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Sample records for large muscle afferents

  1. Connexions from large, ipsilateral hind limb muscle and skin afferents to the rostral main cuneate nucleus and to the nucleus X region in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, H; Silfvenius, H

    1977-01-01

    1. Evidence is presented for an input from ipsilateral hind limb group I muscle afferents and low threshold cutaneous afferents, to cells in the rostral division of the main cuneate nucleus (rMCN) and in the region of the descending vestibular nucleus and the nucleus X of Brodal & Pompeiano (1957a), the (DV-X). 2. Thirteen group I-rMCN cells were recorded from. The functional properties of these cells were similar to those of nueleus Z (Landgren & Silfvenius, 1971; Johansson & Silfvenius, 1977a, b). The cells were monosynaptically linked to spinal dorsolateral fascicle (DLF) fibres. Nine cells projected to the contralateral thalamus, i.e. a second group I hind limb bulbothalamic tract is described. Ten cells were synaptically activated from the ipsilateral cerebellum from the anterior projection zone of the dorsal spinocerebellar tract (DSCT). Axon-collateral activation by DSCT fibres was established for two of these cells. They were both bulbothalamic relay cells. For the remaining eight cells, activated from the cerebellum, this was not proven. These cells could, however, either be linked to DSCT fibres or to short axon-collaterals of a cell body of unknown location. A projection from the rMCN to the cerebellum is described and agrees with recent anatomical findings. Two cells were not excited from the cerebellum. 3. Four rMCN cells were activated by cutaneous afferents with their secondary axons in the DLF. Suggestive evidence for a bulbothalamic cutaneous hind limb path via the rMCN is presented. Two cells were activated from the cerebellum, presumably via axon-collaterals of nonsegmental cells. 4. Eight group I-DV-X cells were recorded from. They were monosynaptically linked to spinal DLF fibres and resembled functionally the nucleus Z and rMCN cells when stimulated from the periphery. Two cells projected to the contralateral thalamus, and two others were synaptically excited. Seven cells were activated from the ipsilateral cerebellum. Two of them projected to

  2. Transient contractions of urinary bladder smooth muscle are drivers of afferent nerve activity during filling.

    PubMed

    Heppner, Thomas J; Tykocki, Nathan R; Hill-Eubanks, David; Nelson, Mark T

    2016-04-01

    Activation of afferent nerves during urinary bladder (UB) filling conveys the sensation of UB fullness to the central nervous system (CNS). Although this sensory outflow is presumed to reflect graded increases in pressure associated with filling, UBs also exhibit nonvoiding, transient contractions (TCs) that cause small, rapid increases in intravesical pressure. Here, using an ex vivo mouse bladder preparation, we explored the relative contributions of filling pressure and TC-induced pressure transients to sensory nerve stimulation. Continuous UB filling caused an increase in afferent nerve activity composed of a graded increase in baseline activity and activity associated with increases in intravesical pressure produced by TCs. For each ∼4-mmHg pressure increase, filling pressure increased baseline afferent activity by ∼60 action potentials per second. In contrast, a similar pressure elevation induced by a TC evoked an ∼10-fold greater increase in afferent activity. Filling pressure did not affect TC frequency but did increase the TC rate of rise, reflecting a change in the length-tension relationship of detrusor smooth muscle. The frequency of afferent bursts depended on the TC rate of rise and peaked before maximum pressure. Inhibition of small- and large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+)(SK and BK) channels increased TC amplitude and afferent nerve activity. After inhibiting detrusor muscle contractility, simulating the waveform of a TC by gently compressing the bladder evoked similar increases in afferent activity. Notably, afferent activity elicited by simulated TCs was augmented by SK channel inhibition. Our results show that afferent nerve activity evoked by TCs represents the majority of afferent outflow conveyed to the CNS during UB filling and suggest that the maximum TC rate of rise corresponds to an optimal length-tension relationship for efficient UB contraction. Furthermore, our findings implicate SK channels in controlling the gain of sensory

  3. Enhanced Muscle Afferent Signals during Motor Learning in Humans.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Michael

    2016-04-25

    Much has been revealed concerning human motor learning at the behavioral level [1, 2], but less is known about changes in the involved neural circuits and signals. By examining muscle spindle responses during a classic visuomotor adaptation task [3-6] performed by fully alert humans, I found substantial modulation of sensory afferent signals as a function of adaptation state. Specifically, spindle control was independent of concurrent muscle activity but was specific to movement direction (representing muscle lengthening versus shortening) and to different stages of learning. Increased spindle afferent responses to muscle stretch occurring early during learning reflected individual error size and were negatively related to subsequent antagonist activity (i.e., 60-80 ms thereafter). Relative increases in tonic afferent output early during learning were predictive of the subjects' adaptation rate. I also found that independent spindle control during sensory realignment (the "washout" stage) induced afferent signal "linearization" with respect to muscle length (i.e., signals were more tuned to hand position). The results demonstrate for the first time that motor learning also involves independent and state-related modulation of sensory mechanoreceptor signals. The current findings suggest that adaptive motor performance also relies on the independent control of sensors, not just of muscles. I propose that the "γ" motor system innervating spindles acts to facilitate the acquisition and extraction of task-relevant information at the early stages of sensorimotor adaptation. This designates a more active and targeted role for the human proprioceptive system during motor learning. PMID:27040776

  4. Can loss of muscle spindle afferents explain the ataxic gait in Riley–Day syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Gutiérrez, Joel; Axelrod, Felicia B.; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2011-01-01

    The Riley–Day syndrome is the most common of the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (Type III). Among the well-recognized clinical features are reduced pain and temperature sensation, absent deep tendon reflexes and a progressively ataxic gait. To explain the latter we tested the hypothesis that muscle spindles, or their afferents, are absent in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III by attempting to record from muscle spindle afferents from a nerve supplying the leg in 10 patients. For comparison we also recorded muscle spindles from 15 healthy subjects and from two patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, who have profound sensory disturbances but no ataxia. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted percutaneously into fascicles of the common peroneal nerve at the fibular head. Intraneural stimulation within muscle fascicles evoked twitches at normal stimulus currents (10–30 µA), and deep pain (which often referred) at high intensities (1 mA). Microneurographic recordings from muscle fascicles revealed a complete absence of spontaneously active muscle spindles in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III; moreover, responses to passive muscle stretch could not be observed. Conversely, muscle spindles appeared normal in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, with mean firing rates of spontaneously active endings being similar to those recorded from healthy controls. Intraneural stimulation within cutaneous fascicles evoked paraesthesiae in the fascicular innervation territory at normal stimulus intensities, but cutaneous pain was never reported during high-intensity stimulation in any of the patients. Microneurographic recordings from cutaneous fascicles revealed the presence of normal large-diameter cutaneous mechanoreceptors in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III. Our results suggest that the complete absence of functional muscle spindles in these patients explains

  5. The regularity of primary and secondary muscle spindle afferent discharges

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, P. B. C.; Stein, R. B.

    1969-01-01

    1. The patterns of nerve impulses in the afferent fibres from muscle spindles have been studied using the soleus muscle of the decerebrate cat. Impulses from up to five single units were recorded simultaneously on magnetic tape, while the muscle was stretched to a series of different lengths. Various statistics were later determined by computer analysis. 2. After the ventral roots were cut to eliminate any motor outflow to the muscle spindles, both primary and secondary spindle endings discharged very regularly. At frequencies around 30 impulses/sec the coefficient of variation of the interspike interval distributions had a mean value of only 0·02 for the secondary endings and 0·058 for the primary endings. The values obtained for the two kinds of ending did not overlap. 3. When the ventral roots were intact, the `spontaneous' fusimotor activity considerably increased the variability of both kinds of endings. Secondary endings still discharged much more regularly than primary endings, even when the fusimotor activity increased the frequency of firing equally for the two kinds of endings. At frequencies around 30/sec the average coefficient of variation of the interval distributions was then 0·064 for the secondary endings and 0·25 for the primary endings. 4. When the ventral roots were intact there was usually an inverse relation between the values of successive interspike intervals. The first serial correlation coefficient often had values down to - 0·6 for both kinds of ending. Higher order serial correlation coefficients were also computed. 5. Approximate calculations, based on the variability observed when the ventral roots were intact, suggested that when the length of the muscle was constant an observer analysing a 1 sec period of discharge from a single primary ending would only be able to distinguish about six different lengths of the muscle. The corresponding figure for a secondary ending was twenty-five lengths. 6. The increase in variability with

  6. Perceptual responses to microstimulation of single afferents innervating joints, muscles and skin of the human hand.

    PubMed Central

    Macefield, G; Gandevia, S C; Burke, D

    1990-01-01

    1. Microneurographic techniques were used to isolate single afferent axons within cutaneous and motor fascicles of the median and ulnar nerves at the wrist in thirteen subjects. Of the sixty-five identified afferents, eleven innervated the interphalangeal and metacarpophalangeal joints, sixteen innervated muscle spindles, three innervated Golgi tendon organs and thirty-five supplied the glabrous skin of the hand. 2. Intrafascicular stimulation through the recording microelectrode, using trains of constant-voltage positive pulses (0.3-0.8 V, 0.1-0.2 ms, 1-100 Hz) or constant-current biphasic pulses (0.4-13.0 microA, 0.2 ms, 1-100 Hz), evoked specific sensations from sites associated with some afferent species but not others. 3. Microstimulation of eight of the eleven joint afferent sites (73%) evoked specific sensations. With four, subjects reported innocuous deep sensations referred to the relevant joint. With the other four, the subjects reported a sensation of joint displacement that partially reflected the responsiveness of the afferents to joint rotation. 4. Microstimulation of fourteen of the sixteen muscle spindle afferent sites (88%) generated no perceptions when the stimuli did not produce overt movement. However, subjects could correctly detect the slight movements generated when the stimuli excited the motor axons to the parent muscle. 5. With seven of the nine rapidly adapting (type RA or FAI) cutaneous afferents (88%) microstimulation evoked sensations of 'flutter-vibration', and with two of eight slowly adapting (type SAI) afferents (25%) it evoked sensations of 'sustained pressure'. Of the eighteen SAII afferents, which were classified as such by their responses to planar skin stretch, the majority (83%) generated no perceptions, confirming previous work, but three evoked sensations of movements or pressure. 6. The present results suggest a relatively secure transmission of joint afferent traffic to perceptual levels, and it is concluded that the

  7. An In Vitro Adult Mouse Muscle-nerve Preparation for Studying the Firing Properties of Muscle Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Joy A.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Hochman, Shawn; Wilkinson, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle sensory neurons innervating muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs encode length and force changes essential to proprioception. Additional afferent fibers monitor other characteristics of the muscle environment, including metabolite buildup, temperature, and nociceptive stimuli. Overall, abnormal activation of sensory neurons can lead to movement disorders or chronic pain syndromes. We describe the isolation of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and nerve for in vitro study of stretch-evoked afferent responses in the adult mouse. Sensory activity is recorded from the nerve with a suction electrode and individual afferents can be analyzed using spike sorting software. In vitro preparations allow for well controlled studies on sensory afferents without the potential confounds of anesthesia or altered muscle perfusion. Here we describe a protocol to identify and test the response of muscle spindle afferents to stretch. Importantly, this preparation also supports the study of other subtypes of muscle afferents, response properties following drug application and the incorporation of powerful genetic approaches and disease models in mice. PMID:25285602

  8. Morphology of single primary spindle afferents of the intercostal muscles in the cat.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, K; Niwa, M; Sasaki, S I; Ichikawa, T; Hirai, N

    1998-09-01

    A reconstruction was made of the trajectory of primary spindle afferents from the intercostal muscles in the spinal cord of the cat. Intraaxonal recordings were performed from the primary spindle afferents that were identified by their response to lung inflation and stimulus threshold to activate the action potentials. The afferents were stained by using intraaxonal injection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Results were obtained mainly from internal intercostal Ia fibers, which entered the spinal cord and bifurcated into ascending and descending branches. The ascending branches could be traced up to 10.7 mm, and the descending branches could be traced up to 7.3 mm. The ascending branches extended to the next segment. Collaterals ranging from one to six were given off from these branches. The distances between adjacent collaterals ranged from 0.9 mm to 4.7 mm. Each collateral had similar morphological characteristics. The collaterals entered the dorsal horn and ran toward lamina IX through the medial half of the gray matter. Fine branches and boutons were given off in laminae V, VII, VIII, and IX. The aggregations of these branches were found in lamina VII, mainly in the region of Clarke's column and in the ventral and ventrolateral regions thereof and in lamina IX, mainly in the nucleus lateromedialis. Most terminals did not contact the somata of target neurons in all laminae in which terminals were found. However, a few terminals were found to contact large neurons in lamina IX. In addition to these aggregates, there were some terminals scattered throughout the ventral horn. Thus, it was concluded that single intercostal Ia afferents project to the region of Clarke's column, to the intercostal motor nucleus, and to the intermediate regions. PMID:9717703

  9. Assessment of the Potential Role of Muscle Spindle Mechanoreceptor Afferents in Chronic Muscle Pain in the Rat Masseter Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Somayeh; Athanassiadis, Tuija; Caram Salas, Nadia; Auclair, François; Thivierge, Benoît; Arsenault, Isabel; Rompré, Pierre; Westberg, Karl-Gunnar; Kolta, Arlette

    2010-01-01

    Background The phenotype of large diameter sensory afferent neurons changes in several models of neuropathic pain. We asked if similar changes also occur in “functional” pain syndromes. Methodology/Principal Findings Acidic saline (AS, pH 4.0) injections into the masseter muscle were used to induce persistent myalgia. Controls received saline at pH 7.2. Nocifensive responses of Experimental rats to applications of Von Frey Filaments to the masseters were above control levels 1–38 days post-injection. This effect was bilateral. Expression of c-Fos in the Trigeminal Mesencephalic Nucleus (NVmes), which contains the somata of masseter muscle spindle afferents (MSA), was above baseline levels 1 and 4 days after AS. The resting membrane potentials of neurons exposed to AS (n = 167) were hyperpolarized when compared to their control counterparts (n = 141), as were their thresholds for firing, high frequency membrane oscillations (HFMO), bursting, inward and outward rectification. The amplitude of HFMO was increased and spontaneous ectopic firing occurred in 10% of acid-exposed neurons, but never in Controls. These changes appeared within the same time frame as the observed nocifensive behaviour. Ectopic action potentials can travel centrally, but also antidromically to the peripheral terminals of MSA where they could cause neurotransmitter release and activation of adjacent fibre terminals. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that annulospiral endings of masseter MSA express the glutamate vesicular transporter VGLUT1, indicating that they can release glutamate. Many capsules also contained fine fibers that were labelled by markers associated with nociceptors (calcitonin gene-related peptide, Substance P, P2X3 receptors and TRPV1 receptors) and that expressed the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR5. Antagonists of glutamatergic receptors given together with the 2nd injection of AS prevented the hypersensitivity observed bilaterally but were

  10. Neck muscle afferents influence oromotor and cardiorespiratory brainstem neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Edwards, I J; Lall, V K; Paton, J F; Yanagawa, Y; Szabo, G; Deuchars, S A; Deuchars, J

    2015-01-01

    Sensory information arising from the upper neck is important in the reflex control of posture and eye position. It has also been linked to the autonomic control of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Whiplash associated disorders (WAD) and cervical dystonia, which involve disturbance to the neck region, can often present with abnormalities to the oromotor, respiratory and cardiovascular systems. We investigated the potential neural pathways underlying such symptoms. Simulating neck afferent activity by electrical stimulation of the second cervical nerve in a working heart brainstem preparation (WHBP) altered the pattern of central respiratory drive and increased perfusion pressure. Tracing central targets of these sensory afferents revealed projections to the intermedius nucleus of the medulla (InM). These anterogradely labelled afferents co-localised with parvalbumin and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 indicating that they are proprioceptive. Anterograde tracing from the InM identified projections to brain regions involved in respiratory, cardiovascular, postural and oro-facial behaviours--the neighbouring hypoglossal nucleus, facial and motor trigeminal nuclei, parabrachial nuclei, rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla and nucleus ambiguus. In brain slices, electrical stimulation of afferent fibre tracts lateral to the cuneate nucleus monosynaptically excited InM neurones. Direct stimulation of the InM in the WHBP mimicked the response of second cervical nerve stimulation. These results provide evidence of pathways linking upper cervical sensory afferents with CNS areas involved in autonomic and oromotor control, via the InM. Disruption of these neuronal pathways could, therefore, explain the dysphagic and cardiorespiratory abnormalities which may accompany cervical dystonia and WAD. PMID:24595534

  11. Spike Sorting of Muscle Spindle Afferent Nerve Activity Recorded with Thin-Film Intrafascicular Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Djilas, Milan; Azevedo-Coste, Christine; Guiraud, David; Yoshida, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Afferent muscle spindle activity in response to passive muscle stretch was recorded in vivo using thin-film longitudinal intrafascicular electrodes. A neural spike detection and classification scheme was developed for the purpose of separating activity of primary and secondary muscle spindle afferents. The algorithm is based on the multiscale continuous wavelet transform using complex wavelets. The detection scheme outperforms the commonly used threshold detection, especially with recordings having low signal-to-noise ratio. Results of classification of units indicate that the developed classifier is able to isolate activity having linear relationship with muscle length, which is a step towards online model-based estimation of muscle length that can be used in a closed-loop functional electrical stimulation system with natural sensory feedback. PMID:20369071

  12. Firing of antagonist small-diameter muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and torque of elbow flexors.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2013-07-15

    During muscle fatigue, firing of small-diameter muscle afferents can decrease voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle. However, these afferents may have a more widespread effect on other muscles in the exercising limb. We examined if the firing of fatigue-sensitive afferents from elbow extensor muscles in the same arm reduces torque production and voluntary activation of elbow flexors. In nine subjects we examined voluntary activation of elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex during brief (2-3 s) maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). Inflation of a blood pressure cuff following a 2-min sustained MVC blocked blood flow to the fatigued muscle and maintained firing of small-diameter afferents. After a fatiguing elbow flexion contraction, maximal flexion torque was lower (26.0 ± 4.4% versus 67.9 ± 5.2% of initial maximal torque; means ± s.d.; P < 0.001) and superimposed twitches were larger (4.1 ± 1.1% versus 1.8 ± 0.2% ongoing MVC, P = 0.01) with than without ischaemia. After a fatiguing elbow extensor contraction, maximal flexion torque was also reduced (82.2 ± 4.9% versus 91.4 ± 2.3% of initial maximal torque; P = 0.007), superimposed twitches were larger (2.7 ± 0.7% versus 1.3 ± 0.2% ongoing MVC; P = 0.02) and voluntary activation lower (81.6 ± 8.2% versus 95.5 ± 6.9%; P = 0.04) with than without ischaemia. After a fatiguing contraction, voluntary drive to the fatigued muscles is reduced with continued input from small-diameter muscle afferents. Furthermore, fatigue of the elbow extensor muscles decreases voluntary drive to unfatigued elbow flexors of the same arm. Therefore, firing of small-diameter muscle afferents from one muscle can affect voluntary activation and hence torque generation of another muscle in the same limb. PMID:23652589

  13. Electrophysiological characteristics of IB4-negative TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Wen; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Muscle afferent neurons that express transient receptor potential vanilloid type I (TRPV1) are responsible for muscle pain associated with tissue acidosis. We have previously found that TRPV1 of isolectin B4 (IB4)-negative muscle nociceptors plays an important role in the acid-induced hyperalgesic priming and the development of chronic hyperalgesia in a mouse model of fibromyalgia. To understand the electrophysiological properties of the TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent neurons, we used whole-cell patch clamp recording to study the acid responsiveness and action potential (AP) configuration of capsaicin-sensitive neurons innervating to gastrocnemius muscle. Here we showed that IB4-negative TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent neurons are heterogeneous in terms of cell size, resting membrane potential, AP configuration, tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistance, and acid-induced current (Iacid), as well as capsaicin-induced current (Icap). TRPV1-expressing neurons were all acid-sensitive and could be divided into two acid-sensitive groups depending on an acid-induced sustained current (type I) or an acid-induced biphasic ASIC3-like current (type II). Type I TRPV1-expressing neurons were distinguishable from type II TRPV1-expressing neurons in AP overshoot, after-hyperpolarization duration, and all Iacid parameters, but not in AP threshold, TTX-resistance, resting membrane potential, and Icap parameters. These differential biophysical properties of TRPV1-expressing neurons might partially annotate their different roles involved in the development and maintenance of chronic muscle pain. PMID:27493509

  14. Emulated muscle spindle and spiking afferents validates VLSI neuromorphic hardware as a testbed for sensorimotor function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Chuanxin M.; Nandyala, Sirish K.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2014-01-01

    The lack of multi-scale empirical measurements (e.g., recording simultaneously from neurons, muscles, whole body, etc.) complicates understanding of sensorimotor function in humans. This is particularly true for the understanding of development during childhood, which requires evaluation of measurements over many years. We have developed a synthetic platform for emulating multi-scale activity of the vertebrate sensorimotor system. Our design benefits from Very Large Scale Integrated-circuit (VLSI) technology to provide considerable scalability and high-speed, as much as 365× faster than real-time. An essential component of our design is the proprioceptive sensor, or muscle spindle. Here we demonstrate an accurate and extremely fast emulation of a muscle spindle and its spiking afferents, which are computationally expensive but fundamental for reflex functions. We implemented a well-known rate-based model of the spindle (Mileusnic et al., 2006) and a simplified spiking sensory neuron model using the Izhikevich approximation to the Hodgkin–Huxley model. The resulting behavior of our afferent sensory system is qualitatively compatible with classic cat soleus recording (Crowe and Matthews, 1964b; Matthews, 1964, 1972). Our results suggest that this simplified structure of the spindle and afferent neuron is sufficient to produce physiologically-realistic behavior. The VLSI technology allows us to accelerate this behavior beyond 365× real-time. Our goal is to use this testbed for predicting years of disease progression with only a few days of emulation. This is the first hardware emulation of the spindle afferent system, and it may have application not only for emulation of human health and disease, but also for the construction of compliant neuromorphic robotic systems. PMID:25538613

  15. Skeletal muscle afferent regulation of bioassayable growth hormone in the rat pituitary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselink, K. L.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bigbee, A. J.; Grossman, E. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1998-01-01

    There are forms of growth hormone (GH) in the plasma and pituitary of the rat and in the plasma of humans that are undetected by presently available immunoassays (iGH) but can be measured by bioassay (bGH). Although the regulation of iGH release is well documented, the mechanism(s) of bGH release is unclear. On the basis of changes in bGH and iGH secretion in rats that had been exposed to microgravity conditions, we hypothesized that neural afferents play a role in regulating the release of these hormones. To examine whether bGH secretion can be modulated by afferent input from skeletal muscle, the proximal or distal ends of severed hindlimb fast muscle nerves were stimulated ( approximately 2 times threshold) in anesthetized rats. Plasma bGH increased approximately 250%, and pituitary bGH decreased approximately 60% after proximal nerve trunk stimulation. The bGH response was independent of muscle mass or whether the muscles were flexors or extensors. Distal nerve stimulation had little or no effect on plasma or pituitary bGH. Plasma iGH concentrations were unchanged after proximal nerve stimulation. Although there may be multiple regulatory mechanisms of bGH, the present results demonstrate that the activation of low-threshold afferents from fast skeletal muscles can play a regulatory role in the release of bGH, but not iGH, from the pituitary in anesthetized rats.

  16. Modification by previous afferent discharge of the adaptation of frog muscle spindles following an extension.

    PubMed Central

    Brokensha, G; Westbury, D R

    1978-01-01

    1. Extension of a frog muscle spindle evoked a discharge of impulses in its sensory axon. The adaptation of the discharge after the dynamic phase of stretching occurred in two phases. At first the impulse train was almost regular and adapted quickly, but later this gave place to a phase of slower adaptation in which the variability of discharge was much increased. 2. The discharge of action potentials by the muscle spindle depressed the response of the receptor to a subsequent extension. This was true whether they were elicited antidromically by afferent stimulation or orthodromically by longitudinal vibration. This depression had its most marked effect on the first phase of adaptation where it greatly increased the rate of adaptation. The second, slower, phase of adaptation was little influenced. 3. The depression increased with the duration and with the frequency of afferent stimulation. It persisted for about 300 msec. 4. The results show that the properties of the spike generating mechanisms in the muscle spindle are modified by previous discharge and that this modification may influence the overall properties of the receptor. 5. The fact that afferent stimulation has different effects on the two phases of adaptation is consistent with the suggestion that the impulse train evoked by extension is derived from more than one spike generator within the muscle spindle. PMID:146734

  17. Identification of Different Types of Spinal Afferent Nerve Endings That Encode Noxious and Innocuous Stimuli in the Large Intestine Using a Novel Anterograde Tracing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nick J.; Kyloh, Melinda; Duffield, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, sensory stimuli in visceral organs, including those that underlie pain perception, are detected by spinal afferent neurons, whose cell bodies lie in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). One of the major challenges in visceral organs has been how to identify the different types of nerve endings of spinal afferents that transduce sensory stimuli into action potentials. The reason why spinal afferent nerve endings have been so challenging to identify is because no techniques have been available, until now, that can selectively label only spinal afferents, in high resolution. We have utilized an anterograde tracing technique, recently developed in our laboratory, which facilitates selective labeling of only spinal afferent axons and their nerve endings in visceral organs. Mice were anesthetized, lumbosacral DRGs surgically exposed, then injected with dextran-amine. Seven days post-surgery, the large intestine was removed. The characteristics of thirteen types of spinal afferent nerve endings were identified in detail. The greatest proportion of nerve endings was in submucosa (32%), circular muscle (25%) and myenteric ganglia (22%). Two morphologically distinct classes innervated myenteric ganglia. These were most commonly a novel class of intraganglionic varicose endings (IGVEs) and occasionally rectal intraganglionic laminar endings (rIGLEs). Three distinct classes of varicose nerve endings were found to innervate the submucosa and circular muscle, while one class innervated internodal strands, blood vessels, crypts of lieberkuhn, the mucosa and the longitudinal muscle. Distinct populations of sensory endings were CGRP-positive. We present the first complete characterization of the different types of spinal afferent nerve endings in a mammalian visceral organ. The findings reveal an unexpectedly complex array of different types of primary afferent endings that innervate specific layers of the large intestine. Some of the novel classes of nerve endings identified

  18. Responses in muscle afferent fibres of slow conduction velocity to contractions and ischaemia in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Mense, S; Stahnke, M

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find out to what extent muscle receptors with slowly conducting afferent fibres (group III and IV) are activated by muscular contractions of moderate force, and what kind of muscle afferents could mediate the pain of ischaemic exercise. In chloralose-anaesthetized cats, the impulse activity of single afferent units from the triceps surae muscle was recorded from dorsal root filaments during muscular contractions with intact blood supply and after occlusion of the muscle artery. Two types of responses were observed to contractions without muscular ischaemia. One was characterized by sudden onset and a graded response amplitude to contractions of increasing force. In most cases stretching the muscle was also an effective stimulus. Units showing this response behaviour were labelled c.s.m (contraction-sensitive with mechanical mechanism of activation). The other response type had a more delayed onset and often outlasted the exercise period; because of the unknown mechanism of activation, units of this kind were labelled c.s.x. The proportion of c.s.m receptors was significantly higher amongst group III than amongst group IV units. During ischaemic contractions of comparable force the c.s.m and c.s.x receptors exhibited an unchanged or a decreased response amplitude. Under these conditions another receptor type (N, for nociceptive) was activated which did not respond to contractions with intact blood supply. Vigorous activations during ischaemic work were only observed in group IV receptors. The majority of the 131 group III and IV units tested did not respond to contractions at all. These contraction-insensitive (c.i.) endings probably comprised different receptor populations (nociceptors, thermoreceptors, low-threshold mechanoreceptors). It is concluded that the various central nervous effects of muscular exercise without ischaemia which are known to be due to raised activity in thin muscle afferents (e.g. cardiopulmonary adjustments

  19. The pattern of excitation of human lower limb motoneurones by probable group II muscle afferents.

    PubMed

    Simonetta-Moreau, M; Marque, P; Marchand-Pauvert, V; Pierrot-Deseilligny, E

    1999-05-15

    1. Heteronymous group II effects were investigated in the human lower limb. Changes in firing probability of single motor units in quadriceps (Q), biceps (Bi), semitendinosus (ST), gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and tibialis anterior (TA) were studied after electrical stimuli between 1 and 3 times motor threshold (MT) applied to common peroneal (CP), superficial (SP) and deep (DP) peroneal, Bi and GM nerves in those nerve-muscle combinations without recurrent inhibition. 2. Stimulation of the CP and Bi nerves evoked in almost all of the explored Q motor units a biphasic excitation with a low-threshold early peak, attributable to non-monosynaptic group I excitation, and a higher threshold late peak. When the CP nerve was cooled (or the stimulation applied to a distal branch, DP), the increase in latency was greater for the late than for the early peak, indicating that the late excitation is due to stimulation of afferents with a slower conduction velocity than group I fibres, presumably in the group II range. In ST motor units the group II excitation elicited by stimulation of the GM and SP nerves was particularly large and frequent, and the non-monosynaptic group I excitation was often replaced by an inhibition. 3. A late group II-induced excitation from CP to Q motoneurones and from GM and SP to ST motoneurones was also observed when using the H reflex as a test. 4. The electrical threshold and conduction velocity of the largest diameter fibres evoking the group II excitation were estimated to be 2.1 and 0.65 times those of the fastest Ia afferents, respectively. In the combinations tested in the present investigation the group II input seemed to be primarily of muscle origin. 5. The potent heteronymous group II excitation of motoneurones of both flexors and extensors of the knee contrasted with the absence of a group II effect from DP to GM and from GM to TA. In none of the combinations explored was there any evidence for group II inhibition of motoneurones. The

  20. Models of ensemble firing of muscle spindle afferents recorded during normal locomotion in cats

    PubMed Central

    Prochazka, Arthur; Gorassini, Monica

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the ability of several mathematical models to predict the firing characteristics of muscle spindle primary afferents recorded chronically during normal stepping in cats. Ensemble firing profiles of nine hamstring spindle primary (presumed group Ia) afferents were compiled from stored data from 132 step cycles. Three sets of profiles corresponding to slow, medium and fast steps were generated by averaging groups of step cycles aligned to peak muscle length in each cycle. Five models obtained from the literature were compared. Each of these models was used to predict the spindle firing profiles from the averaged muscle length signals. The models were also used in the reverse direction, namely to predict muscle length from the firing profiles. A sixth model incorporating some key aspects of the other models was also included in the comparisons. Five of the models predicted spindle firing well, with root mean square (r.m.s.) errors lower than 14% of the modulation depth of the target profiles. The key variable in achieving good predictions was muscle velocity, the best fits being obtained with power-law functions of velocity, with an exponent of 0.5 or 0.6 (i.e. spindle firing rate is approximately proportional to the square root of muscle velocity). The fits were slightly improved by adding small components of EMG signal to mimic fusimotor action linked to muscle activation. The modest relative size of EMG-linked fusimotor action may be related to the fact that hamstring muscles are not strongly recruited in stepping. Length was predicted very accurately from firing profiles with the inverse of the above models, indicating that the nervous system could in principle process spindle firing in a relatively simple way to give accurate information on muscle length. The responses of the models to standard ramp-and-hold displacements at 10 mm s−1 were also studied (i.e. velocities that were an order of magnitude lower than that during

  1. TRPA1 mediates amplified sympathetic responsiveness to activation of metabolically sensitive muscle afferents in rats with femoral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jihong; Lu, Jian; Li, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic responses to activation of mechanically and metabolically sensitive muscle afferent nerves during static contraction are augmented in rats with femoral artery occlusion. Moreover, metabolically sensitive transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) has been reported to contribute to sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and arterial blood pressure (BP) responses evoked by static muscle contraction. Thus, in the present study, we examined the mechanisms by which afferent nerves' TRPA1 plays a role in regulating amplified sympathetic responsiveness due to a restriction of blood flow directed to the hindlimb muscles. Our data show that 24–72 h of femoral artery occlusion (1) upregulates the protein levels of TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) tissues; (2) selectively increases expression of TRPA1 in DRG neurons supplying metabolically sensitive afferent nerves of C-fiber (group IV); and (3) enhances renal SNA and BP responses to AITC (a TRPA1 agonist) injected into the hindlimb muscles. In addition, our data demonstrate that blocking TRPA1 attenuates SNA and BP responses during muscle contraction to a greater degree in ligated rats than those responses in control rats. In contrast, blocking TRPA1 fails to attenuate SNA and BP responses during passive tendon stretch in both groups. Overall, results of this study indicate that alternations in muscle afferent nerves' TRPA1 likely contribute to enhanced sympathetically mediated autonomic responses via the metabolic component of the muscle reflex under circumstances of chronic muscle ischemia. PMID:26441669

  2. Influences of laryngeal afferent inputs on intralaryngeal muscle activity during vocalization in the cat.

    PubMed

    Shiba, K; Yoshida, K; Nakajima, Y; Konno, A

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the possible role of the laryngeal afferent inputs in the regulation of intralaryngeal muscle activity during vocalization. We studied the influences of airflow and/or pressure applied to the larynx on intralaryngeal muscle activity during vocalization in ketamine-anesthetized cats. Vocalization was induced by airflow applied to the upper airway, which was isolated from the lower airway, during pontine call site stimulation. When the upper airway was open to the atmosphere through the nostrils and mouth, the airflow increased not only the vocal fold adductor and tensor activities but also the duration of these activities. The adductor and tensor activities were increased suddenly at a critical subglottic pressure level equivalent to the subglottic pressure threshold for vocalization. These effects were significantly reduced by sectioning of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve or by lidocaine application to the laryngeal mucosa. Sustained pressure applied to the isolated upper airway, when the mouth and nostrils were occluded, did not affect adductor or tensor activities. These results indicate that the afferent inputs evoked by vocal fold stretching or vibration play an important role in the motor control of intralaryngeal and respiratory muscles during vocalization. PMID:9089702

  3. Mechanical sensitivity of muscle afferents in a nerve treated with colchicine.

    PubMed

    Proske, U; Luff, A R

    1998-04-01

    The experiments reported here demonstrate that the mechanical sensitivity of peripheral nerve fibres typically seen after injury can be induced without overtly injuring the nerve, but by simply applying colchicine topically to the nerve. In cats anaesthetised with pentobarbitone sodium, the medial gastrocnemius nerve was exposed and 10 mM colchicine applied topically for 15 min. The animals recovered from the operation normally and showed no subsequent motor deficit. Six days later animals were re-anaesthetised, a laminectomy carried out and responses recorded in single afferents at the level of the dorsal root. It was found that many afferents, particularly those with conduction velocities in the group II-III range, had become sensitive to local mechanical stimulation of the nerve in the region treated with colchicine and showed slowly adapting responses to stretch of the nerve. Many of the smaller fibres exhibited spontaneous activity. Mechanically sensitive afferents exhibited impulse conduction blocks at the colchicine-treated site. Some afferents, which appeared to conduct impulses normally through the treated region, were associated with muscle receptors having normal response properties. However, other muscle receptors were clearly abnormal and were insensitive to muscle stretch or contraction or exhibited only phasic responses. When the nerve was cut proximal to the colchicine-treated site, some, but not all, spontaneous activity was abolished. It was subsequently shown using a collision technique that the activity in some axons had its origin in the cell body in the dorsal root ganglion. In one experiment, it was shown that after nerve section proximal to the colchicine-treated region three of five axons switched their activity from a peripheral to a central origin. It is postulated that colchicine disrupts fast axonal transport of mechanically sensitive or voltage-sensitive ion channels, from the cell body to the peripheral terminals of the axons, leading

  4. Role of afferent input in load-dependent plasticity of rat muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, F.; Umemoto, S.; Higo, Y.; Kawabe, N.; Wang, X. D.; Lan, Y. B.; Ohira, Y.

    We have been studying the role of afferent input in the plasticity of skeletal muscles. The present study was performed to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the deafferentation-related inhibition of the compensatory hypertrophy in rat soleus muscle. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly separated into the control, functionally overloaded (FO), and functionally overloaded + deafferentation (FO+DA) group. The tendons of plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles were transected in the FO rats. The dorsal roots of the spinal cord at the L4-5 segmental levels were additionally transected in the FO+DA rats. The sampling of the soleus was performed 2 weeks after the surgery and ambulation recovery. The single muscle fibers were isolated in low-calcium relaxing solution. Further, the myonuclei or argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) were stained. Significant increase of the fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) was seen in the FO, but not in the FO+DA, rats. The myonuclear number in fiber was significantly decreased by FO. Addition of DA to FO further promoted the reduction of myonuclear number. The mean nucleus size and DNA content in single nucleus in all groups were identical. Although a single or double AgNORs were seen in ~90% of myonuclei in the control rats, their distributions were 72 and 76% in the FO and FO+DA rats, respectively (p<0.05). More myonuclei containing 3-5 AgNORs were noted in the FO and FO+DA rats. The mean number of the AgNORs per myonucleus was 1.7 in the control, 2.1 in both FO and FO+DA rats (p<0.05). It was suggested that the FO-related increase of the number of AgNORs may be responsible for the induction of compensatory hypertrophy. It was also indicated that intact afferent input plays an essential role in these phenomena.

  5. Effects of ankle extensor muscle afferent inputs on hip abductor and adductor activity in the decerebrate walking cat.

    PubMed

    Bolton, D A E; Misiaszek, J E

    2012-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the lateral gastrocnemius-soleus (LGS) nerve at group I afferent strength leads to adaptations in the amplitude and timing of extensor muscle activity during walking in the decerebrate cat. Such afferent feedback in the stance leg might result from a delay in stance onset of the opposite leg. Concomitant adaptations in hip abductor and adductor activity would then be expected to maintain lateral stability and balance until the opposite leg is able to support the body. As many hip abductors and adductors are also hip extensors, we hypothesized that stimulation of the LGS nerve at group I afferent strength would produce increased activation and prolonged burst duration in hip abductor and adductor muscles in the premammillary decerebrate walking cat. LGS nerve stimulation during the extensor phase of the locomotor cycle consistently increased burst amplitude of the gluteus medius and adductor femoris muscles, but not pectineus or gracilis. In addition, LGS stimulation prolonged the burst duration of both gluteus medius and adductor femoris. Unexpectedly, long-duration LGS stimulus trains resulted in two distinct outcomes on the hip abductor and adductor bursting pattern: 1) a change of burst duration and timing similar to medial gastrocnemius; or 2) to continue rhythmically bursting uninterrupted. These results indicate that activation of muscle afferents from ankle extensors contributes to the regulation of activity of some hip abductor and adductor muscles, but not all. These results have implications for understanding the neural control of stability during locomotion, as well as the organization of spinal locomotor networks. PMID:22972967

  6. Afferent input-associated reduction of muscle activity in microgravity environment.

    PubMed

    Kawano, F; Nomura, T; Ishihara, A; Nonaka, I; Ohira, Y

    2002-01-01

    Responses of electromyogram (EMG) of soleus, lateral portion of gastrocnemius (LG) and tibialis anterior (TA), and both afferent and efferent neurograms at the L(5) segmental level of the spinal cord, to altered gravity levels created by the parabolic flight of a jet airplane were investigated in adult rats. The EMG activity in antigravity soleus muscle gradually increased when the gravity was elevated from 1-G to 1.5-G (+23%) and 2-G (+67%) during the ascending phase of parabolic flight. The activity decreased approximately 72% from the 1-G level immediately when the rat was exposed to microgravity. The EMG level was maintained low during the 20-s microgravity, but it was restored immediately once the gravity level was increased to 1.5-G and then 1-G during the descending and recovery phase. The EMG level of LG also increased gradually when the gravity level was elevated and the level then decreased when the rat was exposed to microgravity (P>0.05). However, the activity level during the 20-s microgravity was identical to that obtained at 1-G. The EMG level of TA even increased insignificantly in response to the exposure to microgravity. The responses of afferent neurogram were similar to those of soleus EMG, even though the magnitude of the reduction of integrated neurogram level in response to microgravity exposure was small (approximately 26% vs. 1-G level) relative to that of soleus EMG. The level of efferent neurogram was also decreased, but only approximately 9% vs. 1-G level, during the 20-s microgravity. The data in the current study suggest that the afferent input is closely associated with the gravity-dependent muscular activity. PMID:12379265

  7. Neck afferents and muscle sympathetic activity in humans: implications for the vestibulosympathetic reflex.

    PubMed

    Ray, C A; Hume, K M

    1998-02-01

    We have shown previously that head-down neck flexion (HDNF) in humans elicits increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of neck muscle afferents on MSNA. We studied this question by measuring MSNA before and after head rotation that would activate neck muscle afferents but not the vestibular system (i.e., no stimulation of the otolith organs or semicircular canals). After a 3-min baseline period with the head in the normal erect position, subjects rotated their head to the side (approximately 90%) and maintained this position for 3 min. Head rotation was performed by the subjects in both the prone (n = 5) and sitting (n = 6) positions. Head rotation did not elicit changes in MSNA. Average MSNA, expressed as burst frequency and total activity, was 13 +/- 1 and 13 +/- 1 bursts/min and 146 +/-34 and 132 +/- 27 units/min during baseline and head rotation, respectively. There were no significant changes in calf blood flow (2.6 +/- 0.3 to 2.5 +/- 0.3 ml.100 ml-1.min-1, n = 8) and calf vascular resistance (39 +/- 4 to 41 +/- 4 units; n = 8). Heart rate (64 +/- 3 to 66 +/- 3 beats/min; P = 0.058) and mean arterial pressure (90 +/- 3 to 93 +/- 3; P < 0.05) increased slightly during head rotation. Additional neck flexion studies were performed with subjects lying on their side (n = 5), MSNA, heart rate, and mean arterial pressure were unchanged during this maneuver, which also does not engage the vestibular system. HDNF was tested in 9 of the 13 subjects. MSNA was significantly increased by 79 +/- 12% (P < 0.001) during HDNF. These findings indicate that neck afferents activated by horizontal neck rotation or flexion in the absence of significant force development do not elicit changes in MSNA. These findings support the concept that HDNF increases MSNA by the activation of the vestibular system. PMID:9475851

  8. Partial blockade of skeletal muscle somatosensory afferents attenuates baroreflex resetting during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott A; Querry, Ross G; Fadel, Paul J; Gallagher, Kevin M; Strømstad, Morten; Ide, Kojiro; Raven, Peter B; Secher, Niels H

    2003-09-15

    During exercise, the carotid baroreflex is reset to operate around the higher arterial pressures evoked by physical exertion. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the contribution of somatosensory input from the exercise pressor reflex to this resetting during exercise. Nine subjects performed seven minutes of dynamic cycling at 30% of maximal work load and three minutes of static one-legged contraction at 25% maximal voluntary contraction before (control) and after partial blockade of skeletal muscle afferents with epidural anaesthesia. Carotid baroreflex function was assessed by applying rapid pulses of hyper- and hypotensive stimuli to the neck via a customised collar. Using a logistic model, heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) responses to carotid sinus stimulation were used to develop reflex function stimulus-response curves. Compared with rest, control dynamic and static exercise reset carotid baroreflex-HR and carotid baroreflex-MAP curves vertically upward on the response arm and laterally rightward to higher operating pressures. Inhibition of exercise pressor reflex input by epidural anaesthesia attenuated the bi-directional resetting of the carotid baroreflex-MAP curve during both exercise protocols. In contrast, the effect of epidural anaesthesia on the resetting of the carotid baroreflex-HR curve was negligible during dynamic cycling whereas it relocated the curve in a laterally leftward direction during static contraction. The data suggest that afferent input from skeletal muscle is requisite for the complete resetting of the carotid baroreflex during exercise. However, this neural input appears to modify baroreflex control of blood pressure to a greater extent than heart rate. PMID:12819303

  9. Short-latency projections to the cat cerebral cortex from skin and muscle afferents in the contralateral forelimb

    PubMed Central

    Oscarsson, O.; Rosén, I.

    1966-01-01

    1. The potentials evoked in the first sensorimotor area on stimulation of muscle and skin nerves in the contralateral forelimb were recorded in preparations with either the dorsal funiculus (DF) or the spinocervical tract (SCT) interrupted. 2. The short-latency, surface-positive potentials in these preparations are mediated by the remaining path, either the DF or SCT. 3. Cutaneous afferents project through both paths to two discrete areas which correspond to the classical sensory and motor cortices (Fig. 10 A and B). The projection areas are not identical: the DF path seems to activate most effectively the sensory cortex; and the SCT path, most effectively the motor cortex. 4. The potentials evoked from cutaneous nerves have a similar latency in the two areas. On stimulation of the superficial radial nerve the latency was about 4·5 msec in preparations with intact DF, and about 5·3 msec in preparations with intact SCT. 5. High threshold muscle afferents project to the same areas as the cutaneous afferents. 6. Group I muscle afferents project, exclusively through the DF path, to an area distinct from the two cutaneous projection areas (Fig. 10C). It occupies a caudal part of the motor cortex and an intermediate zone between the sensory and motor cortices. 7. The projection areas are compared with the recent cytoarchitectonic map of Hassler & Muhs-Clement (1964) (Fig. 10D). 8. It is suggested that the afferent projections to the motor cortex and the intermediate zone are used in the integration of movements elicited from the cortex. The general similarity in the organization of afferent paths to the motor cortex and the cerebellum is pointed out. PMID:5937410

  10. Static γ-motoneurones couple group Ia and II afferents of single muscle spindles in anaesthetised and decerebrate cats

    PubMed Central

    Gladden, M H; Matsuzaki, H

    2002-01-01

    Ideas about the functions of static γ-motoneurones are based on the responses of primary and secondary endings to electrical stimulation of single static γ-axons, usually at high frequencies. We compared these effects with the actions of spontaneously active γ-motoneurones. In anaesthetised cats, afferents and efferents were recorded in intramuscular nerve branches to single muscle spindles. The occurrence of γ-spikes, identified by a spike shape recognition system, was linked to video-taped contractions of type-identified intrafusal fibres in the dissected muscle spindles. When some static γ-motoneurones were active at low frequency (< 15 Hz) they coupled the firing of group Ia and II afferents. Activity of other static γ-motoneurones which tensed the intrafusal fibres appeared to enhance this effect. Under these conditions the secondary ending responded at shorter latency than the primary ending. In another series of experiments on decerebrate cats, responses of primary and secondary endings of single muscle spindles to activation of γ-motoneurones by natural stimuli were compared with their responses to electrical stimulation of single γ-axons supplying the same spindle. Electrical stimulation mimicked the natural actions of γ-motoneurones on either the primary or the secondary ending, but not on both together. However, γ-activity evoked by natural stimuli coupled the firing of afferents with the muscle at constant length, and also when it was stretched. Analysis showed that the timing and tightness of this coupling determined the degree of summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by each afferent in α-motoneurones and interneurones contacted by terminals of both endings, and thus the degree of facilitation of reflex actions of group II afferents. PMID:12181298

  11. Spinal inhibition of phrenic motoneurones by stimulation of afferents from leg muscle in the cat: blockade by strychnine.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, F L; Millhorn, D E; Waldrop, T

    1987-08-01

    1. Phrenic nerve responses to stimulation of calf muscle receptors or their afferents were studied in paralysed high (C1) spinal cats whose phrenic nerve activity was evoked by activation of the intercostal-to-phrenic reflex. End-tidal PCO2 was maintained at a constant level by means of a servo-controlled ventilator. 2. Physical stimulation of calf muscles or electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve uniformly caused inhibition of phrenic activity evoked by facilitatory conditioning stimuli. The degree of inhibition gradually decreased as muscle stimulation continued, and there was a post-stimulus augmentation of phrenic activity. 3. Pre-treatment with subconvulsive doses of strychnine, an antagonist of the neurotransmitter glycine, partially or completely blocked the inhibitory effects on phrenic activity of muscle-afferent stimulation. The blockade was reversible with time. 4. Pre-treatment with a subconvulsive dose of bicuculline, an antagonist of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), had no effect on the inhibitory mechanism. 5. We conclude that glycine is an important transmitter of the inhibition of phrenic motoneurones induced by muscle-afferent stimulation, but that GABA is not involved in this inhibitory mechanism. PMID:3681723

  12. The Dynamics of Voluntary Force Production in Afferented Muscle Influence Involuntary Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Christopher M.; Nagamori, Akira; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary control of force is always marked by some degree of error and unsteadiness. Both neural and mechanical factors contribute to these fluctuations, but how they interact to produce them is poorly understood. In this study, we identify and characterize a previously undescribed neuromechanical interaction where the dynamics of voluntary force production suffice to generate involuntary tremor. Specifically, participants were asked to produce isometric force with the index finger and use visual feedback to track a sinusoidal target spanning 5–9% of each individual's maximal voluntary force level. Force fluctuations and EMG activity over the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscle were recorded and their frequency content was analyzed as a function of target phase. Force variability in either the 1–5 or 6–15 Hz frequency ranges tended to be largest at the peaks and valleys of the target sinusoid. In those same periods, FDS EMG activity was synchronized with force fluctuations. We then constructed a physiologically-realistic computer simulation in which a muscle-tendon complex was set inside of a feedback-driven control loop. Surprisingly, the model sufficed to produce phase-dependent modulation of tremor similar to that observed in humans. Further, the gain of afferent feedback from muscle spindles was critical for appropriately amplifying and shaping this tremor. We suggest that the experimentally-induced tremor may represent the response of a viscoelastic muscle-tendon system to dynamic drive, and therefore does not fall into known categories of tremor generation, such as tremorogenic descending drive, stretch-reflex loop oscillations, motor unit behavior, or mechanical resonance. Our findings motivate future efforts to understand tremor from a perspective that considers neuromechanical coupling within the context of closed-loop control. The strategy of combining experimental recordings with physiologically-sound simulations will enable thorough

  13. The Dynamics of Voluntary Force Production in Afferented Muscle Influence Involuntary Tremor.

    PubMed

    Laine, Christopher M; Nagamori, Akira; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary control of force is always marked by some degree of error and unsteadiness. Both neural and mechanical factors contribute to these fluctuations, but how they interact to produce them is poorly understood. In this study, we identify and characterize a previously undescribed neuromechanical interaction where the dynamics of voluntary force production suffice to generate involuntary tremor. Specifically, participants were asked to produce isometric force with the index finger and use visual feedback to track a sinusoidal target spanning 5-9% of each individual's maximal voluntary force level. Force fluctuations and EMG activity over the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscle were recorded and their frequency content was analyzed as a function of target phase. Force variability in either the 1-5 or 6-15 Hz frequency ranges tended to be largest at the peaks and valleys of the target sinusoid. In those same periods, FDS EMG activity was synchronized with force fluctuations. We then constructed a physiologically-realistic computer simulation in which a muscle-tendon complex was set inside of a feedback-driven control loop. Surprisingly, the model sufficed to produce phase-dependent modulation of tremor similar to that observed in humans. Further, the gain of afferent feedback from muscle spindles was critical for appropriately amplifying and shaping this tremor. We suggest that the experimentally-induced tremor may represent the response of a viscoelastic muscle-tendon system to dynamic drive, and therefore does not fall into known categories of tremor generation, such as tremorogenic descending drive, stretch-reflex loop oscillations, motor unit behavior, or mechanical resonance. Our findings motivate future efforts to understand tremor from a perspective that considers neuromechanical coupling within the context of closed-loop control. The strategy of combining experimental recordings with physiologically-sound simulations will enable thorough exploration

  14. Dual Modulation of Nociception and Cardiovascular Reflexes during Peripheral Ischemia through P2Y1 Receptor-Dependent Sensitization of Muscle Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Queme, Luis F.; Ross, Jessica L.; Lu, Peilin; Hudgins, Renita C.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous musculoskeletal pain disorders are based in dysfunction of peripheral perfusion and are often comorbid with altered cardiovascular responses to muscle contraction/exercise. We have recently found in mice that 24 h peripheral ischemia induced by a surgical occlusion of the brachial artery (BAO) induces increased paw-guarding behaviors, mechanical hypersensitivity, and decreased grip strength. These behavioral changes corresponded to increased heat sensitivity as well as an increase in the numbers of chemosensitive group III/IV muscle afferents as assessed by an ex vivo forepaw muscles/median and ulnar nerves/dorsal root ganglion (DRG)/spinal cord (SC) recording preparation. Behaviors also corresponded to specific upregulation of the ADP-responsive P2Y1 receptor in the DRGs. Since group III/IV muscle afferents have separately been associated with regulating muscle nociception and exercise pressor reflexes (EPRs), and P2Y1 has been linked to heat responsiveness and phenotypic switching in cutaneous afferents, we sought to determine whether upregulation of P2Y1 was responsible for the observed alterations in muscle afferent function, leading to modulation of muscle pain-related behaviors and EPRs after BAO. Using an afferent-specific siRNA knockdown strategy, we found that inhibition of P2Y1 during BAO not only prevented the increased mean blood pressure after forced exercise, but also significantly reduced alterations in pain-related behaviors. Selective P2Y1 knockdown also prevented the increased firing to heat stimuli and the BAO-induced phenotypic switch in chemosensitive muscle afferents, potentially through regulating membrane expression of acid sensing ion channel 3. These results suggest that enhanced P2Y1 in muscle afferents during ischemic-like conditions may dually regulate muscle nociception and cardiovascular reflexes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our current results suggest that P2Y1 modulates heat responsiveness and chemosensation in muscle afferents

  15. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in mouse skeletal muscle afferents are heteromers composed of ASIC1a, ASIC2, and ASIC3 subunits

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Mamta; Benson, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are expressed in skeletal muscle afferents, in which they sense extracellular acidosis and other metabolites released during ischemia and exercise. ASICs are formed as homotrimers or heterotrimers of several isoforms (ASIC1a, ASIC1b, ASIC2a, ASIC2b, and ASIC3), with each channel displaying distinct properties. To dissect the ASIC composition in muscle afferents, we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to study the properties of acid-evoked currents (amplitude, pH sensitivity, the kinetics of desensitization and recovery from desensitization, and pharmacological modulation) in isolated, labeled mouse muscle afferents from wild-type (C57BL/6J) and specific ASIC−/− mice. We found that ASIC-like currents in wild-type muscle afferents displayed fast desensitization, indicating that they are carried by heteromeric channels. Currents from ASIC1a−/− muscle afferents were less pH-sensitive and displayed faster recovery, currents from ASIC2−/− mice showed diminished potentiation by zinc, and currents from ASIC3−/− mice displayed slower desensitization than those from wild-type mice. Finally, ASIC-like currents were absent from triple-null mice lacking ASIC1a, ASIC2a, and ASIC3. We conclude that ASIC1a, ASIC2a, and ASIC3 heteromers are the principle channels in skeletal muscle afferents. These results will help us understand the role of ASICs in exercise physiology and provide a molecular target for potential drug therapies to treat muscle pain.—Gautam, M., Benson, C. J. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in mouse skeletal muscle afferents are heteromers composed of ASIC1a, ASIC2, and ASIC3 subunits. PMID:23109675

  16. Signal transmission from motor axons to group Ia muscle spindle afferents: frequency responses and second-order non-linearities.

    PubMed

    Windhorst, U; Kokkoroyiannis, T; Laouris, Y; Meyer-Lohmann, J

    1994-03-01

    Spinal recurrent inhibition via Renshaw cells and proprioceptive feedback via skeletal muscle and muscle spindle afferents have been hypothesized to constitute a compound feedback system [Windhorst (1989) Afferent Control of Posture and Locomotion; Windhorst (1993) Robots and Biological Systems--Towards a New Bionics]. To assess their detailed functions, it is necessary to know their dynamic characteristics. Previously we have extensively described the properties of signal transmission from motor axons to Renshaw cells using random motor axon stimulation and data analysis methods based thereupon. Using the same methods, we here compare these properties, in the cat, with those between motor axons and group Ia muscle spindle afferents in terms of frequency responses and nonlinear features. The frequency responses depend on the mean rate (carrier rate) of activation of motor axons and on the strength of coupling between motor units and spindles. In general, they are those of a second-order low-pass system with a cut-off at fairly low frequencies. This contrasts with the dynamics of motor axon-Renshaw cell couplings which are those of a much broader band-pass with its peak in the range of c. 2-15 Hz [Christakos (1987) Neuroscience 23, 613-623]. The second-order non-linearities in motor unit-muscle spindle signal lines are much more diverse than those in motor axon-Renshaw cell couplings. Although the average strength of response declines with mean stimulus rate in both subsystems, there is no systematic relationship between the amount of non-linearity and the average response in the former, whilst there is in the latter. The qualitative appearance of motor unit-muscle spindle non-linearities was complicated as was the average response to motor unit twitches. Thus, whilst Renshaw cells appear to dynamically reflect motor output rather faithfully, muscle spindles seem to signal local muscle fibre length changes and their dynamics. This would be consistent with the

  17. The effect of deep tissue incision on pH responses of afferent fibers and dorsal root ganglia innervating muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Kanta; Gautam, Mamta; Benson, Christopher J.; Gu, He; Brennan, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanisms underlying deep tissue pain in the postoperative period is critical to improve therapies. Using the in vitro plantar flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle-nerve preparation and patch-clamp recordings from cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons innervating incised and unincised muscle, we investigated responses to various pH changes. Methods Incision including the plantar FDB muscle or sham operation was made in the rat hindpaw. On postoperative day one, in vitro single fiber recording was undertaken. Based on previous studies, we recorded from at least 40 fibers per group. Also Di-I labeled DRG innervating muscle from rats undergoing incision and a sham operation were cultured and tested for acid responses using whole cell patch-clamp recordings. Results The prevalence of responsive group IV afferents to lactic acid pH 6.5 in the incision group (15 of 67, 22.3%) was greater than that in the control group (2 of 35, 5.7%, p=0.022). In DRG neurons innervating muscle, incision increased mean current amplitudes of acid-evoked currents; the acid-sensing ion channel blocker, amiloride 300 μM, inhibited more than 75% of the acid-evoked current, whereas the transient receptor vanilloid receptor 1 blocker (AMG9810 1 μM) did not cause significant inhibition. Conclusion Our experiments demonstrated that incision increases the responses of FDB muscle afferent fibers to weak acid solutions, and increased acid-evoked currents in DRG innervating muscle. Our data suggest that upregulation of acid-sensing ion channels might underlie this increased chemosensitivity caused by surgery. PMID:23732174

  18. On the contribution of group III and IV muscle afferents to the circulatory response to rhythmic exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Markus; Runnels, Sean; Morgan, David E; Trinity, Joel D; Fjeldstad, Anette S; Wray, D Walter; Reese, Van R; Richardson, Russell S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the role of skeletal muscle afferent feedback in circulatory control during rhythmic exercise in humans. Nine healthy males performed single leg knee-extensor exercise (15/30/45 watts, 3 min each) under both control conditions (Ctrl) and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing μ-opioid receptor-sensitive muscle afferents. Cardiac output and femoral blood flow were determined, and femoral arterial/venous blood samples were collected during the final minute of each workload. To rule out cephalad migration of fentanyl to the brainstem, we documented unchanged resting ventilatory responses to different levels of hypercapnia. There were no haemodynamic differences between conditions at rest. However, during exercise cardiac output was ∼20% lower with fentanyl blockade compared to control (P < 0.05), secondary to a 6% and 13% reduction in heart rate and stroke volume, respectively. Throughout exercise mean arterial pressure (MAP) was reduced by 7% (P < 0.01) which is likely to have contributed to the 15% fall in femoral blood flow. However, MAP was not completely responsible for this peripheral haemodynamic change as vascular conductance was also attenuated (∼9%). Evidence of increasing noradrenaline spillover (P = 0.09) implicated an elevation in sympathetic outflow in this response. The attenuated femoral blood flow during exercise with fentanyl was associated with a 17% reduction in leg O2 delivery (P < 0.01) and a concomitant rise in the arteriovenous O2 difference (4–9%), but leg O2 consumption remained 7–13% lower than control (P < 0.05). Our findings reveal an essential contribution of continuous muscle afferent feedback to ensure the appropriate haemodynamic and ultimately metabolic response to rhythmic exercise in humans. PMID:21646407

  19. Cortical Responses to Aδ-Fiber Stimulation: Magnetoencephalographic Recordings in a Subject Lacking Large Myelinated Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Olausson, Håkan; Cole, Jonathan; Jousmäki, Veikko; Hari, Riitta

    2010-01-01

    Controversy persists over the role of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) in processing small-fiber peripheral afferent input. We therefore examined subject I.W, who, due to sensory neuronopathy syndrome, has no large-fiber afferents below C3 level. Cortical evoked responses were recorded with a whole-scalp neuromagnetometer to high-intensity electrical stimulation of the distal right radial, median, and tibial nerves and skin over the forearm and mechanical stimulation of (neurologically intact) lip. The responses to electrical stimulation in the Aβ-denervated limbs peaked at 110–140 ms in contralateral SI and at 140–220 ms in contralateral secondary somatosensory cortex (SII), consistent with Aδ-mediated input. I.W. was able to localize pin-prick stimuli with 4 cm accuracy. Responses to laser stimuli on the radial dorsum of the hand peaked in contralateral SII cortex at 215 ms, also compatible with Aδ-mediated input. These results support the role of the SI cortex in processing the sensory discriminative aspects of Aδ-mediated input. PMID:19959562

  20. Muscle afferent potential (`A-wave') in the surface electromyogram of a phasic stretch reflex in normal humans

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Alex. M.; Michie, Patricia T.; Glue, Leonard C. T.

    1972-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper tested the hypothesis that the afferent potential elicited by a tendon tap in an isometrically recorded phasic stretch reflex can be detected in the surface EMG of normal humans when appropriate techniques are used. These techniques involved (1) training the subjects to relax mentally and physically so that the EMG was silent before and immediately after the diphasic MAP which reflects a highly synchronous discharge of afferent impulses from low threshold muscle stretch receptors after a tendon tap, and (2) using a data retrieval computer to summate stimulus-locked potentials in the EMG over a series of 16 samples using taps of uniform peak force and duration on the Achilles tendon to elicit the tendon jerk in the calf muscles. A discrete, diphasic potential (`A-wave') was recorded from EMG electrodes placed on the surface of the skin over the medial gastrocnemius muscle. The `A-wave' afferent potential had the opposite polarity to the corresponding efferent MAP. Under control conditions of relaxation the `A-wave' had a latency after the onset of the tap of 2 msec, the peak to peak amplitude was of the order of 5 μV and the duration was in the range of 6 to 10 msec. Further experiments were conducted to show that the `A-wave' (1) was not an artefact of the instrumentation used, (2) had a threshold at low intensities of stimulation, and (3) could be reliably augmented by using a Jendrassik manoeuvre compared with the potential observed during control (relaxation) conditions. The results support the conclusion that the `A-wave' emanates from the pool of muscle spindles which discharges impulses along group Ia nerve fibres in response to the phasic stretch stimulus because the primary ending of the spindles is known to initiate the stretch reflex and the spindles can be sensitized by fusimotor impulses so that their threshold is lowered as a result of a Jendrassik manoeuvre. The finding has important implications for the

  1. Central alterations of neuromuscular function and feedback from group III-IV muscle afferents following exhaustive high-intensity one-leg dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Pageaux, Benjamin; Angius, Luca; Hopker, James G; Lepers, Romuald; Marcora, Samuele M

    2015-06-15

    The aims of this investigation were to describe the central alterations of neuromuscular function induced by exhaustive high-intensity one-leg dynamic exercise (OLDE, study 1) and to indirectly quantify feedback from group III-IV muscle afferents via muscle occlusion (MO, study 2) in healthy adult male humans. We hypothesized that these central alterations and their recovery are associated with changes in afferent feedback. Both studies consisted of two time-to-exhaustion tests at 85% peak power output. In study 1, voluntary activation level (VAL), M-wave, cervicomedullary motor evoked potential (CMEP), motor evoked potential (MEP), and MEP cortical silent period (CSP) of the knee extensor muscles were measured. In study 2, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and leg muscle pain were measured during MO. Measurements were performed preexercise, at exhaustion, and after 3 min recovery. Compared with preexercise values, VAL was lower at exhaustion (-13 ± 13%, P < 0.05) and after 3 min of recovery (-6 ± 6%, P = 0.05). CMEP area/M area was lower at exhaustion (-38 ± 13%, P < 0.01) and recovered after 3 min. MEP area/M area was higher at exhaustion (+25 ± 27%, P < 0.01) and after 3 min of recovery (+17 ± 20%, P < 0.01). CSP was higher (+19 ± 9%, P < 0.01) only at exhaustion and recovered after 3 min. Markers of afferent feedback (MAP and leg muscle pain during MO) were significantly higher only at exhaustion. These findings suggest that the alterations in spinal excitability and CSP induced by high-intensity OLDE are associated with an increase in afferent feedback at exhaustion, whereas central fatigue does not fully recover even when significant afferent feedback is no longer present. PMID:25855308

  2. Long-Term Effects of Botulinum Toxin Complex Type A Injection on Mechano- and Metabo-Sensitive Afferent Fibers Originating from Gastrocnemius Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Guillaume; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate long term effects of motor denervation by botulinum toxin complex type A (BoNT/A) from Clostridium Botulinum, on the afferent fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were divided in 2 experimental groups: 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle, the latter being itself divided into 3 subgroups according to their locomotor recovery with the help of a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats: i) no recovery (B0), ii) 50% recovery (B50) and iii) full recovery (B100). Then, muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to potassium chloride (KCl) and lactic acid injections and Electrically-Induced Fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations were measured. At the end of the experiment, rats were killed and the toxin injected muscles were weighted. After toxin injection, we observed a complete paralysis associated to a loss of force to muscle stimulation and a significant muscle atrophy, and a return to baseline when the animals recover. The response to fatigue was only decreased in the B0 group. The responses to KCl injections were only altered in the B100 groups while responses to lactic acid were altered in the 3 injected groups. Finally, our results indicated that neurotoxin altered the biphasic pattern of response of the mechanosensitive fiber to tendon vibrations in the B0 and B50 groups. These results indicated that neurotoxin injection induces muscle afferent activity alterations that persist and even worsen when the muscle has recovered his motor activity. PMID:26485650

  3. Type III-IV muscle afferents are not required for steady-state exercise hyperpnea in healthy subjects and patients with COPD or heart failure.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chi-Sang; Song, Gang

    2015-09-15

    Blockade of group III-IV muscle afferents by intrathecal injection of the μ-opioid agonist fentanyl (IF) in humans has been variously reported to depress exercise hyperpnea in some studies but not others. A key unanswered question is whether such an effect is transient or persists in the steady state. Here we show that in healthy subjects undergoing constant-load cycling exercise IF significantly slows the transient exercise ventilatory kinetics but has no discernible effect on the ventilatory response when exercise is sufficiently prolonged. Thus, the ventilatory response to group III-IV muscle afferents input in healthy subjects is not a simple reflex but acts like a high-pass filter with maximum sensitivity during early-phase exercise and is reset in the late phase. In patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) IF causes sustained CO2 retention not only during exercise but also in the resting state, where muscle afferents feedback is minimal. In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), IF also elicits sustained decreases in the exercise ventilatory response but with little or no resultant CO2 retention due to concomitant decreases in physiological VD/VT (dead space-to-ventilation ratio). These results support the proposition that optimal long-term regulation of exercise hyperpnea in health and in disease is determined centrally by the respiratory controller through the continuing adaptation of an internal model which dynamically tracks the metabolic CO2 load and the ventilatory inefficiency 1/1-VD/VT that must be overcome for the maintenance of arterial PCO2 homeostasis, rather than being reflexively driven by group III-IV muscle afferents feedback per se. PMID:25911558

  4. Role played by NaV 1.7 channels on thin-fiber muscle afferents in transmitting the exercise pressor reflex.

    PubMed

    Stone, Audrey J; Copp, Steven W; Kaufman, Marc P

    2015-11-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) 1.7 are highly expressed on the axons of somatic afferent neurons and are thought to play an important role in the signaling of inflammatory pain. NaV 1.7 channels are classified as tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive, meaning that they are blocked by TTX concentrations of less than 300 nM. These findings prompted us to determine in decerebrated, unanesthetized rats, the role played by NaV 1.7 channels in the transmission of muscle afferent input evoking the exercise pressor reflex. We first showed that the exercise pressor reflex, which was evoked by static contraction of the triceps surae muscles, was reversibly attenuated by application of 50 nM TTX, but not 5 nM TTX, to the L4-L5 dorsal roots (control: 21 ± 1 mmHg, TTX: 8 ± 2 mmHg, recovery: 21 ± 3 mmHg; n = 6; P < 0.01). We next found that the peak pressor responses to contraction were significantly attenuated by dorsal root application of 100 nM Ssm6a, a compound that is a selective NaV 1.7 channel inhibitor. Removal of Ssm6a restored the reflex to its control level (control: 19 ± 3 mmHg, Ssm6a: 10 ± 1 mmHg, recovery: 19 ± 4 mmHg; n = 6; P < 0.05). Compound action potentials recorded from the L4 and L5 dorsal roots and evoked by single-pulse stimulation of the sciatic nerve showed that both TTX and Ssm6a attenuated input from group III, as well as group IV afferents. We conclude that NaV 1.7 channels play a role in the thin-fiber muscle afferent pathway evoking the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:26310938

  5. Stable human standing with lower-limb muscle afferents providing the only sensory input.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, R; Rogers, D K; McCloskey, D I

    1994-01-01

    1. This study investigated the sources of sensory information upon which normal subjects' ability to stand depends. 2. An 'equivalent body' was used to simulate the physical properties of each subject's body during standing. The modulation of ankle torque required to support the equivalent body in an upright position was similar to that required to support the subject's own body when standing. However, when balancing the equivalent body, vestibular inputs were excluded from directing the appropriate changes in ankle torque. Thus, stability of stance could be studied with (normal stance) and without (balancing equivalent body) modulation by vestibular inputs. Vision could be excluded by closing the eyes. Sensory input from the feet and ankles could be removed by local anaesthesia from prolonged ischaemia, induced by occluding blood flow with inflated pneumatic cuffs just above the ankles. With vestibular, visual and peripheral sensory inputs negated, standing could rely only upon remaining sensory inputs, notably those from sensory receptors in the leg muscles. 3. Unlike the human body, the equivalent body used to negate vestibular inputs is not segmented. Therefore, the effects on stability of having a segmented body were determined by splinting subjects during standing so that only ankle movement was possible. This was done in the presence and absence of visual stabilization. 4. For each experimental task, either standing or balancing the equivalent body, sway was recorded while posture was unperturbed. Root mean square values of sway amplitude and power spectra were used to compare conditions. 5. Every subject could balance the equivalent body in a stable way when the eyes were closed, and when the feet were anaesthetized.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7869254

  6. Phase relation changes between the firings of alpha and gamma-motoneurons and muscle spindle afferents in the sacral micturition centre during continence functions in brain-dead human and patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Schalow, G

    2010-01-01

    1. Single-nerve fibre action potentials (APs) were recorded with 2 pairs of wire electrodes from lower sacral nerve roots during surgery in patients with spinal cord injury and in a brain-dead human. Conduction velocity distribution histograms were constructed for afferent and efferent fibres, nerve fibre groups were identified and simultaneous impulse patterns of alpha and gamma-motoneurons and secondary muscle spindle afferents (SP2) were constructed. Temporal relations between afferent and efferent APs were analyzed by interspike interval (II) and phase relation changes to explore the coordinated self-organization of somatic and parasympathetic neuronal networks in the sacral micturition centre during continence functions under physiologic (brain-dead) and pathophysiologic conditions (spinal cord injury). 2. In a paraplegic with hyperreflexia of the bladder, urinary bladder stretch (S1) and tension receptor afferents (ST) fired already when the bladder was empty, and showed a several times higher bladder afferent activity increase upon retrograde bladder filling than observed in the brain-dead individual. Two alpha2-motoneurons (FR) innervating the external bladder sphincter were already oscillatory firing to generate high activity levels when the bladder was empty. They showed activity levels with no bladder filling, comparable to those measured at a bladder filling of 600 ml in the brain-dead individual. A bladder storage volume of 600 ml was thus lost in the paraplegic, due to a too high bladder afferent input to the sacral micturition center, secondary to inflammation and hypertrophy of the detrusor. 3. In a brain-dead human, 2 phase relations existed per oscillation period of 160 ms between the APs of a sphincteric oscillatory firing alpha2-motoneuron, a dynamic fusimotor and a secondary muscle spindle afferent fibre. Following stimulation of mainly somatic afferent fibres, the phase relations changed only little. 4. In a paraplegic with dyssynergia of the

  7. Identification of different functional types of spinal afferent neurons innervating the mouse large intestine using a novel CGRPα transgenic reporter mouse.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Timothy J; Kestell, Garreth R; Kyloh, Melinda A; Brookes, Simon J H; Wattchow, David A; Spencer, Nick J

    2016-04-15

    Spinal afferent neurons detect noxious and physiological stimuli in visceral organs. Five functional classes of afferent terminals have been extensively characterized in the colorectum, primarily from axonal recordings. Little is known about the corresponding somata of these classes of afferents, including their morphology, neurochemistry, and electrophysiology. To address this, we made intracellular recordings from somata in L6/S1 dorsal root ganglia and applied intraluminal colonic distensions. A transgenic calcitonin gene-related peptide-α (CGRPα)-mCherry reporter mouse, which enabled rapid identification of soma neurochemistry and morphology following electrophysiological recordings, was developed. Three distinct classes of low-threshold distension-sensitive colorectal afferent neurons were characterized; an additional group was distension-insensitive. Two of three low-threshold classes expressed CGRPα. One class expressing CGRPα discharged phasically, with inflections on the rising phase of their action potentials, at low frequencies, to both physiological (<30 mmHg) and noxious (>30 mmHg) distensions. The second class expressed CGRPα and discharged tonically, with smooth, briefer action potentials and significantly greater distension sensitivity than phasically firing neurons. A third class that lacked CGRPα generated the highest-frequency firing to distension and had smaller somata. Thus, CGRPα expression in colorectal afferents was associated with lower distension sensitivity and firing rates and larger somata, while colorectal afferents that generated the highest firing frequencies to distension had the smallest somata and lacked CGRPα. These data fill significant gaps in our understanding of the different classes of colorectal afferent somata that give rise to distinct functional classes of colorectal afferents. In healthy mice, the majority of sensory neurons that respond to colorectal distension are low-threshold, wide-dynamic-range afferents

  8. Inhibitory mechanisms following electrical stimulation of tendon and cutaneous afferents in the lower limb.

    PubMed

    Khan, Serajul I; Burne, John A

    2010-01-13

    Electrical stimulation of the Achilles tendon (TES) produced strong reflex depression (duration>250 ms) of a small background contraction in both heads of gastrocnemius (GA) via large diameter electrodes localized to the tendon. The inhibitory responses were produced without electrical (M wave) or mechanical (muscle twitch) signs of direct muscle stimulation. In this study, the contribution of presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms to the depression was investigated by studying conditioning effects of tendon afferent stimulation on the mechanical tendon reflex (TR) and magnetic motor evoked potential (MEP). TES completely inhibited the TR over an ISI of 300 ms that commenced before and continued during and after the period of voluntary EMG depression. Tendon afferent conditioning stimuli also partially inhibited the MEP, but over a short time course confined to the period of voluntary EMG depression. The strength and extended time course of tendon afferent conditioning of the TR and its failure to produce a similar depression of the MEP are consistent with a mechanism involving presynaptic inhibition of Ia terminals. Cutaneous (sural nerve) afferent conditioning partially inhibited the TR and MEP over a short time course (ISI <100 ms) resembling the inhibition seen in the voluntary EMG. This was consistent with the postsynaptic origin of cutaneous inhibition of the motoneurons. PMID:19850015

  9. Afferent innervation patterns of the saccule in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakir, M.; Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The innervation patterns of vestibular saccular afferents were quantitatively investigated in pigeons using biotinylated dextran amine as a neural tracer and three-dimensional computer reconstruction. Type I hair cells were found throughout a large portion of the macula, with the highest density observed in the striola. Type II hair cells were located throughout the macula, with the highest density in the extrastriola. Three classes of afferent innervation patterns were observed, including calyx, dimorph, and bouton units, with 137 afferents being anatomically reconstructed and used for quantitative comparisons. Calyx afferents were located primarily in the striola, innervated a number of type I hair cells, and had small innervation areas. Most calyx afferent terminal fields were oriented parallel to the anterior-posterior axis and the morphological polarization reversal line. Dimorph afferents were located throughout the macula, contained fewer type I hair cells in a calyceal terminal than calyx afferents and had medium sized innervation areas. Bouton afferents were restricted to the extrastriola, with multi-branching fibers and large innervation areas. Most of the dimorph and bouton afferents had innervation fields that were oriented dorso-ventrally but were parallel to the neighboring reversal line. The organizational morphology of the saccule was found to be distinctly different from that of the avian utricle or lagena otolith organs and appears to represent a receptor organ undergoing evolutionary adaptation toward sensing linear motion in terrestrial and aerial species.

  10. Identification and properties of parietal pleural afferents in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Jammes, Yves; Trousse, Delphine; Delpierre, Stéphane

    2005-01-01

    Although pain and dyspnoea are common symptoms in pleural diseases, there are few studies on the sensory innervation of the pleura. Using rabbits, after removal of all muscles in the intercostal space to be studied, we investigated the afferents of the internal intercostal nerve by applying to the internal thoracic wall pieces of gauze soaked in warmed (37°C), buffered saline (mechanical stimulation) or solutions containing lactic acid, inflammatory mediators or capsaicin (chemical stimulation). The afferent conduction velocity ranged from 0.5 to 14 m s−1. Most units (97%) were activated by mechanical stimulation of the pleura (local positive pressure range = 4.5–8.5 cmH2O) and we found a linear relationship between the discharge rate of afferents and the force applied to the thoracic wall. The majority of mechanosensitive units (70%) also responded to one or several chemical agents. Thus, the afferents were activated by lactic acid (49%) and/or a mixture of inflammatory mediators (50%). Local application of capsaicin elicited an initial increased or decreased background afferent activity in 57% of the afferents, a delayed decrease in firing rate being noted in some units initially activated by capsaicin. Capsaicin blocked the afferent response to a further application of inflammatory mediators but did not affect the mechanosensitive units. Thus, sensory endings connected with thin myelinated and unmyelinated fibres in the internal intercostal nerve detect the mechanical and chemical events of pleural diseases. PMID:15975985

  11. Vertical Rectus Muscles Transposition in Large Exotropia with Medial Rectus Muscle Transection Following Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoonae A.; Rah, Sang Hoon; Kim, Myung Mi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of transposition procedures on the vertical rectus muscle (VRM) in the patients who underwent a medial rectus muscle (MR) transection after endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). Methods In 4 patients with exotropia (XT) and a lack of adduction after ESS, orbital CT or MRI revealed a complete transection of the midportion of the MR. Full-tendon VRM transposition was performed within 3 months after injury (early surgery) in 2 patients with 40Δ XT. Two patients with 70Δ and 85Δ XT underwent an X-type augmented Hümmelsheim procedure, which involved pulling each half-tendon and crossing it through the undersurface of the severed MR to the other end of the MR insertion, concurrently with an ipsilateral lateral rectus (LR) recession 11 months and 36 months after ESS, respectively. The adduction deficits were divided into -1 through to -8. The patients were followed up for more than than 1.5 years. Results Postoperatively, 3 patients showed orthophoria and no diplopia in the primary position. The adduction deficits improved to -3.5 or -4. One patient who underwent an X-type augmented Hümmelsheim procedure showed a residual XT of 25Δ. Conclusions VRM transposition is effective in correcting a large XT secondary to a MR transection after ESS. When a longstanding large-angle XT with severe contracture of the ipsilateral LR and massive scarring of the adjacent tissues is present, the X-type augmented Hümmelsheim procedure coupled with an ipsilateral LR recession had an augmenting effect. PMID:18612228

  12. Blockage of vibrissae afferents: I. Motor effects.

    PubMed

    Prchal, A; Albarracín, A L; Décima, E E

    2004-02-01

    In the past, it has been proposed that the rat vibrissae play an important role in other hand, postural abnormalities, muscle tone decreases and hypomotility after sensory organ destructions were proposed as evidence supporting the "level setting" or "tonic" hypothesis. This hypothesis postulates that afferent activity, besides its well know transductive functions, sets the excitability state of the central nervous system. We thought the vibrissal system to be a good model to dissect these two postulated roles because vibrissae trimming would annul the transductive function without affecting the integrity of nerve activity. Thus we compare the effects of trimming the whiskers with blocking the vibrissal afferent nerves on two types of motor behavior: activity in an open field and walking over a rope connecting two elevated platforms. We found that only vibrissal afferent blockage (both nerve section and local anaesthesia) produced severe failures in the motor performances studied. These effects could not be fully explained by the abolition of the vibrissae as a sensory modality because cutting the whiskers did not significantly affect the motor performance. These data are discussed in reference to a tonic or general excitatory function of sensory inputs upon the central nervous system. PMID:15143620

  13. Integrative transcriptomics and proteomics analysis of longissimus dorsi muscles of Canadian double-muscled Large White pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuqin; Han, Wenpeng; Jiang, Shunyan; Zhao, Chunjiang; Wu, Changxin

    2016-02-10

    Canadian double-muscled Large White pigs are characterized by notable muscle mass, showing high daily gain and lean rate and good meat quality. In order to identify the major genes or proteins involved in muscle hyperplasia and hypertrophy, three pairs of full-sib pigs with extreme muscle mass difference from Canadian Large White were selected as experimental animals at 3 months age. The phenotypic differences of longissimus dorsi muscles (LD) were investigated with microarray and proteomics (2-DE, MALDI-TOF-MS), and results were verified by real-time PCR and western bolting respectively. The gene expressing profiling identified 57 and 260 and 147 differently expressed genes (DEGs) from the three pairs respectively with Bayesian statistics and significant analysis of microarrays (SAM) (p<0.05, q<0.05, fold>2). From the network of these DEGs, some major genes were displayed, such as EGF, PPARG, FN1, SERPINE1, MYC, JUN, involved in Wnt, MAPK and TGF-β signal pathway respectively, which mainly participated in cell differentiation and proliferation. In parallel, proteomics analyses revealed 50 differently expressed protein (DEP) spots with mass spectrum, and 33 spots of them were found annotated, which took part in energy metabolism and the structure and contraction of muscle fiber. In brief, our integrated study provides a good foundation for the further study on the genetic mechanism of the double muscle traits in pigs. PMID:26602029

  14. Contractile properties of afferent and efferent arterioles.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Abe, K

    1997-07-01

    1. The balance of vascular tone of the afferent and efferent arteriole is a crucial determinant of glomerular haemodynamics. Despite their intimate anatomical relationship in the juxtaglomerular apparatus, the mechanisms that regulate afferent and efferent arteriolar tone are different. 2. In the afferent arteriole, two intrinsic mechanisms, the myogenic response and macula densa-mediated tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) play a dominant role, maintaining the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at a constant level over a wide range of renal perfusion pressure. Studies have shown that these two mechanisms are modulated by nitric oxide (NO). In addition, an interaction between TGF and angiotensin II (AngII) seems to be essential to maintaining GFR despite large variations in daily intake of salt and water. 3. In the efferent arteriole, neither myogenic response nor TGF seems to be important, while AngII is one major factor involved in the control of vascular resistance. In addition, recent studies have provided evidence that NO and prostaglandins produced by the glomerulus may control resistance of the downstream efferent arteriole. 4. As the early segment of the efferent arteriole resides within the glomerulus, various autacoid hormones produced by the glomerulus may reach and directly act on this segment, thereby controlling the glomerular capillary pressure. Thus, it would be important to understand the differences in the mechanisms operating at the afferent and efferent arteriole, as well as their alterations in various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:9248673

  15. Large conducting potassium channel reconstituted from airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Savaria, D; Lanoue, C; Cadieux, A; Rousseau, E

    1992-03-01

    Microsomal fractions were prepared from canine and bovine airway smooth muscle (ASM) by differential and gradient centrifugations. Surface membrane vesicles were characterized by binding assays and incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. Single-channel activities were recorded in symmetric or asymmetric K+ buffer systems and studied under voltage and Ca2+ clamp conditions. A large-conductance K(+)-selective channel (greater than 220 pS in 150 mM K+) displaying a high Ca2+, low Ba2+, and charybdotoxin (CTX) sensitivity was identified. Time analysis of single-channel recordings revealed a complex kinetic behavior compatible with the previous schemes proposed for Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels in a variety of biological surface membranes. We now report that the open probability of the channel at low Ca2+ concentration is enhanced on in vitro phosphorylation, which is mediated via an adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate-dependent protein kinase. In addition to this characterization at the molecular level, a second series of pharmacological experiments were designed to assess the putative role of this channel in ASM strips. Our results show that 50 nM CTX, a specific inhibitor of the large conducting Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channel, prevents norepinephrine transient relaxation on carbamylcholine-precontracted ASM strips. It was also shown that CTX reversed the steady-state relaxation induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide and partially antagonized further relaxation induced by cumulative doses of this potent bronchodilatator. Thus it is proposed that the Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels have a physiological role because they are indirectly activated on stimulation of various membrane receptors via intracellular mechanisms. PMID:1372487

  16. A predictive model of muscle excitations based on muscle modularity for a large repertoire of human locomotion conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Vargas, Jose; Sartori, Massimo; Dosen, Strahinja; Torricelli, Diego; Pons, Jose L.; Farina, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Humans can efficiently walk across a large variety of terrains and locomotion conditions with little or no mental effort. It has been hypothesized that the nervous system simplifies neuromuscular control by using muscle synergies, thus organizing multi-muscle activity into a small number of coordinative co-activation modules. In the present study we investigated how muscle modularity is structured across a large repertoire of locomotion conditions including five different speeds and five different ground elevations. For this we have used the non-negative matrix factorization technique in order to explain EMG experimental data with a low-dimensional set of four motor components. In this context each motor components is composed of a non-negative factor and the associated muscle weightings. Furthermore, we have investigated if the proposed descriptive analysis of muscle modularity could be translated into a predictive model that could: (1) Estimate how motor components modulate across locomotion speeds and ground elevations. This implies not only estimating the non-negative factors temporal characteristics, but also the associated muscle weighting variations. (2) Estimate how the resulting muscle excitations modulate across novel locomotion conditions and subjects. The results showed three major distinctive features of muscle modularity: (1) the number of motor components was preserved across all locomotion conditions, (2) the non-negative factors were consistent in shape and timing across all locomotion conditions, and (3) the muscle weightings were modulated as distinctive functions of locomotion speed and ground elevation. Results also showed that the developed predictive model was able to reproduce well the muscle modularity of un-modeled data, i.e., novel subjects and conditions. Muscle weightings were reconstructed with a cross-correlation factor greater than 70% and a root mean square error less than 0.10. Furthermore, the generated muscle excitations matched

  17. Unmyelinated type II afferent neurons report cochlear damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Glowatzki, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Paul Albert

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian cochlea, acoustic information is carried to the brain by the predominant (95%) large-diameter, myelinated type I afferents, each of which is postsynaptic to a single inner hair cell. The remaining thin, unmyelinated type II afferents extend hundreds of microns along the cochlear duct to contact many outer hair cells. Despite this extensive arbor, type II afferents are weakly activated by outer hair cell transmitter release and are insensitive to sound. Intriguingly, type II afferents remain intact in damaged regions of the cochlea. Here, we show that type II afferents are activated when outer hair cells are damaged. This response depends on both ionotropic (P2X) and metabotropic (P2Y) purinergic receptors, binding ATP released from nearby supporting cells in response to hair cell damage. Selective activation of P2Y receptors increased type II afferent excitability by the closure of KCNQ-type potassium channels, a potential mechanism for the painful hypersensitivity (that we term “noxacusis” to distinguish from hyperacusis without pain) that can accompany hearing loss. Exposure to the KCNQ channel activator retigabine suppressed the type II fiber’s response to hair cell damage. Type II afferents may be the cochlea’s nociceptors, prompting avoidance of further damage to the irreparable inner ear. PMID:26553995

  18. Contribution of vagal afferents to respiratory reflexes evoked by acute inhalation of ozone in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Schelegle, E.S.; Carl, M.L.; Coleridge, H.M.; Coleridge, J.C.; Green, J.F. )

    1993-05-01

    Acute inhalation of ozone induces vagally mediated rapid shallow breathing and bronchoconstriction. In spontaneously breathing anesthetized dogs, we attempted to determine whether afferent vagal C-fibers in the lower airways contributed to these responses. Dogs inhaled 3 ppm ozone for 40-70 min into the lower trachea while cervical vagal temperature was maintained successively at 37, 7, and 0 degrees C. At 37 degrees C, addition of ozone to the inspired air decreased tidal volume and dynamic lung compliance and increased breathing frequency, total lung resistance, and tracheal smooth muscle tension. Ozone still evoked significant effects when conduction in myelinated vagal axons was blocked selectively by cooling the nerves to 7 degrees C. Ozone-induced effects were largely abolished when nonmyelinated vagal axons were blocked by cooling to 0 degree C, breathing during ozone inhalation at 0 degree C being generally similar to that during air breathing at 0 degree C, except that minute volume and inspiratory flow were higher. We conclude that afferent vagal C-fibers in the lower airways make a major contribution to the acute respiratory effects of ozone and that nonvagal afferents contribute to the effects that survive vagal blockade.

  19. Blockade of B2 receptors attenuates the responses of group III afferents to static contraction.

    PubMed

    Leal, Anna K; Stone, Audrey J; Yamauchi, Katsuya; McCord, Jennifer L; Kaufman, Marc P

    2013-10-25

    Recent evidence has been presented demonstrating that group III mechanoreceptors comprise an important part of the sensory arm of the exercise pressor reflex, which in turn functions to increase arterial blood flow to contracting skeletal muscles. Although group III afferents are stimulated by mechanical distortion of their receptive fields, they are also stimulated by bradykinin, which is produced by skeletal muscle when it contracts. Moreover, blockade of B (bradykinin)2 receptors has been shown to decrease the magnitude of the exercise pressor reflex. Nevertheless, the effect of blockade of B2 receptors on responses of group III afferents to contraction is not known. We therefore determined the effect of B2 receptor blockade with HOE 140 (40μg/kg) on the responses to both static and intermittent contraction of group III afferents with endings in the triceps surae muscle of decerebrated unanesthetized cats. We found that HOE 140 significantly attenuated (P=0.04) the responses of 14 group III afferents to static contraction, but did not significantly attenuate (P=0.16) the responses of 16 group III afferents to intermittent contraction. The attenuation induced by HOE 140 was present throughout the static contraction period, and led us to speculate that blockade of B2 receptors on the endings of group III afferents decreased their sensitivity to mechanical events occurring in the working muscles. PMID:24036460

  20. Purinergic 2 receptor blockade prevents the responses of group IV afferents to post-contraction circulatory occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kindig, Angela E; Hayes, Shawn G; Kaufman, Marc P

    2007-01-01

    ATP, by activating purinergic 2 (P2) receptors on group III and IV afferents, is thought to evoke the metabolic component of the exercise pressor reflex. Previously we have shown that injection of PPADS, a P2 receptor antagonist, into the arterial supply of skeletal muscle of decerebrated cats attenuated the responses of group III and IV afferents to static contraction while the muscles were freely perfused. We have now tested the hypothesis that injection of PPADS (10 mg kg−1) attenuated the responses of group III (n = 13) and group IV afferents (n = 9) to post-contraction circulatory occlusion. In the present study, we found that PPADS attenuated the group III afferent responses to static contraction during circulatory occlusion (P < 0.05). Likewise, PPADS abolished the group IV afferent responses to static contraction during occlusion (P = 0.001). During a 1 minute period of post-contraction circulatory occlusion, four of the 13 group III afferents and eight of the nine group IV afferents maintained their increased discharge. A Fischer's exact probability test revealed that more group IV afferents than group III afferents were stimulated by post-contraction circulatory occlusion (P < 0.02). In addition, the nine group IV afferents increased their mean discharge rate over baseline levels during the post-contraction circulatory occlusion period, whereas the 13 group III afferents did not (P < 0.05). PPADS abolished this post-contraction increase in discharge by the group IV afferents (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that P2 receptors on group IV afferents play a role in evoking the metabolic component of the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:17038431

  1. Large fiber size in skeletal muscle is metabolically advantageous

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Dillaman, Richard M.; Kinsey, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fiber size is highly variable, and while diffusion appears to limit maximal fiber size, there is no paradigm for the control of minimal size. The optimal fiber size hypothesis posits that the reduced surface area to volume (SA:V) in larger fibers reduces the metabolic cost of maintaining the membrane potential, and so fibers attain an optimal size that minimizes metabolic cost while avoiding diffusion limitation. Here we examine changes during hypertrophic fiber growth in metabolic cost and activity of the Na+-K+-ATPase in white skeletal muscle from crustaceans and fishes. We provide evidence for a major tenet of the optimal fiber size hypothesis by demonstrating that larger fibers are metabolically cheaper to maintain, and the cost of maintaining the membrane potential is proportional to fiber SA:V. The influence of SA:V on metabolic cost is apparent during growth in 16 species spanning a 20-fold range in fiber size, suggesting that this principle may apply widely. PMID:23851638

  2. Increasing cutaneous afferent feedback improves proprioceptive accuracy at the knee in patients with sensory ataxia.

    PubMed

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Goulding, Niamh; Palma, Jose-Alberto; Fuente Mora, Cristina; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type III (HSAN III) features disturbed proprioception and a marked ataxic gait. We recently showed that joint angle matching error at the knee is positively correlated with the degree of ataxia. Using intraneural microelectrodes, we also documented that these patients lack functional muscle spindle afferents but have preserved large-diameter cutaneous afferents, suggesting that patients with better proprioception may be relying more on proprioceptive cues provided by tactile afferents. We tested the hypothesis that enhancing cutaneous sensory feedback by stretching the skin at the knee joint using unidirectional elasticity tape could improve proprioceptive accuracy in patients with a congenital absence of functional muscle spindles. Passive joint angle matching at the knee was used to assess proprioceptive accuracy in 25 patients with HSAN III and 9 age-matched control subjects, with and without taping. Angles of the reference and indicator knees were recorded with digital inclinometers and the absolute error, gradient, and correlation coefficient between the two sides calculated. Patients with HSAN III performed poorly on the joint angle matching test [mean matching error 8.0 ± 0.8° (±SE); controls 3.0 ± 0.3°]. Following application of tape bilaterally to the knee in an X-shaped pattern, proprioceptive performance improved significantly in the patients (mean error 5.4 ± 0.7°) but not in the controls (3.0 ± 0.2°). Across patients, but not controls, significant increases in gradient and correlation coefficient were also apparent following taping. We conclude that taping improves proprioception at the knee in HSAN III, presumably via enhanced sensory feedback from the skin. PMID:26655817

  3. Afferent innervation of the utricular macula in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, Xiaohong; Zakir, Mridha Md; Dickman, J. David

    2003-01-01

    Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was used to retrogradely label afferents innervating the utricular macula in adult pigeons. The pigeon utriclar macula consists of a large rectangular-shaped neuroepithelium with a dorsally curved anterior edge and an extended medioposterior tail. The macula could be demarcated into several regions based on cytoarchitectural differences. The striola occupied 30% of the macula and contained a large density of type I hair cells with fewer type II hair cells. Medial and lateral extrastriola zones were located outside the striola and contained only type II hair cells. A six- to eight-cell-wide band of type II hair cells existed near the center of the striola. The reversal line marked by the morphological polarization of hair cells coursed throughout the epithelium, near the peripheral margin, and through the center of the type II band. Calyx afferents innervated type I hair cells with calyceal terminals that contained between 2 and 15 receptor cells. Calyx afferents were located only in the striola region, exclusive of the type II band, had small total fiber innervation areas and low innervation densities. Dimorph afferents innervated both type I and type II hair cells with calyceal and bouton terminals and were primarily located in the striola region. Dimorph afferents had smaller calyceal terminals with few type I hair cells, extended fiber branches with bouton terminals and larger innervation areas. Bouton afferents innervated only type II hair cells in the extrastriola and type II band regions. Bouton afferents innervating the type II band had smaller terminal fields with fewer bouton terminals and smaller innervation areas than fibers located in the extrastriolar zones. Bouton afferents had the most bouton terminals on the longest fibers, the largest innervation areas with the highest innervation densities of all afferents. Among all afferents, smaller terminal innervation fields were observed in the striola and large fields were

  4. Transgenic Overexpression of LARGE Induces α-Dystroglycan Hyperglycosylation in Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Paul S.; Liu, Ke; Cirak, Sebahattin; Brown, Susan C.; Wells, Dominic J.; Muntoni, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Background LARGE is one of seven putative or demonstrated glycosyltransferase enzymes defective in a common group of muscular dystrophies with reduced glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. Overexpression of LARGE induces hyperglycosylation of α-dystroglycan in both wild type and in cells from dystroglycanopathy patients, irrespective of their primary gene defect, restoring functional glycosylation. Viral delivery of LARGE to skeletal muscle in animal models of dystroglycanopathy has identical effects in vivo, suggesting that the restoration of functional glycosylation could have therapeutic applications in these disorders. Pharmacological strategies to upregulate Large expression are also being explored. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to asses the safety and efficacy of long term LARGE over-expression in vivo, we have generated four mouse lines expressing a human LARGE transgene. On observation, LARGE transgenic mice were indistinguishable from the wild type littermates. Tissue analysis from young mice of all four lines showed a variable pattern of transgene expression: highest in skeletal and cardiac muscles, and lower in brain, kidney and liver. Transgene expression in striated muscles correlated with α-dystroglycan hyperglycosylation, as determined by immunoreactivity to antibody IIH6 and increased laminin binding on an overlay assay. Other components of the dystroglycan complex and extracellular matrix ligands were normally expressed, and general muscle histology was indistinguishable from wild type controls. Further detailed muscle physiological analysis demonstrated a loss of force in response to eccentric exercise in the older, but not in the younger mice, suggesting this deficit developed over time. However this remained a subclinical feature as no pathology was observed in older mice in any muscles including the diaphragm, which is sensitive to mechanical load-induced damage. Conclusions/Significance This work shows that potential therapies in the

  5. Interdependency between mechanical parameters and afferent nerve discharge in hypertrophic intestine of rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Zhao, Jingbo; Chen, Pengmin; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Grundy, David; Gregersen, Hans

    2016-03-15

    Partial intestinal obstruction causes smooth muscle hypertrophy, enteric neuronal plasticity, motility disorders, and biomechanical remodeling. In this study we characterized the stimulus-response function of afferent fibers innervating the partially obstructed jejunum. A key question is whether changes in afferent firing arise from remodeled mechanical tissue properties or from adaptive afferent processes. Partial obstruction was created by placing a polyethylene ring for 2 wk in jejunum of seven rats. Sham obstruction was made in six rats and seven rats served as normal controls. Firing from mesenteric afferent nerve bundles was recorded during mechanical ramp, relaxation, and creep tests. Stress-strain, spike rate increase ratio (SRIR), and firing rate in single units were assessed for evaluation of interdependency of the mechanical stimulations, histomorphometry data, and afferent nerve discharge. Partial intestinal obstruction resulted in hypertrophy and jejunal stiffening proximal to the obstruction site. Low SRIR at low strains during fast distension and at high stresses during slow distension was found in the obstructed rats. Single unit analysis showed increased proportion of mechanosensitive units but absent high-threshold (HT) units during slow stimulation, decreased number of HT units during fast stimulation, and shift from HT sensitivity towards low threshold sensitivity in the obstructed jejunum. Biomechanical remodeling and altered afferent response to mechanical stimulations were found in the obstructed jejunum. Afferents from obstructed jejunum preserved their function in encoding ongoing mechanical stimulation but showed changes in their responsiveness. The findings support that mechanical factors rather than adaption are important for afferent remodeling. PMID:26585414

  6. Electrophysiological Properties of Dural Afferents in the Absence and Presence of Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Harriott, Andrea M.; Gold, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Migraine is a debilitating condition characterized by recurrent severe head pain. Although mechanisms underlying a migraine attack remain controversial, one proposal is that inflammatory mediator (IM)–induced activation and sensitization of dural afferents contribute to the initiation of migraine pain. We and others have shown that the electrophysiological properties of afferents, both in the absence and the presence of IM, vary as a function of target of innervation. These differences may account for unique aspects of pain syndromes associated with specific body regions. Therefore the purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the electrophysiological properties of dural afferents differ from those innervating the temporalis muscle (TM), a structure in close proximity to the dura but that is not associated with pain syndromes at all similar to migraine. Acutely dissociated retrograde labeled primary afferents innervating the dura and TM were examined with whole cell current-clamp recordings. Passive and active electrophysiological properties were determined before and after the application of IM: (in μM) prostaglandin E2 (1), bradykinin (10), and histamine (1). In the absence of IM, there were significant differences between the two populations, particularly with respect to the response to suprathreshold stimulation where dural afferents were more excitable than TM afferents. Importantly, although both populations of afferents were sensitized by IM, the pattern of passive and active electrophysiological changes associated with IM-induced sensitization of these two populations of afferents suggested that there were both similarities and marked differences between the two with respect to underlying mechanisms of sensitization. If the differences between dural and TM afferents are due to a differential pattern of ion channel expression rather than differences in the relative density/biophysical properties of the same ion channels, it may be

  7. Peripheral innervation patterns of vestibular nerve afferents in the bullfrog utriculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1994-01-01

    Vestibular nerve afferents innervating the bullfrog utriculus differ in their response dynamics and sensitivity to natural stimulation. They also supply hair cells that differ markedly in hair bundle morphology. To examine the peripheral innervation patterns of individual utricular afferents more closely, afferent fibers were labeled by the extracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the vestibular nerve after sectioning the vestibular nerve medial to Scarpa's ganglion to allow the degeneration of sympathetic and efferent fibers. The peripheral arborizations of individual afferents were then correlated with the diameters of their parent axons, the regions of the macula they innervate, and the number and type of hair cells they supply. The utriculus is divided by the striola, a narrow zone of distinctive morphology, into media and lateral parts. Utiricular afferents were classified as striolar or extrastriolar according to the epithelial entrance of their parent axons and the location of their terminal fields. In general, striolar afferents had thicker parent axons, fewer subepithelial bifurcations, larger terminal fields, and more synaptic endings than afferents in extrstriolar regions. Afferents in a juxtastriolar zone, immediately adjacent to the medial striola, had innervation patterns transitional between those in the striola and more peripheral parts of the medial extrastriola. moast afferents innervated only a single macular zone. The terminal fields of striolar afferents, with the notable exception of a few afferents with thin parent axons, were generally confined to one side of the striola. Hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus have perviously been classified into four types based on hair bundle morphology. Afferents in the extrastriolar and juxtastriolar zones largely or exclusively innervated Type B hair cells, the predominant hair cell type in the utricular macula. Striolar afferents supplied a mixture of four hair cell types, but largely

  8. RNA-seq transcriptome analysis of extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles in large white pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiayu; Shi, Xin'e; Lu, Hongzhao; Xia, Bo; Li, Yuefeng; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Qiangling; Yang, Gongshe

    2016-04-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers are mainly categorized into red and white fiber types, and the ratio of red/white fibers within muscle mass plays a crucial role in meat quality such as tenderness and flavor. To better understand the molecular difference between the two muscle fibers, this study takes advantage of RNA-seq to compare differences in the transcriptome between extensor digitorum longus (EDL; white fiber) and soleus (Sol; red fiber) muscles of large white pigs. In total, 89,658,562 and 46,723,568 raw reads from EDL and Sol were generated, respectively. Comparison between the two transcriptomes revealed 561 differentially expressed genes, with 408 displaying higher and 153 lower levels of expression in Sol. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction validated the differential expression of nine genes. Gene ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis discovered several differentially enriched biological functions and processes of the two muscles. Moreover, transcriptome comparison between EDL and Sol identified many muscle-related genes (CSRP3, ACTN2, MYL1, and MYH6) and pathways related to myofiber formation, such as focal adhesion, tight junction formation, extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor pathway, calcium signaling, and Wnt signaling. In addition, 58,362 and 58,359 single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in EDL and Sol, respectively, and the sequence of 9069 genes was refined at the 5', 3' or both ends. Numerous novel transcripts and alternatively spliced RNAs were also identified. Our transcriptome analysis constitutes valuable sequence resource for uncovering important genes and pathways involved in muscle fiber type determination, and might help further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms in different types of muscle. PMID:26520103

  9. Comparative Analysis on Antioxidative Ability of Muscle between Laiwu Pig and Large White.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Zhu, Hong-Lei; Shi, Yuan; Zhao, Meng-Meng; Wang, Hui; Zeng, Yong-Qing

    2012-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate effects of storage temperatures (4°C and 20°C) and pig breeds (Laiwu pig and Large White pig) on the main antioxidative enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) activity and lipid oxidation in porcine Longissimus dorsi muscle. Activities of antioxidative enzymes (AOE) decreased slightly during storage, regardless of storage temperatures. Muscle antioxidative enzymes activities stored at 4°C were higher than that stored at 20°C. Laiwu pig's enzymes activities were significantly (p<0.01) higher than Large White's. The level of malondialdehyde is a direct expression of the grade of lipid oxidation in meat. In our study, the malondialdehyde contents increased after 6 days storage. However, malondialdehyde contents of Laiwu pig were significantly (p<0.01) lower than Large White's. A lower content of malondialdehyde corresponds to a lower oxidation of lipids. These results indicated the muscle antioxidative ability of Laiwu pig was higher than Large White pig. It also implied that antioxidative enzymes were involved in the essentials and deciding mechanisms of meat quality by quenching oxygen free radicals and inhibiting lipid oxidation in muscle. PMID:25049680

  10. Comparative Analysis on Antioxidative Ability of Muscle between Laiwu Pig and Large White

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Zhu, Hong-Lei; Shi, Yuan; Zhao, Meng-Meng; Wang, Hui; Zeng, Yong-Qing

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate effects of storage temperatures (4°C and 20°C) and pig breeds (Laiwu pig and Large White pig) on the main antioxidative enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) activity and lipid oxidation in porcine Longissimus dorsi muscle. Activities of antioxidative enzymes (AOE) decreased slightly during storage, regardless of storage temperatures. Muscle antioxidative enzymes activities stored at 4°C were higher than that stored at 20°C. Laiwu pig’s enzymes activities were significantly (p<0.01) higher than Large White’s. The level of malondialdehyde is a direct expression of the grade of lipid oxidation in meat. In our study, the malondialdehyde contents increased after 6 days storage. However, malondialdehyde contents of Laiwu pig were significantly (p<0.01) lower than Large White’s. A lower content of malondialdehyde corresponds to a lower oxidation of lipids. These results indicated the muscle antioxidative ability of Laiwu pig was higher than Large White pig. It also implied that antioxidative enzymes were involved in the essentials and deciding mechanisms of meat quality by quenching oxygen free radicals and inhibiting lipid oxidation in muscle. PMID:25049680

  11. Utricular afferents: morphology of peripheral terminals

    PubMed Central

    Huwe, J. A.; Logan, G. J.; Williams, B.; Rowe, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    The utricle provides critical information about spatiotemporal properties of head movement. It comprises multiple subdivisions whose functional roles are poorly understood. We previously identified four subdivisions in turtle utricle, based on hair bundle structure and mechanics, otoconial membrane structure and hair bundle coupling, and immunoreactivity to calcium-binding proteins. Here we ask whether these macular subdivisions are innervated by distinctive populations of afferents to help us understand the role each subdivision plays in signaling head movements. We quantified the morphology of 173 afferents and identified six afferent classes, which differ in structure and macular locus. Calyceal and dimorphic afferents innervate one striolar band. Bouton afferents innervate a second striolar band; they have elongated terminals and the thickest processes and axons of all bouton units. Bouton afferents in lateral (LES) and medial (MES) extrastriolae have small-diameter axons but differ in collecting area, bouton number, and hair cell contacts (LES >> MES). A fourth, distinctive population of bouton afferents supplies the juxtastriola. These results, combined with our earlier findings on utricular hair cells and the otoconial membrane, suggest the hypotheses that MES and calyceal afferents encode head movement direction with high spatial resolution and that MES afferents are well suited to signal three-dimensional head orientation and striolar afferents to signal head movement onset. PMID:25632074

  12. Explosive development of pectoral muscle fibres in large juvenile blue catfish Ictalurus furcatus.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, S; Fine, M L

    2015-11-01

    As part of an effort on scaling of pectoral spines and muscles, the basis for growth was examined in six pectoral muscles in juvenile blue catfish Ictalurus furcatus, the largest catfish in North America. Fibre number increases slowly in fish from 13.0 to 26.4 cm in total length, doubles by 27.0 cm and remains stable in larger individuals. Simultaneously, mean fibre diameter decreases by half, caused by the addition of new small fibres, before increasing non-linearly in larger fish. The orders of magnitude disparity between the size at hatching and the size of large adults may have selected for rapid muscle fibre addition at a threshold size. PMID:26399583

  13. Endoscopic management of afferent loop syndrome after a pylorus preserving pancreatoduodenecotomy presenting with obstructive jaundice and ascending cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Kyung; Park, Chan Hyuk; Huh, Ji Hye; Park, Jeong Youp; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Chung, Jaebock; Bang, Seungmin

    2011-09-01

    Afferent loop syndrome is a rare complication of gastrojejunostomy. Patients usually present with abdominal distention and bilious vomiting. Afferent loop syndrome in patients who have undergone a pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy can present with ascending cholangitis. This condition is related to a large volume of reflux through the biliary-enteric anastomosis and static materials with bacterial overgrowth in the afferent loop. Patients with afferent loop syndrome after pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy frequently cannot be confirmed as surgical candidates due to poor medical condition. In that situation, a non-surgical palliation should be considered. Herein, we report two patients with afferent loop syndrome presenting with obstructive jaundice and ascending cholangitis. The patients suffered from the recurrence of pancreatic cancer after pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The diagnosis of afferent loop syndrome was confirmed, and the patients were successfully treated by inserting an endoscopic metal stent using a colonoscopic endoscope. PMID:22741115

  14. Neck afferent involvement in cardiovascular control during movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, P. S.; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    It is well established that labyrinth and neck afferent information contributes to the regulation of somatomotor function during movement and changes in posture. There is also convincing evidence that the vestibular system participates in the modulation of sympathetic outflow and cardiovascular function during changes in posture, presumably to prevent orthostatic hypotension. However, the labyrinth organs do not provide any signals concerning body movements with respect to the head. In contrast, the neck receptors, particularly muscle spindles, are well located and suited to provide information about changes in body position with respect to the head and vestibular signals. Studies in the cat suggest that neck afferent information may modulate the vestibulosympathetic reflex responses to head-neck movements. There is some evidence in the cat to suggest involvement of low threshold mechanoreceptors. However, human studies do not indicate that low threshold mechanoreceptors in the neck modulate cardiovascular responses. The human studies are consistent with the studies in the cat in that they demonstrate the importance of otolith activation in mediating cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to changes in posture. This paper briefly reviews the current experimental evidence concerning the involvement of neck afferent information in the modulation of cardiovascular control during movement and changes in posture.

  15. Comparative Analyses between Skeletal Muscle miRNAomes from Large White and Min Pigs Revealed MicroRNAs Associated with Postnatal Muscle Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Hemin; Wang, Lixian; Qi, Xiaolong; Xing, Shuhan; Guo, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs) that underlies postnatal hypertrophy of skeletal muscle is complex and remains unclear. Here, the miRNAomes of longissimus dorsi muscle collected at five postnatal stages (60, 120, 150, 180, and 210 days after birth) from Large White (commercial breed) and Min pigs (indigenous breed of China) were analyzed by Illumina sequencing. We identified 734 miRNAs comprising 308 annotated miRNAs and 426 novel miRNAs, of which 307 could be considered pig-specific. Comparative analysis between two breeds suggested that 60 and 120 days after birth were important stages for skeletal muscle hypertrophy and intramuscular fat accumulation. A total of 263 miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between two breeds at one or more developmental stages. In addition, the differentially expressed miRNAs between every two adjacent developmental stages in each breed were determined. Notably, ssc-miR-204 was significantly more highly expressed in Min pig skeletal muscle at all postnatal stages compared with its expression in Large White pig skeletal muscle. Based on gene ontology and KEGG pathway analyses of its predicted target genes, we concluded that ssc-miR-204 may exert an impact on postnatal hypertrophy of skeletal muscle by regulating myoblast proliferation. The results of this study will help in elucidating the mechanism underlying postnatal hypertrophy of skeletal muscle modulated by miRNAs, which could provide valuable information for improvement of pork quality and human myopathy. PMID:27253583

  16. Comparative Analyses between Skeletal Muscle miRNAomes from Large White and Min Pigs Revealed MicroRNAs Associated with Postnatal Muscle Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xihui; Wang, Ligang; Ni, Hemin; Wang, Lixian; Qi, Xiaolong; Xing, Shuhan; Guo, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs) that underlies postnatal hypertrophy of skeletal muscle is complex and remains unclear. Here, the miRNAomes of longissimus dorsi muscle collected at five postnatal stages (60, 120, 150, 180, and 210 days after birth) from Large White (commercial breed) and Min pigs (indigenous breed of China) were analyzed by Illumina sequencing. We identified 734 miRNAs comprising 308 annotated miRNAs and 426 novel miRNAs, of which 307 could be considered pig-specific. Comparative analysis between two breeds suggested that 60 and 120 days after birth were important stages for skeletal muscle hypertrophy and intramuscular fat accumulation. A total of 263 miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between two breeds at one or more developmental stages. In addition, the differentially expressed miRNAs between every two adjacent developmental stages in each breed were determined. Notably, ssc-miR-204 was significantly more highly expressed in Min pig skeletal muscle at all postnatal stages compared with its expression in Large White pig skeletal muscle. Based on gene ontology and KEGG pathway analyses of its predicted target genes, we concluded that ssc-miR-204 may exert an impact on postnatal hypertrophy of skeletal muscle by regulating myoblast proliferation. The results of this study will help in elucidating the mechanism underlying postnatal hypertrophy of skeletal muscle modulated by miRNAs, which could provide valuable information for improvement of pork quality and human myopathy. PMID:27253583

  17. Hair cell tufts and afferent innervation of the bullfrog crista ampullaris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Steven F.; Lewis, Edwin R.

    1990-01-01

    Within the bullfrog semicircular canal crista, hair cell tuft types were defined and mapped with the aid of scanning electron microscopy. Dye-filled planar afferent axons had mean distal axonal diameters of 1.6-4.9 microns, highly branched arbors, and contacted 11-24 hair cells. Dye-filled isthmus afferent axons had mean distal axonal diameters of 1.8-7.9 microns, with either small or large field arbors contacting 4-9 or 25-31 hair cells. The estimated mean number of contacts per innervated hair cell was 2.2 for planar and 1.3 for isthmus afferent neurons. Data on evoked afferent responses were available only for isthmus units that were observed to respond to our microrotational stimuli. Of 21 such afferent neurons, eight were successfully dye-filled. Within this sample, high-gain units had large field arbors and lower-gain units had small field arbors. The sensitivity of each afferent neuron was analyzed in terms of noise equivalent input (NEI), the stimulus amplitude for which the afferent response amplitude is just equivalent to the rms deviation of the instantaneous spike rate. NEI for isthmus units varied from 0.63 to 8.2 deg/s; the mean was 3.2 deg/s.

  18. Large-scale Models Reveal the Two-component Mechanics of Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jarosch, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive explanation of striated muscle mechanics and contraction on the basis of filament rotations. Helical proteins, particularly the coiled-coils of tropomyosin, myosin and α-actinin, shorten their H-bonds cooperatively and produce torque and filament rotations when the Coulombic net-charge repulsion of their highly charged side-chains is diminished by interaction with ions. The classical “two-component model” of active muscle differentiated a “contractile component” which stretches the “series elastic component” during force production. The contractile components are the helically shaped thin filaments of muscle that shorten the sarcomeres by clockwise drilling into the myosin cross-bridges with torque decrease (= force-deficit). Muscle stretch means drawing out the thin filament helices off the cross-bridges under passive counterclockwise rotation with torque increase (= stretch activation). Since each thin filament is anchored by four elastic α-actinin Z-filaments (provided with force-regulating sites for Ca2+ binding), the thin filament rotations change the torsional twist of the four Z-filaments as the “series elastic components”. Large scale models simulate the changes of structure and force in the Z-band by the different Z-filament twisting stages A, B, C, D, E, F and G. Stage D corresponds to the isometric state. The basic phenomena of muscle physiology, i. e. latency relaxation, Fenn-effect, the force-velocity relation, the length-tension relation, unexplained energy, shortening heat, the Huxley-Simmons phases, etc. are explained and interpreted with the help of the model experiments. PMID:19330099

  19. Different types of spinal afferent nerve endings in stomach and esophagus identified by anterograde tracing from dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Nick J; Kyloh, Melinda; Beckett, Elizabeth A; Brookes, Simon; Hibberd, Tim

    2016-10-15

    In visceral organs of mammals, most noxious (painful) stimuli as well as innocuous stimuli are detected by spinal afferent neurons, whose cell bodies lie in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). One of the major unresolved questions is the location, morphology, and neurochemistry of the nerve endings of spinal afferents that actually detect these stimuli in the viscera. In the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract, there have been many anterograde tracing studies of vagal afferent endings, but none on spinal afferent endings. Recently, we developed a technique that now provides selective labeling of only spinal afferents. We used this approach to identify spinal afferent nerve endings in the upper GI tract of mice. Animals were anesthetized, and injections of dextran-amine were made into thoracic DRGs (T8-T12). Seven days post surgery, mice were euthanized, and the stomach and esophagus were removed, fixed, and stained for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Spinal afferent axons were identified that ramified extensively through many rows of myenteric ganglia and formed nerve endings in discrete anatomical layers. Most commonly, intraganglionic varicose endings (IGVEs) were identified in myenteric ganglia of the stomach and varicose simple-type endings in the circular muscle and mucosa. Less commonly, nerve endings were identified in internodal strands, blood vessels, submucosal ganglia, and longitudinal muscle. In the esophagus, only IGVEs were identified in myenteric ganglia. No intraganglionic lamellar endings (IGLEs) were identified in the stomach or esophagus. We present the first identification of spinal afferent endings in the upper GI tract. Eight distinct types of spinal afferent endings were identified in the stomach, and most of them were CGRP immunoreactive. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3064-3083, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27019197

  20. Vagal afferent innervation of the rat fundic stomach: morphological characterization of the gastric tension receptor.

    PubMed

    Berthoud, H R; Powley, T L

    1992-05-01

    Although the gastric tension receptor has been characterized behaviorally and electrophysiologically quite well, its location and structure remains elusive. Therefore, the vagal afferents to the rat fundus (forestomach or nonglandular stomach) were anterogradely labeled in vivo with injections of the carbocyanine dye Dil into the nodose ganglia, and the nerves and ganglia of the enteric nervous system were labeled in toto with intraperitoneal Fluorogold injection. Dissected layers and cryostat cross sections of the fundic wall were mounted in glycerin and analyzed by means of conventional and laser scanning confocal microscopy. Particularly in the longitudinal, and to a lesser extent in the circular, smooth muscle layers, Dil-labeled fibers and terminals were abundant. These processes, which originated from fibers coursing through the myenteric ganglia and connectives, entered either muscle coat and then ran parallel to the respective muscle fibers, often for several millimeters. They ran in close association with the Fluorogold-labeled network of interstitial cells of Cajal, upon which they appeared to form multiple spiny appositions or varicosities. In the myenteric plexus, two different types of afferent vagal structures were observed. Up to 300 highly arborizing endings forming dense accumulations of small puncta similar to the esophageal intraganglionic laminar endings (Rodrigo et al., '75 Acta Anat. 92:79-100) were found in the fundic wall ipsilateral to the injected nodose ganglion. They often covered small clusters of myenteric neurons or even single isolated ganglion cells (mean = 5.8 neurons) and tended to extend throughout the neuropil of the ganglia. In a second pattern, fine varicose fibers with less profuse arborizations innervated mainly the central regions of myenteric ganglia. Camera lucida analyses established that single vagal afferent fibers had separate collaterals in both a smooth muscle layer and the myenteric ganglia. Finally, Dil

  1. Muscle spindle responses to horizontal support surface perturbation in the anesthetized cat: insights into the role of autogenic feedback in whole body postural control.

    PubMed

    Honeycutt, Claire F; Nardelli, Paul; Cope, Timothy C; Nichols, T Richard

    2012-09-01

    Intact cats and humans respond to support surface perturbations with broadly tuned, directionally sensitive muscle activation. These muscle responses are further sensitive to initial stance widths (distance between feet) and perturbation velocity. The sensory origins driving these responses are not known, and conflicting hypotheses are prevalent in the literature. We hypothesize that the direction-, stance-width-, and velocity-sensitive muscle response during support surface perturbations is driven largely by rapid autogenic proprioceptive pathways. The primary objective of this study was to obtain direct evidence for our hypothesis by establishing that muscle spindle receptors in the intact limb can provide appropriate information to drive the muscle response to whole body postural perturbations. Our second objective was to determine if spindle recordings from the intact limb generate the heightened sensitivity to small perturbations that has been reported in isolated muscle experiments. Maintenance of this heightened sensitivity would indicate that muscle spindles are highly proficient at detecting even small disturbances, suggesting they can provide efficient feedback about changing postural conditions. We performed intraaxonal recordings from muscle spindles in anesthetized cats during horizontal, hindlimb perturbations. We indeed found that muscle spindle afferents in the intact limb generate broadly tuned but directionally sensitive activation patterns. These afferents were also sensitive to initial stance widths and perturbation velocities. Finally, we found that afferents in the intact limb have heightened sensitivity to small perturbations. We conclude that muscle spindle afferents provide an array of important information about biomechanics and perturbation characteristics highlighting their potential importance in generating appropriate muscular response during a postural disturbance. PMID:22673334

  2. Susceptibility to Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage: a Cluster Analysis with a Large Sample.

    PubMed

    Damas, F; Nosaka, K; Libardi, C A; Chen, T C; Ugrinowitsch, C

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the responses of indirect markers of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) among a large number of young men (N=286) stratified in clusters based on the largest decrease in maximal voluntary contraction torque (MVC) after an unaccustomed maximal eccentric exercise bout of the elbow flexors. Changes in MVC, muscle soreness (SOR), creatine kinase (CK) activity, range of motion (ROM) and upper-arm circumference (CIR) before and for several days after exercise were compared between 3 clusters established based on MVC decrease (low, moderate, and high responders; LR, MR and HR). Participants were allocated to LR (n=61), MR (n=152) and HR (n=73) clusters, which depicted significantly different cluster centers of 82%, 61% and 42% of baseline MVC, respectively. Once stratified by MVC decrease, all muscle damage markers were significantly different between clusters following the same pattern: small changes for LR, larger changes for MR, and the largest changes for HR. Stratification of individuals based on the magnitude of MVC decrease post-exercise greatly increases the precision in estimating changes in EIMD by proxy markers such as SOR, CK activity, ROM and CIR. This indicates that the most commonly used markers are valid and MVC orchestrates their responses, consolidating the role of MVC as the best EIMD indirect marker. PMID:27116346

  3. A novel method of selective ablation of afferent renal nerves by periaxonal application of capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Jason D.; Wainford, Richard D.; Engeland, William C.; Fink, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Renal denervation has been shown to lower arterial pressure in some hypertensive patients, yet it remains unclear whether this is due to ablation of afferent or efferent renal nerves. To investigate the role of afferent renal nerves in arterial pressure regulation, previous studies have used methods that disrupt both renal and nonrenal afferent signaling. The present study was conducted to develop and validate a technique for selective ablation of afferent renal nerves that does not disrupt other afferent pathways. To do this, we adapted a technique for sensory denervation of the adrenal gland by topical application of capsaicin and tested the hypothesis that exposure of the renal nerves to capsaicin (renal-CAP) causes ablation of afferent but not efferent renal nerves. Renal-CAP had no effect on renal content of the efferent nerve markers tyrosine hydroxylase and norepinephrine; however, the afferent nerve marker, calcitonin gene-related peptide was largely depleted from the kidney 10 days after intervention, but returned to roughly half of control levels by 7 wk postintervention. Moreover, renal-CAP abolished the cardiovascular responses to acute pharmacological stimulation of afferent renal nerves. Renal-CAP rats showed normal weight gain, as well as cardiovascular and fluid balance regulation during dietary sodium loading. To some extent, renal-CAP did blunt the bradycardic response and increase the dipsogenic response to increased salt intake. Lastly, renal-CAP significantly attenuated the development of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension. These results demonstrate that renal-CAP effectively causes selective ablation of afferent renal nerves in rats. PMID:25411365

  4. Mechanisms producing coordinated function across the breadth of a large biarticular thigh muscle

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Jennifer A.; Ellerby, David J.; Rubenson, Jonas; Marsh, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY We examined the hypothesis that structural features of the iliotibialis lateralis pars postacetabularis (ILPO) in guinea fowl allow this large muscle to maintain equivalent function along its anterior–posterior axis. The ILPO, the largest muscle in the hindlimb of the guinea fowl, is a hip and knee extensor. The fascicles of the ILPO originate across a broad region of the ilium and ischium posterior to the hip. Its long posterior fascicles span the length of the thigh and insert directly on the patellar tendon complex. However, its anterior fascicles are shorter and insert on a narrow aponeurosis that forms a tendinous band along the anterior edge of the muscle and is connected distally to the patellar tendon. The biarticular ILPO is actively lengthened and then actively shortened during stance. The moment arm of the fascicles at the hip increases along the anterior to posterior axis, whereas the moment arm at the knee is constant for all fascicles. Using electromyography and sonomicrometry, we examined the activity and strain of posterior and anterior fascicles of the ILPO. The activation was not significantly different in the anterior and posterior fascicles. Although we found significant differences in active lengthening and shortening strain between the anterior and posterior fascicles, the differences were small. The majority of shortening strain is caused by hip extension and the inverse relationship between hip moment arm and fascicle length along the anterior–posterior axis was found to have a major role in ensuring similar shortening strain. However, because the knee moment arm is the same for all fascicles, knee flexion in early stance was predicted to produce much larger lengthening strains in the short anterior fascicles than our measured values at this location. We propose that active lengthening of the anterior fascicles was lower than predicted because the aponeurotic tendon of insertion of the anterior fascicles was stretched and only a

  5. Central changes in primary afferent fibers following peripheral nerve lesions.

    PubMed

    Coggeshall, R E; Lekan, H A; Doubell, T P; Allchorne, A; Woolf, C J

    1997-04-01

    Cutting or crushing rat sciatic nerve does not significantly reduce the number of central myelinated sensory axons in the dorsal roots entering the fourth and fifth lumbar segments even over very extended periods of time. Unmyelinated axons were reduced by approximately 50%, but only long after sciatic nerve lesions (four to eight months), and reinnervation of the peripheral target did not rescue these axons. This indicates that a peripheral nerve lesion sets up a slowly developing but major shift towards large afferent fiber domination of primary afferent input into the spinal cord. In addition, since myelinated axons are never lost, this is good evidence that the cells that give rise to these fibers are also not lost. If this is the case, this would indicate that adult primary sensory neurons with myelinated axons do not depend on peripheral target innervation for survival. PMID:9130791

  6. Cortical projection of afferent information from tendon organs in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, A K; Proske, U; Rawson, J A

    1984-01-01

    In cats anaesthetized with chloralose, evidence has been sought for the projection of information from tendon organs to the sensory receiving areas of the cerebral cortex. Selective stimulation of afferent fibres from tendon organs has been achieved by raising the threshold to electrical stimulation of the fibres from primary endings of muscle spindles. The method uses longitudinal vibration at 200-250 Hz to elicit, over a period of 20 min, one impulse for each excursion of the vibrator from all of the spindles in the test muscle, soleus or medial gastrocnemius. The accumulated post-spike positivities following passage of the impulses are thought to be responsible for the rise in threshold. Segmental monosynaptic reflex testing after a bout of vibration was used to confirm that the residual Group I volley no longer contained impulses from muscle spindles. The volley in response to stimulating the nerve of the test muscle was timed to facilitate the monosynaptic reflex of a synergist. Before vibration 5- to 10-fold facilitation of reflex amplitude could be produced; however, after vibration, if all the spindle primary endings had been effectively engaged by the stimulus, no detectable facilitation remained. This test was found to be sensitive and reproducible. An afferent volley containing only activity of tendon organ afferents evoked small-amplitude potentials from the post-sigmoid gyrus of the contralateral pericruciate cortex. The field was highly localized and lay caudal to the main receiving area for activity from the sural nerve and from afferents of hip flexor muscles. Recordings with tungsten micro-electrodes revealed that the surface-evoked activity took origin in cellular discharges in the internal pyramidal layer of area 3a. Recent psychophysical experiments have provided evidence for a sense of muscle tension, as distinct from a sense of effort, and the tendon organ has been suggested as the likely receptor of origin. Our electrophysiological

  7. Identification of the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones mediating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J; Mazzone, Stuart B; Meeker, Sonya N; Mori, Nanako; Reynolds, Sandra M; Undem, Bradley J

    2004-01-01

    We have identified the tracheal and laryngeal afferent nerves regulating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Cough was evoked by electrical or mechanical stimulation of the tracheal or laryngeal mucosa, or by citric acid applied topically to the trachea or larynx. By contrast, neither capsaicin nor bradykinin challenges to the trachea or larynx evoked cough. Bradykinin and histamine administered intravenously also failed to evoke cough. Electrophysiological studies revealed that the majority of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurones (both Aδ- and C-fibres) innervating the rostral trachea and larynx have their cell bodies in the jugular ganglia and project to the airways via the superior laryngeal nerves. Capsaicin-insensitive afferent neurones with cell bodies in the nodose ganglia projected to the rostral trachea and larynx via the recurrent laryngeal nerves. Severing the recurrent nerves abolished coughing evoked from the trachea and larynx whereas severing the superior laryngeal nerves was without effect on coughing. The data indicate that the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones regulating cough are polymodal Aδ-fibres that arise from the nodose ganglia. These afferent neurones are activated by punctate mechanical stimulation and acid but are unresponsive to capsaicin, bradykinin, smooth muscle contraction, longitudinal or transverse stretching of the airways, or distension. Comparing these physiological properties with those of intrapulmonary mechanoreceptors indicates that the afferent neurones mediating cough are quite distinct from the well-defined rapidly and slowly adapting stretch receptors innervating the airways and lungs. We propose that these airway afferent neurones represent a distinct subtype and that their primary function is regulation of the cough reflex. PMID:15004208

  8. A computational model for estimating recruitment of primary afferent fibers by intraneural stimulation in the dorsal root ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbeau, D. J.; Hokanson, J. A.; Rubin, J. E.; Weber, D. J.

    2011-10-01

    Primary afferent microstimulation has been proposed as a method for activating cutaneous and muscle afferent fibers to restore tactile and proprioceptive feedback after limb loss or peripheral neuropathy. Large populations of primary afferent fibers can be accessed directly by implanting microelectrode arrays in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), which provide a compact and stable target for stimulating a diverse group of sensory fibers. To gain insight into factors affecting the number and types of primary afferents activated, we developed a computational model that simulates the recruitment of fibers in the feline L7 DRG. The model comprises two parts. The first part is a single-fiber model used to describe the current-distance relation and was based on the McIntyre-Richardson-Grill model for excitability. The second part uses the results of the singe-fiber model and published data on fiber size distributions to predict the probability of recruiting a given number of fibers as a function of stimulus intensity. The range of intensities over which exactly one fiber was recruited was approximately 0.5-5 µA (0.1-1 nC per phase); the stimulus intensity at which the probability of recruiting exactly one fiber was maximized was 2.3 µA. However, at 2.3 µA, it was also possible to recruit up to three fibers, albeit with a lower probability. Stimulation amplitudes up to 6 µA were tested with the population model, which showed that as the amplitude increased, the number of fibers recruited increased exponentially. The distribution of threshold amplitudes predicted by the model was similar to that previously reported by in vivo experimentation. Finally, the model suggested that medium diameter fibers (7.3-11.5 µm) may be recruited with much greater probability than large diameter fibers (12.8-16 µm). This model may be used to efficiently test a range of stimulation parameters and nerve morphologies to complement results from electrophysiology experiments and to aid in the

  9. Afferent control of locomotor CPG: insights from a simple neuromechanical model.

    PubMed

    Markin, Sergey N; Klishko, Alexander N; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Lemay, Michel A; Prilutsky, Boris I; Rybak, Ilya A

    2010-06-01

    A simple neuromechanical model has been developed that describes a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) controlling the locomotor movement of a single-joint limb via activation of two antagonist (flexor and extensor) muscles. The limb performs rhythmic movements under control of the muscular, gravitational and ground reaction forces. Muscle afferents provide length-dependent (types Ia and II) and force-dependent (type Ib from the extensor) feedback to the CPG. We show that afferent feedback adjusts CPG operation to the kinematics and dynamics of the limb providing stable "locomotion." Increasing the supraspinal drive to the CPG increases locomotion speed by reducing the duration of stance phase. We show that such asymmetric, extensor-dominated control of locomotor speed (with relatively constant swing duration) is provided by afferent feedback independent of the asymmetric rhythmic pattern generated by the CPG alone (in "fictive locomotion" conditions). Finally, we demonstrate the possibility of reestablishing stable locomotion after removal of the supraspinal drive (associated with spinal cord injury) by increasing the weights of afferent inputs to the CPG, which is thought to occur following locomotor training. PMID:20536917

  10. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Lindsea C.; May, Clive N.; Yao, Song T.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF. PMID:26483699

  11. Cross-Modal Calibration of Vestibular Afference for Human Balance

    PubMed Central

    Héroux, Martin E; Law, Tammy C. Y.; Fitzpatrick, Richard C.; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    To determine how the vestibular sense controls balance, we used instantaneous head angular velocity to drive a galvanic vestibular stimulus so that afference would signal that head movement was faster or slower than actual. In effect, this changed vestibular afferent gain. This increased sway 4-fold when subjects (N = 8) stood without vision. However, after a 240 s conditioning period with stable balance achieved through reliable visual or somatosensory cues, sway returned to normal. An equivalent galvanic stimulus unrelated to sway (not driven by head motion) was equally destabilising but in this situation the conditioning period of stable balance did not reduce sway. Reflex muscle responses evoked by an independent, higher bandwidth vestibular stimulus were initially reduced in amplitude by the galvanic stimulus but returned to normal levels after the conditioning period, contrary to predictions that they would decrease after adaptation to increased sensory gain and increase after adaptation to decreased sensory gain. We conclude that an erroneous vestibular signal of head motion during standing has profound effects on balance control. If it is unrelated to current head motion, the CNS has no immediate mechanism of ignoring the vestibular signal to reduce its influence on destabilising balance. This result is inconsistent with sensory reweighting based on disturbances. The increase in sway with increased sensory gain is also inconsistent with a simple feedback model of vestibular reflex action. Thus, we propose that recalibration of a forward sensory model best explains the reinterpretation of an altered reafferent signal of head motion during stable balance. PMID:25894558

  12. Afferent Connectivity of the Zebrafish Habenulae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Katherine J.; Hawkins, Thomas A.; Yáñez, Julián; Anadón, Ramón; Wilson, Stephen W.; Folgueira, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    The habenulae are bilateral nuclei located in the dorsal diencephalon that are conserved across vertebrates. Here we describe the main afferents to the habenulae in larval and adult zebrafish. We observe afferents from the subpallium, nucleus rostrolateralis, posterior tuberculum, posterior hypothalamic lobe, median raphe; we also see asymmetric afferents from olfactory bulb to the right habenula, and from the parapineal to the left habenula. In addition, we find afferents from a ventrolateral telencephalic nucleus that neurochemical and hodological data identify as the ventral entopeduncular nucleus (vENT), confirming and extending observations of Amo et al. (2014). Fate map and marker studies suggest that vENT originates from the diencephalic prethalamic eminence and extends into the lateral telencephalon from 48 to 120 hour post-fertilization (hpf). No afferents to the habenula were observed from the dorsal entopeduncular nucleus (dENT). Consequently, we confirm that the vENT (and not the dENT) should be considered as the entopeduncular nucleus “proper” in zebrafish. Furthermore, comparison with data in other vertebrates suggests that the vENT is a conserved basal ganglia nucleus, being homologous to the entopeduncular nucleus of mammals (internal segment of the globus pallidus of primates) by both embryonic origin and projections, as previously suggested by Amo et al. (2014). PMID:27199671

  13. Vestibular afferent responses to microrotational stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Steven F.; Lewis, Edwin R.

    1991-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrode recording/labeling techniques were used to investigate vestibular afferent responses in the bullfrog, to very small amplitude (less than 5 deg p-p) sinusoidal rotations in the vertical plane over the frequency range of 0.063-4 Hz. Robust responses to peak accelerations as low as 0.031 deg/sec per sec were obtained from units subsequently traced to either the central portion of the anterior canal crista or the striolar region of the utricle. All of these microrotationally sensitive afferent neurons had irregular resting discharge rates, and the majority had transfer ratios (relative to rotational velocity) of 1-40 spikes/sec per deg/sec. Individual utricular afferent velocity transfer ratios were nearly constant over the frequency range of 0.125-4 Hz. Canal units displayed decreasing response transfer ratios as stimulus frequencies increased. These findings indicate that, although utricular striolar and central crista afferent velocity transfer ratios to microrotations were very similar, utricular striolar afferent neurons were more faithful sensors of very small amplitude rotational velocity in the vertical plane.

  14. Molecular characterization and expression patterns of emerin (EMD) gene in skeletal muscle between Meishan and Large White pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Xiao, Xia; Wang, Linjie

    2016-03-15

    The emerin protein is a nuclear membrane protein and has important functions in muscle development, regeneration, and cell signal transduction. However, knowledge regarding emerin in the domestic animal is limited. In this study, we cloned and characterized the pig emerin (EMD) gene. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the EMD gene was expressed at the highest level in the heart and fat at 120d. However, the fetal skeletal muscles displayed a greater abundance of EMD mRNA than that in skeletal muscles at postnatal development stages. In addition, the expression level of EMD at 60 day was significantly higher (p<0.05) in Meishan than Large White pigs. Pig EMD protein displayed the sarcolemma and perinuclear distribution in skeletal muscle sections, and there was no distribution change of EMD in skeletal muscle sections between Large White and Meishan pigs. These studies provide useful information for further research on the functions of pig EMD gene in skeletal muscle. PMID:26743124

  15. Changes in muscle spindle firing in response to length changes of neighboring muscles.

    PubMed

    Smilde, Hiltsje A; Vincent, Jake A; Baan, Guus C; Nardelli, Paul; Lodder, Johannes C; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Cope, Tim C; Maas, Huub

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle force can be transmitted to the skeleton, not only via its tendons of origin and insertion but also through connective tissues linking the muscle belly to surrounding structures. Through such epimuscular myofascial connections, length changes of a muscle may cause length changes within an adjacent muscle and hence, affect muscle spindles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epimuscular myofascial forces on feedback from muscle spindles in triceps surae muscles of the rat. We hypothesized that within an intact muscle compartment, muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but can also sense length changes that occur as a result of changing the length of synergistic muscles. Action potentials from single afferents were measured intra-axonally in response to ramp-hold release (RHR) stretches of an agonistic muscle at different lengths of its synergist, as well as in response to synergist RHRs. A decrease in force threshold was found for both soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius afferents, along with an increase in length threshold for SO afferents. In addition, muscle spindle firing could be evoked by RHRs of the synergistic muscle. We conclude that muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but also local length changes that occur as a result of changing the length and relative position of synergistic muscles. PMID:27075540

  16. Thin-fibre receptors responding to mechanical, chemical, and thermal stimulation in the skeletal muscle of the dog

    PubMed Central

    Kumazawa, T.; Mizumura, K.

    1977-01-01

    1. Unitary activities of muscular thin fibre afferents, which were not sensitive to muscle stretching, were recorded from the nerve of the medial gastrocnemius muscle of the dog. Responses to mechanical stimulation, intra-arterial injection and local application of chemical solutions, and thermal stimulation of the surface of the muscle were studied. It was observed that polymodal receptors which responded to all types of stimulation existed in the thin fibre afferents of the muscle. 2. The receptive area of these units tested by mechanical stimulation was spot-like and appeared to be located not only on the surface but in the midst of the muscle. 3. The mechanical response varied among these units with respect to the threshold and the pattern of discharges. 4. In these units, NaCl, KCl, and bradykinin consistently evoked responses, with differences in the latencies and discharge patterns, while solutions of histamine, acetylcholine and sodium citrate caused responses less consistently and less effectively. In the stretch receptors, chemical stimulation applied in the same way as tested in the thin fibre afferents produced quite different features in their responses. 5. Heating the receptive area of the muscle surface caused responses in twenty-five out of thirty-six units, which were sensitive both to mechanical and to chemical stimulations. The threshold varied from 38·0 to 48·3 °C, with a mean of 43·1 °C for C fibre units and 41 °C for A-δ fibre units. 6. The responses to heating were consistently obtained in the units responding to the surface application of chemical solutions. However, the above response was never obtained in the units which did not respond to surface chemical stimulation but responded to intra-arterial injection. These results suggest a large population of polymodal receptors in the muscular thin fibre afferents. PMID:599419

  17. Facilitation of motor evoked potentials by somatosensory afferent stimulation.

    PubMed

    Deletis, V; Schild, J H; Berić, A; Dimitrijević, M R

    1992-10-01

    The effect of an electrically induced peripheral afferent volley upon electrical and magnetic motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from muscles of the upper and lower extremities was studied in 16 healthy volunteers. A standard conditioning-test (C-T) paradigm was employed whereby the test stimulus (transcranial electric or magnetic) was applied at random time intervals, from 10 msec prior to 90 msec after the conditioning stimulus (peripheral nerve stimulus). MEP amplitude facilitation was observed for the majority of the upper extremity muscles tested at two distinct periods, one occurring at short, and the other at long C-T intervals. This bimodal trend of MEP facilitation was found to be equally as prominent in the lower extremity muscles tested. The period of short C-T interval facilitation is consistent with modifications in the spinal excitability of the segmental motoneuron pool. On the other hand, the period of long C-T interval facilitation is suggested to be due to alterations in excitability of the motor cortex as a result of the arrival of the orthodromic sensory volley. Although most pronounced in muscles innervated by the nerve to which the conditioning stimulus was applied, this bimodal facilitatory effect was also observed in adjacent muscles not innervated by the stimulated nerve. Qualitatively, the conditioned MEPs from the upper and lower extremities responded similarly to both electrical and magnetic trans-cranial stimulation. In addition, our study demonstrates that the C-T paradigm has potential for use in the assessment of spinal and cortical sensorimotor integration by providing quantitative information which cannot be obtained through isolated assessment of sensory and/or motor pathways.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1385090

  18. Neuroanatomy of extrinsic afferents supplying the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Berthoud, H R; Blackshaw, L A; Brookes, S J H; Grundy, D

    2004-04-01

    Here we discuss the neuroanatomy of extrinsic gastrointestinal (GI) afferent neurones, the relationship between structure and function and the role of afferents in disease. Three pathways connect the gut to the central nervous system: vagal afferents signal mainly from upper GI regions, pelvic afferents mainly from the colorectal region and splanchnic afferents from throughout. Vagal afferents mediate reflex regulation of gut function and behaviour, operating mainly at physiological levels. There are two major functional classes - tension receptors, responding to muscular contraction and distension, and mucosal receptors. The function of vagal endings correlates well with their anatomy: tracing studies show intramuscular arrays (IMAs) and intraganglionic laminar endings (IGLEs); IGLEs are now known to respond to tension. Functional mucosal receptors correlate with endings traced to the lamina propria. Pelvic afferents serve similar functions to vagal afferents, and additionally mediate both innocuous and noxious sensations. Splanchnic afferents comprise mucosal and stretch-sensitive afferents with low thresholds in addition to high-threshold serosal/mesenteric afferents suggesting diverse roles. IGLEs, probably of pelvic origin, have been identified recently in the rectum and respond similarly to gastric vagal IGLEs. Gastrointestinal afferents may be sensitized or inhibited by chemical mediators released from several cell types. Whether functional changes have anatomical correlates is not known, but it is likely that they underlie diseases involving visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:15066001

  19. Whisker-related afferents in superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Castro-Alamancos, Manuel A; Favero, Morgana

    2016-05-01

    Rodents use their whiskers to explore the environment, and the superior colliculus is part of the neural circuits that process this sensorimotor information. Cells in the intermediate layers of the superior colliculus integrate trigeminotectal afferents from trigeminal complex and corticotectal afferents from barrel cortex. Using histological methods in mice, we found that trigeminotectal and corticotectal synapses overlap somewhat as they innervate the lower and upper portions of the intermediate granular layer, respectively. Using electrophysiological recordings and optogenetics in anesthetized mice in vivo, we showed that, similar to rats, whisker deflections produce two successive responses that are driven by trigeminotectal and corticotectal afferents. We then employed in vivo and slice experiments to characterize the response properties of these afferents. In vivo, corticotectal responses triggered by electrical stimulation of the barrel cortex evoke activity in the superior colliculus that increases with stimulus intensity and depresses with increasing frequency. In slices from adult mice, optogenetic activation of channelrhodopsin-expressing trigeminotectal and corticotectal fibers revealed that cells in the intermediate layers receive more efficacious trigeminotectal, than corticotectal, synaptic inputs. Moreover, the efficacy of trigeminotectal inputs depresses more strongly with increasing frequency than that of corticotectal inputs. The intermediate layers of superior colliculus appear to be tuned to process strong but infrequent trigeminal inputs and weak but more persistent cortical inputs, which explains features of sensory responsiveness, such as the robust rapid sensory adaptation of whisker responses in the superior colliculus. PMID:26864754

  20. Rates of ubiquitin conjugation increase when muscles atrophy, largely through activation of the N-end rule pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, V.; Baracos, V.; Sarraf, P.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    The rapid loss of muscle mass that accompanies many disease states, such as cancer or sepsis, is primarily a result of increased protein breakdown in muscle, and several observations have suggested an activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Accordingly, in extracts of atrophying muscles from tumor-bearing or septic rats, rates of 125I-ubiquitin conjugation to endogenous proteins were found to be higher than in control extracts. On the other hand, in extracts of muscles from hypothyroid rats, where overall proteolysis is reduced below normal, the conjugation of 125I-ubiquitin to soluble proteins decreased by 50%, and treatment with triiodothyronine (T3) restored ubiquitination to control levels. Surprisingly, the N-end rule pathway, which selectively degrades proteins with basic or large hydrophobic N-terminal residues, was found to be responsible for most of these changes in ubiquitin conjugation. Competitive inhibitors of this pathway that specifically block the ubiquitin ligase, E3alpha, suppressed most of the increased ubiquitin conjugation in the muscle extracts from tumor-bearing and septic rats. These inhibitors also suppressed ubiquitination in normal extracts toward levels in hypothyroid extracts, which showed little E3alpha-dependent ubiquitination. Thus, the inhibitors eliminated most of the differences in ubiquitination under these different pathological conditions. Moreover, 125I-lysozyme, a model N-end rule substrate, was ubiquitinated more rapidly in extracts from tumor-bearing and septic rats, and more slowly in those from hypothyroid rats, than in controls. Thus, the rate of ubiquitin conjugation increases in atrophying muscles, and these hormone- and cytokine-dependent responses are in large part due to activation of the N-end rule pathway.

  1. [Changes in the afferent activity of the vagus nerve and the rectal temperature in rats following Escherichia coli endotoxin administration].

    PubMed

    Lapsha, V I; Lukashenko, T M; Utkina, L N; Gurin, V N

    2001-10-01

    In anaesthetised rats, i.p. administration of the Echerichia coli lipopolysaccharide in doses 5 mcg/kg (LPS) increased afferent activity of the cervical vagus, whereas 100 and 1000 mcg/kg doses inhibited the afferent discharges. Pyrogen-free saline (PFS) did not alter the activity. Rectal temperature (RT) was decreased by the PFS and by large doses of the LPS. Sodium salicylate administration prevented the effects. PMID:11767451

  2. Thyroid Hormone Signaling in Male Mouse Skeletal Muscle Is Largely Independent of D2 in Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Werneck-de-Castro, Joao P; Fonseca, Tatiana L; Ignacio, Daniele L; Fernandes, Gustavo W; Andrade-Feraud, Cristina M; Lartey, Lattoya J; Ribeiro, Marcelo B; Ribeiro, Miriam O; Gereben, Balazs; Bianco, Antonio C

    2015-10-01

    The type 2 deiodinase (D2) activates the prohormone T4 to T3. D2 is expressed in skeletal muscle (SKM), and its global inactivation (GLOB-D2KO mice) reportedly leads to skeletal muscle hypothyroidism and impaired differentiation. Here floxed Dio2 mice were crossed with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the myosin light chain 1f (cre-MLC) to disrupt D2 expression in the late developmental stages of skeletal myocytes (SKM-D2KO). This led to a loss of approximately 50% in D2 activity in neonatal and adult SKM-D2KO skeletal muscle and about 75% in isolated SKM-D2KO myocytes. To test the impact of Dio2 disruption, we measured soleus T3 content and found it to be normal. We also looked at the expression of T3-responsive genes in skeletal muscle, ie, myosin heavy chain I, α-actin, myosin light chain, tropomyosin, and serca 1 and 2, which was preserved in neonatal SKM-D2KO hindlimb muscles, at a time that coincides with a peak of D2 activity in control animals. In adult soleus the baseline level of D2 activity was about 6-fold lower, and in the SKM-D2KO soleus, the expression of only one of five T3-responsive genes was reduced. Despite this, adult SKM-D2KO animals performed indistinguishably from controls on a treadmill test, running for approximately 16 minutes and reached a speed of about 23 m/min; muscle strength was about 0.3 mN/m·g body weight in SKM-D2KO and control ankle muscles. In conclusion, there are multiple sources of D2 in the mouse SKM, and its role is limited in postnatal skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:26214036

  3. Functional variation of neck muscles and their relation to feeding style in Tyrannosauridae and other large theropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Snively, Eric; Russell, Anthony P

    2007-08-01

    Reconstructed neck muscles of large theropod dinosaurs suggest influences on feeding style that paralleled variation in skull mechanics. In all examined theropods, the head dorsiflexor m. transversospinalis capitis probably filled in the posterior dorsal concavity of the neck, for a more crocodilian- than avian-like profile in this region. The tyrannosaurine tyrannosaurids Daspletosaurus and Tyrannosaurus had relatively larger moment arms for latero-flexion by m. longissimus capitis superficialis and m. complexus than albertosaurine tyrannosaurids, and longer dorsiflexive moment arms for m. complexus. Areas of dorsiflexor origination are significantly larger relative to neck length in adult Tyrannosaurus rex than in other tyrannosaurids, suggesting relatively large muscle cross-sections and forces. Tyrannosaurids were not particularly specialized for neck ventro-flexion. In contrast, the hypothesis that Allosaurus co-opted m. longissimus capitis superficialis for ventro-flexion is strongly corroborated. Ceratosaurus had robust insertions for the ventro-flexors m. longissimus capitis profundus and m. rectus capitis ventralis. Neck muscle morphology is consistent with puncture-and-pull and powerful shake feeding in tyrannosaurids, relatively rapid strikes in Allosaurus and Ceratosaurus, and ventroflexive augmentation of weaker jaw muscle forces in the non tyrannosaurids. PMID:17654673

  4. Afferent neurons of the hypoglossal nerve of the rat as demonstrated by horseradish peroxidase tracing.

    PubMed

    Neuhuber, W; Mysicka, A

    1980-01-01

    Cell bodies of sensory neurons of the rat's hypoglossal nerve were demonstrated by the somatopetal horseradish peroxidase (HRP) transport technique. Labelled perikarya were found within the second and third cervical spinal ganglia and in the vagal sensory ganglia. After application of HRP to the cut peripheral trunk of the hypoglossal nerve about 200 labelled cell bodies were counted in each animal. The vast majority of the axons from cervical spinal ganglion cells reach the hypoglossal nerve via the descending ramus (N. descendens hypoglossi). However, there may exist an additional pathway, probably via the cervical sympathetic trunk. Application of HPR to the medial and lateral end branches led to a labelling of much fewer spinal ganglion cells while the number of labelled vegal sensory neurons remained unchanged. Thus, it is suggested that the majority of the cervical afferents of the hypoglossal nerve originates within the extrinsic tongue musculature and the geniohyoid muscle, whereas the vagal afferents may perhaps derive exclusively from the intrinsic muslces. Histograms of the mean diameters of labelled cell bodies show a predominance of very small perikarya. This contrasts with the diameter distribution of sensory perikarya labelled after HRP application to nerves supplying other skeletal muscles. It is therefore assumed that the afferent component of the hypoglossal nerve is composed mainly of small-calibre axons. PMID:7356184

  5. Phrenic nerve afferent activation of neurons in the cat SI cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Paul W; Reep, Roger L; Thompson, Floyd J

    2010-03-01

    Stimulation of respiratory afferents elicits neural activity in the somatosensory region of the cerebral cortex in humans and animals. Respiratory afferents have been stimulated with mechanical loads applied to breathing and electrical stimulation of respiratory nerves and muscles. It was hypothesized that stimulation of the phrenic nerve myelinated afferents will activate neurons in the 3a and 3b region of the somatosensory cortex. This was investigated in cats with electrical stimulation of the intrathoracic phrenic nerve and C(5) root of the phrenic nerve. The somatosensory cortical response to phrenic afferent stimulation was recorded from the cortical surface, contralateral to the phrenic nerve, ispilateral to the phrenic nerve and with microelectrodes inserted into the cortical site of the surface dipole. Short-latency, primary cortical evoked potentials (1 degrees CEP) were recorded with stimulation of myelinated afferents of the intrathoracic phrenic nerve in the contralateral post-cruciate gyrus of all animals (n = 42). The mean onset and peak latencies were 8.5 +/- 5.7 ms and 21.8 +/- 9.8 ms, respectively. The rostro-caudal surface location of the 1 degrees CEP was found between the rostral edge of the post-cruciate dimple (PCD) and the rostral edge of the ansate sulcus, medio-lateral location was between 2 mm lateral to the sagittal sulcus and the lateral end of the cruciate sulcus. Histological examination revealed that the 1 degrees CEP sites were recorded over areas 3a and 3b of the SI somatosensory cortex. Intracortical activation of 16 neurons with two patterns of neural activity was recorded: (1) short-latency, short-duration activation of neurons and (2) long-latency, long-duration activation of neurons. Short-latency neurons had a mean onset latency of 10.4 +/- 3.1 ms and mean burst duration of 10.1 +/- 3.2 ms. The short-latency units were recorded at an average depth of 1.7 +/- 0.5 mm below the cortical surface. The long-latency neurons had a

  6. Natural Bile Acids and Synthetic Analogues Modulate Large Conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) Channel Activity in Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dopico, Alejandro M.; Walsh, John V.; Singer, Joshua J.

    2002-01-01

    Bile acids have been reported to produce relaxation of smooth muscle both in vitro and in vivo. The cellular mechanisms underlying bile acid–induced relaxation are largely unknown. Here we demonstrate, using patch-clamp techniques, that natural bile acids and synthetic analogues reversibly increase BKCa channel activity in rabbit mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells. In excised inside-out patches bile acid–induced increases in channel activity are characterized by a parallel leftward shift in the activity-voltage relationship. This increase in BKCa channel activity is not due to Ca2+-dependent mechanism(s) or changes in freely diffusible messengers, but to a direct action of the bile acid on the channel protein itself or some closely associated component in the cell membrane. For naturally occurring bile acids, the magnitude of bile acid–induced increase in BKCa channel activity is inversely related to the number of hydroxyl groups in the bile acid molecule. By using synthetic analogues, we demonstrate that such increase in activity is not affected by several chemical modifications in the lateral chain of the molecule, but is markedly favored by polar groups in the side of the steroid rings opposite to the side where the methyl groups are located, which stresses the importance of the planar polarity of the molecule. Bile acid–induced increases in BKCa channel activity are also observed in smooth muscle cells freshly dissociated from rabbit main pulmonary artery and gallbladder, raising the possibility that a direct activation of BKCa channels by these planar steroids is a widespread phenomenon in many smooth muscle cell types. Bile acid concentrations that increase BKCa channel activity in mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells are found in the systemic circulation under a variety of human pathophysiological conditions, and their ability to enhance BKCa channel activity may explain their relaxing effect on smooth muscle. PMID:11865021

  7. Pain processing by spinal microcircuits: afferent combinatorics.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Steven A; Ratté, Stéphanie

    2012-08-01

    Pain, itch, heat, cold, and touch represent different percepts arising from somatosensory input. How stimuli give rise to these percepts has been debated for over a century. Recent work supports the view that primary afferents are highly specialized to transduce and encode specific stimulus modalities. However, cross-modal interactions (e.g. inhibition or exacerbation of pain by touch) support convergence rather than specificity in central circuits. We outline how peripheral specialization together with central convergence could enable spinal microcircuits to combine inputs from distinctly specialized, co-activated afferents and to modulate the output signals thus formed through computations like normalization. These issues will be discussed alongside recent advances in our understanding of microcircuitry in the superficial dorsal horn. PMID:22409855

  8. Stretchable Multichannel Electromyography Sensor Array Covering Large Area for Controlling Home Electronics with Distinguishable Signals from Multiple Muscles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namyun; Lim, Taehoon; Song, Kwangsun; Yang, Sung; Lee, Jongho

    2016-08-17

    Physiological signals provide important information for biomedical applications and, more recently, in the form of wearable electronics for active interactions between bodies and external environments. Multiple physiological sensors are often required to map distinct signals from multiple points over large areas for more diverse applications. In this paper, we present a reusable, multichannel, surface electromyography (EMG) sensor array that covers multiple muscles over relatively large areas, with compliant designs that provide different levels of stiffness for repetitive uses, without backing layers. Mechanical and electrical characteristics along with distinct measurements from different muscles demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. The results should be useful to actively control devices in the environment with one array of wearable sensors, as demonstrated with home electronics. PMID:27500864

  9. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells migrate in afferent skin lymph.

    PubMed

    Pascale, Florentina; Pascale, Florentia; Contreras, Vanessa; Bonneau, Michel; Courbet, Alexandre; Chilmonczyk, Stefan; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Epardaud, Mathieu; Eparaud, Mathieu; Niborski, Violeta; Riffault, Sabine; Balazuc, Anne-Marie; Foulon, Eliane; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Riteau, Beatrice; Hope, Jayne; Bertho, Nicolas; Charley, Bernard; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2008-05-01

    Conventional dendritic cells enter lymph nodes by migrating from peripheral tissues via the lymphatic route, whereas plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), also called IFN-producing cells (IPC), are described to gain nodes from blood via the high endothelial venules. We demonstrate here that IPC/pDC migrate in the afferent lymph of two large mammals. In sheep, injection of type A CpG oligodinucleotide (ODN) induced lymph cells to produce type I IFN. Furthermore, low-density lymph cells collected at steady state produced type I IFN after stimulation with type A CpG ODN and enveloped viruses. Sheep lymph IPC were found within a minor B(neg)CD11c(neg) subset expressing CD45RB. They presented a plasmacytoid morphology, expressed high levels of TLR-7, TLR-9, and IFN regulatory factor 7 mRNA, induced IFN-gamma production in allogeneic CD4(pos) T cells, and differentiated into dendritic cell-like cells under viral stimulation, thus fulfilling criteria of bona fide pDC. In mini-pig, a CD4(pos)SIRP(pos) subset in afferent lymph cells, corresponding to pDC homologs, produced type I IFN after type A CpG-ODN triggering. Thus, pDC can link innate and acquired immunity by migrating from tissue to draining node via lymph, similarly to conventional dendritic cells. PMID:18424716

  10. Population Coding of Forelimb Joint Kinematics by Peripheral Afferents in Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Umeda, Tatsuya; Seki, Kazuhiko; Sato, Masa-aki; Nishimura, Yukio; Kawato, Mitsuo; Isa, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Various peripheral receptors provide information concerning position and movement to the central nervous system to achieve complex and dexterous movements of forelimbs in primates. The response properties of single afferent receptors to movements at a single joint have been examined in detail, but the population coding of peripheral afferents remains poorly defined. In this study, we obtained multichannel recordings from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in cervical segments of monkeys. We applied the sparse linear regression (SLiR) algorithm to the recordings, which selects useful input signals to reconstruct movement kinematics. Multichannel recordings of peripheral afferents were performed by inserting multi-electrode arrays into the DRGs of lower cervical segments in two anesthetized monkeys. A total of 112 and 92 units were responsive to the passive joint movements or the skin stimulation with a painting brush in Monkey 1 and Monkey 2, respectively. Using the SLiR algorithm, we reconstructed the temporal changes of joint angle, angular velocity, and acceleration at the elbow, wrist, and finger joints from temporal firing patterns of the DRG neurons. By automatically selecting a subset of recorded units, the SLiR achieved superior generalization performance compared with a regularized linear regression algorithm. The SLiR selected not only putative muscle units that were responsive to only the passive movements, but also a number of putative cutaneous units responsive to the skin stimulation. These results suggested that an ensemble of peripheral primary afferents that contains both putative muscle and cutaneous units encode forelimb joint kinematics of non-human primates. PMID:23112841

  11. Glutamate-induced sensitization of rat masseter muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Cairns, B E; Gambarota, G; Svensson, P; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Berde, C B

    2002-01-01

    In rats, intradermal or intraarticular injection of glutamate or selective excitatory amino acid receptor agonists acting at peripheral excitatory amino acid receptors can decrease the intensity of mechanical stimulation required to evoke nocifensive behaviors, an indication of hyperalgesia. Since excitatory amino acid receptors have been found on the terminal ends of cutaneous primary afferent fibers, it has been suggested that increased tissue glutamate levels may have a direct sensitizing effect on primary afferent fibers, in particular skin nociceptors. However, less is known about the effects of glutamate on deep tissue afferent fibers. In the present study, a series of experiments were undertaken to investigate the effect of intramuscular injection of glutamate on the excitability and mechanical threshold of masseter muscle afferent fibers in anesthetized rats of both sexes. Injection of 1.0 M, but not 0.1 M glutamate evoked masseter muscle afferent activity that was significantly greater than that evoked by isotonic saline. The mechanical threshold of masseter muscle afferent fibers, which was assessed with a Von Frey hair, was reduced by approximately 50% for a period of 30 min after injection of 1.0 M glutamate, but was unaffected by injections of 0.1 M glutamate or isotonic saline. Injection of 25% dextrose, which has the same osmotic strength as 1.0 M glutamate, did not evoke significant activity in or decrease the mechanical threshold of masseter muscle afferent fibers. Magnetic resonance imaging experiments confirmed that injection of 25% dextrose and 1.0 M glutamate produced similar edema volumes in the masseter muscle tissue. Co-injection of 0.1 M kynurenate, an excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist, and 1.0 M glutamate attenuated glutamate-evoked afferent activity and prevented glutamate-induced mechanical sensitization. When male and female rats were compared, no difference in the baseline mechanical threshold or in the magnitude of glutamate

  12. Voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels in group IV sensory afferents

    PubMed Central

    Elmslie, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication suffer from both muscle pain and an exacerbated exercise pressor reflex. Excitability of the group III and group IV afferent fibers mediating these functions is controlled in part by voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. We previously found tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8 channels to be the primary type in muscle afferent somata. However, action potentials in group III and IV afferent axons are blocked by TTX, supporting a minimal role of NaV1.8 channels. To address these apparent differences in NaV channel expression between axon and soma, we used immunohistochemistry to identify the NaV channels expressed in group IV axons within the gastrocnemius muscle and the dorsal root ganglia sections. Positive labeling by an antibody against the neurofilament protein peripherin was used to identify group IV neurons and axons. We show that >67% of group IV fibers express NaV1.8, NaV1.6, or NaV1.7. Interestingly, expression of NaV1.8 channels in group IV somata was significantly higher than in the fibers, whereas there were no significant differences for either NaV1.6 or NaV1.7. When combined with previous work, our results suggest that NaV1.8 channels are expressed in most group IV axons, but that, under normal conditions, NaV1.6 and/or NaV1.7 play a more important role in action potential generation to signal muscle pain and the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:27385723

  13. Detection of flavor compounds in longissimus muscle from four hybrid pig breeds of Sus scrofa, Bamei pig, and Large White.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoshun; Sui, Yanan; Chen, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    To detect the flavor quality and flavor compounds in raw longissimus muscle from four typical pig breeds: Sus scrofa × Bamei pig named F1 (group A), F1 × F1 (group B), F1 × Bamei pig (group C), and F1 × Large White (group D). The chemical compositions of longissimus muscles from four breeds were examined using headspace solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography mass spectrometry method. Distinct differences for the same flavor compounds of longissimus muscles between different breeds were analyzed. Totally 64 flavor compounds shared in four groups, and 10 flavor compounds with significant difference among four groups (p < 0.05), including allyl butyrate, (Z)-2-penten-1-ol, 2,2-dimethyl-3-methyl oxirane, 2-pentylfuran, dodecane, 2,4-decadienal, vinylsilane, 3-methyl-1-butanol, (1-methyldecyl)-benzene, and dipropyl phthalate. Totally, 23-41 flavor compounds did not commonly exist in four groups, such as only as dibutyl isophthalate in group A; 6,10-dimethyl-5-9-undecadien-2 one, bis (2-trimethylsilyl) ethyl ester-malonic acid, heptadecane, 2,4,6-trimethyl pyridine, and diisooctyl adipate in group C alone; and 1,3-dimethylcyclopentanol, 2-octanone, and trimethylsilane in group D alone. While, no specific flavor compounds were identified in group B. All these flavor compounds covered 12 types of hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, hydroxybenzenes, acids, ketones, esters, sulfides, furans, alkenes, and pyrrole. Besides, we analyzed 14 flavor compounds with different flavors combining with previous studies. The flavor compounds in longissimus muscles might be closely related to the breeds, and the hybrid of S. scrofa × Bamei pig had the most flavor compounds in raw longissimus muscle. PMID:25052201

  14. Spatial orientation of semicircular canals and afferent sensitivity vectors in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Dickman, J D

    1996-09-01

    Rotational head motion in vertebrates is detected by the semicircular canal system, whose innervating primary afferent fibers carry information about movement in specific head planes. The semicircular canals have been qualitatively examined over a number of years, and the canal planes have been quantitatively characterized in several animal species. The present study first determined the geometric relationship between individual semicircular canals and between the canals and the stereotactic head planes in pigeons. Stereotactic measurements of multiple points along the circumference of the bony canals were taken, and the measured points fitted with a three-dimensional planar surface. Direction normals to the plane's surface were calculated and used to define angles between semicircular canal pairs. Because of the unusual shape of the anterior semicircular canals in pigeons, two planes, a major and a minor, were fitted to the canal's course. Calculated angle values for all canals indicated that the horizontal and posterior semicircular canals are nearly orthogonal, but the anterior canals have substantial deviations from orthogonality with other canal planes. Next, the responses of the afferent fibers that innervate each of the semicircular canals to 0.5 Hz sinusoidal rotation about an earth-vertical axis were obtained. The head orientation relative to the rotation axis was systematically varied so that directions of maximum sensitivity for each canal afferent could be determined. These sensitivity vectors were then compared with the canal plane direction normals. The afferents that innervated specific semicircular canals formed homogeneous clusters of sensitivity vectors in different head planes. The horizontal and posterior afferents had average sensitivity vectors that were largely co-incident with the innervated canal plane direction normals. Anterior canal afferents, however, appeared to synthesize contributions from the major and minor plane components of the

  15. Spatial orientation of semicircular canals and afferent sensitivity vectors in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    Rotational head motion in vertebrates is detected by the semicircular canal system, whose innervating primary afferent fibers carry information about movement in specific head planes. The semicircular canals have been qualitatively examined over a number of years, and the canal planes have been quantitatively characterized in several animal species. The present study first determined the geometric relationship between individual semicircular canals and between the canals and the stereotactic head planes in pigeons. Stereotactic measurements of multiple points along the circumference of the bony canals were taken, and the measured points fitted with a three-dimensional planar surface. Direction normals to the plane's surface were calculated and used to define angles between semicircular canal pairs. Because of the unusual shape of the anterior semicircular canals in pigeons, two planes, a major and a minor, were fitted to the canal's course. Calculated angle values for all canals indicated that the horizontal and posterior semicircular canals are nearly orthogonal, but the anterior canals have substantial deviations from orthogonality with other canal planes. Next, the responses of the afferent fibers that innervate each of the semicircular canals to 0.5 Hz sinusoidal rotation about an earth-vertical axis were obtained. The head orientation relative to the rotation axis was systematically varied so that directions of maximum sensitivity for each canal afferent could be determined. These sensitivity vectors were then compared with the canal plane direction normals. The afferents that innervated specific semicircular canals formed homogeneous clusters of sensitivity vectors in different head planes. The horizontal and posterior afferents had average sensitivity vectors that were largely co-incident with the innervated canal plane direction normals. Anterior canal afferents, however, appeared to synthesize contributions from the major and minor plane components of the

  16. Differential segmental strain during active lengthening in a large biarticular thigh muscle during running

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Jennifer A.; Ellerby, David J.; Marsh, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The iliotibialis lateralis pars postacetabularis (ILPO) is the largest muscle in the hindlimb of the guinea fowl and is thought to play an important role during the stance phase of running, both absorbing and producing work. Using sonomicrometry and electromyography, we examined whether the ILPO experiences differential strain between proximal, central and distal portions of the posterior fascicles. When the ILPO is being lengthened while active, the distal portion was found to lengthen significantly more than either the proximal or central portions of the muscle. Our data support the hypothesis that the distal segment lengthened farther and faster because it began activity at shorter sarcomere lengths on the ascending limb of the length–tension curve. Probably because of the self-stabilizing effects of operating on the ascending limb of the length–tension curve, all segments reached the end of lengthening and started shortening at the same sarcomere length. During shortening, this similarity in sarcomere length among the segments was maintained, as predicted from force–velocity effects, and shortening strain was similar in all segments. The differential active strain during active lengthening is thus ultimately determined by differences in strain during the passive portion of the cycle. The sarcomere lengths of all segments of the fascicles were similar at the end of active shortening, but after the passive portion of the cycle the distal segment was shorter. Differential strain in the segments during the passive portion of the cycle may be caused by differential joint excursions at the knee and hip acting on the ends of the muscle and being transmitted differentially by the passive visco-elastic properties of the muscle. Alternatively, the differential passive strain could be due to the action of active or passive muscles in the thigh that transmit force to the IPLO in shear. Based on basic sarcomere dynamics we predict that differential strain is

  17. Fatigue-related firing of muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of ipsilateral but not contralateral lower limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David S; Fitzpatrick, Siobhan C; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2015-02-15

    During fatiguing upper limb exercise, maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents can limit voluntary drive to muscles within the same limb. It is not known if this effect occurs in the lower limb. We investigated the effects of group III/IV muscle afferent firing from fatigued ipsilateral and contralateral extensor muscles and ipsilateral flexor muscles of the knee on voluntary activation of the knee extensors. In three experiments, we examined voluntary activation of the knee extensors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by femoral nerve stimulation. Subjects attended on 2 days for each experiment. On one day a sphygmomanometer cuff occluded blood flow of the fatigued muscles to maintain firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min extensor contraction (experiment 1; n = 9), mean voluntary activation was lower with than without maintained ischemia (47 ± 19% vs. 87 ± 8%, respectively; P < 0.001). After a 2-min knee flexor maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) (experiment 2; n = 8), mean voluntary activation was also lower with than without ischemia (59 ± 21% vs. 79 ± 9%; P < 0.01). After the contralateral (left) MVC (experiment 3; n = 8), mean voluntary activation of the right leg was similar with or without ischemia (92 ± 6% vs. 93 ± 4%; P = 0.65). After fatiguing exercise, activity in group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle and nonfatigued antagonist muscles in the same leg. However, group III/IV muscle afferents from the fatigued left leg had no effect on the unfatigued right leg. This suggests that any "crossover" of central fatigue in the lower limbs is not mediated by group III/IV muscle afferents. PMID:25525208

  18. Targeted Collection of Plasmid DNA in Large and Growing Animal Muscles 6 Weeks after DNA Vaccination with and without Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Dory, Daniel; Le Moigne, Vincent; Cariolet, Roland; Béven, Véronique; Keranflec'h, André; Jestin, André

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccination has been developed in the last two decades in human and animal species as a promising alternative to conventional vaccination. It consists in the injection, in the muscle, for example, of plasmid DNA encoding the vaccinating polypeptide. Electroporation which forces the entrance of the plasmid DNA in cells at the injection point has been described as a powerful and promising strategy to enhance DNA vaccine efficacy. Due to the fact that the vaccine is composed of DNA, close attention on the fate of the plasmid DNA upon vaccination has to be taken into account, especially at the injection point. To perform such studies, the muscle injection point has to be precisely recovered and collected several weeks after injection. This is even more difficult for large and growing animals. A technique has been developed to localize precisely and collect efficiently the muscle injection points in growing piglets 6 weeks after DNA vaccination accompanied or not by electroporation. Electroporation did not significantly increase the level of remaining plasmids compared to nonelectroporated piglets, and, in all the cases, the levels were below the limit recommended by the FDA to research integration events of plasmid DNA into the host DNA. PMID:26380318

  19. Intensity and frequency dependence of laryngeal afferent inputs to respiratory hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, S W

    1997-12-01

    Inspiratory hypoglossal motoneurons (IHMs) mediate contraction of the genioglossus muscle and contribute to the regulation of upper airway patency. Intracellular recordings were obtained from antidromically identified IHMs in anesthetized, vagotomized cats, and IHM responses to electrical activation of superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) afferent fibers at various frequencies and intensities were examined. SLN stimulus frequencies <2 Hz evoked an excitatory-inhibitory postsynaptic potential (EPSP-IPSP) sequence or only an IPSP in most IHMs that did not change in amplitude as the stimulus was maintained. During sustained stimulus frequencies of 5-10 Hz, there was a reduction in the amplitude of SLN-evoked IPSPs with time with variable changes in the EPSP. At stimulus frequencies >25 Hz, the amplitude of EPSPs and IPSPs was reduced over time. At a given stimulus frequency, increasing stimulus intensity enhanced the decay of the SLN-evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). Frequency-dependent attenuation of SLN inputs to IHMs also occurred in newborn kittens. These results suggest that activation of SLN afferents evokes different PSP responses in IHMs depending on the stimulus frequency. At intermediate frequencies, inhibitory inputs are selectively filtered so that excitatory inputs predominate. At higher frequencies there was no discernible SLN-evoked PSP temporally locked to the SLN stimuli. Alterations in SLN-evoked PSPs could play a role in the coordination of genioglossal contraction during respiration, swallowing, and other complex motor acts where laryngeal afferents are activated. PMID:9390960

  20. Role of primary afferents in the developmental regulation of motor axon synapse numbers on Renshaw cells.

    PubMed

    Siembab, Valerie C; Gomez-Perez, Laura; Rotterman, Travis M; Shneider, Neil A; Alvarez, Francisco J

    2016-06-15

    Motor function in mammalian species depends on the maturation of spinal circuits formed by a large variety of interneurons that regulate motoneuron firing and motor output. Interneuron activity is in turn modulated by the organization of their synaptic inputs, but the principles governing the development of specific synaptic architectures unique to each premotor interneuron are unknown. For example, Renshaw cells receive, at least in the neonate, convergent inputs from sensory afferents (likely Ia) and motor axons, raising the question of whether they interact during Renshaw cell development. In other well-studied neurons, such as Purkinje cells, heterosynaptic competition between inputs from different sources shapes synaptic organization. To examine the possibility that sensory afferents modulate synaptic maturation on developing Renshaw cells, we used three animal models in which afferent inputs in the ventral horn are dramatically reduced (ER81(-/-) knockout), weakened (Egr3(-/-) knockout), or strengthened (mlcNT3(+/-) transgenic). We demonstrate that increasing the strength of sensory inputs on Renshaw cells prevents their deselection and reduces motor axon synaptic density, and, in contrast, absent or diminished sensory afferent inputs correlate with increased densities of motor axons synapses. No effects were observed on other glutamatergic inputs. We conclude that the early strength of Ia synapses influences their maintenance or weakening during later development and that heterosynaptic influences from sensory synapses during early development regulates the density and organization of motor inputs on mature Renshaw cells. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1892-1919, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26660356

  1. Effects of movement-related afferent inputs on spinal reflexes evoked by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation during robot-assisted passive stepping.

    PubMed

    Masugi, Yohei; Kawashima, Noritaka; Inoue, Daisuke; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-08-01

    Studies of robot-assisted passive stepping paradigms have reported that movement-related afferent inputs strongly inhibit the excitability of the Hoffmann (H) reflex in the soleus (Sol) during walking. However, it is unknown if movement-related afferent inputs have the same effect on the excitability of spinal reflexes in the other lower-limb muscles that are involved in normal walking in healthy subjects. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of movement-related afferent inputs on the spinal reflexes in lower-limb muscles during walking. Spinal reflexes that were elicited by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation (tSCS) were recorded during passive air standing and air stepping at three stepping velocities (stride frequencies: 14, 25, and 36 strides/min). The amplitude of the spinal reflexes was reduced in most of the recorded muscles during passive air stepping compared with air standing. Furthermore, in the Sol and lateral gastrocnemius, the amplitude of the reflexes during air stepping significantly decreased as stride frequency increased. These results demonstrate that movement-related afferent inputs inhibit spinal reflexes in the Sol and other lower-limb muscles during walking. PMID:27235576

  2. Neurogenic muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-08-01

    Muscle cramps are sustained, painful contractions of muscle and are prevalent in patients with and without medical conditions. The objective of this review is to present updates on the mechanism, investigation and treatment of neurogenic muscle cramps. PubMed and Embase databases were queried between January 1980 and July 2014 for English-language human studies. The American Academy of Neurology classification of studies (classes I-IV) was used to assess levels of evidence. Mechanical disruption, ephaptic transmission, disruption of sensory afferents and persistent inward currents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurogenic cramps. Investigations are directed toward identifying physiological triggers or medical conditions predisposing to cramps. Although cramps can be self-limiting, disabling or sustained muscle cramps should prompt investigation for underlying medical conditions. Lifestyle modifications, treatment of underlying conditions, stretching, B-complex vitamins, diltiezam, mexiletine, carbamazepine, tetrahydrocannabinoid, leveteracitam and quinine sulfate have shown evidence for treatment. PMID:25673127

  3. Large Asymmetric Hypertrophy of Rectus Abdominis Muscle in Professional Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin; Idoate, Fernando; Dorado, Cecilia; Alayón, Santiago; Calbet, Jose A. L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the volume and degree of asymmetry of the musculus rectus abdominis (RA) in professional tennis players. Methods The volume of the RA was determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 8 professional male tennis players and 6 non-active male control subjects. Results Tennis players had 58% greater RA volume than controls (P = 0.01), due to hypertrophy of both the dominant (34% greater volume, P = 0.02) and non-dominant (82% greater volume, P = 0.01) sides, after accounting for age, the length of the RA muscle and body mass index (BMI) as covariates. In tennis players, there was a marked asymmetry in the development of the RA, which volume was 35% greater in the non-dominant compared to the dominant side (P<0.001). In contrast, no side-to-side difference in RA volume was observed in the controls (P = 0.75). The degree of side-to-side asymmetry increased linearly from the first lumbar disc to the pubic symphysis (r = 0.97, P<0.001). Conclusions Professional tennis is associated with marked hypertrophy of the musculus rectus abdominis, which achieves a volume that is 58% greater than in non-active controls. Rectus abdominis hypertrophy is more marked in the non-dominant than in the dominant side, particularly in the more distal regions. Our study supports the concept that humans can differentially recruit both rectus abdominis but also the upper and lower regions of each muscle. It remains to be determined if this disequilibrium raises the risk of injury. PMID:21209832

  4. Response properties of pigeon otolith afferents to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, X.; Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the sensitivity to sinusoidal linear accelerations in the plane of the utricular macula was tested in afferents. The head orientation relative to the translation axis was varied in order to determine the head position that elicited the maximal and minimal responses for each afferent. The response gain and phase values obtained to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz linear acceleration stimuli were then plotted as a function of head orientation and a modified cosine function was fit to the data. From the best-fit cosine function, the predicted head orientations that would produce the maximal and minimal response gains were estimated. The estimated maximum response gains to linear acceleration in the utricular plane for the afferents varied between 75 and 1420 spikes s-1 g-1. The mean maximal gains for all afferents to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration stimuli were 282 and 367 spikes s-1 g-1, respectively. The minimal response gains were essentially zero for most units. The response phases always led linear acceleration and remained constant for each afferent, regardless of head orientation. These response characteristics indicate that otolith afferents are cosine tuned and behave as one-dimensional linear accelerometers. The directions of maximal sensitivity to linear acceleration for the afferents varied throughout the plane of the utricle; however, most vectors were directed out of the opposite ear near the interaural axis. The response dynamics of the afferents were tested using stimulus frequencies ranging between 0.25 Hz and 10 Hz (0.1 g peak acceleration). Across stimulus frequencies, most afferents had increasing gains and constant phase values. These dynamic properties for individual afferents were fit with a simple transfer function that included three parameters: a mechanical time constant, a gain constant, and a fractional order distributed adaptation operator.

  5. Severe hypoxia affects exercise performance independently of afferent feedback and peripheral fatigue.

    PubMed

    Millet, Guillaume Y; Muthalib, Makii; Jubeau, Marc; Laursen, Paul B; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2012-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that hypoxia centrally affects performance independently of afferent feedback and peripheral fatigue, we conducted two experiments under complete vascular occlusion of the exercising muscle under different systemic O(2) environmental conditions. In experiment 1, 12 subjects performed repeated submaximal isometric contractions of the elbow flexor to exhaustion (RCTE) with inspired O(2) fraction fixed at 9% (severe hypoxia, SevHyp), 14% (moderate hypoxia, ModHyp), 21% (normoxia, Norm), or 30% (hyperoxia, Hyper). The number of contractions (performance), muscle (biceps brachii), and prefrontal near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) parameters and high-frequency paired-pulse (PS100) evoked responses to electrical muscle stimulation were monitored. In experiment 2, 10 subjects performed another RCTE in SevHyp and Norm conditions in which the number of contractions, biceps brachii electromyography responses to electrical nerve stimulation (M wave), and transcranial magnetic stimulation responses (motor-evoked potentials, MEP, and cortical silent period, CSP) were recorded. Performance during RCTE was significantly reduced by 10-15% in SevHyp (arterial O(2) saturation, SpO(2) = ∼75%) compared with ModHyp (SpO(2) = ∼90%) or Norm/Hyper (SpO(2) > 97%). Performance reduction in SevHyp occurred despite similar 1) metabolic (muscle NIRS parameters) and functional (changes in PS100 and M wave) muscle states and 2) MEP and CSP responses, suggesting comparable corticospinal excitability and spinal and cortical inhibition between SevHyp and Norm. It is concluded that, in SevHyp, performance and central drive can be altered independently of afferent feedback and peripheral fatigue. It is concluded that submaximal performance in SevHyp is partly reduced by a mechanism related directly to brain oxygenation. PMID:22323647

  6. Control of ankle extensor muscle activity in walking cats.

    PubMed

    Hatz, Kathrin; Mombaur, Katja; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2012-11-01

    Our objective was to gain insight into the relative importance of feedforward control and different proprioceptive feedback pathways to ongoing ankle extensor activity during walking in the conscious cat. We asked whether the modulation of stance phase muscle activity is due primarily to proprioceptive feedback and whether the same proprioceptive gains and feedforward commands can automatically generate the muscle activity required for changes in walking slope. To test these hypotheses, we analyzed previously collected muscle activity and mechanics data from cats with an isolated medial gastrocnemius muscle walking along a sloped pegway. Models of proprioceptor dynamics predicted afferent activity from the measured muscle mechanics. We modeled muscle activity as the weighted sum of the activity predicted from the different proprioceptive pathways and a simple model of central drive. We determined the unknown model parameters using optimization procedures that minimized the error between the predicted and measured muscle activity. We found that the modulation of muscle activity within the stance phase and across walking slopes is indeed well described by neural control that employs constant central drive and constant proprioceptive feedback gains. Furthermore, it is force feedback from Ib afferents that is primarily responsible for modulating muscle activity; group II afferent feedback makes a small contribution to tonic activity, and Ia afferent feedback makes no contribution. Force feedback combined with tonic central drive appears to provide a simple control mechanism for automatically compensating for changes in terrain without requiring different commands from the brain or even modification of central nervous system gains. PMID:22933727

  7. Effect of Microgravity on Afferent Innervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Presentations and publications are: (1) an audiovisual summary web presentation on results from SLM-MIR avian experiments. A color presentation summarizing results from the SLM-MIR and STS-29 avian experiments; (2) color threshold and ratio of S 100B MAP5, NF68/200, GABA and GAD; (3) chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents; (4) microgravity in the STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery affected the vestibular system of chick embryos; (5) expression of S 100B in sensory and secretory cells of the vertebrate inner ear; (6) otoconia biogenesis, phylogeny, composition and functional attributes;(7) the glycan keratin sulfate in inner ear crystals; (8) elliptical-P cells in the avian perilymphatic interface of the tegmentum vasculosum; and (9) LAMP2c and S100B upregulation in brain stem after VIIIth nerve deafferentation.

  8. Chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, H.; Chen, X.; Hartsfield, J. F.; Hara, J.; Martin, D.; Fermin, C. D.

    1998-01-01

    Neurons from the vestibular (VG) and the statoacoustic (SAG) ganglion of the chick (Gallus domesticus) were evaluated histologically and morphometrically. Embryos at stages 34 (E8 days), 39 (E13 days) and 44 (E18 days) were sacrificed and temporal bones microdissected. Specimens were embedded in JB-4 methacrylate plastic, and stained with a mixture of 0.2% toluidine blue (TB) and 0.1% basic Fuschin in 25% ethanol or with a mixture of 2% TB and 1% paraphenylenediamine (PDA) for axon and myelin measurement study. Images of the VIIIth nerve were produced by a V150 (R) color imaging system and the contour of 200-300 neuronal bodies (perikarya) was traced directly on a video screen with a mouse in real time. The cross-sectional area of VG perikarya was 67.29 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 128.46 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 275.85 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). The cross-sectional area of SAG perikarya was 62.44 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 102.05 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 165.02 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). A significant cross-sectional area increase of the VG perikarya between stage 39 (E13) and stage 44 (E18) was determined. We randomly measured the cross-sectional area of myelin and axoplasm of hatchling afferent nerves, and found a correspondence between axoplasmic and myelin cross-sectional area in the utricular, saccular and semicircular canal nerve branches of the nerve. The results suggest that the period between stage 34 (E8) and 39 (E13) is a critical period for afferent neuronal development. Physiological and behavioral vestibular properties of developing and maturing hatchlings may change accordingly. The results compliment previous work by other investigators and provide valuable anatomical measures useful to correlate physiological data obtained from stimulation of the whole nerve or its parts.

  9. Circadian variation in gastric vagal afferent mechanosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kentish, Stephen J; Frisby, Claudine L; Kennaway, David J; Wittert, Gary A; Page, Amanda J

    2013-12-01

    Food intake is coordinated to cellular metabolism by clock gene expression with a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus synchronized by light exposure. Gastric vagal afferents play a role in regulating food intake, but it is unknown whether they exhibit circadian variation in their mechanosensitivity. We aimed to determine whether gastric vagal afferents express clock genes and whether their response to mechanical stimuli oscillates throughout the light/dark cycle. Nodose ganglia were collected from 8-week-old female C57BL/6 mice every 3 h starting at lights off (1800 h) to quantify Bmal1, Per1, Per2, and Nr1d1 mRNA by qRT-PCR. Additionally in vitro single-fiber recordings of gastric vagal mechanoreceptors were taken at all time points. Per1, Per2, Bmal1, and Nr1d1 mRNA is expressed in the nodose ganglia and levels oscillated over a 24 h period. In mice fed ad libitum, gastric content was 3 times higher at 0000 h and 0300 h than 1200 h. The response of tension receptors to 3 g stretch was reduced by up to 70% at 2100 h, 0000 h, and 0300 h compared with 1200 h. Gastric mucosal receptor response to stroking with a 50 mg von Frey hair was 3 times greater at 1200 h and 1500 h than the response at 0000 h. Similar findings were obtained in mice fasted for 6 h or maintained in darkness for 3 d before study. Therefore, these changes do not result from food intake or the light/dark cycle. Thus, gastric vagal mechanoreceptors display circadian rhythm, which may act to control food intake differentially at different times of the day. PMID:24305819

  10. Microcystin accumulation in liver and muscle of tilapia in two large Brazilian hydroelectric reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Deblois, Charles P; Aranda-Rodriguez, Rocio; Giani, Alessandra; Bird, David F

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to measure levels of the toxin microcystin in different tissues of fish known to feed on cyanobacteria during toxic bloom events. Wild Nile and redbreast tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus and Tilapia rendalli) were sampled from the catch of artisanal fishermen at eutrophic stations of Funil and Furnas reservoirs in southeastern Brazil. Phytoplankton communities in the two reservoirs were quite different taxonomically, but not dissimilar in microcystin content (200 microg g dry weight (DW) seston(-1) at Funil, 800 microg gDW seston(-1) at Furnas). All of the 27 fish sampled contained microcystin, ranging from 0.8 to 32.1 microg g liver(-1) and from 0.9 to 12.0 ng g muscle(-1). Most microcystin variants found in seston were also found in fish liver. T. rendalli had the lowest concentration in both tissues when compared to O. niloticus. In both reservoirs, one of every four fish sampled, always O. niloticus, had a level of microcystins beyond the World Health Organization tolerable daily intake (8 ng g tissue(-1)) and represented a risk for consumers. It is possible that closer study of inter-species variability in toxin burden in cyanobacteria-impacted water bodies will permit the development of guidelines for fish consumption that will better protect public health. PMID:18067935

  11. Effect of estrogen on vagal afferent projections to the brainstem in the female.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John; Caverson, Monica M

    2016-04-01

    The effects of 17β-estradiol (E) on the distribution and density of brainstem projections of small or large diameter primary vagal afferents were investigated in Wistar rats using transganglionic transport of wheat germ agglutinin- (WGA; preferentially transported by non-myelinated afferent C-fibers; 2%), or cholera toxin B-subunit- (CTB, 5%; preferentially transported by large myelinated afferent A-fibers) conjugated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in combination with the tetramethylbenzidine method in age matched ovariectomized (OVX) only or OVX and treated with E (OVX+E; 30 pg/ml plasma) females for 12 weeks. Additionally, these projections were compared to aged matched males. Unilateral microinjection of WGA-HRP into the nodose ganglion resulted in dense anterograde labeling bilaterally, with an ipsilateral predominance in several subnuclei of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and in area postrema that was greatest in OVX+E animals compared to OVX only and males. Moderately dense anterograde labeling was also observed in paratrigeminal nucleus (PAT) of the OVX+E animals. CTB-HRP produced less dense anterograde labeling in the NTS complex, but had a wider distribution within the brainstem including the area postrema, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, PAT, the nucleus ambiguus complex and ventrolateral medulla in all groups. The distribution of CTB-HRP anterograde labeling was densest in OVX+E, less dense in OVX only females and least dense in male rats. Little, if any, labeling was found within PAT in males using either WGA-or CTB-HRP. Taken together, these data suggest that small, non-myelinated (WGA-labeled) and large myelinated (CTB-labeled) diameter vagal afferents projecting to brainstem autonomic areas are differentially affected by circulating levels of estrogen. These effects of estrogen on connectivity may contribute to the sex differences observed in central autonomic mechanisms between gender, and in females with and without estrogen. PMID

  12. Differential effects of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide on myogenic signaling, membrane potential, and contractions of mouse renal afferent arterioles.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingli; Lai, En Yin; Wellstein, Anton; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2016-06-01

    Myogenic contraction is the principal component of renal autoregulation that protects the kidney from hypertensive barotrauma. Contractions are initiated by a rise in perfusion pressure that signals a reduction in membrane potential (Em) of vascular smooth muscle cells to activate voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. Since ROS have variable effects on myogenic tone, we investigated the hypothesis that superoxide (O2 (·-)) and H2O2 differentially impact myogenic contractions. The myogenic contractions of mouse isolated and perfused single afferent arterioles were assessed from changes in luminal diameter with increasing perfusion pressure (40-80 mmHg). O2 (·-), H2O2, and Em were assessed by fluorescence microscopy during incubation with paraquat to increase O2 (·-) or with H2O2 Paraquat enhanced O2 (·-) generation and myogenic contractions (-42 ± 4% vs. -19 ± 4%, P < 0.005) that were blocked by SOD but not by catalase and signaled via PKC. In contrast, H2O2 inhibited the effects of paraquat and reduced myogenic contractions (-10 ± 1% vs. -19 ± 2%, P < 0.005) and signaled via PKG. O2 (·-) activated Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels that reduced Em, whereas H2O2 activated Ca(2+)-activated and voltage-gated K(+) channels that increased Em Blockade of voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels prevented the enhanced myogenic contractions with paraquat without preventing the reduction in Em Myogenic contractions were independent of the endothelium and largely independent of nitric oxide. We conclude that O2 (·-) and H2O2 activate different signaling pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells linked to discreet membrane channels with opposite effects on Em and voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels and therefore have opposite effects on myogenic contractions. PMID:27053691

  13. Regional intravascular delivery of AAV-2-F.IX to skeletal muscle achieves long-term correction of hemophilia B in a large animal model.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Valder R; Stedman, Hansell H; Nichols, Timothy C; Haskins, Mark E; Nicholson, Matthew; Herzog, Roland W; Couto, Linda B; High, Katherine A

    2005-05-01

    In earlier work, we showed that adeno-associated virus-mediated delivery of a Factor IX gene to skeletal muscle by direct intramuscular injection resulted in therapeutic levels of circulating Factor IX in mice. However, achievement of target doses in humans proved impractical because of the large number of injections required. We used a novel intravascular delivery technique to achieve successful transduction of extensive areas of skeletal muscle in a large animal with hemophilia. We provide here the first report of long-term (> 3 years, with observation ongoing), robust Factor IX expression (circulating levels of 4%-14%) by muscle-directed gene transfer in a large animal, resulting in essentially complete correction of the bleeding disorder in hemophilic dogs. The results of this translational study establish an experimental basis for clinical studies of this delivery method in humans with hemophilia B. These findings also have immediate relevance for gene transfer in patients with muscular dystrophy. PMID:15479726

  14. Vagal Afferent Innervation of the Airways in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Stuart B; Undem, Bradley J

    2016-07-01

    Vagal sensory neurons constitute the major afferent supply to the airways and lungs. Subsets of afferents are defined by their embryological origin, molecular profile, neurochemistry, functionality, and anatomical organization, and collectively these nerves are essential for the regulation of respiratory physiology and pulmonary defense through local responses and centrally mediated neural pathways. Mechanical and chemical activation of airway afferents depends on a myriad of ionic and receptor-mediated signaling, much of which has yet to be fully explored. Alterations in the sensitivity and neurochemical phenotype of vagal afferent nerves and/or the neural pathways that they innervate occur in a wide variety of pulmonary diseases, and as such, understanding the mechanisms of vagal sensory function and dysfunction may reveal novel therapeutic targets. In this comprehensive review we discuss historical and state-of-the-art concepts in airway sensory neurobiology and explore mechanisms underlying how vagal sensory pathways become dysfunctional in pathological conditions. PMID:27279650

  15. Differential central projections of vestibular afferents in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Fang, Q.

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether a differential distribution of vestibular afferent information to central nuclear neurons is present in pigeons was studied using neural tracer compounds. Discrete tracing of afferent fibers innervating the individual semicircular canal and otolith organs was produced by sectioning individual branches of the vestibular nerve that innervate the different receptor organs and applying crystals of horseradish peroxidase, or a horseradish peroxidase/cholera toxin mixture, or a biocytin compound for neuronal uptake and transport. Afferent fibers and their terminal distributions within the brainstem and cerebellum were visualized subsequently. Discrete areas in the pigeon central nervous system that receive primary vestibular input include the superior, dorsal lateral, ventral lateral, medial, descending, and tangential vestibular nuclei; the A and B groups; the intermediate, medial, and lateral cerebellar nuclei; and the nodulus, the uvula, and the paraflocculus. Generally, the vertical canal afferents projected heavily to medial regions in the superior and descending vestibular nuclei as well as the A group. Vertical canal projections to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei were observed but were less prominent. Horizontal canal projections to the superior and descending vestibular nuclei were much more centrally located than those of the vertical canals. A more substantial projection to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei was seen with horizontal canal afferents compared to vertical canal fibers. Afferents innervating the utricle and saccule terminated generally in the lateral regions of all vestibular nuclei in areas that were separate from the projections of the semicircular canals. In addition, utricular fibers projected to regions in the vestibular nuclei that overlapped with the horizontal semicircular canal terminal fields, whereas saccular afferents projected to regions that received vertical canal fiber terminations. Lagenar

  16. Acid-sensing by airway afferent nerves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lu-Yuan; Gu, Qihai; Xu, Fadi; Hong, Ju-Lun

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation of acid aerosol or aspiration of acid solution evokes a stimulatory effect on airway C-fiber and Aδ afferents, which in turn causes airway irritation and triggers an array of defense reflex responses (e.g., cough, reflex bronchoconstriction, etc.). Tissue acidosis can also occur locally in the respiratory tract as a result of ischemia or inflammation, such as in the airways of asthmatic patients during exacerbation. The action of proton on the airway sensory neurons is generated by activation of two different current species: a transient (rapidly activating and inactivating) current mediated through the acid-sensing ion channels, and a slowly activating and sustained current mediated through the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. In view of the recent findings that the expression and/or sensitivity of TRPV1 are up-regulated in the airway sensory nerves during chronic inflammatory reaction, the proton-evoked irritant effects on these nerves may play an important part in the manifestation of various symptoms associated with airway inflammatory diseases. PMID:23524016

  17. Fatigue-related firing of distal muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of proximal muscles of the same limb.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2014-02-15

    With fatiguing exercise, firing of group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and force of the exercised muscles. These afferents can also act across agonist/antagonist pairs, reducing voluntary activation and force in nonfatigued muscles. We hypothesized that maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents after a fatiguing adductor pollicis (AP) contraction would decrease voluntary activation and force of AP and ipsilateral elbow flexors. In two experiments (n = 10) we examined voluntary activation of AP and elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by ulnar nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex, respectively. Inflation of a sphygmomanometer cuff after a 2-min AP maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) blocked circulation of the hand for 2 min and maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min AP MVC, maximal AP voluntary activation was lower with than without ischemia (56.2 ± 17.7% vs. 76.3 ± 14.6%; mean ± SD; P < 0.05) as was force (40.3 ± 12.8% vs. 57.1 ± 13.8% peak MVC; P < 0.05). Likewise, after a 2-min AP MVC, elbow flexion voluntary activation was lower with than without ischemia (88.3 ± 7.5% vs. 93.6 ± 3.9%; P < 0.05) as was torque (80.2 ± 4.6% vs. 86.6 ± 1.0% peak MVC; P < 0.05). Pain during ischemia was reported as Moderate to Very Strong. Postfatigue firing of group III/IV muscle afferents from the hand decreased voluntary drive and force of AP. Moreover, this effect decreased voluntary drive and torque of proximal unfatigued muscles, the elbow flexors. Fatigue-sensitive group III/IV muscle nociceptors act to limit voluntary drive not only to fatigued muscles but also to unfatigued muscles within the same limb. PMID:24356522

  18. Functional classification of afferent phrenic nerve fibres and diaphragmatic receptors in cats.

    PubMed

    Bałkowiec, A; Kukuła, K; Szulczyk, P

    1995-03-15

    1. Single afferent fibres with receptive fields in the diaphragm (272 units) dissected from the right phrenic nerve were classified according to the following properties: reaction to contraction of the diaphragm, resting activity, conduction velocity, location and properties of receptive fields, and reaction to injection of bradykinin and lactic acid into the internal thoracic artery. Nine additional fibres dissected from the phrenic nerve had receptive fields outside the diaphragm. The experiments were performed on chloralose-anaesthetized cats. 2. Ninety-six fibres (36%) had high resting activity when unloaded by contraction of the diaphragm, had low-threshold receptive fields in the muscle and were mostly group II and III fibres. They probably innervated muscle spindles. 3. Eighty-eight fibres (32%) were vigorously activated by contraction of the diaphragm. They had low-threshold receptive fields located in the musculotendinous border and central tendon. Their conduction velocity was in the range for group II and III fibres. We infer that they may innervate tendon organs. 4. Eighty-eight fibres (32%) were slightly affected or not affected by diaphragmatic contraction. They had low- and high-threshold receptive fields located mostly in the muscular part of the diaphragm, and negligible resting activity. Most of them were group III and IV afferent fibres and were activated when bradykinin and lactic acid were applied to their receptive fields. Possibly these low- and high-threshold receptors innervated diaphragmatic ergo- and nociceptors, respectively. 5. Sensory outflow from the diaphragm was found to be somatotopically organized, so that fibres with receptive fields in the sternocostal portion were predominantly located in the upper phrenic nerve root, and those with lumbar receptive fields were in the lower root. 6. It is concluded that the phrenic nerve contains fibres from several distinct classes of sensory receptors: muscle spindles, tendon organs

  19. Functional classification of afferent phrenic nerve fibres and diaphragmatic receptors in cats.

    PubMed Central

    Bałkowiec, A; Kukuła, K; Szulczyk, P

    1995-01-01

    1. Single afferent fibres with receptive fields in the diaphragm (272 units) dissected from the right phrenic nerve were classified according to the following properties: reaction to contraction of the diaphragm, resting activity, conduction velocity, location and properties of receptive fields, and reaction to injection of bradykinin and lactic acid into the internal thoracic artery. Nine additional fibres dissected from the phrenic nerve had receptive fields outside the diaphragm. The experiments were performed on chloralose-anaesthetized cats. 2. Ninety-six fibres (36%) had high resting activity when unloaded by contraction of the diaphragm, had low-threshold receptive fields in the muscle and were mostly group II and III fibres. They probably innervated muscle spindles. 3. Eighty-eight fibres (32%) were vigorously activated by contraction of the diaphragm. They had low-threshold receptive fields located in the musculotendinous border and central tendon. Their conduction velocity was in the range for group II and III fibres. We infer that they may innervate tendon organs. 4. Eighty-eight fibres (32%) were slightly affected or not affected by diaphragmatic contraction. They had low- and high-threshold receptive fields located mostly in the muscular part of the diaphragm, and negligible resting activity. Most of them were group III and IV afferent fibres and were activated when bradykinin and lactic acid were applied to their receptive fields. Possibly these low- and high-threshold receptors innervated diaphragmatic ergo- and nociceptors, respectively. 5. Sensory outflow from the diaphragm was found to be somatotopically organized, so that fibres with receptive fields in the sternocostal portion were predominantly located in the upper phrenic nerve root, and those with lumbar receptive fields were in the lower root. 6. It is concluded that the phrenic nerve contains fibres from several distinct classes of sensory receptors: muscle spindles, tendon organs

  20. Changes in vagal afferent drive alter tracheobronchial coughing in anesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Simera, Michal; Poliacek, Ivan; Veternik, Marcel; Babalova, Lucia; Kotmanova, Zuzana; Jakus, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Unilateral cooling of the vagus nerve (<5°C, blocking mainly conductivity of myelinated fibers) and unilateral vagotomy were employed to reduce cough afferent drive in order to evaluate the effects of these interventions on the temporal features of the cough reflex. Twenty pentobarbitone anesthetized, spontaneously breathing cats were used. Cough was induced by mechanical stimulation of the tracheobronchial airways. The number of coughs during vagal cooling was significantly decreased (p<0.001). Inspiratory cough efforts were reduced by approximately 30% (p<0.001) and expiratory motor drive by more than 80% (p<0.001). Temporal analysis showed prolonged inspiratory and expiratory phases, the total cycle duration, its active portion, and the interval between maxima of the diaphragm and the abdominal activity during coughing (p<0.001). There was no significant difference in the average effects on the cough reflex between cooling of the left or the right vagus nerve. Compared to control, vagal cooling produced no significant difference in heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure (p>0.05), however, cold block of vagal conduction reduced respiratory rate (p<0.001). Unilateral vagotomy significantly reduced cough number, cough-related diaphragmatic activity, and relative values of maximum expiratory esophageal pressure (all p<0.05). Our results indicate that reduced cough afferent drive (lower responsiveness) markedly attenuates the motor drive to respiratory pump muscles during coughing and alters cough temporal features. Differences in the effects of unilateral vagal cooling and vagotomy on coughing support an inhibitory role of sensory afferents that are relatively unaffected by cooling of the vagus nerve to 5°C on mechanically induced cough. PMID:27184303

  1. A quantitative study of cutaneous receptors and afferent fibres in the cat and rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A. G.; Iggo, A.

    1967-01-01

    1. The discharge in myelinated afferent fibres innervating hairs in anaesthetized cats and rabbits, dissected from the saphenous nerve, was recorded during controlled movements of the hairs. 2. Three types of rapidly adapting afferent unit were found and they innervated three kinds of hair follicle—down hair, guard hair and tylotrich. 3. The down hair units had low thresholds (critical slopes) and some of the guard hairs had the highest thresholds and least sensitivity to displacement. 4. There was a good fit to a power function for the relation between velocity of displacement of a hair and the frequency of discharge in the corresponding afferent fibre. 5. It is concluded that the rapidly adapting hair follicle receptors can function as efficient exact movement detectors. 6. Tylotrich follicles were often associated with touch corpuscles, but there was independent innervation of the rapidly adapting tylotrich follicle receptors and the slowly adapting touch corpuscle receptors. 7. The conduction velocities of large populations of myelinated cutaneous axons innervating cutaneous mechanoreceptors were measured in cats and rabbits. PMID:16992307

  2. The Effects of Group Relaxation Training/Large Muscle Exercise, and Parental Involvement on Attention to Task, Impulsivity, and Locus of Control among Hyperactive Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Sally S.; Omizo, Michael M.

    1984-01-01

    The study examined the effects of group relaxation training/large muscle exercise and parental involvement on attention to task, impulsivity, and locus of control among 34 hyperactive boys. Following treatment both experimental groups recorded significantly higher attention to task, lower impulsivity, and lower locus of control scores. (Author/CL)

  3. Limb venous distension evokes sympathetic activation via stimulation of the limb afferents in humans.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; McQuillan, Patrick M; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2012-08-15

    We have recently shown that a saline infusion in the veins of an arterially occluded human forearm evokes a systemic response with increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure. In this report, we examined whether this response was a reflex that was due to venous distension. Blood pressure (Finometer), heart rate, and MSNA (microneurography) were assessed in 14 young healthy subjects. In the saline trial (n = 14), 5% forearm volume normal saline was infused in an arterially occluded arm. To block afferents in the limb, 90 mg of lidocaine were added to the same volume of saline in six subjects during a separate visit. To examine whether interstitial perfusion of normal saline alone induced the responses, the same volume of albumin solution (5% concentration) was infused in 11 subjects in separate studies. Lidocaine abolished the MSNA and blood pressure responses seen with saline infusion. Moreover, compared with the saline infusion, an albumin infusion induced a larger (MSNA: Δ14.3 ± 2.7 vs. Δ8.5 ± 1.3 bursts/min, P < 0.01) and more sustained MSNA and blood pressure responses. These data suggest that venous distension activates afferent nerves and evokes a powerful systemic sympathoexcitatory reflex. We posit that the venous distension plays an important role in evoking the autonomic adjustments seen with postural stress in human subjects. PMID:22707559

  4. Afferent Arteriolar Dilation to 11,12-EET Analogs Involves PP2A Activity and Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Imig, John D.; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Reddy, D. Sudarshan; White, Richard E.; Falck, John R.

    2008-01-01

    The epoxygenase metabolite, 11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (11,12-EET), has renal vascular actions. 11,12-EET analogs have been developed to determine the structure activity relationship for 11,12-EET and as a tool to investigate signaling mechanisms responsible for afferent arteriolar dilation. We hypothesized that 11,12-EET mediated afferent arteriolar dilation involves increased phosphoprotein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and large-conductance calcium activated K+ (KCa) channels. We evaluated the chemically and/or metabolically stable 11,12-EET analogs: 11,12-EET-N-methylsulfonimide (11,12-EET-SI), 11-nonyloxy-undec-8(Z)-enoic acid (11,12-ether-EET-8-ZE), and 11,12-trans-oxidoeicosa-8(Z)-eonoic acid (11,12-tetra-EET-8-ZE). Afferent arteriolar responses were assessed. Activation of KCa channels by 11,12-EET analogs were established by single cell channel recordings in renal myocytes. Assessment of renal vascular responses revealed that 11,12-EET analogs increased afferent arteriolar diameter. Vasodilator responses to 11,12-EET analogs were abolished by K+ channel or PP2A inhibition. 11,12-EET analogs activated renal myocyte large-conductance KCa channels. 11,12-EET analogs increased cAMP by 2-fold and PP2A activity increased 3-8 fold in renal myocytes. PP2A inhibition did not significantly affect the 11,12-EET analog mediated increase in cAMP and PP2A increased renal myocyte KCa channel activity to a much greater extent than PKA. These data support the concept that 11,12-EET utilizes PP2A dependent pathways to activate large-conductance KCa channels and dilate the afferent arteriole. PMID:18260004

  5. Histaminergic afferent system in the cerebellum: structure and function.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zhu, Jing-Ning; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Histaminergic afferent system of the cerebellum, having been considered as an essential component of the direct hypothalamocerebellar circuits, originates from the tuberomammillary nucleus in the hypothalamus. Unlike the mossy fibers and climbing fibers, the histaminergic afferent fibers, a third type of cerebellar afferents, extend fine varicose fibers throughout the cerebellar cortex and nuclei. Histamine receptors, belonging to the family of G protein-coupled receptors, are widely present in the cerebellum. Through these histamine receptors, histamine directly excites Purkinje cells and granule cells in the cerebellar cortex, as well as the cerebellar nuclear neurons. Therefore, the histaminergic afferents parallelly modulate these dominant components in the cerebellar circuitry and consequently influence the final output of the cerebellum. In this way, the histaminergic afferent system actively participates in the cerebellum-mediated motor balance and coordination and nonsomatic functions. Accordingly, histaminergic reagents may become potential drugs for clinical treatment of cerebellar ataxia and other cerebellar disease. On the other hand, considering the hypothalamus is a high regulatory center for autonomic and visceral activities, the hypothalamocerebellar histaminergic fibers/projections, bridging the nonsomatic center to somatic structure, may play a critical role in the somatic-nonsomatic integration. PMID:26331029

  6. In vitro Functional Characterization of Mouse Colorectal Afferent Endings

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bin; Gebhart, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    This video demonstrates in detail an in vitro single-fiber electrophysiological recording protocol using a mouse colorectum-nerve preparation. The approach allows unbiased identification and functional characterization of individual colorectal afferents. Extracellular recordings of propagated action potentials (APs) that originate from one or a few afferent (i.e., single-fiber) receptive fields (RFs) in the colorectum are made from teased nerve fiber fascicles. The colorectum is removed with either the pelvic (PN) or lumbar splanchnic (LSN) nerve attached and opened longitudinally. The tissue is placed in a recording chamber, pinned flat and perfused with oxygenated Krebs solution. Focal electrical stimulation is used to locate the colorectal afferent endings, which are further tested by three distinct mechanical stimuli (blunt probing, mucosal stroking and circumferential stretch) to functionally categorize the afferents into five mechanosensitive classes. Endings responding to none of these mechanical stimuli are categorized as mechanically-insensitive afferents (MIAs). Both mechanosensitive and MIAs can be assessed for sensitization (i.e., enhanced response, reduced threshold, and/or acquisition of mechanosensitivity) by localized exposure of RFs to chemicals (e.g., inflammatory soup (IS), capsaicin, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)). We describe the equipment and colorectum–nerve recording preparation, harvest of colorectum with attached PN or LSN, identification of RFs in the colorectum, single-fiber recording from nerve fascicles, and localized application of chemicals to the RF. In addition, challenges of the preparation and application of standardized mechanical stimulation are also discussed. PMID:25651300

  7. Semicircular Canal Geometry, Afferent Sensitivity And Animal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hullar, Timothy A.

    2008-01-01

    The geometry of the semicircular canals has been used in evolutionary studies to predict the behaviors of extinct animals. These predictions have relied on an assumption that the responses of the canals can be determined from their dimensions, and that an organism’s behavior can be determined from these responses. However, the relationship between a canal’s sensitivity and its size is not well known. An intraspecies comparison among canal responses in each of three species (cat, squirrel monkey, and pigeon) was undertaken to evaluate various models of canal function and determine how their dimensions may be related to afferent physiology. All models predicted the responses of the cat afferents, but the models performed less well for squirrel monkey and pigeon. Possible causes for this discrepancy include incorrectly assuming that afferent responses accurately represent canal function, or errors in current biophysical models of the canals. These findings leave open the question as to how reliably canal anatomy can be used to estimate afferent responses and how closely afferent responses are related to behavior. Other labyrinthine features—such as orientation of the horizontal canal, which is reliably held near earth-horizontal across many species—may be better to use when extrapolating the posture and related behavior of extinct animals from labyrinthine morphology. PMID:16550591

  8. Evidence that antidromically stimulated vagal afferents activate inhibitory neurones innervating guinea-pig trachealis.

    PubMed Central

    Canning, B J; Undem, B J

    1994-01-01

    -selective agonist, acetyl-[Arg6, Sar9, Met (O2)11]-SP(6-11), elicited oesophagus-dependent relaxations of the trachealis that were abolished by oesophagus removal. Furthermore, pretreatment with the NK1-selective antagonists, CP 96345 and CP 99994, or pretreatment with a concentration of SR 48968 that also blocks NK3 receptors, markedly attenuated relaxations elicited by stimulation of the capsaicin-sensitive vagal pathways. 6. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that relaxations elicited by stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents involve tachykinin-mediated activation of peripheral NANC inhibitory neurones that are in some way associated with the oesophagus. The data also indicate that airway smooth muscle tone might be regulated by peripheral reflexes initiated by activation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent fibres. PMID:7869272

  9. An Unusual Case of Extranodal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Infiltrating Skeletal Muscle: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hatem, Joseph; Bogusz, Agata M.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is extranodal in approximately 40% of cases, arising in nearly any organ system. DLBCL involvement of soft tissue and in particular skeletal muscle is extremely rare, comprising less than 1% of all extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). We report a case of a 79-year-old man that presented with a DLBCL of the left triceps. In particular, we describe an unusual histologic appearance of pseudoglandular structures, resembling adenocarcinoma. We performed a review of lymphoma cases involving skeletal muscle diagnosed at our institution over the past 15 years as well as thorough PubMed review of the literature. We discuss the features of lymphoma involving skeletal muscle as it pertains to clinical characteristics, histologic subtype, tumor localization, diagnostic studies, therapy, and outcome. Finally, we highlight the diagnostic difficulties that can present in these rare and often challenging cases. PMID:27247818

  10. A binocular pupil model for simulation of relative afferent pupil defects and the swinging flashlight test.

    PubMed

    Privitera, Claudio M; Stark, Lawrence W

    2006-03-01

    Many important intracranial neural pathways are involved in the control of the two muscles of the human pupil and the observation and analysis of pupil responses to light or other stimuli is of great interest in many clinical procedures. The binocular pupil model presented in this document has a topology encompassing much of the complexity of the pupil system neurophysiology. The dynamic parameters of the model were matched against pupil experiments under multiple conditions. It is employed here to simulate responses to the swinging flashlight test, a procedure which is routinely practiced in ophthalmology to diagnose different degrees of relative afferent pupil defects often a consequence of severe optic nerve diseases or retinal dysfunctions. Other, not light-dependent, pupil stimuli are briefly discussed. PMID:16404612

  11. Transplantation of tectal tissue in rats. I. Organization of transplants and pattern of distribution of host afferents within them

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, R.D.; Harvey, A.R.

    1981-01-01

    We have examined the maturation of tectal tissue transplanted from fetal rats to the midbrain of newborns and have characterized the distribution of host retinal and cortical afferents within the transplants. The transplants develop characteristic internal order and connections which distinguish them from either embryonic cortex or retina placed in the same region. Host retinal afferents project to clearly circumscribed regions, where they synapse mainly on small dendrites or dendritic spines, and only rarely on vesicle-containing profiles. The retinorecipient areas contain few stained axons in neurofibrillar preparations and are almost always located at the surface of the transplant. There is very little overlap in the input from the two eyes into a single transplant even though the projections from each eye may lie adjacent to one another. Cortical afferents spread more broadly in the transplants, but are largely absent from areas of optic termination and from other more deeply located regions with sparse fiber staining properties. The observations suggest that when placed close to its normal location, tectal tissue can develop a number of features characteristic of normal superior colliculus. Appreciation of the internal order of the transplants makes it possible to investigate the cortical and retinal afferent pathways using physiological techniques.

  12. Thyroid hormone is required for the pruning of afferent type II spiral ganglion neurons in the mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, S; Balasubbu, S; Mustapha, M

    2016-01-15

    Afferent connections to the sensory inner (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs) in the cochlea refine and functionally mature during the thyroid hormone (TH)-critical period of inner ear development that occurs perinatally in rodents. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypothyroidism on afferent type II innervation to outer hair cells using the Snell dwarf mouse (Pit1(dw)). Using a transgenic approach to specifically label type II spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), we found that lack of TH causes persistence of excess type II SGN connections to the OHCs, as well as continued expression of the hair cell functional marker, otoferlin (OTOF), in the OHCs beyond the maturation period. We also observed a concurrent delay in efferent attachment to the OHCs. Supplementing with TH during the early postnatal period from postnatal day (P) 3 to P4 reversed the defect in type II SGN pruning but did not alter OTOF expression. Our results show that hypothyroidism causes a defect in the large-scale pruning of afferent type II SGNs in the cochlea, and a delay in efferent attachment and the maturation of OTOF expression. Our data suggest that the state of maturation of hair cells, as determined by OTOF expression, may not regulate the pruning of their afferent innervation. PMID:26592716

  13. Determinants of Spatial and Temporal Coding by Semicircular Canal Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Highstein, Stephen M.; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Holstein, Gay R.; Boyle, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    The vestibular semicircular canals are internal sensors that signal the magnitude, direction, and temporal properties of angular head motion. Fluid mechanics within the 3-canal labyrinth code the direction of movement and integrate angular acceleration stimuli over time. Directional coding is accomplished by decomposition of complex angular accelerations into 3 biomechanical components—one component exciting each of the 3 ampullary organs and associated afferent nerve bundles separately. For low-frequency angular motion stimuli, fluid displacement within each canal is proportional to angular acceleration. At higher frequencies, above the lower corner frequency, real-time integration is accomplished by viscous forces arising from the movement of fluid within the slender lumen of each canal. This results in angular velocity sensitive fluid displacements. Reflecting this, a subset of afferent fibers indeed report angular acceleration to the brain for low frequencies of head movement and report angular velocity for higher frequencies. However, a substantial number of afferent fibers also report angular acceleration, or a signal between acceleration and velocity, even at frequencies where the endolymph displacement is known to follow angular head velocity. These non-velocity-sensitive afferent signals cannot be attributed to canal biomechanics alone. The responses of non-velocity-sensitive cells include a mathematical differentiation (first-order or fractional) imparted by hair-cell and/or afferent complexes. This mathematical differentiation from velocity to acceleration cannot be attributed to hair cell ionic currents, but occurs as a result of the dynamics of synaptic transmission between hair cells and their primary afferent fibers. The evidence for this conclusion is reviewed below. PMID:15845995

  14. A novel role for TRPM8 in visceral afferent function.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea M; Hughes, Patrick A; Martin, Christopher M; Yang, Jing; Castro, Joel; Isaacs, Nicole J; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Brierley, Stuart M

    2011-07-01

    Transient receptor potential ion channel melastatin subtype 8 (TRPM8) is activated by cold temperatures and cooling agents, such as menthol and icilin. Compounds containing peppermint are reported to reduce symptoms of bowel hypersensitivity; however, the underlying mechanisms of action are unclear. Here we determined the role of TRPM8 in colonic sensory pathways. Laser capture microdissection, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence, and retrograde tracing were used to localise TRPM8 to colonic primary afferent neurons. In vitro extracellular single-fibre afferent recordings were used to determine the effect of TRPM8 channel activation on the chemosensory and mechanosensory function of colonic high-threshold afferent fibres. TRPM8 mRNA was present in colonic DRG neurons, whereas TRPM8 protein was present on nerve fibres throughout the wall of the colon. A subpopulation (24%, n=58) of splanchnic serosal and mesenteric afferents tested responded directly to icilin (5 μmol/L). Subsequently, icilin significantly desensitised afferents to mechanical stimulation (P<.0001; n=37). Of the splanchnic afferents responding to icilin, 21 (33%) also responded directly to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (3 μmol/L), and icilin reduced the direct chemosensory response to capsaicin. Icilin also prevented mechanosensory desensitization and sensitization induced by capsaicin and the TRPA1 agonist AITC (40 μmol/L), respectively. TRPM8 is present on a select population of colonic high threshold sensory neurons, which may also co-express TRPV1. TRPM8 couples to TRPV1 and TRPA1 to inhibit their downstream chemosensory and mechanosensory actions. PMID:21489690

  15. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  16. The afferent pupillary defect in acute optic neuritis.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, C J

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with acute optic neuritis were studied by the techniques of infrared pupillometry and visual evoked responses (VER) to pattern reversal. A relative afferent pupillary defect was found in all cases and the magnitude of this defect was found to be related to the amplitude, but not to the latency, of the VER. During follow-up the afferent defect was found to remain persistently abnormal while other methods of clinical evaluation could not demonstrate abnormality reliably. The amplitude of the VER also remained low. PMID:501365

  17. Contribution of Primary Afferent Input to Trigeminal Astroglial Hyperactivity, Cytokine Induction and NMDA Receptor Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Guo, W; Yang, K; Wei, F; Dubner, R; Ren, K

    2010-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that primary afferent inputs play a role in astroglial hyperactivity after tissue injury. We first injected complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, 0.05 ml, 1:1 oil/saline) into the masseter muscle, which upregulated glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of astrocytes, interleukin (IL)-1β an inflammatory cytokine, and phosphorylation of serine896 of the NR1 subunit (P-NR1) of the NMDA receptor in the subnuclei interpolaris/caudalis (Vi/Vc) transition zone, an important structure for processing trigeminal nociceptive input. Local anesthetic block with lidocaine (2%) of the masseter muscle at 10 min prior to injection of CFA into the same site significantly reduced the CFA-induced increase in GFAP, IL-1β and P-NR1 (p<0.05, n=4/group). We then tested the effect of peripheral electrical stimulation (ES). The ES protocol was burst stimulation consisting of trains of 4 square pulses (10-100 Hz, 0.1-3 mA, 0.5 ms pulse width). Under pentobarbital anesthesia, an ES was delivered every 0.2 s for a total of 30 min. The Vi/Vc tissues were processed for immunohistochemistry or western blot analysis at 10-120 min after ES. Compared to naive and SHAM-treated rats, there was increased immunoreactivity against GFAP, IL-1β and P-NR1 in the Vi/Vc in rats receiving ES. Double staining showed that IL-1β was selectively localized in GFAP-positive astroglia, and P-NR1-immunoreactivity was localized to neurons. These findings indicate that primary afferent inputs are necessary and sufficient to induce astroglial hyperactivity and upregulation of IL-1β, as well as neuronal NMDA receptor phosphorylation. PMID:21170295

  18. Predicted effects of nitric oxide and superoxide on the vasoactivity of the afferent arteriole.

    PubMed

    Layton, Anita T; Edwards, Aurélie

    2015-10-15

    We expanded a published mathematical model of an afferent arteriole smooth muscle cell in rat kidney (Edwards A, Layton, AT. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 306: F34-F48, 2014) to understand how nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O(2)(-)) modulate the arteriolar diameter and its myogenic response. The present model includes the kinetics of NO and O(2)(-) formation, diffusion, and reaction. Also included are the effects of NO and its second messenger cGMP on cellular Ca²⁺ uptake and efflux, Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ currents, and myosin light chain phosphatase activity. The model considers as well pressure-induced increases in O(2)(-) production, O(2)(-)-mediated regulation of L-type Ca²⁺ channel conductance, and increased O(2)(-) production in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR). Our results indicate that elevated O(2)(-) production in SHR is sufficient to account for observed differences between normotensive and hypertensive rats in the response of the afferent arteriole to NO synthase inhibition, Tempol, and angiotensin II at baseline perfusion pressures. In vitro, whether the myogenic response is stronger in SHR remains uncertain. Our model predicts that if mechanosensitive cation channels are not modulated by O(2)(-), then fractional changes in diameter induced by pressure elevations should be smaller in SHR than in normotensive rats. Our results also suggest that most NO diffuses out of the smooth muscle cell without being consumed, whereas most O(2)(-) is scavenged, by NO and superoxide dismutase. Moreover, the predicted effects of superoxide on arteriolar constriction are not predominantly due to its scavenging of NO. PMID:26180238

  19. Calcium dynamics underlying the myogenic response of the renal afferent arteriole

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Aurélie

    2013-01-01

    The renal afferent arteriole reacts to an elevation in blood pressure with an increase in muscle tone and a decrease in luminal diameter. This effect, known as the myogenic response, is believed to stabilize glomerular filtration and to protect the glomerulus from systolic blood pressure increases, especially in hypertension. To study the mechanisms underlying the myogenic response, we developed a mathematical model of intracellular Ca2+ signaling in an afferent arteriole smooth muscle cell. The model represents detailed transmembrane ionic transport, intracellular Ca2+ dynamics, the kinetics of myosin light chain phosphorylation, and the mechanical behavior of the cell. It assumes that the myogenic response is initiated by pressure-induced changes in the activity of nonselective cation channels. Our model predicts spontaneous vasomotion at physiological luminal pressures and KCl- and diltiazem-induced diameter changes comparable to experimental findings. The time-periodic oscillations stem from the dynamic exchange of Ca2+ between the cytosol and the sarcoplasmic reticulum, coupled to the stimulation of Ca2+-activated potassium (KCa) and chloride (ClCa) channels, and the modulation of voltage-activated L-type channels; blocking sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pumps, ryanodine receptors (RyR), KCa, ClCa, or L-type channels abolishes these oscillations. Our results indicate that the profile of the myogenic response is also strongly dependent on the conductance of ClCa and L-type channels, as well as the activity of plasmalemmal Ca2+ pumps. Furthermore, inhibition of KCa is not necessary to induce myogenic contraction. Lastly, our model suggests that the kinetic behavior of L-type channels results in myogenic kinetics that are substantially faster during constriction than during dilation, consistent with in vitro observations (Loutzenhiser R, Bidani A, Chilton L. Circ. Res. 90: 1316–1324, 2002). PMID:24173354

  20. Heart failure induces changes in acid-sensing ion channels in sensory neurons innervating skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, David D; Kutschke, William J; Weiss, Robert M; Benson, Christopher J

    2015-10-15

    Heart failure is associated with diminished exercise capacity, which is driven, in part, by alterations in exercise-induced autonomic reflexes triggered by skeletal muscle sensory neurons (afferents). These overactive reflexes may also contribute to the chronic state of sympathetic excitation, which is a major contributor to the morbidity and mortality of heart failure. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are highly expressed in muscle afferents where they sense metabolic changes associated with ischaemia and exercise, and contribute to the metabolic component of these reflexes. Therefore, we tested if ASICs within muscle afferents are altered in heart failure. We used whole-cell patch clamp to study the electrophysiological properties of acid-evoked currents in isolated, labelled muscle afferent neurons from control and heart failure (induced by myocardial infarction) mice. We found that the percentage of muscle afferents that displayed ASIC-like currents, the current amplitudes, and the pH dose-response relationships were not altered in mice with heart failure. On the other hand, the biophysical properties of ASIC-like currents were significantly different in a subpopulation of cells (40%) from heart failure mice. This population displayed diminished pH sensitivity, altered desensitization kinetics, and very fast recovery from desensitization. These unique properties define these channels within this subpopulation of muscle afferents as being heteromeric channels composed of ASIC2a and -3 subunits. Heart failure induced a shift in the subunit composition of ASICs within muscle afferents, which significantly altered their pH sensing characteristics. These results might, in part, contribute to the changes in exercise-mediated reflexes that are associated with heart failure. PMID:26314284

  1. Greater eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage by large versus small range of motion with the same end-point.

    PubMed

    Fochi, A G; Damas, F; Berton, R; Alvarez, I; Miquelini, M; Salvini, T F; Libardi, C A

    2016-09-01

    Several factors can affect the magnitude of eccentric exercise (ECC)-induced muscle damage, but little is known regarding the effect of the range of motion (ROM) in ECC-induced muscle damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether elbow flexor ECC with 120° of ROM (from 60° of elbow flexion until elbow full extension - 180° [120ROM]) induces a greater magnitude of muscle damage compared with a protocol with 60° of ROM (120-180° of elbow flexion [60ROM]). Twelve healthy young men (age: 22 ± 3.1 years; height: 1.75 ± 0.05 m; body mass: 75.6 ± 13.6 kg) performed the ECC with 120ROM and 60ROM using different arms in a random order separated by 2 weeks and were tested before and 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after ECC for maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque (MVC-ISO), ROM and muscle soreness. The 120ROM protocol showed greater changes and effect sizes (ES) for MVC-ISO (-35%, ES: 1.97), ROM (-11.5°, ES: 1.27) and muscle soreness (19 mm, ES: 1.18) compared with the 60ROM protocol (-23%, ES: 0.93; -12%, ES: 0.56; 17°, ES: 0.63; 8 mm, ES: 1.07, respectively). In conclusion, ECC of the elbow flexors with 120° of ROM promotes a greater magnitude of muscle damage compared with a protocol with 60° of ROM, even when both protocols are performed at long muscle lengths. PMID:27601784

  2. Greater eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage by large versus small range of motion with the same end-point

    PubMed Central

    Fochi, AG; Damas, F; Berton, R; Alvarez, I; Miquelini, M; Salvini, TF

    2016-01-01

    Several factors can affect the magnitude of eccentric exercise (ECC)-induced muscle damage, but little is known regarding the effect of the range of motion (ROM) in ECC-induced muscle damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether elbow flexor ECC with 120° of ROM (from 60° of elbow flexion until elbow full extension - 180° [120ROM]) induces a greater magnitude of muscle damage compared with a protocol with 60° of ROM (120-180° of elbow flexion [60ROM]). Twelve healthy young men (age: 22 ± 3.1 years; height: 1.75 ± 0.05 m; body mass: 75.6 ± 13.6 kg) performed the ECC with 120ROM and 60ROM using different arms in a random order separated by 2 weeks and were tested before and 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after ECC for maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque (MVC-ISO), ROM and muscle soreness. The 120ROM protocol showed greater changes and effect sizes (ES) for MVC-ISO (-35%, ES: 1.97), ROM (-11.5°, ES: 1.27) and muscle soreness (19 mm, ES: 1.18) compared with the 60ROM protocol (-23%, ES: 0.93; -12%, ES: 0.56; 17°, ES: 0.63; 8 mm, ES: 1.07, respectively). In conclusion, ECC of the elbow flexors with 120° of ROM promotes a greater magnitude of muscle damage compared with a protocol with 60° of ROM, even when both protocols are performed at long muscle lengths. PMID:27601784

  3. Regionally distinct cutaneous afferent populations contribute to reflex modulation evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve during walking.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Shinya; Futatsubashi, Genki; Ohtsuska, Hiroyuki; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Barss, Trevor S; Klarner, Taryn; Zehr, E Paul; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2016-07-01

    During walking, cutaneous reflexes in ankle flexor muscle [tibialis anterior (TA)] evoked by tibial nerve (TIB) stimulation are predominantly facilitatory at early swing phase but reverse to suppression at late swing phase. Although the TIB innervates a large portion of the skin of the foot sole, the extent to which specific foot-sole regions contribute to the reflex reversals during walking remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated regional cutaneous contributions from discrete portions of the foot sole on reflex reversal in TA following TIB stimulation during walking. Summation effects on reflex amplitudes, when applying combined stimulation from foot-sole regions with TIB, were examined. Middle latency responses (MLRs; 70-120 ms) after TIB stimulation were strongly facilitated during the late stance to mid-swing phases and reversed to suppression just before heel (HL) strike. Both forefoot-medial (f-M) and forefoot-lateral stimulation in the foot sole induced facilitation during stance-to-swing transition phases, but HL stimulation evoked suppression during the late stance to the end of swing phases. At the stance-to-swing transition, a summation of MLR amplitude occurred only for combined f-M&TIB stimulation. However, the same was not true for the combined HL&TIB stimulation. At the swing-to-stance transition, there was a suppressive reflex summation only for HL&TIB stimulation. In contrast, this summation was not observed for the f-M&TIB stimulation. Our results suggest that reflex reversals evoked by TIB stimulation arise from distinct reflex pathways to TA produced by separate afferent populations innervating specific regions of the foot sole. PMID:27075541

  4. Ventral Tegmental Area Afferents and Drug-Dependent Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Idaira; Wanat, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Drug-related behaviors in both humans and rodents are commonly thought to arise from aberrant learning processes. Preclinical studies demonstrate that the acquisition and expression of many drug-dependent behaviors involves the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a midbrain structure comprised of dopamine, GABA, and glutamate neurons. Drug experience alters the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input onto VTA dopamine neurons, suggesting a critical role for VTA afferents in mediating the effects of drugs. In this review, we present evidence implicating the VTA in drug-related behaviors, highlight the diversity of neuronal populations in the VTA, and discuss the behavioral effects of selectively manipulating VTA afferents. Future experiments are needed to determine which VTA afferents and what neuronal populations in the VTA mediate specific drug-dependent behaviors. Further studies are also necessary for identifying the afferent-specific synaptic alterations onto dopamine and non-dopamine neurons in the VTA following drug administration. The identification of neural circuits and adaptations involved with drug-dependent behaviors can highlight potential neural targets for pharmacological and deep brain stimulation interventions to treat substance abuse disorders. PMID:27014097

  5. Changes in monkey horizontal semicircular canal afferent responses after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correia, M. J.; Perachio, A. A.; Dickman, J. D.; Kozlovskaia, I. B.; Sirota, M. G.; Iakushin, S. B.; Beloozerova, I. N.

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular responses from single horizontal semicircular canal afferents in two rhesus monkeys were studied after recovery from a 14-day biosatellite (Cosmos 2044) orbital spaceflight. On the 1st postflight day, the mean gain for 9 different horizontal canal afferents, tested using one or several different passive yaw rotation waveforms, was nearly twice that for 20 horizontal canal afferents similarly tested during preflight and postflight control studies. Adaptation of the afferent response to passive yaw rotation on the 1st postflight day was also greater. These results suggest that at least one component of the vestibular end organ (the semicircular canals) is transiently modified after exposure to 14 days of microgravity. It is unclear whether the changes are secondary to other effects of microgravity, such as calcium loss, or an adaptive response. If the response is adaptive, then this report is the first evidence that the response of the vestibular end organ may be modified (presumably by the central nervous system via efferent connections) after prolonged unusual vestibular stimulation. If this is the case, the sites of plasticity of vestibular responses may not be exclusively within central nervous system vestibular structures, as previously believed.

  6. Identity of the core proteins of the large chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans synthesized by skeletal muscle and prechondrogenic mesenchyme.

    PubMed Central

    Carrino, D A; Dennis, J E; Drushel, R F; Haynesworth, S E; Caplan, A I

    1994-01-01

    Large, chondroitin sulphate-containing proteoglycans are synthesized by three prominent tissue in the embryonic chick limb. One of these proteoglycans is aggrecan, the phenotype-specific proteoglycan of cartilage. Another, PG-M, is produced by prechondrogenic mesenchymal cells. The third, M-CSPG, is made by developing skeletal muscle cells. While the carbohydrate components of PG-M and M-CSPG share some similarities, both of these proteoglycans clearly have different carbohydrate moieties from those of aggrecan. To compare these three proteoglycans at another level, their core protein structures were analysed in three ways: by the presence or absence of monoclonal antibody epitopes, by one-dimensional peptide display of the cyanogen bromide-cleaved core proteins and by electron microscopic imaging of the molecules. Monoclonal antibodies whose epitopes are present in aggrecan core protein were tested with core protein preparations from M-CSPG and PG-M. One of these, 7D1, recognizes both PG-M and M-CSPG, while another, 1C6, shows no reactivity for the non-cartilage proteoglycans. The absence of 1C6 reactivity is of interest, as its epitope is in a region of the aggrecan core protein known to have a functional homologue in the core proteins of PG-M and M-CSPG. The cyanogen bromide-fragmented peptide pattern of M-CSPG is the same as that of PG-M, and both are different from that of aggrecan. The aggrecan pattern has one prominent large band (molecular mass 130 kDa), some less prominent large bands (molecular mass 70-100 kDa) and several smaller bands. In contrast, the PG-M and M-CSPG patterns show no bands with molecular masses > 73 kDa, and the smaller bands (molecular mass < 40 kDa) have a different pattern to that of the smaller bands from aggrecan. The electron microscopic images of aggrecan show a core protein with one end having two globular regions separated by a short linear segment; adjacent to this is a long linear segment, which sometimes contains a third

  7. Increased AMP‐activated protein kinase in skeletal muscles of Murphy Roth Large mice and its potential role in altered metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Berhanu, Tirsit K.; Holley‐Cuthrell, Jenan; Roberts, Nathan W.; Mull, Aaron J.; Heydemann, Ahlke

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Wild‐type Murphy Roth Large (MRL) mice have long been investigated for their superior healing ability when subjected to various wound and disease models. Despite this long history, the mechanisms causing their extraordinary healing ability remain undefined. As we have recently demonstrated that MRL mice with muscular dystrophy are resistant to the associated fibrosis and the Heber‐Katz group has demonstrated MRL mitochondrial mutations, we decided to investigate the skeletal muscle metabolic characteristics of the MRL mouse strain compared to the commonly utilized C57BL/6J control mouse strain. We now have evidence demonstrating an altered metabolism in the MRL quadriceps, triceps brachii, and diaphragm of 8‐week‐old animals compared to tissues from control animals. The MRL skeletal muscles have increased activated phosphorylated AMP‐activated protein kinase (pAMPK). The increased pAMPK signaling coincides with increased skeletal muscle mitochondrial content. These metabolic changes may compensate for insufficient oxidative phosphorylation which is demonstrated by altered quantities of proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation and ex vivo metabolic investigations. We also demonstrate that the MRL muscle cells have increased metabolic physiologic reserve. These data further the investigations into this important and unique mouse strain. Why the MRL mice have increased pAMPK and how increased pAMPK and the resultant metabolic alterations affect the healing ability in the MRL mouse strain is discussed. Understanding the molecular mechanisms surrounding the super healing characteristics of these mice will lead to relevant clinical intervention points. In conclusion, we present novel data of increased mitochondrial content, pAMPK, and glycolytic indicators in MRL skeletal muscles. PMID:24760507

  8. A comparison of the heart and muscle total lipid and fatty acid profiles of nine large shark species from the east coast of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Bruce; Sidell, Jonathan; Rhodes, Jeffrey; Cliff, Geremy

    2011-03-01

    We have assessed the fatty acid profiles of the hearts and different muscle tissues from nine large shark species (Carcharhinus limbatus (blacktip), Carcharhinus obscurus (dusky), Carcharhinus brevipinna (spinner), Carcharhinus leucas (Zambezi/bull), Galeocerdo cuvier (tiger), Sphyrna lewini (scalloped hammerhead), Sphyrna zygaena (smooth hammerhead), Carcharodon carcharias (great white) and Carcharias taurus (raggedtooth/grey nurse/sand tiger)) found off the east coast of South Africa. While there was generally little variation between the species, all species showed profiles rich in both n6 and n3 polyunsaturated fatty acids compared to terrestrial commercial meats that have low n3. Thus, utilizing skeletal muscle tissues from sharks caught as part of the bycatch when fishing for teleosts would avoid unnecessary wastage of a potentially valuable resource, with all the possible health benefits of high quality protein combined with balanced polyunsaturates, although contamination with high levels of metabolic wastes, such as urea, may be a negative consideration. PMID:20694746

  9. Ileal bladder substitute: antireflux nipple or afferent tubular segment?

    PubMed

    Studer, U E; Spiegel, T; Casanova, G A; Springer, J; Gerber, E; Ackermann, D K; Gurtner, F; Zingg, E J

    1991-01-01

    Spheroidal bladder substitutes made from double-folded ileal segments, similar to Goodwin's cup-patch technique, are devoid of major coordinated wall contractions. This, together with the reservoir's direct anastomosis to the membranous urethra, prevents major intraluminal pressure peaks and assures a residue-free voiding of sterile urine. In order to determine whether, under these conditions, an afferent tubular isoperistaltic ileal segment of 20-cm length protects the upper urinary tract as efficiently as an antireflux nipple, 60 male patients who were subjected to radical cystectomy were prospectively randomised to groups in which a bladder substitute was formed together with either of these 2 antireflux devices. An analysis of the results obtained in 20 patients from each group who could be followed for more than 1 year (median observation time 30 and 36 months) showed no differences between the groups in metabolic disturbances, kidney size, reservoir capacity, diurnal and nocturnal urinary continence, the incidence of urinary tract infection or episodes of acute pyelonephritis. Later than 1 year postoperatively, intravenous urograms of the renoureteral units of 25% of the patients with antireflux nipples showed persistent but generally slight dilatation of the upper urinary tracts. This observation was significantly more frequent than it was in patients with afferent tubular segments. Urodynamic and radiographic studies showed that the competence of the antireflux nipples was secured by the raised surrounding intravesical pressure. This, however, also resulted in a transient functional obstruction, and a gradual rise of the basal pressure in the upper urinary tracts was recorded. In patients with afferent ileal tubular segments, contrast medium could be forced upwards into the renal pelvis when the bladder substitutes were overfilled. However, despite raised intravesical pressures, peristalsis in the isoperistaltic afferent tubular segment gradually returned

  10. The responses of primary spindle afferents to fusimotor stimulation at constant and abruptly changing rates.

    PubMed Central

    Hulliger, M

    1979-01-01

    1. Single fusimotor fibres to de-efferented soleus of the cat were stimulated to investigate the size and time course of the responses elicited in single primary spindle afferents. The muscle was kept at constant length close to the physiological maximum. Constant and alternating rates of fusimotor stimulation were used: (a) repetitive stimulation at constant rate (maintained stimulation); (b) modulated stimulation with the rate of activation alternating between two constant levels at repeat frequencies between 0.09 and 2 Hz (rectangular stimulation). The responses were averaged and displayed as post-stimulus time (pst) histograms (a) or as cycle histograms (b). 2. During static fusimotor stimulation the pst histograms could be clearly modulated over a range of rates of stimulation. However, histogram modulation was not a prerequisite of static action since with different fibres the degree of modulation could range from deeply modulated to completely non-modulated to completely non-modulated. 3. Dynamic fusimotor stimulation was almost always accompanied by non-modulated pst histograms. 4. Primary spindle afferents responded to rectangular stimulation of either kind of fusimotor fibre with an approximately rectangular modulation of the rate of discharge. At the repeat frequencies studied the size of the responses was appreciably larger with static than with dynamic activation. It was assessed as 'fusimotor rate-sensitivity during alternating stimulation' by the response/stimulus ratio which is defined as change in firing/change in alternating rate of stimulation, in impulses/stimuli. The mean values of rate-sensitivity were 1.35 impulses/stimuli (statics) and 0.29 (dynamics), with a static/dynamic ratio of 4.7. 5. The afferents' 'fusimotor rate-sensitivity during steady stimulation' (change in firing/change in maintained rate of stimulation( was also determined. The mean values were 0.78 (static) and 0.37 (dynamics), with a static/dynamic ratio of 2.1. 6. The time

  11. Modulating mechanosensory afferent excitability by an atypical mGluR.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    Mechanotransduction by proprioceptive sensory organs is poorly understood. Evidence was recently shown that muscle spindle and hair follicle primary afferents (lanceolates) constantly release glutamate from synaptic-like vesicles (SLVs) within the terminals. The secreted glutamate activates a highly unusual metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) to modulate the firing rate (spindles) and SLV recycling (lanceolates). This receptor has yet to be isolated and sequenced. To further investigate this receptor's pharmacology, ligands selective for classical mGluRs have been recently characterised for their ability to alter stretch-evoked spindle firing and SLV endocytosis in these different endings. Here, it is described how the results of these screens facilitated the development of novel compounds to be used in the process of isolating and sequencing of this non-canonical mGluR. This study shows how the compounds were tested for their ability to alter stretch-evoked afferent firing in muscle spindles and SLV endocytosis in the lanceolate endings of hair follicles to ensure they maintained their ability to bind to the receptor. For the development of novel compounds, kainate was chosen as the parent ligand due to its potency and ease of chemical modification. Novel kainate derivatives were then synthesised and tested to find potent analogues suitable for 'click-chemistry', an established technique for relatively quick, cheap, stereospecific and high-yield chemical modifications (Angewandte Chemie (International ed. in English), 40, 2001, pp2004). Of the novel kainate analogues developed, unfortunately ZCZ49 and ZCZ50 lost the ability to produce a significant change in spindle stretch-evoked firing. However, ZCZ90 was as potent as kainate, increasing firing by a similar margin at 1 μm (n = 8; P < 0.001). The addition of either a biotin or a fluorescein side group to ZCZ90, using the click-chemistry technique, did not affect the potency and hence these

  12. Competition with Primary Sensory Afferents Drives Remodeling of Corticospinal Axons in Mature Spinal Motor Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu-Qiu; Zaaimi, Boubker

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the mature motor system drives significant spontaneous axonal sprouting instead of axon regeneration. Knowing the circuit-level determinants of axonal sprouting is important for repairing motor circuits after injury to achieve functional rehabilitation. Competitive interactions are known to shape corticospinal tract axon outgrowth and withdrawal during development. Whether and how competition contributes to reorganization of mature spinal motor circuits is unclear. To study this question, we examined plastic changes in corticospinal axons in response to two complementary proprioceptive afferent manipulations: (1) enhancing proprioceptive afferents activity by electrical stimulation; or (2) diminishing their input by dorsal rootlet rhizotomy. Experiments were conducted in adult rats. Electrical stimulation produced proprioceptive afferent sprouting that was accompanied by significant corticospinal axon withdrawal and a decrease in corticospinal connections on cholinergic interneurons in the medial intermediate zone and C boutons on motoneurons. In contrast, dorsal rootlet rhizotomy led to a significant increase in corticospinal connections, including those on cholinergic interneurons; C bouton density increased correspondingly. Motor cortex-evoked muscle potentials showed parallel changes to those of corticospinal axons, suggesting that reciprocal corticospinal axon changes are functional. Using the two complementary models, we showed that competitive interactions between proprioceptive and corticospinal axons are an important determinant in the organization of mature corticospinal axons and spinal motor circuits. The activity- and synaptic space-dependent properties of the competition enables prediction of the remodeling of spared corticospinal connection and spinal motor circuits after injury and informs the target-specific control of corticospinal connections to promote functional recovery. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuroplasticity is limited in maturity

  13. Decoding of the spike timing of primary afferents during voluntary arm movements in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Umeda, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Hidenori; Sato, Masa-aki; Kawato, Mitsuo; Isa, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of encoding forelimb kinematics in the activity of peripheral afferents is essential for developing a somatosensory neuroprosthesis. To investigate whether the spike timing of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons could be estimated from the forelimb kinematics of behaving monkeys, we implanted two multi-electrode arrays chronically in the DRGs at the level of the cervical segments in two monkeys. Neuronal activity during voluntary reach-to-grasp movements were recorded simultaneously with the trajectories of hand/arm movements, which were tracked in three-dimensional space using a motion capture system. Sixteen and 13 neurons, including muscle spindles, skin receptors, and tendon organ afferents, were recorded in the two monkeys, respectively. We were able to reconstruct forelimb joint kinematics from the temporal firing pattern of a subset of DRG neurons using sparse linear regression (SLiR) analysis, suggesting that DRG neuronal ensembles encoded information about joint kinematics. Furthermore, we estimated the spike timing of the DRG neuronal ensembles from joint kinematics using an integrate-and-fire model (IF) incorporating the SLiR algorithm. The temporal change of firing frequency of a subpopulation of neurons was reconstructed precisely from forelimb kinematics using the SLiR. The estimated firing pattern of the DRG neuronal ensembles encoded forelimb joint angles and velocities as precisely as the originally recorded neuronal activity. These results suggest that a simple model can be used to generate an accurate estimate of the spike timing of DRG neuronal ensembles from forelimb joint kinematics, and is useful for designing a proprioceptive decoder in a brain machine interface. PMID:24860416

  14. A role for extraocular afferents in post-critical period reversal of monocular deprivation.

    PubMed Central

    Crewther, D P; Crewther, S G; Pettigrew, J D

    1978-01-01

    1. In order to investigate the phenomenon of acute reversibility of cortical ocular dominance, pressure block of the retinal ganglion cells and local anaesthetic block of the extraocular afferents were applied to the normal eye of six monocularly deprived cats. 2. Neither pressure blinding nor retrobulbar anaesthesia alone produced a significant increase in the proportion of single neurones recorded from area 17 which could be driven by the deprived eye. 3. Following combined pressure blinding and retrobulbar blockade, sixty-four cells (54% of all encountered) could be stimulated through the deprived eye. 4. Of the sixty-four cells driven by the deprived eye following both treatments a number showed direction (thirty) and orientation (thirteen) selectivity, but the majority showed non-specific receptive field properties. 5. In four separate cases, out of the nine where the experiment could be carried out, it was possible to observe an individual neurone shift its ocular dominance. In the presence of a retrobulbar block, the four neurones could be driven first by the experienced eye alone, then by the deprived eye alone, and finally by the experienced eye again, all within a few minutes of the introduction and removal of pressure blinding. 6. These findings support previous studies which have revealed the presence of significant numbers of potentially functional cortical inputs from the deprived eye. Our new finding is that removal of tonic activity from the experienced eye, while it seems to be necessary to reveal these inputs, is not sufficient. An additional role in this phenomenon is played by extraocular afferents, possibly those involved in proprioception from the eye muscles. PMID:722518

  15. Movement-generated afference paired with transcranial magnetic stimulation: an associative stimulation paradigm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A peripheral nerve stimulus can enhance or suppress the evoked response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) depending on the latency of the preceding peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) pulse. Similarly, somatosensory afference from the passively moving limb can transiently alter corticomotor excitability, in a phase-dependent manner. The repeated association of PNS with TMS is known to modulate corticomotor excitability; however, it is unknown whether repeated passive-movement associative stimulation (MAS) has similar effects. Methods In a proof-of-principle study, using a cross-over design, seven healthy subjects received in separate sessions: (1) TMS (120% of the resting motor threshold-RMT, optimal site for Flexor Carpi Radialis) with muscle at rest; (2) TMS paired with cyclic passive movement during extension cyclic passive movement (400 pairs, 1 Hz), with the intervention order randomly assigned. Normality was tested using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, then compared to pre-intervention baseline using repeated measures ANOVA with a Dunnet multiple comparisons test. Results MAS led to a progressive and significant decrease in the motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude over the intervention (R2 = 0.6665, P < 0.0001), which was not evident with TMS alone (R2 = 0.0068, P = 0.641). Post-intervention excitability reduction, only present with MAS intervention, remained for 20min (0-10min = 68.2 ± 4.9%, P < 0.05; 10-20min = 73.3 ± 9.7%, P < 0.05). Conclusion The association of somatosensory afference from the moving limb with TMS over primary motor cortex in healthy subjects can be used to modulate corticomotor excitability, and may have therapeutic implications. PMID:24597619

  16. Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Veazey, R.B.; Severin, C.M.

    1982-01-10

    Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus (DMN) of the rat were demonstrated with axonal transport techniques. Potential sources for projections to the DMN were first identified by injecting the nucleus with HRP and examining the cervical spinal cord, brain stem, and cortex for retrogradely labeled neurons. Areas consistently labeled were then injected with a tritiated radioisotope, the tissue processed for autoradiography, and the DMN examined for anterograde labeling. Afferent projections to the medial and/or lateral parts of the DMN were found to originate from a number of spinal, bulbar, and cortical centers. Rostral brain centers projecting to both medial and lateral parts of the DMN include the ipsilateral motor and somatosensory cortex, the entopeduncular nucleus, and zona incerta. at the level of the midbrain, the ipsilateral substantia nigra and contralateral DMN likewise project to the DMN. Furthermore, the ipsilateral superior colliculus projects to the DMN, involving mainly the lateral part of the nucleus. Afferents from caudal centers include bilateral projections from the sensory nucleus of the trigeminal complex and the nucleus medulla oblongata centralis, as well as from the contralateral dentate nucleus. The projections from the trigeminal complex and nucleus medullae oblongatae centralis terminate in the intermediate and medial parts of the DMN, whereas projections from the contralateral dentate nucleus terminate mainly in its lateral part. In general, the afferent connections of the DMN arise from diverse areas of the brain. Although most of these projections distribute throughout the entire extent of the DMN, some of them project mainly to either medial or lateral parts of the nucleus, thus suggesting that the organization of the DMN is comparable, at least in part, to that of the reticular formation of the pons and medulla, a region in which hodological differences between medial and lateral subdivisions are known to exist.

  17. Transfer characteristics of the hair cell's afferent synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, Erica C.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2006-04-01

    The sense of hearing depends on fast, finely graded neurotransmission at the ribbon synapses connecting hair cells to afferent nerve fibers. The processing that occurs at this first chemical synapse in the auditory pathway determines the quality and extent of the information conveyed to the central nervous system. Knowledge of the synapse's input-output function is therefore essential for understanding how auditory stimuli are encoded. To investigate the transfer function at the hair cell's synapse, we developed a preparation of the bullfrog's amphibian papilla. In the portion of this receptor organ representing stimuli of 400-800 Hz, each afferent nerve fiber forms several synaptic terminals onto one to three hair cells. By performing simultaneous voltage-clamp recordings from presynaptic hair cells and postsynaptic afferent fibers, we established that the rate of evoked vesicle release, as determined from the average postsynaptic current, depends linearly on the amplitude of the presynaptic Ca2+ current. This result implies that, for receptor potentials in the physiological range, the hair cell's synapse transmits information with high fidelity. auditory system | exocytosis | glutamate | ribbon synapse | synaptic vesicle

  18. Endothelin-1 induced desensitization in primary afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Terika P.; Smith, Sherika N.; Sweitzer, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a known algogen that causes acute pain and sensitization in humans and spontaneous nociceptive behaviors when injected into the periphery in rats, and is elevated during vaso-occlusive episodes (VOEs) in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Previously, our lab has shown that a priming dose of ET-1 produces sensitization to capsaicin-induce secondary hyperalgesia. The goal of this study was to determine if the sensitization induced by ET-1 priming is occurring at the level of the primary afferent neuron. Calcium imaging in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons was utilized to examine the effects of ET-1 on primary afferent neurons. ET-1 induces [Ca2+]i transients in unprimed cells. ET-1 induced [Ca2+]i transients are attenuated by priming with ET-1. This priming effect occurs whether the priming dose is given 0-4 days prior to the challenge dose. Similarly, ET-1 priming decreases capsaicin-induced [Ca2+]i transients. At the level of the primary afferent neuron, ET-1 priming has a desensitizing effect on challenge exposures to ET-1 and capsaicin. PMID:25220703

  19. Vagal afferents, diaphragm fatigue, and inspiratory resistance in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Adams, J M; Farkas, G A; Rochester, D F

    1988-06-01

    This study tests three hypotheses regarding mechanisms that produce rapid shallow breathing during a severe inspiratory resistive load (IRL): 1) an intact vagal afferent pathway is necessary; 2) diaphragm fatigue contributes to tachypnea; and 3) hypoxia may alter the pattern of respiration. We imposed a severe IRL on pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized dogs, followed by bilateral vagotomy, then by supplemental O2. IRL alone produced rapid shallow breathing associated with hypercapnia and hypoxia. After the vagotomy, the breathing pattern became slow and deep, restoring arterial PCO2 but not arterial PO2 toward the control values. Relief of hypoxia had no effect, and at no time was there any evidence of fatigue of the diaphragm as measured by the response to phrenic nerve stimulation. We conclude that an intact afferent vagal pathway is necessary for the tachypnea resulting from a severe IRL, neither hypoxia nor diaphragm fatigue played a role, and, although we cannot rule out stimulation of vagal afferents, the simplest explanation for the increased frequency in our experiments is increased respiratory drive due to hypercapnia. PMID:3136122

  20. Subcortical afferent connections of the amygdala in the monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehler, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The cells of origin of the afferent connections of the amygdala in the rhesus and squirrel monkeys are determined according to the retrograde axonal transport of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase injected into various quadrants of the amygdala. Analysis of the distribution of enzyme-labeled cells reveals afferent amygdalar connections with the ipsilateral halves of the midline nucleus paraventricularis thalami and both the parvo- and magnocellular parts of the nucleus subparafascicularis in the dorsal thalamus, all the subdivisions of the midline nucleus centralis complex, the nucleus reuniens ventralis and the nucleus interventralis. The largest populations of enzyme-labeled cells in the hypothalamus are found to lie in the middle and posterior parts of the ipsilateral, lateral hypothalamus and the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, with scattered cells in the supramammillary and dorsomedial nuclei and the posterior hypothalamic area, Tsai's ventral tegmental area, the rostral and caudal subdivisions of the nucleus linearis in the midbrain and the dorsal raphe nucleus. The most conspicuous subdiencephalic source of amygdalar afferent connections is observed to be the pars lateralis of the nucleus parabrachialis in the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum, with a few labeled cells differentiated from pigmented cells in the locus coeruleus.

  1. On the nature of the afferent fibers of oculomotor nerve.

    PubMed

    Manni, E; Draicchio, F; Pettorossi, V E; Carobi, C; Grassi, S; Bortolami, R; Lucchi, M L

    1989-03-01

    The oculogyric nerves contain afferent fibers originating from the ophthalmic territory, the somata of which are located in the ipsilateral semilunar ganglion. These primary sensory neurons project to the Subnucleus Gelatinosus of the Nucleus Caudalis Trigemini, where they make presynaptic contact with the central endings of the primary trigeminal afferents running in the fifth cranial nerve. After complete section of the trigeminal root, the antidromic volleys elicited in the trunk of the third cranial nerve by stimulating SG of NCT consisted of two waves belonging to the A delta and C groups. The area of both components of the antidromic volleys decreased both after bradykinin and hystamine injection into the corresponding cutaneous region and after thermic stimulation of the ipsilateral trigeminal ophthalmic territory. The reduction of such potentials can be explained in terms of collision between the antidromic volleys and those elicited orthodromically by chemical and thermic stimulation. Also, capsaicin applied on the nerve induced an immediate increase, followed by a long lasting decrease, of orthodromic evoked response area. These findings bring further support to the nociceptive nature of the afferent fibers running into the oculomotor nerve. PMID:2719524

  2. Factors forming the edge of a receptive field: the presence of relatively ineffective afferent terminals.

    PubMed

    Merrill, E G; Wall, P D

    1972-11-01

    A specialized type of spinal cord cell has its cell body in lamina IV and has a small low threshold cutaneous receptive field which is remarkable for its abrupt edge. No signs could be found of a subliminal fringe to this field since its size remains fixed during wide excursions of the cell's excitability. Reversible blocking of peripheral nerves and dorsal roots showed that the afferents responsible for exciting these cells following natural stimuli, run in a restricted area of peripheral nerve and dorsal root. When the fibres necessary to sustain the natural stimulus receptive field were blocked, it was shown that other large myelinated fibres in neighbouring roots were still capable of firing the cell monosynaptically following electrical stimulation of the root or periphery although no natural stimuli were able to change the cell's excitability. It is necessary to divide the afferent synapses on such cells into a class which is highly effective in firing the cell on natural stimulation and a second class which has no effect yet detected following natural stimuli but which can fire the cell monosynaptically if synchronously activated by electrical stimulation. Suggestions are made for possible presynaptic and post-synaptic mechanisms which might divide the effect of arriving impulses into two such classes. PMID:4637631

  3. Morphologic diversity of cutaneous sensory afferents revealed by genetically directed sparse labeling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Williams, John; Nathans, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of cutaneous sensory afferents has been studied by many investigators using behavioral, physiologic, molecular, and genetic approaches. Largely missing, thus far, is an analysis of the complete morphologies of individual afferent arbors. Here we present a survey of cutaneous sensory arbor morphologies in hairy skin of the mouse using genetically-directed sparse labeling with a sensory neuron-specific alkaline phosphatase reporter. Quantitative analyses of 719 arbors, among which 77 were fully reconstructed, reveal 10 morphologically distinct types. Among the two types with the largest arbors, one contacts ∼200 hair follicles with circumferential endings and a second is characterized by a densely ramifying arbor with one to several thousand branches and a total axon length between one-half and one meter. These observations constrain models of receptive field size and structure among cutaneous sensory neurons, and they raise intriguing questions regarding the cellular and developmental mechanisms responsible for this morphological diversity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00181.001 PMID:23256042

  4. Afferent modulation of neonatal rat respiratory rhythm in vitro: cellular and synaptic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mellen, Nicholas M; Roham, Maryam; Feldman, Jack L

    2004-05-01

    In mammals, expiration is lengthened by mid-expiratory lung inflation (Breuer-Hering Expiratory reflex; BHE). The central pathway mediating the BHE is paucisynaptic, converging on neurones in the rostral ventrolateral medulla. An in vitro neonatal rat brainstem-lung preparation in which mid-expiratory inflation lengthens expiration was used to study afferent modulation of respiratory neurone activity. Recordings were made from respiratory neurones in or near the pre-Bötzinger Complex (preBötC). Respiratory neurone membrane properties and BHE-induced changes in activity were characterized. Our findings suggest the following mechanisms for the BHE: (i) lung afferent signals strongly excite biphasic neurones that convey these signals to respiratory neurones in ventrolateral medulla; (ii) expiratory lengthening is mediated by inhibition of rhythmogenic and (pre)motoneuronal networks; and (iii) pre-inspiratory (Pre-I) neurones, some of which project to abdominal expiratory motoneurones, are excited during the BHE. These findings are qualitatively similar to studies of the BHE in vivo. Where there are differences, they can largely be accounted for by developmental changes and experimental conditions. PMID:14766932

  5. Vestibular afferent responses to linear accelerations in the alert squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somps, Christopher J.; Schor, Robert H.; Tomko, David L.

    1994-01-01

    The spontaneous activity of 40 otolith afferents and 44 canal afferents was recorded in 4 alert, intact squirrel monkeys. Polarization vectors and response properties of otolith afferents were determined during static re-orientations relative to gravity and during Earth-horizontal, sinusoidal, linear oscillations. Canal afferents were tested for sensitivity to linear accelerations. For regular otolith afferents, a significant correlation between upright discharge rate and sensitivity to dynamic acceleration in the horizontal plane was observed. This correlation was not present in irregular units. The sensitivity of otolith afferents to both static tilts and dynamic linear acceleration was much greater in irregularly discharging units than in regularly discharging units. The spontaneous activity and static and dynamic response properties of regularly discharging otolith afferents were similar to those reported in barbiturate-anesthetized squirrel monkeys. Irregular afferents also had similar dynamic response properties when compared to anesthetized monkeys. However, this sample of irregular afferents in alert animals had higher resting discharge rates and greater sensitivity to static tilts. The majority of otolith polarization vectors were oriented near the horizontal in the plane of the utricular maculae; however, directions of maximum sensitivity were different during dynamic and static testing. Canal afferents were not sensitive to static tilts or linear oscillations of the head.

  6. Characterization of Mouse Lumbar Splanchnic and Pelvic Nerve Urinary Bladder Mechanosensory Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Linjing; Gebhart, G. F.

    2009-01-01

    Sensory information from the urinary bladder is conveyed via lumbar splanchnic (LSN) and sacral pelvic (PN) nerves to the spinal cord. In the present report we compared the mechanosensitive properties of single afferent fibers in these two pathways using an in vitro mouse bladder preparation. Mechanosensitive primary afferents were recorded from the LSN or PN and distinguished based on their response to receptive field stimulation with different mechanical stimuli: probing (160 mg to 2 g), stretch (1–25 g), and stroking of the urothelium (10–1,000 mg). Four different classes of afferent were recorded from the LSN and PN: serosal, muscular, muscular/urothielial, and urothelial. The LSN contained principally serosal and muscular afferents (97% of the total sample), whereas all four afferent classes of afferent were present in the PN (63% of which were muscular afferents). In addition, the respective proportions and receptive field distributions differed between the two pathways. Both low- and high-threshold stretch-sensitive muscular afferents were present in both pathways, and muscular afferents in the PN were shown to sensitize after exposure to an inflammatory soup cocktail. The LSN and PN pathways contain different populations of mechanosensitive afferents capable of detecting a range of mechanical stimuli and individually tuned to detect the type, magnitude, and duration of the stimulus. This knowledge broadens our understanding of the potential roles these two pathways play in conveying mechanical information from the bladder to the spinal cord. PMID:18003875

  7. Effect of hypergravity on the development of vestibulocerebellar afferent fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L. L.

    Gravity is a critical factor in the normal development of the vestibular system, as prolonged prenatal exposures to either micro- or hypergravity will alter the pattern of projections from specific vestibular organs to specific targets in the vestibular nuclei. This study addresses the effect of gravity on the development of vestibulocerebellar projections. In adult rats the semicircular canal afferents project mainly to the cerebellar nodulus whereas the otolith maculae project mainly to the ventral uvula of the cerebellum. To determine if the distribution pattern of these afferents is altered by exposures to altered gravity, 10 pregnant rats were exposed to hypergravity (1.5g) from embryonic day 12 (before vestibular ganglion neurons contact vestibular nuclei) to embryonic day 21 (near the time when the vestibular system becomes functional). Controls were exposed to Earth's gravity but otherwise received the same treatment. At the end of the exposure the embryos were deeply anesthetized and fixed by transcardiac perfusion with 4% paraformaldehyde in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH7.4). Filter strips coated with DiI and PTIR were implanted into the saccule (gravistatic vestibular receptor) or into the posterior vertical canal (angular acceleration receptor), and allowed to diffuse for 2 weeks at 37°C. Then the brains were dissected and sectioned for fluorescent confocal imaging. Examination of the control cerebella revealed that the canal and otolith afferents have reached the nodulus and uvula, and axons extend into the internal granular, Purkinje, and molecular layers. Projections from the saccule and posterior vertical canal were partially segregated into their respective domains, the uvula and nodulus. In contrast, in hypergravity-exposed rat fetuses the saccule and posterior vertical canal projections were poorly segregated, and both organs contributed labeled fibers to all layers of the nodulus and uvula. This contrasts with the increased afferent segregation

  8. Impaired intestinal afferent nerve satiety signalling and vagal afferent excitability in diet induced obesity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Daly, Donna M; Park, Sung Jin; Valinsky, William C; Beyak, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Gastrointestinal vagal afferents transmit satiety signals to the brain via both chemical and mechanical mechanisms. There is indirect evidence that these signals may be attenuated in obesity. We hypothesized that responses to satiety mediators and distension of the gut would be attenuated after induction of diet induced obesity. Obesity was induced by feeding a high fat diet (60% kcal from fat). Low fat fed mice (10% kcal from fat) served as a control. High fat fed mice were obese, with increased visceral fat, but were not hyperglycaemic. Recordings from jejunal afferents demonstrated attenuated responses to the satiety mediators cholecystokinin (CCK, 100 nm) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 10 μm), as was the response to low intensity jejunal distension, while responses to higher distension pressures were preserved. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings on nodose ganglion neurons, both unlabelled, and those labelled by fast blue injection into the wall of the jejunum. The cell membrane of both labelled and unlabelled nodose ganglion neurons was less excitable in HFF mice, with an elevated rheobase and decreased number of action potentials at twice rheobase. Input resistance of HFF neurons was also significantly decreased. Calcium imaging experiments revealed reduced proportion of nodose ganglion neurons responding to CCK and 5-HT in obese mice. These results demonstrate a marked reduction in afferent sensitivity to satiety related stimuli after a chronic high fat diet. A major mechanism underlying this change is reduced excitability of the neuronal cell membrane. This may explain the development of hyperphagia when a high fat diet is consumed. Improving sensitivity of gastrointestinal afferent nerves may prove useful to limit food intake in obesity. PMID:21486762

  9. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy. Disuse atrophy occurs from a lack of physical activity. In most people, muscle atrophy is caused by not using the ...

  10. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  11. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  12. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  13. Effectiveness and Complications of Percutaneous Needle Tenotomy with a Large Needle for Muscle Contractures: A Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Chesnel, Camille; Genêt, François; Almangour, Waleed; Denormandie, Philippe; Parratte, Bernard; Schnitzler, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Background Twenty-two percent of institutionalised elderly persons have muscle contractures. Contractures have important functional consequences, rendering hygiene and positioning in bed or in a chair difficult. Medical treatment (such as botulinum toxin injections, physiotherapy or positioning) is not very effective and surgery may be required. Surgery is carried out in the operating theatre, under local or general anaesthesia but is often not possible in fragile patients. Mini-invasive tenotomy could be a useful alternative as it can be carried out in ambulatory care, under local anaesthesia. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous needle tenotomy and the risks of damage to adjacent structures in cadavers. Method Thirty two doctors who had never practiced the technique (physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists, geriatricians and orthopaedic surgeons) carried out 401 tenotomies on the upper and lower limbs of 8 fresh cadavers. A 16G needle was used percutaneous following location of the tendons. After each tenotomy, a neuro-orthopaedic surgeon and an anatomist dissected the area in order to evaluate the success of the tenotomy and any adjacent lesions which had occurred. Results Of the 401 tenotomies, 72% were complete, 24.9% partial and 2.7% failed. Eight adjacent lesions occurred (2%): 4 (1%) in tendons or muscles, 3 (0.7%) in nerves and 1 (0.2%) in a vessel. Conclusion This percutaneous needle technique effectively ruptured the desired tendons, with few injuries to adjacent structures. Although this study was carried out on cadavers, the results suggest it is safe to carry out on patients. PMID:26624990

  14. Differential expression of vesicular glutamate transporters by vagal afferent terminals in rat nucleus of the solitary tract: projections from the heart preferentially express vesicular glutamate transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Corbett, E K A; Sinfield, J K; McWilliam, P N; Deuchars, J; Batten, T F C

    2005-01-01

    The central projections and neurochemistry of vagal afferent neurones supplying the heart in the rat were investigated by injecting cholera toxin B-subunit into the pericardium. Transganglionically transported cholera toxin B-subunit was visualized in the medulla oblongata in axons and varicosities that were predominantly aggregated in the dorsomedial, dorsolateral, ventrolateral and commissural subnuclei of the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract. Unilateral vagal section in control rats prevented cholera toxin B-subunit labeling on the ipsilateral side of the nucleus of the solitary tract. Fluorescent and electron microscopic dual labeling showed colocalization of immunoreactivity for vesicular glutamate transporter 1, but only rarely vesicular glutamate transporters 2 or 3 with cholera toxin B-subunit in terminals in nucleus of the solitary tract, suggesting that cardiac vagal axons release glutamate as a neurotransmitter. In contrast, populations of vagal afferent fibers labeled by injection of cholera toxin B-subunit, tetra-methylrhodamine dextran or biotin dextran amine into the aortic nerve, stomach or nodose ganglion colocalized vesicular glutamate transporter 2 more frequently than vesicular glutamate transporter 1. The presence of other neurochemical markers of primary afferent neurones was examined in nucleus of the solitary tract axons and nodose ganglion cells labeled by pericardial cholera toxin B-subunit injections. Immunoreactivity for a 200-kDa neurofilament protein in many large, cholera toxin B-subunit-labeled nodose ganglion cells indicated that the cardiac afferent fibers labeled are mostly myelinated, whereas binding of Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 to fewer small cholera toxin B-subunit-labeled ganglion cells suggested that tracer was also taken up by some non-myelinated axons. A few labeled nucleus of the solitary tract axons and ganglion cells were positive for substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, which are considered as

  15. Differential roles of stretch-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents innervating mouse distal colon and rectum

    PubMed Central

    Brumovsky, Pablo R.; Gebhart, Gerald F.

    2010-01-01

    Information about colorectal distension (i.e., colorectal dilation by increased intraluminal pressure) is primarily encoded by stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents in the pelvic nerve (PN). Despite anatomic differences between rectum and distal colon, little is known about the functional roles of colonic vs. rectal afferents in the PN pathway or the quantitative nature of mechanosensory encoding. We utilized an in vitro mouse colorectum-PN preparation to investigate pressure-encoding characteristics of colorectal afferents. The colorectum with PN attached was dissected, opened longitudinally, and pinned flat in a Sylgard-lined chamber. Action potentials of afferent fibers evoked by circumferential stretch (servo-controlled force actuator) were recorded from the PN. Stretch-sensitive fibers were categorized into the following four groups: colonic muscular, colonic muscular/mucosal, rectal muscular, and rectal muscular/mucosal. Seventy-nine stretch-sensitive PN afferents evenly distributed into the above four groups were studied. Rectal muscular afferents had significantly greater stretch-responses than the other three groups. Virtually all rectal afferents (98%) had low thresholds for response and encoded stimulus intensity into the noxious range without obvious saturation. Most colonic afferents (72%) also had low thresholds (<14 mmHg), but a significant proportion (28%) had high thresholds (>18 mmHg) for response. These high-threshold colonic afferents were sensitized to stretch by inflammatory soup; response threshold was significantly reduced (from 23 to 12 mmHg), and response magnitude significantly increased. These results suggest that the encoding of mechanosensory information differs between colonic and rectal stretch-sensitive PN afferents. Rectal afferents have a wide response range to stretch, whereas high-threshold colonic afferents likely contribute to visceral nociception. PMID:20075141

  16. Thermosensitivity of muscle: high-intensity thermal stimulation of muscle tissue induces muscle pain in humans.

    PubMed

    Graven-Nielsen, T; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Mense, S

    2002-04-15

    Small-calibre afferent units responding to thermal stimuli have previously been reported to exist in muscle. The question as to whether these receptors in humans mediate subjective thermal sensations from muscle remains unresolved. The aims of the present study were to determine in humans whether intramuscular injection of warm and cold isotonic saline elicits temperature sensations, muscle pain or any other sensations. In 15 subjects, no thermal sensations assessed on a temperature visual analogue scale (VAS) could be detected with intramuscular injections of isotonic saline (1.5 ml) into the anterior tibial muscle at temperatures ranging from 8 to 48 degrees C. The same subjects recorded strongly increasing scores on a temperature VAS when thermal stimuli in the same intensity range were applied to the skin overlying the muscle by a contact thermode. However, I.M. isotonic saline of 48 degrees C induced muscle pain with peak scores of 3.2 +/- 0.8 cm on a VAS scale ranging from 0 to 10 cm. Using the the McGill pain questionnaire a subgroup, of subjects qualitatively described the pain using the 'thermal hot' and 'dullness' word groups. Temperature measurements within the muscle during the stimulating injections showed that the time course of the pain sensation elicited by saline at 48 degrees C paralleled that of the intramuscular temperature and far outlasted the injection time. The present data show that high-intensity thermal stimulation of muscle is associated with muscle pain. High-threshold warm-sensitive receptors may mediate the pain following activation by temperatures of 48 degrees C or more. Taken together, the data indicate that thermosensation from a given volume of muscle is less potent than nociception. PMID:11956350

  17. Long-term sensitization of mechanosensitive and -insensitive afferents in mice with persistent colorectal hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    La, Jun-ho; Schwartz, Erica S.; Tanaka, Takahiro; McMurray, Timothy P.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    Afferent input contributes significantly to the pain and colorectal hypersensitivity that characterize irritable bowel syndrome. In the present study, we investigated the contributions of mechanically sensitive and mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs; or silent afferents) to colorectal hypersensitivity. The visceromotor response to colorectal distension (CRD; 15–60 mmHg) was recorded in mice before and for weeks after intracolonic treatment with zymosan or saline. After CRD tests, the distal colorectum with the pelvic nerve attached was removed for single-fiber electrophysiological recordings. Colorectal afferent endings were located by electrical stimulation and characterized as mechanosensitive or not by blunt probing, mucosal stroking, and circumferential stretch. Intracolonic zymosan produced persistent colorectal hypersensitivity (>24 days) associated with brief colorectal inflammation. Pelvic nerve muscular-mucosal but not muscular mechanosensitive afferents recorded from mice with colorectal hypersensitivity exhibited persistent sensitization. In addition, the proportion of MIAs (relative to control) was significantly reduced from 27% to 13%, whereas the proportion of serosal afferents was significantly increased from 34% to 53%, suggesting that MIAs acquired mechanosensitivity. PGP9.5 immunostaining revealed no significant loss of colorectal nerve fiber density, suggesting that the reduction in MIAs is not due to peripheral fiber loss after intracolonic zymosan. These results indicate that colorectal MIAs and sensitized muscular-mucosal afferents that respond to stretch contribute significantly to the afferent input that sustains hypersensitivity to CRD, suggesting that targeted management of colorectal afferent input could significantly reduce patients' complaints of pain and hypersensitivity. PMID:22268098

  18. Corneal afferents differentially target thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis

    PubMed Central

    Aicher, Sue A.; Hermes, Sam M.; Hegarty, Deborah M.

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal horn neurons send ascending projections to both thalamic nuclei and parabrachial nuclei; these pathways are thought to be critical pathways for central processing of nociceptive information. Afferents from the corneal surface of the eye mediate nociception from this tissue which is susceptible to clinically important pain syndromes. This study examined corneal afferents to the trigeminal dorsal horn and compared inputs to thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons. We used anterograde tracing with cholera toxin B subunit to identify corneal afferent projections to trigeminal dorsal horn, and the retrograde tracer FluoroGold to identify projection neurons. Studies were conducted in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our analysis was conducted at two distinct levels of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) which receive corneal afferent projections. We found that corneal afferents project more densely to the rostral pole of Vc than the caudal pole. We also quantified the number of thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons in the regions of Vc that receive corneal afferents. Corneal afferent inputs to both groups of projection neurons were also more abundant in the rostral pole of Vc. Finally, by comparing the frequency of corneal afferent appositions to thalamic- versus parabrachial-projecting neurons, we found that corneal afferents preferentially target parabrachial-projecting neurons in trigeminal dorsal horn. These results suggest that nociceptive pain from the cornea may be primarily mediated by a non-thalamic ascending pathway. PMID:23201828

  19. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Frances L.; Kirk, Matthew E.; Rennie, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K+ channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K+ channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space. PMID:26082693

  20. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Rabbitt, Richard D; Brichta, Alan M; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C; Poppi, Lauren A; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in <3 ms and decaying with a time constant of ∼24 ms. The inhibitory component dominated whole cell currents in 50% of hair cells at -68 mV and in 67% of hair cells at -60 mV. Responses were quantified and described on the basis of first principles of thermodynamics. Results identify key molecular targets underlying heat pulse excitability in vestibular sensory organs and provide quantitative methods for rational application of optical heat pulses to examine protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. PMID:27226448

  1. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Frances L; Kirk, Matthew E; Rennie, Katherine J

    2015-01-01

    Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K(+) channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K(+) channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space. PMID:26082693

  2. Mechano- and thermosensitivity of regenerating cutaneous afferent nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Jänig, Wilfrid; Grossmann, Lydia; Gorodetskaya, Natalia

    2009-06-01

    Crush lesion of a skin nerve is followed by sprouting of myelinated (A) and unmyelinated (C) afferent fibers into the distal nerve stump. Here, we investigate quantitatively both ongoing activity and activity evoked by mechanical or thermal stimulation of the nerve in 43 A- and 135 C-fibers after crush lesion of the sural nerve using neurophysiological recordings in anesthetized rats. The discharge patterns in the injured afferent nerve fibers and in intact (control) afferent nerve fibers were compared. (1) Almost all (98%) A-fibers were mechanosensitive, some of them exhibited additionally weak cold/heat sensitivity; 7% had ongoing activity. (2) Three patterns of physiologically evoked activity were present in the lesioned C-fibers: (a) C-fibers with type 1 cold sensitivity (low cold threshold, inhibition on heating, high level of ongoing and cold-evoked activity; 23%): almost all of them were mechanoinsensitive and 40% of them were additionally heat-sensitive; (b) C-fibers with type 2 cold sensitivity (high cold threshold, low level of ongoing and cold-evoked activity; 23%). All of them were excited by mechanical and/or heat stimuli; (c) cold-insensitive C-fibers (54%), which were heat- and/or mechanosensitive. (3) The proportions of C-fibers exhibiting these three patterns of discharge to physiological stimuli were almost identical in the population of injured C-fibers and in a population of 91 intact cutaneous C-fibers. 4. Ongoing activity was present in 56% of the lesioned C-fibers. Incidence and rate of ongoing activity were the same in the populations of lesioned and intact type 1 cold-sensitive C-fibers. The incidence (but not rate) of ongoing activity was significantly higher in lesioned type 2 cold-sensitive and cold insensitive C-fibers than in the corresponding populations of intact C-fibers (42/93 fibers vs. 11/72 fibers). PMID:19139872

  3. Bladder afferent hyperexcitability in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Oguchi, Tomohiko; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Sugino, Yoshio; Kawamorita, Naoki; Kashyap, Mahendra P; Chancellor, Michael B; Tyagi, Pradeep; Ogawa, Teruyuki

    2014-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a disease with lower urinary tract symptoms, such as bladder pain and urinary frequency, which results in seriously impaired quality of life of patients. The extreme pain and urinary frequency are often difficult to treat. Although the etiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is still not known, there is increasing evidence showing that afferent hyperexcitability as a result of neurogenic bladder inflammation and urothelial dysfunction is important to the pathophysiological basis of symptom development. Further investigation of the pathophysiology will lead to the effective treatment of patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. PMID:24807488

  4. No-dependent signaling pathways in unloaded skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shenkman, Boris S.; Nemirovskaya, Tatiana L.; Lomonosova, Yulia N.

    2015-01-01

    The main focus of the current review is the nitric oxide (NO)-mediated signaling mechanism in unloaded skeletal. Review of the published data describing muscles during physical activity and inactivity demonstrates that NO is an essential trigger of signaling processes, which leads to structural and metabolic changes of the muscle fibers. The experiments with modulation of NO-synthase (NOS) activity during muscle unloading demonstrate the ability of an activated enzyme to stabilize degradation processes and prevent development of muscle atrophy. Various forms of muscle mechanical activity, i.e., plantar afferent stimulation, resistive exercise and passive chronic stretch increase the content of neural NOS (nNOS) and thus may facilitate an increase in NO production. Recent studies demonstrate that NO-synthase participates in the regulation of protein and energy metabolism in skeletal muscle by fine-tuning and stabilizing complex signaling systems which regulate protein synthesis and degradation in the fibers of inactive muscle. PMID:26582991

  5. A novel mechanism of autophagic cell death in dystrophic muscle regulated by P2RX7 receptor large-pore formation and HSP90

    PubMed Central

    Young, Christopher NJ; Sinadinos, Anthony; Lefebvre, Alexis; Chan, Philippe; Arkle, Stephen; Vaudry, David; Gorecki, Dariusz C

    2015-01-01

    P2RX7 is an ATP-gated ion channel, which can also exhibit an open state with a considerably wider permeation. However, the functional significance of the movement of molecules through the large pore (LP) and the intracellular signaling events involved are not known. Here, analyzing the consequences of P2RX7 activation in primary myoblasts and myotubes from the Dmdmdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we found ATP-induced P2RX7-dependent autophagic flux, leading to CASP3-CASP7-independent cell death. P2RX7-evoked autophagy was triggered by LP formation but not Ca2+ influx or MAPK1-MAPK3 phosphorylation, 2 canonical P2RX7-evoked signals. Phosphoproteomics, protein expression inference and signaling pathway prediction analysis of P2RX7 signaling mediators pointed to HSPA2 and HSP90 proteins. Indeed, specific HSP90 inhibitors prevented LP formation, LC3-II accumulation, and cell death in myoblasts and myotubes but not in macrophages. Pharmacological blockade or genetic ablation of p2rx7 also proved protective against ATP-induced death of muscle cells, as did inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA. The functional significance of the P2RX7 LP is one of the great unknowns of purinergic signaling. Our data demonstrate a novel outcome—autophagy—and show that molecules entering through the LP can be targeted to phagophores. Moreover, we show that in muscles but not in macrophages, autophagy is needed for the formation of this LP. Given that P2RX7-dependent LP and HSP90 are critically interacting in the ATP-evoked autophagic death of dystrophic muscles, treatments targeting this axis could be of therapeutic benefit in this debilitating and incurable form of muscular dystrophy. PMID:25700737

  6. A novel mechanism of autophagic cell death in dystrophic muscle regulated by P2RX7 receptor large-pore formation and HSP90.

    PubMed

    Young, Christopher N J; Sinadinos, Anthony; Lefebvre, Alexis; Chan, Philippe; Arkle, Stephen; Vaudry, David; Gorecki, Dariusz C

    2015-01-01

    P2RX7 is an ATP-gated ion channel, which can also exhibit an open state with a considerably wider permeation. However, the functional significance of the movement of molecules through the large pore (LP) and the intracellular signaling events involved are not known. Here, analyzing the consequences of P2RX7 activation in primary myoblasts and myotubes from the Dmd(mdx) mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we found ATP-induced P2RX7-dependent autophagic flux, leading to CASP3-CASP7-independent cell death. P2RX7-evoked autophagy was triggered by LP formation but not Ca(2+) influx or MAPK1-MAPK3 phosphorylation, 2 canonical P2RX7-evoked signals. Phosphoproteomics, protein expression inference and signaling pathway prediction analysis of P2RX7 signaling mediators pointed to HSPA2 and HSP90 proteins. Indeed, specific HSP90 inhibitors prevented LP formation, LC3-II accumulation, and cell death in myoblasts and myotubes but not in macrophages. Pharmacological blockade or genetic ablation of p2rx7 also proved protective against ATP-induced death of muscle cells, as did inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA. The functional significance of the P2RX7 LP is one of the great unknowns of purinergic signaling. Our data demonstrate a novel outcome--autophagy--and show that molecules entering through the LP can be targeted to phagophores. Moreover, we show that in muscles but not in macrophages, autophagy is needed for the formation of this LP. Given that P2RX7-dependent LP and HSP90 are critically interacting in the ATP-evoked autophagic death of dystrophic muscles, treatments targeting this axis could be of therapeutic benefit in this debilitating and incurable form of muscular dystrophy. PMID:25700737

  7. Dysaesthesiae induced by physiological and electrical activation of posterior column afferents after stroke.

    PubMed

    Triggs, W J; Berić, A

    1994-09-01

    Six of 48 stroke patients had functionally limiting dysaesthesiae induced by repetitive light touch, joint movement, or neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMS). Only one of these six patients had a thalamic lesion. Quantitative sensory testing showed substantial impairment of pain and temperature sensation in all six patients, whereas light touch, vibration and position sense, and graphaesthesia were normal (three patients) or relatively spared (three patients). By contrast, none of 15 stroke patients in whom NMS did not evoke dysaesthesiae had clinical evidence of dissociated sensory loss. Conscious perception of joint movement and light touch is mediated mainly by the same population of large myelinated fibres activated preferentially by low intensity electrical stimulation. It is suggested that activation of these non-nociceptive, presumably dorsal column, afferents may contribute to dysaesthesiae in some patients with sensory loss after stroke. PMID:8089673

  8. Dysaesthesiae induced by physiological and electrical activation of posterior column afferents after stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Triggs, W J; Berić, A

    1994-01-01

    Six of 48 stroke patients had functionally limiting dysaesthesiae induced by repetitive light touch, joint movement, or neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMS). Only one of these six patients had a thalamic lesion. Quantitative sensory testing showed substantial impairment of pain and temperature sensation in all six patients, whereas light touch, vibration and position sense, and graphaesthesia were normal (three patients) or relatively spared (three patients). By contrast, none of 15 stroke patients in whom NMS did not evoke dysaesthesiae had clinical evidence of dissociated sensory loss. Conscious perception of joint movement and light touch is mediated mainly by the same population of large myelinated fibres activated preferentially by low intensity electrical stimulation. It is suggested that activation of these non-nociceptive, presumably dorsal column, afferents may contribute to dysaesthesiae in some patients with sensory loss after stroke. PMID:8089673

  9. Oxytocin hyperpolarizes cultured duodenum myenteric intrinsic primary afferent neurons by opening BK(Ca) channels through IP₃ pathway.

    PubMed

    Che, Tongtong; Sun, Hui; Li, Jingxin; Yu, Xiao; Zhu, Dexiao; Xue, Bing; Liu, Kejing; Zhang, Min; Kunze, Wolfgang; Liu, Chuanyong

    2012-05-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is clinically important in gut motility and constitutively reduces duodenum contractility. Intrinsic primary afferent neurons (IPANs), whose physiological classification is as AH cells, are the 1st neurons of the peristaltic reflex pathway. We set out to investigate if this inhibitory effect is mediated by IPANs and to identify the ion channel(s) and intracellular signal transduction pathway that are involved in this effect. Myenteric neurons were isolated from the longitudinal muscle myenteric plexus (LMMP) preparation of rat duodenum and cultured for 16-24 h before electrophysiological recording in whole cell mode and AH cells identified by their electrophysiological characteristics. The cytoplasmic Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺](i) ) of isolated neurons was measured using calcium imaging. The concentration of IP(3) in the LMMP and the OT secreted from the LMMP were measured using ELISA. The oxytocin receptor (OTR) and large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK(Ca)) channels, as well as the expression of OT and the IPAN marker calbindin 28 K, on the myenteric plexus neurons were localized using double-immunostaining techniques. We found that administration of OT (10⁻⁷ to 10⁻⁵ M) dose dependently hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential and increased the total outward current. The OTR antagonist atosiban or the BK(Ca) channel blocker iberiotoxin (IbTX) blocked the effects of OT suggesting that the increased outward current resulted from BK(Ca) channel opening. OTR and the BK(Ca) α subunit were co-expressed on a subset of myenteric neurons at the LMMP. NS1619 (10⁻⁵ M, a BK(Ca) channel activator) increased the outward current similar to the effect of OT. OT administration also increased [Ca²⁺](i) and the OT-evoked outward current was significantly attenuated by thapsigargin (10⁻⁶ M) or CdCl₂. The effect of OT on the BK(Ca) current was also blocked by pre-treatment with the IP₃ receptor antagonist 2-APB (10⁻⁴ M

  10. Muscle proprioceptive feedback and spinal networks.

    PubMed

    Windhorst, U

    2007-07-12

    This review revolves primarily around segmental feedback systems established by muscle spindle and Golgi tendon organ afferents, as well as spinal recurrent inhibition via Renshaw cells. These networks are considered as to their potential contributions to the following functions: (i) generation of anti-gravity thrust during quiet upright stance and the stance phase of locomotion; (ii) timing of locomotor phases; (iii) linearization and correction for muscle nonlinearities; (iv) compensation for muscle lever-arm variations; (v) stabilization of inherently unstable systems; (vi) compensation for muscle fatigue; (vii) synergy formation; (viii) selection of appropriate responses to perturbations; (ix) correction for intersegmental interaction forces; (x) sensory-motor transformations; (xi) plasticity and motor learning. The scope will at times extend beyond the narrow confines of spinal circuits in order to integrate them into wider contexts and concepts. PMID:17562384

  11. Directional sensitivity of human periodontal mechanoreceptive afferents to forces applied to the teeth.

    PubMed Central

    Trulsson, M; Johansson, R S; Olsson, K A

    1992-01-01

    1. Single-unit impulse activity from thirty-eight mechanoreceptive afferent fibres was recorded in the human inferior alveolar nerve using tungsten microelectrodes. All afferents responded to mechanical stimulation of the teeth and most likely supplied periodontal mechanoreceptors. 2. All afferents showed their highest sensitivity to forces applied to a particular tooth (the lower incisors, the canine or the first premolar). Forces with 'ramp-and-hold' shaped profiles of similar magnitudes were applied to that tooth in the following six directions: lingual, labial, mesial and distal in the horizontal plane, and up and down in the axial direction of the tooth. Both static and dynamic response components were analysed. 3. All afferents were 'slowly adapting' since they discharged continuously in response to static forces in at least one stimulation direction. Twenty-five afferents (66%) were spontaneously active in the sense that they showed an on-going discharge in the absence of external stimulation. 4. Diverse receptive fields were observed. Most afferents (74%) responded to static forces in two or three of the four horizontal directions. Likewise, all units showed excitatory responses to axial loading with a majority (74%) responding in one of the two axial directions and the remainder in both axial directions. Spontaneously active afferents generally decreased their discharge rate when stimulated in directions opposite to the directions exciting the afferent. With regard to population responses, approximately half of the afferents showed excitatory responses to each stimulus direction except for downwards, in which 86% responded. 5. Twenty-three afferents (61%) exhibited the strongest response to forces in one of the horizontal directions. Of those, a majority were most responsive to the lingual direction (52%) and some to the labial direction (30%). Accordingly, the discharge rates during force application averaged over the whole afferent sample were highest in

  12. Neural circuits underlying tongue movements for the prey-catching behavior in frog: distribution of primary afferent terminals on motoneurons supplying the tongue.

    PubMed

    Kecskes, Szilvia; Matesz, Clara; Gaál, Botond; Birinyi, András

    2016-04-01

    The hypoglossal motor nucleus is one of the efferent components of the neural network underlying the tongue prehension behavior of Ranid frogs. Although the appropriate pattern of the motor activity is determined by motor pattern generators, sensory inputs can modify the ongoing motor execution. Combination of fluorescent tracers were applied to investigate whether there are direct contacts between the afferent fibers of the trigeminal, facial, vestibular, glossopharyngeal-vagal, hypoglossal, second cervical spinal nerves and the hypoglossal motoneurons. Using confocal laser scanning microscope, we detected different number of close contacts from various sensory fibers, which were distributed unequally between the motoneurons innervating the protractor, retractor and inner muscles of the tongue. Based on the highest number of contacts and their closest location to the perikaryon, the glossopharyngeal-vagal nerves can exert the strongest effect on hypoglossal motoneurons and in agreement with earlier physiological results, they influence the protraction of the tongue. The second largest number of close appositions was provided by the hypoglossal and second cervical spinal afferents and they were located mostly on the proximal and middle parts of the dendrites of retractor motoneurons. Due to their small number and distal location, the trigeminal and vestibular terminals seem to have minor effects on direct activation of the hypoglossal motoneurons. We concluded that direct contacts between primary afferent terminals and hypoglossal motoneurons provide one of the possible morphological substrates of very quick feedback and feedforward modulation of the motor program during various stages of prey-catching behavior. PMID:25575900

  13. Reorganization of central terminals of myelinated primary afferents in the rat dorsal horn following peripheral axotomy.

    PubMed

    Woolf, C J; Shortland, P; Reynolds, M; Ridings, J; Doubell, T; Coggeshall, R E

    1995-09-11

    We have investigated the time course and extent to which peripheral nerve lesions cause a morphological reorganization of the central terminals of choleragenoid-horseradish peroxidase (B-HRP)-labelled primary afferent fibers in the mammalian dorsal horn. Choleragenoid-horseradish peroxidase is retrogradely transported by myelinated (A) sensory axons to laminae I, III, IV and V of the normal dorsal horn of the spinal cord, leaving lamina II unlabelled. We previously showed that peripheral axotomy results in the sprouting of numerous B-HRP-labelled large myelinated sensory axons into lamina II. We show here that this spread of B-HRP-labelled axons into lamina II is detectable at 1 week, maximal by 2 weeks and persists for over 6 months postlesion. By 9 months, however, B-HRP fibers no longer appear in lamina II. The sprouting into lamina II occurs whether regeneration is allowed (crush) or prevented (section with ligation), and does not reverse at times when peripheral fibers reinnervate the periphery. We also show that 15 times more synaptic terminals in lamina II are labelled by B-HRP 2 weeks after axotomy than in the normal. We interpret this as indicating that the sprouting fibers are making synaptic contacts with postsynaptic targets. This implies that A-fiber terminal reorganization is a prominent and long-lasting but not permanent feature of peripheral axotomy. We also provide evidence that this sprouting is the consequence of a combination of an atrophic loss of central synaptic terminals and the conditioning of the sensory neurons by peripheral axotomy. The sprouting of large sensory fibers into the spinal territory where postsynaptic targets usually receive only small afferent fiber input may bear on the intractable touch-evoked pain that can follow nerve injury. PMID:7499558

  14. Trichinella spiralis in human muscle (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is the parasite Trichinella spiralis in human muscle tissue. The parasite is transmitted by eating undercooked ... produce large numbers of larvae that migrate into muscle tissue. The cysts may cause muscle pain and ...

  15. Microsecond-Scale Timing Precision in Rodent Trigeminal Primary Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Michael R.; Campagner, Dario; Erskine, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Communication in the nervous system occurs by spikes: the timing precision with which spikes are fired is a fundamental limit on neural information processing. In sensory systems, spike-timing precision is constrained by first-order neurons. We found that spike-timing precision of trigeminal primary afferents in rats and mice is limited both by stimulus speed and by electrophysiological sampling rate. High-speed video of behaving mice revealed whisker velocities of at least 17,000°/s, so we delivered an ultrafast “ping” (>50,000°/s) to single whiskers and sampled primary afferent activity at 500 kHz. Median spike jitter was 17.4 μs; 29% of neurons had spike jitter < 10 μs. These results indicate that the input stage of the trigeminal pathway has extraordinary spike-timing precision and very high potential information capacity. This timing precision ranks among the highest in biology. PMID:25878266

  16. Interactions between visceral afferent signaling and stimulus processing

    PubMed Central

    Critchley, Hugo D.; Garfinkel, Sarah N.

    2015-01-01

    Visceral afferent signals to the brain influence thoughts, feelings and behavior. Here we highlight the findings of a set of empirical investigations in humans concerning body-mind interaction that focus on how feedback from states of autonomic arousal shapes cognition and emotion. There is a longstanding debate regarding the contribution of the body to mental processes. Recent theoretical models broadly acknowledge the role of (autonomically-mediated) physiological arousal to emotional, social and motivational behaviors, yet the underlying mechanisms are only partially characterized. Neuroimaging is overcoming this shortfall; first, by demonstrating correlations between autonomic change and discrete patterns of evoked, and task-independent, neural activity; second, by mapping the central consequences of clinical perturbations in autonomic response and; third, by probing how dynamic fluctuations in peripheral autonomic state are integrated with perceptual, cognitive and emotional processes. Building on the notion that an important source of the brain's representation of physiological arousal is derived from afferent information from arterial baroreceptors, we have exploited the phasic nature of these signals to show their differential contribution to the processing of emotionally-salient stimuli. This recent work highlights the facilitation at neural and behavioral levels of fear and threat processing that contrasts with the more established observations of the inhibition of central pain processing during baroreceptors activation. The implications of this body-brain-mind axis are discussed. PMID:26379481

  17. Fusimotor influence on jaw muscle spindle activity during swallowing-related movements in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A; Hidaka, O; Durbaba, R; Ellaway, P H

    1997-01-01

    1. The activity patterns of muscle spindle afferents in jaw-closer muscles were studied during reflex swallowing movements in anaesthetized cats. Simultaneous records were made of the electromyogram (EMG) in masseter and anterior digastric muscles and of the unloaded jaw movements. The underlying patterns of fusimotor activity were deduced by comparing afferent discharges occurring during active swallowing with those occurring when exactly the same movements were imposed passively. The interpretation of spindle behaviour was greatly facilitated by characterizing the afferents according to the evidence for their contact with the various intrafusal muscle fibres, derived from testing with succinylcholine. It was also valuable to have two different types of afferent recorded simultaneously. 2. There was clear evidence of fusimotor activity occurring during active jaw closing so as to oppose the spindle silencing. This effect was most marked in b2c-type afferents (probably secondaries) and was therefore attributed to a modulation of static fusimotor discharge approximately in parallel with alpha-activity. 3. Afferents with evidence of bag1 fibre contacts (primaries) showed much greater sensitivity to muscle lengthening during active movement than when the movement was imposed. This difference was exaggerated when anaesthesia was deepened for the passive movements. This was interpreted as evidence for a higher level of dynamic fusimotor activity maintained during active movements than at rest. 4. The results support the view that for a variety of active jaw movements, static fusimotor neurone firing is modulated roughly in parallel with alpha-activity but leading it so as to counteract spindle unloading. Dynamic fusimotor neurone firing appears to be set at a raised level during active movements. Anaesthesia appears to depress activity in the alpha-motoneurones more than in gamma-motoneurones. PMID:9288683

  18. A study on synaptic coupling between single orofacial mechanoreceptors and human masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Türker, Kemal S; Johnsen, Skjalg E; Sowman, Paul F; Trulsson, Mats

    2006-04-01

    The connection between individual orofacial mechanoreceptive afferents and the motoneurones that innervate jaw muscles is not well established. For example, although electrical and mechanical stimulation of orofacial afferents in bulk evokes responses in the jaw closers, whether similar responses can be evoked in the jaw muscles from the discharge of type identified single orofacial mechanoreceptive afferents is not known. Using tungsten microelectrodes, we have recorded from 28 afferents in the inferior alveolar nerve and 21 afferents in the lingual nerve of human volunteers. We have used discharges of single orofacial afferents as the triggers and the electromyogram (EMG) of the masseter as the source to generate spike-triggered averaged records to illustrate time-based EMG modulation by the nerve discharge. We have then used cross correlation analysis to quantify the coupling. Furthermore, we have also used coherence analysis to study frequency-based relationship between the nerve spike trains and the EMG. The discharge patterns of the skin and mucosa receptors around the lip and the gingiva generated significant modulation in EMGs with a success rate of 40% for both cross correlation and coherence analyses. The discharge patterns of the periodontal mechanoreceptors (PMRs) generated more coupling with a success rate of 70% for cross correlation and about 35% for coherence analyses. Finally, the discharges of the tongue receptors displayed significant coupling with the jaw muscle motoneurones with a success rate of about 40% for both analyses. Significant modulation of the jaw muscles by single orofacial receptors suggests that they play important roles in controlling the jaw muscle activity so that mastication and speech functions are executed successfully. PMID:16328261

  19. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion. II. Phase asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Spardy, Lucy E.; Markin, Sergey N.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.; Prilutsky, Boris I.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze a closed loop neuromechanical model of locomotor rhythm generation. The model is composed of a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) and a single-joint limb, with CPG outputs projecting via motoneurons to muscles that control the limb and afferent signals from the muscles feeding back to the CPG. In a preceding companion paper, we analyzed how the model generates oscillations in the presence or absence of feedback, identified curves in a phase plane associated with the limb that signify where feedback levels induce phase transitions within the CPG, and explained how increasing feedback strength restores oscillations in a model representation of spinal cord injury; from these steps, we derived insights about features of locomotor rhythms in several scenarios and made predictions about rhythm responses to various perturbations. In this paper, we exploit our analytical observations to construct a reduced model that retains important characteristics from the original system. We prove the existence of an oscillatory solution to the reduced model using a novel version of a Melnikov function, adapted for discontinuous systems and also comment on the uniqueness and stability of this solution. Our analysis yields a deeper understanding of how the model must be tuned to generate oscillations and how the details of the limb dynamics shape overall model behavior. In particular, we explain how, due to the feedback signals in the model, changes in the strength of a tonic supra-spinal drive to the CPG yield asymmetric alterations in the durations of different locomotor phases, despite symmetry within the CPG itself. PMID:22058275

  20. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: II. Phase asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Spardy, Lucy E; Markin, Sergey N; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Prilutsky, Boris I; Rybak, Ilya A; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we analyze a closed loop neuromechanical model of locomotor rhythm generation. The model is composed of a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) and a single-joint limb, with CPG outputs projecting via motoneurons to muscles that control the limb and afferent signals from the muscles feeding back to the CPG. In a preceding companion paper (Spardy et al 2011 J. Neural Eng. 8 065003), we analyzed how the model generates oscillations in the presence or absence of feedback, identified curves in a phase plane associated with the limb that signify where feedback levels induce phase transitions within the CPG, and explained how increasing feedback strength restores oscillations in a model representation of spinal cord injury; from these steps, we derived insights about features of locomotor rhythms in several scenarios and made predictions about rhythm responses to various perturbations. In this paper, we exploit our analytical observations to construct a reduced model that retains important characteristics from the original system. We prove the existence of an oscillatory solution to the reduced model using a novel version of a Melnikov function, adapted for discontinuous systems, and also comment on the uniqueness and stability of this solution. Our analysis yields a deeper understanding of how the model must be tuned to generate oscillations and how the details of the limb dynamics shape overall model behavior. In particular, we explain how, due to the feedback signals in the model, changes in the strength of a tonic supra-spinal drive to the CPG yield asymmetric alterations in the durations of different locomotor phases, despite symmetry within the CPG itself. PMID:22058275

  1. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: II. Phase asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spardy, Lucy E.; Markin, Sergey N.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.; Prilutsky, Boris I.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we analyze a closed loop neuromechanical model of locomotor rhythm generation. The model is composed of a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) and a single-joint limb, with CPG outputs projecting via motoneurons to muscles that control the limb and afferent signals from the muscles feeding back to the CPG. In a preceding companion paper (Spardy et al 2011 J. Neural Eng. 8 065003), we analyzed how the model generates oscillations in the presence or absence of feedback, identified curves in a phase plane associated with the limb that signify where feedback levels induce phase transitions within the CPG, and explained how increasing feedback strength restores oscillations in a model representation of spinal cord injury; from these steps, we derived insights about features of locomotor rhythms in several scenarios and made predictions about rhythm responses to various perturbations. In this paper, we exploit our analytical observations to construct a reduced model that retains important characteristics from the original system. We prove the existence of an oscillatory solution to the reduced model using a novel version of a Melnikov function, adapted for discontinuous systems, and also comment on the uniqueness and stability of this solution. Our analysis yields a deeper understanding of how the model must be tuned to generate oscillations and how the details of the limb dynamics shape overall model behavior. In particular, we explain how, due to the feedback signals in the model, changes in the strength of a tonic supra-spinal drive to the CPG yield asymmetric alterations in the durations of different locomotor phases, despite symmetry within the CPG itself.

  2. Cationic influences upon synaptic transmission at the hair cell-afferent fiber synapse of the frog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    The concentrations of inorganic cations (K+, Na+, and Ca2+) bathing the isolated frog labyrinth were varied in order to assess their role in influencing and mediating synaptic transmission at the hair cell-afferent fiber synapse. Experiments employed intracellular recordings of synaptic activity from VIIIth nerve afferents. Recordings were digitized continuously at 50 kHz, and excitatory postsynaptic potentials were detected and parameters quantified by computer algorithms. Particular attention was focused on cationic effects upon excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency of occurrence and excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude, in order to discriminate between pre- and postsynaptic actions. Because the small size of afferents preclude long term stable recordings, alterations in cationic concentrations were applied transiently and their peak effects on synaptic activity were assessed. Increases in extracellular K+ concentration of a few millimolar produced a large increase in the frequency of occurrence of excitatory postsynaptic potentials with little change in amplitude, indicating that release of transmitter from the hair cell is tightly coupled to its membrane potential. Increasing extracellular Na+ concentration resulted in an increase in excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude with no significant change in excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency of occurrence, suggesting that the transmitter-gated subsynaptic channel conducts Na+ ions. Decreases in extracellular Ca2+ concentration had little effect upon excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency, but increased excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency and amplitude. These findings suggest that at higher concentrations Ca2+ act presynaptically to prevent transmitter release and postsynaptically to prevent Na+ influx during the generation of the excitatory postsynaptic potential. The influences of these ions on synaptic activity at this synapse are remarkably similar to those reported at the

  3. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  4. Greater impairments in cerebral artery compared with skeletal muscle feed artery endothelial function in a mouse model of increased large artery stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ashley E; Henson, Grant D; Reihl, Kelly D; Morgan, R Garrett; Dobson, Parker S; Nielson, Elizabeth I; Ling, Jing; Mecham, Robert P; Li, Dean Y; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Donato, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Advancing age as well as diseases such as diabetes are characterized by both increased large artery stiffness and impaired peripheral artery function. It has been hypothesized that greater large artery stiffness causes peripheral artery dysfunction; however, a cause-and-effect relationship has not previously been established. We used elastin heterozygote mice (Eln+/–) as a model of increased large artery stiffness without co-morbidities unrelated to the large artery properties. Aortic stiffness, measured by pulse wave velocity, was ∼35% greater in Eln+/– mice than in wild-type (Eln+/+) mice (P = 0.04). Endothelium-dependent dilatation (EDD), assessed by the maximal dilatation to acetylcholine, was ∼40% lower in Eln+/– than Eln+/+ mice in the middle cerebral artery (MCA, P < 0.001), but was similar between groups in the gastrocnemius feed arteries (GFA, P = 0.79). In the MCA, EDD did not differ between groups after incubation with the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (P > 0.05), indicating that lower NO bioavailability contributed to the impaired EDD in Eln+/– mice. Superoxide production and content of the oxidative stress marker nitrotyrosine was higher in MCAs from Eln+/− compared with Eln+/+ mice (P < 0.05). In the MCA, after incubation with the superoxide scavenger TEMPOL, maximal EDD improved by ∼65% in Eln+/– (P = 0.002), but was unchanged in Eln+/+ mice (P = 0.17). These results indicate that greater large artery stiffness has a more profound effect on endothelial function in cerebral arteries compared with skeletal muscle feed arteries. Greater large artery stiffness can cause cerebral artery endothelial dysfunction by reducing NO bioavailability and increasing oxidative stress. PMID:25627876

  5. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  6. RESPONSE OF LUMBAR PARASPINAL MUSCLES SPINDLES IS GREATER TO SPINAL MANIPULATIVE LOADING COMPARED WITH SLOWER LOADING UNDER LENGTH CONTROL

    PubMed Central

    Pickar, Joel G.; Sung, Paul S.; Kang, Yu-Ming; Ge, Weiqing

    2007-01-01

    arm was securely attached to the L6 spinous process via a forceps. Results As thrust duration became shorter the discharge of the lumbar paraspinal muscle spindles increased in a curvilinear fashion. A concave up inflection occurred near the 100ms duration eliciting both a higher frequency discharge compared to the longer durations and a substantially faster rate of change as thrust duration was shortened. This pattern was evident in paraspinal afferents with receptive fields both close and far from the midline. Paradoxically, spindle afferents were almost twice as sensitive to the 1mm compared to the 2mm amplitude thrust (6.2 vs 3.3 spikes/s/mm/s). This latter finding may be related to the small vs large signal range properties of muscle spindles. Conclusions . The results indicate that the duration and amplitude of a spinal manipulation elicits a pattern of discharge from paraspinal muscle spindles different from slower mechanical inputs. Clinically, these parameters may be important determinants of an HVLA-SM's therapeutic benefit. PMID:17905321

  7. Muscle aches

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cause of muscle aches and pain is fibromyalgia , a condition that causes tenderness in your muscles ... imbalance, such as too little potassium or calcium Fibromyalgia Infections, including the flu, Lyme disease , malaria , muscle ...

  8. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  9. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs of a muscle disorder, tests such as an electromyogram , ...

  10. Loss of Afferent Vestibular Input Produces Central Adaptation and Increased Gain of Vestibular Prosthetic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christopher; Shepherd, Sarah J; Nowack, Amy; Nie, Kaibao; Kaneko, Chris R S; Rubinstein, Jay T; Ling, Leo; Phillips, James O

    2016-02-01

    Implanted vestibular neurostimulators are effective in driving slow phase eye movements in monkeys and humans. Furthermore, increases in slow phase velocity and electrically evoked compound action potential (vECAP) amplitudes occur with increasing current amplitude of electrical stimulation. In intact monkeys, protracted intermittent stimulation continues to produce robust behavioral responses and preserved vECAPs. In lesioned monkeys, shorter duration studies show preserved but with somewhat lower or higher velocity behavioral responses. It has been proposed that such changes are due to central adaptive changes in the electrically elicited vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). It is equally possible that these differences are due to changes in the vestibular periphery in response to activation of the vestibular efferent system. In order to investigate the site of adaptive change in response to electrical stimulation, we performed transtympanic gentamicin perfusions to induce rapid changes in vestibular input in monkeys with long-standing stably functioning vestibular neurostimulators, disambiguating the effects of implantation from the effects of ototoxic lesion. Gentamicin injection was effective in producing a large reduction in natural VOR only when it was performed in the non-implanted ear, suggesting that the implanted ear contributed little to the natural rotational response before injection. Injection of the implanted ear produced a reduction in the vECAP responses in that ear, suggesting that the intact hair cells in the non-functional ipsilateral ear were successfully lesioned by gentamicin, reducing the efficacy of stimulation in that ear. Despite this, injection of both ears produced central plastic changes that resulted in a dramatically increased slow phase velocity nystagmus elicited by electrical stimulation. These results suggest that loss of vestibular afferent activity, and a concurrent loss of electrically elicited vestibular input, produces an

  11. Trafficking of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger to the site of persistent inflammation in nociceptive afferents.

    PubMed

    Scheff, Nicole N; Gold, Michael S

    2015-06-01

    Persistent inflammation results in an increase in the amplitude and duration of depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transients in putative nociceptive afferents. Previous data indicated that these changes were the result of neither increased neuronal excitability nor an increase in the amplitude of depolarization. Subsequent data also ruled out an increase in voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents and recruitment of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Parametric studies indicated that the inflammation-induced increase in the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient required a relatively large and long-lasting increase in the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+) implicating the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), a major Ca(2+) extrusion mechanism activated with high intracellular Ca(2+) loads. The contribution of NCX to the inflammation-induced increase in the evoked Ca(2+) transient in rat sensory neurons was tested using fura-2 AM imaging and electrophysiological recordings. Changes in NCX expression and protein were assessed with real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. An inflammation-induced decrease in NCX activity was observed in a subpopulation of putative nociceptive neurons innervating the site of inflammation. The time course of the decrease in NCX activity paralleled that of the inflammation-induced changes in nociceptive behavior. The change in NCX3 in the cell body was associated with a decrease in NCX3 protein in the ganglia, an increase in the peripheral nerve (sciatic) yet no change in the central root. This single response to inflammation is associated with changes in at least three different segments of the primary afferent, all of which are likely to contribute to the dynamic response to persistent inflammation. PMID:26041911

  12. Determinants of renal microvascular response to ACh: afferent and efferent arteriolar actions of EDHF.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemei; Loutzenhiser, Rodger

    2002-01-01

    The renal microvascular actions of ACh were investigated using the in vitro perfused hydronephrotic rat kidney. ACh reversed ANG II-induced vasoconstriction in the afferent and efferent arteriole by 106 +/- 2 and 75 +/- 5%, respectively. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase [NOS; 100 micromol/l N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)] and cyclooxygenase (COX; 10 micromol/l ibuprofen) prevented the sustained response of the afferent arteriole but did not reduce the magnitude of the initial dilation (97 +/- 7%). However, NOS/COX inhibition abolished the response of the efferent arteriole. The underlying mechanisms mediating this endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)-like response were characterized using K channel blockers. Ba (100 micromol/l), tetraethylammonium (1 mmol/l), and ouabain (3 mmol/l) had no effect, arguing against a role of an inward rectifier K channel, large-conductance Ca-activated K channel, or Na,K-ATPase. Charybdotoxin (10 nmol/l) and apamin (1.0micromol/l) attenuated the response when administered alone (63 +/- 7% and 37 +/- 5%, respectively) and abolished the response when coadministered (0.1 +/- 1.0%). These findings indicate that, as in other vascular beds, the renal EDHF-like response to ACh involves K channels that are sensitive to a combination of apamin and charybdotoxin. Our finding that EDHF modulates preglomerular, but not postglomerular, tone is consistent with the evolving concept that vasomotor mechanisms in cortical efferent arterioles do not involve voltage-gated Ca entry. PMID:11739120

  13. Functional recovery of anterior semicircular canal afferents following hair cell regeneration in birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Richard; Highstein, Stephen M.; Carey, John P.; Xu, Jinping

    2002-01-01

    Streptomycin sulfate (1.2 g/kg i.m.) was administered for 5 consecutive days to 5-7-day-old white Leghorn chicks; this causes damage to semicircular canal hair cells that ultimately regenerate to reform the sensory epithelium. During the recovery period, electrophysiological recordings were taken sequentially from anterior semicircular canal primary afferents using an indentation stimulus of the canal that has been shown to mimic rotational stimulation. Chicks were assigned to an early (14-18 days; n = 8), intermediate (28-34 days; n = 5), and late (38-58 days; n = 4) period based on days after treatment. Seven untreated chicks, 15-67 days old, provided control data. An absence of background and indent-induced discharge was the prominent feature of afferents in the early period: only "silent" afferents were encountered in 5/8 experiments. In several of these chicks, fascicles of afferent fibers were seen extending up to the epithelium that was void of hair cells, and intra- and extracellular biocytin labeling revealed afferent processes penetrating into the supporting cell layer of the crista. In 3/8 chicks 74 afferents could be characterized, and they significantly differed from controls (n = 130) by having a lower discharge rate and a negligible response to canal stimulation. In the intermediate period there was considerable variability in discharge properties of 121 afferents, but as a whole the number of "silent" fibers in the canal nerve diminished, the background rate increased, and a response to canal stimulation detected. Individually biocytin-labeled afferents had normal-appearing terminal specializations in the sensory epithelium by 28 days poststreptomycin. In the late period, afferents (n = 58) remained significantly different from controls in background discharge properties and response gain. The evidence suggests that a considerable amount of variability exists between chicks in the return of vestibular afferent function following ototoxic injury and

  14. Treg engage lymphotoxin beta receptor for afferent lymphatic transendothelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, C. Colin; Iwami, Daiki; Hritzo, Molly K.; Xiong, Yanbao; Ahmad, Sarwat; Simon, Thomas; Hippen, Keli L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Bromberg, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential to suppress unwanted immunity or inflammation. After islet allo-transplant Tregs must migrate from blood to allograft, then via afferent lymphatics to draining LN to protect allografts. Here we show that Tregs but not non-Treg T cells use lymphotoxin (LT) during migration from allograft to draining LN, and that LT deficiency or blockade prevents normal migration and allograft protection. Treg LTαβ rapidly modulates cytoskeletal and membrane structure of lymphatic endothelial cells; dependent on VCAM-1 and non-canonical NFκB signalling via LTβR. These results demonstrate a form of T-cell migration used only by Treg in tissues that serves an important role in their suppressive function and is a unique therapeutic focus for modulating suppression. PMID:27323847

  15. Interleukin-1β sensitizes abdominal visceral afferents of cats to ischaemia and histamine

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C

    1999-01-01

    Activation of abdominal splanchnic visceral afferents during mesenteric ischaemia induces visceral pain and evokes excitatory cardiovascular responses. Previous studies have shown that interleukin-1β (IL-1β) concentration is increased locally in tissues during ischaemia and reperfusion. Local administration of IL-1β sensitizes somatic afferents to mechanical, thermal and chemical stimulation. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-1β stimulates or sensitizes splanchnic visceral afferents to ischaemia and to the action of chemical stimuli such as histamine. The concentration of IL-1β in mesenteric lymph and portal venous plasma in anaesthetized cats was measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay before, during and after 10 min of abdominal ischaemia. The level of IL-1β was significantly increased during ischaemia in lymph, but not in plasma. Discharge activity of single-unit abdominal visceral C fibre afferents was measured from the right thoracic sympathetic chain. Ischaemically sensitive C fibre afferents were identified according to their response to 5–10 min of abdominal ischaemia. Intra-arterial (i.a.) injection of a high dose of IL-1β (500 ng kg−1), but not of a lower dose (i.e. 15, 50 or 150 ng kg−1), stimulated most (six of seven) abdominal visceral afferents. IL-1β (15 ng kg−1, i.a.) significantly enhanced the increased activity of 11 of 13 C fibre afferents during 10 min of ischaemia. Conversely, an IL-1 type I receptor antagonist (IL-1ra, 1·5 μg kg−1, i.a.) significantly attenuated the increased activity in six of seven other C fibre afferents during ischaemia. IL-1β (15 ng kg−1, i.a.) significantly augmented the responses of 13 of 16 ischaemically sensitive abdominal afferents to histamine (5–10 μg kg−1, i.a.). Conversely, IL-1ra (1·5 μg kg−1, i.a.) significantly attenuated the responses of five of six other C fibre afferents to histamine. These data strongly suggest that stimulation of IL-1 type I receptors by IL-1

  16. Equol increases cerebral blood flow in rats via activation of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Wang, Yan; Song, Zheng; Zhao, Li-Mei; Li, Gui-Rong; Deng, Xiu-Ling

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of equol on cerebral blood flow and the underlying molecular mechanisms. The regional cerebral blood flow in parietal lobe of rats was measured by using a laser Doppler flowmetry. Isolated cerebral basilar artery and mesenteric artery rings from rats were used for vascular reactivity measurement with a multi wire myography system. Outward K(+) current in smooth muscle cells of cerebral basilar artery, large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel current in BK-HEK 293 cells stably expressing both human α (hSlo)- and β1-subunits, and hSlo channel current in hSlo-HEK 293 cells expressing only the α-subunit of BK channels were recorded with whole cell patch-clamp technique. The results showed that equol significantly increased regional cerebral blood flow in rats, and produced a concentration-dependent but endothelium-independent relaxation in rat cerebral basilar arteries. Both paxilline and iberiotoxin, two selective BK channel blockers, significantly inhibited equol-induced vasodilation in cerebral arteries. Outward K(+) currents in smooth muscle cells of cerebral basilar artery were increased by equol and fully reversed by washout or blockade of BK channels with iberiotoxin. Equol remarkably enhanced human BK current in BK-HEK 293 cells, but not hSlo current in hSlo-HEK 293 cells, and the increase was completely abolished by co-application of paxilline. Our findings provide the first information that equol selectively stimulates BK channel current by acting on its β1 subunit, which may in turn contribute to the equol-mediated vasodilation and cerebral blood flow increase. PMID:26995303

  17. A-272651, a nonpeptidic blocker of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, modulates bladder smooth muscle contractility and neuronal action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, C-C; Turner, S C; Zhang, X-F; Milicic, I; Parihar, A; Jinkerson, T; Wilkins, J; Buckner, S A; Gopalakrishnan, M

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel (BKCa, KCa1.1) links membrane excitability with intracellular Ca2+ signaling and plays important roles in smooth muscle contraction, neuronal firing, and neuroendocrine secretion. This study reports the characterization of a novel BKCa channel blocker, 2,4-dimethoxy-N-naphthalen-2-yl-benzamide (A-272651). Experimental Approach: 86Rb+ efflux in HEK-293 cells expressing BKCa was measured. Effects of A-272651 on BKCa α- and BKCa αβ1-mediated currents were evaluated by patch-clamp. Effects on contractility were assessed using low-frequency electrical field stimulated pig detrusor and spontaneously contracting guinea pig detrusor. Effects of A-272651 on neuronal activity were determined in rat small diameter dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Key Results: A-272651 (10 μM) inhibited 86Rb+ efflux evoked by NS-1608 in HEK-293 cells expressing BKCa currents. A-272651 concentration-dependently inhibited BKCa currents with IC50 values of 4.59 μM (Hill coefficient 1.04, measured at +40 mV), and 2.82 μM (Hill coefficient 0.89), respectively, for BKCa α and BKCa αβ1-mediated currents. Like iberiotoxin, A-272651 enhanced field stimulated twitch responses in pig detrusor and spontaneous contractions in guinea pig detrusor with EC50 values of 4.05±0.05 and 37.95±0.12 μM, respectively. In capsaicin-sensitive DRG neurons, application of A-272651 increased action potential firing and prolonged action potential duration. Conclusions and Implications: These data demonstrate that A-272651 modulates smooth muscle contractility and neuronal firing properties. Unlike previously reported peptide BKCa blockers, A-272651 represents one of the first small molecule BKCa channel blockers that could serve as a useful tool for further characterization of BKCa channels in physiological and pathological states. PMID:17519951

  18. An artificial muscle computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marc O'Brien, Benjamin; Alexander Anderson, Iain

    2013-03-01

    We have built an artificial muscle computer based on Wolfram's "2, 3" Turing machine architecture, the simplest known universal Turing machine. Our computer uses artificial muscles for its instruction set, output buffers, and memory write and addressing mechanisms. The computer is very slow and large (0.15 Hz, ˜1 m3); however by using only 13 artificial muscle relays, it is capable of solving any computable problem given sufficient memory, time, and reliability. The development of this computer shows that artificial muscles can think—paving the way for soft robots with reflexes like those seen in nature.

  19. Functional dopamine D2 receptors on rat vagal afferent neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, A J; Krstew, E; Jarrott, B

    1995-01-01

    1. In the present study in vitro electrophysiology and receptor autoradiography were used to determine whether rat vagal afferent neurones possess dopamine D2 receptors. 2. Dopamine (10-300 microM) elicited a temperature- and concentration-dependent depolarization of the rat isolated nodose ganglion preparation. When applied to the tissue 15 min prior to agonist, raclopride (10 microM), clozapine (10 microM) or a mixture of raclopride and clozapine (10 microM each) all produced a threefold parallel shift to the right of the dopamine concentration-response curve. In contrast, SCH 23390 (100 nM), phentolamine and propranolol (1 microM each) failed to antagonize the dopamine-mediated depolarization. 3. [125I]-NCQ 298 (0.5 nM), a D2 selective radioligand, bound topographically to sections of rat brainstem. Densitometric quantification of autoradiograms revealed 93.8 +/- 0.5% specific binding of this salicylamide radioligand, as determined by raclopride (10 microM, n = 10 animals). Binding was highest in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), particularly the medial and gelatinous subnuclei. In addition, specific binding was also observed in the interpolar spinal trigeminal nucleus and the inferior olive. 4. Unilateral nodose ganglionectomy caused a 36.6 +/- 3.0% reduction in specific binding in the denervated NTS compared to the contralateral NTS. Furthermore, the loss of binding was confined to the dorsal aspect of the medial subnucleus of the NTS. Sham surgery had no effect on the binding of [125I]-NCQ 298 in rat brainstem. 5. The present data provide evidence for the presence of functionally relevant dopamine D2 receptors on both the soma and central terminals of rat vagal afferent neurones.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 3 PMID:7606337

  20. The vestibular system does not modulate fusimotor drive to muscle spindles in contracting leg muscles of seated subjects.

    PubMed

    Bent, L R; Sander, M; Bolton, P S; Macefield, V G

    2013-06-01

    We previously showed that sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) does not modulate the firing of spontaneously active muscle spindles in relaxed human leg muscles. However, given that there is little, if any, fusimotor drive to relaxed human muscles, we tested the hypothesis that vestibular modulation of muscle spindles becomes apparent during volitional contractions at levels that engage the fusimotor system. Unitary recordings were made from 28 muscle spindle afferents via tungsten microelectrodes inserted percutaneously into the common peroneal nerve of seated awake human subjects. Twenty-one of the spindle afferents were spontaneously active at rest and each increased its firing rate during a weak static contraction; seven were silent at rest and were recruited during the contraction. Sinusoidal bipolar binaural galvanic vestibular stimulation (±2 mA, 100 cycles) was applied to the mastoid processes at 0.8 Hz. This continuous stimulation produced a sustained illusion of "rocking in a boat" or "swinging in a hammock" but no entrainment of EMG. Despite these robust vestibular illusions, none of the fusimotor-driven muscle spindles exhibited phase-locked modulation of firing during sinusoidal GVS. We conclude that this dynamic vestibular input was not sufficient to modulate the firing of fusimotor neurones recruited during a voluntary steady-state contraction, arguing against a significant role of the vestibular system in adjusting the sensitivity of muscle spindles via fusimotor neurones. PMID:23552997

  1. Localization of TRPV1 and P2X3 in unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Sam M; Andresen, Michael C; Aicher, Sue A

    2016-03-01

    The vagus nerve is dominated by afferent fibers that convey sensory information from the viscera to the brain. Most vagal afferents are unmyelinated, slow-conducting C-fibers, while a smaller portion are myelinated, fast-conducting A-fibers. Vagal afferents terminate in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in the dorsal brainstem and regulate autonomic and respiratory reflexes, as well as ascending pathways throughout the brain. Vagal afferents form glutamatergic excitatory synapses with postsynaptic NTS neurons that are modulated by a variety of channels. The organization of vagal afferents with regard to fiber type and channels is not well understood. In the present study, we used tract tracing methods to identify distinct populations of vagal afferents to determine if key channels are selectively localized to specific groups of afferent fibers. Vagal afferents were labeled with isolectin B4 (IB4) or cholera toxin B (CTb) to detect unmyelinated and myelinated afferents, respectively. We find that TRPV1 channels are preferentially found in unmyelinated vagal afferents identified with IB4, with almost half of all IB4 fibers showing co-localization with TRPV1. These results agree with prior electrophysiological findings. In contrast, we found that the ATP-sensitive channel P2X3 is found in a subset of both myelinated and unmyelinated vagal afferent fibers. Specifically, 18% of IB4 and 23% of CTb afferents contained P2X3. The majority of CTb-ir vagal afferents contained neither channel. Since neither channel was found in all vagal afferents, there are likely further degrees of heterogeneity in the modulation of vagal afferent sensory input to the NTS beyond fiber type. PMID:26706222

  2. Frequency response properties of primary afferent neurons in the posterior lateral line system of larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Levi, Rafael; Akanyeti, Otar; Ballo, Aleksander; Liao, James C

    2015-01-15

    The ability of fishes to detect water flow with the neuromasts of their lateral line system depends on the physiology of afferent neurons as well as the hydrodynamic environment. Using larval zebrafish (Danio rerio), we measured the basic response properties of primary afferent neurons to mechanical deflections of individual superficial neuromasts. We used two types of stimulation protocols. First, we used sine wave stimulation to characterize the response properties of the afferent neurons. The average frequency-response curve was flat across stimulation frequencies between 0 and 100 Hz, matching the filtering properties of a displacement detector. Spike rate increased asymptotically with frequency, and phase locking was maximal between 10 and 60 Hz. Second, we used pulse train stimulation to analyze the maximum spike rate capabilities. We found that afferent neurons could generate up to 80 spikes/s and could follow a pulse train stimulation rate of up to 40 pulses/s in a reliable and precise manner. Both sine wave and pulse stimulation protocols indicate that an afferent neuron can maintain their evoked activity for longer durations at low stimulation frequencies than at high frequencies. We found one type of afferent neuron based on spontaneous activity patterns and discovered a correlation between the level of spontaneous and evoked activity. Overall, our results establish the baseline response properties of lateral line primary afferent neurons in larval zebrafish, which is a crucial step in understanding how vertebrate mechanoreceptive systems sense and subsequently process information from the environment. PMID:25355959

  3. Distribution of presumptive chemosensory afferents with FMRFamide- or substance P-like immunoreactivity in decapod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M

    1997-01-23

    In five species of decapod crustaceans--Cherax destructor (crayfish), Carcinus maenas (crab), Homarus americanus (clawed lobster), Eriocheir sinensis (crab), Macrobrachium rosenbergii (shrimp)--immunocytochemical stainings revealed the presence of sensory afferents with FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system. These afferents were extremely thin, very numerous, and innervated all sensory neuropils except the optic and olfactory lobes. In their target neuropils they gave rise to condensed net- or ball-like terminal structures. Only in Homarus americanus but not in any other studied species immunocytochemistry revealed a separate, non-overlapping class of sensory afferents with substance P-like immunoreactivity. Also the afferents with substance P-like immunoreactivity were very thin and numerous, innervated all sensory neuropils except optic and olfactory lobes, and gave rise to condensed terminal structures. From their morphological characteristics it can be concluded that likely both classes of afferents are chemosensory. The substance P-like immunoreactivity suggests a link with the nociceptor afferents of vertebrates, with which both classes of afferents share several other morphological features. PMID:9037486

  4. Technetium-99m HIDA hepatobiliary scanning in evaluation of afferent loop syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Sivelli, R.; Farinon, A.M.; Sianesi, M.; Percudani, M.; Ugolotti, G.; Calbiani, B.

    1984-08-01

    A study of 118 patients, operated on with Billroth II gastrectomy for peptic disease and affected by postgastrectomy syndromes, was carried out. Fifty patients were investigated by means of technetium-99m HIDA hepatobiliary scanning. In 18 patients, in whom an afferent loop syndrome was clinically suspected, hepatobiliary scanning demonstrated an altered afferent loop emptying in 8 and atonic distension of the gallbladder without afferent loop motility changes in 10. Among the patients in the first group, four were treated with a biliary diversion surgical procedure and in the second group, two patients underwent cholecystectomy. Our findings indicate that biliary vomiting, right upper abdominal pain pyrosis, and biliary diarrhea in Billroth II gastrectomized patients are not always pathognomonic symptoms of afferent loop syndrome. Technetium-99m HIDA hepatobiliary scanning represents the only diagnostic means of afferent loop syndrome definition. A differential diagnosis of abnormal afferent loop emptying and gallbladder dyskinesia is necessary for the management planning of these patients, and furthermore, when a surgical treatment is required, biliary diversion with Roux-Y anastomosis or Braun's biliary diversion seems the treatment of choice for afferent loop syndrome, whereas cholecystectomy represents the best procedure for atonic distension of the gallbladder.

  5. Frequency response properties of primary afferent neurons in the posterior lateral line system of larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Rafael; Akanyeti, Otar; Ballo, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    The ability of fishes to detect water flow with the neuromasts of their lateral line system depends on the physiology of afferent neurons as well as the hydrodynamic environment. Using larval zebrafish (Danio rerio), we measured the basic response properties of primary afferent neurons to mechanical deflections of individual superficial neuromasts. We used two types of stimulation protocols. First, we used sine wave stimulation to characterize the response properties of the afferent neurons. The average frequency-response curve was flat across stimulation frequencies between 0 and 100 Hz, matching the filtering properties of a displacement detector. Spike rate increased asymptotically with frequency, and phase locking was maximal between 10 and 60 Hz. Second, we used pulse train stimulation to analyze the maximum spike rate capabilities. We found that afferent neurons could generate up to 80 spikes/s and could follow a pulse train stimulation rate of up to 40 pulses/s in a reliable and precise manner. Both sine wave and pulse stimulation protocols indicate that an afferent neuron can maintain their evoked activity for longer durations at low stimulation frequencies than at high frequencies. We found one type of afferent neuron based on spontaneous activity patterns and discovered a correlation between the level of spontaneous and evoked activity. Overall, our results establish the baseline response properties of lateral line primary afferent neurons in larval zebrafish, which is a crucial step in understanding how vertebrate mechanoreceptive systems sense and subsequently process information from the environment. PMID:25355959

  6. Novel Afferent Terminal Structure in the Crista Ampullaris of the Goldfish, Carassius auratus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanford, Pamela J.; Popper, Arthur N.

    1996-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy, we have identified a new type of afferent terminal structure in the crista ampullaris of the goldfish Carassius auratus. In addition to the bouton-type afferent terminals previously described in the ear of this species, the crista also contained enlarged afferent terminals that enveloped a portion of the basolateral hair cell membrane. The hair cell membrane was evaginated and protruded into the afferent terminal in a glove-and-finger configuration. The membranes of the two cells were regularly aligned in the protruded region of the contact and had a distinct symmetrical electron density. The electron-dense profiles of these contacts were easily identified and were present in every crista sampled. In some cases, efferent terminals synapsed onto the afferents at a point where the hair cell protruded into the terminal. The ultrastructural similarities of the goldfish crista afferents to calyx afferents found in amniotes (birds, reptiles, and mammals) are discussed. The results of the study support the hypothesis that structural variation in the vertebrate inner ear may have evolved much earlier in evolution than previously supposed.

  7. Electrical stimulation of the sural cutaneous afferent nerve controls the amplitude and onset of the swing phase of locomotion in the spinal cat

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Krupka, Alexander J.; AuYong, Nicholas; Miller, Kassi; Prilutsky, Boris I.

    2011-01-01

    Sensory feedback plays a crucial role in the control of locomotion and in the recovery of function after spinal cord injury. Investigations in reduced preparations have shown that the locomotor cycle can be modified through the activation of afferent feedback at various phases of the gait cycle. We investigated the effect of phase-dependent electrical stimulation of a cutaneous afferent nerve on the locomotor pattern of trained spinal cord-injured cats. Animals were first implanted with chronic nerve cuffs on the sural and sciatic nerves and electromyographic electrodes in different hindlimb muscles. Cats were then transected at T12 and trained daily to locomote on a treadmill. We found that electrical stimulation of the sural nerve can enhance the ongoing flexion phase, producing higher (+129%) and longer (+17.4%) swing phases of gait even at very low threshold of stimulation. Sural nerve stimulation can also terminate an ongoing extension and initiate a flexion phase. A higher prevalence of early switching to the flexion phase was observed at higher stimulation levels and if stimulation was applied in the late stance phase. All flexor muscles were activated by the stimulation. These results suggest that electrical stimulation of the sural nerve may be used to increase the magnitude of the swing phase and control the timing of its onset after spinal cord injury and locomotor training. PMID:21389308

  8. Electrical stimulation of the sural cutaneous afferent nerve controls the amplitude and onset of the swing phase of locomotion in the spinal cat.

    PubMed

    Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Krupka, Alexander J; AuYong, Nicholas; Miller, Kassi; Prilutsky, Boris I; Lemay, Michel A

    2011-05-01

    Sensory feedback plays a crucial role in the control of locomotion and in the recovery of function after spinal cord injury. Investigations in reduced preparations have shown that the locomotor cycle can be modified through the activation of afferent feedback at various phases of the gait cycle. We investigated the effect of phase-dependent electrical stimulation of a cutaneous afferent nerve on the locomotor pattern of trained spinal cord-injured cats. Animals were first implanted with chronic nerve cuffs on the sural and sciatic nerves and electromyographic electrodes in different hindlimb muscles. Cats were then transected at T12 and trained daily to locomote on a treadmill. We found that electrical stimulation of the sural nerve can enhance the ongoing flexion phase, producing higher (+129%) and longer (+17.4%) swing phases of gait even at very low threshold of stimulation. Sural nerve stimulation can also terminate an ongoing extension and initiate a flexion phase. A higher prevalence of early switching to the flexion phase was observed at higher stimulation levels and if stimulation was applied in the late stance phase. All flexor muscles were activated by the stimulation. These results suggest that electrical stimulation of the sural nerve may be used to increase the magnitude of the swing phase and control the timing of its onset after spinal cord injury and locomotor training. PMID:21389308

  9. The transduction properties of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Gregory A; Johnson, Richard D; Davenport, Paul W

    2002-01-01

    Background Intercostal muscles are richly innervated by mechanoreceptors. In vivo studies of cat intercostal muscle have shown that there are 3 populations of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors: primary muscle spindles (1°), secondary muscle spindles (2°) and Golgi tendon organs (GTO). The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanical transduction properties of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors in response to controlled length and velocity displacements of the intercostal space. Mechanoreceptors, recorded from dorsal root fibers, were localized within an isolated intercostal muscle space (ICS). Changes in ICS displacement and the velocity of ICS displacement were independently controlled with an electromagnetic motor. ICS velocity (0.5 – 100 μm/msec to a displacement of 2,000 μm) and displacement (50–2,000 μm at a constant velocity of 10 μm/msec) parameters encompassed the full range of rib motion. Results Both 1° and 2° muscle spindles were found evenly distributed within the ICS. GTOs were localized along the rib borders. The 1° spindles had the greatest discharge frequency in response to displacement amplitude followed by the 2° afferents and GTOs. The 1° muscle spindles also possessed the greatest discharge frequency in response to graded velocity changes, 3.0 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1. GTOs had a velocity response of 2.4 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1 followed by 2° muscle spindles at 0.6 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1. Conclusion The results of this study provide a systematic description of the mechanosenitivity of the 3 types of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors. These mechanoreceptors have discharge properties that transduce the magnitude and velocity of intercostal muscle length. PMID:12392601

  10. Modulation of vagal afferent excitation and reduction of food intake by leptin and cholecystokinin.

    PubMed

    Peters, James H; Simasko, Steven M; Ritter, Robert C

    2006-11-30

    The gut-peptide, cholecystokinin (CCK), reduces food intake by acting at CCK-1 receptors on vagal afferent neurons, whereas the feeding effects of the adipokine hormone, leptin, are associated primarily with its action on receptors (ObRb) in the hypothalamus. Recently, however, ObRb mRNA has been reported in vagal afferent neurons, some of which also express CCK-1 receptor, suggesting that leptin, alone or in cooperation with CCK, might activate vagal afferent neurons, and influence food intake via a vagal route. To evaluate these possibilities we have been examining the cellular and behavioral effects of leptin and CCK on vagal afferent neurons. In cultured vagal afferent neurons leptin and CCK evoked short latency, transient depolarizations, often leading to action potentials, and increases in cytosolic calcium. There was a much higher prevalence of CCK and leptin sensitivity amongst cultured vagal afferent neurons that innervate stomach or duodenum than there was in the overall vagal afferent population. Furthermore, almost all leptin-responsive gastric and duodenal vagal afferents also were sensitive to CCK. Leptin, infused into the upper GI tract arterial supply, reduced meal size, and enhanced satiation evoked by CCK. These results indicate that vagal afferent neurons are activated by leptin, and that this activation is likely to participate in meal termination, perhaps by enhancing vagal sensitivity to CCK. Our findings are consistent with the view that leptin and CCK exert their influence on food intake by accessing multiple neural systems (viscerosensory, motivational, affective and motor) at multiple points along the neuroaxis. PMID:16872644