1200 Danish control individuals and in databases with whole-genome and exome sequence data. The predicted effect of the mutation was a truncation of the last six C-terminal residues of the cytoplasmic tail of CD164, including a highly conserved canonical sorting motif (YXX?). In whole blood from an affected individual, we found by RT-PCR both the wild-type and the mutated transcript suggesting that the mutant transcript escapes nonsense mediated decay. Functional studies in HEK cells demonstrated that the truncated protein was almost completely retained on the plasma cell membrane in contrast to the wild-type protein, which targeted primarily to the endo-lysosomal compartments, implicating failed endocytosis as a possible disease mechanism. In the mouse ear, we found CD164 expressed in the inner and outer hair cells of the organ of Corti, as well as in other locations in the cochlear duct. In conclusion, we have identified a new DFNA locus located on chromosome 6q15-21 and implicated CD164 as a novel gene for hearing impairment. PMID:26197441

  19. The Crystal Structure of Bacteriophage HK97 gp6: Defining a Large Family of Head?Tail Connector Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, Lia; Lam, Robert; Tuite, Ashleigh; Baker, Lindsay A.; Sadowski, Paul D.; Radford, Devon R.; Rubinstein, John L.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Chirgadze, Nickolay; Maxwell, Karen L.; Davidson, Alan R.

    2010-08-17

    The final step in the morphogenesis of long-tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages is the joining of the DNA-filled head to the tail. The connector is a specialized structure of the head that serves as the interface for tail attachment and the point of egress for DNA from the head during infection. Here, we report the determination of a 2.1 {angstrom} crystal structure of gp6 of bacteriophage HK97. Through structural comparisons, functional studies, and bioinformatic analysis, gp6 has been determined to be a component of the connector of phage HK97 that is evolutionarily related to gp15, a well-characterized connector component of bacteriophage SPP1. Whereas the structure of gp15 was solved in a monomeric form, gp6 crystallized as an oligomeric ring with the dimensions expected for a connector protein. Although this ring is composed of 13 subunits, which does not match the symmetry of the connector within the phage, sequence conservation and modeling of this structure into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the SPP1 connector indicate that this oligomeric structure represents the arrangement of gp6 subunits within the mature phage particle. Through sequence searches and genomic position analysis, we determined that gp6 is a member of a large family of connector proteins that are present in long-tailed phages. We have also identified gp7 of HK97 as a homologue of gp16 of phage SPP1, which is the second component of the connector of this phage. These proteins are members of another large protein family involved in connector assembly.

  20. New Family of Quantum Spin Hall Insulators in Two-dimensional Transition-Metal Halide with Large Nontrivial Band Gaps.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liujiang; Kou, Liangzhi; Sun, Yan; Felser, Claudia; Hu, Feiming; Shan, Guangcun; Smith, Sean C; Yan, Binghai; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are promising for achieving dissipationless transport devices due to the robust gapless states inside the insulating bulk gap. However, currently realized two-dimensional (2D) TIs, quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulators, suffer from ultrahigh vacuum and extremely low temperature. Thus, seeking for desirable QSH insulators with high feasibility of experimental preparation and large nontrivial gap is of great importance for wide applications in spintronics. On the basis of the first-principles calculations, we predict a novel family of 2D QSH insulators in transition-metal halide MX (M = Zr, Hf; X = Cl, Br, and I) monolayers, especially, which is the first case based on transition-metal halide-based QSH insulators. MX family has the large nontrivial gaps of 0.12-0.4 eV, comparable with bismuth (111) bilayer (0.2 eV), stanene (0.3 eV), and larger than ZrTe5 (0.1 eV) monolayers and graphene-based sandwiched heterstructures (30-70 meV). Their corresponding 3D bulk materials are weak topological insulators from stacking QSH layers, and some of bulk compounds have already been synthesized in experiment. The mechanism for 2D QSH effect in this system originates from a novel d-d band inversion, significantly different from conventional band inversion between s-p, p-p, or d-p orbitals. The realization of pure layered MX monolayers may be prepared by exfoliation from their 3D bulk phases, thus holding great promise for nanoscale device applications and stimulating further efforts on transition metal-based QSH materials. PMID:26524118

  1. A Novel Locus Harbouring a Functional CD164 Nonsense Mutation Identified in a Large Danish Family with Nonsyndromic Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten S.; Corydon, Thomas J.; Demontis, Ditte; Starnawska, Anna; Hedemand, Anne; Buniello, Annalisa; Niola, Francesco; Overgaard, Michael T.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Ahmad, Wasim; Wikman, Friedrik P.; Petersen, Kirsten B.; Crüger, Dorthe G.; Oostrik, Jaap; Kremer, Hannie; Tommerup, Niels; Frödin, Morten; Steel, Karen P.; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Børglum, Anders D.

    2015-01-01

    Nonsyndromic hearing impairment (NSHI) is a highly heterogeneous condition with more than eighty known causative genes. However, in the clinical setting, a large number of NSHI families have unexplained etiology, suggesting that there are many more genes to be identified. In this study we used SNP-based linkage analysis and follow up microsatellite markers to identify a novel locus (DFNA66) on chromosome 6q15-21 (LOD 5.1) in a large Danish family with dominantly inherited NSHI. By locus specific capture and next-generation sequencing, we identified a c.574C>T heterozygous nonsense mutation (p.R192*) in CD164. This gene encodes a 197 amino acid transmembrane sialomucin (known as endolyn, MUC-24 or CD164), which is widely expressed and involved in cell adhesion and migration. The mutation segregated with the phenotype and was absent in 1200 Danish control individuals and in databases with whole-genome and exome sequence data. The predicted effect of the mutation was a truncation of the last six C-terminal residues of the cytoplasmic tail of CD164, including a highly conserved canonical sorting motif (YXX?). In whole blood from an affected individual, we found by RT-PCR both the wild-type and the mutated transcript suggesting that the mutant transcript escapes nonsense mediated decay. Functional studies in HEK cells demonstrated that the truncated protein was almost completely retained on the plasma cell membrane in contrast to the wild-type protein, which targeted primarily to the endo-lysosomal compartments, implicating failed endocytosis as a possible disease mechanism. In the mouse ear, we found CD164 expressed in the inner and outer hair cells of the organ of Corti, as well as in other locations in the cochlear duct. In conclusion, we have identified a new DFNA locus located on chromosome 6q15-21 and implicated CD164 as a novel gene for hearing impairment. PMID:26197441

  2. Large Deviations for Stationary Probabilities of a Family of Continuous Time Markov Chains via Aubry-Mather Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Artur O.; Neumann, Adriana

    2015-05-01

    In the present paper, we consider a family of continuous time symmetric random walks indexed by , . For each the matching random walk take values in the finite set of states ; notice that is a subset of , where is the unitary circle. The infinitesimal generator of such chain is denoted by . The stationary probability for such process converges to the uniform distribution on the circle, when . Here we want to study other natural measures, obtained via a limit on , that are concentrated on some points of . We will disturb this process by a potential and study for each the perturbed stationary measures of this new process when . We disturb the system considering a fixed potential and we will denote by the restriction of to . Then, we define a non-stochastic semigroup generated by the matrix , where is the infinifesimal generator of . From the continuous time Perron's Theorem one can normalized such semigroup, and, then we get another stochastic semigroup which generates a continuous time Markov Chain taking values on . This new chain is called the continuous time Gibbs state associated to the potential , see (Lopes et al. in J Stat Phys 152:894-933, 2013). The stationary probability vector for such Markov Chain is denoted by . We assume that the maximum of is attained in a unique point of , and from this will follow that . Thus, here, our main goal is to analyze the large deviation principle for the family , when . The deviation function , which is defined on , will be obtained from a procedure based on fixed points of the Lax-Oleinik operator and Aubry-Mather theory. In order to obtain the associated Lax-Oleinik operator we use the Varadhan's Lemma for the process . For a careful analysis of the problem we present full details of the proof of the Large Deviation Principle, in the Skorohod space, for such family of Markov Chains, when . Finally, we compute the entropy of the invariant probabilities on the Skorohod space associated to the Markov Chains we analyze.

  3. A Novel Syntaxin 11 Gene (STX11) Mutation c.650T>C, p.Leu217Pro, in a Korean Child With Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Sultanova, Ardak K; Kim, Seong Koo; Lee, Jae Wook; Jang, Pil Sang; Chung, Nack Gyun; Cho, Bin; Park, Joonhong; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Myungshin

    2016-03-01

    We report the first Far Eastern case of a Korean child with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) caused by a novel syntaxin 11 (STX11) mutation. A 33-month-old boy born to non-consanguineous Korean parents was admitted for intermittent fever lasting one week, pancytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and HLH in the bone marrow. Under the impression of HLH, genetic study revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation of STX11: c.650T>C, p.Leu217Pro. Although no large deletion or allele drop was identified, genotype analysis demonstrated that the homozygous c.650T>C may have resulted from the duplication of a maternal (unimaternal) chromosomal region and concurrent loss of the other paternal allele, likely caused by meiotic errors such as two crossover events. A cumulative study of such novel mutations and their effects on specific protein interactions may deepen the understanding of how abnormal STX1 expression results in deficient cytotoxic function. PMID:26709266

  4. Chlamydia abortus YhbZ, a truncated Obg family GTPase, associates with the Escherichia coli large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Polkinghorne, Adam; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2011-01-01

    The stringent stress response is vital for bacterial survival under adverse environmental conditions. Obligate intracellular Chlamydia lack key stringent response proteins, but nevertheless can interrupt the cell cycle and enter stasis or persistence upon amino acid starvation. A possible key protein retained is YhbZ, a homologue of the ObgE guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) superfamily connecting the stringent stress response to ribosome maturation. Curiously, chlamydial YhbZ lacks the ObgE C-terminal domain thought to be essential for binding the large ribosomal subunit. We expressed recombinant Chlamydia abortus YhbZ and showed it to be a functional GTPase, with similar activity to other Obg GTPase family members. As Chlamydia are resistant to genetic manipulation, we performed heterologous expression and gradient centrifugation experiments in Escherichia coli and found that, despite the missing C-terminal domain, C. abortus YhbZ co-fractionates with the E. coli 50S large ribosomal subunit. In addition, overexpression of chlamydial YhbZ in E. coli leads to growth defects and elongation, as reported for other Obg members. YhbZ did not complement an E. coli obgE temperature-sensitive mutant, indicating the C-terminal acidic domain may have an additional role. This data supports a role for YhbZ linking the chlamydial stress response to ribosome function and cellular growth. PMID:21195156

  5. High proportion of large genomic deletions and a genotype–phenotype update in 80 unrelated families with juvenile polyposis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aretz, S; Stienen, D; Uhlhaas, S; Stolte, M; Entius, M M; Loff, S; Back, W; Kaufmann, A; Keller, K?M; Blaas, S H; Siebert, R; Vogt, S; Spranger, S; Holinski?Feder, E; Sunde, L; Propping, P; Friedl, W

    2007-01-01

    Background In patients with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) the frequency of large genomic deletions in the SMAD4 and BMPR1A genes was unknown. Methods Mutation and phenotype analysis was used in 80 unrelated patients of whom 65 met the clinical criteria for JPS (typical JPS) and 15 were suspected to have JPS. Results By direct sequencing of the two genes, point mutations were identified in 30 patients (46% of typical JPS). Using MLPA, large genomic deletions were found in 14% of all patients with typical JPS (six deletions in SMAD4 and three deletions in BMPR1A). Mutation analysis of the PTEN gene in the remaining 41 mutation negative cases uncovered a point mutation in two patients (5%). SMAD4 mutation carriers had a significantly higher frequency of gastric polyposis (73%) than did patients with BMPR1A mutations (8%) (p<0.001); all seven cases of gastric cancer occurred in families with SMAD4 mutations. SMAD4 mutation carriers with gastric polyps were significantly older at gastroscopy than those without (p<0.001). In 22% of the 23 unrelated SMAD4 mutation carriers, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) was also diagnosed clinically. The documented histologic findings encompassed a wide distribution of different polyp types, comparable with that described in hereditary mixed polyposis syndromes (HMPS). Conclusions Screening for large deletions raised the mutation detection rate to 60% in the 65 patients with typical JPS. A strong genotype?phenotype correlation for gastric polyposis, gastric cancer, and HHT was identified, which should have implications for counselling and surveillance. Histopathological results in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes must be critically interpreted. PMID:17873119

  6. Mapping of a possible X-linked form of familial developmental dysphasia (FDD) in a single large pedigree

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, P.W.; Doody, R.S.; Epstein, H.F.

    1994-09-01

    Children diagnosed with developmental dysphasia develop speech very late without exhibiting sensory or motor dysfunction, and when they do begin to speak their grammar is abnormal. A large three-generation British pedigree was recently identified in which 16 out of 30 members were diagnosed as dysphasic. Assuming a dominant mode of inheritance with homogeneous phenotypic expression and complete penetrance among affected members, we showed by simulation analysis that this pedigree has the power to detect linkage to marker loci with an average maximum LOD score of 3.67 at {theta}=0.1. Given the absence of male-to-male transmission and a ratio of female to male affecteds (10/6) in this pedigree within the expected range for an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance, we decided to begin a genome-wide linkage analysis with microsatellite markers on the human X chromosome. Fifteen individuals (10 affected) from three generations were genotyped with 35 polymorphic STS`s (Research Genetics) which were approximately uniformly distributed along the X chromosome. Two-point linkage was assessed using the MLINK and ILINK programs from the LINKAGE package. Markers DXS1223, DXS987, DXS996 and DXS1060 on Xp22 showed consistent linkage to the disease locus with a maximum LOD score of 0.86 at a distance of 22 cM for DXS1060. If further analysis with additional markers and additional family members confirms X-linkage, such a localization would provide support for Lehrke`s hypothesis for X-linkage of major intellectual traits including verbal functioning.

  7. Evaluation of the Genetic Basis of Familial Aggregation of Pacemaker Implantation by a Large Next Generation Sequencing Panel

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Hillel A.; Uradu, Andrea; Lynnes, Ty C.; Groh, William J.; Miller, John M.; Lin, Hai; Gao, Hongyu; Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Yunlong; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Vatta, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Background The etiology of conduction disturbances necessitating permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation is often unknown, although familial aggregation of PPM (faPPM) suggests a possible genetic basis. We developed a pan-cardiovascular next generation sequencing (NGS) panel to genetically characterize a selected cohort of faPPM. Materials and Methods We designed and validated a custom NGS panel targeting the coding and splicing regions of 246 genes with involvement in cardiac pathogenicity. We enrolled 112 PPM patients and selected nine (8%) with faPPM to be analyzed by NGS. Results Our NGS panel covers 95% of the intended target with an average of 229x read depth at a minimum of 15-fold depth, reaching a SNP true positive rate of 98%. The faPPM patients presented with isolated cardiac conduction disease (ICCD) or sick sinus syndrome (SSS) without overt structural heart disease or identifiable secondary etiology. Three patients (33.3%) had heterozygous deleterious variants previously reported in autosomal dominant cardiac diseases including CCD: LDB3 (p.D117N) and TRPM4 (p.G844D) variants in patient 4; TRPM4 (p.G844D) and ABCC9 (p.V734I) variants in patient 6; and SCN5A (p.T220I) and APOB (p.R3527Q) variants in patient 7. Conclusion FaPPM occurred in 8% of our PPM clinic population. The employment of massive parallel sequencing for a large selected panel of cardiovascular genes identified a high percentage (33.3%) of the faPPM patients with deleterious variants previously reported in autosomal dominant cardiac diseases, suggesting that genetic variants may play a role in faPPM. PMID:26636822

  8. Dandy-Walker malformation, genitourinary abnormalities, and intellectual disability in two families.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Maha S; Masri, Amira; Gregor, Anne; Gleeson, Joseph G; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur

    2015-11-01

    We report on two families, each with documented consanguinity and two affected with overlapping features of Dandy-Walker malformation, genitourinary abnormalities, intellectual disability, and hearing deficit. This phenotype shares similar findings with many well-known syndromes. However, the clinical findings of this syndrome categorize this as a new syndrome as compared with the phenotype of already established syndromes. Due to parental consanguinity, occurrence in siblings of both genders and the absence of manifestations in obligate carrier parents, an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance is more likely. The authors believe that these families suggest a novel autosomal recessive cerebello-genital syndrome. Array CGH analyses of an affected did not show pathological deletions or duplications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26109232

  9. Discovery of four recessive developmental disorders using probabilistic genotype and phenotype matching among 4,125 families.

    PubMed

    Akawi, Nadia; McRae, Jeremy; Ansari, Morad; Balasubramanian, Meena; Blyth, Moira; Brady, Angela F; Clayton, Stephen; Cole, Trevor; Deshpande, Charu; Fitzgerald, Tomas W; Foulds, Nicola; Francis, Richard; Gabriel, George; Gerety, Sebastian S; Goodship, Judith; Hobson, Emma; Jones, Wendy D; Joss, Shelagh; King, Daniel; Klena, Nikolai; Kumar, Ajith; Lees, Melissa; Lelliott, Chris; Lord, Jenny; McMullan, Dominic; O'Regan, Mary; Osio, Deborah; Piombo, Virginia; Prigmore, Elena; Rajan, Diana; Rosser, Elisabeth; Sifrim, Alejandro; Smith, Audrey; Swaminathan, Ganesh J; Turnpenny, Peter; Whitworth, James; Wright, Caroline F; Firth, Helen V; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Lo, Cecilia W; FitzPatrick, David R; Hurles, Matthew E

    2015-11-01

    Discovery of most autosomal recessive disease-associated genes has involved analysis of large, often consanguineous multiplex families or small cohorts of unrelated individuals with a well-defined clinical condition. Discovery of new dominant causes of rare, genetically heterogeneous developmental disorders has been revolutionized by exome analysis of large cohorts of phenotypically diverse parent-offspring trios. Here we analyzed 4,125 families with diverse, rare and genetically heterogeneous developmental disorders and identified four new autosomal recessive disorders. These four disorders were identified by integrating Mendelian filtering (selecting probands with rare, biallelic and putatively damaging variants in the same gene) with statistical assessments of (i) the likelihood of sampling the observed genotypes from the general population and (ii) the phenotypic similarity of patients with recessive variants in the same candidate gene. This new paradigm promises to catalyze the discovery of novel recessive disorders, especially those with less consistent or nonspecific clinical presentations and those caused predominantly by compound heterozygous genotypes. PMID:26437029

  10. A Comparative Analysis of Training and Development and Work-Family Education Systems in a Large Corporate Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Sharon K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the findings of a comparative analysis of two education systems in one corporate organization: training and development and work-family. Key learning features across these systems were analyzed to determine similarities and differences and to identify common concerns. The findings indicated that, although this organization…

  11. The Sensitivity of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines to Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor-Induced Apoptosis Is Modulated by BCL-2 Family Protein Activity

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Ryan C.; Vardinogiannis, Iosif; Gilmore, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a genetically heterogeneous disease and this variation can often be used to explain the response of individual patients to chemotherapy. One cancer therapeutic approach currently in clinical trials uses histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi’s) as monotherapy or in combination with other agents. Methodology/Principal Findings We have used a variety of cell-based and molecular/biochemical assays to show that two pan-HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A and vorinostat, induce apoptosis in seven of eight human DLBCL cell lines. Consistent with previous reports implicating the BCL-2 family in regulating HDACi-induced apoptosis, ectopic over-expression of anti-apoptotic proteins BCL-2 and BCL-XL or pro-apoptotic protein BIM in these cell lines conferred further resistance or sensitivity, respectively, to HDACi treatment. Additionally, BCL-2 family antgonist ABT-737 increased the sensitivity of several DLBCL cell lines to vorinostat-induced apoptosis, including one cell line (SUDHL6) that is resistant to vorinostat alone. Moreover, two variants of the HDACi-sensitive SUDHL4 cell line that have decreased sensitivity to vorinostat showed up-regulation of BCL-2 family anti-apoptotic proteins such as BCL-XL and MCL-1, as well as decreased sensitivity to ABT-737. These results suggest that the regulation and overall balance of anti- to pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family protein expression is important in defining the sensitivity of DLBCL to HDACi-induced apoptosis. However, the sensitivity of DLBCL cell lines to HDACi treatment does not correlate with expression of any individual BCL-2 family member. Conclusions/Significance These studies indicate that the sensitivity of DLBCL to treatment with HDACi’s is dependent on the complex regulation of BCL-2 family members and that BCL-2 antagonists may enhance the response of a subset of DLBCL patients to HDACi treatment. PMID:23667527

  12. A Family-Wide RT-PCR Assay for Detection of Paramyxoviruses and Application to a Large-Scale Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    van Boheemen, Sander; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Verhagen, Josanne H.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Pas, Suzan D.; Herfst, Sander; Fouchier, Ron A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Family-wide molecular diagnostic assays are valuable tools for initial identification of viruses during outbreaks and to limit costs of surveillance studies. Recent discoveries of paramyxoviruses have called for such assay that is able to detect all known and unknown paramyxoviruses in one round of PCR amplification. We have developed a RT-PCR assay consisting of a single degenerate primer set, able to detect all members of the Paramyxoviridae family including all virus genera within the subfamilies Paramyxovirinae and Pneumovirinae. Primers anneal to domain III of the polymerase gene, with the 3? end of the reverse primer annealing to the conserved motif GDNQ, which is proposed to be the active site for nucleotide polymerization. The assay was fully optimized and was shown to indeed detect all available paramyxoviruses tested. Clinical specimens from hospitalized patients that tested positive for known paramyxoviruses in conventional assays were also detected with the novel family-wide test. A high-throughput fluorescence-based RT-PCR version of the assay was developed for screening large numbers of specimens. A large number of samples collected from wild birds was tested, resulting in the detection of avian paramyxoviruses type 1 in both barnacle and white-fronted geese, and type 8 in barnacle geese. Avian metapneumovirus type C was found for the first time in Europe in mallards, greylag geese and common gulls. The single round family-wide RT-PCR assay described here is a useful tool for the detection of known and unknown paramyxoviruses, and screening of large sample collections from humans and animals. PMID:22496880

  13. Identification of rare DNA sequence variants in high-risk autism families and their prevalence in a large case/control population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetics clearly plays a major role in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), but studies to date are only beginning to characterize the causal genetic variants responsible. Until recently, studies using multiple extended multi-generation families to identify ASD risk genes had not been undertaken. Methods We identified haplotypes shared among individuals with ASDs in large multiplex families, followed by targeted DNA capture and sequencing to identify potential causal variants. We also assayed the prevalence of the identified variants in a large ASD case/control population. Results We identified 584 non-conservative missense, nonsense, frameshift and splice site variants that might predispose to autism in our high-risk families. Eleven of these variants were observed to have odds ratios greater than 1.5 in a set of 1,541 unrelated children with autism and 5,785 controls. Three variants, in the RAB11FIP5, ABP1, and JMJD7-PLA2G4B genes, each were observed in a single case and not in any controls. These variants also were not seen in public sequence databases, suggesting that they may be rare causal ASD variants. Twenty-eight additional rare variants were observed only in high-risk ASD families. Collectively, these 39 variants identify 36 genes as ASD risk genes. Segregation of sequence variants and of copy number variants previously detected in these families reveals a complex pattern, with only a RAB11FIP5 variant segregating to all affected individuals in one two-generation pedigree. Some affected individuals were found to have multiple potential risk alleles, including sequence variants and copy number variants (CNVs), suggesting that the high incidence of autism in these families could be best explained by variants at multiple loci. Conclusions Our study is the first to use haplotype sharing to identify familial ASD risk loci. In total, we identified 39 variants in 36 genes that may confer a genetic risk of developing autism. The observation of 11 of these variants in unrelated ASD cases further supports their role as ASD risk variants. PMID:24467814

  14. Isolation of a gene (DLG3) encoding a second member of the discs-large family on chromosome 17q12-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.A.; Holik, P.; Stevens, J.

    1996-01-15

    The discs-large family is a collection of proteins that have a common structural organization and are thought to be involved in signal transduction and mediating protein-protein interactions at the cytoplasmic surface of the cell membrane. The defining member of this group of proteins is the gene product of the Drosophila lethal (1) discs large (dlg) 1 locus, which was originally identified by the analysis of recessive lethal mutants. Germline mutations in dlg result in loss of apical-basolateral polarity, disruption of normal cell-cell adhesion, and neoplastic overgrowth of the imaginal disc epithelium. We have isolated and characterized a novel human gene, DLG3, that encodes a new member of the discs-large family of proteins. The putative DLG3 gene product has a molecular weight of 66 kDa and contains a discs-large homologous region, an src oncogene homology motif 3, and a domain with homology to guanylate kinase. The DLG3 gene is located on chromosome 17, in the same segment, 17q12-q21, as the related gene, DLG2. The products of the DLG2 and DLG3 genes show 36% identity and 58% similarity to each other, and both show nearly 60% sequence similarity to p55, an erythroid phosphoprotein that is a component of the red cell membrane. We suggest that p55, DLG2, and DLG3 are closely related members of a gene family, whose protein products have a common structural organization and probably a similar function. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Variable Region and Major Histocompatibility Region Genes Are Linked to Induced Graves' Disease in Females From Two Very Large Families of Recombinant Inbred Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aliesky, Holly; Banuelos, Bianca; Magana, Jessica; Williams, Robert W.; Rapoport, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Graves' hyperthyroidism is caused by antibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR) that mimic thyroid stimulation by TSH. Stimulating TSHR antibodies and hyperthyroidism can be induced by immunizing mice with adenovirus expressing the human TSHR A-subunit. Prior analysis of induced Graves' disease in small families of recombinant inbred (RI) female mice demonstrated strong genetic control but did not resolve trait loci for TSHR antibodies or elevated serum T4. We investigated the genetic basis for induced Graves' disease in female mice of two large RI families and combined data with earlier findings to provide phenotypes for 178 genotypes. TSHR antibodies measured by inhibition of TSH binding to its receptor were highly significantly linked in the BXD set to the major histocompatibility region (chromosome 17), consistent with observations in 3 other RI families. In the LXS family, we detected linkage between T4 levels after TSHR-adenovirus immunization and the Ig heavy chain variable region (Igvh, chromosome 12). This observation is a key finding because components of the antigen binding region of Igs determine antibody specificity and have been previously linked to induced thyroid-stimulating antibodies. Data from the LXS family provide the first evidence in mice of a direct link between induced hyperthyroidism and Igvh genes. A role for major histocompatibility genes has now been established for genetic susceptibility to Graves' disease in both humans and mice. Future studies using arrays incorporating variation in the complex human Ig gene locus will be necessary to determine whether Igvh genes are also linked to Graves' disease in humans. PMID:25051451

  16. Topological properties of large-scale structural brain networks in children with familial risk for reading difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, S.M. Hadi; Black, Jessica M.; Soriano, Teresa; Bugescu, Nicolle; Martinez, Rociel; Raman, Mira M.; Kesler, Shelli R.; Hoeft, Fumiko

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is a neurobiological deficit characterized by persistent difficulty in learning to read in children and adults who otherwise possess normal intelligence. Functional and structural connectivity data suggest that developmental dyslexia could be a disconnection syndrome. However, whether abnormalities in connectivity exist in beginning readers at-risk for reading difficulties is unknown. Using graphtheoretical analysis, we investigated differences in global and regional topological properties of structural brain networks in 42 beginning readers with (FH+) and without (FH?) familial risk for reading difficulties. We constructed separate structural correlation networks based on measures of surface area and cortical thickness. Results revealed changes in topological properties in brain regions known to be abnormal in dyslexia (left supramarginal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus) in the FH+ group mainly in the network constructed from measures of cortical surface area. We also found alterations in topological properties in regions that are not often advertised as dyslexia but nonetheless play important role in reading (left posterior cingulate, hippocampus, and left precentral gyrus). To our knowledge, this is the first report of altered topological properties of structural correlation networks in children at risk for reading difficulty, and motivates future studies that examine the mechanisms underlying how these brain networks may mediate the influences of family history on reading outcome. PMID:23333415

  17. Mutations in Danish patients with long QT syndrome and the identification of a large founder family with p.F29L in KCNH2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac ion channelopathy which presents clinically with palpitations, syncope or sudden death. More than 700 LQTS-causing mutations have been identified in 13 genes, all of which encode proteins involved in the execution of the cardiac action potential. The most frequently affected genes, covering?>?90% of cases, are KCNQ1, KCNH2 and SCN5A. Methods We describe 64 different mutations in 70 unrelated Danish families using a routine five-gene screen, comprising KCNQ1, KCNH2 and SCN5A as well as KCNE1 and KCNE2. Results Twenty-two mutations were found in KCNQ1, 28 in KCNH2, 9 in SCN5A, 3 in KCNE1 and 2 in KCNE2. Twenty-six of these have only been described in the Danish population and 18 are novel. One double heterozygote (1.4% of families) was found. A founder mutation, p.F29L in KCNH2, was identified in 5 “unrelated” families. Disease association, in 31.2% of cases, was based on the type of mutation identified (nonsense, insertion/deletion, frameshift or splice-site). Functional data was available for 22.7% of the missense mutations. None of the mutations were found in 364 Danish alleles and only three, all functionally characterised, were recorded in the Exome Variation Server, albeit at a frequency of?large founder family with p.F29L in KCNH2 was identified. In 48.4% of the mutations disease causation was based on mutation type or functional analysis. PMID:24606995

  18. Identification of a novel large intragenic deletion in a family with Fanconi anemia: first molecular report from India and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pallavi; Rao, Anita; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Vundinti, Babu Rao

    2013-04-15

    We report here an Indian case with Fanconi anemia (FA) presented with fever, pallor, short stature, hyperpigmentation and upper limb anomaly. Chromosome breakage analysis together with FANCD2 Western blot monoubiquitination assay confirmed the diagnosis as FA. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) revealed a novel homozygous large intragenic deletion (exons 8-27 del) in the FANCA gene in the proband. His sib and parents were also analyzed and found to be heterozygous for the same mutation. We also reviewed the literature of FANCA large intragenic deletions found in FA patients from different countries and the mechanism involved in the formation of these deletions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first molecular report from India on FA. The finding expands the mutation spectrum of the FANCA gene. Identification of the mutation confirms the diagnosis of FA at DNA level and helps in providing proper genetic counseling to the family. PMID:23370339

  19. Inherited multicentric osteolysis with arthritis: a variant resembling Torg syndrome in a Saudi family.

    PubMed

    Al Aqeel, A; Al Sewairi, W; Edress, B; Gorlin, R J; Desnick, R J; Martignetti, J A

    2000-07-01

    The autosomal recessive multicentric osteolytic disorders of childhood-Torg, Winchester, and François syndromes-predominantly affect the carpal, tarsal, and interphalangeal joints, and their progressive bone loss and crippling arthritic deformities mimic severe juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. In a consanguineous Saudi Arabian family two affected sibs with facial anomalies and short stature displayed a distal arthropathy of the metacarpal, metatarsal, and interphalangeal joints starting in the first few months of life that eventually progressed to the proximal joints and resulted in crippling ankylosis and severe generalized osteopenia. Facial changes included proptosis, a narrow nasal bridge, bulbous nose, and micrognathia. In addition, they had large, painful fibrocollagenous palmar and plantar pads and mild body hirsutism. Affected individuals were of normal intelligence and had normal renal function. Routine hematologic, chemistry, and rheumatoid studies were within normal limits. Histologic examination of bone marrow and an interphalangeal joint biopsy were not informative. The autosomal recessive inheritance, clinical, and radiologic characteristics of the affected sibs suggested that they had a form of multicentric osteolysis most closely resembling the Torg syndrome, but with a unique facial appearance, fibrocollagenous pads, and body hirsutism not noted in the original description of the syndrome. PMID:10861676

  20. Correlated Si isotope anomalies and large C-13 enrichments in a family of exotic SiC grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Epstein, S.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    A hypothesis is presented to the effect that the distinctive morphological characteristics and comparatively simple Si isotope systematics identify the platy SiC crystals as a genetically related family, formed around a single isotopically heterogeneous presolar star on an association of related stars. The enrichments in C-13 and the Si isotope systematics of the platy SiC are broadly consistent with theoretical models of nucleosynthesis in low-mass, carbon stars on the ASG. The Si isotope array most plausibly reflects mixing between (Si-28)-rich material, inherited from a previous generation of stars, and material enriched in Si-29 and Si-30, produced in intershell regions by neutron capture during He-burning. The absence of a correlation between the Si and C isotopic compositions of the SiC suggests either episodic condensation of SiC, extending over several thermal pulses, in the atmosphere of a single star, or the derivation of the SiC from several stars characterized by different rates of C-13 production.

  1. The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel holds the key to the conundrum of familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jo; Kang, Sun-Yang; Yi, Jin Woong; Kim, Seung-Min

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOKPP) is an autosomal dominant channelopathy characterized by episodic attacks of muscle weakness and hypokalemia. Mutations in the calcium channel gene, CACNA1S, or the sodium channel gene, SCN4A, have been found to be responsible for HOKPP; however, the mechanism that causes hypokalemia remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to improve the understanding of this mechanism by investigating the expression of calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channel genes in HOKPP patients. Methods We measured the intracellular calcium concentration with fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester in skeletal muscle cells of HOKPP patients and healthy individuals. We examined the mRNA and protein expression of KCa channel genes (KCNMA1, KCNN1, KCNN2, KCNN3, and KCNN4) in both cell types. Results Patient cells exhibited higher cytosolic calcium levels than normal cells. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the mRNA levels of the KCa channel genes did not significantly differ between patient and normal cells. However, western blot analysis showed that protein levels of the KCNMA1 gene, which encodes KCa1.1 channels (also called big potassium channels), were significantly lower in the membrane fraction and higher in the cytosolic fraction of patient cells than normal cells. When patient cells were exposed to 50 mM potassium buffer, which was used to induce depolarization, the altered subcellular distribution of BK channels remained unchanged. Conclusion These findings suggest a novel mechanism for the development of hypokalemia and paralysis in HOKPP and demonstrate a connection between disease-associated mutations in calcium/sodium channels and pathogenic changes in nonmutant potassium channels. PMID:25379045

  2. Association of SLC6A4 variants with obsessive-compulsive disorder in a large multicenter US family study.

    PubMed

    Voyiaziakis, E; Evgrafov, O; Li, D; Yoon, H-J; Tabares, P; Samuels, J; Wang, Y; Riddle, M A; Grados, M A; Bienvenu, O J; Shugart, Y Y; Liang, K-Y; Greenberg, B D; Rasmussen, S A; Murphy, D L; Wendland, J R; McCracken, J T; Piacentini, J; Rauch, S L; Pauls, D L; Nestadt, G; Fyer, A J; Knowles, J A

    2011-01-01

    Genetic association studies of SLC6A4 (SERT) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been equivocal. We genotyped 1241 individuals in 278 pedigrees from the OCD Collaborative Genetics Study for 13 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, for the linked polymorphic region (LPR) indel with molecular haplotypes at rs25531, for VNTR polymorphisms in introns 2 and 7 and for a 381-bp deletion 3' to the LPR. We analyzed using the Family-Based Association Test (FBAT) under additive, dominant, recessive and genotypic models, using both OCD and sex-stratified OCD as phenotypes. Two-point FBAT analysis detected association between Int2 (P = 0.0089) and Int7 (P = 0.0187) (genotypic model). Sex-stratified two-point analysis showed strong association in females with Int2 (P<0.0002), significant after correction for linkage disequilibrium, and multiple marker and model testing (P(Adj) = 0.0069). The SLC6A4 gene is composed of two haplotype blocks (our data and the HapMap); FBAT whole-marker analysis conducted using this structure was not significant. Several noteworthy nonsignificant results have emerged. Unlike Hu et al., we found no evidence for overtransmission of the LPR L(A) allele (genotype relative risk = 1.11, 95% confidence interval: 0.77-1.60); however, rare individual haplotypes containing L(A) with P<0.05 were observed. Similarly, three individuals (two with OCD/OCPD) carried the rare I425V SLC6A4 variant, but none of them passed it on to their six OCD-affected offspring, suggesting that it is unlikely to be solely responsible for the 'OCD plus syndrome', as reported by Ozaki et al. In conclusion, we found evidence of genetic association at the SLC6A4 locus with OCD. A noteworthy lack of association at the LPR, LPR-rs25531 and rare 425V variants suggests that hypotheses about OCD risk need revision to accommodate these new findings, including a possible gender effect. PMID:19806148

  3. Identification of Rare Recurrent Copy Number Variants in High-Risk Autism Families and Their Prevalence in a Large ASD Population

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, G. Bryce; Kim, Cecilia; Frackelton, Edward; Thomas, Kelly; da Silva, Renata Pellegrino; Stevens, Jeff; Baird, Lisa; Otterud, Brith; Ho, Karen; Varvil, Tena; Leppert, Tami; Lambert, Christophe G.; Leppert, Mark; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2013-01-01

    Structural variation is thought to play a major etiological role in the development of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), and numerous studies documenting the relevance of copy number variants (CNVs) in ASD have been published since 2006. To determine if large ASD families harbor high-impact CNVs that may have broader impact in the general ASD population, we used the Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0 to identify 153 putative autism-specific CNVs present in 55 individuals with ASD from 9 multiplex ASD pedigrees. To evaluate the actual prevalence of these CNVs as well as 185 CNVs reportedly associated with ASD from published studies many of which are insufficiently powered, we designed a custom Illumina array and used it to interrogate these CNVs in 3,000 ASD cases and 6,000 controls. Additional single nucleotide variants (SNVs) on the array identified 25 CNVs that we did not detect in our family studies at the standard SNP array resolution. After molecular validation, our results demonstrated that 15 CNVs identified in high-risk ASD families also were found in two or more ASD cases with odds ratios greater than 2.0, strengthening their support as ASD risk variants. In addition, of the 25 CNVs identified using SNV probes on our custom array, 9 also had odds ratios greater than 2.0, suggesting that these CNVs also are ASD risk variants. Eighteen of the validated CNVs have not been reported previously in individuals with ASD and three have only been observed once. Finally, we confirmed the association of 31 of 185 published ASD-associated CNVs in our dataset with odds ratios greater than 2.0, suggesting they may be of clinical relevance in the evaluation of children with ASDs. Taken together, these data provide strong support for the existence and application of high-impact CNVs in the clinical genetic evaluation of children with ASD. PMID:23341896

  4. A rare branch-point mutation is associated with missplicing of fibrillin-2 in a large family with congenital contractural arachnodactyly.

    PubMed Central

    Maslen, C; Babcock, D; Raghunath, M; Steinmann, B

    1997-01-01

    Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) is an autosomal dominant disorder that is phenotypically similar to but genetically distinct from Marfan syndrome. Genetic-linkage analysis has implicated the fibrillin-2 gene (FBN2) as the CCA locus. Mutation analysis of two isolated CCA patients revealed missense mutations, indicating that defects in FBN2 may be responsible for this disorder. However, cosegregation of a mutant allele with the disease phenotype has not yet been established. We have investigated the primary cause of CCA in a large well-characterized kindred with five generations comprising 18 affected individuals. Previous studies demonstrated linkage of this family's CCA phenotype to FBN2. Mutation analysis of cDNA derived from the proband and her affected brother, using a nonisotopic RNase cleavage assay, revealed the partial skipping of exon 31. Approximately 25% mutant transcript is produced, which is apparently sufficient to cause a CCA phenotype. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA revealed an unusual base composition for intron 30 and identified the mutation, a g-26t transversion, in the vicinity of the splicing branch-point site in intron 30. Genomic DNA from 30 additional family members, both affected and unaffected, then was analyzed for the mutation. The results clearly demonstrate cosegregation of the branch-point mutation with the CCA phenotype. This is the first report of a CCA mutation in a multiplex family, unequivocally establishing that mutation in FBN2 are responsible for the CCA phenotype. In addition, branch-point mutations only very rarely have been associated with human disease, suggesting that the unusual composition of this intron influences splicing stability. Images Figure 2ab Figure 2c Figure 3ab Figure 3c Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9199560

  5. Comparison of autoantibody specificities between traditional and bead-based assays in a large, diverse collection of SLE patients and family members

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Benjamin F.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Lu, Rufei; Vidal, Gabriel; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Robertson, Julie M.; Kamen, Diane L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Neas, Barbara R.; Reichlin, Morris; Scofield, R. Hal; Harley, John B.; James, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The replacement of standard immunofluorescence anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) methods with bead-based assays is a new clinical option. A large, multi-racial cohort of SLE patients, blood relatives and unaffected control individuals was evaluated for familial aggregation and subset clustering of autoantibodies by high-throughput serum screening technology and traditional methods. Methods Serum samples (1,540 SLE patients, 1,127 unaffected relatives, and 906 healthy, population-based controls) were analyzed for SLE autoantibodies using a bead-based assay, immunofluorescence, and immunodiffusion. Autoantibody prevalence, disease sensitivity, clustering, and association with standard immunodiffusion results were evaluated. Results ANA frequency in SLE patient sera were 89%, 73%, and 67% by BioPlex 2200 and 94%, 84%, and 86% by immunofluorescence in African-American, Hispanic, and European-American patients respectively. 60kD Ro, La, Sm, nRNP A, and ribosomal P prevalence were compared across assays, with sensitivities ranging from 0.92 to 0.83 and specificities ranging from 0.90 to 0.79. Cluster autoantibody analysis showed association of three subsets: 1) 60kD Ro, 52kD Ro and La, 2) spliceosomal proteins, and 3) dsDNA, chromatin, and ribosomal P. Familial aggregation of Sm/RNP, ribosomal P, and 60kD Ro in SLE patient sibling pairs was observed (p ? 0.004). Simplex pedigree patients had a greater prevalence for dsDNA (p=0.0003) and chromatin (p=0.005) autoantibodies than multiplex patients. Conclusion ANA frequencies detected by a bead-based assay are lower in European-American SLE patients compared to immunofluorescence. These assays have strong positive predictive values across racial groups, provide useful information for clinical care, and provide unique insights to familial aggregation and autoantibody clustering. PMID:23112091

  6. A novel transthyretin variant p.H110D (H90D) as a cause of familial amyloid polyneuropathy in a large Irish kindred.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Zepeda, Victor H; Bahlis, Nizar J; Gilbertson, Janet; Rendell, Nigel; Porcari, Riccardo; Lachmann, Helen J; Gillmore, Julian D; Hawkins, Philip N; Rowczenio, Dorota M

    2015-03-01

    Hereditary transthyretin (ATTR) amyloidosis is caused by inheritance of an abnormal TTR gene in an autosomal dominant fashion. In its native state, TTR is a homotetramer consisting of four identical polypeptides. Mutations in the TTR gene contribute to destabilization and dissociation of the TTR tetramer, enabling abnormally folded monomers to self-assemble as amyloid fibrils. Currently, over 120 TTR variants have been described, with varying geographic distributions, degrees of amyloidogenicity and organ involvement. We report here a large Irish family with familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP), consisting of multiple affected generations, caused by a novel TTR mutation; p.H110D (H90D). The demonstration, by immunohistochemistry and laser micro dissection-mass spectrometry (LMD/MS) that the amyloid fibrils were composed of TTR, in conjunction with a typical FAP phenotype, indicates that the novel TTR mutation was the cause of amyloidosis. We used a molecular visualization tool PyMOL to analyze the effect of the p.H110D (H90D) replacement on the stability of the TTR molecule. Our data suggest that the loss of two hydrogen bonds and the presence of an additional negative charge in the core of a cluster of acidic residues significantly perturb the tetramer stability and likely contribute to the pathogenic role of this variant. PMID:25430583

  7. Members of the glutathione and ABC-transporter families are associated with clinical outcome in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Andreadis, Charalambos; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Wahl, Peter; Hammond, Rachel; Houldsworth, Jane; Schuster, Stephen J; Rebbeck, Timothy R

    2007-04-15

    Standard chemotherapy fails in 40% to 50% of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Some of these failures can be salvaged with high-dose regimens, suggesting a role for drug resistance in this disease. We examined the expression of genes in the glutathione (GSH) and ATP-dependent transporter (ABC) families in 2 independent tissue-based expression microarray datasets obtained prior to therapy from patients with DLBCL. Among genes in the GSH family, glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) had the most significant adverse effect on disease-specific overall survival (dOS) in the primary dataset (n = 130) (HR: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.26-2.22; P < .001). This effect remained statistically significant after controlling for biologic signature, LLMPP cell-of-origin signature, and IPI score, and was confirmed in the validation dataset (n = 39) (HR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.05-2.8; P = .033). Recursive partitioning identified a group of patients with low-level expression of GPX1 and multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1; ABCB1) without early treatment failures and with superior dOS (P < .001). Overall, our findings suggest an important association of oxidative-stress defense and drug elimination with treatment failure in DLBCL and identify GPX1 and ABCB1 as potentially powerful biomarkers of early failure and disease-specific survival. PMID:17179223

  8. Absence of linkage of phonological coding dyslexia to chromosome 6p23-p21.3 in a large family data set.

    PubMed Central

    Field, L L; Kaplan, B J

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that a locus predisposing to specific reading disability (dyslexia) resides on chromosome 6p23-p21.3. We investigated 79 families having at least two siblings affected with phonological coding dyslexia, the most common form of reading disability (617 people genotyped, 294 affected), and we tested for linkage with the genetic markers reported to be linked to dyslexia in those studies. No evidence for linkage was found by LOD score analysis or affected-sib-pair methods. However, using the affected-pedigree-member (APM) method, we detected significant evidence for linkage and/or association with some markers when we used published allele frequencies with weighting of rarer alleles. APM results were not significant when we used marker allele frequencies estimated from parents. Furthermore, results were not significant with the more robust SIMIBD method using either published or parental marker frequencies. Finally, family-based association analysis using the AFBAC program showed no evidence for association with any marker. We conclude that the APM method should be used only with extreme caution, because it appears to have generated false-positive results. In summary, using a large data set with high power to detect linkage, we were unable to find evidence for linkage or association between phonological coding dyslexia and chromosome 6p markers. PMID:9792873

  9. A Large Family of AvrLm6-like Genes in the Apple and Pear Scab Pathogens, Venturia inaequalis and Venturia pirina

    PubMed Central

    Shiller, Jason; Van de Wouw, Angela P.; Taranto, Adam P.; Bowen, Joanna K.; Dubois, David; Robinson, Andrew; Deng, Cecilia H.; Plummer, Kim M.

    2015-01-01

    Venturia inaequalis and V. pirina are Dothideomycete fungi that cause apple scab and pear scab disease, respectively. Whole genome sequencing of V. inaequalis and V. pirina isolates has revealed predicted proteins with sequence similarity to AvrLm6, a Leptosphaeria maculans effector that triggers a resistance response in Brassica napus and B. juncea carrying the resistance gene, Rlm6. AvrLm6-like genes are present as large families (>15 members) in all sequenced strains of V. inaequalis and V. pirina, while in L. maculans, only AvrLm6 and a single paralog have been identified. The Venturia AvrLm6-like genes are located in gene-poor regions of the genomes, and mostly in close proximity to transposable elements, which may explain the expansion of these gene families. An AvrLm6-like gene from V. inaequalis with the highest sequence identity to AvrLm6 was unable to trigger a resistance response in Rlm6-carrying B. juncea. RNA-seq and qRT-PCR gene expression analyses, of in planta- and in vitro-grown V. inaequalis, has revealed that many of the AvrLm6-like genes are expressed during infection. An AvrLm6 homolog from V. inaequalis that is up-regulated during infection was shown (using an eYFP-fusion protein construct) to be localized to the sub-cuticular stroma during biotrophic infection of apple hypocotyls. PMID:26635823

  10. Novel mutation in the SLC19A2 gene in an Iranian family with thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia: a series of three cases.

    PubMed

    Ghaemi, Nosrat; Ghahraman, Martha; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Baradaran-Heravi, Alireza; Vakili, Rahim

    2013-09-10

    Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA) is a clinical triad characterized by megaloblastic anemia, non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus, and sensory-neural hearing loss. Mutations in the thiamine transporter gene, solute carrier family 19, member 2 (SLC19A2), have been associated with TRMA. Three pediatric patients from a large consanguineous Iranian family with hyperglycemia, anemia, and hearing loss were clinically diagnosed with TRMA. In all three patients, TRMA was confirmed by direct sequencing of the SLC19A2 gene that revealed a novel missense homozygous mutation c.382 G>A (p.E128K). This mutation results in the substitution of glutamic acid to lysine at position 128 in exon 2 and was not detected in 200 control chromosomes. Thiamine therapy reversed the anemia and alleviated the hyperglycemia in all three patients. We recommend sequence analysis of the SLC19A2 gene in individuals with a clinical triad of diabetes mellitus, hearing loss, and anemia. The administration of thiamine ameliorates the megaloblastic anemia and the hyperglycemia in patients with TRMA. PMID:24072090

  11. Identification and Clinical Implications of Novel MYO15A Mutations in a Non-consanguineous Korean Family by Targeted Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mun Young; Kim, Ah Reum; Kim, Nayoung K.D.; Lee, Chung; Lee, Kyoung Yeul; Jeon, Woo-Sung; Koo, Ja-Won; Oh, Seung Ha; Park, Woong-Yang; Kim, Dongsup; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of MYO15A are generally known to cause severe to profound hearing loss throughout all frequencies. Here, we found two novel MYO15A mutations, c.3871C>T (p.L1291F) and c.5835T>G (p.Y1945X) in an affected individual carrying congenital profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) through targeted resequencing of 134 known deafness genes. The variant, p.L1291F and p.Y1945X, resided in the myosin motor and IQ2 domains, respectively. The p.L1291F variant was predicted to affect the structure of the actin-binding site from three-dimensional protein modeling, thereby interfering with the correct interaction between actin and myosin. From the literature analysis, mutations in the N-terminal domain were more frequently associated with residual hearing at low frequencies than mutations in the other regions of this gene. Therefore we suggest a hypothetical genotype-phenotype correlation whereby MYO15A mutations that affect domains other than the N-terminal domain, lead to profound SNHL throughout all frequencies and mutations that affect the N-terminal domain, result in residual hearing at low frequencies. This genotype-phenotype correlation suggests that preservation of residual hearing during auditory rehabilitation like cochlear implantation should be intended for those who carry mutations in the N-terminal domain and that individuals with mutations elsewhere in MYO15A require early cochlear implantation to timely initiate speech development. PMID:26242193

  12. Large linkage analysis in 100 families with autosomal recessive spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and 11 EPH families using 15 polymorphic loci in the region 5q11. 2-q13. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, B.; Pick, E.; Leutner, A.; Dadze, A.; Voosen, B.; Piechaczek-Wappenschmidt, B.; Rudnik-Schoeneborn, S.; Schoenling, J.; Zerres, K. ); Knapp, M. )

    1994-03-01

    The autosomal recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) gene was mapped to the region 5q11.2-q.13.3 in 1990. Here, the authors present a large genetic linkage study of 100 SMA families and 11 CEPH families using 14 polymorphic simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and one RFLP in the region 5q11.2-q.13.3. The genetic interval between the closest SMA flanking loci D5S435 and D5S557 comprises 1 cM at z[sub max] = 27.94. Two recombinants were identified between the SMA gene and the closest telomeric marker D5S557. The first places the SMA gene centromeric to this marker; the second suggests a double recombinant at D5S557, which is very unlikely. More likely explanations are discussed in the paper. No recombinant was found between D5S435 and the SMA gene. They localized a recently described polymorphic marker, D5S351, close to the SMA. Due to its high PIC value of 0.70, it represents a very useful marker for prenatal diagnosis. In addition, they developed a new reverse primer for the nearest centromeric locus D5S435, a useful marker for prenatal diagnosis, which has been very difficult to amplify in the past. Three of the markers presented here are newly developed polymorphic SSRs (one tetranucleotide repeat, D5s507/W15CATT, and two dinucleotide repeats, D5S544/C88.2GT and D5S682/C88.3GT). These markers are too far from the SMA gene to be relevant for cloning; nevertheless, as part of the human genome project, they are contributing to the fine genetic mapping of the region 5q11.2-q.13.3. The most likely order of the loci based on two-point and multipoint linkage analyses as well as on specific recombination events and physical mapping studies is D5S76-D5S507-D5S6-D5S125-D5S680-D5S435-SMA-D5S557-D5S35 -15[prime]MAP1B-3[prime]MAP1B-JK53CA1/2-(D5S127-D5S39)-(D5S544-D5S682). In general, the genetic distances obtained from the SMA and CEPH families are comparable. 25 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. The Community of Family Circles (CFC) algorithm: a new inversion approach to obtaining self-consitent 4D thermal histories from large, spatially distributed thermochronological data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beucher, R.; Brown, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most significant advances in interpreting thermochronological data is arguably our ability to extract information about the rate and trajectory of cooling over a range of temperatures, rather than having to rely on the veracity of the simplification of assuming a single closure temperature specified by a rate of monotonic cooling. Modern thermochronometry data, such as apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He analysis, are particularly good examples of data amenable to this treatment as acceptably well calibrated kinetic models now exist for both systems. With ever larger data sets of this type being generated over ever larger areas the prospect of inverting very large amounts of such data distributed spatially over large areas offers new possibilities for constraining the thermal and erosional histories over length scales approximating whole orogens and sub-continents. The challenge though is in how to properly deal with joint inversion of multiple samples in a self-consistent manner while also utilising all the available information contained in the data. We describe a new approach to this problem, called the Community of Family Circles (CFC) algorithm, which extracts information from spatially distributed apatite fission track ages (AFT) and track length distributions (TLD). The method is based on the rationale that the 3D geothermal field of the crust varies smoothly through space and time because of the efficiency of thermal diffusion. Our approach consists of seeking groups of spatially adjacent samples, or families, within a given circular radius for which a common thermal history is appropriate. The temperature offsets between individual time-temperature paths are determined relative to a low-pass filtered topographic surface, whose shape is assumed to mimic the shape of the isotherms in the partial annealing zone. This enables a single common thermal history to be shared, or interpolated, between the family members while still honouring the individual samples temperature offset requirements. The geothermal gradient can be either treated as a parameter in the inversion scheme or evaluated when local vertical profile or heat flow measurements are available. As data for each sample is inverted several times with different subsets, or as a member of different families, we then extract the subset with the lowest misfit and assign that sample to its respective ''family'' whose optimum time-temperature path is subsequently assigned to the sample. We thus obtain a set of thermal histories (one for each sample) which can then be interpolated to obtain exhumation rates or maximum temperature maps. We demonstrate our approach on a variety of synthetic datasets, generated for different geomorphologies and sampling densities, using the 3D thermal Pecube code in order to test the resolution and limits of the method. The approach is then applied to a 600 by 600 km area in northern Namibia where an extensive apatite fission track dataset including ages and track length distributions is available. We finally discuss extension of the technique to multiple thermochronometers. We also discuss possible future modifications and strategies for improving the flexibility and computational efficiency and effectiveness of the method.

  14. Role of family susceptibility, occupational and family histories and individuals' blood groups in the development of silicosis.

    PubMed Central

    Noweir, M H; Moselhi, M; Amine, E K

    1980-01-01

    A previous investigation has shown that family susceptibility and occupational and family histories have a decisive role in the development of byssinosis among workers exposed to flax dust. Results of investigation of silicosis in 814 male workers exposed to silica-bearing dust showed that family susceptibility has an important role in the development of silicosis among examined workers, and workers whose fathers had an occupational history of exposure to silica-bearing dust were more resistant to the development of the disease than those with non-exposed fathers. The degree of consanguinity of parents and individuals' blood groups, also, have a role. Workers with cousin parents were relatively highly susceptible to the development of silicosis as well as workers with blood groups "O" or "AB". It has been concluded that the investigated factors might have a role in the development of other occupational diseases and further investigations are indicated. PMID:6255981

  15. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: Tight linkage to chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Wu, C.T.B.; Jones, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) (MIM No.18260) constitutes a clinically and genetically diverse group of disorders that share the primary feature of progressive, severe, lower extremity spasticity. FSP is classified according to the mode of inheritance and whether progressive spasticity occurs in isolation ({open_quotes}uncomplicated FSP{close_quotes}) or with other neurologic abnormalities ({open_quotes}complicated FSP{close_quotes}), including optic neuropathy, retinopathy, extrapyramidal disturbance, dementia, ataxia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, or deafness. Recently, autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP was shown to be genetically heterogeneous and tightly linked to a group of microsatellite markers on chromosome 14q in one large kindred. We examined 126 members of a non-consanguineous North American kindred of Irish descent. FSP was diagnosed in 31 living subjects who developed insidiously progressive gait disturbance between ages 12 and 35 years. Using genetic linkage analysis to microsatellite DNA polymorphisms, we showed that the FSP locus on chromosome 14q was exluded from linkage with the disorder in our family. Subsequently, we searched for genetic linkage between the disorder and microsatellite DNA polymorphisms spanning approximately 50% of the genome. We observed significantly positive, two-point maximum lod scores (Z) for markers on chromosome 15q: D15S128 (Z=9.70, {theta}=0.05), D15S165 (Z=3.30, {theta}=0.10), and UT511 (Z=3.86, {theta}=0.10). Our data clearly establishes that one locus for autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP is mapped to the pericentric region of chromosome 15q. Identifying genes responsible for chromosome 15q-linked and chromosome 14q-linked FSP will greatly advance our understanding of this condition and hopefully other inherited and degenerative brain and spinal cord disorders that are also characterized by axonal degeneration.

  16. A Missense Mutation in the Alpha-Actinin 1 Gene (ACTN1) Is the Cause of Autosomal Dominant Macrothrombocytopenia in a Large French Family

    PubMed Central

    Guéguen, Paul; Rouault, Karen; Chen, Jian-Min; Raguénès, Odile; Fichou, Yann; Hardy, Elisabeth; Gobin, Eric; Pan-petesch, Brigitte; Kerbiriou, Mathieu; Trouvé, Pascal; Marcorelles, Pascale; Abgrall, Jean-francois; Le Maréchal, Cédric; Férec, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenia is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by a reduced number of blood platelets. Despite the identification of nearly 20 causative genes in the past decade, approximately half of all subjects with inherited thrombocytopenia still remain unexplained in terms of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Here we report a six-generation French pedigree with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and the identification of its genetic basis. Of the 55 subjects available for analysis, 26 were diagnosed with isolated macrothrombocytopenia. Genome-wide linkage analysis mapped a 10.9 Mb locus to chromosome 14 (14q22) with a LOD score of 7.6. Candidate gene analysis complemented by targeted next-generation sequencing identified a missense mutation (c.137GA; p.Arg46Gln) in the alpha-actinin 1 gene (ACTN1) that segregated with macrothrombocytopenia in this large pedigree. The missense mutation occurred within actin-binding domain of alpha-actinin 1, a functionally critical domain that crosslinks actin filaments into bundles. The evaluation of cultured mutation-harboring megakaryocytes by electron microscopy and the immunofluorescence examination of transfected COS-7 cells suggested that the mutation causes disorganization of the cellular cytoplasm. Our study concurred with a recently published whole-exome sequence analysis of six small Japanese families with congenital macrothrombocytopenia, adding ACTN1 to the growing list of thrombocytopenia genes. PMID:24069336

  17. Order and disorder in large multi-site docking proteins of the Gab family--implications for signalling complex formation and inhibitor design strategies.

    PubMed

    Simister, Philip C; Feller, Stephan M

    2012-01-01

    Large multi-site docking (LMD) proteins of the Gab, IRS, FRS, DOK and Cas families consist of one or two folded N-terminal domains, followed by a predominantly disordered C-terminal extension. Their primary function is to provide a docking platform for signalling molecules (including PI3K, PLC, Grb2, Crk, RasGAP, SHP2) in intracellular signal transmission from activated cell-surface receptors, to which they become coupled. A detailed analysis of the structural nature and intrinsic disorder propensity of LMD proteins, with Gab proteins as specific examples, is presented. By primary sequence analysis and literature review the varying levels of disorder and hidden order are predicted, revealing properties and a physical architecture that help to explain their biological function and characteristics, common for network hub proteins. The virulence factor, CagA, from Helicobacter pylori is able to mimic Gab function once injected by this human pathogen into stomach epithelial cells. Its predicted differential structure is compared to Gab1 with respect to its functional mimicry. Lastly, we discuss how LMD proteins, in particular Gab1 and Gab2, and their protein partners, such as SH2 and SH3 domain-containing adaptors like Grb2, might qualify for future anti-cancer strategies in developing protein-protein interaction (PPI) inhibitors towards binary interactors consisting of an intrinsically disordered epitope and a structured domain surface. PMID:21935523

  18. A Novel Splice-Site Mutation in ALS2 Establishes the Diagnosis of Juvenile Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in a Family with Early Onset Anarthria and Generalized Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Anthony; Azim, Saad; Silver, David L.; Mansoor, Atika; Tay, Stacey Kiat Hong; Abbasi, Sumiya; Hashmi, Asraf Hussain; Janjua, Jamal; Khalid, Sumbal; Tai, E. Shyong; Yeo, Gene W.; Khor, Chiea Chuen

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of childhood neurological disorders remains challenging given the overlapping clinical presentation across subgroups and heterogeneous presentation within subgroups. To determine the underlying genetic cause of a severe neurological disorder in a large consanguineous Pakistani family presenting with severe scoliosis, anarthria and progressive neuromuscular degeneration, we performed genome-wide homozygosity mapping accompanied by whole-exome sequencing in two affected first cousins and their unaffected parents to find the causative mutation. We identified a novel homozygous splice-site mutation (c.3512+1G>A) in the ALS2 gene (NM_020919.3) encoding alsin that segregated with the disease in this family. Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in ALS2 are known to cause juvenile-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), one of the many neurological conditions having overlapping symptoms with many neurological phenotypes. RT-PCR validation revealed that the mutation resulted in exon-skipping as well as the use of an alternative donor splice, both of which are predicted to cause loss-of-function of the resulting proteins. By examining 216 known neurological disease genes in our exome sequencing data, we also identified 9 other rare nonsynonymous mutations in these genes, some of which lie in highly conserved regions. Sequencing of a single proband might have led to mis-identification of some of these as the causative variant. Our findings established a firm diagnosis of juvenile ALS in this family, thus demonstrating the use of whole exome sequencing combined with linkage analysis in families as a powerful tool for establishing a quick and precise genetic diagnosis of complex neurological phenotypes. PMID:25474699

  19. A Case of Nasu-Hakola Disease without Fractures or Consanguinity Diagnosed Using Exome Sequencing and Treated with Sodium Valproate.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Kiyohiro; Yoshino, Yuta; Mori, Yoko; Ochi, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Taku; Ishimaru, Takashi; Ueno, Shu-Ichi

    2015-12-31

    Nasu-Hakola disease (NHD) is a rare autosomal recessive neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by bone cysts, fractures, and cognitive impairment. Two genes are responsible for the development of NHD; TYROBPand TREM2. Although it presents with typical signs and symptoms, diagnosing this disease remains difficult. This case report describes a male with NHD with no family or past history of bone fractures who was diagnosed using exome sequencing. His frontal lobe psychiatric symptoms recovered partially following treatment with sodium valproate, but not with an antipsychotic. PMID:26598595

  20. A Case of Nasu-Hakola Disease without Fractures or Consanguinity Diagnosed Using Exome Sequencing and Treated with Sodium Valproate

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Kiyohiro; Yoshino, Yuta; Mori, Yoko; Ochi, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Taku; Ishimaru, Takashi; Ueno, Shu-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Nasu-Hakola disease (NHD) is a rare autosomal recessive neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by bone cysts, fractures, and cognitive impairment. Two genes are responsible for the development of NHD; TYROBP and TREM2. Although it presents with typical signs and symptoms, diagnosing this disease remains difficult. This case report describes a male with NHD with no family or past history of bone fractures who was diagnosed using exome sequencing. His frontal lobe psychiatric symptoms recovered partially following treatment with sodium valproate, but not with an antipsychotic. PMID:26598595

  1. Challenges and solutions for gene identification in the presence of familial locus heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Atteeq U; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Drummond, Meghan C; Shahzad, Mohsin; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Morell, Robert J; Ansar, Muhammad; Jan, Abid; Wang, Xin; Aziz, Abdul; Riazuddin, Saima; Smith, Joshua D; Wang, Gao T; Ahmed, Zubair M; Gul, Khitab; Shearer, A Eliot; Smith, Richard J H; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Hinnant, John; Khan, Shaheen N; Fisher, Rachel A; Ahmad, Wasim; Friderici, Karen H; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B; Wilch, Ellen S; Leal, Suzanne M

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of exomes and genomes has accelerated the identification of genes involved in Mendelian phenotypes. However, many NGS studies fall short of identifying causal variants, with estimates for success rates as low as 25% for uncovering the pathological variant underlying disease etiology. An important reason for such failures is familial locus heterogeneity, where within a single pedigree causal variants in two or more genes underlie Mendelian trait etiology. As examples of intra- and inter-sibship familial locus heterogeneity, we present 10 consanguineous Pakistani families segregating hearing impairment due to homozygous variants in two different hearing impairment genes and a European-American pedigree in which hearing impairment is caused by four variants in three different genes. We have identified 41 additional pedigrees with syndromic and nonsyndromic hearing impairment for which a single previously reported hearing impairment gene has been identified but only segregates with the phenotype in a subset of affected pedigree members. We estimate that locus heterogeneity occurs in 15.3% (95% confidence interval: 11.9%, 19.9%) of the families in our collection. We demonstrate novel approaches to apply linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping (for autosomal recessive consanguineous pedigrees), which can be used to detect locus heterogeneity using either NGS or SNP array data. Results from linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping can also be used to group sibships or individuals most likely to be segregating the same causal variants and thereby increase the success rate of gene identification. PMID:25491636

  2. Challenges and solutions for gene identification in the presence of familial locus heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Atteeq U; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Drummond, Meghan C; Shahzad, Mohsin; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Morell, Robert J; Ansar, Muhammad; Jan, Abid; Wang, Xin; Aziz, Abdul; Riazuddin, Saima; Smith, Joshua D; Wang, Gao T; Ahmed, Zubair M; Gul, Khitab; Shearer, A Eliot; Smith, Richard J H; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Hinnant, John; Khan, Shaheen N; Fisher, Rachel A; Ahmad, Wasim; Friderici, Karen H; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B; Wilch, Ellen S; Leal, Suzanne M

    2015-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of exomes and genomes has accelerated the identification of genes involved in Mendelian phenotypes. However, many NGS studies fall short of identifying causal variants, with estimates for success rates as low as 25% for uncovering the pathological variant underlying disease etiology. An important reason for such failures is familial locus heterogeneity, where within a single pedigree causal variants in two or more genes underlie Mendelian trait etiology. As examples of intra- and inter-sibship familial locus heterogeneity, we present 10 consanguineous Pakistani families segregating hearing impairment due to homozygous variants in two different hearing impairment genes and a European-American pedigree in which hearing impairment is caused by four variants in three different genes. We have identified 41 additional pedigrees with syndromic and nonsyndromic hearing impairment for which a single previously reported hearing impairment gene has been identified but only segregates with the phenotype in a subset of affected pedigree members. We estimate that locus heterogeneity occurs in 15.3% (95% confidence interval: 11.9%, 19.9%) of the families in our collection. We demonstrate novel approaches to apply linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping (for autosomal recessive consanguineous pedigrees), which can be used to detect locus heterogeneity using either NGS or SNP array data. Results from linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping can also be used to group sibships or individuals most likely to be segregating the same causal variants and thereby increase the success rate of gene identification. PMID:25491636

  3. Human KZNF Gene Catalog - A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors

    DOE Data Explorer

    Huntley, S; Baggott, D. M.; Hamilton, A. T.; Tran-Gyamfi, M.; Yang, S.; Kim, J.; Gordon, L.; Branscomb, E.; Stubbs, L.

    Kruppel-type zinc finger (ZNF) motifs are prevalent components of transcription factor proteins in all eukaryotes. KRAB-ZNF proteins, in which a potent repressor domain is attached to a tandem array of DNA-binding zinc-finger motifs, are specific to tetrapod vertebrates and represent the largest class of ZNF proteins in mammals. To define the full repertoire of human KRAB-ZNF proteins, we searched the genome sequence for key motifs and then constructed and manually curated gene models incorporating those sequences. The resulting gene catalog contains 423 KRAB-ZNF protein-coding loci, yielding alternative transcripts that altogether predict at least 742 structurally distinct proteins. Active rounds of segmental duplication, involving single genes or larger regions and including both tandem and distributed duplication events, have driven the expansion of this mammalian gene family. Comparisons between the human genes and ZNF loci mined from the draft mouse, dog, and chimpanzee genomes not only identified 103 KRAB-ZNF genes that are conserved in mammals but also highlighted a substantial level of lineage-specific change; at least 136 KRAB-ZNF coding genes are primate specific, including many recent duplicates. KRAB-ZNF genes are widely expressed and clustered genes are typically not coregulated, indicating that paralogs have evolved to fill roles in many different biological processes. To facilitate further study, we have developed a Web-based public resource with access to gene models, sequences, and other data, including visualization tools to provide genomic context and interaction with other public data sets. [This abstract was copied from: S Huntley, DM Baggott, AT Hamilton, M Tran-Gyamfi, S Yang, J Kim, L Gordon, E Branscomb, and L Stubbs. 2006. A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors, Genome Research 16(5):669 - 677] The website provides the ability to search the online catalog by genomic coordinates, name, locus type, and motifs, to utilize a graphical browser and to download data files.

  4. Family Issues

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Living with Autism > Family Issues Family Issues A child’s autism diagnosis affects every member of the family in ... can help their family by informing their other children about autism and the complications it introduces, understanding the challenges ...

  5. Homozygosity Mapping in Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa in South Indian Families

    PubMed Central

    Srilekha, Sundaramurthy; Arokiasamy, Tharigopala; Srikrupa, Natarajan N.; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Meenakshi, Swaminathan; Sen, Parveen; Kapur, Suman; Soumittra, Nagasamy

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are retinal degenerative diseases which cause severe retinal dystrophy affecting the photoreceptors. LCA is predominantly inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and contributes to 5% of all retinal dystrophies; whereas RP is inherited by all the Mendelian pattern of inheritance and both are leading causes of visual impairment in children and young adults. Homozygosity mapping is an efficient strategy for mapping both known and novel disease loci in recessive conditions, especially in a consanguineous mating, exploiting the fact that the regions adjacent to the disease locus will also be homozygous by descent in such inbred children. Here we have studied eleven consanguineous LCA and one autosomal recessive RP (arRP) south Indian families to know the prevalence of mutations in known genes and also to know the involvement of novel loci, if any. Complete ophthalmic examination was done for all the affected individuals including electroretinogram, fundus photograph, fundus autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomography. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 250K HMA GeneChip on eleven LCA families followed by screening of candidate gene(s) in the homozygous block identified mutations in ten families; AIPL1 – 3 families, RPE65- 2 families, GUCY2D, CRB1, RDH12, IQCB1 and SPATA7 in one family each, respectively. Six of the ten (60%) mutations identified are novel. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 10K HMA GeneChip on the arRP family identified a novel nonsense mutation in MERTK. The mutations segregated within the family and was absent in 200 control chromosomes screened. In one of the eleven LCA families, the causative gene/mutation was not identified but many homozygous blocks were noted indicating that a possible novel locus/gene might be involved. The genotype and phenotype features, especially the fundus changes for AIPL1, RPE65, CRB1, RDH12 genes were as reported earlier. PMID:26147992

  6. Late-onset hexosaminidase A and hexosaminidase A and B deficiency: family study and review.

    PubMed

    Adams, C; Green, S

    1986-04-01

    Five children from two non-consanguineous Asian families with juvenile-onset hexosaminidase deficiency are presented. Two have juvenile Tay-Sachs disease with hexosaminidase A deficiency and three have juvenile Sandhoff disease with hexosaminidase A and B deficiency. The contributing factors in the spectrum of the hexosaminidase deficiency disease are outlined, and previously reported cases of late-onset Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff disease are reviewed. The heterogeneity of the effects of hexosaminidase deficiency is discussed, with the recommendation that the diagnosis be considered, in its various forms, when there is no other obvious explanation. PMID:2940136

  7. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Kricker, Anne; Paltiel, Ora; Flowers, Christopher R.; Wang, Sophia S.; Monnereau, Alain; Blair, Aaron; Maso, Luigino Dal; Kane, Eleanor V.; Nieters, Alexandra; Foran, James M.; Miligi, Lucia; Clavel, Jacqueline; Bernstein, Leslie; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Skibola, Christine F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although risk factors for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) have been suggested, their independent effects, modification by sex, and association with anatomical sites are largely unknown. Methods In a pooled analysis of 4667 cases and 22639 controls from 19 studies, we used stepwise logistic regression to identify the most parsimonious multivariate models for DLBCL overall, by sex, and for selected anatomical sites. Results DLBCL was associated with B-cell activating autoimmune diseases (odds ratio [OR] = 2.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.80 to 3.09), hepatitis C virus seropositivity (OR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.47 to 2.76), family history of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.54 to 2.47), higher young adult body mass index (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.12 to 2.23, for 35+ vs 18.5 to 22.4 kg/m2), higher recreational sun exposure (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.69 to 0.89), any atopic disorder (OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.76 to 0.89), and higher socioeconomic status (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.79 to 0.94). Additional risk factors for women were occupation as field crop/vegetable farm worker (OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.22 to 2.60), hairdresser (OR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.12 to 2.41), and seamstress/embroider (OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.13 to 1.97), low adult body mass index (OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.29 to 0.74, for <18.5 vs 18.5 to 22.4 kg/m2), hormone replacement therapy started age at least 50 years (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.52 to 0.88), and oral contraceptive use before 1970 (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.62 to 1.00); and for men were occupation as material handling equipment operator (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.02 to 2.44), lifetime alcohol consumption (OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.44 to 0.75, for >400kg vs nondrinker), and previous blood transfusion (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.57 to 0.83). Autoimmune disease, atopy, and family history of non-Hodgkin lymphoma showed similar associations across selected anatomical sites, whereas smoking was associated with central nervous system, testicular and cutaneous DLBCLs; inflammatory bowel disease was associated with gastrointestinal DLBCL; and farming and hair dye use were associated with mediastinal DLBCL. Conclusion Our results support a complex and multifactorial etiology for DLBCL with some variation in risk observed by sex and anatomical site. PMID:25174023

  8. A novel mutation of EYA4 in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant middle-frequency sensorineural hearing loss by targeted exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Zhang, Zhao; Cheng, Jing; Lu, Yu; Yang, Chang-Liang; Luo, Yan-Yun; Yang, Guang; Yang, Hui; Zhu, Li; Zhou, Jia; Yao, Hang-Qi

    2015-06-01

    The middle-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (MFSNHL) is rare among hereditary non-syndromic hearing loss. To date, only three genes are reported to be associated with MFSNHL, including TECTA, EYA4 and COL11A2. In this report, we analyzed and explored the clinical audiological characteristics and the causative gene of a Chinese family named HG-Z087 with non-syndromic autosomal dominant inherited MFSNHL. Clinical audiological characteristics and inheritance pattern of a family were evaluated, and pedigree was drawn based on medical history investigation. Our results showed that the Chinese family was characterized by late onset, progressive, non-sydromic autosomal dominant MFSNHL. Targeted exome sequencing, conducted using DNA samples of an affected member in this family, revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation c.1643C>G in exon 18 of EYA4, causing amino-acid (aa) substitution Arg for Thr at a conserved position aa-548. The p.T548R mutation related to hearing loss in the selected Chinese family was validated by Sanger sequencing. However, the mutation was absent in control group containing 100 DNA samples from normal Chinese families. In conclusion, we identified the pathogenic gene and found that the novel missense mutation c.1643C>G (p.T548R) in EYA4 might have caused autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing impairment in the selected Chinese family. PMID:25809937

  9. [Familial hypertriglyceridemia: biochemical, clinical and molecular study in a Moroccan family].

    PubMed

    Bouabdellah, Mounya; Iraqi, Hinde; Benlian, Pascale; Berqia, Ikram; Benchekroun, Laila; Chraïbi, Abdelmjid; Chabraoui, Layachi

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypertriglyceridemia is a rare autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism. Mutation within the LPL gene constitutes the first cause of monogenic etiology. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is the key enzyme in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins catabolism. Familial LPL deficiency is expressed by eruptive xanthomatosis and acute pancreatitis. We report a Moroccan case with a monstrous hypertriglyceridemia caused by LPL gene mutation. We discuss pathophysiology aspects according to available investigations data and the relevance of familial screening. The proband is a 19-year-old woman originating from the village of Taourirt (South of Morocco). She was admitted in emergency for diabetic ketoacidosis. Clinical investigations and routine laboratory tests were performed upon admission. Then lipoprotein electrophoresis and sequencing of the LPL gene were practiced. A monstrous hypertriglyceridemia up to 199 mmol/L was found. Lipoprotein electrophoresis has objectified profound disturbances on chylomicrons, VLDL and IDL. The sequencing detected a missense mutation p.S286R at homozygous state in a consanguinity context. Discovery of this LPL gene mutation is the first indigenous and documented case, never related in any other ethnic group. It constitutes a novel proof of a founder effect in the south Moroccan population. Prevalence studies with familial screening should be done for preventative action which is the only acceptable way to limit the cardiovascular and pancreatitis risks in this population where inbreeding is a general rule. PMID:26104879

  10. Autosomal dominant Kufs` disease: Clinical heterogeneity in nine families, and exclusion of linkage to CLN1 and CLN3 markers in a large American kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Andermann, F.; Andermann, E.; Carpenter, S.

    1994-09-01

    Most forms of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) are autosomal recessive, and three genes have already been mapped: the infantile form (CLN 1); the juvenile form (CLN 3); and the early juvenile variant (CLN 5) on chromosomes 1, 16 and 13, respectively. Kufs` disease or adolescent-adult onset NCL is usually inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, and presents as three distinct clinical syndromes: progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME) with onset in the early teens or around age 30; and onset of dementia with motor disability in the 30s. We have studied three families originating from different parts of the USA manifesting dominantly inherited Kufs` disease. Granular osmophilic deposits (GROD) were found in brain, but storage in skin was not an obligatory feature. Six dominantly inherited PME families have been ascertained from three different regions of Spain. No storage was found in skin or muscle in any of these families. The mean age of onset in the American families is earlier, the clinical manifestations more severe, and the progression much more rapid that in the Spanish families. These findings would suggest the possibility of genetic heterogeneity involving two or more loci, or different mutations at the same gene locus. Genetic linkage studies have been carried out in a six-generation New Jersey family in an attempt to characterize the gene(s) responsible for this disorder. The infantile NCL locus on chromosome 1p (CLN1) and the juvenile NCL locus on chromosome 16p (CLN 3) have been excluded in this family. Further clinical, pathological and molecular genetic studies should lead to the clarification of the diagnostic approaches in this disorder.

  11. Family History

    MedlinePLUS

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  12. Family Folklore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotkin, Amy J.; Baker, Holly C.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the Family Folklore Program of the Smithsonian Institution's annual Festival of American Folklife, in which the whole family can be involved in tracing family history through story telling, photographs, etc. (MS)

  13. Familiality of Tourette Syndrome, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Heritability Analysis in a Large Sib-Pair Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Carol A.; Grados, Marco A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with a genetic component that is highly comorbid with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic relations between these disorders have not been clearly elucidated. This study examined the familial relations among TS,…

  14. Sfr13, a member of a large family of asymmetrically localized Sfi1-repeat proteins, is important for basal body separation and stability in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Stemm-Wolf, Alexander J.; Meehl, Janet B.; Winey, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Summary Directed fluid flow, which is achieved by the coordinated beating of motile cilia, is required for processes as diverse as cellular swimming, developmental patterning and mucus clearance. Cilia are nucleated, anchored and aligned at the plasma membrane by basal bodies, which are cylindrical microtubule-based structures with ninefold radial symmetry. In the unicellular ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, two centrin family members associated with the basal body are important for both basal body organization and stabilization. We have identified a family of 13 proteins in Tetrahymena that contain centrin-binding repeats related to those identified in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sfi1 protein. We have named these proteins Sfr1–Sfr13 (for Sfi1-repeat). Nine of the Sfr proteins localize in unique polarized patterns surrounding the basal body, suggesting non-identical roles in basal body organization and association with basal body accessory structures. Furthermore, the Sfr proteins are found in distinct basal body populations in Tetrahymena cells, indicating that they are responsive to particular developmental programs. A complete genetic deletion of one of the family members, Sfr13, causes unstable basal bodies and defects in daughter basal body separation from the mother, phenotypes also observed with centrin disruption. It is likely that the other Sfr family members are involved in distinct centrin functions, providing specificity to the tasks that centrins perform at basal bodies. PMID:23426847

  15. Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  16. [Family Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance: The Newsletter of the National Transition Alliance, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue provides four articles that address family involvement in the transition of youth with disabilities from school to work. The first article, "Family Involvement" by Marge Goldberg and Shauna McDonald, offers evidence of the importance of family involvement at this stage of the individual's life, reports on families' experiences,…

  17. Familial congenital laryngeal abductor paralysis: different expression in a family with one male and three females affected.

    PubMed

    Schinzel, A; Hof, E; Dangel, P; Robinson, W

    1990-11-01

    A brother and two sisters of remotely consanguineous parents had congenital laryngeal abductor paralysis and moderate mental retardation. In the two older sibs, mental deficiency could have resulted from birth asphyxia, but the youngest girl was already microcephalic at birth and had no apparent asphyxia. The mother, who was healthy and of normal intelligence, was found on laryngoscopy to have unilateral laryngeal abductor paralysis. This is the first family with both mentally retarded and nonretarded affected members with congenital laryngeal abductor paralysis. Inheritance is most likely autosomal dominant with variable expression, but autosomal recessive inheritance, with both parents carriers and the mother an affected homozygote, and X linked inheritance are also possible. PMID:2277390

  18. Heterogeneous growth hormone (GH) gene mutations in familial GH deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Cogan, J.D.; Phillips, J.A. III; Sakati, N.; Frisch, H.; Schober, E.; Milner, R.D.G. )

    1993-05-01

    The GH1 genes of probands of two families with familial isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) were sequenced. Double stranded sequencing of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification products from genomic DNA of two affected cousins in a consanguineous Turkish family revealed a G[yields]A transition in the 20th codon of the GH1 signal peptide. This substitution converts a TGG (Trp) to a TAG (stop) codon and generates a new AluI recognition site. PCR amplification of the GH1 alleles of family members, followed by AluI digestion, revealed that the G[yields]A transition segregated with the IGHD phenotype. In a Saudi Arabian family, a G[yields]C transversion was found that alters the first base of the donor splice site of intron IV. This substitution should perturb mRNA splicing, resulting in an altered protein product which should be unstable or bioinactive. This transversion also destroys an HphI site, which was used to assay samples from relatives. Digestion of PCR amplification products with HphI demonstrated cosegregation of the G[yields]C transversion with IGHD. These results demonstrate that in the expression of the GH1 gene. 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Family Recovery.

    PubMed

    Spaniol, LeRoy; Nelson, Ann

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the recovery process of families of people with severe mental illnesses. The paper describes the phases of family recovery and useful interventions by phase with the family by professionals. The recovery process of people with serious mental illnesses has been well documented but that of the family has been neglected. Hopefully, this paper will generate further research into the impact of serious mental illnesses on family members. PMID:25947133

  20. Severe mental retardation in six generations of a large South African family carrying a translocation t(6;10)(q27;q25.2).

    PubMed Central

    Brusnický, J; van Heerden, K M; de Jong, G; Cronjé, A S; Retief, A E

    1986-01-01

    Partial monosomy 10q25.2----qter, detected in a newborn baby with multiple congenital abnormalities, was found to be derived from a balanced maternal translocation t(6;10)(q27;q25.2). The pedigree of six generations of the family is presented. In an extensive cytogenetic study of this family, the chromosome complements of 57 subjects, potentially capable of carrying some form of this translocation, were analysed. A total of 14 male carriers (four obligatory) and 14 female carriers (three obligatory) of this translocation was found. Partial trisomy 10q25.2----qter, associated with severe mental retardation, occurred in nine cases, eight males and one female. Two of these eight males were detected prenatally and subsequently therapeutically aborted. The phenotypes of the family members with partial trisomy 10q25.2----qter are compared to each other and to those reported in publications. No further cases of partial monosomy 10q25.2----qter were encountered. A review of published reports of partial monosomy and partial trisomy 10qter is given. The apparent absence of infertility, the occurrence of many first trimester miscarriages, and the marked sex ratio are discussed. Images PMID:3783620

  1. Novel mutations of MYO7A and USH1G in Israeli Arab families with Usher syndrome type 1

    PubMed Central

    Rizel, Leah; Safieh, Christine; Shalev, Stavit A.; Mezer, Eedy; Jabaly-Habib, Haneen; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Chervinsky, Elena; Briscoe, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the genetic basis for Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) in four consanguineous Israeli Arab families. Methods Haplotype analysis for all known USH1 loci was performed in each family. In families for which haplotype analysis was inconclusive, we performed genome-wide homozygosity mapping using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. For mutation analysis, specific primers were used to PCR amplify the coding exons of the MYO7A, USH1C, and USH1G genes including intron-exon boundaries. Mutation screening was performed with direct sequencing. Results A combination of haplotype analysis and genome-wide homozygosity mapping indicated linkage to the USH1B locus in two families, USH1C in one family and USH1G in another family. Sequence analysis of the relevant genes (MYO7A, USH1C, and USH1G) led to the identification of pathogenic mutations in all families. Two of the identified mutations are novel (c.1135–1147dup in MYO7A and c.206–207insC in USH1G). Conclusions USH1 is a genetically heterogenous condition. Of the five USH1 genes identified to date, USH1C and USH1G are the rarest contributors to USH1 etiology worldwide. It is therefore interesting that two of the four Israeli Arab families reported here have mutations in these two genes. This finding further demonstrates the unique genetic structure of the Israeli population in general, and the Israeli Arab population in particular, which due to high rates of consanguinity segregates many rare autosomal recessive genetic conditions. PMID:22219650

  2. Familial Clustering of Type 2 Diabetes among Omanis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sinani, Sawsan; Al-Shafaee, Mohammed; Al-Mamari, Ali; Woodhouse, Nicholas; Al-Shafie, Omaima; Hassan, Mohammed; Al-Yahyaee, Said; Albarwani, Sulayma; Jaju, Deepali; Al-Hashmi, Khamis; Al-Abri, Mohammed; Rizvi, Syed; Bayoumi, Riad

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to screen Omani individuals for the familial aggregation of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods A random cohort of 1182 Omani individuals visiting the Family Medicine Clinic at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman, for regular medical checkup, aged ?40 years, were sampled. Patients were categorized into three groups: (1) individuals who claim not to have diabetes and had no family history of diabetes; (2) individuals who claim not to have diabetes but had family history of diabetes; (3) individuals with diabetes. Only 16% of these Omani individuals had no diabetes and no family history of diabetes. Another separate random cohort of 234 Omani type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, from the Diabetes Clinic at SQUH, were interviewed and questioned about their family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results Ninety five percent of the patients had a family history of diabetes. Eighty percent had first degree relatives with diabetes and 46% had second degree relatives with diabetes. At least one parent with diabetes was reported among 55% of these diabetics, while maternal diabetes (55%) was found to be higher than paternal diabetes (47%). However, only 15% had both parents with diabetes. Furthermore, almost half of the 234 diabetics were having at least one of the following relatives with diabetes: brother, sister, aunt or an uncle. Conclusion The findings of this study confirm familial aggregation of diabetes among the Omani population. Compared to other populations, familial aggregation of type 2 diabetes mellitus among Omanis is relatively very high, and is perhaps due to the very high degree of consanguinity among Omanis. Since almost everyone seems to have a genetic predisposition to diabetes, the dramatic lifestyle changes over the past 25 years, could tip the population into an epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:24498483

  3. Family Meals

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A With Robert Irvine Pregnant? What to Expect Family Meals KidsHealth > Parents > Nutrition & Fitness Center > Healthy Eating & ... even more important as kids get older. Making Family Meals Happen It can be a big challenge ...

  4. Familial gigantism.

    PubMed

    Herder, Wouter W de

    2012-01-01

    Familial GH-secreting tumors are seen in association with three separate hereditary clinical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex, and familial isolated pituitary adenomas. PMID:22584702

  5. Family History

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Pediatric Aneurysms Brain Aneurysm Causes and Risk Factors Family History ... Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Pediatric Aneurysms Brain Aneurysm Causes and Risk Factors Family History ...

  6. A Novel von Hippel Lindau Gene Intronic Variant and Its Reclassification from VUS to Pathogenic: the Impact on a Large Family.

    PubMed

    Sexton, A; Rawlings, L; McKavanagh, G; Simons, K; Winship, I

    2015-12-01

    We present a case where a variant of uncertain significance in the von Hippel Lindau syndrome gene (VHL) was identified in a proband with haemangioblastoma, and in a second degree relative with phaeochromocytoma. Initial uncertainty due to the unclear nature of the variant created psychosocial challenges for this family, in which four other genetic conditions were also present. Subsequent RNA studies confirmed this as a novel pathogenic mutation affecting splicing of exon 2. A third relative has since been diagnosed with haemangioblastoma. We suggest that this mutation possibly has reduced penetrance as there was no history of haemangioblastoma, renal tumours (apart from small cysts) or other VHL tumours among five mutation positive and seven untested adult relatives at 50 % risk of the VHL mutation (average age 46 years, range 18-70 years). This case presents a novel VHL splicing mutation and highlights the psychosocial and medical value of additional laboratory studies on uncertain variants for individuals, their families and for the health professionals providing advice and counseling. PMID:26323595

  7. Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This "special focus" journal issue consists of 13 individual articles on the theme of rural family programs relating to school, health services, church, and other institutions. It includes: (1) "Towards a Rural Family Policy" (Judith K. Chynoweth and Michael D. Campbell); (2) "Montana: Council for Families Collaborates for Prevention (Jean…

  8. Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, Colleen, Ed.; McBride, Marijo, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This "Feature Issue" of the quarterly journal "Impact" presents 19 brief articles on family support systems in the United States for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. Emphasis is on provisions of Public Law 99-457. Articles include: "Family Support in the United States: Setting a Course for the 1990s" (James Knoll);…

  9. Rare intracranial cholesterol deposition and a homozygous mutation of LDLR in a familial hypercholesterolemia patient.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoxian; Zhang, Yanghui; Wei, Xianda; Peng, Ying; Yang, Pu; Tan, Hu; Chen, Chen; Pan, Qian; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-09-15

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH MIM# 143890) is one of the most common autosomal inherited diseases. FH is characterized by elevated plasma levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Mutation in the LDLR gene, which encodes the LDL receptor protein, is responsible for most of the morbidity of FH. The incidence of heterozygous FH is about 1/500, whereas the incidence of homozygous FH is only 1/1,000,000 in Caucasian population. In this study, we report a homozygous LDLR mutation (c.298G>A) in a familial hypercholesterolemia patient, who exhibited intracranial cholesterol deposition, which is a rare addition to the common FH phenotypes. The proband's consanguineous parents have the same heterozygous mutation with elevated concentrations of LDL-C but no xanthoma. PMID:25936346

  10. Jamaican families.

    PubMed

    Miner, Dianne Cooney

    2003-01-01

    The study of the family in the Caribbean originated with European scholars who assumed the universality of the patriarchal nuclear family and the primacy of this structure to the healthy functioning of society. Matrifocal Caribbean families thus were seen as chaotic and disorganized and inadequate to perform the essential tasks of the social system. This article provides a more current discussion of the Jamaican family. It argues that its structure is the result of the agency and adaptation of its members and not the root cause of the increasing marginalization of peoples in the developing world. The article focuses on families living in poverty and how the family structure supports essential family functions, adaptations, and survival. PMID:12597672

  11. Two Novel Mutations in Myosin Binding Protein C Slow Causing Distal Arthrogryposis Type 2 in Two Large Han Chinese Families May Suggest Important Functional Role of Immunoglobulin Domain C2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuefu; Zhong, Bomeng; Han, Weitian; Zhao, Ning; Liu, Wei; Sui, Yu; Wang, Yawen; Lu, Yongping; Wang, Hong; Li, Jianxin; Jiang, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Distal arthrogryposes (DAs) are a group of disorders that mainly involve the distal parts of the limbs and at least ten different DAs have been described to date. DAs are mostly described as autosomal dominant disorders with variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance, but recently autosomal recessive pattern was reported in distal arthrogryposis type 5D. Mutations in the contractile genes are found in about 50% of all DA patients. Of these genes, mutations in the gene encoding myosin binding protein C slow MYBPC1 were recently identified in two families with distal arthrogryposis type 1B. Here, we described two large Chinese families with autosomal dominant distal arthrogryposis type 2(DA2) with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Some unique overextension contractures of the lower limbs and some distinctive facial features were present in our DA2 pedigrees. We performed follow-up DNA sequencing after linkage mapping and first identified two novel MYBPC1 mutations (c.1075G>A [p.E359K] and c.956C>T [p.P319L]) responsible for these Chinese DA2 families of which one introduced by germline mosacism. Each mutation was found to cosegregate with the DA2 phenotype in each family but not in population controls. Both substitutions occur within C2 immunoglobulin domain, which together with C1 and the M motif constitute the binding site for the S2 subfragment of myosin. Our results expand the phenotypic spectrum of MYBPC1-related arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). We also proposed the possible molecular mechanisms that may underlie the pathogenesis of DA2 myopathy associated with these two substitutions in MYBPC1. PMID:25679999

  12. Identification of an extensive gene cluster among a family of PPOs in Trifolium pratense L. (red clover) using a large insert BAC library

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in plants is a trait with potential economic, agricultural and environmental impact. In relation to the food industry, PPO-induced browning causes unacceptable discolouration in fruit and vegetables: from an agriculture perspective, PPO can protect plants against pathogens and environmental stress, improve ruminant growth by increasing nitrogen absorption and decreasing nitrogen loss to the environment through the animal's urine. The high PPO legume, red clover, has a significant economic and environmental role in sustaining low-input organic and conventional farms. Molecular markers for a range of important agricultural traits are being developed for red clover and improved knowledge of PPO genes and their structure will facilitate molecular breeding. Results A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library comprising 26,016 BAC clones with an average 135 Kb insert size, was constructed from Trifolium pratense L. (red clover), a diploid legume with a haploid genome size of 440–637 Mb. Library coverage of 6–8 genome equivalents ensured good representation of genes: the library was screened for polyphenol oxidase (PPO) genes. Two single copy PPO genes, PPO4 and PPO5, were identified to add to a family of three, previously reported, paralogous genes (PPO1–PPO3). Multiple PPO1 copies were identified and characterised revealing a subfamily comprising three variants PPO1/2, PPO1/4 and PPO1/5. Six PPO genes clustered within the genome: four separate BAC clones could be assembled onto a predicted 190–510 Kb single BAC contig. Conclusion A PPO gene family in red clover resides as a cluster of at least 6 genes. Three of these genes have high homology, suggesting a more recent evolutionary event. This PPO cluster covers a longer region of the genome than clusters detected in rice or previously reported in tomato. Full-length coding sequences from PPO4, PPO5, PPO1/5 and PPO1/4 will facilitate functional studies and provide genetic markers for plant breeding. PMID:19619287

  13. Large, larger, largest--a family of cluster-based tantalum copper aluminides with giant unit cells. I. Structure solution and refinement.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Kobas, Miroslav; Conrad, Matthias; Harbrecht, Bernd; Steurer, Walter

    2009-06-01

    This is the first of two parts, where we report the structure determination of a novel family of cluster-based intermetallic phases of unprecedented complexity: cF444-Al(63.6)Ta(36.4) (AT-19), a = 19.1663 (1) A, V = 7040 A3, cF(5928-x)-Al(56.6)Cu(3.9)Ta(39.5), x = 20 (ACT-45), a = 45.376 (1) A, V = 93,428 A(3) and cF(23,256-x)-Al(55.4)Cu(5.4)Ta(39.1), x = 122 (ACT-71), a = 71.490 (4) A, V = 365,372 A3. The space group is F43m in all three cases. These cluster-based structures are closely related to the class of Frank-Kasper phases. It is remarkable that all three structures show the same average structure that resembles the cubic Laves phase. PMID:19461140

  14. The sodium-phosphate co-transporter SLC34A2, and pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: Presentation of an inbred family and a novel truncating mutation in exon 3

    PubMed Central

    Vismara, Marco Favio Michele; Colao, Emma; Fabiani, Fernanda; Bombardiere, Francesco; Tamburrini, Oscar; Alessio, Caterina; Manti, Francesco; Pelaia, Gerolamo; Romeo, Pasquale; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Perrotti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a disorder in which many tiny fragments (microliths) of calcium phosphate gradually accumulate in alveoli. Loss of function mutations in the gene SLC34A2 coding for the sodium phosphate co-transporter (NaPi-IIb) are responsible for genetic forms of alveolar microlithiasis. We now report a consanguineous Italian family from Calabria with two affected members segregating alveolar microlithiasis in a recessive fashion. We describe, for the first time, a novel loss of function mutation in the gene coding for NaPi-IIb. A careful description of the clinical phenotype is provided together with technical details for direct sequencing of the gene. PMID:26744662

  15. Triton Parent & Family Ambassador Sign-Up Form

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    Triton Parent & Family Ambassador Sign-Up Form Parent/Family Member Name(s): Are you an alumnus in the family to go to college As a Triton Parent & Family Ambassador, I am interested in (check all that apply and families ___ Volunteering at large scale events on the UC San Diego campus (i.e. Family Weekend, Triton

  16. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Constitutes a Large and Diverse Family of Proteins Involved in Development and Abiotic Stress Responses in Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb.)

    PubMed Central

    Pedrosa, Andresa Muniz; Martins, Cristina de Paula Santos; Gonçalves, Luana Pereira; Costa, Marcio Gilberto Cardoso

    2015-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are an ubiquitous group of polypeptides that were first described to accumulate during plant seed dehydration, at the later stages of embryogenesis. Since then they have also been recorded in vegetative plant tissues experiencing water limitation and in anhydrobiotic bacteria and invertebrates and, thereby, correlated with the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. This study provides the first comprehensive study about the LEA gene family in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb.), the most important and widely grown fruit crop around the world. A surprisingly high number (72) of genes encoding C. sinensis LEAs (CsLEAs) were identified and classified into seven groups (LEA_1, LEA_2, LEA_3 and LEA_4, LEA_5, DEHYDRIN and SMP) based on their predicted amino acid sequences and also on their phylogenetic relationships with the complete set of Arabidopsis thaliana LEA proteins (AtLEAs). Approximately 60% of the CsLEAs identified in this study belongs to the unusual LEA_2 group of more hydrophobic LEA proteins, while the other LEA groups contained a relatively small number of members typically hydrophilic. A correlation between gene structure and motif composition was observed within each LEA group. Investigation of their chromosomal localizations revealed that the CsLEAs were non-randomly distributed across all nine chromosomes and that 33% of all CsLEAs are segmentally or tandemly duplicated genes. Analysis of the upstream sequences required for transcription revealed the presence of various stress-responsive cis-acting regulatory elements in the promoter regions of CsLEAs, including ABRE, DRE/CRT, MYBS and LTRE. Expression analysis using both RNA-seq data and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR) revealed that the CsLEA genes are widely expressed in various tissues, and that many genes containing the ABRE promoter sequence are induced by drought, salt and PEG. These results provide a useful reference for further exploration of the CsLEAs functions and applications on crop improvement. PMID:26700652

  17. Family Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This feature issue of IMPACT focuses on the empowerment of families with a member who has a developmental disability. It presents strategies and models for a collaborative, respectful approach to service provision, and presents the experiences of families in seeking support and assistance. Feature articles include "Two Generations of Disability: A…

  18. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  19. Family violence.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, S J

    2000-01-01

    Domestic and intimate partner abuse, child and adolescent physical and sexual abuse, and elder abuse constitute family violence. Such violence is responsible for a significant proportion of intentional injury and, accordingly, is a major public health problem. This chapter provides information on aspects of each type of family violence. PMID:10885265

  20. Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on various aspects of mammal family life ranging from ways different species are born to how different mammals are raised. Learning activities include making butter from cream, creating birth announcements for mammals, and playing a password game on family life. (ML)

  1. Family Potyviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses potyvirus study group has revised the description of the family Potyviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 9th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of viral sp...

  2. FAMILY POTYVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses potyvirus study group has revised the description of the family Geminiviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 8th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of vira...

  3. FAMILY GEMINIVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses geminivirus study group has revised the description of the family Geminiviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 8th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of vi...

  4. The Role of a Novel TRMT1 Gene Mutation and Rare GRM1 Gene Defect in Intellectual Disability in Two Azeri Families.

    PubMed

    Davarniya, Behzad; Hu, Hao; Kahrizi, Kimia; Musante, Luciana; Fattahi, Zohreh; Hosseini, Masoumeh; Maqsoud, Fariba; Farajollahi, Reza; Wienker, Thomas F; Ropers, H Hilger; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment or intellectual disability (ID) is a widespread neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by low IQ (below 70). ID is genetically heterogeneous and is estimated to affect 1-3% of the world's population. In affected children from consanguineous families, autosomal recessive inheritance is common, and identifying the underlying genetic cause is an important issue in clinical genetics. In the framework of a larger project, aimed at identifying candidate genes for autosomal recessive intellectual disorder (ARID), we recently carried out single nucleotide polymorphism-based genome-wide linkage analysis in several families from Ardabil province in Iran. The identification of homozygosity-by-descent loci in these families, in combination with whole exome sequencing, led us to identify possible causative homozygous changes in two families. In the first family, a missense variant was found in GRM1 gene, while in the second family, a frameshift alteration was identified in TRMT1, both of which were found to co-segregate with the disease. GRM1, a known causal gene for autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia (SCAR13, MIM#614831), encodes the metabotropic glutamate receptor1 (mGluR1). This gene plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and cerebellar development. Conversely, the TRMT1 gene encodes a tRNA methyltransferase that dimethylates a single guanine residue at position 26 of most tRNAs using S-adenosyl methionine as the methyl group donor. We recently presented TRMT1 as a candidate gene for ARID in a consanguineous Iranian family (Najmabadi et al., 2011). We believe that this second Iranian family with a biallelic loss-of-function mutation in TRMT1 gene supports the idea that this gene likely has function in development of the disorder. PMID:26308914

  5. The Role of a Novel TRMT1 Gene Mutation and Rare GRM1 Gene Defect in Intellectual Disability in Two Azeri Families

    PubMed Central

    Kahrizi, Kimia; Musante, Luciana; Fattahi, Zohreh; Hosseini, Masoumeh; Maqsoud, Fariba; Farajollahi, Reza; Wienker, Thomas F.; Ropers, H. Hilger; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment or intellectual disability (ID) is a widespread neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by low IQ (below 70). ID is genetically heterogeneous and is estimated to affect 1–3% of the world’s population. In affected children from consanguineous families, autosomal recessive inheritance is common, and identifying the underlying genetic cause is an important issue in clinical genetics. In the framework of a larger project, aimed at identifying candidate genes for autosomal recessive intellectual disorder (ARID), we recently carried out single nucleotide polymorphism-based genome-wide linkage analysis in several families from Ardabil province in Iran. The identification of homozygosity-by-descent loci in these families, in combination with whole exome sequencing, led us to identify possible causative homozygous changes in two families. In the first family, a missense variant was found in GRM1 gene, while in the second family, a frameshift alteration was identified in TRMT1, both of which were found to co-segregate with the disease. GRM1, a known causal gene for autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia (SCAR13, MIM#614831), encodes the metabotropic glutamate receptor1 (mGluR1). This gene plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and cerebellar development. Conversely, the TRMT1 gene encodes a tRNA methyltransferase that dimethylates a single guanine residue at position 26 of most tRNAs using S-adenosyl methionine as the methyl group donor. We recently presented TRMT1 as a candidate gene for ARID in a consanguineous Iranian family (Najmabadi et al., 2011). We believe that this second Iranian family with a biallelic loss-of-function mutation in TRMT1 gene supports the idea that this gene likely has function in development of the disorder. PMID:26308914

  6. Synthesis, structure, and magnetism of a family of heterometallic {Cu2Ln7} and {Cu4Ln12} (Ln = Gd, Tb, and Dy) complexes: the Gd analogues exhibiting a large magnetocaloric effect.

    PubMed

    Langley, Stuart K; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Tomasi, Corrado; Evangelisti, Marco; Brechin, Euan K; Murray, Keith S

    2014-12-15

    The syntheses, structures, and magnetic properties of two heterometallic Cu(II)-Ln(III) (Ln(III) = Gd, Tb, and Dy) families, utilizing triethanolamine and carboxylate ligands, are reported. The first structural motif displays a nonanuclear {Cu(II)2Ln(III)7} metallic core, while the second reveals a hexadecanuclear {Cu(II)4Ln(III)12} core. The differing nuclearities of the two families stem from the choice of carboxylic acid used in the synthesis. Magnetic studies show that the most impressive features are displayed by the {Cu(II)2Gd(III)7} and {Cu(II)4Gd(III)12} complexes, which display a large magnetocaloric effect, with entropy changes -?Sm = 34.6 and 33.0 J kg(-1) K(-1) at T = 2.7 and 2.9 K, respectively, for a 9 T applied field change. It is also found that the {Cu(II)4Dy(III)12} complex displays single-molecule magnet behavior, with an anisotropy barrier to magnetization reversal of 10.1 K. PMID:25494949

  7. Family acholeplasmataceae (including phytoplasmas)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family Acholeplasmataceae was originally established to accommodate the genus Acholeplasma, comprising the mollicutes that could be cultivated without the supplement of cholesterol and that use UGA as a stop codon instead of coding for tryptophan. It was later shown that the phytoplasmas, a larg...

  8. Family Health and Family Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This document is made up of a selection of some of the papers distributed to participants in courses on "Family Health and Family Planning" which have been organized each year since 1973 by the International Children's Center and the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. Six courses, held between 1973 and 1978, brought together a…

  9. Homozygosity mapping in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa families detects novel mutations

    PubMed Central

    Marzouka, Nour al Dain; Hebrard, Maxime; Manes, Gaël; Sénéchal, Audrey; Meunier, Isabelle; Hamel, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease resulting in progressive loss of photoreceptors that leads to blindness. To date, 36 genes are known to cause arRP, rendering the molecular diagnosis a challenge. The aim of this study was to use homozygosity mapping to identify the causative mutation in a series of inbred families with arRP. Methods arRP patients underwent standard ophthalmic examination, Goldman perimetry, fundus examination, retinal OCT, autofluorescence measurement, and full-field electroretinogram. Fifteen consanguineous families with arRP excluded for USH2A and EYS were genotyped on 250 K SNP arrays. Homozygous regions were listed, and known genes within these regions were PCR sequenced. Familial segregation and mutation analyzes were performed. Results We found ten mutations, seven of which were novel mutations in eight known genes, including RP1, IMPG2, NR2E3, PDE6A, PDE6B, RLBP1, CNGB1, and C2ORF71, in ten out of 15 families. The patients carrying RP1, C2ORF71, and IMPG2 mutations presented with severe RP, while those with PDE6A, PDE6B, and CNGB1 mutations were less severely affected. The five families without mutations in known genes could be a source of identification of novel genes. Conclusions Homozygosity mapping combined with systematic screening of known genes results in a positive molecular diagnosis in 66.7% of families. PMID:24339724

  10. Population Landscape of Familial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frank, C.; Fallah, M.; Sundquist, J.; Hemminki, A.; Hemminki, K.

    2015-01-01

    Public perception and anxiety of familial cancer have increased demands for clinical counseling, which may be well equipped for gene testing but less prepared for counseling of the large domain of familial cancer with unknown genetic background. The aim of the present study was to highlight the full scope of familial cancer and the variable levels of risk that need to be considered. Data on the 25 most common cancers were obtained from the Swedish Family Cancer Database and a Poisson regression model was applied to estimate relative risks (RR) distinguishing between family histories of single or multiple affected first-degree relatives and their diagnostic ages. For all cancers, individual risks were significantly increased if a parent or a sibling had a concordant cancer. While the RRs were around 2.00 for most cancers, risks were up to 10-fold increased for some cancers. Familial risks were even higher when multiple relatives were affected. Although familial risks were highest at ages below 60 years, most familial cases were diagnosed at older ages. The results emphasized the value of a detailed family history as a readily available tool for individualized counseling and its preventive potential for a large domain of non-syndromatic familial cancers. PMID:26256549

  11. Family Issues

    MedlinePLUS

    ... not mean that everyone gets along all the time. Conflicts are a part of family life. Many things can lead to conflict, such as illness, disability, addiction, job loss, school problems, and marital issues. Listening to ...

  12. Rapid multipoint linkage analysis of recessive traits in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Kruglyak, L; Daly, M J; Lander, E S

    1995-01-01

    Homozygosity mapping is a powerful strategy for mapping rare recessive traits in children of consanguineous marriages. Practical applications of this strategy are currently limited by the inability of conventional linkage analysis software to compute, in reasonable time, multipoint LOD scores for pedigrees with inbreeding loops. We have developed a new algorithm for rapid multipoint likelihood calculations in small pedigrees, including those with inbreeding loops. The running time of the algorithm grows, at most, linearly with the number of loci considered simultaneously. The running time is not sensitive to the presence of inbreeding loops, missing genotype information, and highly polymorphic loci. We have incorporated this algorithm into a software package, MAPMAKER/HOMOZ, that allows very rapid multipoint mapping of disease genes in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping. Multipoint analysis with dozens of markers can be carried out in minutes on a personal workstation. PMID:7847388

  13. Family Hypnotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araoz, Daniel L.; Negley-Parker, Esther

    1985-01-01

    A therapeutic model to help families activate experiential and right hemispheric functioning through hypnosis is presented in detail, together with a clinical illustration. Different situations in which this model is effective are mentioned and one such set of circumstances is described. (Author)

  14. Family Disruptions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Returns Do you or your spouse frequently travel on business? These can be disruptive times for your child and for the family as ... these out-of-town trips. Spend as much time as it takes to explain where you are ... before and during your travels. You need to acknowledge and accept her feelings: " ...

  15. Serving Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Geoffrey; Beggs, Marjorie; Seiderman, Ethel

    Parent Services Project (PSP), the first comprehensive program of resources and mental health activities for parents offered at child care centers in the San Francisco Bay Area (California), has expanded to centers in six states, serving over 19,000 families. This report describes the program's history, aims, and achievements, along with specific…

  16. My Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State-Operated Schools, Anchorage.

    This elementary reader is designed for use in a bilingual Inupiat-English program in Buckland and Deering, Alaska. It is the story of a small boy named Paul and his family. The Inupiat text and its English equivalent are never in opposition. The Inupiat text is presented on a picture page, with the English on the back. The illustrations, by J.…

  17. FAMILY TYMOVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article provides a brief review of the taxonomic structure, virion properties, genome organization and replication strategy, antigenic properties, and biological properties of viruses in the family Tymoviridae. Criteria for demarcation of genus and species are provided. A brief review of each...

  18. Small Families

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or as an individual, if you are a single parent). Taking a few hours off from each other ... last few generations, most American families were two-parent ones; living ... worked outside the home. In many ways, this formula worked well: There ...

  19. Family Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.

    This document contains a brief bibliography of peer-reviewed literature, with abstracts, on family caregiving. It is one of 12 bibliographies on aging prepared by the National Agricultural Library for its "Pathfinders" series of publications. Topics covered by the other 11 bibliographies include aging parents, adult children, dementia and…

  20. Families & Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dyck, Nicholas B.

    1983-01-01

    Argues that television reflects the ideal of American family life in its programs, and that adverse behavior is correlated with amounts of time spent viewing rather than program content. Television can offer rich source material for the imagination, but parents need to actively guide children's viewing throughout their formative years. (MBR)

  1. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the findings of the 2001 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 2000 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized into the following 23 categories: (1) number of regulated…

  2. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the findings of the 2002 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 2001 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized into the following 23 categories: (1) number of regulated…

  3. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollestelle, Kay; Koch, Pauline D.

    This report presents the findings of the 2003 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 2002 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized into the following 23 categories: (1) number of regulated…

  4. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Nia, Comp.

    This report presents the findings of the 2000 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 1999 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized in 23 categories: (1) number of regulated homes; (2)…

  5. Families of Frobenius seaweed Lie algebras

    E-print Network

    Coll, Vincent; Wang, Hua

    2012-01-01

    We extend the set of known infinite families of Frobenius seaweed Lie subalgebras of $\\mathfrak{sl}_{n}$ to include a family which is the first non-trivial general family containing algebras whose associated meanders have an arbitrarily large number of parts.

  6. Familial hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Tullu, Milind S; Advirkar, Asmita V; Ghildiyal, Radha G; Tambe, Shrinivas

    2008-12-01

    Familial hypertriglyceridemia (FHTG) is an uncommon primary (genetic) dyslipidemia. FHTG is characterized by moderately elevated serum triglycerides, usually in the absence of significant hypercholesterolemia and rarely manifests in childhood. We report an eight-month-old boy incidentally diagnosed as a case of FHTG due to lipemic serum (patient was admitted for malaria with anemia). He had elevated serum triglycerides with normal serum cholesterol, but had no symptoms related to the primary disorder (FHTG). PMID:19057857

  7. A Novel ABCA12 Mutation in Two Families with Congenital Ichthyosis

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, D. M.; Shah, S. H.; Simpson, M. A.; Morgan, N. V.; Khaliq, S.; Trembath, R. C.; Mehdi, S. Q.; Maher, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a rare genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by hyperkeratosis in addition to dry, scaly skin. There are six genes currently known to be associated with the disease. Exome sequencing data for two affected individuals with ichthyosis from two apparently unrelated consanguineous Pakistani families was analysed. Potential candidate mutations were analysed in additional family members to determine if the putative mutation segregated with disease status. A novel mutation (c.G4676T, p.Gly1559Val) in ABCA12 occurred at a highly conserved residue, segregated with disease status in both families, and was not detected in 143 control chromosomes. Genotyping with microsatellite markers demonstrated a partial common haplotype in the two families, and a common founder mutation could not be excluded. Comparison to previously reported cases was consistent with the hypothesis that severe loss of function ABCA12 mutations are associated with Harlequin Ichthyosis and missense mutations are preferentially associated with milder phenotypes. In addition to identifying a possible founder mutation, this paper illustrates how advances in genome sequencing technologies could be utilised to rapidly elucidate the molecular basis of inherited skin diseases which can be caused by mutations in multiple disease genes. PMID:24278723

  8. From Family Therapy to Family Intervention.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Allan M

    2015-07-01

    For many, family therapy refers to sessions in which all family members are present. Yet in contemporary psychiatry there are many ways to work with families in addition to this classic concept. This article proposes family intervention as an encompassing term for a new family paradigm in child and adolescent psychiatry. Developmental psychopathology is a guiding principle of this paradigm. A full range of ways to work with families clinically is described with clinical examples. PMID:26092733

  9. A novel family of insect-selective peptide neurotoxins targeting insect large-conductance calcium-activated K+ channels isolated from the venom of the theraphosid spider Eucratoscelus constrictus.

    PubMed

    Windley, Monique J; Escoubas, Pierre; Valenzuela, Stella M; Nicholson, Graham M

    2011-07-01

    Spider venoms are actively being investigated as sources of novel insecticidal agents for biopesticide engineering. After screening 37 theraphosid spider venoms, a family of three new "short-loop" inhibitory cystine knot insecticidal toxins (?-TRTX-Ec2a, ?-TRTX-Ec2b, and ?-TRTX-Ec2c) were isolated and characterized from the venom of the African tarantula Eucratoscelus constrictus. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons revealed that, despite significant sequence homology with other theraphosid toxins, these 29-residue peptides lacked activity on insect voltage-activated sodium and calcium channels. It is noteworthy that ?-TRTX-Ec2 toxins were all found to be high-affinity blockers of insect large-conductance calcium-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channel currents with IC(50) values of 3 to 25 nM. In addition, ?-TRTX-Ec2a caused the inhibition of insect delayed-rectifier K(+) currents, but only at significantly higher concentrations. ?-TRTX-Ec2a and ?-TRTX-Ec2b demonstrated insect-selective effects, whereas the homologous ?-TRTX-Ec2c also resulted in neurotoxic signs in mice when injected intracerebroventricularly. Unlike other theraphosid toxins, ?-TRTX-Ec2 toxins induce a voltage-independent channel block, and therefore, we propose that these toxins interact with the turret and/or loop region of the external entrance to the channel and do not project deeply into the pore of the channel. Furthermore, ?-TRTX-Ec2a and ?-TRTX-Ec2b differ from other theraphotoxins at the C terminus and positions 5 to 6, suggesting that these regions of the peptide contribute to the phyla selectivity and are involved in targeting BK(Ca) channels. This study therefore establishes these toxins as tools for studying the role of BK(Ca) channels in insects and lead compounds for the development of novel insecticides. PMID:21447641

  10. Unusual evolutionary conservation and further species-specific adaptations of a large family of Nonclassical MHC class Ib genes across different degrees of genome ploidy in the amphibian subfamily Xenopodinae

    PubMed Central

    Edholm, Eva-Stina; Goyos, Ana; Taran, Joseph; De Jesús Andino, Francisco; Ohta, Yuko; Robert, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Nonclassical MHC class Ib (class Ib) genes are a family of highly diverse and rapidly evolving genes wherein gene numbers, organization and expression markedly differ even among closely related species rendering class Ib phylogeny difficult to establish. Whereas among mammals there are few unambiguous class Ib gene orthologs, different amphibian species belonging to the anuran subfamily Xenopodinae exhibit an unusually high degree of conservation among multiple class Ib gene lineages. Comparative genomic analysis of class Ib gene loci of two divergent (~65 million years) Xenopodinae subfamily members X. laevis (allotetraploid) and X. tropicalis (diploid) shows that both species possess a large cluster of class Ib genes denoted as Xenopus/Silurana nonclassical (XNC/SNC). Our study reveals two distinct phylogenetic patterns among these genes: some gene lineages display a high degree of flexibility, as demonstrated by species-specific expansion and contractions, whereas other class Ib gene lineages have been maintained as monogenic subfamilies with very few changes in their nucleotide sequence across divergent species. In this second category, we further investigated the XNC/SNC10 gene lineage that in X. laevis is required for the development of a distinct semi-invariant T cell population. We report compelling evidence of the remarkable high degree of conservation of this gene lineage that is present in all 12 species of the Xenopodinae examined, including species with different degrees of ploidy ranging from 2, 4, 8 to 12N. This suggests that the critical role of XNC10 during early T cell development is conserved in amphibians. PMID:24771209

  11. Homozygosity and severity of phenotypic presentation in a CADASIL family.

    PubMed

    Vinciguerra, Claudia; Rufa, Alessandra; Bianchi, Silvia; Sperduto, Antonio; De Santis, Monica; Malandrini, Alessandro; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Federico, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Most of causative mutations of the cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) are missense point mutations either creating or deleting one cysteine residue, inherited in a heterozygous state. Only few homozygous patients are reported to date and some of them showed phenotypic peculiarities. We here describe a CADASIL family in which a member showed homozygous mutation and compare its clinical profile with five subjects throughout three generation of the pedigree, carrying the same mutation in heterozygosity. The index patient was a 44-year-old Italian man, born from consanguineous parents (first cousins). Symptoms started at 23 years and progressing with recurrent ischemic stroke episode. Diffuse leukoencephalopathy and a severe cognitive impairment were evident, GOMs were detected in skin specimens and a homozygous p.Cys183Ser mutation of the NOTCH3 gene was found. Among the other five heterozygous relatives for the same mutation, both parents developed stroke in advanced age and all the others were clinically asymptomatic. We discuss these findings in relationship to previous data from the literature in CADASIL and in other dominant neurological disorders. PMID:24277202

  12. Family planning for travellers.

    PubMed

    Rustom, A

    1990-11-01

    A public health nurse from London describes the customs of nomadic people in the British Isles, known as "travellers," as they affect provision of family planning services. Most are of British or Irish stock, some migrate and others live in caravan sites all year. Their traditions dictate that men work and women are housewives. Early, often arranged, marriage, early childbearing and large families are the norm. Sex and contraception are not considered appropriate for discussion between the sexes, or in the presence of children. Large families and financial hardship force many women to space pregnancies. Women often have to hide contraceptives from their husbands, difficult in conditions without privacy. Therefore they prefer IUDs, but some use oral contraceptives, although sometimes erratically because most are illiterate. Traveller women are usually unwilling to do self-examination, as needed with IUDs. They often have difficulty attending regular Pap smear clinics. Cervical cancer rates are high. They experience discrimination in clinics, and need extra care about modesty. It is worth while to take time to develop trust in the clinical relationship, to deal with the traveller woman's uneasy among outsiders. PMID:2286082

  13. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Request Permissions Print to PDF Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 09/2015 What is familial adenomatous polyposis? Classic familial adenomatous polyposis, called FAP or classic ...

  14. Family transitions and juvenile delinquency.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Ryan D; Osgood, Aurea K; Oghia, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    There is a large body of research that shows children from non-intact homes show higher rates of juvenile delinquency than children from intact homes, partially due to weaker parental control and supervision in non-intact homes. What has not been adequately addressed in the research is the influence of changes in family structure among individual adolescents over time on delinquent offending. Using the first and third waves of the National Youth Study, we assess the effect of family structure changes on changes in delinquent offending between waves through the intermediate process of changes in family time and parental attachment. Although prior research has documented adolescents in broken homes are more delinquent than youth in intact homes, the process of family dissolution is not associated with concurrent increases in offending. In contrast, family formation through marriage or cohabitation is associated with simultaneous increases in offending. Changes in family time and parental attachment account for a portion of the family formation effect on delinquency, and prior parental attachment and juvenile offending significantly condition the effect of family formation on offending. PMID:20879178

  15. A novel mutation in PYCR1 causes an autosomal recessive cutis laxa with premature aging features in a family.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dar-Shong; Yeung, Chun-Yan; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Ho, Che-Sheng; Shu, Chyong-Hsin; Chuang, Chih-Kuang; Huang, Yu-Wen; Wu, Tsu-Yen; Huang, Zon-Darr; Jian, Yuan-Ren; Lin, Shuan-Pei

    2011-06-01

    The autosomal recessive form of type II cutis laxa (ARCL II) is characterized by the appearance of redundant, inelastic skin with wrinkling, an aged look and additional variable systemic involvement including intrauterine growth retardation, failure to thrive, developmental delay, dysmorphism, osseous abnormality, and CNS manifestations. Several genetic defects have been found in patients and families with the clinical manifestations of ARCL II. Recently, mutations in PYCR1 have been linked to cutis laxa with progeroid features. We ascertained two siblings with of ARCL II born to non-consanguineous parents. Mutation analysis of PYCR1 revealed a novel single-base deletion (c.345delC) in exon 4 leading to frame-shift and premature stop of translation. The effect of this mutation results in a strong reduction of PYCR1 expression in skin fibroblasts from affected siblings. These two cases extend the genotypic spectrum of PYCR1-related ARCL II. PMID:21567914

  16. A novel mutation in the TMC1 gene causes non-syndromic hearing loss in a Moroccan family.

    PubMed

    Bakhchane, Amina; Charoute, Hicham; Nahili, Halima; Roky, Rachida; Rouba, Hassan; Charif, Majida; Lenaers, Guy; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2015-12-10

    Autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) is one of the most common genetic diseases in human and is subject to important genetic heterogeneity, rendering molecular diagnosis difficult. Whole-exome sequencing is thus a powerful strategy for this purpose. After excluding GJB2 mutation and other common mutations associated with hearing loss in Morocco, whole-exome sequencing was performed to study the genetic causes of one sibling with ARSHNL in a consanguineous Moroccan family. After filtering data and Sanger sequencing validation, one novel pathogenic homozygous mutation c.1810C>G (p.Arg604Gly) was identified in TMC1, a gene reported to cause deafness in various populations. Thus, we identified here the first mutation in the TMC1 gene in the Moroccan population causing non-syndromic hearing loss. PMID:26226225

  17. Infantile systemic hyalinosis in an Iranian family with a mutation in the CMG2/ANTXR2 gene.

    PubMed

    Vahidnezhad, H; Ziaee, V; Youssefian, L; Li, Q; Sotoudeh, S; Uitto, J

    2015-08-01

    Infantile systemic hyalinosis (ISH) is an extremely rare genodermatosis, characterized by thickened skin, joint contractures and subcutaneous nodules. ISH is caused by mutations in the CMG2 gene, which encodes a protein of unknown function. In this report, we describe a patient with ISH, who was a twin born to a consanguineous Iranian couple, and who demonstrated unusual skin findings in addition to the characteristic features of ISH. Mutation analysis disclosed a homozygous deletion mutation, c.1074delT in CMG2, resulting in a frameshift and premature termination codon 50 amino acids downstream of the deletion. This information adds to the recurring nature of this mutation in ISH, with implications for genetic counselling in extended families with a history of this disease. PMID:25754064

  18. Asteroid families from cratering: Detection and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, A.; Cellino, A.; Kneževi?, Z.; Novakovi?, B.; Spoto, F.; Paolicchi, P.

    2014-07-01

    A new asteroid families classification, more efficient in the inclusion of smaller family members, shows how relevant the cratering impacts are on large asteroids. These do not disrupt the target, but just form families with the ejecta from large craters. Of the 12 largest asteroids, 8 have cratering families: number (2), (4), (5), (10), (87), (15), (3), and (31). At least another 7 cratering families can be identified. Of the cratering families identified so far, 7 have >1000 members. This imposes a remarkable change from the focus on fragmentation families of previous classifications. Such a large dataset of asteroids believed to be crater ejecta opens a new challenge: to model the crater and family forming event(s) generating them. The first problem is to identify which cratering families, found by the similarity of proper elements, can be formed at once, with a single collision. We have identified as a likely outcome of multiple collisions the families of (4), (10), (15), and (20). Of the ejecta generated by cratering, only a fraction reaches the escape velocity from the surviving parent body. The distribution of velocities at infinity, giving to the resulting family an initial position and shape in the proper elements space, is highly asymmetric with respect to the parent body. This shape is deformed by the Yarkovsky effect and by the interaction with resonances. All the largest asteroids have been subjected to large cratering events, thus the lack of a family needs to be interpreted. The most interesting case is (1) Ceres, which is not the parent body of the nearby family of (93). Two possible interpretations of the low family forming efficiency are based on either the composition of Ceres with a significant fraction of ice, protected by a thin crust, or with the larger escape velocity of ~500 m/s.

  19. Reclaiming Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John

    2012-01-01

    The pull for family is strong, almost primeval, most likely it is evolutionary, and for those lacking the benefit of family or Family Privilege, the loss of family is painful and profoundly sad. Young people who struggle to cope without stable family connections are profoundly aware of their lack of "Family Privilege." In this article, the author…

  20. Family: Involving Families in Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Jaclynn Rogers

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the importance of family and community involvement to student achievement. Schools can establish an effective partnership among schools, families, and the community by providing support for families, creating family-community learning centers, supporting the community, providing opportunities for shared responsibility, facilitating the…

  1. Thankful for Family and Foods! (An ABLE Teaching Unit).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barringer, Mary Dean; And Others

    The teaching unit focuses on a month (November) of primary grade learning activities which focus on being thankful for food, family, and friends. Concepts stressed throughout the unit include: We are all part of the large family of Americans; Families are made up of a variety of people and our families are usually different from each other;…

  2. Genetic homogeneity in Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome: Linkage to chromosome 17p in families of different non-Swedish ethnic origins

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, G.R.; Lee, M.; Compton, J.G.

    1995-11-01

    Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by congenital ichthyosis, mental retardation, and spastic diplegia or tetraplegia. Three United States families, three Egyptian families, and one Israeli Arab family were investigated for linkage of the SLS gene to a region of chromosome 17. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis with nine markers mapped the SLS gene to the same region of the genome as that reported in Swedish SLS pedigrees. Examination of recombinants by haplotype analysis showed that the gene lies in the region containing the markers D17S953, D17S805, D17S689, and D17S842. D17S805 is pericentromeric on 17p. Patients in two consanguineous Egyptian families were homozygous at the nine marker loci tested, and another patient from a third family was homozygous for eight of the nine, suggesting that within each of these families the region of chromosome 17 carrying the SLS gene is identical by descent. Linkage of the SLS gene to chromosome 17p in families of Arabic, mixed European, Native American, and Swedish descent provides evidence for a single SLS locus and should prove useful for diagnosis and carrier detection in worldwide cases. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. 'I don't see any point in telling them': attitudes to sharing genetic information in the family and carrier testing of relatives among British Pakistani adults referred to a genetics clinic.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Alison; Hurst, Jane A

    2009-04-01

    The sharing of genetic information following the diagnosis of a genetic condition can be important for managing familial risks for genetic conditions. This paper explores factors that impede or facilitate the sharing of genetic information within a sample of British Pakistani families. It draws from research investigating understandings of genetics and inheritance, attitudes to prenatal diagnosis and risk communication in the family that used methods of participant observation and interview with adults from 66 families of Pakistani origin referred to a genetics clinic in southern England. We found a lack of English often restricted one partner's access to genetic information and partners fluent in English sometimes withheld information to protect a partner (usually the wife) from blame, stigma or feelings of marital insecurity. Many couples felt genetic information was private to them as a couple and were unwilling to share it with the wider family, commenting on its potentially stigmatizing and emotionally and socially disruptive effects on themselves, their child and their marriage, as well as on the marriage prospects of other family members. Those who sought carrier testing because of a family history did so when considering their own marriage or parenting, sometimes on the insistence of an affected relative, but did not readily discuss carrier testing with other relatives. Despite the complex consanguinity in some families, a family-based approach to risk management is not necessarily any easier among British Pakistanis than other ethnic groups. PMID:19052940

  4. Family Matters: Kinship in Jane Austen [book chapter

    E-print Network

    Perry, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Families shape the individuals born into them in large and small ways, consciously and unconsciously; but the kinship dynamics that structure power in families are perhaps the most invisible of these forces. I doubt that ...

  5. Novel TMPRSS3 variants in Pakistani families with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Lee, K; Khan, S; Islam, A; Ansar, M; Andrade, P B; Kim, S; Santos-Cortez, R L P; Ahmad, W; Leal, S M

    2012-07-01

    Mutations in the TMPRSS3 gene are known to cause autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI). After undergoing a genome scan, 10 consanguineous Pakistani families with ARNSHI were found to have significant or suggestive evidence of linkage to the TMPRSS3 region. In order to elucidate if the TMPRSS3 gene is responsible for ARNSHI in these families, the gene was sequenced using DNA samples from these families. Six TMPRSS3 variants were found to cosegregate in 10 families. None of these variants were detected in 500 control chromosomes. Four novel variants, three of which are missense [c.310G>A (p.Glu104Lys), c.767C>T (p.Ala256Val) and c.1273T>C (p.Cys425Arg)] and one nonsense [c.310G>T (p.Glu104Stop)], were identified. The pathogenicity of novel missense variants was investigated through bioinformatics analyses. Additionally, the previously reported deletion c.208delC (p.His70ThrfsX19) was identified in one family and the known mutation c.1219T>C (p.Cys407Arg) was found in five families, which makes c.1219T>C (p.Cys407Arg) as the most common TMPRSS3 mutation within the Pakistani population. Identification of these novel variants lends support to the importance of elements within the low-density lipoprotein receptor A (LDLRA) and serine protease domains in structural stability, ligand binding and proteolytic activity for proper TMPRSS3 function within the inner ear. PMID:21534946

  6. The Changing Family Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter issue contains feature articles and short reports on how and why family structures are undergoing substantial change in many parts of the world. These articles include: (1) "The Changing Family Structure," a review of how families are changing and why; (2) "Peru: Families in the Andes"; (3) "Thailand: Families of the Garbage Dump";…

  7. Choosing a Family Doctor

    MedlinePLUS

    ... who takes care of the whole family. Family doctors create caring relationships with patients and their families. They really get know their patients. They listen to them and help them make the right health care decisions. What do family doctors do? Family doctors take care of the physical, ...

  8. Family Reading Night

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Darcy; Greenfeld, Marsha; Epstein, Joyce

    2007-01-01

    This book offers clear and practical guidelines to help engage families in student success. It shows families how to conduct a successful Family Reading Night at their school. Family Night themes include Scary Stories, Books We Love, Reading Olympics, Dr. Seuss, and other themes. Family reading nights invite parents to come to school with their…

  9. Characterization of familial breast cancer in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The contribution of genetic factors to the development of breast cancer in the admixed and consanguineous population of the western region of Saudi Arabia is thought to be significant as the disease is early onset. The current protocols of continuous clinical follow-up of relatives of such patients are costly and cause a burden on the usually over-stretched medical resources. Discovering the significant contribution of BRCA1/2 mutations to breast cancer susceptibility allowed for the design of genetic tests that allows the medical practitioner to focus the care for those who need it most. However, BRCA1/2 mutations do not account for all breast cancer susceptibility genes and there are other genetic factors, known and unknown that may play a role in the development of such disease. The advent of whole-exome sequencing is offering a unique opportunity to identify the breast cancer susceptibility genes in each family of sufferers. The polymorphisms/mutations identified will then allow for personalizing the genetic screening tests accordingly. To this end, we have performed whole-exome sequencing of seven breast cancer patients with positive family history of the disease using the Agilent SureSelect™ Whole-Exome Enrichment kit and sequencing on the SOLiD™ platform. Results We have identified several coding single nucleotide variations that were either novel or rare affecting genes controlling DNA repair in the BRCA1/2 pathway. Conclusion The disruption of DNA repair pathways is very likely to contribute to breast cancer susceptibility in the Saudi population. PMID:25923920

  10. Bounding CKM Mixing with a Fourth Family

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, Michael S.

    2009-04-22

    CKM mixing between third family quarks and a possible fourth family is constrained by global fits to the precision electroweak data. The dominant constraint is from nondecoupling oblique corrections rather than the vertex correction to Z {yields} {bar b}b used in previous analyses. The possibility of large mixing suggested by some recent analyses of FCNC processes is excluded, but 3-4 mixing of the same order as the Cabbibo mixing of the first two families is allowed.

  11. Family boundary characteristics, work-family conflict and life satisfaction: A moderated mediation model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lin; Fan, Jinyan

    2015-10-01

    Although work-family border and boundary theory suggest individuals' boundary characteristics influence their work-family relationship, it is largely unknown how boundary flexibility and permeability mutually influence work-family conflict and subsequent employee outcomes. Moreover, the existing work-family conflict research has been mainly conducted in the United States and other Western countries. To address these gaps in the work-family literature, the present study examines a moderated mediation model regarding how family boundary characteristics may influence individuals' work-family conflict and life satisfaction with a sample of 278 Chinese full-time employees. Results showed that employees' family flexibility negatively related to their perceived work interference with family (WIF) and family interference with work (FIW), and both these two relationships were augmented by individuals' family permeability. In addition, WIF mediated the relationship between family flexibility and life satisfaction; the indirect effect of family flexibility on life satisfaction via WIF was stronger for individuals with higher family permeability. The theoretical and managerial implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25331584

  12. Managing a Family Budget 

    E-print Network

    McCorkle, Dean; Klinefelter, Danny A.

    2008-09-16

    Without budgeting, family living expenses may exceed the available income and jeopardize the overall financial goals of the farm and family. This publication offers information on developing a family budget and provides an example of a monthly...

  13. Family Reunion Health Guide

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Phone (Continued) 1. Send a Kidney Health Message Hi Family, I came across this information and thought ... mails to family members. Before the Reunion 1. Hi family! Taking care of your kidneys is important. ...

  14. Family Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  15. Work/Family Conflicts: Policy Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Maureen

    In the past 20 years, the percentage of married women in the Canadian labor force has risen dramatically. Despite women's increased participation in the labor force, child care and housework are still largely done by women. While the difficulty of combining work and family responsibilities can result in work/family conflicts, a variety of…

  16. Solanaceae (Nightshade family) Horsenettle

    E-print Network

    Solanaceae (Nightshade family) Horsenettle Solanum carolinense L. Life cycle Spreading to erect to identifying Christmas tree weeds. #12;Solanaceae (Nightshade family) Horsenettle continued Flowers and fruit

  17. Incidence of Wife Abuse in Incestuous Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truesdell, Donna L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Investigates a largely uncharted dynamic in the literature--the incidence of wife abuse among incestuous families--and suggests that professional caregivers reevaluate conventional treatment modalities that are based on certain assumptions regarding the mother's role in incest. (Author)

  18. Consanguine Calculations Input File: blood.in

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    " always has two ­ alleles. The blood type of a person is a combination of ABO blood type and Rh factor. The blood type is written by suffixing the ABO blood type with the + or - representing the Rh factor in a particular ABO blood type for that person. Combination ABO Blood Type AA A AB AB AO A BB B BO B OO O Likewise

  19. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of a culturally-adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9–12 year old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted with each family. Parental stress, parent-child dysfunctional relations, and child behavior problems were reduced in the families receiving the intervention; family hardiness and family attachment were improved. Findings contribute to the validation of the SFP with Latinos, and can be used to inform social work practice with Puerto Rican families. PMID:20871785

  20. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia associated with mutation in the human Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Aida, Kaoru; Koishi, Sawako; Inoue, Masaharu

    1995-09-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is generally characterized by lifelong hypercalcemia without hypercalciuria and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Affected individuals show abnormal parathyroid and renal responses to changes in the extracellular calcium concentration. A Japanese FHH family was screened for mutations in the Ca{sup 2+} -sensing receptor gene by the polymerase chain reaction and single strand conformation polymorphism. The proband with hypercalcemia showed an abnormal pattern in exon 1 of the gene, whereas her two sisters with normocalcemia showed a normal pattern. The consanguineous parents with borderline serum calcium concentrations showed both patterns. Nucleotide sequence analysis identified a G{yields}C point mutation at nucleotide 118 that resulted in the conversion of the normal codon for proline into a codon for alanine at amino acid 40 (numbered according to the bovine complementary DNA). The proband was homozygous for the mutation, and the parents were heterozygous. These results imply that this mutation in the human Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene causes FHH and that the dosage of the gene defect determines disease phenotype. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. La maladie de Wilson: à propos d'un cas familial

    PubMed Central

    Mouzari, Yassine; Abdelkhalek, Ryme; El Asri, Fouad; Reda, Karim; Oubaaz, Abedelbarre

    2014-01-01

    La maladie de Wilson est une maladie rare autosomique récessive due à une diminution de l’élimination du cuivre dans la bile et son accumulation toxique dans les organes en particulier le cerveau, le foie, la cornée et le rein d'où son hétérogénéité clinique. Les manifestations ophtalmologiques représentent des critères diagnostiques importants. Le traitement précoce permet une réversibilité des déficits; non traitée la maladie de Wilson est létale. Nous rapportons un cas familial de la maladie de Wilson: deux membres d'une fratrie issus d'un mariage consanguin étaient atteints de la maladie de Wilson dans ses trois formes cliniques: hépatique, neurologique et psychiatrique. Les manifestations ophtalmologiques de la maladie de Wilson sont l'anneau de Keyser Fleischer et la cataracte en tournesol, l'atteinte hépatique se manifeste par une hépatite chronique et une cirrhose, la symptomatologie neurologique et psychiatrique est variée; on retrouve à l'IRM une atteinte prédominante aux noyaux gris centraux. Le diagnostic positif de la maladie de Wilson est fait sur la triade: présence de l'anneau de Keyser Fleischer, céruloplasmine sanguine basse et augmentation de la cuprurie de 24 heures. Le traitement précoce basé sur les chélateurs de cuivre permet la réversibilité des lésions. Le pronostic dépend de la sévérité de la maladie lors du diagonstic et de la qualité de la prise en charge. Ce cas familial de la maladie de Wilson démontre l'importance du dépistage des membres pré symptomatique par un examen ophtalmologique et général rigoureux. PMID:25426217

  2. Homozygosity mapping, to chromosome 11p, of the gene for familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.M.; Cote, G.J.; Hallman, D.M.; Mathew, P.M.

    1995-02-01

    Familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease of unregulated insulin secretion, defined by elevations in serum insulin despite severe hypoglycemia. We used the homozygosity gene-mapping strategy to localize this disorder to the region of chromosome 11p between markers D11S1334 and D11S899 (maximum LOD score 5.02 [{theta} = 0] at marker D11S926) in five consanguineous families of Saudi Arabian origin. These results extend those of a recent report that also placed PHHI on chromosome 11p, between markers D11S926 and D11S928. Comparison of the boundaries of these two overlapping regions allows the PHHI locus to be assigned to the 4-cM region between the markers D11S926 and D11S899. Identification of this gene may allow a better understanding of other disorders of glucose homeostasis, by providing insight into the regulation of insulin release. 37 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. The Family in Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlop, Jean D.

    This paper describes Laurelhurst Manor's family treatment program to help families affected by chemical dependency, a 7-month program which treats family members from the perspective of developmental stages and family roles. The center, located in Portland, Oregon, is a 40-bed, free-standing facility having a 20-bed adolescent unit and a 20-bed…

  4. Black Families. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, Harriette Pipes, Ed.

    The chapters of this collection explore the experiences of black families in the United States and Africa, today and in the past. They are: (1) "African American Families: A Historical Note" (John Hope Franklin); (2) "African American Families and Family Values" (Niara Sudarkasa); (3) "Old-Time Religion: Benches Can't Say 'Amen'" (William Harrison…

  5. Building Family Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Penny

    2007-01-01

    The family is centre stage of many current policy agendas and this is an exciting time to expand the understanding of the wider benefits of learning as a family and in a family. This article aims to open up new discussions and debate on using the concept of "family capital". The author states that as the debate on the social value of learning and…

  6. THE FAMILY FLAVIVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family Flaviviridae, commonly referred to as the flavivirus family, contains viruses important to both human and veterinary medicine. The term flavivirus can be confusing because it is used both to refer to the family and one of the three genera within that family. The proper name of the viral...

  7. Is More Too Many? Adjustment in Families with Adopted Children with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glidden, Laraine Masters; Flaherty, Evelyn M.; McGlone, Andrew P.

    2000-01-01

    Compared adjustment of large versus conventional sized adoptive families rearing children with disabilities. Found that parents of large families functioned as well or better than parents of conventional-sized families with regard to family strengths, disharmony, marital adjustment, and adjustment to adopted child. Concluded that placement should…

  8. Familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lung, M S; Trainer, A H; Campbell, I; Lipton, L

    2015-05-01

    Identifying individuals with a genetic predisposition to developing familial colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial to the management of the affected individual and their family. In order to do so, the physician requires an understanding of the different gene mutations and clinical manifestations of familial CRC. This review summarises the genetics, clinical manifestations and management of the known familial CRC syndromes, specifically Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated neoplasia, juvenile polyposis syndrome and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. An individual suspected of having a familial CRC with an underlying genetic predisposition should be referred to a familial cancer centre to enable pre-test counselling and appropriate follow up. PMID:25955461

  9. Paucity of family planning.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, C

    1988-04-01

    A wall chart compiled by the Population Crisis Committee of Washington D.C. called "World Access to Birth Control" is described. The chart compares developing countries and developed countries with respect to need of effective contraception, using data from the World Fertility Surveys. Up to 250 million women need contraception; a substantial percentage want no more children, over half in several large countries. The chart ranks the United Kingdom as 1st in providing family planning services, information, education and advertising. All of the developed countries were considered good except Russia and Romania, although some had deficiencies, such as Japan for lacking sterilization services. The U.S. ranked 7th, failing to provide women the full range of contraceptive methods, to provide adequate sex education and services to adolescents, and to publish information and adequate advertising about birth control. The USSR was placed 14th on the list of 15 because of poor quality and erratic supplies. Among the developing countries, Libya, Kampuchea and Laos were cited as having no services whatsoever. In contrast, several Asian national family planning programs, notably China, Taiwan, Singapore, South Korea and Hong Kong, had such excellent programs that fertility had declined over 30% in 15 years. In China, fertility has fallen 50% in that time. PMID:12179876

  10. Family Allowances and Fertility: Socioeconomic Differences

    PubMed Central

    SCHELLEKENS, JONA

    2009-01-01

    This article explores socioeconomic differences in the effect of family allowances on fertility. Although several studies have examined the relationship between cash benefits and fertility, few studies have addressed the possible differential effects of cash benefits on families of different income or education levels. I reconstructed the birth histories of women in the past two Israeli censuses of 1983 and 1995 to study socioeconomic differences in the effect of family allowances up to the seventh parity. The results indicate that family allowances have a significant effect at every parity. Using female education as an indicator of socioeconomic status, I find that socioeconomic status is a significant modifier of the effect of family allowances. Family allowances seem to have a relatively large impact on more-educated women. PMID:19771939

  11. Identification of a Novel MYO15A Mutation in a Chinese Family with Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hong; Huang, Xiangjun; Guo, Yi; Hu, Pengzhi; He, Guangxiang; Deng, Xiong; Xu, Hongbo; Yang, Zhijian; Deng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) is a genetically heterogeneous sensorineural disorder, generally manifested with prelingual hearing loss and absence of other clinical manifestations. The aim of this study is to identify the pathogenic gene in a four-generation consanguineous Chinese family with ARNSHL. A novel homozygous variant, c.9316dupC (p.H3106Pfs*2), in the myoxin XVa gene (MYO15A) was identified by exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing. The homozygous MYO15A c.9316dupC variant co-segregated with the phenotypes in the ARNSHL family and was absent in two hundred normal controls. The variant was predicted to interfere with the formation of the Myosin XVa-whirlin-Eps8 complex at the tip of stereocilia, which is indispensable for stereocilia elongation. Our data suggest that the homozygous MYO15A c.9316dupC variant might be the pathogenic mutation, and exome sequencing is a powerful molecular diagnostic strategy for ARNSHL, an extremely heterogeneous disorder. Our findings extend the mutation spectrum of the MYO15A gene and have important implications for genetic counseling for the family. PMID:26308726

  12. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 4H Resulting from Compound Heterozygous Mutations in FGD4 from Nonconsanguineous Korean Families.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Young Se; Lee, Jinho; Kim, Hye Jin; Hong, Young Bin; Koo, Heasoo; Smith, Alec S T; Kim, Deok-Ho; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2015-11-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4H (CMT4H) is an autosomal recessive demyelinating subtype of peripheral enuropathies caused by mutations in the FGD4 gene. Most CMT4H patients are in consanguineous Mediterranean families characterized by early onset and slow progression. We identified two CMT4H patients from a Korean CMT cohort, and performed a detailed genetic and clinical analysis in both cases. Both patients from nonconsanguineous families showed characteristic clinical manifestations of CMT4H including early onset, scoliosis, areflexia, and slow disease progression. Exome sequencing revealed novel compound heterozygous mutations in FGD4 as the underlying cause in both families (p.Arg468Gln and c.1512-2A>C in FC73, p.Met345Thr and c.2043+1G>A (p.Trp663Trpfs*30) in FC646). The missense mutations were located in highly conserved RhoGEF and PH domains which were predicted to be pathogenic in nature by in silico modeling. The CMT4H occurrence frequency was calculated to 0.7% in the Korean demyelinating CMT patients. This study is the first report of CMT4H in Korea. FGD4 assay could be considered as a means of molecular diagnosis for sporadic cases of demyelinating CMT with slow progression. PMID:26400421

  13. Safe motherhood through family planning.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    Family planning is an alternative guarantee of safe motherhood, to the option of providing improved obstetric care. Family planning eliminates many high-risk births, and reduces the risk due to sheer number of births, but also may decrease the risk from numbers of dangerous illegal abortions. In some countries, notably Latin America, illegal abortions are responsible for half the maternal deaths, because of consequent infection and hemorrhage. In Chile, for example, deaths from illegal abortion fell from 118 to 24 per 100,000 live births between 1964 and 1979, after expansion of family planning services. Overall maternal deaths fell from 280 to 80 per 100,000 live births, and the birth rate fell 33%. The majority of women with 3 or more children in developing countries want no more, and 2/3 of such women were not using contraception. If people knew that pregnancy is almost always more dangerous than using any kind of contraception, the demand for family planning would probably increase. A study of maternal deaths in Bali showed that pregnancy is 200 times more likely to kill a mother than using contraception. Contraception can also improve maternal survival for those who desire large families, by helping them space their children. PMID:12281273

  14. Familial adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Half, Elizabeth; Bercovich, Dani; Rozen, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is characterized by the development of many tens to thousands of adenomas in the rectum and colon during the second decade of life. FAP has an incidence at birth of about 1/8,300, it manifests equally in both sexes, and accounts for less than 1% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. In the European Union, prevalence has been estimated at 1/11,300-37,600. Most patients are asymptomatic for years until the adenomas are large and numerous, and cause rectal bleeding or even anemia, or cancer develops. Generally, cancers start to develop a decade after the appearance of the polyps. Nonspecific symptoms may include constipation or diarrhea, abdominal pain, palpable abdominal masses and weight loss. FAP may present with some extraintestinal manifestations such as osteomas, dental abnormalities (unerupted teeth, congenital absence of one or more teeth, supernumerary teeth, dentigerous cysts and odontomas), congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE), desmoid tumors, and extracolonic cancers (thyroid, liver, bile ducts and central nervous system). A less aggressive variant of FAP, attenuated FAP (AFAP), is characterized by fewer colorectal adenomatous polyps (usually 10 to 100), later age of adenoma appearance and a lower cancer risk. Some lesions (skull and mandible osteomas, dental abnormalities, and fibromas on the scalp, shoulders, arms and back) are indicative of the Gardner variant of FAP. Classic FAP is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and results from a germline mutation in the adenomatous polyposis (APC) gene. Most patients (~70%) have a family history of colorectal polyps and cancer. In a subset of individuals, a MUTYH mutation causes a recessively inherited polyposis condition, MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), which is characterized by a slightly increased risk of developing CRC and polyps/adenomas in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Diagnosis is based on a suggestive family history, clinical findings, and large bowel endoscopy or full colonoscopy. Whenever possible, the clinical diagnosis should be confirmed by genetic testing. When the APC mutation in the family has been identified, genetic testing of all first-degree relatives should be performed. Presymptomatic and prenatal (amniocentesis and chorionic villous sampling), and even preimplantation genetic testing is possible. Referral to a geneticist or genetic counselor is mandatory. Differential diagnoses include other disorders causing multiple polyps (such as Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, familial juvenile polyps or hyperplastic polyposis, hereditary mixed polyposis syndromes, and Lynch syndrome). Cancer prevention and maintaining a good quality of life are the main goals of management and regular and systematic follow-up and supportive care should be offered to all patients. By the late teens or early twenties, colorectal cancer prophylactic surgery is advocated. The recommended alternatives are total proctocolectomy and ileoanal pouch or ileorectal anastomosis for AFAP. Duodenal cancer and desmoids are the two main causes of mortality after total colectomy, they need to be identified early and treated. Upper endoscopy is necessary for surveillance to reduce the risk of ampullary and duodenal cancer. Patients with progressive tumors and unresectable disease may respond or stabilize with a combination of cytotoxic chemotherapy and surgery (when possible to perform). Adjunctive therapy with celecoxib has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency in patients with FAP. Individuals with FAP carry a 100% risk of CRC; however, this risk is reduced significantly when patients enter a screening-treatment program. PMID:19822006

  15. AIDS and the family: families take care.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    In 1994, the International Year of the Family, the WHO's Global Program on AIDS (GPA) is marking World AIDS Day under the banner AIDS and the Family. Traditional and non-traditional families have a crucial role to play in addressing the HIV/AIDS pandemic. In the run-up to World AIDS Day--and on 1 December itself--GPA urges the world to focus on how families of all kinds are affected by AIDS, on how they can be more effective in prevention and care, and on how they can contribute to global efforts against the disease. For GPA, any group of people linked by feelings of trust, mutual support and a common destiny may be seen as a family. The concept need not be limited to ties of blood, marriage, sexual partnership or adoption. In this light, religious congregations, workers' associations, support groups of people with HIV/AIDS, gangs of street children, circles of drug injectors, collectives of sex workers and networks of governmental, nongovernmental and intergovernmental organizations may all be regarded as families within the over-arching family of humankind. Every kind of family should take care to protect its members from HIV. And all families should take care of those among them who fall ill with AIDS. Families take care. "Families whose bonds are based on love, trust, nurturing and openness are best placed to protect their members from infection and give compassionate care and support to those affected by HIV or AIDS," says Dr. Hiroshi Nakajima, Director-General of the WHO [World Health Organization]. PMID:12287963

  16. Family Roles, Alcoholism, and Family Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alford, Karola M.

    1998-01-01

    Examines family roles in college undergraduates (N=748). Comparing role identification found no differences between children of alcoholics (ACOA) and non-ACOAs. Differences were found in participants from dysfunctional families. Results suggest a need for clinicians to re-think the use of role conceptualization in therapeutic work with ACOAs, with…

  17. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a culturally adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9- to 12-year-old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted…

  18. Conceptualising Family Life and Family Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Don

    The United Nations International Year of the Family 1994 will give policymakers the opportunity to bring together threads of social life that have previously been treated separately. The danger in talking about the concept of "the family" lies both in its abstractness and in its emotional, religious, and political overtones. To avoid this…

  19. Invest in Family*

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilesh; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The family is an integral part of one's life. It is very essential that every individual employed or unemployed invests time therein. The family is a source of support and growth for an individual, and the lack of family support or loneliness may be a causative factor in the genesis of psychiatric disorders, especially depression. In India, family plays a paramount role when it comes to mental health of the individual. Tips on how one should invest time in one's family along with the role of a family in one's personal and social structure are discussed. PMID:25838732

  20. Genetic heterogeneity of familial hemiplegic migraine

    SciTech Connect

    Joutel, A.; Ducros, A.; Vahedi, K.

    1994-09-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is an autosomal dominant subtype of migraine with aura, characterized by the occurrence of a transient hemiplegia during the aura. We previously mapped the affected gene to the short arm of chromosome 19, within a 30 cM interval bracketed by D19S216 and D19S215. Linkage analysis conducted on 2 large FHM pedigrees did not show evidence of heterogeneity, despite their clinical differences due to the presence in one family of a cerebellar ataxia and a nystagmus. Herein we report linkage data on 9 additional FHM families including 2 other ones with cerebellar ataxia. Analysis was conducted with a set of 7 markers spanning the D19S216-D19S215 interval. Two point and multipoint lodscores analysis as well as HOMOG testing provided significant evidence for genetic heterogenity. Strong evidence of linkage was obtained in 3 families and absence of linkage in 6 families. Thus within the 11 families so far tested, 5 were linked, including those with an associated cerebellar ataxia. We could not find any clinical difference between the {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} FHM families whether or not they were linked. This study also allowed us to establish that the most likely location of the gene is a 12 cM interval bracketed by D19S413 and D19S226. One of the unlinked family was large enough to conduct genetic mapping of the affected gene. Data will be presented at the meeting.

  1. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by... administrative fee reserve) to pay any part of the family share, including the family rent to owner. Payment...

  2. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by... administrative fee reserve) to pay any part of the family share, including the family rent to owner. Payment...

  3. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by... administrative fee reserve) to pay any part of the family share, including the family rent to owner. Payment...

  4. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by... administrative fee reserve) to pay any part of the family share, including the family rent to owner. Payment...

  5. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by... administrative fee reserve) to pay any part of the family share, including the family rent to owner. Payment...

  6. Family Policy in Scotland 

    E-print Network

    Wasoff, Fran; Hill, Malcolm

    This briefing looks at the development of family policy in Scotland, considers the interplay between devolved and reserved matters, outlines the Departments of the Scottish Executive responsible for family policy, and ...

  7. Efficient haplotyping for families

    E-print Network

    Williams, Amy Lynne, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    Hapi is a novel dynamic programming algorithm for haplotyping nuclear families that outperforms contemporary family-based haplotyping algorithms. Haplotypes are useful for mapping and identifying genes which cause and ...

  8. Family Caregiver Alliance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... path forward. Discover ways to survive, post-caregiving. >> FAMILY CARE NAVIGATOR ? Click on Your State AL AK ... FCA’s 30 Days of Caregiving blog during National Family Caregivers Month, former FCA staff members were asked ...

  9. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are here: Health Information > Condition Information Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis: Overview When two or more members within the ... of Programs & Services Doctors Who Treat Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis No doctors are currently listed for this condition. ...

  10. American Families Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medeiros, Ray

    1992-01-01

    Describes the "American Families Project," in which students from two or more schools participate in a creative writing, historical research activity, each playing a role in a fictitious family living in 1838 and corresponding with each other. (RS)

  11. The Changing American Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Pamela B.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews recent statistics which demonstrate how different modern families are from the stereotyped model American nuclear family. Provides suggestions for elementary social studies teachers and includes an annotated bibliography of instructional resources. (JDH)

  12. Genetic heterogeneity of familial hemiplegic migraine

    SciTech Connect

    Joutel, A.; Ducros, A.; Delrieu, O.; Maziaceck, J.; Tournier-Lasserve, E.; Vahedi, K. |; Bousser, M.G.; Ponsot, G.; Gouttiere, F.; Labauge, P.; Mancini, J.

    1994-12-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is an autosomal dominant variety of migraine with aura. We previously mapped a gene for this disorder to the short arm of chromosome 19, within a 30-cM interval bracketed by D19S216 and D19S215. Linkage analysis conducted on two large pedigrees did not show any evidence of heterogeneity, despite their clinical differences due to the presence, in one family, of cerebellar ataxia and nystagmus. Herein we report linkage data on seven additional FHM families including another one with cerebellar ataxia. Analysis was conducted with a set of seven markers spanning the D19S216-D19S215 interval. Two-point and multipoint strong evidence for genetic heterogeneity. Strong evidence of linkage was obtained in two families and of absence of linkage in four families. The posterior probability of being of the linked type was >.95 in the first two families and <.01 in four other ones. It was not possible to draw any firm conclusion for the last family. Thus, within the nine families so far tested, four were linked, including those with associated cerebellar ataxia. We could not find any clinical difference between the pure FHM families regardless of whether they were linked. In addition to the demonstration of genetic heterogeneity of FHM, this study also allowed us to establish that the most likely location of the gene was within an interval of 12 cM between D19S413 and D19S226.

  13. Familial progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J; Lantos, P; Stratton, M; Roques, P; Rossor, M

    1993-01-01

    A progressive extrapyramidal syndrome and dementia occurred in three members of one family. The age of onset was in the seventh decade and the affected individuals showed many of the clinical features of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Necropsy of one individual revealed the neuropathological features of PSP. We propose that this family has a familial form of PSP and review the evidence in the literature that a familial form exists. Images PMID:8505637

  14. Family Violence: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (DHHS/OHDS), Washington, DC.

    Family violence is a widespread problem; research has shown multiple factors are associated with family violence. Types of family violence include spouse abuse; elder abuse and neglect; child abuse and neglect; parent abuse; and sibling abuse. There are three types of spouse abuse: physical abuse, sexual violence, and psychological/emotional…

  15. The Resiliency of Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, T. R.

    According to researchers, the family may be changing but it is still one of the central institutions in society. Studies report a shift in more than 20 attitudes and values, most of which relate to the context of family life. Specifically, these include attitudes toward marriage, divorce, childbearing, childrearing, working women, family violence,…

  16. Learning from Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, Susan

    2011-01-01

    As a researcher in parent engagement in school and former parent activist, the author shares three lessons for sparking more authentic partnerships between schools and immigrant families. First, schools need to move away from deficit thinking and validate families' cultures. In the case of Latino immigrant families, this entails understanding…

  17. Rape: A Family Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Priscilla N.; Rollins, Judith C.

    1981-01-01

    Rape is a crisis shared by the victim and her family. The family's reaction is influenced by cultural views such as viewing rape as sex rather than violence. Adaptive responses can be supported by open expression, education, and family, as well as individual counseling. (JAC)

  18. Families and Assisted Living*

    PubMed Central

    Gaugler, Joseph E.; Kane, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Despite growing research on assisted living (AL) as a residential care option for older adults, the social ramifications of residents' transitions to assisted living is relatively unexplored. This article examines family involvement in AL, including family structures of residents, types of involvement from family members living outside the AL, and outcomes for these family members. Design and Methods We reviewed current literature utilizing the MEDLINE, PSYCINFO, and CINAHL databases to identify AL studies that examined issues pertaining to families or informal care. Following the screening of abstracts, 180 reports were retrieved for further review, and 62 studies were selected for inclusion. Results Families visit residents frequently and provide a wide range of instrumental assistance but provide only minimal personal care. Studies of family outcomes indicated relatively high satisfaction, but potential care burden as well. Implications How family care and involvement occurs in AL in relation to formal care provision and whether various types of formal-informal care integration influence family outcomes remains unclear. We suggest a research agenda that attempts to tease out causal relationships for family involvement, differentiate family roles, and implement longitudinal analyses for a range of family outcomes. PMID:18162571

  19. Strengths of Remarried Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knaub, Patricia Kain; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on remarried families' (N=80) perceptions of family strengths, marital satisfaction, and adjustment to the remarried situation. Results indicated that although most would like to make some changes, scores on the measurements used were high. A supportive environment was the most important predictor of family strength and success. (JAC)

  20. Focus on the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, James M.

    This research attempts to evaluate the YMCA's program in terms of its effect upon the family members it serves. The study was designed to: (1) classify, by descriptive types, the various kinds of YMCA operations which serve the family, identifying their characteristic differences; (2) examine and describe operating practices of family YMCAs…

  1. Year of the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Agriculture, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This special issue focuses on problems and challenges confronting the California family and on research and extension efforts to provide at least partial answers. Research briefs by staff include "Challenges Confront the California Family" (state trends in poverty, divorce, single-parent families, child abuse, delinquency, teen births, limited…

  2. Family Customs and Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, Cynthia

    Recognizing the importance of maintaining open communication with immediate and extended family members, this book provides a compilation of ideas for family traditions and customs that are grounded in compassion and human kindness. The traditions were gathered from families in the United States and Canada who responded to advertisements in…

  3. Families in Multicultural Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingoldsby, Bron B., Ed.; Smith, Suzanna, Ed.

    Covering contemporary Third World as well as Western families, this teaching text addresses topics essential for developing a multicultural perspective on the family. It is an ideal text for comparative family courses and includes exercises (as well as exercise guidelines for instructors) developed to challenge students' existing viewpoints and…

  4. Family Support Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalley, Jacqueline, Ed.; Ahsan, Nilofer, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    The Family Resource Coalition of America (FRCA) and the National Resource Center for Family Centered Practice convened a meeting of evaluators, policymakers, and program practitioners to discuss the issue of evaluation in the field of family support. The goal was to bring together those who were implementing programs, evaluating programs, and…

  5. Fatherhood and Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    On the assumption that fathers have been relatively absent from family support programs, this publication of the Family Resource Coalition addresses the role of fathers in family support programs, examines the impact of fathers on their children, and describes programs involving fathers successfully. Articles include: (1) "What's Behind the…

  6. Doing Better for Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    All OECD governments want to give parents more choice in their work and family decisions. This book looks at the different ways in which governments support families. It seeks to provide answers to questions like: Is spending on family benefits going up, and how does it vary by the age of the child? Has the crisis affected public support for…

  7. The Family Leukemia Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, Eleanor

    1976-01-01

    An association of families of children with leukemia, the Family Leukemia Association (FLA), was recently established in Toronto. This paper discusses (a) philosophy of the FLA; (b) formative years of this organization; (c) problems encountered by leukemic children and their families; and (d) the FLA's past and future educational and social…

  8. Roles & Responsibilities Host Families

    E-print Network

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    countries and assist them in their adjustment to American customs and lifestyles. Many host families relaxing and getting to know one another. Many families invite students to their homes for holidays (LaborRoles & Responsibilities Host Families Hosts should try to get together with their student at least

  9. Triallelic Inheritance of TGM1 and ALOXE3 Mutations Associated with Severe Phenotype of Ichtyosis in an Iranian Family - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    AKBARI, Mohammad Taghi; ATAEI-KACHOUI, Mojgan

    2015-01-01

    Lamellar ichthyosis is one form of congenital autosomal recessive ichthyosis. To date, seven causative genes for ARCI have been identified. To understand further the genetic spectrum of the disease, we analyzed a four-generation Iranian family with ARCI that had observable inheritance. Exome sequencing data for one of the affected individuals with ichthyosis from a consanguineous Iranian family was analyzed. Potential candidate mutations were analyzed in additional family members to determine if the putative mutation segregated with disease status. A novel homozygous mutation (p.D414V) in TGM1 and rs3027232 in ALOXE3 gene in heterozygous form were identified which segregated with disease status in the family. Bioinformatic studies with Polyphen-2 and SIFT showed that these variants are damaging. We identified a possible triallelic inheritance in this study. Moreover, this paper illustrates how advances in genome sequencing technologies could be utilized to rapidly elucidate the molecular basis of inherited skin diseases which can be caused by mutations in multiple disease genes.

  10. Fourth lepton family is natural in technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Frandsen, Mads T.; Masina, Isabella; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Imagine discovering a new fourth family of leptons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) but no signs of an associated fourth family of quarks. What would that imply? An intriguing possibility is that the new fermions needed to compensate for the new leptons gauge anomalies simultaneously address the big hierarchy problem of the standard model. A natural way to accomplish such a scenario is to have the Higgs itself be a composite of these new fermions. This is the setup we are going to investigate in this paper using as a template minimal walking technicolor. We analyze a general heavy neutrino mass structure with and without mixing with the standard model families. We also analyze the LHC potential to observe the fourth lepton family in tandem with the new composite Higgs dynamics. We finally introduce a model uniting the fourth lepton family and the technifermion sector at higher energies.

  11. Familial Aggregation and Childhood Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojing; Su, Shaoyong; Snieder, Harold

    2015-01-01

    There is growing concern about elevated blood pressure (BP) in children. The evidence for familial aggregation of childhood BP is substantial. Twin studies have shown that a large part of the familial aggregation of childhood BP is due to genes. The first part of this review provides the latest progress in gene finding for childhood BP, focusing on the combined effects of multiple loci identified from the genome-wide association studies on adult BP. We further review the evidence on the contribution of the genetic components of other family risk factors to the familial aggregation of childhood BP including obesity, birth weight, sleep quality, sodium intake, parental smoking, and socioeconomic status. At the end, we emphasize the promise of using genomic-relatedness-matrix restricted maximum likelihood (GREML) analysis, a method that uses genome-wide data from unrelated individuals, in answering a number of unsolved questions in the familial aggregation of childhood BP. PMID:25432901

  12. Molecular study of the 5 {alpha}-reductase type 2 gene in three European families with 5 {alpha}-reductase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Boudon, C.; Lumbroso, S.; Lobaccaro, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    The molecular basis of 5{alpha}-reductase (5{alpha}R) deficiency was investigated in four patients from three European families. In the French family, the first patient was raised as a female, and gonadectomy was performed before puberty. The second sibling, also raised as female, differed in that gonadal removal was performed after the onset of pubertal masculinization. The other two patients, both from Polish families, developed masculinization of external genitalia during puberty. All patients developed a female sexual identity. In all cases, no known consanguinity or family history of 5{alpha}R deficiency was reported. The genomic DNAs of the patients were sequenced after polymerase chain reaction amplification of the five exons of the 5{alpha}R type 2 gene. We found two homozygous mutations responsible for gutamine to arginine and histidine to arginine substitution in families 1 and 3, respectively. In family 2, we found a heterozygous mutation responsible for an asparagine to serine substitution at position 193. The glutamine/arginine 126 mutation in the French family was previously reported in a Creole ethnic group, and the Polish histidine/arginine 231 mutation was previously reported in a patient from Chicago, Moreover, all of the mutations created new restriction sites, which were used to determine the kindred carrier status in the three families. Because 5{alpha}R deficiency is known to be heterogenous disease in terms of clinical and biochemical expression, our data suggest that molecular biology analysis of the type 2 gene could be an essential step in diagnosing 5{alpha}R deficiency. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Improving Youth Mental Health through Family-Based Prevention In Family Homeless Shelters

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Cynthia J.; Acri, Mary C.; Goldstein, Leah; Bannon, William; Beharie, Nisha; McKay, Mary M.

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examines changes in suicidal ideation among a sample (N = 28) of homeless youth, ages 11-14, residing within family shelters in a large metropolitan area. Changes in suicidal ideation from pretest to posttest are compared across two group approaches to delivering HIV prevention. Youth and their families participating in the HOPE Family Program, incorporating a family strengthening approach, are compared to those receiving a traditional health education-only approach. Multivariate analyses reveal that youth in the HOPE Family Program were 13 times more likely to report a decrease of suicidal ideation. These findings indicate that health education programs integrating a family strengthening approach hold promise for positively impacting mental health outcomes for vulnerable youth. PMID:25157200

  14. The incestoid family.

    PubMed

    Braun-Scharm, H; Frank, R

    1989-01-01

    Following a short overall view on family therapeutic models of close family systems and on incest family models, the concept "incestoid family" is conceived. In this way, families should be exemplified in which it is true that no manifest incest occurs, but by going from one generation to another, relationships between parents and children, resembling a relationship between partners and the constellation of subliminal enticement and seduction situations promote pseudosexual behaviour patterns; the most conspicuous symptom of such a family is hyper- as well as hyposexualised behaviour in children and young people. Definitive and conceptual demarcations to oedipal and incestuous structures were undertaken. Four case descriptions should illustrate the clinic of incestoid families. PMID:2487482

  15. Trauma therapy for death row families.

    PubMed

    Long, Walter C

    2011-01-01

    The family members of death row inmates undergo unique suffering that includes disenfranchised grief and intense psychological trauma. In Texas, where executions occur at a rate of 1 every 2 weeks, this class of trauma victims presumably is large, a fact that should generate public mental health concern. Yet the class remains virtually unknown to the therapeutic community. Very little has been done to address the trauma healing needs of death row families. This theoretical paper proposes that structural therapy designed to reengage attachment relationships and reempower family members' innate resources to emotionally regulate one another may provide one of the most effective means of helping this population survive trauma. PMID:21967176

  16. A novel recessive mutation in fibroblast growth factor-23 causes familial tumoral calcinosis.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Tobias; Yu, Xijie; Davis, Siobhan I; Draman, Mohamad S; Mooney, Sean D; Cullen, Michael J; White, Kenneth E

    2005-04-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) are responsible for autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets, a disorder of isolated renal phosphate wasting. Patients with the disorder display hypophosphatemia with normocalcemia as well as inappropriately normal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D3] concentrations. Reciprocally tumoral calcinosis (TC) patients are often hyperphosphatemic with inappropriately normal or elevated serum 1,25(OH)2D3 levels and have ectopic and vascular calcifications, a phenotype similar to that of Fgf23 null mice. Therefore, the goal of the present studies was to test whether FGF23 was a candidate gene for TC. Two sisters in a consanguineous TC family had hyperphosphatemia and normal 1,25(OH)2D3 levels with characteristic ectopic and vascular calcifications. Interestingly, these patients had low-normal intact serum FGF23 levels but demonstrated FGF23 concentrations approximately 40 times normal when assessed with a C-terminal FGF23 serum assay. Mutational analyses identified a homozygous S71G mutation in FGF23 in the TC patients, which was not found in control alleles. Finally, modeling demonstrated that the S71G mutation most likely destabilizes full-length FGF23. In summary, recessive FGF23 mutations can lead to TC. Additionally, our findings indicate that FGF23 may adopt an unstable conformation in some TC patients, possibly leading to nonfunctional FGF23 protein. PMID:15687325

  17. Identification of a Novel Mutation in the CDHR1 Gene in a Family With Recessive Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Jacque L.; Roorda, Austin; Navani, Mili; Vishweswaraiah, Sangeetha; Syed, Reema; Soudry, Shiri; Ratnam, Kavitha; Gudiseva, Harini V.; Lee, Pauline; Gaasterland, Terry; Ayyagari, Radha

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the clinical phenotype and identify the molecular basis of disease in a consanguineous family of Palestinian origin with autosomal recessive retinal degeneration. Methods Eight family members were evaluated with visual acuity and perimetry tests, color fundus photographs, full-field electroretinography, and optical coherence tomography. Cone photoreceptors surrounding the fovea were imaged in 2 members, using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Exome was captured using probes and sequenced. Readings were mapped to reference hg19. Variant calls and annotations were performed, using published protocols. Confirmation of variants and segregation analysis was performed using dideoxy sequencing. Results Analysis detected 24 037 single-nucleotide variants in one affected family member, of which 3622 were rare and potentially damaging to encoded proteins. Further analysis revealed a novel homozygous nonsense change, c.1381 C>T, p.Gln461X in exon 13 of the CDHR1 gene, which segregated with retinal degeneration in this family. Affected members had night blindness beginning during adolescence with progressive visual acuity and field loss and unmeasurable electroretinographic responses, as well as macular outer retinal loss, although residual cones with increased cone spacing were observed in the youngest individual. Conclusions Exome analysis revealed a novel CDHR1 nonsense mutation segregating with progressive retinal degeneration causing severe central vision loss by the fourth decade of life. High-resolution retinal imaging revealed outer retinal changes suggesting that CDHR1 is important for normal photoreceptor structure and survival. Clinical Relevance Exome sequencing is a powerful technique that may identify causative genetic variants in families with autosomal recessive retinal degeneration. PMID:23044944

  18. Does Addiction Run in Families?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Addiction? » Does Addiction Run in Families? Does Addiction Run in Families? Listen Addiction can run in ... English Español "Heart disease runs in some families. Addiction runs in ours." Matt's family has a history ...

  19. Creating a Family Health History

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health History? Click for more information A Family Tree for Health A family health history is a ... family members grew up. It's like a family tree for health. Click for more information What a ...

  20. Intimacy and Family Consent: A Confucian Ideal.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shui Chuen

    2015-08-01

    In the West, mainstream bioethicists tend to appreciate intimate relationships as a hindrance to individual autonomy. Scholars have even argued against approaching a mother to donate a kidney to save the life of her child; the request, they claim, is too manipulative and, thereby, violates her autonomy. For Chinese bioethicists, such a moral analysis is absurd. The intimate relationship between mother and child establishes strong mutual obligations. It creates mutual moral responsibilities that often require sacrifices for each other. This paper argues that while aiding others is a moral duty, helping one's family is a much stronger duty and poses no threat to one's autonomy. For Confucianism, empathetic intimate feelings, the heart and mind of ren, rest at the root of morality. It requires that we, as moral beings, assume duties to relieve the suffering of others. The more intimate the relationship the stronger the obligation to assist. The family is a closely knitted moral community. Family members often share living resources, mutual experiences, and a sense of identity. Family members act as a social unit, and, ordinarily, mutual obligations among members have priority over duties to those outside of the family. For Confucian bioethics, family-based consent to medical treatment is regarded as natural and reasonable. Family-based decision making is a taken-for-granted norm of social life. While close family members have priority, Confucianism extends such obligations outward toward members of the extended family and the society at large. There is a general principle of gradation of love, which reflects different degrees of personal intimacy and, therefore, of moral obligation. In this fashion, Confucianism seeks to treat the whole of society as one extended family. Hence, in bioethics, mutual responsibility and family-based consent are regarded as basic principles. Through a series of case discussions, this paper illustrates that atomistic individual-based autonomy offers but a poor response to bioethical issues. PMID:26142440

  1. The Role of Stress Exposure and Family Functioning in Internalizing Outcomes of Urban Families

    PubMed Central

    Henry, David B.; Tolan, Patrick H.; Strachan, Martha K.

    2013-01-01

    Although research suggests that stress exposure and family functioning are associated with internalizing problems in adolescents and caregivers, surprisingly few studies have investigated the mechanisms that underlie this association. To determine whether family functioning buffers the development of internalizing problems in stress-exposed families, we assessed the relation between stress exposure, family functioning, and internalizing symptoms among a large sample of inner-city male youth and their caregivers living in poverty across five waves of data collection. We hypothesized that stress exposure and family functioning would predict development of subsequent youth and caregiver internalizing problems and that family functioning would moderate this relation, with higher functioning families demonstrating greater resiliency to stress exposure. We used a longitudinal, prospective design to evaluate whether family functioning (assessed at waves one through four) activated or buffered the effects of stress exposure (assessed at wave one) on subsequent internalizing symptoms (assessed at waves four and five). Stress from Developmental Transitions and family functioning were significant predictors of depressive symptoms and anxiety in youth; however, family functioning did not moderate the relation. Family functioning mediated the relation between stress from Daily Hassles and internalizing outcomes suggesting that poor parenting practices, low structure, and low emotional cohesion activate depression and anxiety in youth exposed to chronic and frequent everyday stressors. Surprisingly, only family functioning predicted depressive symptoms in caregivers. Results validate the use of a comprehensive, multi-informant assessment of stress when investigating internalizing outcomes in youth and support using family-based interventions in the treatment and prevention of internalizing. PMID:25601821

  2. Putting 'family' back in family planning.

    PubMed

    Seifer, David B; Minkoff, Howard; Merhi, Zaher

    2015-01-01

    Family planning visits are designed to help women build families in a manner most compatible with their life goals. Women's knowledge regarding age-related fertility is suboptimal, and first wanted pregnancies are now occurring at older ages. Here we review the issue of diminishing chances of a pregnancy occurring in women over 30 years of age. A debate arises over whether to perform a standard fertility assessment at an age when, for example, oocyte freezing is still practical and feasible, knowing that the proven predictors in subfertile couples may be less informative, or even inappropriate, in women without complaints about fertility. Studies have demonstrated that if women knew that their fertility was diminishing, they might alter life plans, including having children sooner or considering oocyte preservation. Therefore, we argue that physicians need to make an effort to evaluate a woman's childbearing priorities, though not necessarily their fertility, during the initial family planning visit. PMID:25406182

  3. Asteroid family ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoto, Federica; Milani, Andrea; Kneževi?, Zoran

    2015-09-01

    A new family classification, based on a catalog of proper elements with ?384,000 numbered asteroids and on new methods is available. For the 45 dynamical families with >250 members identified in this classification, we present an attempt to obtain statistically significant ages: we succeeded in computing ages for 37 collisional families. We used a rigorous method, including a least squares fit of the two sides of a V-shape plot in the proper semimajor axis, inverse diameter plane to determine the corresponding slopes, an advanced error model for the uncertainties of asteroid diameters, an iterative outlier rejection scheme and quality control. The best available Yarkovsky measurement was used to estimate a calibration of the Yarkovsky effect for each family. The results are presented separately for the families originated in fragmentation or cratering events, for the young, compact families and for the truncated, one-sided families. For all the computed ages the corresponding uncertainties are provided, and the results are discussed and compared with the literature. The ages of several families have been estimated for the first time, in other cases the accuracy has been improved. We have been quite successful in computing ages for old families, we have significant results for both young and ancient, while we have little, if any, evidence for primordial families. We found 2 cases where two separate dynamical families form together a single V-shape with compatible slopes, thus indicating a single collisional event. We have also found 3 examples of dynamical families containing multiple collisional families, plus a dubious case: for these we have obtained discordant slopes for the two sides of the V-shape, resulting in distinct ages. We have found 2 cases of families containing a conspicuous subfamily, such that it is possible to measure the slope of a distinct V-shape, thus the age of the secondary collision. We also provide data on the central gaps appearing in some families. The ages computed in this paper are obtained with a single and uniform methodology, thus the ages of different families can be compared, providing a first example of collisional chronology of the asteroid main belt.

  4. A clinically euthyroid child with a large goiter due to a thyroglobulin gene defect: clinical features and genetic studies

    PubMed Central

    Hermanns, Pia; Refetoff, Samuel; Sriphrapradang, Chutintorn; Pohlenz, Joachim; Okamato, Jessica; Slyper, Leeyat

    2014-01-01

    A 10-year old child born to consanguineous parents presented with an extremely large goiter, a low free T4 level and free T4 index, and normal TSH concentration. The findings of undetectable thyroglobulin (TG) and low free T4, and an elevated free T3/free T4 ratio suggested the possibility of a defect in TG synthesis. Noteworthy aspects of this case were the extremely elevated thyroidal radioiodide uptake despite a normal TSH concentration and the fact that the reduction in the size of her goiter only occurred when her TSH was suppressed below the normal range. Gene sequencing revealed that the patient was homozygous for a donor splice site mutation in intron 30 (IVS30 + 1G > C). Isolation of RNA obtained from the thyroid gland by fine needle aspiration and sequencing of the TG cDNA confirmed the prediction that exon 30 was skipped, resulting in an in-frame loss of 46 amino acids. PMID:23457313

  5. Strengthening Families: Exploring the Impacts of Family Camp Experiences on Family Functioning and Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garst, Barry A.; Baughman, Sarah; Franz, Nancy K.; Seidel, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that family camp experiences can enhance family relationships. Families often participate in family camp experiences for a vacation, as part of a therapeutic and/or intervention strategy, or to gain general enrichment or engagement. To better understand the impacts of family camp experiences on family functioning, a mixed-methods…

  6. Foot Disorders in Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cathcart, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    The foot has been largely ignored in modern practice and teaching. Paramedical disciplines are therefore taking up where physicians leave off. This paper seeks to outline the common conditions which are quickly and easily prevented, diagnosed and treated by family physicians. The major component of all three is an awareness of feet. A removal of the shoes and socks, and a rapid examination will tell us all, for the foot is not a hidden organ. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 4Fig. 7Fig. 9

  7. Family Medicine in Small Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    This article is an off-the-cuff commentary on one practice in a city of 40,000 people. This city is in a largely agricultural area. The article stresses the pluses: the continuity of care and the more interesting and variegated nature of family practice here. There are negatives, as well: the more limited social life and the problems relating to employment for one's spouse. Patient confidentiality is more difficult to maintain, as is one's own privacy. Generally it is a busier and more challenging life, which I heartily recommend. PMID:21263786

  8. THE CREATION OF HAUMEA'S COLLISIONAL FAMILY

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichting, Hilke E.; Sari, Re'em E-mail: sari@tapir.caltech.edu

    2009-08-01

    Recently, the first collisional family was discovered in the Kuiper Belt. The parent body of this family, Haumea, is one of the largest objects in the Kuiper Belt and is orbited by two satellites. It has been proposed that the Haumea family was created from dispersed fragments that resulted from a giant impact. This proposed origin of the Haumea family is however in conflict with the observed velocity dispersion between the family members ({approx} 140 m s{sup -1}) which is significantly less than the escape velocity from Haumea's surface ({approx} 900 m s{sup -1}). In this paper we propose a different formation scenario for Haumea's collisional family. In our scenario the family members are ejected while in orbit around Haumea. This scenario, therefore, naturally gives rise to a lower velocity dispersion among the family members than expected from direct ejection from Haumea's surface. In our scenario Haumea's giant impact forms a single moon that tidally evolves outward until it suffers a destructive collision from which the family is created. We show that this formation scenario yields a velocity dispersion of {approx} 190 m s{sup -1} among the family members which is in good agreement with the observations. We discuss an alternative scenario that consists of the formation and tidal evolution of several satellites that are ejected by collisions with unbound Kuiper Belt objects. However, the formation of the Haumea family in this latter way is difficult to reconcile with the large abundance of Kuiper Belt binaries. We, therefore, favor forming the family by a destructive collision of a single moon of Haumea. The probability for Haumea's initial giant impact in today's Kuiper Belt is less than 10{sup -3}. In our scenario, however, Haumea's giant impact can occur before the excitation of the Kuiper Belt and the ejection of the family members afterward. This has the advantage that one can preserve the dynamical coherence of the family and explain Haumea's original giant impact, which is several orders of magnitude more likely to have occurred in the primordial dynamically cold Kuiper Belt compared to the dynamically excited Kuiper Belt today.

  9. Datura family: the 2009 update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokrouhlický, D.; Durech, J.; Micha?owski, T.; Krugly, Yu. N.; Gaftonyuk, N. M.; Kryszczy?ska, A.; Colas, F.; Lecacheux, J.; Molotov, I.; Slyusarev, I.; Poli?ska, M.; Nesvorný, D.; Beshore, E.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Research of asteroid families has been recently refreshed by the discovery of very young ones. These families are of great interest because they represent the product of their parent body fragmentation before orbital and physical evolutionary processes can change them. A cluster of seven objects around the largest body (1270) Datura is of particular interest because it has enough known members and resides in the inner part of the main asteroid belt, facilitating observations. Aims: We carried out photometric observations of the two largest members of the Datura family - asteroids (1270) Datura and (90265) 2003 CL5 - with the goal of inferring their physical parameters. We also used numerous astrometric observations of Datura-family members in the past few years to revisit the age of this cluster. Methods: We performed numerous photometric observations of (1270) Datura over several oppositions. We then used the lightcurve inversion method to determine the spin state and shape of this asteroid. In the case of (90265) 2003 CL5, for which only limited lightcurve data have been acquired so far, we used Fourier analysis to determine the synodic rotation period during the 2008 apparition. We also used backward numerical integration of the improved orbits of Datura family members to reduce uncertainty in its age. Results: We determined the rotation state of (1270) Datura, the largest member of its own family. Its major properties are a short rotation period of ~3.36 h and small obliquity, which, however, exhibits ~±15° excursions because of a forced Cassini state of the proper nodal frequency. Any possible initial non-principal rotation state has probably been damped and the asteroid rotates about the shortest axis of the inertia tensor. Its global shape, although convex in our representation, may reflect regions related to the excavation of the family members from the parent body surface. Interestingly, the second largest member of the Datura family - (90265) 2003 CL5 - appears to be very slow rotator with the rotation period ~24 h. The large amplitude of its rotation curve suggests that its shape is extremely elongated, possibly bi-lobed. Improved orbits of the family members allow us to re-determine the possible age of this family. We find an age that is slightly older than previously reported. Using a conservative approach, we obtain an age in the 450 to 600 kyr range. With strengthened, but plausible, conditions, we find that the current data may support an age of 530±20 kyr. Further astrometric and photometric observations of the Datura cluster members are needed to determine its age more accurately. Photometric data is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/507/495

  10. Families, Risk, and Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Michael, Ed.; Feiring, Candice, Ed.

    The problems of studying families arise from the difficulty in studying systems in which there are multiple elements interacting with each other and with the child. This book attests to the growing sophistication of the conceptualization and measurement techniques for understanding family processes. Chapters in the first part of the book, "The…

  11. A Family Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Virginia Clarke

    1983-01-01

    Discusses alcoholism, its effect upon the children in the family, and what teachers can do to help children of alcoholics. Suggests that teachers be caring, nonjudgmental, and empathetic; learn what alcoholism is, how it affects the family, and how to identify affected children in classroom; and provide information on alcoholic help groups. (DMM)

  12. Firearms and family violence.

    PubMed

    Kellermann, A; Heron, S

    1999-08-01

    Firearms contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality in family violence. This article discusses the debate on gun use for protection and guns in the home. Weapons-related risks in the setting of intimate partner violence are closely reviewed. Recommendations for physicians are discussed in the context of firearms and family violence. PMID:10516848

  13. Family-Friendly Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Patterson; Garcia, Maria

    2004-01-01

    In the late 1980s, the Denver Art Museum initiated efforts to make the museum a destination for families. From 1997 to 2001, with a generous grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts, these efforts came to fruition. From the moment they walk through the doors, families' needs are anticipated. For example, they can pick up a welcoming brochure, Free…

  14. Changing Families, Changing Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchi, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    American families and workplaces have both changed dramatically over the past half-century. Paid work by women has increased sharply, as has family instability. Education-related inequality in work hours and income has grown. These changes, says Suzanne Bianchi, pose differing work-life issues for parents at different points along the income…

  15. The Working Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boethius, Monica

    1984-01-01

    The working family is today by far the most common family type in Sweden. However, just over 50 percent of the children of working parents have access to day care. Because Swedish income tax policy is based on the concept that all adults will support themselves and does not take into account the number of persons supported on an income, one parent…

  16. Education and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Leonard, Ed.

    This book is the report of the Family Ties Commission, which was established by the Association of Teacher Educators to study the relationship between home and school. Following the preface and two introductory essays, "Education and My Family" (K.B. O'Rourke as told to E. Johnson) and "Preparing for Successful Children" (B. Clawson), the book is…

  17. Normalizing Disability in Families.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Mary

    2015-01-01

    This comment shifts Ouellette's frame of reference in linking prenatal selection against disability, laws prohibiting prenatal sex selection, and fertility specialists' discrimination against disabled adults. Viewing decisions about who can reproduce and what children will be born as fundamentally decisions about family suggests ways to promote acceptance of people with disabilities as valued family members — without limiting reproductive liberties. PMID:26242942

  18. Uninsured Rural Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziller, Erika C.; Coburn, Andrew F.; Anderson, Nathaniel J.; Loux, Stephenie L.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Although research shows higher uninsured rates among rural versus urban individuals, prior studies are limited because they do not examine coverage across entire rural families. Purpose: This study uses the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) to compare rural and urban insurance coverage within families, to inform the design of…

  19. Family Literacy in Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Libraries, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Explains the need for family literacy programs in Illinois and describes efforts to improve adult and child literacy. Topics discussed include poverty; reading, writing, and computing instruction; interaction between parents and children; families and books; partnerships between state agencies, private organizations, and public libraries; and…

  20. Employers, Families and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partnership for Family Involvement in Education (ED), Washington, DC.

    Family involvement in education is good for business, critical to children's school achievement, and important in creating strong and vibrant communities. This report discusses the role of businesses and employers in helping partners and family members be more involved in children's learning. Throughout the report, programs at specific companies…

  1. Balancing Family and Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahnke, Sally; And Others

    The purpose of this monograph is to present a series of activities designed to teach strategies needed for effectively managing the multiple responsibilities of family and work. The guide contains 11 lesson plans dealing with balancing family and work that can be used in any home economics class, from middle school through college. The lesson…

  2. Explaining Family Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Mary Anne, Ed.; Vangelisti, Anita L., Ed.

    A detailed review of current research and state-of-the-art ideas concerning both communication processes and family functioning is presented in this collection of articles. The volume is organized around three sections. Part 1, "The Development of Family Communication Patterns," contains: (1) "Communication in Infancy" (Marguerite Stevenson…

  3. Alcohol and Family Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantrell, Leslie A., Comp.

    This document reports on the relationship between alcohol abuse and battering. Several theories, e.g., the disinhibition, disavowal, and learned behavior theories concerning the relationship between alcohol abuse and family violence are discussed. Literature on the relationship between alcohol and family violence is reviewed. Five intervention and…

  4. Marinating the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensel, Karen A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the New York Aquarium's program specifically designed for family learning and teaching. The program's goal is to create an environment where child-parent roles are dropped and where the philosophy that no one of us is as smart as all of us prevails. Strategies for family involvement are outlined. (MH)

  5. [Inclusive Recreation and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyne, Linda A., Ed.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This feature issue focuses on inclusive recreation for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. The articles provide information about the benefits of inclusive recreation for individuals and families, the challenges in attempting to create or access community recreation services that offer inclusive programs, and strategies…

  6. Family Support and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Lou Ann

    2013-01-01

    Family involvement is essential to the developmental outcome of infants born into Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). In this article, evidence has been presented on the parent's perspective of having an infant in the NICU and the context of family. Key points to an educational assessment are also reviewed. Throughout, the parent's concerns and…

  7. Black Families. Interdisciplinary Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Harold E., Ed.; Stewart, James B., Ed.

    Since the early 1960s, the black family has been characterized as pathological. This six-part collection of 18 research studies presents alternative approaches to understanding the special characteristics of black families. Part I, "Theoretical and Methodological Perspectives," comprises a comparison of the pioneering work of W. E. B. Du Bois and…

  8. Engaging Families in In-Home Family Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ronald W.; Koley, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Boys Town has created a program called In-Home Family Services to deliver help to families in stress. In-home family intervention programs have become widely used to help more families who are at risk and experiencing difficulties with a wide range of problems including domestic violence, child behavior problems, parent-child and family

  9. [Family therapy in divorce].

    PubMed

    Bauers, B

    1992-09-01

    A multi-generational approach to family therapy with divorce families is presented. Parents and children of such families are faced--with special problems during the phases of ambivalence, divorce and post-divorce. Their problems require varying focal points during therapeutic treatment. It focuses on arriving at a decision, finding constructive solutions for practical and emotional problems caused by the divorce ("psychic divorce" and parental cooperation concerning custody and education of the children) as well as supporting individuation and re-orientations. The main aim of therapeutic treatment is to alter the underlying pathogenic patterns of relationships and conflict-solving in order to prevent its repetition in a new partnership or in the next generation. Family therapy with divorce families is complicated to a high degree by aggressiveness, destructivity and resistance against working on central conflicts which serve to avoid feelings of anxiety, shame, guilt, anger and mourning. PMID:1438053

  10. Familial malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kopf, A.W.; Hellman, L.J.; Rogers, G.S.; Gross, D.F.; Rigel, D.S.; Friedman, R.J.; Levenstein, M.; Brown, J.; Golomb, F.M.; Roses, D.F.; Gumport, S.L.

    1986-10-10

    Characteristics associated with familial compared with nonfamilial malignant melanoma were assessed. These data were obtained from consecutive prospectively completed questionnaires on 1169 cases of cutaneous malignant melanoma. Of these, 69 patients indicated a positive family history for this cancer. Among the various clinical and histological variables compared, those that significantly correlated with the familial occurrence of malignant melanoma include younger age at first diagnosis, smaller diameter of the lesion, lower Clark level, decreased frequency of nonmelanoma skin cancer, and reduced prevalence of noncutaneous cancer. Increased awareness of malignant melanoma among family members could account for some of these observations. Identification of the familial variety of malignant melanoma has practical implications concerning early detection and prompt intervention.

  11. Mental health and family planning.

    PubMed

    David, H P

    1971-04-01

    It is known that unwanted pregnancies have damaging consequences. Despite the fact that 97% of fecund U.S. women have used or expect to use contraception, more than 1/2 of the births were reported by married couples in 1965 as unplanned. The circular relationship between excess fertility and conditions of poverty and their relevance for mental health has been studied; results have shown that in large families there is a great likelihood that the last-born child is unwanted. It is also true that in families with 4 or more children, those in the last half of the birth order are more likely to develop mental illness than their older siblings. One way to reduce unwanted pregnancies is to enable couples to have children only with their own informed consent. Induced abortion must be among the available alternatives for the women desiring it. The role of unregulated fertility in the etiology of mental disorder is seldon explored. Systematic observations of the mental health consequences of unwanted pregnancies are rare. Similarly, the appropriateness of applying family planning concepts in preventive mental health programs has received little attention. Sex education and contraceptive information should be introduced when a girl reaches menarche. Closer work between mental health association, medical schools, general practitioners, etc., is needed urgently. The author maintains that the prevalence of unwanted pregnancies and the appalling numbers of unwanted births in the U.S today represent a mental health problem of undefined but clearly immense proportions. PMID:5098783

  12. Raf Family Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Matallanas, David; Birtwistle, Marc; Romano, David; Zebisch, Armin; Rauch, Jens; von Kriegsheim, Alexander; Kolch, Walter

    2011-01-01

    First identified in the early 1980s as retroviral oncogenes, the Raf proteins have been the objects of intense research. The discoveries 10 years later that the Raf family members (Raf-1, B-Raf, and A-Raf) are bona fide Ras effectors and upstream activators of the ubiquitous ERK pathway increased the interest in these proteins primarily because of the central role that this cascade plays in cancer development. The important role of Raf in cancer was corroborated in 2002 with the discovery of B-Raf genetic mutations in a large number of tumors. This led to intensified drug development efforts to target Raf signaling in cancer. This work yielded not only recent clinical successes but also surprising insights into the regulation of Raf proteins by homodimerization and heterodimerization. Surprising insights also came from the hunt for new Raf targets. Although MEK remains the only widely accepted Raf substrate, new kinase-independent roles for Raf proteins have emerged. These include the regulation of apoptosis by suppressing the activity of the proapoptotic kinases, ASK1 and MST2, and the regulation of cell motility and differentiation by controlling the activity of Rok-?. In this review, we discuss the regulation of Raf proteins and their role in cancer, with special focus on the interacting proteins that modulate Raf signaling. We also describe the new pathways controlled by Raf proteins and summarize the successes and failures in the development of efficient anticancer therapies targeting Raf. Finally, we also argue for the necessity of more systemic approaches to obtain a better understanding of how the Ras-Raf signaling network generates biological specificity. PMID:21779496

  13. Blended Families: Issues of Remarriage

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Gary L.

    1984-01-01

    Canada's divorce rate increased by 50% between 1968 and 1982. This has resulted in new family forms. One of these, the family which has been `blended' through remarriage of a parent, has some unique developmental hardships and differences from traditional nuclear families. Blended families are subject to a number of myths that may adversely affect their formation. In addition, members of these families need more time and patience to form a stable and functioning family group than do traditional families. Family physicians can aid the blended family with frank discussion, preparation and specific information. PMID:21279000

  14. Family intervention for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pharoah, Fiona; Mari, Jair; Rathbone, John; Wong, Winson

    2014-01-01

    Background People with schizophrenia from families that express high levels of criticism, hostility, or over involvement, have more frequent relapses than people with similar problems from families that tend to be less expressive of emotions. Forms of psychosocial intervention, designed to reduce these levels of expressed emotions within families, are now widely used. Objectives To estimate the effects of family psychosocial interventions in community settings for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like conditions compared with standard care. Search strategy We updated previous searches by searching the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (September 2008). Selection criteria We selected randomised or quasi-randomised studies focusing primarily on families of people with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder that compared community-orientated family-based psychosocial intervention with standard care. Data collection and analysis We independently extracted data and calculated fixed-effect relative risk (RR), the 95% confidence intervals (CI) for binary data, and, where appropriate, the number needed to treat (NNT) on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD). Main results This 2009-10 update adds 21 additional studies, with a total of 53 randomised controlled trials included. Family intervention may decrease the frequency of relapse (n = 2981, 32 RCTs, RR 0.55 CI 0.5 to 0.6, NNT 7 CI 6 to 8), although some small but negative studies might not have been identified by the search. Family intervention may also reduce hospital admission (n = 481, 8 RCTs, RR 0.78 CI 0.6 to 1.0, NNT 8 CI 6 to 13) and encourage compliance with medication (n = 695, 10 RCTs, RR 0.60 CI 0.5 to 0.7, NNT 6 CI 5 to 9) but it does not obviously affect the tendency of individuals/families to leave care (n = 733, 10 RCTs, RR 0.74 CI 0.5 to 1.0). Family intervention also seems to improve general social impairment and the levels of expressed emotion within the family. We did not find data to suggest that family intervention either prevents or promotes suicide. Authors’ conclusions Family intervention may reduce the number of relapse events and hospitalisations and would therefore be of interest to people with schizophrenia, clinicians and policy makers. However, the treatment effects of these trials may be overestimated due to the poor methodological quality. Further data from trials that describe the methods of randomisation, test the blindness of the study evaluators, and implement the CONSORT guidelines would enable greater confidence in these findings. PMID:21154340

  15. Structure and function of the human Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase enzyme family

    E-print Network

    Rood, Jennifer E. (Jennifer Evelyn)

    2013-01-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family of enzymes in humans is comprised of 17 proteins. PARP-1, the first member of the family, synthesizes a large, complex post-translational modification, poly(ADP-ribose). While ...

  16. Economic conditions of military families.

    PubMed

    Hosek, James; Wadsworth, Shelley MacDermid

    2013-01-01

    For military children and their families, the economic news is mostly good. After a period of steady pay increases, James Hosek and Shelley MacDermid Wadsworth write, service members typically earn more than civilians with a comparable level of education. Moreover, they receive many other benefits that civilians often do not, including housing allowances, subsidized child care, tuition assistance, and top-of-the-line comprehensive health care. Of course, service members tend to work longer hours than civilians do, and they are exposed to hazards that civilians rarely, if ever, face. The extra pay they receive when they are deployed to combat zones helps their families cope financially but cannot alleviate the stress. Though service members are relatively well paid, the military lifestyle takes a toll on the earnings of their spouses. Chiefly because the military requires service members to move frequently, spouses' careers are regularly interrupted, and employers are hesitant to offer them jobs that require a large investment in training or a long learning curve. More military spouses than comparable civilian spouses are either unemployed or work fewer hours than they would like, and military spouses overall tend to earn less than their civilian counterparts. Despite the military's relatively high pay, some service members and their families--particularly among the junior enlisted ranks--report financial distress, and a handful even qualify for food stamps. Moreover, precisely because military pay tends to be higher than civilian pay, families may see a drop in income when a service member leaves the armed forces. Finally, the pay increases of recent years have slowed, and force cutbacks are coming; both of these factors will alter the financial picture for service members, possibly for the worse. PMID:25518691

  17. Family Day Care Training Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakatsu, Gail

    California's Family Day Care Training Program was designed to recruit and train in 7 weeks, Lao, Vietnamese, and Chinese refugees to establish their own state-licensed, family day care homes. Topics in the program's curriculum include an introduction to family day care, state licenses for family day care, state licensing requirements for family

  18. Lights, Camera--Families--Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, Doreen

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the family night concert as a way to involve family members in music education, where they can participate in the orchestra or as part of a family act. Describes how to create the family concert. Includes a sample invitation and a program to a family night performance. (CMK)

  19. 75 FR 9247 - Single Family Mortgage Insurance Premium, Single Family

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ...DEVELOPMENT [Docket No. FR-5376-N-13] Single Family Mortgage Insurance Premium, Single Family AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer...the subject proposal. Lenders use the Single Family Premium Collection Subsystem-Upfront...

  20. Family and Consumer Sciences and STEM Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Vinson; Beachner, Maggie; Daugherty, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Family and consumer sciences (FCS) education has traditionally attracted a large percentage of female students (Vincenti, 1997; Werhan, 2013). Werhan (2013) reported that slightly less than 3.5 million students are engaged in FCS courses, and at the high school level, approximately 65% of them are female. This skewed representation of female…

  1. Family Characteristics of Children with Dyslexia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melekian, Badrig A.

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective review of 249 French children (ages 8-15) with severe dyslexia found that families were characterized by low occupational status and educational level for parents and predominance of high-ranking children in large sibships. Parental age and matrimonial status seemed unimportant. (Author/JDD)

  2. Why family planning matters.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, U D; Robey, B

    1999-07-01

    This Population Reports issue focuses on family planning and the importance of advocacy in family planning programs. Key evidences supporting family planning programs are summarized. This article presents the importance of advocacy for the improvement of the family planning programs in developing countries. Advocacy for family planning is becoming crucial as demand for reproductive health care grows. As many as 600 million people have used contraception, and millions more would do so with better access to good-quality services. Although fertility levels are falling in much of the world, rapid population growth remains a critical issue in most developing countries. This is where advocacy is very much needed. Through advocacy, many individuals and countries will benefit especially in the area of family planning. The benefits include saving the lives of women and children; offering women more choices; and encouraging adoption of safer sexual behavior. Through effective family planning programs, population growth will also be affected. Slower population growth helps protect the environment and it aids development. PMID:10730298

  3. Orbifold family unification

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Yoshiharu; Kinami, Teppei; Oda, Kin-ya

    2007-08-01

    We study the possibility of complete family unification in higher-dimensional space-time. Three families of matters in SU(5) grand unified theory are derived from a single bulk multiplet of the SU(N) gauge group (N{>=}9) in the framework of S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} orbifold models. In the case of the direct orbifold breaking down to the standard model gauge group, there are models in which bulk fields from a single multiplet and a few brane fields compose three families of quarks and leptons.

  4. Germline rearrangements in families with strong family history of glioma and malignant melanoma, colon, and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Cederquist, Kristina; Aradottir, Steina; Borg, Åke; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Shete, Sanjay; Lau, Ching C.; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Lai, Rose; Il'yasova, Dora; Houlston, Richard S.; Schildkraut, Joellen; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Wrensch, Margaret; Davis, Faith G.; Merrell, Ryan; Johansen, Christoffer; Sadetzki, Siegal; Bondy, Melissa L.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Adatto, Phyllis; Morice, Fabian; Payen, Sam; McQuinn, Lacey; McGaha, Rebecca; Guerra, Sandra; Paith, Leslie; Roth, Katherine; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Yung, Alfred; Aldape, Kenneth; Gilbert, Mark; Weinberger, Jeffrey; Colman, Howard; Conrad, Charles; de Groot, John; Forman, Arthur; Groves, Morris; Levin, Victor; Loghin, Monica; Puduvalli, Vinay; Sawaya, Raymond; Heimberger, Amy; Lang, Frederick; Levine, Nicholas; Tolentino, Lori; Saunders, Kate; Thach, Thu-Trang; Iacono, Donna Dello; Sloan, Andrew; Gerson, Stanton; Selman, Warren; Bambakidis, Nicholas; Hart, David; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Alan; Cohen, Mark; Rogers, Lisa; Nock, Charles J; Wolinsky, Yingli; Devine, Karen; Fulop, Jordonna; Barrett, Wendi; Shimmel, Kristen; Ostrom, Quinn; Barnett, Gene; Rosenfeld, Steven; Vogelbaum, Michael; Weil, Robert; Ahluwalia, Manmeet; Peereboom, David; Staugaitis, Susan; Schilero, Cathy; Brewer, Cathy; Smolenski, Kathy; McGraw, Mary; Naska, Theresa; Rosenfeld, Steven; Ram, Zvi; Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix; Umansky, Felix; Zaaroor, Menashe; Cohen, Avi; Tzuk-Shina, Tzeela; Voldby, Bo; Laursen, René; Andersen, Claus; Brennum, Jannick; Henriksen, Matilde Bille; Marzouk, Maya; Davis, Mary Elizabeth; Boland, Eamon; Smith, Marcel; Eze, Ogechukwu; Way, Mahalia; Lada, Pat; Miedzianowski, Nancy; Frechette, Michelle; Paleologos, Nina; Byström, Gudrun; Svedberg, Eva; Huggert, Sara; Kimdal, Mikael; Sandström, Monica; Brännström, Nikolina; Hayat, Amina; Tihan, Tarik; Zheng, Shichun; Berger, Mitchel; Butowski, Nicholas; Chang, Susan; Clarke, Jennifer; Prados, Michael; Rice, Terri; Sison, Jeannette; Kivett, Valerie; Duo, Xiaoqin; Hansen, Helen; Hsuang, George; Lamela, Rosito; Ramos, Christian; Patoka, Joe; Wagenman, Katherine; Zhou, Mi; Klein, Adam; McGee, Nora; Pfefferle, Jon; Wilson, Callie; Morris, Pagan; Hughes, Mary; Britt-Williams, Marlin; Foft, Jessica; Madsen, Julia; Polony, Csaba; McCarthy, Bridget; Zahora, Candice; Villano, John; Engelhard, Herbert; Borg, Ake; Chanock, Stephen K; Collins, Peter; Elston, Robert; Kleihues, Paul; Kruchko, Carol; Petersen, Gloria; Plon, Sharon; Thompson, Patricia; Johansen, C.; Sadetzki, S.; Melin, B.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Lau, Ching C.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Liu, Yanhong; Shete, Sanjay; Yu, Robert K.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Houlston, Richard S.; Hosking, Fay J.; Robertson, Lindsay; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Sloan, Andrew E.; Barnett, Gene; Devine, Karen; Wolinsky, Yingli; Lai, Rose; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sadetzki, Siegal; Yechezkel, Galit Hirsh; Bruchim, Revital Bar-Sade; Aslanov, Lili; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Broholm, Helle; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Schubert, Erica; DeAngelis, Lisa; Jenkins, Robert B.; Yang, Ping; Rynearson, Amanda; Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Henriksson, Roger; Melin, Beatrice S.; Cederquist, Kristina; Aradottir, Steina; Borg, Åke; Merrell, Ryan; Lada, Patricia; Wrensch, Margaret; Wiencke, John; Wiemels, Joe; McCoy, Lucie; McCarthy, Bridget J.; Davis, Faith G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although familial susceptibility to glioma is known, the genetic basis for this susceptibility remains unidentified in the majority of glioma-specific families. An alternative approach to identifying such genes is to examine cancer pedigrees, which include glioma as one of several cancer phenotypes, to determine whether common chromosomal modifications might account for the familial aggregation of glioma and other cancers. Methods Germline rearrangements in 146 glioma families (from the Gliogene Consortium; http://www.gliogene.org/) were examined using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. These families all had at least 2 verified glioma cases and a third reported or verified glioma case in the same family or 2 glioma cases in the family with at least one family member affected with melanoma, colon, or breast cancer.The genomic areas covering TP53, CDKN2A, MLH1, and MSH2 were selected because these genes have been previously reported to be associated with cancer pedigrees known to include glioma. Results We detected a single structural rearrangement, a deletion of exons 1-6 in MSH2, in the proband of one family with 3 cases with glioma and one relative with colon cancer. Conclusions Large deletions and duplications are rare events in familial glioma cases, even in families with a strong family history of cancers that may be involved in known cancer syndromes. PMID:24723567

  5. Family Emergency Preparedness Plan 1 Family Emergency Preparedness Plan

    E-print Network

    Noble, James S.

    ......................................................................................9 Floor Plan#12;#12;Family Emergency Preparedness Plan 1 Family Emergency Preparedness Plan Why Plan?.........................................................................................2 Four Steps to Disaster Planning .......................................................3 Disaster

  6. 75 FR 17946 - Family Report, MTW Family Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... understand demographic, family profile, income, and housing information for participants in the Public... Information and Its Proposed Use: Tenant data is collected to understand demographic, family profile,...

  7. Family Demands, Social Support and Family Functioning in Taiwanese Families Rearing Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, C-Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome (DS) affects not only children but also their families. Much remains to be learned about factors that influence how families of children with DS function, especially families in non-Western populations. The purpose of this cross-sectional, correlational study was to examine how family demographics, family demands and…

  8. Family Health History and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diabetes > Know Your Family Health History Family Health History and Diabetes En español Haywood, a physical education ... story > 1 2 3 4 5 Family health history is an important risk factor for developing type ...

  9. Building Family Capacity for Native Hawaiian Women with Breast Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokuau, Noreen; Braun, Kathryn L.; Daniggelis, Ephrosine

    2012-01-01

    Native Hawaiian women have the highest breast cancer incidence and mortality rates when compared with other large ethnic groups in Hawai'i. Like other women, they rely on the support of their families as co-survivors. This project explored the feasibility and effects of a culturally tailored educational intervention designed to build family

  10. Connecting Complex Processes: A Decade of Research on Immigrant Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Jennifer E.

    2010-01-01

    This review examines research on immigrant families in the United States from the past decade from multiple disciplinary perspectives. This work has used variations on assimilation and acculturation perspectives. In the case of the assimilation perspectives, the focus has largely been on family formation, whereas research using acculturation…

  11. Studies in Family Planning, Volume 3 Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Population Council, New York, NY.

    A new design for government family planning programs is proposed in "Family Planning Programs: An Economic Approach," the principal article in this monthly publication of The Population Council. The design is intended primarily for low-income countries that seek large and rapid reductions in fertility. Thirteen elements of the proposed system of…

  12. Familial Mediterranean fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recurrent polyserositis; Benign paroxysmal peritonitis; Periodic disease; Periodic fever; FMF ... Familial Mediterranean fever is most often caused by a mutation in the MEFV gene. This gene creates proteins involved in inflammation. ...

  13. Veterans and their families 

    E-print Network

    McKie, Linda; Morrison, Zoe; Thomson, Fionagh; Alstead, Allan

    This briefing paper reports on the outcomes of a range of activities undertaken with a number of veterans, veterans’ families, and third and public sector organisations located in Scotland. Our aim was to explore the resettlement experiences...

  14. National Military Family Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... we move into 2016 and beyond? FIND OUT Force of the Future sounds intriguing, but do the ... a kitchen table has expanded into a strong force of military families representing all ranks and Services. ...

  15. Families in the Military

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Activities: Striking the Right Balance Advocating For Your Child Attachment Disorders ... consider donating to the Campaign for America’s Kids . Your support will help us continue to produce and distribute Facts for Families , ...

  16. Natural family planning.

    PubMed

    Smoley, Brian A; Robinson, Christa M

    2012-11-15

    Natural family planning methods provide a unique option for committed couples. Advantages include the lack of medical adverse effects and the opportunity for participants to learn about reproduction. Modern methods of natural family planning involve observation of biologic markers to identify fertile days in a woman's reproductive cycle. The timing of intercourse can be planned to achieve or avoid pregnancy based on the identified fertile period. The current evidence for effectiveness of natural family planning methods is limited to lower-quality clinical trials without control groups. Nevertheless, perfect use of these methods is reported to be at least 95 percent effective in preventing pregnancy. The effectiveness of typical use is 76 percent, which demonstrates that motivation and commitment to the method are essential for success. Depending on the method, couples can learn about natural family planning methods in a single office visit, through online instruction, or from certified instructors. PMID:23157145

  17. Family Adjustment to Aphasia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this time. Seek additional counseling services as necessary. Communication Skills Family members also can help the person ... aphasia develop new skills to compensate for the communication problems. Some suggestion include: Continue to talk to ...

  18. General Dynamics Atlas family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, James

    Developments concerning the Atlas family of launch vehicles over the last three or four years are summarized. Attention is given to the center of gravity, load factors, acoustics, pyroshock, low-frequency sinusoidal vibration, and high-frequency random vibration.

  19. Family Treatment for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    FALLOON, IAN R. H.; MCGILL, CHARISTINE W.; MATTHEWS, SUSAN M.; KEITH, SAMUEL J.; SCHOOLER, NINA R.

    1996-01-01

    The NIMH Treatment Strategies in Schizophrenia (TSS) collaborative study group investigated the efficacy of antisychotic drug maintenance strategies involving reduced medication exposure in interaction with applied and supportive family management for the long-term treatment of schizophrenia. Therapy was provided at five centers by 25 clinicians who did not participate in the development of the therapies. They were trained by two of the authors, I.R.H.F and C.W.M, in applied family management, a homebased treatment derived from the behavioral family therapy developed by them. Clinicians’ characteristics, selection, and training methods, as well as patient rehospitalization rates, are reported for the two family management conditions. The TSS study represents a bridge between the development of a novel therapy and its dissemination in general clinical practice. PMID:22700264

  20. Natural Family Planning

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ovaries releases an egg. This process is called ovulation. The egg moves toward the uterus through the ... intercourse takes place just before or just after ovulation. How does natural family planning work? Two methods ...

  1. MSUD Family Support Group

    MedlinePLUS

    Remember me Forgot login? | Register HOT NEWS Zebrafish Research Continues » As noted in Sandy Bulcher’s review of research supported by ... Projects Funded by the MSUD Family Support Group » Over the years, ...

  2. Concepts of family planning.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, C W

    1978-01-01

    Family planning, often equated with birth control consists in the broadest sense of numerous issues and factors. Planning, according to the author entails realistic assessment of ones ability to plan plus recognizing the limitations inherant in planning. The following determinents of parenthood are additional factors one must consider when discussing concepts of family planning: 1) the system of relationships among groups of individuals with differing roles and expectations; 2) values toward family size and parenthood; 3) the concept of parenthood as a career. Successful family planning is often a result of perceiving the goal of planning as either termination of further childbearing or spacing of births; and 4) psychosocial and economic aspects of contraception. The author finally suggests that there are acceptable alternatives to biological parenthood. PMID:255395

  3. Brassicaceae (Mustard family) Hoary alyssum

    E-print Network

    Brassicaceae (Mustard family) Hoary alyssum Berteroa incana (L.) DC. Life cycle Annual, biennial to identifying Christmas tree weeds. #12;Brassicaceae (Mustard family) oval and slightly flattened, grayish green

  4. Brassicaceae (Mustard family) Field pennycress

    E-print Network

    Brassicaceae (Mustard family) Field pennycress Thlaspi arvense L. Life cycle Erect winter or summer. Back to identifying Christmas tree weeds. #12;Brassicaceae (Mustard family) Field pennycress continued

  5. Poaceae (Grass family) Rhizomatous perennial.

    E-print Network

    Poaceae (Grass family) Life cycle Rhizomatous perennial. Leaves Bright green leaves are hairless. Patch of Johnsongrass. Back to identifying Christmas tree weeds. #12;Poaceae (Grass family) Johnsongrass

  6. Families and brain death.

    PubMed

    Kompanje, Erwin J O

    2015-04-01

    It is necessary to support the family of a patient with a progressively worsening severe acute brain injury, and to do this with the utmost understanding of their ultimate hopelessness. Any conversation starts with an explanation of the catastrophic nature of the illness, but also with establishing the point of no return. When brainstem reflexes are lost and the patient has become apneic, family members should be appropriately informed. In contrast to circulatory death, the relatives of such a patient do not see a deceased person in the traditional sense, and even the neurologic progression may not have been obvious to family members. The conversation about brain death with the close relatives is therefore different, and is more detailed than a conversation about cardiopulmonary death. In this review, a six-phase approach of communication with the relatives is proposed. Insightful snippets of personal conversations with family members are included. Communicating with family members also necessarily involves a discussion on the potential suitability for organ donation. Some suggestions on how to approach reluctant family members to accept death of their loved one are included. PMID:25839726

  7. COLLISIONALLY BORN FAMILY ABOUT 87 SYLVIA

    SciTech Connect

    Vokrouhlicky, David; Nesvorny, David; Bottke, William F.; Morbidelli, Alessandro E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.ed E-mail: morby@obs-nice.f

    2010-06-15

    There are currently more than 1000 multi-opposition objects known in the Cybele population, adjacent and exterior to the asteroid main belt, allowing a more detailed analysis than was previously possible. Searching for collisionally born clusters in this population, we find only one statistically robust case: a family of objects about (87) Sylvia. We use a numerical model to simulate the Sylvia family long-term evolution due to gravitational attraction from planets and thermal (Yarkovsky) effects and to explain its perturbed structure in the orbital element space. This allows us to conclude that the Sylvia family must be at least several hundreds of million years old, in agreement with evolutionary timescales of Sylvia's satellite system. We find it interesting that other large Cybele-zone asteroids with known satellites-(107) Camilla and (121) Hermione-do not have detectable families of collisional fragments about them (this is because we assume that binaries with large primary and small secondary components are necessarily impact generated). Our numerical simulations of synthetic clusters about these asteroids show they would suffer a substantial dynamical depletion by a combined effect of diffusion in numerous weak mean-motion resonances and Yarkovsky forces provided their age is close to {approx}4 billion years. However, we also believe that a complete effacement of these two families requires an additional component, very likely due to resonance sweeping or other perturbing effects associated with the late Jupiter's inward migration. We thus propose that both Camilla and Hermione originally had their collisional families, as in the Sylvia case, but they lost them in an evolution that lasted a billion years. Their satellites are the only witnesses of these effaced families.

  8. Obstetrics in family practice: a model for residency training.

    PubMed

    Lynch, D A

    1978-10-01

    Family physicians have a unique service to offer families at the time of their reproduction, and have a role to play that cannot be duplicated by an obstetrician-gynecologist or pediatrician. The process of a family integrating a new member is a natural concept to family practice and lends itself to a family-centered model of care seldom seen in medicine. Practicing obstetrics has a positive effect on a family physician's practice for without obstetrics a practice largely of episodic adult internal medicine develops. Obstetrical care provided by a family physician is a natural answer to the currently articulated public need for personalized, sensitive, family-centered, and expert childbirth care. Obstetrical training in the family practice residency needs to include a longitudinal pregnancy care experience in addition to block rotation on hospital services to teach residents skills of good obstetrical practice and to develop an attitude of family-centered health-care advocacy. A detailed program of family-centered patient education classes practical for a private group practice has been developed to extend throughout the entire course of pregnancy and includes classes after delivery. PMID:702071

  9. Changing families, changing workplaces.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Suzanne M

    2011-01-01

    American families and workplaces have both changed dramatically over the past half-century. Paid work by women has increased sharply, as has family instability. Education-related inequality in work hours and income has grown. These changes, says Suzanne Bianchi, pose differing work-life issues for parents at different points along the income distribution. Between 1975 and 2009, the labor force rate of mothers with children under age eighteen increased from 47.4 percent to 71.6 percent. Mothers today also return to work much sooner after the birth of a child than did mothers half a century ago. High divorce rates and a sharp rise in the share of births to unmarried mothers mean that more children are being raised by a single parent, usually their mother. Workplaces too have changed, observes Bianchi. Today's employees increasingly work nonstandard hours. The well-being of highly skilled workers and less-skilled workers has been diverging. For the former, work hours may be long, but income has soared. For lower-skill workers, the lack of "good jobs" disconnects fathers from family obligations. Men who cannot find work or have low earnings potential are much less likely to marry. For low-income women, many of whom are single parents, the work-family dilemma is how to care adequately for children and work enough hours to support them financially. Jobs for working-class and lower middle-class workers are relatively stable, except in economic downturns, but pay is low, and both parents must work full time to make ends meet. Family income is too high to qualify for government subsidized child care, but too low to afford high-quality care in the private market. These families struggle to have a reasonable family life and provide for their family's economic well-being. Bianchi concludes that the "work and family" problem has no one solution because it is not one problem. Some workers need more work and more money. Some need to take time off around the birth of a child without permanently derailing a fulfilling career. Others need short-term support to attend to a family health crisis. How best to meet this multiplicity of needs is the challenge of the coming decade. PMID:22013627

  10. Next generation sequencing identifies mutations in Atonal homolog 7 (ATOH7) in families with global eye developmental defects

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Kamron; Logan, Clare V.; McKibbin, Martin; Sheridan, Eamonn; Elçioglu, Nursel H.; Yenice, Ozlem; Parry, David A.; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Abdelhamed, Zakia I.A.; Al-Maskari, Ahmed; Poulter, James A.; Mohamed, Moin D.; Carr, Ian M.; Morgan, Joanne E.; Jafri, Hussain; Raashid, Yasmin; Taylor, Graham R.; Johnson, Colin A.; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Toomes, Carmel; Ali, Manir

    2012-01-01

    The atonal homolog 7 (ATOH7) gene encodes a transcription factor involved in determining the fate of retinal progenitor cells and is particularly required for optic nerve and ganglion cell development. Using a combination of autozygosity mapping and next generation sequencing, we have identified homozygous mutations in this gene, p.E49V and p.P18RfsX69, in two consanguineous families diagnosed with multiple ocular developmental defects, including severe vitreoretinal dysplasia, optic nerve hypoplasia, persistent fetal vasculature, microphthalmia, congenital cataracts, microcornea, corneal opacity and nystagmus. Most of these clinical features overlap with defects in the Norrin/?-catenin signalling pathway that is characterized by dysgenesis of the retinal and hyaloid vasculature. Our findings document Mendelian mutations within ATOH7 and imply a role for this molecule in the development of structures at the front as well as the back of the eye. This work also provides further insights into the function of ATOH7, especially its importance in retinal vascular development and hyaloid regression. PMID:22068589

  11. Opportunity NYC--Family Rewards: Qualitative Study of Family Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraker, Carolyn A.; Greenberg, David

    2011-01-01

    Aimed at low-income families in six of New York City's highest-poverty communities, the Family Rewards program ties cash rewards to a pre-specified set of activities. This paper presents the qualitative findings from interviews with 77 families. It examines how families incorporated the program into their households, and specifically the…

  12. Families in Demographic Perspective: Implications for Family Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, James H.

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on demographic changes in families and implications for counseling couples and families. Contends that several important demographic changes in families have major impacts on kinds of clients that present for counseling and therapy. Looks at children born to unmarried women, separation and divorce, single-parent families, and remarriage…

  13. Family Support & Health Care: Working Together for Healthy Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalley, Jacqueline, Ed.; Ahsan, Nilofer, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This report of the Family Resource Coalition of America examines partnerships between family support programs and health care providers, forged to ensure that the comprehensive needs of families are met. The report begins with two articles, "Family Support and the Emerging Health System" and "Social and Economic Issues Affecting Health--A…

  14. Sensemaking in a High-Risk Lifestyle: The Relationship Between Work and Family for Public Safety Families 

    E-print Network

    Bochantin, Jaime Elizabeth

    2011-10-21

    Past research concerning work and family has largely been from traditional, white-collar settings and has only taken into consideration the perceptions of the employees' experiences with regard to the relationship between ...

  15. Redefining the role of family therapy in psychiatric residency education.

    PubMed

    Slovik, L S; Griffith, J L; Forsythe, L; Polles, A

    1997-03-01

    In order to learn how psychiatry residents use family therapy training from residency in their clinical practices after graduation, the authors interviewed graduates from a large program in the metropolitan Northeast and a small program in the rural South. Graduates from both programs were using family therapy theory and skills to a greater extent than they had anticipated during residency. However, these skills were being used primarily to treat individual patients and to solve clinical and administrative problems in settings other than traditional couple and family therapies. Based on the findings, the authors suggest a restructuring of content and redefinition of role for family therapy training in psychiatry residencies. PMID:24442812

  16. Myc oncogenes: the enigmatic family.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, K M; Birnie, G D

    1996-01-01

    The myc family of proto-oncogenes is believed to be involved in the establishment of many types of human malignancy. The members of this family have been shown to function as transcription factors, and through a designated target sequence bring about continued cell-cycle progression, cellular immortalization and blockages to differentiation in many lineages. However, while much of the recent work focusing on the c-myc oncogene has provided some very important advances, it has also brought to light a large amount of conflicting data as to the mechanism of action of the gene product. In this regard, it has now been shown that c-myc is effective in transcriptional repression as well as transcriptional activation and, perhaps more paradoxically, that it has a role in programmed cell death (apoptosis) as well as in processes of cell-cycle progression. In addition, particular interest has surrounded the distinct roles of the two alternative translation products of the c-myc gene, c-Myc 1 and c-Myc 2. The intriguing observation that the ratio of c-Myc 1 to c-Myc 2 increases markedly upon cellular quiescence led to the discovery that the enforced expression of the two proteins individually showed that c-Myc 2 stimulates cell growth, whereas c-Myc 1 appears to be growth suppressing. Clearly, the disparities in the activities of c-Myc, together with the consistent occurrence of mutations of c-myc in human malignancies, means that, although reaching an understanding of the functions of the myc gene family might not be simple, it remains well worthy of pursuit. PMID:8615760

  17. Familial Hepatitis and Chronic Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Debré, Robert

    1939-01-01

    The author reports the history of a family of six children, of whom two, the eldest and the fifth, are normal; three died, a boy when 6 months old and two girls when 9 and 10 years old, from the same familial disease that also attacked another boy now 7 years old. The essential features of this disease are hypertrophy of both liver and spleen, chronic icterus with evidence of salts and bile-pigments in the blood and urine, retardation of physical, mental, and sexual development, slight deafness in one case and clubbing of the fingers in another. This condition is a good example of biliary cirrhosis of the liver. After reviewing recent French observations, the author recalls the large contribution of English authors on the subject. He then distinguishes three types of familial cirrhosis: Laennec's type with enlarged liver, the type of splenomegalic anascitic and anicteric cirrhosis, resembling Banti's syndrome, and the commonest type or biliary cirrhosis. The author describes particular histological lesions, and when dealing with differential diagnoses, excludes dyslipoidic, polycoric, and other acquired cirrhosis in children. He then summarizes the relationships between this disease and the obstructive cirrhosis to a congenital defect of the bile-ducts, the cirrhosis in young Indians, the syndrome of hepatic lenticular degeneration, and the syndrome of cirrhosis of the liver combined with hæmangiomatosis. Finally, after recalling the close analogy of the condition with renal dwarfism, the author shows how the interpretation of these relationships may throw light on the pathogenesis of various progressive congenital diseases. PMID:19992037

  18. Trends in Family Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The author presents insights from various readers of "ExchangeEveryDay" regarding trends in the world of family child care. Kathleen Reticker of Acre Family Child Care in Lowell, Massachusetts thinks an increasing trend in Family Child Care is the pressure to emulate a Center, instead of seeing family child care as a different model. Over the…

  19. Family Involvement with Assistive Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroth, Roger; Bolson, Mary-Dale

    1996-01-01

    Expectations for family involvement and professional behavior are different when working with families of children who use adaptive technology than they are with families of other children with special needs. The article addresses some of the differences, describing family and professional roles in assessment, interpersonal communication,…

  20. Family Research Project Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, David C.; Bell, Linda G.

    This document presents an overview and progress report on the Family Research Project, started in 1974 to (1) study the relationship between family process and individual development of family members, especially children, (2) conceptualize and measure system level variables describing family structure and process, (3) develop microanalytic…

  1. The Power of Family Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Family Literacy, Louisville, KY.

    This report presents the early findings from the analysis of a family literacy demonstration project under the direction of the National Center for Family Literacy. The data in this report are based upon the experiences of over 300 families who participated in the Toyota Families for Learning Program during the 1992-1993 school year. The first…

  2. About Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Colon CFR includes lifestyle, medical history, and family history data collected from more than 41,000 men and women from 14,500 families with and without colorectal cancer. The Colon CFR began recruiting families in 1997, and all participants are followed up every 5 years to update personal and family histories and expand recruitment if new cases have occurred since baseline.

  3. Preservation and Modification of Culture in Family Socialization: Development of Parenting Measures for Korean Immigrant Families

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoonsun; Kim, You Seung; Drankus, Dina; Kim, Hyun Jee

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to describe the family socialization beliefs and practices of Korean immigrant parents through testing psychometric properties of several newly developed items and scales to assess the major components of the Korean traditional concept of family socialization, ga-jung-kyo-yuk. These new measures were examined for validity and reliability. The findings show that Korean immigrant parents largely preserve their traditional and core parenting values, while also showing meaningful, yet not very dramatic, signs of adopting new cultural traits. The results also suggest that the acculturative process may not be simply bilinear but may generate a new, unique and blended value and behavior set from the two (or more) cultures involved. Culturally appropriate practice requires not only further validation of existing knowledge with minority groups, but the development of a theoretical framework of family socialization that recognizes the cultural uniqueness of immigrant families. PMID:24765236

  4. No Pain, No Gain? A Resource-Based Model of Work-to-Family Enrichment and Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zheng; Powell, Gary N.

    2012-01-01

    Work-family scholars tend to work in two largely disconnected research streams, focusing on either work-family enrichment--the positive side of the work-family interface--or work-family conflict--the negative side of this interface. The purpose of this study is to suggest a reconciliation of the two research streams by proposing and testing a…

  5. Characterizing gene family evolution

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene families are widely used in comparative genomics, molecular evolution, and in systematics. However, they are constructed in different manners, their data analyzed and interpreted differently, with different underlying assumptions, leading to sometimes divergent conclusions. In systematics, concepts like monophyly and the dichotomy between homoplasy and homology have been central to the analysis of phylogenies. We critique the traditional use of such concepts as applied to gene families and give examples of incorrect inferences they may lead to. Operational definitions that have emerged within functional genomics are contrasted with the common formal definitions derived from systematics. Lastly, we question the utility of layers of homology and the meaning of homology at the character state level in the context of sequence evolution. From this, we move forward to present an idealized strategy for characterizing gene family evolution for both systematic and functional purposes, including recent methodological improvements. PMID:19461954

  6. IRAS asteroid families

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Williams, J. G.; Tedesco, E. F.; Matson, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) sampled the entire asteroid population at wavelengths from 12 to 100 microns during its 1983 all sky survey. The IRAS Minor Planet Survey (IMPS) includes updated results for more recently numbered as well as other additional asteroids with reliable orbital elements. Albedos and diameters were derived from the observed thermal emission and assumed absolute visual magnitudes and then entered into the IMPS database at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) for members of the Themis, Eos, Koronis and Maria asteroid families and compared with their visual colors. The IMPS results for the small (down to about 20 km) asteroids within these major families confirm trends previously noted for their larger members. Each of these dynamical families which are defined by their similar proper elements appears to have homogeneous physical properties.

  7. The effect of pathological gambling on families, marriages, and children.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Martha C; Forbush, Kelsie T; Schlinder, Jessica; Rosenman, Eugene; Black, Donald W

    2007-08-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) is widely reported to have negative consequences on marriages, families, and children. Empirical evidence is only now accumulating but when put together with anecdotal information, the extent of these problems is clear. PG contributes to chaos and dysfunction within the family unit, disrupts marriages, leading to high rates of separation and divorce, and is associated with child abuse and neglect. Divorce rates are high, not surprising in light of reports that these marriages are often abusive. Research shows that the families of pathological gamblers are filled with members who gamble excessively, suffer from depressive or anxiety disorders, and misuse alcohol, drugs, or both. Families of persons with PG are also large, a variable independently related to family dysfunction. The authors review the evidence on the impact of PG on families, marriages, and offspring, and make recommendations for future research targeting these problems. PMID:17667890

  8. $?(27)$ family symmetry and neutrino mixing

    E-print Network

    Ivo de Medeiros Varzielas

    2015-08-03

    The observed neutrino mixing, having a near maximal atmospheric neutrino mixing angle and a large solar mixing angle, is close to tri-bi-maximal. This structure may be related to the existence of a discrete non-Abelian family symmetry. In this paper the family symmetry is the non-Abelian discrete group $\\Delta(27)$, a subgroup of $SU(3)$ with triplet and anti-triplet representations. Different frameworks are constructed in which the mixing follows from combining fermion mass terms with the vacuum structure enforced by the discrete symmetry. Mass terms for the fermions originate from familon triplets, anti-triplets or both. Vacuum alignment for the family symmetry breaking familons follows from simple invariants.

  9. Family violence: guidelines for recognition and management

    PubMed Central

    Ghent, William R.; Da Sylva, Normand P.; Farren, Margo E.

    1985-01-01

    Chronic and intermittent abuse of one family member by another is common. Victims may be children who are sexually or physically abused, wives or live-in partners, or older relatives. Physicians are often the first points of contact for patients who have been abused, but the abuse is frequently concealed by the victims. Physicians should be alert to signs of battering such as bruises in various stages of healing, unusual behaviour in children and interpersonal difficulties in the family. There are a number of options in prevention and treatment, including referral to social service and legal authorities, calling on other resources in the family and helping the individual develop coping skills. This review also lists a large number of social agencies in Canada that are willing to help victims of abuse. PMID:3971273

  10. Familial pityriasis rotunda.

    PubMed

    Lodi, A; Betti, R; Chiarelli, G; Carducci, M; Crosti, C

    1990-09-01

    Pityriasis rotunda is a rare dermatosis characterized by circular, dusty scaling, dyschromic patches, quite asymptomatic and mostly described in Japanese and blacks. The authors have seen three cases of pityriasis rotunda in a Sardinian family that are to be added to two other similar reports. The patients were all in good health. An interesting feature was the association with favism. On inquiry it was discovered that many more members of the family were affected by either or both pathologies. The authors believe this condition to be a form of minor acquired ichthyosis of which Sardinia could be an ethnic center. PMID:2228374

  11. Familial pityriasis rotunda.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Lodi A; Betti R; Chiarelli G; Carducci M; Crosti C

    1990-09-01

    Pityriasis rotunda is a rare dermatosis characterized by circular, dusty scaling, dyschromic patches, quite asymptomatic and mostly described in Japanese and blacks. The authors have seen three cases of pityriasis rotunda in a Sardinian family that are to be added to two other similar reports. The patients were all in good health. An interesting feature was the association with favism. On inquiry it was discovered that many more members of the family were affected by either or both pathologies. The authors believe this condition to be a form of minor acquired ichthyosis of which Sardinia could be an ethnic center.

  12. [Familial LCAT deficiency].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, M

    1994-12-01

    Familial plasma lecithine: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency is a disease that is inherited as an autosomal recessing trait. The main clinical abnormalities are corneal opacities, anemia and frequently, though not invariably, proteinuria. These abnormalities result from a failure of LCAT to esterify cholesterol in plasma. Renal failure can be a life-threatening complication. In plasma, all lipoprotein classes show abnormalities including lipid composition, shape, distribution and concentration. Fish eye disease, which is characterized by corneal opacities and plasma lipoprotein abnormalities, is also a result from deficiency of LCAT activity. As LCAT gene has been cloned, molecular defects of both familial LCAT deficiency and fish eye disease have been reported recently. PMID:7853712

  13. The Collagen Family

    PubMed Central

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant proteins in mammals. The collagen family comprises 28 members that contain at least one triple-helical domain. Collagens are deposited in the extracellular matrix where most of them form supramolecular assemblies. Four collagens are type II membrane proteins that also exist in a soluble form released from the cell surface by shedding. Collagens play structural roles and contribute to mechanical properties, organization, and shape of tissues. They interact with cells via several receptor families and regulate their proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Some collagens have a restricted tissue distribution and hence specific biological functions. PMID:21421911

  14. Emotional Problems — A Family Affair

    PubMed Central

    Weston, W. W.

    1972-01-01

    It is important for the family physician to be able to utilize family treatment concepts to help him understand the families in his care. He should recognize how family dysfunction contributes to the problems of his individual patients. He should be able to help these families recognize and deal with many of their problems and should be aware of his own limitations and when consultation is indicated. PMID:20468782

  15. Family Support Builds Stronger Families: The Roots of Family-Supportive Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiderman, Ethel

    2009-01-01

    Parent Services Project (PSP) is one model of family support that emerged from the heightened awareness of families' needs. Founded in 1980 to integrate family support into four San Francisco Bay Area early childhood programs, PSP since has spread to more than 800 organizations serving 30,000 families in Alaska, California, Delaware, Florida,…

  16. Getting a High-Speed Family Connection: Associations between Family Media Use and Family Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla-Walker, Laura M.; Coyne, Sarah M.; Fraser, Ashley M.

    2012-01-01

    The way families have used the media has substantially changed over the past decade. Within the framework of family systems theory, this paper examines the relations between family media use and family connection in a sample of 453 adolescents (mean age of child = 14.32 years, SD = 0.98, 52% female) and their parents. Results revealed that cell…

  17. Family Literacy as a Welfare Reform Strategy. Family Independence Initiative Audioconference. Family Independence Initiative Publication #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Family Literacy, Louisville, KY.

    In 1997, the National Center for Family Literacy convened four state policymakers for an audioconference to discuss five issues related to family literacy and its role as a welfare reform strategy. First, with regard to the value of family literacy, policymakers saw literacy as the key to employment and job retention. Second, family literacy was a…

  18. Perceived Family Functioning and Family Resources of Hong Kong Families: Implications for Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Joyce L. C.; Wong, Timothy K. Y.; Lau, Luk King; Pun, Shuk Han

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of a telephone survey (n = 1,015 respondents) that aims to identify the perceived general family functioning and family resources of Hong Kong Chinese families and their linkage to each other in a rapidly transforming society. The perceived general family functioning of the respondents was average, and the five…

  19. The Consequences of Witnessing Family Violence on Children and Implications for Family Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Christopher M.

    2006-01-01

    Although a large number of children are directly abused, an even larger number may indirectly experience the effects of abuse as witnesses of family violence. However, the effects on children who witness such violence have long been unaddressed, although a growing body of research indicates that these children are affected in various domains,…

  20. Korean Families in America: Their Family Language Policies and Home-Language Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Hyun-Sook

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the family language policies (FLP) of Korean American parents and how the language practice, management, and ideology components of their FLP and demographic variables predict maintenance of the home language. Results of a large-scale (N = 480) survey show that different sets of FLP and demographic variables contributed to a…

  1. The Dfam database of repetitive DNA families

    PubMed Central

    Hubley, Robert; Finn, Robert D.; Clements, Jody; Eddy, Sean R.; Jones, Thomas A.; Bao, Weidong; Smit, Arian F.A.; Wheeler, Travis J.

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive DNA, especially that due to transposable elements (TEs), makes up a large fraction of many genomes. Dfam is an open access database of families of repetitive DNA elements, in which each family is represented by a multiple sequence alignment and a profile hidden Markov model (HMM). The initial release of Dfam, featured in the 2013 NAR Database Issue, contained 1143 families of repetitive elements found in humans, and was used to produce more than 100 Mb of additional annotation of TE-derived regions in the human genome, with improved speed. Here, we describe recent advances, most notably expansion to 4150 total families including a comprehensive set of known repeat families from four new organisms (mouse, zebrafish, fly and nematode). We describe improvements to coverage, and to our methods for identifying and reducing false annotation. We also describe updates to the website interface. The Dfam website has moved to http://dfam.org. Seed alignments, profile HMMs, hit lists and other underlying data are available for download. PMID:26612867

  2. [Family planning in Chile (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Romero, H

    1977-10-01

    Like many other countries, Chile began programs for family planning in 1962, with the organization of the Chilean Association for Family Protection (APROFA). The need for family planning in order to reduce large families and avoid unwanted pregnancies was felt by the community. Later on, a number of institutions, both state and private, joined in these efforts, with special participation of the National Health Service which is currently directing the programs and facilitates the outpatient clinics. APROFA is affiliated with FIPF and thereby obtains financial, scientific, and technical aid. The birth rate has decreased in Chile from 36/1000 in 1964 to 26.6/1000 in 1974. In the same period, the population growth has decreased to 1.6% and maternal mortality has diminished 40%. Mortality from abortions has decreased 65% and hospitalizations derived from this source by 15%. It must be emphasized that not all of these changes can be attributed to action of family planning. Since there has been a concomitant improvement in living standards as well as other factors difficult to evaluate. (author's modified) PMID:398064

  3. The Dfam database of repetitive DNA families.

    PubMed

    Hubley, Robert; Finn, Robert D; Clements, Jody; Eddy, Sean R; Jones, Thomas A; Bao, Weidong; Smit, Arian F A; Wheeler, Travis J

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive DNA, especially that due to transposable elements (TEs), makes up a large fraction of many genomes. Dfam is an open access database of families of repetitive DNA elements, in which each family is represented by a multiple sequence alignment and a profile hidden Markov model (HMM). The initial release of Dfam, featured in the 2013 NAR Database Issue, contained 1143 families of repetitive elements found in humans, and was used to produce more than 100 Mb of additional annotation of TE-derived regions in the human genome, with improved speed. Here, we describe recent advances, most notably expansion to 4150 total families including a comprehensive set of known repeat families from four new organisms (mouse, zebrafish, fly and nematode). We describe improvements to coverage, and to our methods for identifying and reducing false annotation. We also describe updates to the website interface. The Dfam website has moved to http://dfam.org. Seed alignments, profile HMMs, hit lists and other underlying data are available for download. PMID:26612867

  4. Not Your Family Farm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol; Baker, Gayle; Grogg, Jill E.

    2007-01-01

    The information industry continues to consolidate, just as agribusiness has consolidated and now dominates farming. Both the family farm and the small information company still exist but are becoming rarer in an age of mergers, acquisitions, and increased economies of scale. Small companies distinguish themselves by high quality, special themes,…

  5. All in the Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2010-01-01

    Even as a little girl, Dr. Nitasha Sharma aspired to become a college professor like her parents, whose careers let the family spend entire summers or longer in either her mother's native Brooklyn, New York, or her father's native India. She dreamed of long vacations as a grown-up and going home for lunch on weekdays. But during a stay in India…

  6. It's a Family Affair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demski, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author features Computers for Youth (CFY), a nonprofit organization that provides computers, software, and training to sixth-grade students and their families at low-income schools. Founded in 1999, Computers for Youth works with low-income schools to put computers in the homes of sixth-grade students and bring parents into…

  7. Profiling Canada's Families II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanier Inst. of the Family, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Noting that Canadians have witnessed profound demographic, economic, social, cultural, and technological changes over the last century and the need for sound demographic information for future planning, this report is the second to identify significant trends affecting Canada's families. Following an introductory section providing relevant…

  8. Perspectives on Family Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Assistance Center, New York, NY.

    This joint publication of the journals of the Literacy Assistance Center (LAC) and the National Even Start Association (NESA) focuses on innovative practices and theory in family literacy education, offers an array of perspectives to members of the literacy community, and critically examines some assumptions about literacy in general, as well as…

  9. Women and Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lein, Laura

    Increases in the divorce rate, decreases in women's childbearing, and increases in women's participation in the labor force represent three major trends that have had a great impact on women and on the family as a setting in which to work, raise children, and control resources. Although women's employment is clearly related in part to their…

  10. Incarceration in Fragile Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildeman, Christopher; Western, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s the U.S. imprisonment rate has increased roughly fivefold. As Christopher Wildeman and Bruce Western explain, the effects of this sea change in the imprisonment rate--commonly called mass imprisonment or the prison boom--have been concentrated among those most likely to form fragile families: poor and minority men with little…

  11. Family Feathers. [Videotape Series].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    Family Feathers is a set of 18 videotapes for parents of preschool children, created by the Alaska Native Home Base Video Project of the Tlingit and Haida Head Start Program. This series offers culturally relevant solutions to the challenges of parenting, drawing on practical advice from Tlingit and Haida parents, wisdom from elders, and some of…

  12. The Family of Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavao, Joyce Maguire

    This book aims to provide a broad framework within which to think about adoption as a whole system, so that everyone involved will learn to feel some empathy for the other members of the adoption process. The book, written by a family and adoption therapist who was adopted as an infant, describes predictable developmental stages and challenges for…

  13. Family First Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFee, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The typical superintendent these days is male (though the percentage of female superintendents is steadily rising, now accounting for one in four, according to AASA's 2010 decennial study of the superintendency), in his 40s and almost always married with children. When educators become superintendents, the issues of family dynamics and related…

  14. Family Science Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCubbins, Sara; Thomas, Bethany; Vetere, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a family-friendly science day event that encourages scientific discovery through hands-on activities, while also providing an opportunity to learn about scientific careers from actual research scientists and science educators, thereby raising awareness of the importance of STEM in our society. The one-day event bought…

  15. Families in the Military

    MedlinePLUS

    ... stress and possibly serious problems. The responses of children to stress of separation are determined by their individual makeup ... it is a difficult time for families, most children can and do adjust successfully to the separation and stress involved when a parent in the military is ...

  16. Investing in Family Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Most discussions about narrowing the achievement gap focus on ways to provide disadvantaged children with schooling comparable to that received by middle-class kids. Addressing deficiencies in children's social environment, health, housing, and family income would be more effective and would probably reduce special-education spending. (MLH)

  17. potentialpotentialpotential Guiding Families through

    E-print Network

    Pevsner, Jonathan

    after a spinal cord injury 4 Lifeline Conquering complex medical conditions together: One family in our International Center for Spinal Cord Injury, and we'll continue to provide care and therapy-death: Emerging Consciousness after Brain Injury A publication of Kennedy Krieger Institute #12;Letter from our

  18. Family Play Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariel, Shlomo

    This paper examines a case study of family play therapy in Israel. The unique contributions of play therapy are evaluated including the therapy's accessibility to young children, its richness and flexibility, its exposure of covert patterns, its wealth of therapeutic means, and its therapeutic economy. The systematization of the therapy attempts…

  19. Family Problems Single Parenting

    E-print Network

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Family Problems Single Parenting Dual Careers Anxiety Depression Parent/Child Conflict Job "Burnout Life Transition Aging Parents Unresolved Grief Marital Problems Sexual Problems Personal Concerns to assist employees who may be dealing with personal problems that affect their relationships at home

  20. Family Support Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.

    This document contains a brief bibliography of peer-reviewed literature, with abstracts, on family support networks. It is one of 12 bibliographies on aging prepared by the National Agricultural Library for its "Pathfinders" series of publications. Topics covered by the other 11 bibliographies include aging parents, adult children, dementia and…

  1. Endangered Language Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, D. H.; Simons, Gary F.

    2012-01-01

    Linguists have increased their documentation efforts in response to the sharp decline in the number of languages. Greater awareness and new sources of funding have led to an upsurge in language documentation. While individual languages make unique contributions to the world's linguistic heritage, language families, by virtue of their shared…

  2. Elevated Rates of Schizophrenia in a Familial Sample with Mental Illness and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, C. M. T.; Husted, J.; Bomba, M. D.; Hodgkinson, K. A.; Bassett, A. S.

    2004-01-01

    It is unknown whether intellectual disability (ID) is more familially related to psychotic mood disorders or schizophrenia. L. S. Penrose's large sample of families with two or more members admitted to psychiatric hospitals provided a unique opportunity to investigate the familial relationship between mild ID, schizophrenia and psychotic affective…

  3. Where Are "Their" Voices? Examining Power and Privilege in a Family Literacy Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Tracey

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how a family literacy text linked to a large-scale, U.S.-based family literacy program either privileged or disprivileged dominant, Eurocentric literacy practices. More specifically, this study investigated the ways in which the family literacy text: (1) conceptualized literacy; and (2) constructed the role…

  4. Using family members as gamete donors or surrogates.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    The use of intrafamilial gamete donors and surrogates is generally ethically acceptable when all participants are fully informed and counseled, but arrangements that replicate the results of true consanguineous or incestuous unions should be prohibited, child to parent arrangements are generally unacceptable, and parent to child arrangements are acceptable in limited situations. Programs that choose to participate in intrafamilial arrangements should be prepared to spend additional time counseling participants and ensuring that they have made free, informed decisions. PMID:22835449

  5. Familial Bird-headed Dwarfism (Seckel's Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, John J.; Litt, Richard; Espiritu, Ceres E.; Delaney, James R.

    1973-01-01

    Low birth weight dwarfism with mental retardation, large eyes, a beaklike nose, narrow face, receding mandible, and dental anomalies are the specific features of `bird-headed dwarf of Seckel'. The following case report presents details of a Seckel dwarf with familial occurrence of the trait and, thus supports an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. In addition, the possible significance of dental alterations is noted. Images PMID:4714590

  6. Enhancing family resilience through family narrative co-construction.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, William R; Pynoos, Robert S; Lester, Patricia; Layne, Christopher M; Beardslee, William R

    2013-09-01

    We draw upon family resilience and narrative theory to describe an evidence-based method for intervening with military families who are impacted by multiple wartime deployments and psychological, stress-related, or physical parental injuries. Conceptual models of familial resilience provide a guide for understanding the mechanics of how families respond and recover from exposure to extreme events, and underscore the role of specific family processes and interaction patterns in promoting resilient capabilities. Leading family theorists propose that the family's ability to make meaning of stressful and traumatic events and nurture protective beliefs are critical aspects of resilient adaptation. We first review general theoretical and empirical research contributions to understanding family resilience, giving special attention to the circumstances, challenges, needs, and strengths of American military families. Therapeutic narrative studies illustrate the processes through which family members acquire meaning-making capacities, and point to the essential role of parents' in facilitating discussions of stressful experiences and co-constructing coherent and meaningful narratives. This helps children to make sense of these experiences and develop capacities for emotion regulation and coping. Family-based narrative approaches provide a structured opportunity to elicit parents' and children's individual narratives, assemble divergent storylines into a shared family narrative, and thereby enhance members' capacity to make meaning of stressful experiences and adopt beliefs that support adaptation and growth. We discuss how family narratives can help to bridge intra-familial estrangements and re-engage communication and support processes that have been undermined by stress, trauma, or loss. We conclude by describing a family-based narrative intervention currently in use with thousands of military children and families across the USA. PMID:23797387

  7. Familial Aggregation of Lymphoproliferative Disorders from the Scandinavian Family Cancer Database

    Cancer.gov

    Familial aggregation of lymphoproliferative disorders from the Scandinavian family cancer database Print This Page Familial Aggregation of Lymphoproliferative Disorders from the Scandinavian Family Cancer Database Our Research

  8. Counseling Families with Chronic Illness. Family Psychology and Counseling Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Susan H., Ed.

    Regardless of whether a patient's health-care provider works from a traditional biomedical or a new biopsychosocial model, therapists and counselors need to work with patients and their families challenged by the onset of a serious illness. This book addresses this need and outlines the five goals of medical family therapy: (1) help the family

  9. Indicators of Familial Alcoholism in Children's Kinetic Family Drawings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Elizabeth S.; Kaiser, Donna H.

    2001-01-01

    Attempts to delineate indicators in children's depictions of family that suggest the presence of parental alcoholism. Kinetic Family Drawings from two groups of children were collected. Statistical analysis revealed two of six items of the evaluation - depiction of isolation of self and isolation of other family members - were significantly higher…

  10. Measuring Family Problem Solving: The Family Problem Solving Diary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieren, Dianne K.

    The development and use of the family problem-solving diary are described. The diary is one of several indicators and measures of family problem-solving behavior. It provides a record of each person's perception of day-to-day family problems (what the problem concerns, what happened, who got involved, what those involved did, how the problem…

  11. [Family Research Council: 1993 Family Issues Survey Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Family Research Council of America, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This document contains a variety of information sheets developed from a survey completed on behalf of the Family Research Council to explore the family attitudes of American adults (N=1,100). The top 10 findings from the 1993 Family Issues Survey are enumerated on a summary sheet. Following this summary, each of the top 10 findings is discussed…

  12. Family Structure, Family Processes, and Adolescent Smoking and Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Susan L.; Rinelli, Lauren N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether family structure was associated with adolescent risk behaviors, including smoking and drinking. Family living arrangements have become increasingly diverse, yet research on adolescent risk behaviors has typically relied on measures of family structure that do not adequately capture this diversity. Data from the…

  13. Family and Family Change in Ireland: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canavan, John

    2012-01-01

    In Ireland, historically and in the current era, family has been a central concern for society and the State. This article provides a descriptive overview of family life in Ireland and of major family-related changes over the past 40 years. It presents a general framework of analysis within which these changes can be understood, considers the…

  14. Strengthening Family Resilience. The Guilford Family Therapy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Froma

    Offering an alternative to clinician's prevalent focus on family dysfunction, this book draws upon extensive clinical and research experience to present a framework for therapeutic and preventive work with couples and families who are distressed, vulnerable, or at risk. The book identifies key interactional processes that enable family members to…

  15. Family Theory versus the Theories Families Live By.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Kerry

    2003-01-01

    Argues that there is significant disjunction between the way that families live their lives and the way that professionals theorize about families. Using the metaphor of positive and negative spaces, argues that there are many negative spaces in our theorizing--everyday family activities that take up considerable time, energy, and attention but…

  16. Families Around the World. The Japanese Family. Teacher's Resource Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    The resource unit prepared for grade one is the fourth in a series on the theme of Families Around the World. For this study of the Japanese family, background material is presented for the teacher describing the site of Suye Mura, family structure, basic physical needs, a typical day, socialization, communication, village life today, and the…

  17. 40 CFR 1048.240 - How do I demonstrate that my engine family complies with exhaust emission standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...my engine family complies with exhaust emission standards? 1048.240 Section 1048... AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW, LARGE NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION...my engine family complies with exhaust emission standards? (a) For purposes...

  18. 40 CFR 1048.240 - How do I demonstrate that my engine family complies with exhaust emission standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...my engine family complies with exhaust emission standards? 1048.240 Section 1048... AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW, LARGE NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION...my engine family complies with exhaust emission standards? (a) For purposes...

  19. 40 CFR 1048.240 - How do I demonstrate that my engine family complies with exhaust emission standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...my engine family complies with exhaust emission standards? 1048.240 Section 1048... AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW, LARGE NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION...my engine family complies with exhaust emission standards? (a) For purposes...

  20. A novel frameshift mutation in KCNQ4 in a family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Wasano, Koichiro; Mutai, Hideki; Obuchi, Chie; Masuda, Sawako; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2015-08-01

    Mutation of KCNQ4 has been reported to cause autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss (DFNA2A) that usually presents as progressive hearing loss starting from mild to moderate hearing loss during childhood. Here, we identified a novel KCNQ4 mutation, c.1044_1051del8, in a family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss. The proband was homozygous for the mutation and was born to consanguineous parents; she showed severe hearing loss that was either congenital or of early childhood onset. The proband had a sister who was heterozygous for the mutation but showed normal hearing. The mutation caused a frameshift that eliminated most of the cytoplasmic C-terminus, including the A-domain, which has an important role for protein tetramerization, and the B-segment, which is a binding site for calmodulin (CaM) that regulates channel function via Ca ions. The fact that the heterozygote had normal hearing indicates that sufficient tetramerization and CaM binding sites were present to preserve a normal phenotype even when only half the proteins contained an A-domain and B-segment. On the other hand, the severe hearing loss in the homozygote suggests that complete loss of the A-domain and B-segment in the protein caused loss of function due to the failure of tetramer formation and CaM binding. This family suggests that some KCNQ4 mutations can cause autosomal recessive hearing loss with more severe phenotype in addition to autosomal dominant hearing loss with milder phenotype. This genotype-phenotype correlation is analogous to that in KCNQ1 which causes autosomal dominant hereditary long QT syndrome 1 with milder phenotype and the autosomal recessive Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome 1 with more severe phenotype due to deletion of the cytoplasmic C-terminus of the potassium channel. PMID:26036578

  1. Balancing Family and Career

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andam, Aba Bentil; Dawson, Silvina Ponce; Horton, K. Renee; Sandow, Barbara

    2005-10-01

    In essentially all countries, responsibilities for child care, cooking, cleaning, and other homemaking tasks fall predominantly on the wife and mother. In addition, the childbearing years come during the period when a physicist must study hard, work long hours on research, and take temporary positions, often abroad. Thus, balancing family and career has long been one of the major barriers to women's participation in science and engineering fields, including physics. While many young women believe that they must choose between having children and having a science career, the fact is that the majority of women physicists in both developing and developed countries have successfully done both. This paper summarizes some ideas and recommendations raised in discussions, especially focused on easing the challenges of having children while in temporary jobs, returning to physics after a career break, the need for "family-friendly" working conditions, and the dual-career problem facing couples where both are scientists.

  2. Compositional study of the Themis family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsset, Michael; Vernazza, Pierre; Birlan, Mirel; DeMeo, Francesca; Binzel, Richard P.; Dumas, Christophe; Milli, Julien; Popescu, Marcel

    2015-11-01

    Themis is an outer main-belt family comprising more than 4,000 dynamically well-established members (Nesvorny 2012), mainly B- and C-type asteroids (Florczak et al. 1999; Mothé-Diniz et al. 2005; Ziffer et al. 2011). This family is rather unique for a number of reasons:- It is believed to be the only main-belt family formed from the catastrophic disruption of a large (D>200 km) B-/C-type body (Brož et al. 2013). As such, it offers a unique view on the internal composition of a primitive asteroid.- Elst-Pizarro, one of the family member, was one of the first main belt comets to be discovered (Hsieh & Jewitt 2006).- 24 Themis is the first main belt asteroid for which water ice was detected at its surface (Campins et al. 2010; Rivkin & Emery 2010).- The low density values recorded for two family members (<1.3 g/cm3 , Descamps et al. 2007; Marchis et al. 2008) likely imply high fractions of ice(s) in the interior of these bodies.The last three features all point towards an ice-rich composition for the Themis parent body while showing little compatibility with a thermally metamorphosed body that has been heated throughout at temperatures exceeding 300 K. The latter interpretation was previously suggested on the basis of a similarity between the near-infrared spectral properties of heated CI/CM chondrites and those of the family members’ surfaces (Clark et al. 2010; Ziffer et al. 2011). In brief, the Themis family members appear unsampled by our meteorite collections. Recently, Vernazza et al. (2015) instead proposed that Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) may be more appropriate extraterrestrial analogs for these objects’ surfaces.In the light of Vernazza et al. (2015)’s recent work, we investigated the surface mineralogy of a sample of Themis family members using a combined dataset of spectra covering the visible (Bus & Binzel 2002; Lazzaro et al. 2004), near-infrared (this work), and mid-infrared (Licandro et al. 2012; Hargrove et al. 2015) spectral ranges.Assuming particle sizes (typically sub- to micrometer sizes) and end-members composition similar to those found in chondritic porous IDPs, we modeled the spectral properties of the Themis family members. The results of this study will be presented in details.

  3. Chinese youth favor one-child families.

    PubMed

    Yu, P

    1995-04-01

    Sichuan province in China has 109 million people. Reports from a 1988 student survey of over 69% of students from rural Sichuan province indicated most lived by moderate standards, and family economic well-being has improved in the past 5 years. 78% of the teenagers surveyed considered the one-child family ideal. 43% of students in the 7th grade but only 31% in the 12th grade preferred having only one child someday. 65% of 7th graders compared to only 43% of 12th graders thought that the one-child family was an ideal family size for China. The desired family size for oneself was higher for urban youth (1.2) than rural youth (1.0). About 90% agreed with the statement that China had a population growth problem. Manliness and happiness were not equated with having large families. Over 50% agreed that children provided old age security. 80% reported lack of son preference. Modern attitudes were also reflected in the attitude toward equality in marriage and women's role. Student attitudes on small family size could reflect a norm or youthful responses that would change with maturity. 75% reported a desire to use contraception. 10% disapproved of contraception within marriage, and 20% objected to any personal use of contraception. 49% disagreed and 29% agreed with the unacceptability of premarital sexual relations. The average ideal marriage age was given as 24.3 years for women and 25.4 years for men. Suitable marriage age did not vary by socioeconomic status. Only 10% considered getting married as very important for themselves, and only 28% thought married people were happier. Under 50% thought everyone should get married. Regardless of the modern attitudes reported, the indications were that knowledge of family planning and human sexuality was limited. Only 18% knew when a woman's most fertile period was. About 40% relied on printed material as the main source of information on sexuality and reproduction. 18% learned about sexuality from their peers. Under 10% talked with parents about having children or received information from parents about sexuality. 62% knew almost nothing about family planning. Only 16% of 12th grade students knew three or more methods. Sexual practices were not surveyed. More formally educated students and students with a modern outlook were most likely to have greater knowledge of sexual matters. The population education curriculum favored social aspects over reproductive content. PMID:12319246

  4. [Familial lead poisoning].

    PubMed

    Ríos, E; Dal Borgo, P; Riveros, A; Díaz, S M

    1989-06-01

    A 1 year and 9 month old patient was admitted with ataxia. CBC showed a microcytic, hypocromic anemia with intense basophilic sttipling of erythrocytes. Lead poisoning was suspected and confirmed with a blood lead level of 167 micrograms/dl. The patient was treated with EDTA and BAL. It was discovered that family burned old car batteries for food cooking. Four members were intoxicated, with blood lead levels at or above 50 micrograms/dl. PMID:2519417

  5. A family reunion.

    PubMed

    Kirchheimer, B

    2000-10-23

    In a deal that will combine two companies with familial links to Nashville's HCA-The Healthcare Co., Dallas-based Triad Hospitals last week agreed to acquire Brentwood, Tenn.-based Quorum Health Group for $2.4 billion. The merger would create the nation's third-largest investor-owned hospital chain, behind HCA and Tenet Healthcare Corp. Analysts say sell-offs of some hospitals and Quorum's hospital management business are likely. PMID:11141838

  6. Clustered protocadherin family.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Takeshi

    2008-06-01

    The brain is a complex system composed of enormous numbers of differentiated neurons, and brain structure and function differs among vertebrates. To examine the molecular mechanisms underlying brain structure and function, it is important to identify the molecules involved in generating neural diversity and organization. The clustered protocadherin (Pcdh) family is the largest subgroup of the diverse cadherin superfamily. The clustered Pcdh proteins are predominantly expressed in the brain and their gene structures in vertebrates are diversified. In mammals, the clustered Pcdh family consists of three gene clusters: Pcdh-alpha, Pcdh-beta, and Pcdh-gamma. During brain development, this family is upregulated by neuronal differentiation, and Pcdh-alpha is then dramatically downregulated by myelination. Clustered Pcdh expression continues in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cerebellum until adulthood. Structural analysis of the first cadherin domain of the Pcdh-alpha protein revealed it lacks the features that classical cadherins require for homophilic adhesiveness, but it contains Pcdh-specific loop structures. In Pcdh-alpha, an RGD motif on a specific loop structure binds beta1-integrin. For gene expression, the gene clusters are regulated by multiple promoters and alternative cis splicing. At the single-cell level, several dozen Pcdh-alpha and -gamma mRNA are regulated monoallelically, resulting in the combinatorial expression of distinct variable exons. The Pcdh-alpha and Pcdh-gamma proteins also form oligomers, further increasing the molecular diversity at the cell surface. Thus, the unique features of the clustered Pcdh family may provide the molecular basis for generating individual cellular diversity and the complex neural circuitry of the brain. PMID:18430161

  7. Galileo - Ganymede Family Night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This videotape is a continuation of tape number NONP-NASA-VT-2000036029. When the Galileo spacecraft flew by Ganymede, Jupiter's and the solar system's largest satellite, the project scientist and engineers gather together with their friends and family to view the photos as they are received. This videotape presents the last part of that meeting, which culminates in the announcement of the confirmation of the fly-by, and a review of the current trajectory status.

  8. Advancing Measurement of Family Leisure 

    E-print Network

    Melton, Karen

    2014-08-06

    This study advanced knowledge of the measurement properties of the Family Leisure Activity Profile (FLAP). The FLAP is a sixteen-item index based on the Core and Balance Model of Family Functioning. This study assessed three distinct scaling...

  9. Veterans and Military Family Health

    MedlinePLUS

    Service members and veterans face some different health issues from civilians. Their families also face some unique challenges. Families may have to cope with Separation from their loved ones Anxiety over ...

  10. Roles for the Family Caregiver

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to work together. There may be problems and conflicts in some families, and the stress of caring ... up old issues or make new ones. These conflicts may cause communication problems within the family and ...

  11. 75 FR 63753 - Family Offices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ...conditions or terms contained in every...be treated as a member of a family for...orders, which Congress understood. Where terms and conditions...interactions of family members in the management...First, it would limit the...

  12. Higgs family symmetry and supersymmetry

    E-print Network

    Patt, Brian Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate building models of family symmetry that give the Higgs fields family structure. We construct several models, starting with 2 generation models then moving onto 3 generation models. These models ...

  13. Solanaceae (Nightshade family) Smooth groundcherry

    E-print Network

    Solanaceae (Nightshade family) Smooth groundcherry Physalis longifolia Nutt. var. subglabrata Christmas tree weeds. #12;Solanaceae (Nightshade family) Smooth groundcherry continued Smooth groundcherry. Reproduction Seeds and rhizomes. Smooth groundcherry leaf. Smooth groundcherry flower. #12;Solanaceae

  14. Urticaceae (Nettle family) Stinging nettle

    E-print Network

    Urticaceae (Nettle family) Stinging nettle Urtica dioica L. Life cycle Erect, rhizomatous perennial. Reproduction Seeds and rhizomes that form extensive colonies. Stinging nettle seedling. Back to identifying Christmas tree weeds. #12;Urticaceae (Nettle family) Stinging nettle continued Stinging nettle foliage

  15. [Familial LCAT deficiency].

    PubMed

    Idzior-Walu?, B

    2001-01-01

    Familial deficiency of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) was described by Norum and Gjone in 1967. LCAT (EC 2.3.1.43) is a serum enzyme involved in reverse cholesterol transport. LCAT deficiency is associated with percentage increase of free cholesterol and decrease of esterified cholesterol, and disturbances in lipoprotein particles structure, because cholesterol esters form the lipoprotein core. Lipid disorders involve also other organs, such as kidneys, cornea and erythrocytes; with clinical manifestations of proteinuria, usually associated with renal insufficiency, corneal opacities and haemolytic anemia. Gene encoding LCAT is localized in region q 21-22 on chromosome 16. It consists of 6 exons, divided by 5 introns and spans 4.2 bp. Familial LCAT deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder. In LCAT deficient patients several mutations in all 6 exons have been described. Clinical manifestations of familial LCAT deficiency are highly variable, although no or only low LCAT activity is present and this may suggests that expression of the disease is modulated by additional environmental factors and genes of minor importance. PMID:11957819

  16. The AVIT protein family

    PubMed Central

    Kaser, Alexandra; Winklmayr, Martina; Lepperdinger, Günther; Kreil, Günther

    2003-01-01

    Homologues of a protein originally isolated from snake venom and frog skin secretions are present in many vertebrate species. They contain 80–90 amino acids, 10 of which are cysteines with identical spacing. Various names have been given to these proteins, such as mamba intestinal protein 1 (MIT1), Bv8 (Bombina variegata molecular mass ?8 kDa), prokineticins and endocrine-gland vascular endothelial growth factor (EG-VEGF). Their amino-terminal sequences are identical, and so we propose that the sequence of their first four residues, AVIT, is used as a name for this family. From a comparison of the sequences, two types of AVIT proteins can be discerned. These proteins seem to be distributed widely in mammalian tissues and are known to bind to G-protein-coupled receptors. Members of this family have been shown to stimulate contraction of the guinea pig ileum, to cause hyperalgesia after injection into rats and to be active as specific growth factors. Moreover, the messenger RNA level of one of these AVIT proteins changes rhythmically in the region of the brain known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This shows that members of this new family of small proteins are involved in diverse biological processes. PMID:12728244

  17. About Breast Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast CFR includes lifestyle, medical history, and family history data collected from more than 55,000 women and men from 14,000 families with and without breast cancer. The Breast CFR began recruiting families in 1996, and all participants are followed up 10 years after recruitment to update personal and family histories and expand recruitment if new cases have occurred since baseline.

  18. Eating Disorders and the Family

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Sam; Sananes, Renee

    1991-01-01

    Eating disorders are complex, often chronic, biopsychosocial disorders characterized by a pursuit for control which, in interaction with familial factors, results in disturbed patterns of relating to food and its meaning. Overt and covert resistance to intervention at the family level can reflect family dynamics but can be mitigated by engaging families of adolescents with eating disorders, by using multidisciplinary teams, and by hospitalization. PMID:21228994

  19. Resources, the family and voluntary euthanasia.

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, M R

    1990-01-01

    Ethnological studies show that the care which societies are able to provide for their old people depends largely on available resources. However, the concept of resource depends on contemporary requirements and expectations. Modern families still try to look after their old people, but increasing longevity is making this more difficult. There is a finite ability of populations, however wealthy, to support dependent members. Resources provided to look after old people must necessarily be subtracted from those available for the other, still more important dependent group, the children, with potentially disastrous results in underfunding of social support and education. The sociobiological theory of inclusive fitness emphasizes the importance of the ways in which family members interact to help each other and try to ensure their genetic survival, even if this involves sacrificing their own interests and occasionally, their lives. Many old people do not wish for further longevity after they have become too disabled to be of service to their families, and would prefer to see limited resources being used for the young. In the USA, loss of autonomy of patients and their families owing to the practice of defensive medicine has resulted in the development of the 'living will', a legal document in which people can specify in advance what treatment they wish to accept in the event of life threatening illness. It is to be hoped that improved understanding of family relationships will make this generally unnecessary in the future and that, unless specified to the contrary, families will be allowed to decide about treatment for members who are unable to decide for themselves.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2112015

  20. Family Research: An Ethnographic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Howard F.

    1991-01-01

    An ethnographic approach based on in-depth interviewing, naturalistic and participant observation, narrative description, and contextual interpretation is proposed as a tool for family health care research. The multiple meanings of family, both for research clinicians and for society, are considered. The problem of how a family orientation is incorporated into biomedical' health care is discussed. PMID:21229058

  1. Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Family day care providers are responsible for creating a high-quality program where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care…

  2. Families & School. Best of "set."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podmore, Valerie N., Ed.; Richards, Llyn, Ed.

    Published to celebrate the United Nations' International Year of the Family, this special issue presents selected articles from "set," a twice yearly journal of research information for teachers. These articles look at the contribution of educational research on the relationships between schools and families, and families and learning in Australia…

  3. Remarriage: A Family Developmental Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteside, Mary F.

    1982-01-01

    Outlines a developmental perspective for understanding the dynamics of remarried families. Uses case examples to illustrate the importance of adding to the current family situation both a view of critical points in a family's history, and expectation for its future paths. (RC)

  4. NASA Science Served Family Style

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel-Storr, Jacob; Mitchell, S.; Drobnes, E.

    2010-01-01

    Family oriented innovative programs extend the reach of many traditional out-of-school venues to involve the entire family in learning in comfortable and fun environments. Research shows that parental involvement is key to increasing student achievement outcomes, and family-oriented programs have a direct impact on student performance. Because families have the greatest influence on children's attitudes towards education and career choices, we have developed a Family Science program that provides families a venue where they can explore the importance of science and technology in our daily lives by engaging in learning activities that change their perception and understanding of science. NASA Family Science Night strives to change the way that students and their families participate in science, within the program and beyond. After three years of pilot implementation and assessment, our evaluation data shows that Family Science Night participants have positive change in their attitudes and involvement in science.  Even after a single session, families are more likely to engage in external science-related activities and are increasingly excited about science in their everyday lives.  As we enter our dissemination phase, NASA Family Science Night will be compiling and releasing initial evaluation results, and providing facilitator training and online support resources. Support for NASA Family Science Nights is provided in part through NASA ROSES grant NNH06ZDA001N.

  5. Poaceae (Grass family) Fall panicum

    E-print Network

    Poaceae (Grass family) Fall panicum Panicum dichotomiflorum Michx. Life cycle Erect summer annual to identifying Christmas tree weeds. #12;Poaceae (Grass family) Fall panicum continued Flowers and fruit panicum. #12;Poaceae (Grass family) Fall panicum continued Wild proso millet collar region. Witchgrass

  6. Families with Special Health Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This document contains teacher's materials for a five-unit secondary education vocational home economics course on families with special health needs. The units cover: (1) family health needs (including the impact of special needs on financial well-being, the impact on the psychological health of the family, and the relationship of society to…

  7. On the oldest asteroid families in the main belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruba, Valerio; Nesvorný, David; Aljbaae, Safwan; Domingos, Rita C.

    2015-11-01

    Asteroid families are group of minor bodies produced by collisions. Once the parent body is disrupted by a collision and fragments are launched into space, their orbits evolve because of several gravitational and non-gravitational effects, such as diffusion in mean-motion resonances, Yarkovsky and YORP effects, collisional evolution etc. The subsequent dynamical evolution of asteroid family members may cause some of the original fragments to travel beyond the recognizable limits of the asteroid family. Eventually, the whole family will dynamically disperse and no longer be recognizable. Dynamical erosion of asteroid families has been the subject of a few recent studies, mostly focused on smaller asteroid groups.A natural question that may arise concerns the timescales for dispersion of large families. In particular, what is the oldest still recognizable family in the main belt? Are there any families that may date from the late stages of the Late Heavy Bombardment and that could provide clues on our understanding of the primitive Solar System? In this work we investigate the dynamical stability of seven of the allegedly oldest families in the asteroid main belt, when resonant dynamics, Yarkovsky and stochastic YORP effects, and past changes in the solar luminosity are considered. None of the studied families is estimated to be older than 3.0 Gyr. Results of our numerical simulations show that some of the members of the largest families studied could have survived since 4.2 Gyr, but with a significant depletion in the number of the smallest (D < 5 km) family members.

  8. Drawing attention to family planning.

    PubMed

    1990-03-01

    In February 1990, the Mexican award winning director and animator, Carlos Carrera, went to Tokyo to oversee the photographing of the color frames (brought from Mexico) of the sex education animated film "Music for Two". The film begins with a warning that it should be shown as part of a sex education program. Further, a trained advisor guides the audience during the recommended discussion following the film. "Music for Two" is set in a large city and features a young female teen who daydreams about imaginary lovers. She soon discovers that her young male next door neighbor is interested in her. The moral of the story is that, once a woman is an adolescent, she must consider her future and have lifelong goals. In order for her to do so, however, she must know her mind and body, appreciate them, and not renounce them. This animated short feature includes both English and Spanish versions targeted to adolescents in their mid to late teens, especially females, in Latin America and the Caribbean. Mr. Carrera predicted that conservative older individuals will most likely not approve of "Music for Two". The Japanese Organization for International Cooperation in Family Planning (JOICFP) and the UNFPA sponsored this animated film and the Mexican Family Planning Foundation (MEXFAM) participated in its production. The Sakura Motion Picture Company in Japan and Kinam SCL International in Mexico coproduced it. The Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs underwrote the English version and the UNFPA and IPPF underwrote the Spanish version. Further, in 1989, Mr. Carrera played a major role in a successful sex education animated feature titled "Blue Pigeon". This film was geared to youth in their early to mid teens, however. PMID:12283080

  9. [Familial amyloid polyneuropathies: therapeutic issues].

    PubMed

    Adams, David; Cauquil, Cécile; Théaudin, Marie

    2012-10-01

    Patients with familial amyloidpolyneuropathies (FAP) require multidisciplinary neurologic and cardiologic management, including specific treatments to control the progression of systemic amyloidogenesis, symptomatic treatment of peripheral and autonomic neuropathies, and management of severe organ involvement (heart, eyes, kidneys). The first-line specific treatment of choice for met30 TTR-FAP is liver transplantation (LT) which suppresses the main source of mutant TTR, halts the progression of neuropathy in 70% of cases, and doubles the median survival time. Dual kidney-liver or heart-liver transplantation may be appropriate for patients with severe renal or cardiac failure. Tafamidis (Vyndaqel(R), Pfizer), a novel stabilizer of tetrameric TTR, has shown short-term effectiveness in slowing the progression of peripheral neuropathy in very early stages of met30 TTR-FAP This drug should thus be proposed for stage 1 symptomatic polyneuropathy. Other innovative medicines (RNA interference, antisense oligonucleotides) have been developed to block hepatic production of both mutant and wildtype TTR (noxious in late-onset forms of NAH after age 50 years), and to remove amyloid deposits (monoclonal anti-SAP). Clinical trials should first include patients with late-onset FAP or non-met30 TTR-FAP who are less responsive to LT7 and patients in whom Vyndaqel(R) is ineffective or inappropriate. Initial and periodic cardiac assessment is necessary, as cardiac impairment is inevitable and largely responsible for mortality. Symptomatic treatment is crucial to improve these patients' quality of life. Familial screening for carriers of the TTR gene mutation and regular clinical examination are essential to detect disease onset and to start specific therapy in a timely manner. PMID:23815018

  10. Organizational work-family resources as predictors of job performance and attitudes: the process of work-family conflict and enrichment.

    PubMed

    Odle-Dusseau, Heather N; Britt, Thomas W; Greene-Shortridge, Tiffany M

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to test a model where organizational resources (aimed at managing work and family responsibilities) predict job attitudes and supervisor ratings of performance through the mechanisms of work-family conflict and work-family enrichment. Employees (n = 174) at a large metropolitan hospital were surveyed at two time periods regarding perceptions of family supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), family supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP), bidirectional work-family conflict, bidirectional work-family enrichment, and job attitudes. Supervisors were also asked to provide performance ratings at Time 2. Results revealed FSSB at Time 1 predicted job satisfaction, organizational commitment and intention to leave, as well as supervisor ratings of performance, at Time 2. In addition, both work-family enrichment and family-work enrichment were found to mediate relationships between FSSB and various organizational outcomes, while work-family conflict was not a significant mediator. Results support further testing of supervisor behaviors specific to family support, as well models that include bidirectional work-family enrichment as the mechanism by which work-family resources predict employee and organizational outcomes. PMID:22149204

  11. Food in low-income families.

    PubMed

    Crotty, P A; Rutishauser, I H; Cahill, M

    1992-06-01

    This descriptive study used both quantitative and qualitative research methods to examine the food and nutrient intake, food purchasing patterns and budgeting strategies of 29 sole-parent low-income families with dependent children living in Corio Shire, Victoria, in 1989-90. Expenditure on food and nonalcoholic beverages when compared with the average for all Australian households showed that the study families allocated a greater proportion, but similar amounts of money to cereals, dairy products, fruit and vegetables and miscellaneous foods, and less to meat, nonalcoholic beverages and food eaten away from home. Despite large differences in the amount of money spent in the first and second weeks of a social security payment period, the nutrient density of the parents' diets was maintained at a similar level in both weeks. The only exception was vitamin C, for which the median intake was significantly lower in the second week, consistent with reduced purchases of fruit and vegetables in the same period. In interviews with 13 of the parents a variety of purchasing and budgeting strategies were described, indicating common concerns with making the most of their limited resources. The data from this study support the notion that low-income families give priority to food purchases above other expenses such as recreation. They also support the view that low-income families are concerned about health and nutrition and manage to consume nutritionally sound diets under difficult circumstances. Nutrition education programs could support them in this endeavour. PMID:1391159

  12. Comparing Families of Dynamic Causal Models

    PubMed Central

    Penny, Will D.; Stephan, Klaas E.; Daunizeau, Jean; Rosa, Maria J.; Friston, Karl J.; Schofield, Thomas M.; Leff, Alex P.

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical models of scientific data can be formally compared using Bayesian model evidence. Previous applications in the biological sciences have mainly focussed on model selection in which one first selects the model with the highest evidence and then makes inferences based on the parameters of that model. This “best model” approach is very useful but can become brittle if there are a large number of models to compare, and if different subjects use different models. To overcome this shortcoming we propose the combination of two further approaches: (i) family level inference and (ii) Bayesian model averaging within families. Family level inference removes uncertainty about aspects of model structure other than the characteristic of interest. For example: What are the inputs to the system? Is processing serial or parallel? Is it linear or nonlinear? Is it mediated by a single, crucial connection? We apply Bayesian model averaging within families to provide inferences about parameters that are independent of further assumptions about model structure. We illustrate the methods using Dynamic Causal Models of brain imaging data. PMID:20300649

  13. Search for a Differentiated Asteroid Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Cristina A.; Lim, Lucy F.; Trilling, David E.; Moskovitz, Nicholas

    2014-08-01

    Dynamical asteroid families resulting from catastrophic disruptions represent the interiors of their former parent bodies. Differentiation of a large initially chondritic parent body is expected to produce an ``onion shell" object with a metal core, a thick olivine-rich mantle, and a thin basaltic crust. However, instead of the mineralogical diversity expected from the disruption of a differentiated parent body, most asteroid families tend to show similar spectra among the members. Moreover, spectra of metal-like materials and olivine-dominated assemblages have not been detected in asteroid families in the Main Belt and the expected mantle material is missing from the meteorite record. The deficit of olivine-rich mantle material in the meteorite record and in asteroid observations is known as the ``Missing Mantle" problem. For years the best explanation for the lack of mantle material has been the ``battered to bits" hypothesis that states that all differentiated parent bodies (aside from Vesta) were disrupted very early in the solar system and the resulting olivine-rich material was collisionally broken down until the object diameters fell below our observational limits. However, in a new, competing, hypothesis, Elkins-Tanton et al. (2013) has suggested that previous work has overestimated the amount of olivine produced by the differentiation of a chondritic parent body. We propose to obtain visible spectra of asteroids within the Massalia, Merxia, and Agnia S-type families to search for compositional variations that are indicators of differentiation and to quantitatively constrain the two competing ``Missing Mantle" hypotheses.

  14. Evolution of the oligopeptide transporter family.

    PubMed

    Gomolplitinant, Kenny M; Saier, Milton H

    2011-03-01

    The oligopeptide transporter (OPT) family of peptide and iron-siderophore transporters includes members from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes but with restricted distribution in the latter domain. Eukaryotic members were found only in fungi and plants with a single slime mold homologue clustering with the fungal proteins. All functionally characterized eukaryotic peptide transporters segregate from the known iron-siderophore transporters on a phylogenetic tree. Prokaryotic members are widespread, deriving from many different phyla. Although they belong only to the iron-siderophore subdivision, genome context analyses suggest that many of them are peptide transporters. OPT family proteins have 16 or occasionally 17 transmembrane-spanning ?-helical segments (TMSs). We provide statistical evidence that the 16-TMS topology arose via three sequential duplication events followed by a gene-fusion event for proteins with a seventeenth TMS. The proposed pathway is as follows: 2 TMSs ? 4 TMSs ? 8 TMSs ? 16 TMSs ? 17 TMSs. The seventeenth C-terminal TMS, which probably arose just once, is found in just one phylogenetic group of these homologues. Analyses for orthology revealed that a few phylogenetic clusters consist exclusively of orthologues but most have undergone intermixing, suggestive of horizontal transfer. It appears that in this family horizontal gene transfer was frequent among prokaryotes, rare among eukaryotes and largely absent between prokaryotes and eukaryotes as well as between plants and fungi. These observations provide guides for future structural and functional analyses of OPT family members. PMID:21347612

  15. Anticipation in familial leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, M.; Jarvik, G.P.; Goode, E.L.

    1996-11-01

    Anticipation refers to worsening severity or earlier age at onset with each generation for an inherited disease and primarily has been described for neurodegenerative illnesses resulting from expansion of trinucleotide repeats. We have tested for evidence of anticipation in familial leukemia. Of 49 affected individuals in nine families transmitting autosomal dominant acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), the mean age at onset is 57 years in the grandparental generation, 32 years in the parental generation, and 13 years in the youngest generation (P < .001). Of 21 parent-child pairs with AML, 19 show younger ages at onset in the child and demonstrate a mean decline in age at onset of 28 years (P < .001). Of 18 affected individuals from seven pedigrees with autosomal dominant chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the mean age at onset in the parental generation is 66 years versus 51 years in the youngest generation (P = .008). Of nine parent-child pairs with CLL, eight show younger ages at onset in the child and reveal a mean decline in age at onset of 21 years (P = .001). Inspection of rare pedigrees transmitting acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, multiple types of leukemia, and lymphoma is also compatible with anticipation. Sampling bias is unlikely to explain these findings. This suggests that dynamic mutation of unstable DNA sequence repeats could be a common mechanism of inherited hematopoietic malignancy with implications for the role of somatic mutation in the more frequent sporadic cases. We speculate on three possible candidate genes for familial leukemia with anticipation: a locus on 21q22.1-22.2, CBL2 on 11q23.3, and CBFB or a nearby gene on 16q22. 55 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Living My Family's Story

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Lally, Robin M.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.; Murekeyisoni, Christine; Dickerson, Suzanne S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Based on known or suggested genetic risk factors, a growing number of women now live with knowledge of a potential cancer diagnosis that may never occur. Given this, it is important to understand the meaning of living with high risk for hereditary breast cancer. Objective The objective of the study was to explore how women at high risk for hereditary breast cancer (1) form self-identity, (2) apply self-care strategies toward risk, and (3) describe the meaning of care through a high-risk breast program. Methods Interpretive hermeneutic phenomenology guided the qualitative research method. Women at high risk for hereditary breast cancer were recruited from a high-risk breast program. Open-ended interview questions focused on experiences living as women managing high risk for breast cancer. Consistent with hermeneutic methodology, the principal investigator led a team to analyze the interview transcripts. Results Twenty women participated in in-depth interviews. Analysis revealed that women describe their own identity based on their family story and grieve over actual and potential familial loss. This experience influences self-care strategies, including seeking care from hereditary breast cancer risk experts for early detection and prevention, as well as maintaining a connection for early treatment “when” diagnosis occurs. Conclusions Healthy women living with high risk for hereditary breast cancer are living within the context of their family cancer story, which influences how they define themselves and engage in self-care. Implications for Practice Findings present important practical, research, and policy information regarding health promotion, psychosocial assessment, and support for women living with this risk. PMID:22544165

  17. Balancing family and work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-08-01

    More than 45% of women scientists at top universities in the United States have indicated that their careers have kept them from having as many children as they want, according to an 8 August study, “Scientists want more children,” which appears in the journal PLoS ONE. The study, by sociologists Elaine Howard Ecklund of Rice University and Anne Lincoln of Southern Methodist University, indicates that 24.5% of male scientists surveyed indicated the same concerns. The study also found that among junior scientists, 29% of women indicated concern that a science career would prevent them from having a family; 7% of men indicated the same concern.

  18. Food for the Family

    E-print Network

    Higgins, M. Hellen; Alderson, Inez; Taylor, Elma

    1920-01-01

    with left-over cereals, potatoes, or vegetables, and made into dishes appreci- ated by the whole family. The secret of making up meat left-overs is to season them well. Peppers, celery, onions, carrots, turnips, garlic, to- matoes, sage, pickles, cloves... be left over night. Remember that yeast fermentation takes place more quickly in a sponge than in a dough. A beginner might well use the "dough process" with much yeast for the first attempt. In either process avoid working in flour after the first...

  19. The SEQUEST Family Tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabb, David L.

    2015-11-01

    Since its introduction in 1994, SEQUEST has gained many important new capabilities, and a host of successor algorithms have built upon its successes. This Account and Perspective maps the evolution of this important tool and charts the relationships among contributions to the SEQUEST legacy. Many of the changes represented improvements in computing speed by clusters and graphics cards. Mass spectrometry innovations in mass accuracy and activation methods led to shifts in fragment modeling and scoring strategies. These changes, as well as the movement of laboratories and lab members, have led to great diversity among the members of the SEQUEST family.

  20. Youth, family and employment.

    PubMed

    Peters, J F

    1987-01-01

    Some of the functions and dysfunctions of youth employment in contemporary society are discussed. The focus then shifts to a third variable: family dynamics. The research indicates that youth unemployment prolongs residence with parents. The younger the youth, the more tolerant are the parents of the unemployment. It was also found that a daughter's lack of employment in the summer months is more acceptable than a son's; that debts are part of the lifestyle of youth after age 18; that males incur more debts than do females; and that parents are the major source of financial loans. PMID:3618347