Science.gov

Sample records for large object capture

  1. Perceptual objects capture attention.

    PubMed

    Yeshurun, Yaffa; Kimchi, Ruth; Sha'shoua, Guy; Carmel, Tomer

    2009-06-01

    A recent study has demonstrated that the mere organization of some elements in the visual field into an object attracts attention automatically [Kimchi, R., Yeshurun, Y., & Cohen-Savransky, A. (2007). Automatic, stimulus-driven attentional capture by objecthood. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 14(1), 166-172]. We tested whether similar results will emerge when the target is not a part of the object and with simplified task demands. A matrix of 16 black L elements in various orientations preceded the presentation of a Vernier target. The target was either added to the matrix (Experiment 1), or appeared after its offset (Experiment 2). On some trials four elements formed a square-like object, and on some of these trials the target appeared in the center of the object. No featural uniqueness or abrupt onset was associated with the object and it did not predict the target location or the direction of the target's horizontal offset. Performance was better when the target appeared in the center of the object than in a different location than the object, even when the target appeared after the matrix offset. These findings support the hypothesis that a perceptual object captures attention (Kimchi et al., 2007), and demonstrate that this automatic deployment of attention to the object is robust and involves a spatial component. PMID:18299141

  2. Sizing of "Mother Ship and Catcher" Missions for LEO Small Debris and for GEO Large Object Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.

    2009-01-01

    Most LEO debris lies in a limited number of inclination "bands" associated with specific useful orbits. Objects in such narrow inclination bands have all possible Right Ascensions of Ascending Node (RAANs), creating a different orbit plane for nearly every piece of debris. However, a low-orbiting satellite will always phase in RAAN faster than debris objects in higher orbits at the same inclination, potentially solving the problem. Such a low-orbiting base can serve as a "mother ship" that can tend and then send small, disposable common individual catcher/deboost devices--one for each debris object--as the facility drifts into the same RAAN as each higher object. The dV necessary to catch highly-eccentric orbit debris in the center of the band alternatively allows the capture of less-eccentric debris in a wider inclination range around the center. It is demonstrated that most LEO hazardous debris can be removed from orbit in three years, using a single LEO launch of one mother ship--with its onboard magazine of freeflying low-tech catchers--into each of ten identified bands, with second or potentially third launches into only the three highest-inclination bands. The nearly 1000 objects near the geostationary orbit present special challenges in mass, maneuverability, and ultimate disposal options, leading to a dramatically different architecture and technology suite than the LEO solution. It is shown that the entire population of near-GEO derelict objects can be gathered and tethered together within a 3 year period for future scrap-yard operations using achievable technologies and only two earth launches.

  3. Drifting Recovery Base Concept for GEO Derelict Object Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.

    2009-01-01

    Over 250 objects hover within 6 m/sec of perfect geostationary orbit. Over half of these objects lie within 0.1 m/sec of the GEO velocity. Such items have 62% of the total velocity required to achieve Earth gravitational escape. A conceptual architecture is proposed to clean this orbit area of derelict objects while providing a demonstration mission for many facets of future asteroid mining operations. These near-GEO objects average nearly 2000kg each, consisting of (typically functioning) power systems, batteries, and large quantities of components and raw aerospace-grade refined materials. Such a demonstration collection system could capture, collect and remove all GEO derelict objects in an international effort to create a depot of components and of aerospace-grade raw materials--with a total mass greater than that of the International Space Station--as a space scrap depot ready for transfer to lunar or Mars orbit, using only two heavy-lift launches and 2-3 years of on-orbit operations.

  4. Dynamics and control of robot for capturing objects in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Panfeng

    Space robots are expected to perform intricate tasks in future space services, such as satellite maintenance, refueling, and replacing the orbital replacement unit (ORU). To realize these missions, the capturing operation may not be avoided. Such operations will encounter some challenges because space robots have some unique characteristics unfound on ground-based robots, such as, dynamic singularities, dynamic coupling between manipulator and space base, limited energy supply and working without a fixed base, and so on. In addition, since contacts and impacts may not be avoided during capturing operation. Therefore, dynamics and control problems of space robot for capturing objects are significant research topics if the robots are to be deployed for the space services. A typical servicing operation mainly includes three phases: capturing the object, berthing and docking the object, then repairing the target. Therefore, this thesis will focus on resolving some challenging problems during capturing the object, berthing and docking, and so on. In this thesis, I study and analyze the dynamics and control problems of space robot for capturing objects. This work has potential impact in space robotic applications. I first study the contact and impact dynamics of space robot and objects. I specifically focus on analyzing the impact dynamics and mapping the relationship of influence and speed. Then, I develop the fundamental theory for planning the minimum-collision based trajectory of space robot and designing the configuration of space robot at the moment of capture. To compensate for the attitude of the space base during the capturing approach operation, a new balance control concept which can effectively balance the attitude of the space base using the dynamic couplings is developed. The developed balance control concept helps to understand of the nature of space dynamic coupling, and can be readily applied to compensate or minimize the disturbance to the space base

  5. A method to capture large DNA fragments from genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Ball, Geneviève; Filloux, Alain; Voulhoux, Romé

    2014-01-01

    The gene capture technique is a powerful tool that allows the cloning of large DNA regions (up to 80 kb), such as entire genomic islands, without using restriction enzymes or DNA amplification. This technique takes advantage of the high recombinant capacity of the yeast. A "capture" vector containing both ends of the target DNA region must first be constructed. The target region is then captured by co-transformation and recombination in yeast between the "capture" vector and appropriate genomic DNA. The selected recombinant plasmid can be verified by sequencing and transferred in the bacteria for multiple applications. This chapter describes a protocol specifically adapted for Pseudomonas aeruginosa genomic DNA capture. PMID:24818928

  6. Deflection of large near-earth objects

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1999-01-11

    The Earth is periodically hit by near Earth objects (NEOs) ranging in size from dust to mountains. The small ones are a useful source of information, but those larger than about 1 km can cause global damage. The requirements for the deflection of NEOs with significant material strength are known reasonably well; however, the strength of large NEOs is not known, so those requirements may not apply. Meteor impacts on the Earth`s atmosphere give some information on strength as a function of object size and composition. This information is used here to show that large, weak objects could also be deflected efficiently, if addressed properly.

  7. Exon capture optimization in amphibians with large genomes.

    PubMed

    McCartney-Melstad, Evan; Mount, Genevieve G; Shaffer, H Bradley

    2016-09-01

    Gathering genomic-scale data efficiently is challenging for nonmodel species with large, complex genomes. Transcriptome sequencing is accessible for organisms with large genomes, and sequence capture probes can be designed from such mRNA sequences to enrich and sequence exonic regions. Maximizing enrichment efficiency is important to reduce sequencing costs, but relatively few data exist for exon capture experiments in nonmodel organisms with large genomes. Here, we conducted a replicated factorial experiment to explore the effects of several modifications to standard protocols that might increase sequence capture efficiency for amphibians and other taxa with large, complex genomes. Increasing the amounts of c0 t-1 repetitive sequence blocker and individual input DNA used in target enrichment reactions reduced the rates of PCR duplication. This reduction led to an increase in the percentage of unique reads mapping to target sequences, essentially doubling overall efficiency of the target capture from 10.4% to nearly 19.9% and rendering target capture experiments more efficient and affordable. Our results indicate that target capture protocols can be modified to efficiently screen vertebrates with large genomes, including amphibians. PMID:27223337

  8. Image Tiling for Profiling Large Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Ajit; Schock, Harold; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    1992-01-01

    Three dimensional surface measurements of large objects arc required in a variety of industrial processes. The nature of these measurements is changing as optical instruments arc beginning to replace conventional contact probes scanned over the objects. A common characteristic of the optical surface profilers is the trade off between measurement accuracy and field of view. In order to measure a large object with high accuracy, multiple views arc required. An accurate transformation between the different views is needed to bring about their registration. In this paper, we demonstrate how the transformation parameters can be obtained precisely by choosing control points which lie in the overlapping regions of the images. A good starting point for the transformation parameters is obtained by having a knowledge of the scanner position. The selection of the control points arc independent of the object geometry. By successively recording multiple views and obtaining transformation with respect to a single coordinate system, a complete physical model of an object can be obtained. Since all data arc in the same coordinate system, it can thus be used for building automatic models for free form surfaces.

  9. Objective analysis of image quality of video image capture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowberg, Alan H.

    1990-07-01

    As Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) technology has matured, video image capture has become a common way of capturing digital images from many modalities. While digital interfaces, such as those which use the ACR/NEMA standard, will become more common in the future, and are preferred because of the accuracy of image transfer, video image capture will be the dominant method in the short term, and may continue to be used for some time because of the low cost and high speed often associated with such devices. Currently, virtually all installed systems use methods of digitizing the video signal that is produced for display on the scanner viewing console itself. A series of digital test images have been developed for display on either a GE CT9800 or a GE Signa MRI scanner. These images have been captured with each of five commercially available image capture systems, and the resultant images digitally transferred on floppy disk to a PC1286 computer containing Optimast' image analysis software. Here the images can be displayed in a comparative manner for visual evaluation, in addition to being analyzed statistically. Each of the images have been designed to support certain tests, including noise, accuracy, linearity, gray scale range, stability, slew rate, and pixel alignment. These image capture systems vary widely in these characteristics, in addition to the presence or absence of other artifacts, such as shading and moire pattern. Other accessories such as video distribution amplifiers and noise filters can also add or modify artifacts seen in the captured images, often giving unusual results. Each image is described, together with the tests which were performed using them. One image contains alternating black and white lines, each one pixel wide, after equilibration strips ten pixels wide. While some systems have a slew rate fast enough to track this correctly, others blur it to an average shade of gray, and do not resolve the lines, or give

  10. Attentional Capture of Objects Referred to by Spoken Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salverda, Anne Pier; Altmann, Gerry T. M.

    2011-01-01

    Participants saw a small number of objects in a visual display and performed a visual detection or visual-discrimination task in the context of task-irrelevant spoken distractors. In each experiment, a visual cue was presented 400 ms after the onset of a spoken word. In experiments 1 and 2, the cue was an isoluminant color change and participants…

  11. The lack of large compact symmetric objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusto, P.

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, `baby' (< 103 yr) and `young' (103-105 yr) radio galaxies have been found and classified, although their numbers are still small (tens). Also, they have many different names, depending on the type of survey and scientific context in which they were found: compact steep spectrum sources (CSS), giga-Hertz peaked spectrum sources (GPS) and compact-medium symmetric objects (C-MSO). The latter have the radio galaxy structure more obvious and correspond to the `babies' (CSOs; < 1 kpc) and `young' (MSOs; 1-15 kpc) radio galaxies. The log-size distribution of CSOs shows a sharp drop at 0.3 kpc. This trend continues through flat-spectrum MSOs (over the full 1-15 kpc size range). In order to find out if this lack of large CSOs and flat-spectrum MSOs is due to poor sampling (lack of surveys that probe efficiently the 0.3-15 kpc size range) and/or has physical meaning (e.g. if the lobes of CSOs expand as they grow and age, they might become CSSs, `disappearing' from the flat-spectrum MSO statistics), we have built a sample of 157 flat-spectrum radio sources with structure on ˜0.3-15 kpc scales. We are using new, archived and published data to produce and inspect hundreds of multi-frequency multi-instrument maps and models. We have already found 13 new secure CSO/MSOs. We expect to uncover ˜30-40 new CSOs and MSOs, most on the 0.3-15 kpc size range, when our project is complete.

  12. Large animal normal tissue tolerance with boron neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, P.R.; Swartz, C.D. ); Kraft, S.L. ); Briebenow, M.L. ); DeHaan, C.E.

    1994-03-30

    Normal tissue tolerance of boron neutron capture irradiation using borocaptate sodium (NA[sub 2]B[sub 12]H[sub 11]SH) in an epithermal neutron beam was studied. Large retriever-type dogs were used and the irradiations were performed by single dose, 5 [times] 10 dorsal portal. Fourteen dogs were irradiated with the epithermal neutron beam alone and 35 dogs were irradiated following intravenous administration of borocaptate sodium. Total body irradiation effect could be seen from the decreased leukocytes and platelets following irradiation. Most values returned to normal within 40 days postirradiation. Severe dermal necrosis occurred in animals given 15 Gy epithermal neutrons alone and in animals irradiated to a total peak physical dose greater than 64 Gy in animals following borocaptate sodium infusion. Lethal brain necrosis was seen in animals receiving between 27 and 39 Gy. Lethal brain necrosis occurred at 22-36 weeks postirradiation. A total peak physical dose of approximately 27 Gy and blood-boron concentrations of 25-50 ppm resulted in abnormal magnetic resonance imaging results in 6 months postexamination. Seven of eight of these animals remained normal and the lesions were not detected at the 12-month postirradiation examination. The bimodal therapy presents a complex challenge in attempting to achieve dose response assays. The resultant total radiation dose is a composite of low and high LET components. The short track length of the boron fission fragments and the geometric effect of the vessels causes much of the intravascular dose to miss the presumed critical target of the endothelial cells. The results indicate a large dose-sparing effect from the boron capture reactions within the blood. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Collision free pick up and movement of large objects

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.D.; McKee, G.R.

    1998-08-01

    An automated system is described for the sensor-based precision docking and manipulation of large objects. Past work in the remote handling of large nuclear waste containers is extensible to the problems associated with the handling of large objects such as coils of flat steel in industry. Computer vision and ultrasonic proximity sensing as described here are used to control the precision docking of large objects, and swing damped motion control of overhead cranes is used to control the position of the pick up device and suspended payload during movement. Real-time sensor processing and model-based control are used to accurately position payloads.

  14. Parallel Processing of Large Scale Microphone Arrays for Sound Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Ea-Ee.

    1995-01-01

    Performance of microphone sound pick up is degraded by deleterious properties of the acoustic environment, such as multipath distortion (reverberation) and ambient noise. The degradation becomes more prominent in a teleconferencing environment in which the microphone is positioned far away from the speaker. Besides, the ideal teleconference should feel as easy and natural as face-to-face communication with another person. This suggests hands-free sound capture with no tether or encumbrance by hand-held or body-worn sound equipment. Microphone arrays for this application represent an appropriate approach. This research develops new microphone array and signal processing techniques for high quality hands-free sound capture in noisy, reverberant enclosures. The new techniques combine matched-filtering of individual sensors and parallel processing to provide acute spatial volume selectivity which is capable of mitigating the deleterious effects of noise interference and multipath distortion. The new method outperforms traditional delay-and-sum beamformers which provide only directional spatial selectivity. The research additionally explores truncated matched-filtering and random distribution of transducers to reduce complexity and improve sound capture quality. All designs are first established by computer simulation of array performance in reverberant enclosures. The simulation is achieved by a room model which can efficiently calculate the acoustic multipath in a rectangular enclosure up to a prescribed order of images. It also calculates the incident angle of the arriving signal. Experimental arrays were constructed and their performance was measured in real rooms. Real room data were collected in a hard-walled laboratory and a controllable variable acoustics enclosure of similar size, approximately 6 x 6 x 3 m. An extensive speech database was also collected in these two enclosures for future research on microphone arrays. The simulation results are shown to be

  15. Spacecraft Stabilization and Control for Capture of Non-Cooperative Space Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh; Kelkar, Atul G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses stabilization and control issues in autonomous capture and manipulation of non-cooperative space objects such as asteroids, space debris, and orbital spacecraft in need of servicing. Such objects are characterized by unknown mass-inertia properties, unknown rotational motion, and irregular shapes, which makes it a challenging control problem. The problem is further compounded by the presence of inherent nonlinearities, signi cant elastic modes with low damping, and parameter uncertainties in the spacecraft. Robust dissipativity-based control laws are presented and are shown to provide global asymptotic stability in spite of model uncertainties and nonlinearities. It is shown that robust stabilization can be accomplished via model-independent dissipativity-based controllers using thrusters alone, while stabilization with attitude and position control can be accomplished using thrusters and torque actuators.

  16. Full-matrix capture with phased shift migration for flaw detection in layered objects with complex geometry.

    PubMed

    Lukomski, Tomasz

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a method for an ultrasonic imaging with a phased array based on a wave migration algorithm. The method allows for imaging layered objects with lateral velocity variations such as objects with a complex geometry or layers that are not perpendicular to the array's axis. The full-matrix capture ensures that there is enough information to reconstruct an image even when the wave indication angle is large. The method is implemented in a omega-k domain. The proposed algorithm is first tested in a single simulation of a concave object with side drilled holes under the concave surface. For evaluating the algorithm's performance three experiments are presented: one with a tilted object (surface not perpendicular with respect to the array axis) with side drilled holes and two experiments of an object with concave surface and two artificial defects under it. The results presented in the paper verify that the proposed method reconstructs images from the data gathered with the phased array. PMID:27235778

  17. Exchanging large data object in multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Yaseen, Wathiq Laftah; Othman, Zulaiha Ali; Nazri, Mohd Zakree Ahmad

    2016-08-01

    One of the Business Intelligent solutions that is currently in use is the Multi-Agent System (MAS). Communication is one of the most important elements in MAS, especially for exchanging large low level data between distributed agents (physically). The Agent Communication Language in JADE has been offered as a secure method for sending data, whereby the data is defined as an object. However, the object cannot be used to send data to another agent in a different location. Therefore, the aim of this paper was to propose a method for the exchange of large low level data as an object by creating a proxy agent known as a Delivery Agent, which temporarily imitates the Receiver Agent. The results showed that the proposed method is able to send large-sized data. The experiments were conducted using 16 datasets ranging from 100,000 to 7 million instances. However, for the proposed method, the RAM and the CPU machine had to be slightly increased for the Receiver Agent, but the latency time was not significantly different compared to the use of the Java Socket method (non-agent and less secure). With such results, it was concluded that the proposed method can be used to securely send large data between agents.

  18. Capture of near-Earth objects with low-thrust propulsion and invariant manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gao; Jiang, Fanghua

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a mission incorporating low-thrust propulsion and invariant manifolds to capture near-Earth objects (NEOs) is investigated. The initial condition has the spacecraft rendezvousing with the NEO. The mission terminates once it is inserted into a libration point orbit (LPO). The spacecraft takes advantage of stable invariant manifolds for low-energy ballistic capture. Low-thrust propulsion is employed to retrieve the joint spacecraft-asteroid system. Global optimization methods are proposed for the preliminary design. Local direct and indirect methods are applied to optimize the two-impulse transfers. Indirect methods are implemented to optimize the low-thrust trajectory and estimate the largest retrievable mass. To overcome the difficulty that arises from bang-bang control, a homotopic approach is applied to find an approximate solution. By detecting the switching moments of the bang-bang control the efficiency and accuracy of numerical integration are guaranteed. By using the homotopic approach as the initial guess the shooting function is easy to solve. The relationship between the maximum thrust and the retrieval mass is investigated. We find that both numerically and theoretically a larger thrust is preferred.

  19. Large project experiences with object-oriented methods and reuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessale, William; Reifer, Donald J.; Weller, David

    1992-01-01

    The SSVTF (Space Station Verification and Training Facility) project is completing the Preliminary Design Review of a large software development using object-oriented methods and systematic reuse. An incremental developmental lifecycle was tailored to provide early feedback and guidance on methods and products, with repeated attention to reuse. Object oriented methods were formally taught and supported by realistic examples. Reuse was readily accepted and planned by the developers. Schedule and budget issues were handled by agreements and work sharing arranged by the developers.

  20. Improved Technologies for Decontamination of Crated Large Metal Objects

    SciTech Connect

    McFee, J.; Barbour, K.; Stallings, E.

    2003-02-25

    The Los Alamos Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) has been identifying and demonstrating technologies to reduce the cost and risk of management of transuranic element contaminated large metal objects, i.e. gloveboxes. DOE must dispose of hundreds of gloveboxes from Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and other DOE sites. This paper reports on the results of four technology demonstrations on decontamination of plutonium contaminated gloveboxes with each technology compared to a common baseline technology, wipedown with nitric acid.

  1. Fast large-scale object retrieval with binary quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shifu; Zeng, Dan; Shen, Wei; Zhang, Zhijiang; Tian, Qi

    2015-11-01

    The objective of large-scale object retrieval systems is to search for images that contain the target object in an image database. Where state-of-the-art approaches rely on global image representations to conduct searches, we consider many boxes per image as candidates to search locally in a picture. In this paper, a feature quantization algorithm called binary quantization is proposed. In binary quantization, a scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) feature is quantized into a descriptive and discriminative bit-vector, which allows itself to adapt to the classic inverted file structure for box indexing. The inverted file, which stores the bit-vector and box ID where the SIFT feature is located inside, is compact and can be loaded into the main memory for efficient box indexing. We evaluate our approach on available object retrieval datasets. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach is fast and achieves excellent search quality. Therefore, the proposed approach is an improvement over state-of-the-art approaches for object retrieval.

  2. A Survey of Large Silicate Objects in Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, R.; Bridges, J. C.

    1995-09-01

    We present the results of a survey of large silicate objects in ordinary chondrites (OCs) from the collection of the Natural History Museum, London; 390 H-group, 386 L-group and 57 LL-group meteorites were examined. A total of 61 objects were identified (Table 1). Meteorites with light and dark, brecciated fabrics were excluded from our survey. Following Weisberg et al. [1], large silicate objects are taken to be >= 5mm in size. Macrochondrules have rounded outlines and textures - porphyritic, barred olivine, radiating pyroxene - that are indistinguishable from normal chondrules in OCs [1]. In addition, we also recognise igneous clasts and chondritic clasts. The largest macrochondrule in the collection is 4cm diameter, with a microporphyritic texture [2]. Igneous clasts are those objects whose properties indicate that they originated through melting and differentiation on a planetary body. Examples include a 2cm diameter clast, in Ness County (L6), which contains large (2mm) olivine and enstatite grains set in a plagioclase + olivine groundmass, cristobalite- and tridymite-rich clasts [3] and the FELINE feldspar-nepheline clast [4]. Chondritic clasts comprise a diverse group including a 1cm clast from Barwell (L6) which contains apparently remelted chondrules, microporphyritic clasts with K-rich mesostasis e.g. in Quenggouk (H4) and a 1cm single olivine grain with minor inclusions of anorthite and enstatite, in Julesburg (L3). The K-rich objects are similar to others described from a survey of LL-chondrites and may have an impact origin or have undergone exchange with a K-rich vapor [5]. Abundances of the three types of large silicate objects (Table 1) reflect the relative numbers of H, L and LL meteorite samples in the collection, although LL-group hosted clasts are over-represented as our work concentrated on sections of LL-chondrites. In total, 46% of the objects are macrochondrules, 18% are igneous clasts and 36% are in the indeterminate chondritic clast group

  3. Single sided tomography of extremely large dense objects

    SciTech Connect

    Thoe, R.S.

    1993-03-24

    One can envision many circumstances where radiography could be valuable but is frustrated by the geometry of the object to be radiographed. For example, extremely large objects, the separation of rocket propellants from the skin of solid fuel rocket motor, the structural integrity of an underground tank or hull of a ship, the location of buried objects, inspection of large castings etc. The author has been investigating ways to do this type of radiography and as a result has developed a technique which can be used to obtain three dimensional radiographs using Compton scattered radiation from a monochromatic source and a high efficiency, high resolution germanium spectrometer. This paper gives specific details of the reconstruction technique and presents the results of numerous numerical simulations and compares these simulations to spectra obtained in the laboratory. In addition the author presents the results of calculations made for the development of an alternative single sided radiography technique which will permit inspection of the interior of large objects. As a benchmark the author seeks to obtain three dimensional images with a resolution of about one cubic centimeter in a concrete cube 30 centimeters on a side. Such a device must use photons of very high energy. For example 30 cm of concrete represents about 15 mean free paths for photons of 100 keV, whereas at 1 MeV the attenuation is down to about five mean free paths. At these higher energies Compton scattering becomes much more probable. Although this would appear to be advantageous for single sided imaging techniques, such techniques are hampered by two side effects. In this paper the results are given of numerous Monte Carlo calculations detailing the extent of the multiple scattering and the feasibility of a variety of imaging schemes is explored.

  4. Numerical methods for scattering from electrically large objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enguist, Bjorn; Murphy, W. D.; Rokhlin, Vladimir; Vassiliou, Marius S.

    1991-05-01

    A new and computationally very efficient integral equation numerical method for computing electromagnetic scattering and radar cross section (RCS) was developed. A theory of higher order impedance boundary conditions was derived to handle single and multiple dielectric coatings around conductors. The method was tested in two dimensions using a 14,000-line FORTRAN program and was found to be very promising for electrically large objects. Initial ideas for extensions to three dimensions were explored. Treatments of trailing edge and corner singularities were developed.

  5. Large-scale objective phenotyping of 3D facial morphology

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Peter; Suttie, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal phenotypes have played significant roles in the discovery of gene function, but organized collection of phenotype data has been overshadowed by developments in sequencing technology. In order to study phenotypes systematically, large-scale projects with standardized objective assessment across populations are considered necessary. The report of the 2006 Human Variome Project meeting recommended documentation of phenotypes through electronic means by collaborative groups of computational scientists and clinicians using standard, structured descriptions of disease-specific phenotypes. In this report, we describe progress over the past decade in 3D digital imaging and shape analysis of the face, and future prospects for large-scale facial phenotyping. Illustrative examples are given throughout using a collection of 1107 3D face images of healthy controls and individuals with a range of genetic conditions involving facial dysmorphism. PMID:22434506

  6. USING TAILORED TRANQUILIZER COMBINATIONS TO REDUCE STRESS ASSOCIATED WITH LARGE UNGULATE CAPTURE AND TRANSLOCATION.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Lisa L; Miller, Michael W

    2016-04-01

    Capture and translocation are important tools for managing and studying large ungulates. Although widely used, many established field practices cause fear and stress in subject animals that can hamper overall effectiveness and safety. Over the last 10 years we have been exploring uses of tranquilizer combinations as adjuncts to wild ungulate capture and translocation work in Colorado, USA. Our approaches have been tailored to various field applications to reduce fear and stress, facilitate handling, and improve the overall success of capture and translocation for research or management purposes. For physical capture (drop net or helicopter-net gunning) with local release, combinations of midazolam and azaperone administered immediately upon capture provide transient tranquilization and muscle relaxation during manual restraint and handling to prevent hyperthermia and capture myopathy. For extended tranquilization (during transport and overnight holding), adding a sustained-release haloperidol formulation provides calming effects for at least 24-48 h. In our assessment, appropriate and adaptive use of these tranquilizer combinations benefits captured animals without impeding management or research goals. PMID:26845295

  7. Automatic trajectory measurement of large numbers of crowded objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Liu, Ye; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2013-06-01

    Complex motion patterns of natural systems, such as fish schools, bird flocks, and cell groups, have attracted great attention from scientists for years. Trajectory measurement of individuals is vital for quantitative and high-throughput study of their collective behaviors. However, such data are rare mainly due to the challenges of detection and tracking of large numbers of objects with similar visual features and frequent occlusions. We present an automatic and effective framework to measure trajectories of large numbers of crowded oval-shaped objects, such as fish and cells. We first use a novel dual ellipse locator to detect the coarse position of each individual and then propose a variance minimization active contour method to obtain the optimal segmentation results. For tracking, cost matrix of assignment between consecutive frames is trainable via a random forest classifier with many spatial, texture, and shape features. The optimal trajectories are found for the whole image sequence by solving two linear assignment problems. We evaluate the proposed method on many challenging data sets.

  8. Young Stellar Objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Y.-H.

    2015-05-01

    Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) has played vital roles in complementing space-based observatories to maximize their scientific yields. In the past three decades, I have used CTIO observations to aid in the interpretation of X-ray, ultraviolet, gamma-ray, and infrared observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). In this presentation, I will show how CTIO observations made a difference in the analysis of Spitzer Space Telescope observations of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the LMC. With a higher angular resolution, CCD images taken with the CTIO Blanco 4m telescope can resolve nearby galaxies, small clusters, and compact HII regions that appear to be point sources in Spitzer images; furthermore, ISPI J and Ks images taken with the Blanco telescope reveal near-IR excesses that can be used to confirm YSO candidates identified from their mid-IR excesses. In the near future, CTIO's Dark Energy Camera will survey the LMC, and the data can be used to search for pre-main sequence stars, extending the study of on-going star formation to lower stellar masses.

  9. The DataCapturer component for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafok, H.; Caillat, M.; McMullin, J.

    2006-07-01

    We describe the data capture process (DataCapturer) for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) control software. This is implemented as a JAVA-based CORBA-component running in the framework of the ALMA Common Software (ACS). During an observation, data (e.g., visibilities) and meta-data (e.g., information describing the state of the hardware, antennas, source, etc) flow through the control system and need to be recorded. All meta-data flows through the DataCapturer component where it is collected and organized as an ALMA Science Data model (ASDM) dataset and then written to the ALMA archive data base. DataCapturer is the interface between the telescope and the science domain. In the telescope domain it gets raw information from the control system and the correlator and produces science formated data for ALMA subsystems in the science domain. ASDM data is delivered to the Quicklook display sub-system and the telescope calibration sub-system of the ALMA Software. The final dataset is stored at the end of a sequence of observations (combined in an execution block) in the ALMA science archive.

  10. Cooperative capture of large prey solves scaling challenge faced by spider societies

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Eric C.; Powers, Kimberly S.; Avilés, Leticia

    2008-01-01

    A decrease in the surface area per unit volume is a well known constraint setting limits to the size of organisms at both the cellular and whole-organismal levels. Similar constraints may apply to social groups as they grow in size. The communal three-dimensional webs that social spiders build function ecologically as single units that intercept prey through their surface and should thus be subject to this constraint. Accordingly, we show that web prey capture area per spider, and thus number of insects captured per capita, decreases with colony size in a neotropical social spider. Prey biomass intake per capita, however, peaks at intermediate colony sizes because the spiders forage cooperatively and larger colonies capture increasingly large insects. A peaked prey biomass intake function would explain not only why these spiders live in groups and cooperate but also why they disperse only at large colony sizes, thus addressing both sociality and colony size range in this social spider. These findings may also explain the conspicuous absence of social spiders from higher latitudes and higher elevations, areas that we have previously shown to harbor considerably fewer insects of the largest size classes than the lowland tropical rainforests where social spiders thrive. Our findings thus illustrate the relevance of scaling laws to the size and functioning of levels of organization above the individual. PMID:18689677

  11. A program to accelerate the deployment of CO{sub 2} capture and storage: rational, objectives and cost

    SciTech Connect

    Vello A. Kuuskraa

    2007-10-15

    This White Paper, the first of a series, analyzes one strategy for accelerating the deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) by the coal-fueled electricity generation industry. This strategy involves providing reimbursement for the incremental costs of installing and operating CCS systems, with reimbursement provided for retrofitting existing coal-fuelled electricity generation plants with CCS, incorporating CCS into new plants, and launching large-scale demonstrations of geologic storage of carbon. 14 refs., 4 figs., 23 tabs., 3 apps.

  12. Electron capture into large-l Rydberg states of multiply charged ions escaping from solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedeljković, N.; Nedeljković, Lj.; Mirković, M.

    2003-07-01

    We have investigated the electron capture into large-l Rydberg states of multiply charged ionic projectiles (e.g., the core charges Z=6, 7, and 8) escaping solid surfaces with intermediate velocities (v≈1 a.u.) in the normal emergence geometry. A model of the nonresonant electron capture from the solid conduction band into the moving large angular-momentum Rydberg states of the ions is developed through a generalization of our results obtained previously for the low-l cases (l=0, 1, and 2). The model is based on the two-wave-function dynamics of the Demkov-Ostrovskii type. The electron exchange process is described by a mixed flux through a moving plane (“Firsov plane”), placed between the solid surface and the ionic projectile. Due to low eccentricities of the large-l Rydberg systems, the mixed flux must be evaluated through the whole Firsov plane. It is for this purpose that a suitable asymptotic method is developed. For intermediate ionic velocities and for all relevant values of the principal quantum number n≈Z, the population probability Pnl is obtained as a nonlinear l distribution. The theoretical predictions concerning the ions S VI, Cl VII, and Ar VIII are compared with the available results of the beam-foil experiments.

  13. Comparisons of amine solvents for post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture: A multi-objective analysis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Anita S; Eslick, John C; Miller, David C; Kitchin, John R

    2013-10-01

    Amine solvents are of great interest for post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture applications. Although the development of new solvents is predominantly conducted at the laboratory scale, the ability to assess the performance of newly developed solvents at the process scale is crucial to identifying the best solvents for CO{sub 2} capture. In this work we present a methodology to evaluate and objectively compare the process performance of different solvents. We use Aspen Plus, with the electrolyte-NRTL thermodynamic model for the solvent CO{sub 2} interactions, coupled with a multi-objective genetic algorithm optimization to determine the best process design and operating conditions for each solvent. This ensures that the processes utilized for the comparison are those which are best suited for the specific solvent. We evaluate and compare the process performance of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), and 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) in a 90% CO{sub 2} capture process from a 550 MW coal fired power plant. From our analysis the best process specifications are amine specific and with those specific, optimized specifications DEA has the potential to be a better performing solvent than MEA, with a lower energy penalty and lower capital cost investment.

  14. The small numbers of large Kuiper Belt objects

    SciTech Connect

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Brown, Michael E.; Fraser, Wesley C.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the brightness distribution of the largest and brightest (m(R) < 22) Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). We construct a luminosity function of the dynamically excited or hot Kuiper Belt (orbits with inclinations >5°) from the very brightest to m(R) = 23. We find for m(R) ≲ 23, a single slope appears to describe the luminosity function. We estimate that ∼12 KBOs brighter than m(R) ∼ 19.5 are present in the Kuiper Belt today. With nine bodies already discovered this suggests that the inventory of bright KBOs is nearly complete.

  15. Multisensory Tracking of Objects in Darkness: Capture of Positive Afterimages by the Tactile and Proprioceptive Senses

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Brian W.; Tinker, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on three experiments investigating the contribution of different sensory modalities to the tracking of objects moved in total darkness. Participants sitting in the dark were exposed to a brief, bright flash which reliably induced a positive visual afterimage of the scene so illuminated. If the participants subsequently move their hand in the darkness, the visual afterimage of that hand fades or disappears; this is presumably due to conflict between the illusory visual afterimage (of the hand in its original location) and other information (e.g., proprioceptive) from a general mechanism for tracking body parts. This afterimage disappearance effect also occurs for held objects which are moved in the dark, and some have argued that this represents a case of body schema extension, i.e. the rapid incorporation of held external objects into the body schema. We demonstrate that the phenomenon is not limited to held objects and occurs in conditions where incorporation into the body schema is unlikely. Instead, we propose that the disappearance of afterimages of objects moved in darkness comes from a general mechanism for object tracking which integrates input from multiple sensory systems. This mechanism need not be limited to tracking body parts, and thus we need not invoke body schema extension to explain the afterimage disappearance. In this series of experiments, we test whether auditory feedback of object movement can induce afterimage disappearance, demonstrate that the disappearance effect scales with the magnitude of proprioceptive feedback, and show that tactile feedback alone is sufficient for the effect. Together, these data demonstrate that the visual percept of a positive afterimage is constructed not just from visual input of the scene when light reaches the eyes, but in conjunction with input from multiple other senses. PMID:26959233

  16. Object-based Encoding in Visual Working Memory: Evidence from Memory-driven Attentional Capture.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zaifeng; Yu, Shixian; Zhu, Chengfeng; Shui, Rende; Weng, Xuchu; Li, Peng; Shen, Mowei

    2016-01-01

    Visual working memory (VWM) adopts a specific manner of object-based encoding (OBE) to extract perceptual information: Whenever one feature-dimension is selected for entry into VWM, the others are also extracted. Currently most studies revealing OBE probed an 'irrelevant-change distracting effect', where changes of irrelevant-features dramatically affected the performance of the target feature. However, the existence of irrelevant-feature change may affect participants' processing manner, leading to a false-positive result. The current study conducted a strict examination of OBE in VWM, by probing whether irrelevant-features guided the deployment of attention in visual search. The participants memorized an object's colour yet ignored shape and concurrently performed a visual-search task. They searched for a target line among distractor lines, each embedded within a different object. One object in the search display could match the shape, colour, or both dimensions of the memory item, but this object never contained the target line. Relative to a neutral baseline, where there was no match between the memory and search displays, search time was significantly prolonged in all match conditions, regardless of whether the memory item was displayed for 100 or 1000 ms. These results suggest that task-irrelevant shape was extracted into VWM, supporting OBE in VWM. PMID:26956084

  17. Detection and tracking of objects in an image sequence captured by a VTOL-UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frietsch, Natalie; Meister, Oliver; Schlaile, Christian; Wendel, Jan; Trommer, Gert F.

    2007-04-01

    This paper focusses on the automated detection and tracking of moving objects in a camera sequence, that is provided by a small, electrically powered four-rotor helicopter in a hover-and-stare scenario. Two different algorithms for identifying independently moving areas are investigated and compared. The first approach bases on the previous compensation of the camera movement by estimation of homographies. Moving regions are extracted by robust background subtraction. The second approach bases on a dense optical flow field and needs no stabilization: Single points are identified that move not consistently with the background plane. These points are merged into objects by a cluster analysis algorithm. Furthermore, a strategy for tracking these objects over time is described including a Kalman filter. Due to several reasons, not every extracted area corresponds to an independently moving object and a heuristic rule set is used to sort artifacts out. Experimental results on in-flight images are presented and the performances of the developed algorithms are compared. Finally, first steps towards a geographic location of the tracked objects are described.

  18. Spatial capture-recapture: a promising method for analyzing data collected using artificial cover objects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutherland, Chris; Munoz, David; Miller, David A.W.; Grant, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Spatial capture–recapture (SCR) is a relatively recent development in ecological statistics that provides a spatial context for estimating abundance and space use patterns, and improves inference about absolute population density. SCR has been applied to individual encounter data collected noninvasively using methods such as camera traps, hair snares, and scat surveys. Despite the widespread use of capture-based surveys to monitor amphibians and reptiles, there are few applications of SCR in the herpetological literature. We demonstrate the utility of the application of SCR for studies of reptiles and amphibians by analyzing capture–recapture data from Red-Backed Salamanders, Plethodon cinereus, collected using artificial cover boards. Using SCR to analyze spatial encounter histories of marked individuals, we found evidence that density differed little among four sites within the same forest (on average, 1.59 salamanders/m2) and that salamander detection probability peaked in early October (Julian day 278) reflecting expected surface activity patterns of the species. The spatial scale of detectability, a measure of space use, indicates that the home range size for this population of Red-Backed Salamanders in autumn was 16.89 m2. Surveying reptiles and amphibians using artificial cover boards regularly generates spatial encounter history data of known individuals, which can readily be analyzed using SCR methods, providing estimates of absolute density and inference about the spatial scale of habitat use.

  19. Object-based Encoding in Visual Working Memory: Evidence from Memory-driven Attentional Capture

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zaifeng; Yu, Shixian; Zhu, Chengfeng; Shui, Rende; Weng, Xuchu; Li, Peng; Shen, Mowei

    2016-01-01

    Visual working memory (VWM) adopts a specific manner of object-based encoding (OBE) to extract perceptual information: Whenever one feature-dimension is selected for entry into VWM, the others are also extracted. Currently most studies revealing OBE probed an ‘irrelevant-change distracting effect’, where changes of irrelevant-features dramatically affected the performance of the target feature. However, the existence of irrelevant-feature change may affect participants’ processing manner, leading to a false-positive result. The current study conducted a strict examination of OBE in VWM, by probing whether irrelevant-features guided the deployment of attention in visual search. The participants memorized an object’s colour yet ignored shape and concurrently performed a visual-search task. They searched for a target line among distractor lines, each embedded within a different object. One object in the search display could match the shape, colour, or both dimensions of the memory item, but this object never contained the target line. Relative to a neutral baseline, where there was no match between the memory and search displays, search time was significantly prolonged in all match conditions, regardless of whether the memory item was displayed for 100 or 1000 ms. These results suggest that task-irrelevant shape was extracted into VWM, supporting OBE in VWM. PMID:26956084

  20. Spacial and objective decompositions for very large SCAPs

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Russell W; Van Hentenryck, Pascal; Coffrin, Carleton

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the single commodity allocation problem (SCAP) for disaster recovery, a fundamental problem faced by all populated areas. SCAPs are complex stochastic optimization problems that combine resource allocation, warehouse routing, and parallel fleet routing. Moreover, these problems must be solved under tight run-time constraints to be practical in real-world disaster situations. This paper revisits the SCAP algorithm proposed in and proposes new storage allocation models that are necessary to enable the algorithm to scale to problem sizes of three orders of magnitude greater (250, 500, 1000 storage locations). The new algorithms are validated on large-scale hurricane disaster scenarios generated by Los Alamos National Laboratory using state-of-the-art disaster simulation tools.

  1. Large distance 3D imaging of hidden objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozban, Daniel; Aharon Akram, Avihai; Kopeika, N. S.; Abramovich, A.; Levanon, Assaf

    2014-06-01

    Imaging systems in millimeter waves are required for applications in medicine, communications, homeland security, and space technology. This is because there is no known ionization hazard for biological tissue, and atmospheric attenuation in this range of the spectrum is low compared to that of infrared and optical rays. The lack of an inexpensive room temperature detector makes it difficult to give a suitable real time implement for the above applications. A 3D MMW imaging system based on chirp radar was studied previously using a scanning imaging system of a single detector. The system presented here proposes to employ a chirp radar method with Glow Discharge Detector (GDD) Focal Plane Array (FPA of plasma based detectors) using heterodyne detection. The intensity at each pixel in the GDD FPA yields the usual 2D image. The value of the I-F frequency yields the range information at each pixel. This will enable 3D MMW imaging. In this work we experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an imaging system based on radar principles and FPA of inexpensive detectors. This imaging system is shown to be capable of imaging objects from distances of at least 10 meters.

  2. Spherically-arranged piecewise planar hologram for capturing a diffracted object wave field in 360 degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seungtaik; Seo, Hoyong; Hwang, Chi-Young; Lee, Beom-Ryeol; Son, Wookho

    2013-05-01

    We present a new method to record and reconstruct a diffracted object wave field in all directions. For this, we are going to use spherically-arranged holograms instead of a single spherical hologram. Our spherically-arranged holograms are constructed to store all components of plane waves propagating in all directions. One can use the well-known efficient FFT-based diffraction formulae such as Fresnel transform and angular spectrum method in generation and reconstruction of our spherically-arranged holograms. It is possible to synthesize a new hologram with an arbitrary position and orientation without the geometry of the object. Numerical experiments are presented to show the effectiveness of our method.

  3. Algorithms for detection of objects in image sequences captured from an airborne imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasturi, Rangachar; Camps, Octavia; Tang, Yuan-Liang; Devadiga, Sadashiva; Gandhi, Tarak

    1995-01-01

    This research was initiated as a part of the effort at the NASA Ames Research Center to design a computer vision based system that can enhance the safety of navigation by aiding the pilots in detecting various obstacles on the runway during critical section of the flight such as a landing maneuver. The primary goal is the development of algorithms for detection of moving objects from a sequence of images obtained from an on-board video camera. Image regions corresponding to the independently moving objects are segmented from the background by applying constraint filtering on the optical flow computed from the initial few frames of the sequence. These detected regions are tracked over subsequent frames using a model based tracking algorithm. Position and velocity of the moving objects in the world coordinate is estimated using an extended Kalman filter. The algorithms are tested using the NASA line image sequence with six static trucks and a simulated moving truck and experimental results are described. Various limitations of the currently implemented version of the above algorithm are identified and possible solutions to build a practical working system are investigated.

  4. Nonlinear filtering for tracking large objects in radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenewald, John H.; Musick, Stanton H.

    2005-05-01

    Detecting and tracking a moving ground target in radar imagery is a challenge intensified by clutter, sensor anomalies, and the substantial signature variations that occur when a target's aspect angle changes rapidly. In its GMTI mode, a radar produces range-Doppler images that contain both kinematic reports and shape features. An HRR signature, when formed as the Fourier transform of the range-Doppler image across its Doppler dimension, becomes a derived measurement and an alternative source of identity information. Although HRR signatures can vary enormously with even small changes in target aspect, such signatures were vital for associating kinematic reports to tracks in this work. This development started with video phase history (VPH) data recorded from a live experiment involving a GMTI radar viewing a single moving target. Since the target could appear anywhere in the range-Doppler image derived from the VPH data, the goal was to localize it in a small range-Doppler "chip" that could be extracted and used in subsequent research. Although the clutter in any given VPH frame generally caused false chips to be formed in the full range-Doppler image, at most one chip contained the target. The most effective approach for creating any chip is to ensure that the object is present in the return from each pulse that contributes to that chip, and to correct any phase distortions arising from range gate changes. Processing constraints dictated that the algorithm for target chip extraction be coded in MATLAB with a time budget of a few seconds per frame. Furthermore, templates and shape models to describe the target were prohibited. This paper describes the nonlinear filtering approach used to reason over multiple frames of VPH data. This nonlinear approach automatically detects and segments potential targets in the range-Doppler imagery, and then extracts kinematic and shape features that are tracked over multiple data frames to ensure that the real target is in the

  5. Reward-associated features capture attention in the absence of awareness: Evidence from object-substitution masking.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joseph A; Donohue, Sarah E; Schoenfeld, Mircea A; Hopf, Jens-Max; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Woldorff, Marty G

    2016-08-15

    Reward-associated visual features have been shown to capture visual attention, evidenced in faster and more accurate behavioral performance, as well as in neural responses reflecting lateralized shifts of visual attention to those features. Specifically, the contralateral N2pc event-related-potential (ERP) component that reflects attentional shifting exhibits increased amplitude in response to task-relevant targets containing a reward-associated feature. In the present study, we examined the automaticity of such reward-association effects using object-substitution masking (OSM) in conjunction with MEG measures of visual attentional shifts. In OSM, a visual-search array is presented, with the target item to be detected indicated by a surrounding mask (here, four surrounding squares). Delaying the offset of the target-surrounding four-dot mask relative to the offset of the rest of the target/distracter array disrupts the viewer's awareness of the target (masked condition), whereas simultaneous offsets do not (unmasked condition). Here we manipulated whether the color of the OSM target was or was not of a previously reward-associated color. By tracking reward-associated enhancements of behavior and the N2pc in response to masked targets containing a previously rewarded or unrewarded feature, the automaticity of attentional capture by reward could be probed. We found an enhanced N2pc response to targets containing a previously reward-associated color feature. Moreover, this enhancement of the N2pc by reward did not differ between masking conditions, nor did it differ as a function of the apparent visibility of the target within the masked condition. Overall, these results underscore the automaticity of attentional capture by reward-associated features, and demonstrate the ability of feature-based reward associations to shape attentional capture and allocation outside of perceptual awareness. PMID:27153978

  6. β,β-(1,4-Dithiino)subporphyrin Dimers Capturing Fullerenes with Large Association Constants.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kota; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2016-06-27

    β,β-(1,4-Dithiino)subporphyrin dimers 7-syn and 7-anti were synthesized by the nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction of 2-bromo-3-(4-methoxyphenylsulfonyl)subporphyrin 4 with 2,3-dimercaptosubporphyrin 5 under basic conditions followed by axial arylation. Additions of C60 or C70 to a dilute solution of 7-anti (ca. 10(-6)  m) in toluene did not cause appreciable UV/Vis spectral changes, while similar additions to a concentrated solution (ca. 10(-3)  m) resulted in precipitation of complexes. In contrast, dimer 7-syn captured C60 and C70 in different complexation stoichiometries in toluene; a 1:1 manner and a 2:1 manner, respectively, with large association constants; Ka =(1.9±0.2)×10(6)  m(-1) for C60 @7-syn, and K1 =(1.6±0.5)×10(6) and K2 =(1.8±0.9)×10(5)  m(-1) for C70 @(7-syn)2 . These association constants are the largest for fullerenes-capture by bowl-shaped molecules reported so far. The structures of C60 @7-anti, C70 @7-anti, C60 @7-syn, and C70 @7-syn have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. PMID:27238619

  7. Involuntary attentional capture by task-irrelevant objects that match the search template for category detection in natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Reeder, Reshanne R; van Zoest, Wieske; Peelen, Marius V

    2015-05-01

    Theories of visual search postulate that the selection of targets amongst distractors involves matching visual input to a top-down attentional template. Previous work has provided evidence that feature-based attentional templates affect visual processing globally across the visual field. In the present study, we asked whether more naturalistic, category-level attentional templates also modulate visual processing in a spatially global and obligatory way. Subjects were cued to detect people or cars in a diverse set of photographs of real-world scenes. On a subset of trials, silhouettes of people and cars appeared in search-irrelevant locations that subjects were instructed to ignore, and subjects were required to respond to the location of a subsequent dot probe. In three experiments, results showed a consistency effect on dot-probe trials: dot probes were detected faster when they appeared in the location of the cued category compared with the non-cued category, indicating attentional capture by template-matching stimuli. Experiments 1 and 2 showed that this capture was involuntary: consistency effects persisted under conditions in which attending to silhouettes of the cued category was detrimental to performance. Experiment 3 tested whether these effects could be attributed to non-attentional effects related to the processing of the category cues. Results showed a consistency effect when subjects searched for category exemplars but not when they searched for objects semantically related to the cued category. Together, these results indicate that attentional templates for familiar object categories affect visual processing across the visual field, leading to involuntary attentional capture by template-matching stimuli. PMID:25810159

  8. Application of CFB technology for large power generating units and CO{sub 2} capture

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabov, G. A. Folomeev, O. M.; Sankin, D. A.; Khaneev, K. V.; Bondarenko, I. G.; Mel'nikov, D. A.

    2010-07-15

    Data on the development of the circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology for combustion of fuels in large power generating units are examined. The problems with raising the steam parameters and unit power of boilers with a circulating fluidized bed are examined. With the boiler system at the 460 MW unit at Lagisza (Poland) as an example, the feasibility of raising the efficiency of units with CFB boilers through deep recovery of the heat of the effluent gases and reducing expenditure for in-house needs is demonstrated. Comparative estimates of the capital and operating costs of 225 and 330 MW units are used to determine the conditions for optimum use of CFB boilers in the engineering renovation of thermal power plants in Russia. New areas for the application of CFB technology in CO{sub 2} capture are analyzed in connection with the problem of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

  9. Integrating resource selection into spatial capture-recapture models for large carnivores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Proffitt, Kelly M.; Goldberg, Joshua; Hebblewite, Mark; Russell, Robin E.; Jimenez, Ben; Robinson, Hugh S.; Pilgrim, Kristine; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife managers need reliable methods to estimate large carnivore densities and population trends; yet large carnivores are elusive, difficult to detect, and occur at low densities making traditional approaches intractable. Recent advances in spatial capture-recapture (SCR) models have provided new approaches for monitoring trends in wildlife abundance and these methods are particularly applicable to large carnivores. We applied SCR models in a Bayesian framework to estimate mountain lion densities in the Bitterroot Mountains of west central Montana. We incorporate an existing resource selection function (RSF) as a density covariate to account for heterogeneity in habitat use across the study area and include data collected from harvested lions. We identify individuals through DNA samples collected by (1) biopsy darting mountain lions detected in systematic surveys of the study area, (2) opportunistically collecting hair and scat samples, and (3) sampling all harvested mountain lions. We included 80 DNA samples collected from 62 individuals in the analysis. Including information on predicted habitat use as a covariate on the distribution of activity centers reduced the median estimated density by 44%, the standard deviation by 7%, and the width of 95% credible intervals by 10% as compared to standard SCR models. Within the two management units of interest, we estimated a median mountain lion density of 4.5 mountain lions/100 km2 (95% CI = 2.9, 7.7) and 5.2 mountain lions/100 km2 (95% CI = 3.4, 9.1). Including harvested individuals (dead recovery) did not create a significant bias in the detection process by introducing individuals that could not be detected after removal. However, the dead recovery component of the model did have a substantial effect on results by increasing sample size. The ability to account for heterogeneity in habitat use provides a useful extension to SCR models, and will enhance the ability of wildlife managers to reliably and

  10. Captured segment exchange: a strategy for custom engineering large genomic regions in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Jack R; Palopoli, Michael F; Dale, Sarah T; Stauffer, Jennifer E; Shah, Anita L; Johnson, Justine E; Walsh, Conor W; Flaten, Hanna; Parsons, Christine M

    2013-02-01

    Site-specific recombinases (SSRs) are valuable tools for manipulating genomes. In Drosophila, thousands of transgenic insertions carrying SSR recognition sites have been distributed throughout the genome by several large-scale projects. Here we describe a method with the potential to use these insertions to make custom alterations to the Drosophila genome in vivo. Specifically, by employing recombineering techniques and a dual recombinase-mediated cassette exchange strategy based on the phiC31 integrase and FLP recombinase, we show that a large genomic segment that lies between two SSR recognition-site insertions can be "captured" as a target cassette and exchanged for a sequence that was engineered in bacterial cells. We demonstrate this approach by targeting a 50-kb segment spanning the tsh gene, replacing the existing segment with corresponding recombineered sequences through simple and efficient manipulations. Given the high density of SSR recognition-site insertions in Drosophila, our method affords a straightforward and highly efficient approach to explore gene function in situ for a substantial portion of the Drosophila genome. PMID:23150604

  11. Captured metagenomics: large-scale targeting of genes based on ‘sequence capture’ reveals functional diversity in soils

    PubMed Central

    Manoharan, Lokeshwaran; Kushwaha, Sandeep K.; Hedlund, Katarina; Ahrén, Dag

    2015-01-01

    Microbial enzyme diversity is a key to understand many ecosystem processes. Whole metagenome sequencing (WMG) obtains information on functional genes, but it is costly and inefficient due to large amount of sequencing that is required. In this study, we have applied a captured metagenomics technique for functional genes in soil microorganisms, as an alternative to WMG. Large-scale targeting of functional genes, coding for enzymes related to organic matter degradation, was applied to two agricultural soil communities through captured metagenomics. Captured metagenomics uses custom-designed, hybridization-based oligonucleotide probes that enrich functional genes of interest in metagenomic libraries where only probe-bound DNA fragments are sequenced. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with targeted genes while maintaining their target diversity and their taxonomic distribution correlated well with the traditional ribosomal sequencing. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with genes related to organic matter degradation; at least five times more than similar, publicly available soil WMG projects. This target enrichment technique also preserves the functional representation of the soils, thereby facilitating comparative metagenomics projects. Here, we present the first study that applies the captured metagenomics approach in large scale, and this novel method allows deep investigations of central ecosystem processes by studying functional gene abundances. PMID:26490729

  12. Large object investigation by digital holography with effective spectrum multiplexing under single-exposure approach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning Zhang, Yingying; Xie, Jun

    2014-10-13

    We present a method to investigate large object by digital holography with effective spectrum multiplexing under single-exposure approach. This method splits the original reference beam and redirects one of its branches as a second object beam. Through the modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the two object beams can illuminate different parts of the large object and create a spectrum multiplexed hologram onto the focal plane array of the charge-coupled device/complementary metal oxide semiconductor camera. After correct spectrum extraction and image reconstruction, the large object can be fully observed within only one single snap-shot. The flexibility and great performance make our method a very attractive and promising technique for large object investigation under common 632.8 nm illumination.

  13. Large-Vortex Capture by a Wing at Very High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. M.; Wu, J. Z.; Denny, G. A.; Lu, X. Y.

    1996-01-01

    increased (e.g., Fage and Johansen ; Critzos et al.). Figure 1 shows a typical experimental lift and drag coefficients of NACA-0012 airfoil in this whole range of angle of attack. Obviously, without overcoming the lift crisis at alpha(sub stall) the second lift peak is completely useless. Thus, the ultimate goal of post-stall lift enhancement is to fill the lift valley after stall by flow controls, so that a wing and/or flap can work at the whole range of 0 deg less than alpha less than alpha(sub m). Relevant early experimental studies have been extensively reviewed by Wu et al., who concluded that, first, similar to the leading-edge vortex on a slender wing, the lift enhancement on a large-aspect-ratio wing should be the result of capturing a vortex on the upper surface of the wing; and, second, using steady controls cannot reach the goal, and one must rely on unsteady controls with low-level power input as well. Wu et al. also conjectured that the underlying physics of post-stall lift enhancement by unsteady controls consists of a chain of mechanisms: vortex layer instability - receptivity resonance - nonlinear streaming.

  14. Exploring the Light-Capturing Properties of Photosynthetic Chlorophyll Clusters Using Large-Scale Correlated Calculations.

    PubMed

    Suomivuori, Carl-Mikael; Winter, Nina O C; Hättig, Christof; Sundholm, Dage; Kaila, Ville R I

    2016-06-14

    Chlorophylls are light-capturing units found in photosynthetic proteins. We study here the ground and excited state properties of monomeric, dimeric, and tetrameric models of the special chlorophyll/bacteriochlorophyll (Chl/BChl) pigment (P) centers P700 and P680/P870 of type I and type II photosystems, respectively. In the excited state calculations, we study the performance of the algebraic diagrammatic construction through second-order (ADC(2)) method in combination with the reduced virtual space (RVS) approach and the recently developed Laplace-transformed scaled-opposite-spin (LT-SOS) algorithm, which allows us, for the first time, to address multimeric effects at correlated ab initio levels using large basis sets. At the LT-SOS-RVS-ADC(2)/def2-TZVP level, we obtain vertical excitation energies (VEEs) of 2.00-2.07 and 1.52-1.62 eV for the P680/P700 and the P870 pigment models, respectively, which agree well with the experimental absorption maxima of 1.82, 1.77, and 1.43 eV for P680, P700, and P870, respectively. In the P680/P870 models, we find that the photoexcitation leads to a π → π* transition in which the exciton is delocalized between the adjacent Chl/BChl molecules of the central pair, whereas the exciton is localized to a single chlorophyll molecule in the P700 model. Consistent with experiments, the calculated excitonic splittings between the central pairs of P680, P700, and P870 models are 80, 200, and 400 cm(-1), respectively. The calculations show that the electron affinity of the radical cation of the P680 model is 0.4 V larger than for the P870 model and 0.2 V larger than for P700. The chromophore stacking interaction is found to strongly influence the electron localization properties of the light-absorbing pigments, which may help to elucidate mechanistic details of the charge separation process in type I and type II photosystems. PMID:27153186

  15. Segmentation of Object Outlines into Parts: A Large-Scale Integrative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Winter, Joeri; Wagemans, Johan

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a large number of observers (N=201) were asked to segment a collection of outlines derived from line drawings of everyday objects (N=88). This data set was then used as a benchmark to evaluate current models of object segmentation. All of the previously proposed rules of segmentation were found supported in our results. For example,…

  16. Self-tuning at large (distances): 4D description of runaway dilaton capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, C. P.; Diener, Ross; Williams, M.

    2015-10-01

    We complete here a three-part study (see also arXiv:1506.08095 and arXiv:1508.00856) of how codimension-two objects back-react gravitationally with their environment, with particular interest in situations where the transverse `bulk' is stabilized by the interplay between gravity and flux-quantization in a dilaton-Maxwell-Einstein system such as commonly appears in higher-dimensional supergravity and is used in the Supersymmetric Large Extra Dimensions (SLED) program. Such systems enjoy a classical flat direction that can be lifted by interactions with the branes, giving a mass to the would-be modulus that is smaller than the KK scale. We construct the effective low-energy 4D description appropriate below the KK scale once the transverse extra dimensions are integrated out, and show that it reproduces the predictions of the full UV theory for how the vacuum energy and modulus mass depend on the properties of the branes and stabilizing fluxes. In particular we show how this 4D theory learns the news of flux quantization through the existence of a space-filling four-form potential that descends from the higher-dimensional Maxwell field. We find a scalar potential consistent with general constraints, like the runaway dictated by Weinberg's theorem. We show how scale-breaking brane interactions can give this potential minima for which the extra-dimensional size, ℓ, is exponentially large relative to underlying physics scales, r B , with ℓ 2 = r B 2 e - φ where - φ ≫ 1 can be arranged with a small hierarchy between fundamental parameters. We identify circumstances where the potential at the minimum can (but need not) be parametrically suppressed relative to the tensions of the branes, provide a preliminary discussion of the robustness of these results to quantum corrections, and discuss the relation between what we find and earlier papers in the SLED program.

  17. Background Noises Versus Intraseasonal Variation Signals: Small vs. Large Convective Cloud Objects From CERES Aqua Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kuan-Man

    2015-01-01

    During inactive phases of Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), there are plenty of deep but small convective systems and far fewer deep and large ones. During active phases of MJO, a manifestation of an increase in the occurrence of large and deep cloud clusters results from an amplification of large-scale motions by stronger convective heating. This study is designed to quantitatively examine the roles of small and large cloud clusters during the MJO life cycle. We analyze the cloud object data from Aqua CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) observations between July 2006 and June 2010 for tropical deep convective (DC) and cirrostratus (CS) cloud object types according to the real-time multivariate MJO index, which assigns the tropics to one of the eight MJO phases each day. The cloud object is a contiguous region of the earth with a single dominant cloud-system type. The criteria for defining these cloud types are overcast footprints and cloud top pressures less than 400 hPa, but DC has higher cloud optical depths (=10) than those of CS (<10). The size distributions, defined as the footprint numbers as a function of cloud object diameters, for particular MJO phases depart greatly from the combined (8-phase) distribution at large cloud-object diameters due to the reduced/increased numbers of cloud objects related to changes in the large-scale environments. The medium diameter corresponding to the combined distribution is determined and used to partition all cloud objects into "small" and "large" groups of a particular phase. The two groups corresponding to the combined distribution have nearly equal numbers of footprints. The medium diameters are 502 km for DC and 310 km for cirrostratus. The range of the variation between two extreme phases (typically, the most active and depressed phases) for the small group is 6-11% in terms of the numbers of cloud objects and the total footprint numbers. The corresponding range for the large group is 19-44%. In

  18. Small vs. Large Convective Cloud Objects from CERES Aqua Observations: Where are the Intraseasonal Variation Signals?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kuan-Man

    2016-01-01

    During inactive phases of Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO), there are plenty of deep but small convective systems and far fewer deep and large ones. During active phases of MJO, a manifestation of an increase in the occurrence of large and deep cloud clusters results from an amplification of large-scale motions by stronger convective heating. This study is designed to quantitatively examine the roles of small and large cloud clusters during the MJO life cycle. We analyze the cloud object data from Aqua CERES observations for tropical deep convective (DC) and cirrostratus (CS) cloud object types according to the real-time multivariate MJO index. The cloud object is a contiguous region of the earth with a single dominant cloud-system type. The size distributions, defined as the footprint numbers as a function of cloud object diameters, for particular MJO phases depart greatly from the combined (8-phase) distribution at large cloud-object diameters due to the reduced/increased numbers of cloud objects related to changes in the large-scale environments. The medium diameter corresponding to the combined distribution is determined and used to partition all cloud objects into "small" and "large" groups of a particular phase. The two groups corresponding to the combined distribution have nearly equal numbers of footprints. The medium diameters are 502 km for DC and 310 km for cirrostratus. The range of the variation between two extreme phases (typically, the most active and depressed phases) for the small group is 6-11% in terms of the numbers of cloud objects and the total footprint numbers. The corresponding range for the large group is 19-44%. In terms of the probability density functions of radiative and cloud physical properties, there are virtually no differences between the MJO phases for the small group, but there are significant differences for the large groups for both DC and CS types. These results suggest that the intreseasonal variation signals reside at the

  19. Observations of two peculiar emission objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, M.; Michalitsianos, A. G.; Allen, D. A.; Stencel, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Ultraviolet and visual wavelength spectra were obtained of two peculiar emission objects, Henize S63 and Sanduleak's star in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Previously not observed in the near- or far-ultraviolet, both objects exhibit strong permitted and semiforbidden line emissions. Estimates based on the absolute continuum flux of the hot companion star in Hen S63 indicate that it rivals the luminosity of the carbon star primary. The emission-line profile structure in both objects does not suggest Wolf-Rayet type emission. Carbon in Sanduleak's star (LMC anonymous) is conspicuously absent, while N V, semiforbidden N IV, and semiforbidden N III dominate the UV emission-line spectrum. Nitrogen is overabundant with respect to carbon and oxygen in both objects. The large overabundance of nitrogen in Sanduleak's star suggests evidence for CNO processes material similar to that seen in Nu Car.

  20. Highly Resolved MR Imaging of Arbitrary Subregions in Large Objects by a Whole-Body Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, Karin; Pfeffer, Markus; Jung, Wulf-Ingo; Lutz, Otto; Schick, Fritz

    1993-07-01

    Highly resolved images of defined regions of interest within extended objects were obtaind with a 1.5 T whole-bode imager and standard hardware. The high-resolution spin echo imaging sequence avoids aliasing and allows pixel resolutions down to 39 µm which are confirmed by phantom measurements. The application of the sequence to large biological objects such as, for example, an amaryllis bulb results in images which provide much detail which could not be resolved with standard sequences.

  1. The search for structure - Object classification in large data sets. [for astronomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Research concerning object classifications schemes are reviewed, focusing on large data sets. Classification techniques are discussed, including syntactic, decision theoretic methods, fuzzy techniques, and stochastic and fuzzy grammars. Consideration is given to the automation of MK classification (Morgan and Keenan, 1973) and other problems associated with the classification of spectra. In addition, the classification of galaxies is examined, including the problems of systematic errors, blended objects, galaxy types, and galaxy clusters.

  2. Modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, B.S.

    2000-02-01

    This paper describes the modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program. This effort represents a complete 'white sheet of paper' rewrite of the code. In this paper, the motivation driving this project, the design objectives for the new version of the program, and the design choices and their consequences will be discussed. The design itself will also be described, including the important subsystems as well as the key classes within those subsystems.

  3. Nondestructive measurement of large objects with electron paramagnetic resonance: Pottery, sculpture, and jewel ornament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeya, Motoji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Ishii, Hiroshi

    1994-12-01

    A cylindicral cavity of TE111 mode with an aperture of 3 mm in diameter has been used to measure the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of a large object placed over the aperture. EPR spectra of a precious fossil of a dinosaur tooth piece and a fossil bone of the Machikane Alligator were measured nondestructively in addition to a jadeite sculpture, a pearl and turquoise necklace, a large turmaline, a star ruby, and ceramic pottery. Thus, EPR can be a nondestructive tool to detect forgery and to test the authenticity in art as well as to allocate ancient objects in archaeological provenance study.

  4. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Kk of... - Data Quality Objective and Lower Confidence Limit Approaches for Alternative Capture Efficiency...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Confidence Limit Approaches for Alternative Capture Efficiency Protocols and Test Methods A Appendix A to...) National Emission Standards for the Printing and Publishing Industry Pt. 63, Subpt. KK, App. A Appendix A... procedures can also be used in an alternative CE protocol. For example, a traditional liquid/gas mass...

  5. Open-Loop Thrust Profile Development for Tethered Towing of Large Space Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasper, Lee E. Z.

    Towing objects in space has become an increasingly researched mission concept. Active debris removal, satellite servicing, and asteroid retrieval concepts in many cases rely on a thrusting vehicle to redirect and steer a passive object. Focus is often placed on the method of attachment, considering techniques such as grappling or netting the passive object. However, the actual process of towing, once capture has occurred, has not yet received much attention. This research considers the process of towing in space with the tug and passive object attached by a tether. Tethers are not only an effective way of transmitting forces, but they are utilized on many of the towing concepts considered, especially in orbital debris removal. Because the two end bodies are tethered, there is a potential for collision after any maneuver. To avoid collisions, the maneuver, and therefore thrust profile, must be designed in such a way as to limit separation distance reduction between the end bodies. Open-loop input shaping techniques are developed and employed in order to control the flexible system in both deep space and on-orbit environments. To study the behavior, an active debris removal system is proposed as a case study. This system, called the tethered-tug, considers using the reserve fuel from a recently launched upper stage rocket to rendezvous with, capture, and tow a near-by debris object. The system's performance is considered for five distinct open-loop thrust control profiles including on-off/step, frequency notched, discretized notch, Posicast, and bang-off-bang. Tether property variations are also considered along with off-axis towing, slack tethers, and debris with initial rotation rates. Input shaping is not only necessary but, it can be robust to unknown system properties while nearly zeroing relative motion between the end bodies. When considering on-orbit behavior specifically, the system settles into a tumbling or gravity gradient oscillation formation. This is

  6. Ray-optics cloaking devices for large objects in incoherent natural light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Zheng, Bin; Shen, Lian; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Zhang, Baile

    2013-10-01

    A cloak that can hide living creatures from sight is a common feature of mythology but still remains unrealized as a practical device. To preserve the wave phase, the previous cloaking solution proposed by Pendry and colleagues required transformation of the electromagnetic space around the hidden object in such a way that the rays bending around the object inside the cloak region have to travel faster than those passing it by. This difficult phase preservation requirement is the main obstacle for building a broadband polarization-insensitive cloak for large objects. Here we propose a simplified version of Pendry’s cloak by abolishing the requirement for phase preservation, as it is irrelevant for observation using incoherent natural light with human eyes, which are phase and polarization insensitive. This allows for a cloak design on large scales using commonly available materials. We successfully demonstrate the cloaking of living creatures, a cat and a fish, from the eye.

  7. Ray-optics cloaking devices for large objects in incoherent natural light

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongsheng; Zheng, Bin; Shen, Lian; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Zhang, Baile

    2013-01-01

    A cloak that can hide living creatures from sight is a common feature of mythology but still remains unrealized as a practical device. To preserve the wave phase, the previous cloaking solution proposed by Pendry and colleagues required transformation of the electromagnetic space around the hidden object in such a way that the rays bending around the object inside the cloak region have to travel faster than those passing it by. This difficult phase preservation requirement is the main obstacle for building a broadband polarization-insensitive cloak for large objects. Here we propose a simplified version of Pendry’s cloak by abolishing the requirement for phase preservation, as it is irrelevant for observation using incoherent natural light with human eyes, which are phase and polarization insensitive. This allows for a cloak design on large scales using commonly available materials. We successfully demonstrate the cloaking of living creatures, a cat and a fish, from the eye. PMID:24153410

  8. THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF LARGE KUIPER BELT OBJECT 2007 OR10

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. E.; Fraser, W. C.; Burgasser, A. J.

    2011-09-10

    We present photometry and spectra of the large Kuiper belt object 2007 OR10. The data show significant near-infrared absorption features due to water ice. While most objects in the Kuiper belt with water ice absorption this prominent have the optically neutral colors of water ice, 2007 OR10 is among the reddest Kuiper belt objects known. One other large Kuiper belt object-Quaoar-has similar red coloring and water ice absorption, and it is hypothesized that the red coloration of this object is due to irradiation of the small amounts of methane able to be retained on Quaoar. 2007 OR10, though warmer than Quaoar, is in a similar volatile retention regime because it is sufficiently larger that its stronger gravity can still retain methane. We propose, therefore, that the red coloration on 2007 OR10 is also caused by the retention of small amounts of methane. Positive detection of methane on 2007 OR10 will require spectra with higher signal to noise. Models for volatile retention on Kuiper belt objects appear to continue to do an excellent job reproducing all of the available observations.

  9. A computer package for optimal multi-objective VAR planning in large scale power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, H.D. . School of Electrical Engineering); Liu, C.C.; Chen, Y.L. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Hsiao, Y.T.

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents a simulated annealing based computer package for multi-objective, VAR planning in large scale power systems - SAMVAR. This computer package has three distinct features. First, the optimal VAR planning is reformulated as a constrained, multi-objective, non-differentiable optimization problem. The new formulation considers four different objective functions related to system investment, system operational efficiency, system security and system service quality. The new formulation also takes into consideration load, operation and contingency constraints. Second, it allows both the objective functions and equality and inequality constraints to be non-differentiable; making the problem formulation more realistic. Third, the package employs a two-stage solution algorithm based on an extended simulated annealing technique and the [var epsilon]-constraint method. The first-stage of the solution algorithm uses an extended simulated annealing technique to find a global, non-inferior solution. The results obtained from the first stage provide a basis for planners to prioritize the objective functions such that a primary objective function is chosen and tradeoff tolerances for the other objective functions are set. The primary objective function and the trade-off tolerances are then used to transform the constrained multi-objective optimization problem into a single-objective optimization problem with more constraints by employing the [var epsilon]-constraint method. The second-stage uses the simulated annealing technique to find the global optimal solution. A salient feature of SAMVAR is that it allows planners to find an acceptable, global non-inferior solution for the VAR problem. Simulation results indicate that SAMVAR has the ability to handle the multi-objective VAR planning problem and meet with the planner's requirements.

  10. Musculoskeletal anatomy of the Eurasian lynx, Lynx lynx (Carnivora: Felidae) forelimb: Adaptations to capture large prey?

    PubMed

    Viranta, Suvi; Lommi, Hanna; Holmala, Katja; Laakkonen, Juha

    2016-06-01

    Mammalian carnivores adhere to two different feeding strategies relative to their body masses. Large carnivores prey on animals that are the same size or larger than themselves, whereas small carnivores prey on smaller vertebrates and invertebrates. The Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) falls in between these two categories. Lynx descend from larger forms that were probably large prey specialists, but during the Pleistocene became predators of small prey. The modern Eurasian lynx may be an evolutionary reversal toward specializing in large prey again. We hypothesized that the musculoskeletal anatomy of lynx should show traits for catching large prey. To test our hypothesis, we dissected the forelimb muscles of six Eurasian lynx individuals and compared our findings to results published for other felids. We measured the bones and compared their dimensions to the published material. Our material displayed a well-developed pectoral girdle musculature with some uniquely extensive muscle attachments. The upper arm musculature resembled that of the pantherine felids and probably the extinct sabertooths, and also the muscles responsible for supination and pronation were similar to those in large cats. The muscles controlling the pollex were well-developed. However, skeletal indices were similar to those of small prey predators. Our findings show that lynx possess the topographic pattern of muscle origin and insertion like in large felids. J. Morphol. 277:753-765, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26997516

  11. Three Dimentional Reconstruction of Large Cultural Heritage Objects Based on Uav Video and Tls Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Wu, T. H.; Shen, Y.; Wu, L.

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the synergetic use of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) in 3D reconstruction of cultural heritage objects. Rather than capturing still images, the UAV that equips a consumer digital camera is used to collect dynamic videos to overcome its limited endurance capacity. Then, a set of 3D point-cloud is generated from video image sequences using the automated structure-from-motion (SfM) and patch-based multi-view stereo (PMVS) methods. The TLS is used to collect the information that beyond the reachability of UAV imaging e.g., partial building facades. A coarse to fine method is introduced to integrate the two sets of point clouds UAV image-reconstruction and TLS scanning for completed 3D reconstruction. For increased reliability, a variant of ICP algorithm is introduced using local terrain invariant regions in the combined designation. The experimental study is conducted in the Tulou culture heritage building in Fujian province, China, which is focused on one of the TuLou clusters built several hundred years ago. Results show a digital 3D model of the Tulou cluster with complete coverage and textural information. This paper demonstrates the usability of the proposed method for efficient 3D reconstruction of heritage object based on UAV video and TLS data.

  12. Large-scale aerial images capture details of invasive plant populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Satellite and aerial remote sensing have been successfully used to measure invasive weed infestations over very large areas, but have limited resolution. Ground-based methods have provided detailed measurements of invasive weeds, but can measure only limited areas. Here we test a novel approach th...

  13. Lecture Capture Podcasts: Differential Student Use and Performance in a Large Introductory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Adrienne E.; Aguilar-Roca, Nancy M.; O'Dowd, Diane K.

    2016-01-01

    Video "podcast" recordings of lectures are popular with students, but are often associated with a decrease in attendance and little increase in performance. Assessment has generally focused on the class as a whole, potentially masking benefits to different subgroups. In this study, conducted in 2 sections of a large active-learning…

  14. Calibration strategy of optical measurement network for large-scale and shell-like objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yongkai; Peng, Xiang; Liu, Xiaoli; Li, Ameng; Qu, Xinghua

    2012-04-01

    It can be difficult to calibrate the three-dimensional (3D) optical measurement network (OMN) designed to inspect large-scale and shell-like objects. One of the challenges is how to in situ build up a large and precise calibration target, which can be adapted to the desired measurement volume. In this paper, a strategy for in situ calibration of the OMN is presented. First, one of the said objects is chosen to fabricate a large-scale and shell-like calibration target thereon the coded marks are pasted and their coordinates are calculated by using a technique of auto-reconstruction. This results in a highly accurate benchmark-data-set that can cover the large-scale and shell-like measurement volume. Next, all the node 3D sensors of the OMN are calibrated with the established benchmark-data-set. Thus the extrinsic parameters of all node sensors can be unified into a common coordinate system so that the structure parameters and poses of node sensors in the OMN can be determined accurately. The proposed calibration strategy is verified by a group of experiments and a case study for inspecting a large size crucible.

  15. Fast and Flexible Movable Vision Measurement for the Surface of a Large-Sized Object

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Li, Xiaojing; Li, Fengjiao; Wei, Xinguo; Zhang, Guanjun

    2015-01-01

    The presented movable vision measurement for the three-dimensional (3D) surface of a large-sized object has the advantages of system simplicity, low cost, and high accuracy. Aiming at addressing the problems of existing movable vision measurement methods, a more suitable method for large-sized products on industrial sites is introduced in this paper. A raster binocular vision sensor and a wide-field camera are combined to form a 3D scanning sensor. During measurement, several planar targets are placed around the object to be measured. With the planar target as an intermediary, the local 3D data measured by the scanning sensor are integrated into the global coordinate system. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified through physical experiments. PMID:25723142

  16. The effect of hardhats on head and neck response to vertical impacts from large construction objects.

    PubMed

    Suderman, Bethany L; Hoover, Ryan W; Ching, Randal P; Scher, Irving S

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of hardhats in attenuating head acceleration and neck force in vertical impacts from large construction objects. Two weight-matched objects (lead shot bag and concrete block) weighing 9.1 kg were dropped from three heights (0.91 m, 1.83 m and 2.74 m) onto the head of a 50th percentile male Hybrid III anthropomorphic test device (ATD). Two headgear conditions were tested: no head protection and an ANSI Type-I, Class-E hardhat. A third headgear condition (snow sport helmet) was tested at 1.83 m for comparison with the hardhat. Hardhats significantly reduced the resultant linear acceleration for the concrete block impacts by 70-95% when compared to the unprotected head condition. Upper neck compression was also significantly reduced by 26-60% with the use of a hardhat when compared to the unprotected head condition for the 0.91 and 1.83 m drop heights for both lead shot and concrete block drop objects. In this study we found that hardhats can be effective in reducing both head accelerations and compressive neck forces for large construction objects in vertical impacts. PMID:25215927

  17. A reorbiter for large GEO debris objects using ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Shoji; Hayakawa, Yukio; Kawamoto, Satomi

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, space debris problems have become very serious. The worst case occurs in the low Earth orbit (LEO) region, where debris-to-debris collisions generate new debris. The situation in the geostationary orbit (GEO) region is not as bad as that in the LEO. The debris problem in the GEO region, however, should not be left as it is because the GEO is unique and has few debris-cleansing modes. Thus, we proposed a concept for a reorbiter to reorbit large GEO debris objects such as satellites and rocket upper stages left in orbit after the ends of their missions. This concept is based on the idea of thrusting a debris object by irradiating it with an ion beam. The reorbiter, equipped with two ion engines, approaches a debris object, and the ion beam exhausted from one of the ion engines irradiates and thrusts it to change its orbit. The other engine on the opposite side is operated so that the reorbiter follows the debris object. Their orbits are raised in a spiral to a disposal orbit approximately 300 km higher. After that, the reorbiter returns to GEO to approach another debris object. This system can operate without catching debris objects; thus, it can be applied to a wide range of debris objects without regard to their shapes or rotations. A mission scenario was made to conduct efficient maneuvers. In the GEO region, a number of debris objects are distributed on orbit planes close to each other, and they can be reorbited one after another using a single reorbiter. For a typical model mission, the mission time and the total impulse of the ion engines were calculated. The results show that six debris objects can be reorbited in 170 days. The reorbiter has a targeted launch mass of 2500 kg and 6.9 kW of total power. The ion beam convergence, the effects of ion beam irradiation, and non-cooperative rendezvous were recognized as the critical issues of this system. A highly converged beam is required to make efficient debris irradiation. Numerical calculations

  18. Three-dimensional techniques for capturing and building virtual models of complex objects for use in scientific and industrial applications, data archiving, and the entertainment industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Arthur; Chapman, Ralph E.; Wilcox, Brian

    2003-05-01

    The past 10 years have seen remarkable improvements in the capture of 3-dimesional data. Both scanning speeds and accuracy have increased by a magnitude. Software and increasingly more powerful computers allow larger data bases and faster post processing. CT, laser and optical scanners are finding increased use in the medical, manufacturing, scientific and entertainment industries. CT (Computerized Tomography) is generally used to capture internal as well as external surfaces. Medical (hospital) scanners are the most common and can be of service in industrial applications. But true industrial scanners service a much wider range of sizes and materials. Laser and optical scanners are line-of-sight, and are available in portable and permanent CMM mounting arrangements. Scanners are available to capture a wide range of objects; from entire buildings to fingernail sized parts. Solid objects requiring multiple scans, must register each scan to another for part completion. The collected data is exported as a "point cloud." The data can be used to digitally inspect complex parts, surface them for tooling and reverse engineering, or export surfaces to animation software.

  19. The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiang-Qun; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Chu, Yao-Quan; Li, Guo-Ping; Li, Qi; Zhang, Li-Ping; Su, Hong-Jun; Yao, Zheng-Qiu; Wang, Ya-Nan; Xing, Xiao-Zheng; Li, Xin-Nan; Zhu, Yong-Tian; Wang, Gang; Gu, Bo-Zhong; Luo, A.-Li; Xu, Xin-Qi; Zhang, Zhen-Chao; Liu, Gen-Rong; Zhang, Hao-Tong; Yang, De-Hua; Cao, Shu-Yun; Chen, Hai-Yuan; Chen, Jian-Jun; Chen, Kun-Xin; Chen, Ying; Chu, Jia-Ru; Feng, Lei; Gong, Xue-Fei; Hou, Yong-Hui; Hu, Hong-Zhuan; Hu, Ning-Sheng; Hu, Zhong-Wen; Jia, Lei; Jiang, Fang-Hua; Jiang, Xiang; Jiang, Zi-Bo; Jin, Ge; Li, Ai-Hua; Li, Yan; Li, Ye-Ping; Liu, Guan-Qun; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Lu, Wen-Zhi; Mao, Yin-Dun; Men, Li; Qi, Yong-Jun; Qi, Zhao-Xiang; Shi, Huo-Ming; Tang, Zheng-Hong; Tao, Qing-Sheng; Wang, Da-Qi; Wang, Dan; Wang, Guo-Min; Wang, Hai; Wang, Jia-Ning; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jian-Ling; Wang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Lei; Wang, Shu-Qing; Wang, You; Wang, Yue-Fei; Xu, Ling-Zhe; Xu, Yan; Yang, Shi-Hai; Yu, Yong; Yuan, Hui; Yuan, Xiang-Yan; Zhai, Chao; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Zhou, Fang; Zhou, Guo-Hua; Zhu, Jie; Zou, Si-Cheng

    2012-09-01

    The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also called the Guo Shou Jing Telescope) is a special reflecting Schmidt telescope. LAMOST's special design allows both a large aperture (effective aperture of 3.6 m-4.9 m) and a wide field of view (FOV) (5°). It has an innovative active reflecting Schmidt configuration which continuously changes the mirror's surface that adjusts during the observation process and combines thin deformable mirror active optics with segmented active optics. Its primary mirror (6.67 m × 6.05 m) and active Schmidt mirror (5.74m × 4.40m) are both segmented, and composed of 37 and 24 hexagonal sub-mirrors respectively. By using a parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, the focal surface of 1.75 m in diameter can accommodate 4000 optical fibers. Also, LAMOST has 16 spectrographs with 32 CCD cameras. LAMOST will be the telescope with the highest rate of spectral acquisition. As a national large scientific project, the LAMOST project was formally proposed in 1996, and approved by the Chinese government in 1997. The construction started in 2001, was completed in 2008 and passed the official acceptance in June 2009. The LAMOST pilot survey was started in October 2011 and the spectroscopic survey will launch in September 2012. Up to now, LAMOST has released more than 480000 spectra of objects. LAMOST will make an important contribution to the study of the large-scale structure of the Universe, structure and evolution of the Galaxy, and cross-identification of multi-waveband properties in celestial objects.

  20. Presentation of a large amount of moving objects in a virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Huanzhuo; Gong, Jianya; Ye, Jing

    2004-05-01

    It needs a lot of consideration to manage the presentation of a large amount of moving objects in virtual environment. Motion state model (MSM) is used to represent the motion of objects and 2n tree is used to index the motion data stored in database or files. To minimize the necessary memory occupation for static models, cache with LRU or FIFO refreshing is introduced. DCT and wavelet work well with different playback speeds of motion presentation because they can filter low frequencies from motion data and adjust the filter according to playback speed. Since large amount of data are continuously retrieved, calculated, used for displaying, and then discarded, multithreading technology is naturally employed though single thread with carefully arranged data retrieval also works well when the number of objects is not very big. With multithreading, the level of concurrence should be placed at data retrieval, where waiting may occur, rather than at calculating or displaying, and synchronization should be carefully arranged to make sure that different threads can collaborate well. Collision detection is not needed when playing with history data and sampled current data; however, it is necessary for spatial state prediction. When the current state is presented, either predicting-adjusting method or late updating method could be used according to the users' preference.

  1. Calibration target reconstruction for 3-D vision inspection system of large-scale engineering objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yongkai; Peng, Xiang; Guan, Yingjian; Liu, Xiaoli; Li, Ameng

    2010-11-01

    It is usually difficult to calibrate the 3-D vision inspection system that may be employed to measure the large-scale engineering objects. One of the challenges is how to in-situ build-up a large and precise calibration target. In this paper, we present a calibration target reconstruction strategy to solve such a problem. First, we choose one of the engineering objects to be inspected as a calibration target, on which we paste coded marks on the object surface. Next, we locate and decode marks to get homologous points. From multiple camera images, the fundamental matrix between adjacent images can be estimated, and then the essential matrix can be derived with priori known camera intrinsic parameters and decomposed to obtain camera extrinsic parameters. Finally, we are able to obtain the initial 3D coordinates with binocular stereo vision reconstruction, and then optimize them with the bundle adjustment by considering the lens distortions, leading to a high-precision calibration target. This reconstruction strategy has been applied to the inspection of an industrial project, from which the proposed method is successfully validated.

  2. Initial characterization of the large genome of the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum using shotgun and laser capture chromosome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Keinath, Melissa C.; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A.; Timoshevskaya, Nataliya Y.; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.; Voss, S. Randal; Smith, Jeramiah J.

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrates exhibit substantial diversity in genome size, and some of the largest genomes exist in species that uniquely inform diverse areas of basic and biomedical research. For example, the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum (the Mexican axolotl) is a model organism for studies of regeneration, development and genome evolution, yet its genome is ~10× larger than the human genome. As part of a hierarchical approach toward improving genome resources for the species, we generated 600 Gb of shotgun sequence data and developed methods for sequencing individual laser-captured chromosomes. Based on these data, we estimate that the A. mexicanum genome is ~32 Gb. Notably, as much as 19 Gb of the A. mexicanum genome can potentially be considered single copy, which presumably reflects the evolutionary diversification of mobile elements that accumulated during an ancient episode of genome expansion. Chromosome-targeted sequencing permitted the development of assemblies within the constraints of modern computational platforms, allowed us to place 2062 genes on the two smallest A. mexicanum chromosomes and resolves key events in the history of vertebrate genome evolution. Our analyses show that the capture and sequencing of individual chromosomes is likely to provide valuable information for the systematic sequencing, assembly and scaffolding of large genomes. PMID:26553646

  3. Mesoporous fluorocarbon-modified silica aerogel membranes enabling long-term continuous CO2 capture with large absorption flux enhancements.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Feng; Chen, Chien-Hua; Tung, Kuo-Lun; Wei, Te-Yu; Lu, Shih-Yuan; Chang, Kai-Shiun

    2013-03-01

    The use of a membrane contactor combined with a hydrophobic porous membrane and an amine absorbent has attracted considerable attention for the capture of CO2 because of its extensive use, low operational costs, and low energy consumption. The hydrophobic porous membrane interface prevents the passage of the amine absorbent but allows the penetration of CO2 molecules that are captured by the amine absorbent. Herein, highly porous SiO2 aerogels modified with hydrophobic fluorocarbon functional groups (CF3 ) were successfully coated onto a macroporous Al2 O3 membrane; their performance in a membrane contactor for CO2 absorption is discussed. The SiO2 aerogel membrane modified with CF3 functional groups exhibits the highest CO2 absorption flux and can be continuously operated for CO2 absorption for extended periods of time. This study suggests that a SiO2 aerogel membrane modified with CF3 functional groups could potentially be used in a membrane contactor for CO2 absorption. Also, the resulting hydrophobic SiO2 aerogel membrane contactor is a promising technology for large-scale CO2 absorption during the post-combustion process in power plants. PMID:23417984

  4. Initial characterization of the large genome of the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum using shotgun and laser capture chromosome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Keinath, Melissa C; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Timoshevskaya, Nataliya Y; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Voss, S Randal; Smith, Jeramiah J

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrates exhibit substantial diversity in genome size, and some of the largest genomes exist in species that uniquely inform diverse areas of basic and biomedical research. For example, the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum (the Mexican axolotl) is a model organism for studies of regeneration, development and genome evolution, yet its genome is ~10× larger than the human genome. As part of a hierarchical approach toward improving genome resources for the species, we generated 600 Gb of shotgun sequence data and developed methods for sequencing individual laser-captured chromosomes. Based on these data, we estimate that the A. mexicanum genome is ~32 Gb. Notably, as much as 19 Gb of the A. mexicanum genome can potentially be considered single copy, which presumably reflects the evolutionary diversification of mobile elements that accumulated during an ancient episode of genome expansion. Chromosome-targeted sequencing permitted the development of assemblies within the constraints of modern computational platforms, allowed us to place 2062 genes on the two smallest A. mexicanum chromosomes and resolves key events in the history of vertebrate genome evolution. Our analyses show that the capture and sequencing of individual chromosomes is likely to provide valuable information for the systematic sequencing, assembly and scaffolding of large genomes. PMID:26553646

  5. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Kk of... - Data Quality Objective and Lower Confidence Limit Approaches for Alternative Capture Efficiency...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) protocols and test methods that satisfy the criteria of either the data quality objective (DQO) approach or the lower confidence limit (LCL) approach are acceptable under § 63.827(f). The general criteria for alternative CE protocols and test methods to qualify under either the DQO or LCL approach are described...

  6. Large proper motions of the Herbig-Haro objects HH 1 and HH 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, G. H.; Jones, B. F.

    1981-08-01

    Crossley and 120-in. direct plates obtained between 1946 and 1980 have been measured for the proper motions of the Herbig-Haro objects HH 1, HH 2, and HH 3, which were then referred to the motion of the Orion complex. HH 3 is found to be essentially stationary, while HH 1 and HH 2 have large cross motions in opposite directions, diverging from the position of a faint, red Orion association member which Cohen and Schwartz (1979) have proposed as the exciting star of HH 1. While most of the individual nuclei within each HH object are moving parallel to one another, there is a considerable dispersion in speeds: 155-351 km/sec for HH 1 and 100-294 km/sec for HH 2. A discrepancy is seen between absolute tangential velocities and the relative velocities of gas flowing into the shock front that are inferred from the optical spectra and shock model theory.

  7. Insights into the life history and ecology of a large shortfin mako shark Isurus oxyrinchus captured in southern California.

    PubMed

    Lyons, K; Preti, A; Madigan, D J; Wells, R J D; Blasius, M E; Snodgrass, O E; Kacev, D; Harris, J D; Dewar, H; Kohin, S; MacKenzie, K; Lowe, C G

    2015-07-01

    In June 2013, a record-breaking female Isurus oxyrinchus (total length 373 cm, mass 600 kg) was captured by rod and reel off Huntington Beach, California, where it was subsequently donated to research and provided a rare opportunity to collect the first data for a female I. oxyrinchus of this size. Counts of vertebral band pairs estimate the shark to have been c. 22 years old, depending upon assumptions of band-pair deposition rates, and the distended uteri and spent ovaries indicated that this shark had recently given birth. The stomach contained a c. 4 year-old female California sea lion Zalophus californianus that confirmed the high trophic position of this large I. oxyrinchus, which was corroborated with the high levels of measured contaminants and tissue isotope analyses. PMID:25998058

  8. Dynamic recalibration of scalable fringe-projection systems for large-scale object metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorov, Viktor; Lalor, Michael; Burton, David; Lilley, Francis

    2010-03-10

    Three-dimensional (3D) surface shape measurement is a vital component in many industrial processes. The subject has developed significantly over recent years and a number of mainly noncontact techniques now exist for surface measurement, exhibiting varying levels of maturity. Within the larger group of 3D measurement techniques, one of the most promising approaches is provided by those methods that are based upon fringe analysis. Current techniques mainly focus on the measurement of small and medium-scale objects, while work on the measurement of larger objects is not so well developed. One potential solution for the measurement of large objects that has been proposed by various researchers is the concept of performing multipanel measurement and the system proposed here uses this basic approach, but in a flexible form of a single moveable sensor head that would be cost effective for measuring very large objects. Most practical surface measurement techniques require the inclusion of a calibration stage to ensure accurate measurements. In the case of fringe analysis techniques, phase-to-height calibration is required, which includes the use of phase-to-height models. Most existing models (both analytical and empirical) are intended to be used in a static measurement mode, which means that, typically, a single calibration is performed prior to multiple measurements being made using an unvarying system geometry. However, multipanel measurement strategies do not necessarily keep the measurement system geometry constant and thus require dynamic recalibration. To solve the problem of dynamic recalibration, we propose a class of models called hybrid models. These hybrid models inherit the basic form of analytical models, but their coefficients are obtained in an empirical manner. The paper also discusses issues associated with all phase-to-height models used in fringe analysis that have a quotient form, identifying points of uncertainty and regions of distortion as issues

  9. Capture of cosmic dusts and exposure of organics on the International Space Station: Objectives of the Tanpopo Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kensei

    Finding of a wide variety of organic compounds contained in extraterrestrial bodies such as carbonaceous chondrites and comets suggested that they were important materials for the first life on the Earth. Cosmic dusts (interplanetary dust particles; IDPs) were believed to have been important carriers of extraterrestrial organics, since IDPs could deliver organics to the primitive Earth more safely than asteroids and comets. Since most IDPs have been collected in such terrestrial environments as ocean sediments, Antarctic ices, and air in stratosphere, it is difficult to judge whether biooranics found in IDPs were extraterrestrial origins or not. Thus it would be of importance to collect IDPs out of the terrestrial biosphere. We are planning the Tanpopo Mission by utilizing the Exposed Facility of Japan Experimental Module (JEM/EF) of the International Space Station (ISS). Two types of experiments will be done in the Tanpopo Mission: Capture experiments and exposure experiments. In order to collect cosmic dusts (including IDPs) on the ISS, we are going to use extra-low density aerogel, since both cosmic dusts and ISS are moving at 8 km s-1 or over. We have developed novel aerogel whose density is 0.01 g cm-3. After the return of the aerogel blocks after 1 to a few years’ stay on JEM/EF, organic compounds in the captured dusts will be characterized by a wide variety of analytical techniques including FT-IR, XANES, and MS. Amino acid enantiomers will be determined after HF digestion and acid hydrolysis. A number of amino acids were detected in water extract of carbonaceous chondrites. It is controversial whether meteorites contain free amino acids or amino acid precursors. When dusts are formed from meteorites or comets in interplanetary space, they are exposed to high-energy particles and photons. In order to evaluate stability and possible alteration of amino acid-related compounds, we chose amino acids (glycine and isovaline) and hydantoins (precursors of amino

  10. SURF_ER—surface electron spin resonance (ESR) of the surface domain of large objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrling, Th.; Rehberg, J.; Jung, K.; Groth, N.

    2002-04-01

    SURF_ER is a method for spectral and spatial electron spin resonance measurements on the surface of large objects which extension is only restricted by the width of the pole gap of the magnet and the homogeneity of the magnetic field and not by the cavity dimensions. The application of several techniques like SURF_ER for spectroscopic measurements, SURF_ERM for spatial scanning and SURF_ERI for spatial measurements of the depth of the surface region are discussed and represented for the skin of a human being as an example.

  11. Object-Oriented NeuroSys: Parallel Programs for Simulating Large Networks of Biologically Accurate Neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, P; Miller, P; Kim, J; Leese, T; Zabiyaka, Y

    2003-05-07

    Object-oriented NeuroSys (ooNeuroSys) is a collection of programs for simulating very large networks of biologically accurate neurons on distributed memory parallel computers. It includes two principle programs: ooNeuroSys, a parallel program for solving the large systems of ordinary differential equations arising from the interconnected neurons, and Neurondiz, a parallel program for visualizing the results of ooNeuroSys. Both programs are designed to be run on clusters and use the MPI library to obtain parallelism. ooNeuroSys also includes an easy-to-use Python interface. This interface allows neuroscientists to quickly develop and test complex neuron models. Both ooNeuroSys and Neurondiz have a design that allows for both high performance and relative ease of maintenance.

  12. Database Objects vs Files: Evaluation of alternative strategies for managing large remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, Chaitan; Nandigam, Viswanath; Krishnan, Sriram

    2010-05-01

    Increasingly, the geoscience user community expects modern IT capabilities to be available in service of their research and education activities, including the ability to easily access and process large remote sensing datasets via online portals such as GEON (www.geongrid.org) and OpenTopography (opentopography.org). However, serving such datasets via online data portals presents a number of challenges. In this talk, we will evaluate the pros and cons of alternative storage strategies for management and processing of such datasets using binary large object implementations (BLOBs) in database systems versus implementation in Hadoop files using the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS). The storage and I/O requirements for providing online access to large datasets dictate the need for declustering data across multiple disks, for capacity as well as bandwidth and response time performance. This requires partitioning larger files into a set of smaller files, and is accompanied by the concomitant requirement for managing large numbers of file. Storing these sub-files as blobs in a shared-nothing database implemented across a cluster provides the advantage that all the distributed storage management is done by the DBMS. Furthermore, subsetting and processing routines can be implemented as user-defined functions (UDFs) on these blobs and would run in parallel across the set of nodes in the cluster. On the other hand, there are both storage overheads and constraints, and software licensing dependencies created by such an implementation. Another approach is to store the files in an external filesystem with pointers to them from within database tables. The filesystem may be a regular UNIX filesystem, a parallel filesystem, or HDFS. In the HDFS case, HDFS would provide the file management capability, while the subsetting and processing routines would be implemented as Hadoop programs using the MapReduce model. Hadoop and its related software libraries are freely available

  13. New objects with the B[e] phenomenon in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levato, H.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Saffe, C.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: The study is aimed at discovering new objects with the B[e] phenomenon in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Methods: We report medium-resolution optical spectroscopic observations of two newly found (ARDB 54 and NOMAD 0181-0125572) and two previously known (Hen S-59 and Hen S-137) supergiants with the B[e] phenomenon in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The observations were obtained with the GMOS spectrograph at the southern Gemini telescope. Results: The optical spectra and the fundamental parameters of ARDB 54 and NOMAD 0181-0125572 are presented for the first time. We found that the Balmer line profiles of Hen S-59 and Hen S-137 were different from those observed in their spectra nearly 20 years ago. We suggest a higher effective temperature and luminosity for both objects. With the new fundamental parameters, the lowest luminosity for known supergiants with the B[e] phenomenon in the Magellanic Clouds is higher that previously thought (log L/L⊙ ~ 4.5 instead of 4.0). The object Hen S-59 may be a binary system based on its UV excess, variable B - V color-index and radial velocity of emission lines, and periodically variable I-band brightness. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovacão (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  14. Large micromirror array for multi-object spectroscopy in a cryogenic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canonica, Michael; Waldis, Severin; Zamkotsian, Frederic; Lanzoni, Patrick; Clerc, Pierre-Andre; Noell, Wilfried; de Rooij, Nico

    2009-02-01

    Next-generation infra-red astronomical instrumentation for space and ground-based telescopes requires MOEMS-based programmable slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) which has to work in cryogenic environment. A first prototype of micromirror arrays (MMA) of 5×5 single-crystal silicon micromirrors was successfully designed, fabricated and tested. 100×200 μm2 micromirrors can be tilted by electrostatic actuation yielding 20° mechanical tiltangle. The MMA were successfully actuated before, during and after cryogenic cooling, below 100 K. A MMA is composed of two different chips fabricated on silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers: the mirror chip and the electrode chip. The array was obtained by assembling these two chips. For the assembly step of large array (100×200 micromirrors) we needed high precision alignment as well as the suppression of manual handling. Therefore we developed a technique of assembly for such devices and we designed and fabricated a dedicated XYZ tip/tilt stage. This stage allows aligning the electrodes towards the micromirrors with a micrometer precision. Large MMA of 100×200 micromirrors, measuring 22 mm×25 mm, for large field of view were microfabricated and assembled using the above setup. No additional deformations were observed due to the assembly step. The peak to valley (PTV) deformation of the micromirrors was found to be 14 nm PTV. The first actuation tests were carried out.

  15. Capturing the Interrelationship between Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour in Children in the Context of Diverse Environmental Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Katapally, Tarun R.; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2015-01-01

    Even though physical activity and sedentary behaviour are two distinct behaviours, their interdependent relationship needs to be studied in the same environment. This study examines the influence of urban design, neighbourhood built and social environment, and household and individual factors on the interdependent relationship between objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behaviour in children in the Canadian city of Saskatoon. Saskatoon’s built environment was assessed by two validated observation tools. Neighbourhood socioeconomic variables were derived from 2006 Statistics Canada Census and 2010 G5 Census projections. A questionnaire was administered to 10–14 year old children to collect individual and household data, followed by accelerometry to collect physical activity and sedentary behaviour data. Multilevel logistic regression models were developed to understand the interrelationship between physical activity and sedentary behaviour in the context of diverse environmental exposures. A complex set of factors including denser built environment, positive peer relationships and consistent parental support influenced the interrelationship between physical activity and sedentary behaviour. In developing interventions to facilitate active living, it is not only imperative to delineate pathways through which diverse environmental exposures influence physical activity and sedentary behaviour, but also to account for the interrelationship between physical activity and sedentary behaviour. PMID:26371015

  16. Capturing the Interrelationship between Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour in Children in the Context of Diverse Environmental Exposures.

    PubMed

    Katapally, Tarun R; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2015-09-01

    Even though physical activity and sedentary behaviour are two distinct behaviours, their interdependent relationship needs to be studied in the same environment. This study examines the influence of urban design, neighbourhood built and social environment, and household and individual factors on the interdependent relationship between objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behaviour in children in the Canadian city of Saskatoon. Saskatoon's built environment was assessed by two validated observation tools. Neighbourhood socioeconomic variables were derived from 2006 Statistics Canada Census and 2010 G5 Census projections. A questionnaire was administered to 10-14 year old children to collect individual and household data, followed by accelerometry to collect physical activity and sedentary behaviour data. Multilevel logistic regression models were developed to understand the interrelationship between physical activity and sedentary behaviour in the context of diverse environmental exposures. A complex set of factors including denser built environment, positive peer relationships and consistent parental support influenced the interrelationship between physical activity and sedentary behaviour. In developing interventions to facilitate active living, it is not only imperative to delineate pathways through which diverse environmental exposures influence physical activity and sedentary behaviour, but also to account for the interrelationship between physical activity and sedentary behaviour. PMID:26371015

  17. GenASiS Basics: Object-oriented utilitarian functionality for large-scale physics simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.

    2015-06-11

    Aside from numerical algorithms and problem setup, large-scale physics simulations on distributed-memory supercomputers require more basic utilitarian functionality, such as physical units and constants; display to the screen or standard output device; message passing; I/O to disk; and runtime parameter management and usage statistics. Here we describe and make available Fortran 2003 classes furnishing extensible object-oriented implementations of this sort of rudimentary functionality, along with individual `unit test' programs and larger example problems demonstrating their use. Lastly, these classes compose the Basics division of our developing astrophysics simulation code GenASiS (General Astrophysical Simulation System), but their fundamental nature makes themmore » useful for physics simulations in many fields.« less

  18. Detection of water masers toward young stellar objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Johanson, A. K.; Migenes, V.; Breen, S. L.

    2014-02-01

    We present results from a search for water maser emission toward N4A, N190, and N206, three regions of massive star formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Four water masers were detected; two toward N4A, and two toward N190. In the latter region, no previously known maser emission has been reported. Future studies of maser proper motion to determine the galactic dynamics of the LMC will benefit from the independent data points the new masers in N190 provide. Two of these masers are associated with previously identified massive young stellar objects (YSOs), which strongly supports the authenticity of the classification. We argue that the other two masers identify previously unknown YSOs. No masers were detected toward N206, but it does host a newly discovered 22 GHz continuum source, also associated with a massive YSO. We suggest that future surveys for water maser emission in the LMC be targeted toward the more luminous, massive YSOs.

  19. GENASIS   Basics: Object-oriented utilitarian functionality for large-scale physics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.

    2015-11-01

    Aside from numerical algorithms and problem setup, large-scale physics simulations on distributed-memory supercomputers require more basic utilitarian functionality, such as physical units and constants; display to the screen or standard output device; message passing; I/O to disk; and runtime parameter management and usage statistics. Here we describe and make available Fortran 2003 classes furnishing extensible object-oriented implementations of this sort of rudimentary functionality, along with individual 'unit test' programs and larger example problems demonstrating their use. These classes compose the Basics division of our developing astrophysics simulation code GENASIS  (General Astrophysical Simulation System), but their fundamental nature makes them useful for physics simulations in many fields.

  20. GenASiS Basics: Object-oriented utilitarian functionality for large-scale physics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.

    2015-06-11

    Aside from numerical algorithms and problem setup, large-scale physics simulations on distributed-memory supercomputers require more basic utilitarian functionality, such as physical units and constants; display to the screen or standard output device; message passing; I/O to disk; and runtime parameter management and usage statistics. Here we describe and make available Fortran 2003 classes furnishing extensible object-oriented implementations of this sort of rudimentary functionality, along with individual `unit test' programs and larger example problems demonstrating their use. Lastly, these classes compose the Basics division of our developing astrophysics simulation code GenASiS (General Astrophysical Simulation System), but their fundamental nature makes them useful for physics simulations in many fields.

  1. POPE: A distributed query system for high performance analysis of very large persistent object stores

    SciTech Connect

    Fischler, M.S.; Isely, M.C.; Nigri, A.M.; Rinaldo, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of large physics data sets is a major computing task at Fermilab. One step in such an analysis involves culling ``interesting`` events via the use of complex query criteria. What makes this unusual is the scale required: 100`s of gigabytes of event data must be scanned at 10`s of megabytes per second for the typical queries that are applied, and data must be extracted from 10`s of terabytes based on the result of the query. The Physics Object Persistency Manager (POPM) system is a solution tailored to this scale of problem. A running POPM environment can support multiple queries in progress, each scanning at rates exceeding 10 megabytes per second, all of which are sharing access to a very large persistent address space distributed across multiple disks on multiple hosts. Specifically, POPM employs the following techniques to permit this scale of performance and access: Persistent objects: Experimental data to be scanned is ``populated`` as a data structure into the persistent address space supported by POPM. C++ classes with a few key overloaded operators provide nearly transparent semantics for access to the persistent storage. Distributed and parallel I/O: The persistent address space is automatically distributed across disks of multiple ``I/O nodes`` within the POPM system. A striping unit concept is implemented in POPM, permitting fast parallel I/O across the storage nodes, even for small single queries. Efficient Shared access: POPM implements an efficient mechanism for arbitration and multiplexing of I/O access among multiple queries on the same or separate compute nodes.

  2. Orbital evolution of the large outer solar system object 5145 Pholus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, D. J.; Steel, D. I.

    1993-07-01

    The large asteroid/comet 5145 Pholus in the outer solar system has an orbit which currently crosses Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. We numerically integrate 27 test particles with initial orbits similar to but distinct from the present orbit of Pholus forward over 800,000 yr. Many particles remain in the outer solar system with slow orbital evolution, and another group is accelerated into long-period orbits with perihelia still in the outer planetary region, exceedingly slow evolution then following. However, a significant fraction (5 out of 27) attain orbits crossing Jupiter's path, or at least approaching that planet, and much swifter evolution then occurs. Time-scales for substantial alterations are of the order of 10 exp 6 yr if long-period orbits are reached, 10 exp 5 yr if the objects remain in intermediate-period orbits in the outer solar system, and less than 10 exp 4 yr once Jupiter-approaching orbits are entered. Four of the particles are eventually ejected from the solar system: two by Jupiter, and two by Saturn before they ever become Jupiter-approaching. Two of the particles enter Mars- and even earth-crossing orbits for a few tens of thousands of years, and our results imply a 5-10 percent chance that an object with an orbit like Pholus may attain an earth-approaching orbit within 1 Myr.

  3. Large-Scale Structure Formation: From the First Non-linear Objects to Massive Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planelles, S.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Bykov, A. M.

    2015-05-01

    The large-scale structure of the Universe formed from initially small perturbations in the cosmic density field, leading to galaxy clusters with up to 1015 M⊙ at the present day. Here, we review the formation of structures in the Universe, considering the first primordial galaxies and the most massive galaxy clusters as extreme cases of structure formation where fundamental processes such as gravity, turbulence, cooling and feedback are particularly relevant. The first non-linear objects in the Universe formed in dark matter halos with 105-108 M⊙ at redshifts 10-30, leading to the first stars and massive black holes. At later stages, larger scales became non-linear, leading to the formation of galaxy clusters, the most massive objects in the Universe. We describe here their formation via gravitational processes, including the self-similar scaling relations, as well as the observed deviations from such self-similarity and the related non-gravitational physics (cooling, stellar feedback, AGN). While on intermediate cluster scales the self-similar model is in good agreement with the observations, deviations from such self-similarity are apparent in the core regions, where numerical simulations do not reproduce the current observational results. The latter indicates that the interaction of different feedback processes may not be correctly accounted for in current simulations. Both in the most massive clusters of galaxies as well as during the formation of the first objects in the Universe, turbulent structures and shock waves appear to be common, suggesting them to be ubiquitous in the non-linear regime.

  4. Scalable multi-objective control for large scale water resources systems under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Matteo; Quinn, Julianne; Herman, Jonathan; Castelletti, Andrea; Reed, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The use of mathematical models to support the optimal management of environmental systems is rapidly expanding over the last years due to advances in scientific knowledge of the natural processes, efficiency of the optimization techniques, and availability of computational resources. However, undergoing changes in climate and society introduce additional challenges for controlling these systems, ultimately motivating the emergence of complex models to explore key causal relationships and dependencies on uncontrolled sources of variability. In this work, we contribute a novel implementation of the evolutionary multi-objective direct policy search (EMODPS) method for controlling environmental systems under uncertainty. The proposed approach combines direct policy search (DPS) with hierarchical parallelization of multi-objective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs) and offers a threefold advantage: the DPS simulation-based optimization can be combined with any simulation model and does not add any constraint on modeled information, allowing the use of exogenous information in conditioning the decisions. Moreover, the combination of DPS and MOEAs prompts the generation or Pareto approximate set of solutions for up to 10 objectives, thus overcoming the decision biases produced by cognitive myopia, where narrow or restrictive definitions of optimality strongly limit the discovery of decision relevant alternatives. Finally, the use of large-scale MOEAs parallelization improves the ability of the designed solutions in handling the uncertainty due to severe natural variability. The proposed approach is demonstrated on a challenging water resources management problem represented by the optimal control of a network of four multipurpose water reservoirs in the Red River basin (Vietnam). As part of the medium-long term energy and food security national strategy, four large reservoirs have been constructed on the Red River tributaries, which are mainly operated for hydropower

  5. Large micromirror array for generating programmable slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canonica, Michael; Zamkotsian, Frederic; Lanzoni, Patrick; Noell, Wilfried; de Rooij, Nico

    2012-09-01

    Multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) is a powerful tool for space and ground-based telescopes for the study of the formation and evolution of galaxies. This technique requires a programmable slit mask for astronomical object selection. We are engaged in a European development of micromirror arrays (MMA) for generating reflective slit masks in future MOS, called MIRA. The 100 x 200 μm2 micromirrors are electrostatically tilted providing a precise angle. The main requirements are cryogenic environment capabilities, precise and uniform tilt angle over the whole device, uniformity of the mirror voltage-tilt hysteresis and a low mirror deformation. A first MMA with single-crystal silicon micromirrors was successfully designed, fabricated and tested. A new generation of micromirror arrays composed of 2048 micromirrors (32 x 64) and modelled for individual addressing were fabricated using fusion and eutectic wafer-level bonding. These micromirrors without coating show a peak-to-valley deformation less than 10 nm, a tilt angle of 24° for an actuation voltage of 130 V. Individual addressing capability of each mirror has been demonstrated using a line-column algorithm based on an optimized voltage-tilt hysteresis. Devices are currently packaged, wire-bonded and integrated to a dedicated electronics to demonstrate the individual actuation of all micromirrors on an array. An operational test of this large array with gold coated mirrors has been done at cryogenic temperature (162 K): the micromirrors were actuated successfully before, during and after the cryogenic experiment. The micromirror surface deformation was measured at cryo and is below 30 nm peak-to-valley.

  6. Compact objects at the heart of outflows in large and small systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Paul Harrison

    2013-12-01

    This thesis focuses on studying and assessing high-energy feedback generated by both stellar mass and supermassive compact objects. From these two perspectives, I help bridge the gap in understanding how jets and winds can transform their much larger environments in thousands to millions of years, astronomically short timescales. I have acquired X-ray and optical data that aim to elucidate the role these objects play in powering parsec-scale shockwaves in the ISM and in driving kiloparsec-scale outflows in galaxies. I present Chandra X-ray imaging, Hubble Space Telescope imaging, and WIYN Hydra multi-object optical spectroscopic observations. The data reveal the morphologies of the systems and constrain on a range of interesting parameters: power, outflow velocity, density, accretion efficiency, and timescale. My analysis provides perspective on the importance of black holes, both large and small, and neutron stars for driving outflows into the interstellar and intergalactic medium. On kiloparsec scales, I explore the nature of what appear to be merging or recently merging post-starburst galaxies with very high-velocity winds. This work is part of a multiwavelength effort to characterize the niche these galaxies fill in the larger scheme of galaxy evolution. My focus is on the accretion activity of the coalescing supermassive black holes in their cores. This work leads us to compare the relative importance of a massive starburst to the supermassive black holes in the cores of the galaxies. On parsec scales, I present case studies of two prominent microquasars, Galactic X-ray binaries with jets, Circinus X-1 and Cygnus X-1. In the case of Circinus X-1, I present very deep follow-up observations of parsec-scale shock plumes driven by a powerful, bipolar jet. In the case of Cygnus X-1, I present follow-up observations to probe a recently discovered outflow near the binary. I calculate robust, physically motivated limits on the total power needed to drive the outflows

  7. Development of Numerical Codes for Modeling Electromagnetic Behavior at High Frequencies Near Large Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, R. P.; Deshpande, M. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A study into the problem of determining electromagnetic solutions at high frequencies for problems involving complex geometries, large sizes and multiple sources (e.g. antennas) has been initiated. Typical applications include the behavior of antennas (and radiators) installed on complex conducting structures (e.g. ships, aircrafts, etc..) with strong interactions between antennas, the radiation patterns, and electromagnetic signals is of great interest for electromagnetic compatibility control. This includes the overall performance evaluation and control of all on-board radiating systems, electromagnetic interference, and personnel radiation hazards. Electromagnetic computational capability exists at NASA LaRC, and many of the codes developed are based on the Moment Method (MM). However, the MM is computationally intensive, and this places a limit on the size of objects and structures that can be modeled. Here, two approaches are proposed: (i) a current-based hybrid scheme that combines the MM with Physical optics, and (ii) an Alternating Direction Implicit-Finite Difference Time Domain (ADI-FDTD) method. The essence of a hybrid technique is to split the overall scattering surface(s) into two regions: (a) a MM zone (MMZ) which can be used over any part of the given geometry, but is most essential over irregular and "non-smooth" geometries, and (b) a PO sub-region (POSR). Currents induced on the scattering and reflecting surfaces can then be computed in two ways depending on whether the region belonged to the MMZ or was part of the POSR. For the MMZ, the current calculations proceed in terms of basis functions with undetermined coefficients (as in the usual MM method), and the answer obtained by solving a system of linear equations. Over the POSR, conduction is obtained as a superposition of two contributions: (i) currents due to the incident magnetic field, and (ii) currents produced by the mutual induction from conduction within the MMZ. This effectively leads to

  8. Synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism for controlling large scale reversible deformation of liquid metal objects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Reversible deformation of a machine holds enormous promise across many scientific areas ranging from mechanical engineering to applied physics. So far, such capabilities are still hard to achieve through conventional rigid materials or depending mainly on elastomeric materials, which however own rather limited performances and require complicated manipulations. Here, we show a basic strategy which is fundamentally different from the existing ones to realize large scale reversible deformation through controlling the working materials via the synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism (SCHEME). Such activity incorporates an object of liquid metal gallium whose surface area could spread up to five times of its original size and vice versa under low energy consumption. Particularly, the alterable surface tension based on combination of chemical dissolution and electrochemical oxidation is ascribed to the reversible shape transformation, which works much more flexible than many former deformation principles through converting electrical energy into mechanical movement. A series of very unusual phenomena regarding the reversible configurational shifts are disclosed with dominant factors clarified. This study opens a generalized way to combine the liquid metal serving as shape-variable element with the SCHEME to compose functional soft machines, which implies huge potential for developing future smart robots to fulfill various complicated tasks. PMID:25408295

  9. Multi-objective four-dimensional vehicle motion planning in large dynamic environments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Paul P-Y; Campbell, Duncan; Merz, Torsten

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents Multi-Step A∗ (MSA∗), a search algorithm based on A∗ for multi-objective 4-D vehicle motion planning (three spatial and one time dimensions). The research is principally motivated by the need for offline and online motion planning for autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). For UAVs operating in large dynamic uncertain 4-D environments, the motion plan consists of a sequence of connected linear tracks (or trajectory segments). The track angle and velocity are important parameters that are often restricted by assumptions and a grid geometry in conventional motion planners. Many existing planners also fail to incorporate multiple decision criteria and constraints such as wind, fuel, dynamic obstacles, and the rules of the air. It is shown that MSA∗ finds a cost optimal solution using variable length, angle, and velocity trajectory segments. These segments are approximated with a grid-based cell sequence that provides an inherent tolerance to uncertainty. The computational efficiency is achieved by using variable successor operators to create a multiresolution memory-efficient lattice sampling structure. The simulation studies on the UAV flight planning problem show that MSA∗ meets the time constraints of online replanning and finds paths of equivalent cost but in a quarter of the time (on average) of a vector neighborhood-based A∗. PMID:20851795

  10. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD STAR-FORMING REGION N206

    SciTech Connect

    Romita, Krista Alexandra; Meixner, M.; Sewilo, M.; Shiao, B.; Carlson, Lynn Redding; Whitney, B.; Babler, B.; Meade, M.; Indebetouw, R.; Hora, J. L. E-mail: carlson@stsci.ed E-mail: brian@sal.wisc.ed E-mail: jhora@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-09-20

    We present analysis of the energetic star-forming region Henize 206 (N206) located near the southern edge of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) based on photometric data from the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE-LMC; IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 {mu}m and MIPS 24 {mu}m), Infrared Survey Facility near-infrared survey (J, H, K{sub s}), and the Magellanic Clouds Photometric Survey (MCPS UBVI) covering a wavelength range of 0.36-24 {mu}m. Young stellar object (YSO) candidates are identified based upon their location in infrared color-magnitude space and classified by the shapes of their spectral energy distributions in comparison with a pre-computed grid of YSO models. We identify 116 YSO candidates: 102 are well characterized by the YSO models, predominately Stage I, and 14 may be multiple sources or young sources with transition disks. Careful examination of the individual sources and their surrounding environment allows us to identify a factor of {approx}14.5 more YSO candidates than have already been identified. The total mass of these well-fit YSO candidates is {approx}520 M{sub sun}. We calculate a current star formation rate of 0.27 x 10{sup -1} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. The distribution of YSO candidates appears to follow shells of neutral material in the interstellar medium.

  11. Synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism for controlling large scale reversible deformation of liquid metal objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-11-01

    Reversible deformation of a machine holds enormous promise across many scientific areas ranging from mechanical engineering to applied physics. So far, such capabilities are still hard to achieve through conventional rigid materials or depending mainly on elastomeric materials, which however own rather limited performances and require complicated manipulations. Here, we show a basic strategy which is fundamentally different from the existing ones to realize large scale reversible deformation through controlling the working materials via the synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism (SCHEME). Such activity incorporates an object of liquid metal gallium whose surface area could spread up to five times of its original size and vice versa under low energy consumption. Particularly, the alterable surface tension based on combination of chemical dissolution and electrochemical oxidation is ascribed to the reversible shape transformation, which works much more flexible than many former deformation principles through converting electrical energy into mechanical movement. A series of very unusual phenomena regarding the reversible configurational shifts are disclosed with dominant factors clarified. This study opens a generalized way to combine the liquid metal serving as shape-variable element with the SCHEME to compose functional soft machines, which implies huge potential for developing future smart robots to fulfill various complicated tasks.

  12. Synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism for controlling large scale reversible deformation of liquid metal objects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Reversible deformation of a machine holds enormous promise across many scientific areas ranging from mechanical engineering to applied physics. So far, such capabilities are still hard to achieve through conventional rigid materials or depending mainly on elastomeric materials, which however own rather limited performances and require complicated manipulations. Here, we show a basic strategy which is fundamentally different from the existing ones to realize large scale reversible deformation through controlling the working materials via the synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism (SCHEME). Such activity incorporates an object of liquid metal gallium whose surface area could spread up to five times of its original size and vice versa under low energy consumption. Particularly, the alterable surface tension based on combination of chemical dissolution and electrochemical oxidation is ascribed to the reversible shape transformation, which works much more flexible than many former deformation principles through converting electrical energy into mechanical movement. A series of very unusual phenomena regarding the reversible configurational shifts are disclosed with dominant factors clarified. This study opens a generalized way to combine the liquid metal serving as shape-variable element with the SCHEME to compose functional soft machines, which implies huge potential for developing future smart robots to fulfill various complicated tasks. PMID:25408295

  13. Subjective and objective wine quality in Central Mediterranean in relation to large scale climate patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Marina; Dalu, John David; Dalla Marta, Anna; Orlandini, Simone; Maracchi, Gianpiero; Dalu, Giovannangelo; Grifoni, Daniele; Mancini, Marco

    2013-04-01

    Subjective wine ranking is based on three factors: appearance (eye), smell (nose) and taste (palate); this kind of subjective ranking is often preferred over that based on technical objective means. Wine quality depends on its composition, which is a function of a number of factors: grapevine variety, soil type, cultivation techniques, and climate conditions. Between them, the soil is the main fixed factor; the positive trend is determined by a combination of improved cultural techniques and of warming related to climate change; while the climate variability is the main factor in determining the year-to-year wine quality variations. Therefore, the analysis of the grape composition before harvest is crucial for establishing the quality-climate correlations. In this work, 40 years of objective and subjective wine quality data collected in Italy are analyzed in relation to the climate conditions. Results show that the year-to-year quality variation of wines produced in North and Central Italy depends on the large scale climate variability, and that the wine quality improvement in the last four decades is partially due to an increase of temperature and to a decrease of the precipitations in West and Central Mediterranean Europe (WME; CME). In addition, wine quality is positively correlated with air temperature throughout the entire active period of the grapevine; weakly negatively correlated with precipitation in spring, and well negatively correlated in summer and fall. The month-to-month composites of the NAO anomaly show that, in years of good quality wine, this anomaly is negative in late spring, oscillates around zero in summer, and is positive in early fall; while, in years of bad quality wine, it is positive in late spring and summer, and negative in early fall; i.e. its polarity has an opposite sign in spring and fall in good versus bad years. The composite seasonal maps show that good wines are produced when the spring jet stream over Atlantic diverts most of

  14. Two Wheels are Better than One: The Importance of Capturing the Home Literacy Environment in Large-Scale Assessments of Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Amy Jo; Pisani, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    Children's reading skill development is influenced by availability of reading materials, reading habits and opportunity to read. Save the Children's Literacy Boost data have replicated this finding across numerous developing contexts. Meanwhile international large-scale reading assessments do not capture detail on current home literacy.…

  15. ICE CHEMISTRY IN EMBEDDED YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, J. M.; Van Loon, J. Th.; Chen, C.-H. R.; Indebetouw, R.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Sloan, G. C.; Woods, P. M.; Kemper, F.; Gordon, K. D.; Boyer, M. L.; Shiao, B.; Meixner, M.; Madden, S.; Speck, A. K.; Marengo, M.

    2009-12-20

    We present spectroscopic observations of a sample of 15 embedded young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These observations were obtained with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) as part of the SAGE-Spec Legacy program. We analyze the two prominent ice bands in the IRS spectral range: the bending mode of CO{sub 2} ice at 15.2 mum and the ice band between 5 and 7 mum that includes contributions from the bending mode of water ice at 6 mum among other ice species. The 5-7 mum band is difficult to identify in our LMC sample due to the conspicuous presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission superimposed onto the ice spectra. We identify water ice in the spectra of two sources; the spectrum of one of those sources also exhibits the 6.8 mum ice feature attributed in the literature to ammonium and methanol. We model the CO{sub 2} band in detail, using the combination of laboratory ice profiles available in the literature. We find that a significant fraction (approx>50%) of CO{sub 2} ice is locked in a water-rich component, consistent with what is observed for Galactic sources. The majority of the sources in the LMC also require a pure-CO{sub 2} contribution to the ice profile, evidence of thermal processing. There is a suggestion that CO{sub 2} production might be enhanced in the LMC, but the size of the available sample precludes firmer conclusions. We place our results in the context of the star formation environment in the LMC.

  16. Large increase in the electron capture and excitation cross sections for Li+ colliding with atomic H under UV laser assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Gutiérrez, F. J.; Cabrera-Trujillo, R.

    2015-07-01

    Neutralization and ash products due to electron capture processes in plasmas reduce the efficiency of energy generation in fusion Tokamak reactors. Therefore, lithium ions have been used to improve the efficiency of energy generation where good control of the electron capture process is required. Here, we show that an intense (1.4× {{10}13} W cm-2), ultra-short (1 fs at full width half-maximum) Gaussian laser pulse in the UV region can enhance the electron capture process on L{{i}+}+H(1s) in the low collision keV energy region. We find a factor of 10 enhancement in electron capture cross-section at impact energies lower than 10 keV amu-1 for an 80 nm wavelength laser and a factor of 2 for the excitation process in the hydrogen atom as compared to the laser-free case. In contrast, for a 200 nm wavelength laser the increase of the electron capture cross-sections takes place around 1 keV amu-1 by a factor of 3 and no enhancement for the excitation process. Our results show that the UV assisted production of Li can be controlled, particularly for short UV wave-length for a specific collision energy range. We anticipate that our findings will facilitate UV laser control of the Li production in Tokamak reactors and encourage further experimental work in this system.

  17. Delay-bandwidth and delay-loss limitations for cloaking of large objects.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Hila; Zhang, Baile; Joannopoulos, J D; Johnson, Steven G

    2010-06-25

    We show that the difficulty of cloaking is fundamentally limited by delay-loss and delay-bandwidth limitations that worsen as the size of the object to be cloaked increases relative to the wavelength, using a simple model of ground-plane cloaking. These limitations must be considered when scaling experimental cloaking demonstrations up from wavelength-scale objects. PMID:20867381

  18. A Multi-Transducer Near Field Acoustic Levitation System for Noncontact Transportation of Large-Sized Planar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Takafumi; Koike, Yoshikazu; Nakamura, Kentaro; Ueha, Sadayuki; Hashimoto, Yoshiki

    2000-05-01

    A new noncontact transportation system, which consists of multiple ultrasonic transducers and operates based on near-field acoustic levitation, is proposed to transport a large-sized planar object such as a glass substrate for liquid crystal devices. Using the proposed systems consisting of two and three transducers, the suspension characteristics of the levitated objects are studied as functions of both size difference and angles between the vibration systems and the levitated object. As a result, the holding force is proved to increase as the angle increases and is maximum when the horizontal dimensions of the system and the object coincide.

  19. Photo anthropometric variations in Japanese facial features: Establishment of large-sample standard reference data for personal identification using a three-dimensional capture system.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Y; Wada, B; Taniguchi, K; Miyasaka, S; Imaizumi, K

    2015-12-01

    This study clarifies the anthropometric variations of the Japanese face by presenting large-sample population data of photo anthropometric measurements. The measurements can be used as standard reference data for the personal identification of facial images in forensic practices. To this end, three-dimensional (3D) facial images of 1126 Japanese individuals (865 male and 261 female Japanese individuals, aged 19-60 years) were acquired as samples using an already validated 3D capture system, and normative anthropometric analysis was carried out. In this anthropometric analysis, first, anthropological landmarks (22 items, i.e., entocanthion (en), alare (al), cheilion (ch), zygion (zy), gonion (go), sellion (se), gnathion (gn), labrale superius (ls), stomion (sto), labrale inferius (li)) were positioned on each 3D facial image (the direction of which had been adjusted to the Frankfort horizontal plane as the standard position for appropriate anthropometry), and anthropometric absolute measurements (19 items, i.e., bientocanthion breadth (en-en), nose breadth (al-al), mouth breadth (ch-ch), bizygomatic breadth (zy-zy), bigonial breadth (go-go), morphologic face height (se-gn), upper-lip height (ls-sto), lower-lip height (sto-li)) were exported using computer software for the measurement of a 3D digital object. Second, anthropometric indices (21 items, i.e., (se-gn)/(zy-zy), (en-en)/(al-al), (ls-li)/(ch-ch), (ls-sto)/(sto-li)) were calculated from these exported measurements. As a result, basic statistics, such as the mean values, standard deviations, and quartiles, and details of the distributions of these anthropometric results were shown. All of the results except "upper/lower lip ratio (ls-sto)/(sto-li)" were normally distributed. They were acquired as carefully as possible employing a 3D capture system and 3D digital imaging technologies. The sample of images was much larger than any Japanese sample used before for the purpose of personal identification. The

  20. HIGH- AND INTERMEDIATE-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Gruendl, Robert A.; Chu, Y.-H. E-mail: chu@astro.illinois.edu

    2009-09-01

    Archival Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and MIPS observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have been used to search for young stellar objects (YSOs). We have carried out independent aperture photometry of these data and merged the results from different passbands to produce a photometric catalog. To verify our methodology we have also analyzed the data from the SAGE and SWIRE Legacy programs; our photometric measurements are in general agreement with the photometry released by these programs. A detailed completeness analysis for our photometric catalog of the LMC shows that the 90% completeness limits are, on average, 16.0, 15.0, 14.3, 13.1, and 9.2 mag at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, and 24 {mu}m, respectively. Using our mid-infrared photometric catalogs and two simple selection criteria, [4.5]-[8.0]>2.0 to exclude normal and evolved stars and [8.0]>14-([4.5]-[8.0]) to exclude background galaxies, we have identified a sample of 2910 sources in the LMC that could potentially be YSOs. We then used the Spitzer observations complemented by optical and near-infrared data to carefully assess the nature of each source. To do so we simultaneously considered multiwavelength images and photometry to assess the source morphology, spectral energy distribution (SED) from the optical through the mid-infrared wavelengths, and the surrounding interstellar environment to determine the most likely nature of each source. From this examination of the initial sample, we suggest that 1172 sources are most likely YSOs. We have also identified 1075 probable background galaxies, consistent with the expected number estimated from the SWIRE survey. Spitzer IRS observations of 269 of the brightest YSOs from our sample have confirmed that {approx}>95% are indeed YSOs. An examination of color-color and color-magnitude diagrams shows no simple criteria in color-magnitude space that can unambiguously separate the LMC YSOs from all asymptotic giant branch (AGB)/post-AGB stars, planetary

  1. Too much anticipation? Large anticipatory adjustments of grasping movements to minimal object manipulations.

    PubMed

    Herbort, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    When humans grasp objects, the grasps foreshadow the intended object manipulation. It has been suggested that grasps are selected that lead to medial arm postures, which facilitate movement speed and precision, during critical phases of the object manipulation. In Experiment 1, it has been tested whether grasp selections lead to medial postures during rotations of a dial. Participants twisted their arms considerably before grasping the dial, even when the upcoming dial rotation was minimal (5°). Participants neither assumed a medial posture at any point during a short rotation, nor did they assume any of the postures involved in short rotations in the opposite direction. Thus, grasp selections did not necessarily lead to specific postures at any point of the object manipulation. Experiment 2 examined the effect of various grasps on the speed of dial rotations. A medial initial grasp resulted in the fastest dial rotations for most rotation angles. Spontaneously selected grasps were more excursed than necessary to maximize dial rotation speed. This apparent overshot might be explained by participants' sensitive to the variability of their grasps and is in line with the assumption that grasps facilitate control over the grasped object. PMID:26004123

  2. Enhancement of imagery of objects with highly dynamic brightness and large rotational motion.

    PubMed

    Kanaev, Andrey V; Miller, Christopher W; Seanor, Collin J; Murray-Krezan, Jeremy

    2014-05-01

    We report on application of multi-frame super-resolution (SR) to sampling limited imagery that models space objects (SOs). The difficulties of multi-frame image processing of SOs include abrupt illumination changes and complex in scene SO motion. These conditions adversely affect the accuracy of motion estimation necessary for resolution enhancement. We analyze the motion estimation errors from the standpoint of an optical flow (OF) interpolation error metric and show dependence of the object tracking accuracy on brightness changes and on the pixel displacement values between subsequent images. Despite inaccuracies of motion estimation, we demonstrate spatial acuity enhancement of the pixel limited resolution of model SO motion imagery by applying a SR algorithm that accounts for OF errors. In addition to visual inspection, image resolution improvement attained in the experiments is assessed quantitatively; a 1.8× resolution enhancement is demonstrated. PMID:24921888

  3. Features of X-ray Absorption Densitometry of Large-size Objects with Variable Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, S.; Chakhlov, S.; Osipov, O.; Badin, S.; Abashkin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Features of formation and processing of the primary radiometric signals in the digital high-energy X-ray absorption densitometers for the homogeneous objects with variable thickness are examined. The densitometer's equation based on the polynomial approximation of the object's ray thickness dependence from its mass thickness is proposed. Guidance to select the capacity of the analog-digital converter is given. There is one example of the densitometer's equation coefficients calculation to examine the carbon, aluminum and steel wares with the mass density from 15 to 80 g/cm2. It was shown that disagreement of the experimental and estimated values of the ray thickness for the similar mass thicknesses of the testing object is conditioned by the scattered radiation. On the high-energy digital radiography set with the X-ray source - the betatron MIB-4.5/9 the accuracy of the experimental estimation of the density was within 0.0086 g/cm3 for the steel ware thickness from 25 to 100 mm.

  4. 1998 SM165: A large Kuiper belt object with an irregular shape

    PubMed Central

    Romanishin, W.; Tegler, S. C.; Rettig, T. W.; Consolmagno, G.; Botthof, B.

    2001-01-01

    The recent discovery of an ancient reservoir of icy bodies at and beyond the orbit of Neptune—the Kuiper belt—has opened a new frontier in astronomy. Measurements of the physical and chemical nature of Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) can constrain our ideas of the processes of planet formation and evolution. Our 1.8-m Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope and charge-coupled device camera observations of the KBO 1998 SM165 indicate its brightness periodically varies by 0.56 magnitudes over a 4-h interval. If we assume a uniform albedo of 0.04, which is typical of values found in the literature for a handful of KBOs, and an “equator-on” aspect, we find 1998 SM165 has axes of length 600 × 360 km. If our assumptions are correct, such dimensions put 1998 SM165 among the largest elongated objects known in our solar system. Perhaps long ago, two nearly spherical KBOs of comparable size coalesced to form a compound object, or perhaps 1998 SM165 is the residual core of a catastrophic fragmentation of a larger precursor. PMID:11572937

  5. 1998 SM165: a large Kuiper belt object with an irregular shape.

    PubMed

    Romanishin, W; Tegler, S C; Rettig, T W; Consolmagno, G; Botthof, B

    2001-10-01

    The recent discovery of an ancient reservoir of icy bodies at and beyond the orbit of Neptune-the Kuiper belt-has opened a new frontier in astronomy. Measurements of the physical and chemical nature of Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) can constrain our ideas of the processes of planet formation and evolution. Our 1.8-m Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope and charge-coupled device camera observations of the KBO 1998 SM(165) indicate its brightness periodically varies by 0.56 magnitudes over a 4-h interval. If we assume a uniform albedo of 0.04, which is typical of values found in the literature for a handful of KBOs, and an "equator-on" aspect, we find 1998 SM(165) has axes of length 600 x 360 km. If our assumptions are correct, such dimensions put 1998 SM(165) among the largest elongated objects known in our solar system. Perhaps long ago, two nearly spherical KBOs of comparable size coalesced to form a compound object, or perhaps 1998 SM(165) is the residual core of a catastrophic fragmentation of a larger precursor. PMID:11572937

  6. Tethered Formation Configurations: Meeting the Scientific Objectives of Large Aperture and Interferometric Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Rodger E.; Quinn, David A.; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    With the success of the Hubble Space Telescope, it has become apparent that new frontiers of science and discovery are made every time an improvement in imaging resolution is made. For the HST working primarily in the visible and near-visible spectrum, this meant designing, building, and launching a primary mirror approximately three meters in diameter. Conventional thinking tells us that accomplishing a comparable improvement in resolution at longer wavelengths for Earth and Space Science applications requires a corresponding increase in the size of the primary mirror. For wavelengths in the sub-millimeter range, a very large telescope with an effective aperture in excess of one kilometer in diameter would be needed to obtain high quality angular resolution. Realistically a single aperture this large is practically impossible. Fortunately such large apertures can be constructed synthetically. Possibly as few as three 34 meter diameter mirrors flying in precision formation could be used to collect light at these longer wavelengths permitting not only very large virtual aperture science to be carried out, but high-resolution interferometry as well. To ensure the longest possible mission duration, a system of tethered spacecraft will be needed to mitigate the need for a great deal of propellant. A spin-stabilized, tethered formation will likely meet these requirements. Several configurations have been proposed which possibly meet the needs of the Space Science community. This paper discusses two of them, weighing the relative pros and cons of each concept. The ultimate goal being to settle on a configuration which combines the best features of structure, tethers, and formation flying to meet the ambitious requirements necessary to make future large synthetic aperture and interferometric science missions successful.

  7. Tethered Formation Configurations: Meeting the Scientific Objectives of Large Aperture and Interferometric Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Rodger E.; Quinn, David A.

    2004-01-01

    With the success of the Hubble Space Telescope, it has become apparent that new frontiers of science and discovery are made every time an improvement in imaging resolution is made. For the HST working primarily in the visible and near-visible spectrum, this meant designing, building and launching a primary mirror approximately three meters in diameter. Conventional thinking tells us that accomplishing a comparable improvement in resolution at longer wavelengths for Earth and Space Science applications requires a corresponding increase in the size of the primary mirror. For wavelengths in the sub-millimeter range, a very large telescope with an effective aperture in excess of one kilometer in diameter would be needed to obtain high quality angular resolution. Realistically a single aperture this large is practically impossible. Fortunately such large apertures can be constructed synthetically. Possibly as few as three 3 - 4 meter diameter mirrors flying in precision formation could be used to collect light at these longer wavelengths permitting not only very large virtual aperture science to be carried out, but high-resolution interferometry as well. To ensure the longest possible mission duration, a system of tethered spacecraft will be needed to mitigate the need for a great deal of propellant. A spin-stabilized, tethered formation will likely meet these requirements. Several configurations have been proposed which possibly meet the needs of the Space Science community. This paper discusses two of them, weighing the relative pros and cons of each concept. The ultimate goal being to settle on a configuration which combines the best features of structure, tethers and formation flying to meet the ambitious requirements necessary to make future large synthetic aperture and interferometric science missions successful.

  8. Investigation of an EMI sensor for detection of large metallic objects in the presence of metallic clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Christopher; McMichael, Ian; Riggs, Lloyd

    2005-06-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors and magnetometers have successfully detected surface laid, buried, and visually obscured metallic objects. Potential military activities could require detection of these objects at some distance from a moving vehicle in the presence of metallic clutter. Results show that existing EMI sensors have limited range capabilities and suffer from false alarms due to clutter. This paper presents results of an investigation of an EMI sensor designed for detecting large metallic objects on a moving platform in a high clutter environment. The sensor was developed by the U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD in conjunction with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.

  9. Large-Scale Multi-Objective Optimization for the Management of Seawater Intrusion, Santa Barbara, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanko, Z. P.; Nishikawa, T.; Paulinski, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    The City of Santa Barbara, located in coastal southern California, is concerned that excessive groundwater pumping will lead to chloride (Cl) contamination of its groundwater system from seawater intrusion (SWI). In addition, the city wishes to estimate the effect of continued pumping on the groundwater basin under a variety of initial and climatic conditions. A SEAWAT-based groundwater-flow and solute-transport model of the Santa Barbara groundwater basin was optimized to produce optimal pumping schedules assuming 5 different scenarios. Borg, a multi-objective genetic algorithm, was coupled with the SEAWAT model to identify optimal management strategies. The optimization problems were formulated as multi-objective so that the tradeoffs between maximizing pumping, minimizing SWI, and minimizing drawdowns can be examined by the city. Decisions can then be made on a pumping schedule in light of current preferences and climatic conditions. Borg was used to produce Pareto optimal results for all 5 scenarios, which vary in their initial conditions (high water levels, low water levels, or current basin state), simulated climate (normal or drought conditions), and problem formulation (objective equations and decision-variable aggregation). Results show mostly well-defined Pareto surfaces with a few singularities. Furthermore, the results identify the precise pumping schedule per well that was suitable given the desired restriction on drawdown and Cl concentrations. A system of decision-making is then possible based on various observations of the basin's hydrologic states and climatic trends without having to run any further optimizations. In addition, an assessment of selected Pareto-optimal solutions was analyzed with sensitivity information using the simulation model alone. A wide range of possible groundwater pumping scenarios is available and depends heavily on the future climate scenarios and the Pareto-optimal solution selected while managing the pumping wells.

  10. Capturing and stitching images with a large viewing angle and low distortion properties for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya-Cheng; Chung, Chien-Kai; Lai, Jyun-Yi; Chang, Han-Chao; Hsu, Feng-Yi

    2013-06-01

    Upper gastrointestinal endoscopies are primarily performed to observe the pathologies of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. However, when an endoscope is pushed into the esophagus or stomach by the physician, the organs behave similar to a balloon being gradually inflated. Consequently, their shapes and depth-of-field of images change continually, preventing thorough examination of the inflammation or anabrosis position, which delays the curing period. In this study, a 2.9-mm image-capturing module and a convoluted mechanism was incorporated into the tube like a standard 10- mm upper gastrointestinal endoscope. The scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm was adopted to implement disease feature extraction on a koala doll. Following feature extraction, the smoothly varying affine stitching (SVAS) method was employed to resolve stitching distortion problems. Subsequently, the real-time splice software developed in this study was embedded in an upper gastrointestinal endoscope to obtain a panoramic view of stomach inflammation in the captured images. The results showed that the 2.9-mm image-capturing module can provide approximately 50 verified images in one spin cycle, a viewing angle of 120° can be attained, and less than 10% distortion can be achieved in each image. Therefore, these methods can solve the problems encountered when using a standard 10-mm upper gastrointestinal endoscope with a single camera, such as image distortion, and partial inflammation displays. The results also showed that the SIFT algorithm provides the highest correct matching rate, and the SVAS method can be employed to resolve the parallax problems caused by stitching together images of different flat surfaces.

  11. NASA Orbital Debris Large-Object Baseline Population in ORDEM 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisco, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.; Anz-Meador, P. D.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) has created and validated high fidelity populations of the debris environment for the latest Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM 3.0). Though the model includes fluxes of objects 10 um and larger, this paper considers particle fluxes for 1 cm and larger debris objects from low Earth orbit (LEO) through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO). These are validated by several reliable radar observations through the Space Surveillance Network (SSN), Haystack, and HAX radars. ORDEM 3.0 populations were designed for the purpose of assisting, debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment includes a background derived from the LEO-to-GEO ENvironment Debris evolutionary model (LEGEND) with a Bayesian rescaling as well as specific events such as the FY-1C anti-satellite test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, and the Soviet/Russian Radar Ocean Reconnaissance Satellite (RORSAT) sodium-potassium droplet releases. The environment described in this paper is the most realistic orbital debris population larger than 1 cm, to date. We describe derivations of the background population and added specific populations. We present sample validation charts of our 1 cm and larger LEO population against Space Surveillance Network (SSN), Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  12. X-ray tomography of large objects with limited measurement angle

    SciTech Connect

    Vepsäläinen, Mikko; Markkanen, Markku; Sundberg, Pauli

    2014-02-18

    In this paper we present an efficient implementation of an algorithm for reconstructing a 3D volume from limited angle projection data, based on statistical inversion theory. We demonstrate the strength of the method for detecting structural defects in large composite aerospace components, whose dimensions prevent acquiring measurements over the full circle. In comparison with a number of other tomographic reconstruction methods that can be applied to the limited angle case, such as tomosynthesis or simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART), we achieve superior depth resolution with reduced noise and artifacts.

  13. CHAOTIC CAPTURE OF NEPTUNE TROJANS

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David

    2009-06-15

    Neptune Trojans (NTs) are swarms of outer solar system objects that lead/trail planet Neptune during its revolutions around the Sun. Observations indicate that NTs form a thick cloud of objects with a population perhaps {approx}10 times more numerous than that of Jupiter Trojans and orbital inclinations reaching {approx}25 deg. The high inclinations of NTs are indicative of capture instead of in situ formation. Here we study a model in which NTs were captured by Neptune during planetary migration when secondary resonances associated with the mean-motion commensurabilities between Uranus and Neptune swept over Neptune's Lagrangian points. This process, known as chaotic capture, is similar to that previously proposed to explain the origin of Jupiter's Trojans. We show that chaotic capture of planetesimals from an {approx}35 Earth-mass planetesimal disk can produce a population of NTs that is at least comparable in number to that inferred from current observations. The large orbital inclinations of NTs are a natural outcome of chaotic capture. To obtain the {approx}4:1 ratio between high- and low-inclination populations suggested by observations, planetary migration into a dynamically excited planetesimal disk may be required. The required stirring could have been induced by Pluto-sized and larger objects that have formed in the disk.

  14. Object-oriented design: Deriving conceptual solutions to large-scale information processing problems

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, M.A.

    1990-05-01

    The Vertical Integration of Science, Technology, and Applications (VISTA) Project is a long-term effort conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) directed toward accelerating the process of making research results (data, models, advanced concepts) usable and available to R D applications. The initial goal of the program is to develop a software-based information system to guide the assessment and remediation process for hazardous waste sites at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The information system will link users (DOE, laboratories, and remediation contractors) to computer models and technical data available at PNL, to speed up the remediation process, while decreasing costs and accelerating the deployment of new technologies. This report describes a methodology used to design components of the VISTA information system based on an object-oriented computing model. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Detection of a large massive circumstellar disk around a high-mass young stellar object in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preibisch, T.; Ratzka, T.; Gehring, T.; Ohlendorf, H.; Zinnecker, H.; King, R. R.; McCaughrean, M. J.; Lewis, J. R.

    2011-06-01

    Context. The characterization of circumstellar disks around young stellar objects can provide important information about the process of star formation and the possible formation of planetary systems. Aims: We investigate the spatial structure and the spectral energy distribution of a newly discovered edge-on circumstellar disk around an optically invisible young stellar object that is embedded in a dark cloud in the Carina Nebula. Methods: The disk object was serendipitously discovered in our deep near-IR imaging survey of the Carina Nebula obtained with HAWK-I at the ESO VLT. Whereas the object was detected as an apparently point-like source in earlier infrared observations, only the superb image quality (FWHM ≈ 0.5'') of the HAWK-I data could reveal, for the first time, the peculiar morphology of the object. It consists of a very red point-like central source that is surrounded by a roughly spherical nebula, which is intersected by a remarkable dark lane through the center. We construct the spectral energy distribution of the object from 1 μm to 870 μm and perform a detailed radiative transfer modeling of the spectral energy distribution and the source morphology. Results: The observed object morphology in the near-IR images clearly suggests a young stellar object that is embedded in an extended, roughly spherical envelope and surrounded by a large circumstellar disk with a diameter of ≈5500 AU that is seen nearly edge-on. The radiative transfer modeling shows that the central object is highly luminous and thus must be a massive young stellar object, most likely in the range 10-15 M⊙. The circumstellar disk has a mass of about 2 M⊙. Conclusions: The disk object in Carina is one of the most massive young stellar objects for which a circumstellar disk has been detected so far. The size and mass of the disk are very large compared to the corresponding values found for most other similar objects. These results support the assumption that 10-15 M⊙ stars

  16. Obtaining the Transfer Function of optical instruments using large calibrated reference objects.

    PubMed

    Henning, A J; Huntley, J M; Giusca, C L

    2015-06-29

    It has been suggested recently that the Transfer Function of instruments such as Coherence Scanning Interferometers could be measured via a single measurement of a large spherical artefact [Appl. Opt.53(8), 1554-1563 (2014)]. In the current paper we present analytical solutions for the Fourier transform of the 'foil' model used in this technique, which thus avoids the artefacts resulting from the numerical approach used earlier. The Fourier transform of a partial spherical shell is found to contain points of zero amplitude for spatial frequencies that lie within the Transfer Function. This implies that the Transfer Function is unmeasurable at these points when a single spherical artefact is used, in situations where the foil model is a valid representation of the physical system. We propose extensions to the method to address this issue. PMID:26191674

  17. A LARGE, MASSIVE, ROTATING DISK AROUND AN ISOLATED YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Quanz, Sascha P.; Beuther, Henrik; Steinacker, Juergen; Linz, Hendrik; Krause, Oliver; Henning, Thomas; Birkmann, Stephan M.

    2010-07-10

    We present multi-wavelength observations and a radiative transfer model of a newly discovered massive circumstellar disk of gas and dust which is one of the largest disks known today. Seen almost edge-on, the disk is resolved in high-resolution near-infrared (NIR) images and appears as a dark lane of high opacity intersecting a bipolar reflection nebula. Based on molecular line observations, we estimate the distance to the object to be 3.5 kpc. This leads to a size for the dark lane of {approx}10,500 AU but due to shadowing effects the true disk size could be smaller. In Spitzer/IRAC 3.6 {mu}m images, the elongated shape of the bipolar reflection nebula is still preserved and the bulk of the flux seems to come from disk regions that can be detected due to the slight inclination of the disk. At longer IRAC wavelengths, the flux is mainly coming from the central regions penetrating directly through the dust lane. Interferometric observations of the dust continuum emission at millimeter wavelengths with the Submillimeter Array confirm this finding as the peak of the unresolved millimeter-emission coincides perfectly with the peak of the Spitzer/IRAC 5.8 {mu}m flux and the center of the dark lane seen in the NIR images. Simultaneously acquired CO data reveal a molecular outflow along the northern part of the reflection nebula which seems to be the outflow cavity. An elongated gaseous disk component is also detected and shows signs of rotation. The emission is perpendicular to the molecular outflow and thus parallel to but even more extended than the dark lane in the NIR images. Based on the dust continuum and the CO observations, we estimate a disk mass of up to a few solar masses depending on the underlying assumptions. Whether the disk-like structure is an actual accretion disk or rather a larger-scale flattened envelope or pseudodisk is difficult to discriminate with the current data set. The existence of HCO{sup +}/H{sup 13}CO{sup +} emission proves the presence of

  18. The Impact of a Large Object with Jupiter in July 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Wesley, A.; Orton, G.; Chodas, P.; Hueso, R.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Fletcher, L.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Legarreta, J.; Gomez-Forrellad, J. M.

    2010-05-01

    The only major impact ever observed directly in the Solar System was that of a large fragmented comet with Jupiter in July (1994) (Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9; SL9). We report here the observation of a second, single, large impact on Jupiter that occurred on 19 July 2009 at a latitude of -55° with an orthogonal entry trajectory and a lower incidence angle compared to those of SL9. The size of the initial aerosol cloud debris was 4,800 km East-West and 2,500 km North-South. Comparison its properties with those produced by the SL9 fragments, coupled with dynamical calculations of possible pre-impact orbits, indicates that the impactor was most probably an icy body with a size of 0.5-1 km. We calculate that the rate of collisions of this magnitude may be five to ten times more frequent than previously thought. The search for unpredicted impacts, such as the current one, could be best performed in the near-infrared methane absorption bands at 890 nm and in the 2.12 to 2.3 μm K methane-hydrogen absorption band, where the high-altitude aerosols detach by their brightness relative to Jupiter's primary clouds. We present measurements of the debris dispersion by Jovian winds from a long-term imaging campaign with ground-based telescopes. Ackowledgements: Work was supported by the Spanish MICIIN AYA2009-10701 with FEDER and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07, by NASA funds to JPL, Caltech, by the NASA Postdoctoral Program at JPL, and by the Glasstone Fellowship program at Oxford.

  19. QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT SELECTION ALGORITHM USING TIME VARIABILITY AND MACHINE LEARNING: SELECTION OF 1620 QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT CANDIDATES FROM MACHO LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dae-Won; Protopapas, Pavlos; Alcock, Charles; Trichas, Markos; Byun, Yong-Ik; Khardon, Roni

    2011-07-10

    We present a new quasi-stellar object (QSO) selection algorithm using a Support Vector Machine, a supervised classification method, on a set of extracted time series features including period, amplitude, color, and autocorrelation value. We train a model that separates QSOs from variable stars, non-variable stars, and microlensing events using 58 known QSOs, 1629 variable stars, and 4288 non-variables in the MAssive Compact Halo Object (MACHO) database as a training set. To estimate the efficiency and the accuracy of the model, we perform a cross-validation test using the training set. The test shows that the model correctly identifies {approx}80% of known QSOs with a 25% false-positive rate. The majority of the false positives are Be stars. We applied the trained model to the MACHO Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) data set, which consists of 40 million light curves, and found 1620 QSO candidates. During the selection none of the 33,242 known MACHO variables were misclassified as QSO candidates. In order to estimate the true false-positive rate, we crossmatched the candidates with astronomical catalogs including the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution LMC catalog and a few X-ray catalogs. The results further suggest that the majority of the candidates, more than 70%, are QSOs.

  20. Objective identification of multiple large fire climatologies: an application to a Mediterranean ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffault, J.; Moron, V.; Trigo, R. M.; Curt, T.

    2016-07-01

    There is growing evidence that the climatic conditions favorable to the occurrence of large fires (LFs) might not be unique within a homogeneous biogeographic area. But the identification of these coexistent multi-scalar climatologies often relies on empirical observations. Here we classify summer LFs (>120 ha) in Mediterranean France for the period 1973 to 2012, according to their local-scale weather conditions (i.e. temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and fuel moisture proxies). Three distinct climatologies were identified, and were referred as fire weather types (FWTs). (i) One of them is associated with near-normal atmospheric conditions. (ii) A heat-driven (HD) type is mostly discriminated by warm anomalies. (iii) A wind-driven (WD) type is mostly discriminated by faster winds, but cooler anomalies than usual. The frequency of WD and near-normal LFs sharply decreased in southern France over the last decades while the frequency of HD fires remained unchanged. In addition the current increase in HD potential fire days indicates a potential shift in the dominant FWT for this region. This approach offers a better understanding of the variations in fire activity and fire spread patterns in the context of contemporaneous global changes.

  1. Circularity measuring system: A shape gauge designed especially for use on large objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrkaste, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    The Circularity Measuring System (CMS) was developed to make an in-situ determination of shape similarity for selected fit large cylinders (RSRM segments). It does this to a repeatable accuracy of 0.10 mm (0.004 inch). This is less that the goal of 0.07 mm (0.003 inch), but was determined adequate because of the addition of an assembly aid that increased the entry chamfer of the clevis side of the joint. The usefulness of the CMS is demonstrated by the application to measurements other than its specified design purpose, such as submarine hull circularity, SRM mid-case circularity, as well as circularity of interfacing SRM tooling, specifically the rounding devices and horizontal disassembly devices. Commercialization of the tool is being pursued, since it is an enhancement of metrology technology for circularity determination. The most accurate in-situ technology it replaces is determined from a template. The CMS is an improvement in accuracy and operation.

  2. Reduced-phase dual-illumination interferometer for measuring large stepped objects.

    PubMed

    Tayebi, Behnam; Jafarfard, Mohammad Reza; Sharif, Farnaz; Bae, Yoon Sung; Shokuh, Seyyed Hossein Hosseini; Kim, Dug Young

    2014-10-01

    We present a reduced-phase dual-illumination interferometer (RPDII) that measures the topography of a sample with large step height variation. We experimentally demonstrate the basic principle and the feasibility of this novel single-shot quantitative phase imaging. Two beams of this interferometer illuminate a sample at different incident angles, and two phases of the different incident angles and their phase difference are simultaneously recorded using three spatial frequencies. The relative phase difference between two beams of an RPDII can be controlled by adjusting the angle such that the maximum phase difference is smaller than 2π, and thus there is no phase wrapping ambiguity in the reconstructed phase. One 4f optical system with a transmission grating is used to illuminate the sample with two collimated beams incident at different angles. The feasibility of this technique is demonstrated by measuring the thicknesses of two stepped metal layers with heights of 150 and 660 μm. Although the change in stepped height is more than 1000 times the wavelength of the laser used in our interferometer, the thicknesses of these two metal layers are successfully obtained without the use of an unwrapping algorithm. PMID:25360973

  3. The Impact of a Large Object on Jupiter in 2009 July

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Wesley, A.; Orton, G.; Hueso, R.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Fletcher, L. N.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Legarreta, J.; de Pater, I.; Hammel, H.; Simon-Miller, A.; Gomez-Forrellad, J. M.; Ortiz, J. L.; Garcia-Melendo, E.; Puetter, R. C.; Chodas, P.

    2010-01-01

    On 2009 July 19, we observed a single, large impact on Jupiter at a planetocentric latitude of 55 S. This and the Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) impacts on Jupiter in 1994 are the only planetary-scale impacts ever observed. The 2009 impact had an entry trajectory in the opposite direction and with a Tower incidence angle than that of SL9. Comparison of the initial aerosol cloud debris properties, spanning 4800 km east west and 2500 km north south, with those produced by the SL9 fragments and dynamical calculations of pre-impact orbit indicates that the impactor was most probably an icy body with a size of 0.5-1 km. The collision rate of events of this magnitude may be five to ten times more frequent than previously thought. The search for unpredicted impacts, such as the current one, could be best performed in 890 nm and K (2.03--2.36 micrometer) filters in strong gaseous absorption, where the high-altitude aerosols are more reflective than Jupiter's primary clouds.

  4. THE IMPACT OF A LARGE OBJECT ON JUPITER IN 2009 JULY

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Hueso, R.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Orton, G.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Chodas, P.; Fletcher, L. N.; Legarreta, J.; De Pater, I.; Hammel, H.; Simon-Miller, A.; Gomez-Forrellad, J. M.; Garcia-Melendo, E.; Ortiz, J. L.; Puetter, R. C.

    2010-06-01

    On 2009 July 19, we observed a single, large impact on Jupiter at a planetocentric latitude of 55{sup 0}S. This and the Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) impacts on Jupiter in 1994 are the only planetary-scale impacts ever observed. The 2009 impact had an entry trajectory in the opposite direction and with a lower incidence angle than that of SL9. Comparison of the initial aerosol cloud debris properties, spanning 4800 km east-west and 2500 km north-south, with those produced by the SL9 fragments and dynamical calculations of pre-impact orbit indicates that the impactor was most probably an icy body with a size of 0.5-1 km. The collision rate of events of this magnitude may be five to ten times more frequent than previously thought. The search for unpredicted impacts, such as the current one, could be best performed in 890 nm and K (2.03-2.36 {mu}m) filters in strong gaseous absorption, where the high-altitude aerosols are more reflective than Jupiter's primary clouds.

  5. Multiscale method for modeling binding phenomena involving large objects: application to kinesin motor domains motion along microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Alper, Joshua; Alexov, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Many biological phenomena involve the binding of proteins to a large object. Because the electrostatic forces that guide binding act over large distances, truncating the size of the system to facilitate computational modeling frequently yields inaccurate results. Our multiscale approach implements a computational focusing method that permits computation of large systems without truncating the electrostatic potential and achieves the high resolution required for modeling macromolecular interactions, all while keeping the computational time reasonable. We tested our approach on the motility of various kinesin motor domains. We found that electrostatics help guide kinesins as they walk: N-kinesins towards the plus-end, and C-kinesins towards the minus-end of microtubules. Our methodology enables computation in similar, large systems including protein binding to DNA, viruses, and membranes. PMID:26988596

  6. Multiscale method for modeling binding phenomena involving large objects: application to kinesin motor domains motion along microtubules.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Alper, Joshua; Alexov, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Many biological phenomena involve the binding of proteins to a large object. Because the electrostatic forces that guide binding act over large distances, truncating the size of the system to facilitate computational modeling frequently yields inaccurate results. Our multiscale approach implements a computational focusing method that permits computation of large systems without truncating the electrostatic potential and achieves the high resolution required for modeling macromolecular interactions, all while keeping the computational time reasonable. We tested our approach on the motility of various kinesin motor domains. We found that electrostatics help guide kinesins as they walk: N-kinesins towards the plus-end, and C-kinesins towards the minus-end of microtubules. Our methodology enables computation in similar, large systems including protein binding to DNA, viruses, and membranes. PMID:26988596

  7. Multiscale method for modeling binding phenomena involving large objects: application to kinesin motor domains motion along microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Alper, Joshua; Alexov, Emil

    2016-03-01

    Many biological phenomena involve the binding of proteins to a large object. Because the electrostatic forces that guide binding act over large distances, truncating the size of the system to facilitate computational modeling frequently yields inaccurate results. Our multiscale approach implements a computational focusing method that permits computation of large systems without truncating the electrostatic potential and achieves the high resolution required for modeling macromolecular interactions, all while keeping the computational time reasonable. We tested our approach on the motility of various kinesin motor domains. We found that electrostatics help guide kinesins as they walk: N-kinesins towards the plus-end, and C-kinesins towards the minus-end of microtubules. Our methodology enables computation in similar, large systems including protein binding to DNA, viruses, and membranes.

  8. Characterizing, for packaging and transport, large objects contaminated by radioactive material having a limited A{sub 2} value

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, R.B.; Shappert, L.B.; Michelhaugh, R.D.; Cash, J.M.; Best, R.E.

    1998-02-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Regulations for the safe packaging and transportation of radioactive materials follow a graded approach to the requirements for both packaging and controls during transport. The concept is that, the lower the risk posed to the people and the environment by the contents, (1) the less demanding are the packaging requirements and (2) the smaller in number are the controls imposed on the transport of the material. There are likely to be a great number of situations arising in coming years when large objects, contaminated with radioactive material having unlimited A{sub 2} values will result from various decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities and will then require shipment from the D and D site to a disposal site. Such situations may arise relatively frequently during the cleanup of operations involving mining, milling, feedstock, and uranium enrichment processing facilities. Because these objects are contaminated with materials having an unlimited A{sub 2} value they present a low radiological risk to worker and public safety and to the environment during transport. However, when these radioactive materials reside on the surfaces of equipment and other large objects, where the equipment and objects themselves are not radioactive, the radioactive materials appear as surface contamination and, if the contaminated object is categorized as a surface contaminated object, it would need to be packaged for shipment according to the requirements of the Regulations for SCO. Despite this categorization, alternatives may be available which will allow these contaminants, when considered by themselves for packaging and transport, to be categorized as either (1) a limited quantity of radioactive material to be shipped in an excepted package or (2) low specific activity (LSA) materials to be shipped in an IP-1 package or possibly even shipped unpackaged. These options are discussed in this paper.

  9. A large spectroscopic sample of L and T dwarfs from UKIDSS LAS: peculiar objects, binaries, and space density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocco, F.; Jones, H. R. A.; Day-Jones, A. C.; Pinfield, D. J.; Lucas, P. W.; Burningham, B.; Zhang, Z. H.; Smart, R. L.; Gomes, J. I.; Smith, L.

    2015-06-01

    We present the spectroscopic analysis of a large sample of late-M, L, and T dwarfs from the United Kingdom Deep Infrared Sky Survey. Using the YJHK photometry from the Large Area Survey and the red-optical photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey we selected a sample of 262 brown dwarf candidates and we have followed-up 196 of them using the echelle spectrograph X-shooter on the Very Large Telescope. The large wavelength coverage (0.30-2.48 μm) and moderate resolution (R ˜ 5000-9000) of X-shooter allowed us to identify peculiar objects including 22 blue L dwarfs, 2 blue T dwarfs, and 2 low-gravity M dwarfs. Using a spectral indices-based technique, we identified 27 unresolved binary candidates, for which we have determined the spectral type of the potential components via spectral deconvolution. The spectra allowed us to measure the equivalent width of the prominent absorption features and to compare them to atmospheric models. Cross-correlating the spectra with a radial velocity standard, we measured the radial velocity of our targets, and we determined the distribution of the sample, which is centred at -1.7 ± 1.2 km s-1 with a dispersion of 31.5 km s-1. Using our results, we estimated the space density of field brown dwarfs and compared it with the results of numerical simulations. Depending on the binary fraction, we found that there are (0.85 ± 0.55) × 10-3 to (1.00 ± 0.64) × 10-3 objects per cubic parsec in the L4-L6.5 range, (0.73 ± 0.47) × 10-3 to (0.85 ± 0.55) × 10-3 objects per cubic parsec in the L7-T0.5 range, and (0.74 ± 0.48) × 10-3 to (0.88 ± 0.56) × 10-3 objects per cubic parsec in the T1-T4.5 range. We notice that there seems to be an excess of objects in the L-T transition with respect to the late-T dwarfs, a discrepancy that could be explained assuming a higher binary fraction than expected for the L-T transition, or that objects in the high-mass end and low-mass end of this regime form in different environments, i.e. following

  10. The relation of object naming and other visual speech production tasks:A large scale voxel-based morphometric study

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Johnny King L.; Humphreys, Glyn W.; Douis, Hassan; Balani, Alex; Bickerton, Wai-ling; Rotshtein, Pia

    2015-01-01

    We report a lesion–symptom mapping analysis of visual speech production deficits in a large group (280) of stroke patients at the sub-acute stage (<120 days post-stroke). Performance on object naming was evaluated alongside three other tests of visual speech production, namely sentence production to a picture, sentence reading and nonword reading. A principal component analysis was performed on all these tests' scores and revealed a ‘shared’ component that loaded across all the visual speech production tasks and a ‘unique’ component that isolated object naming from the other three tasks. Regions for the shared component were observed in the left fronto-temporal cortices, fusiform gyrus and bilateral visual cortices. Lesions in these regions linked to both poor object naming and impairment in general visual–speech production. On the other hand, the unique naming component was potentially associated with the bilateral anterior temporal poles, hippocampus and cerebellar areas. This is in line with the models proposing that object naming relies on a left-lateralised language dominant system that interacts with a bilateral anterior temporal network. Neuropsychological deficits in object naming can reflect both the increased demands specific to the task and the more general difficulties in language processing. PMID:25685713

  11. Dependency-tracking object-oriented multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) formulation on a large-scale system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlqvist, Maria Alexandra

    2001-12-01

    Advances in computer technology and analysis software are making optimization of engineering systems more attractive and affordable than ever before. Optimization is becoming a necessary tool in order for companies to stay competitive. While the concept of optimization has been known almost as long as mankind, specific procedures on how to optimize engineering systems are younger. Currently, efforts are being made to reduce the computational time and simplify the organizational complexity involved with solving multidisciplinary systems. The work presented in this dissertation deals with how an object-oriented, dependency-tracking, demand-driven language can be used in reducing the computational time in performing multidisciplinary design optimizations. The work also discusses how the object-oriented language was used in integrating optimization functionality with a missile design system. The object-oriented dependency-tracking demand-driven language is applied to a large-scale multidisciplinary missile system involving disciplines such as a geometry engine, weight analysis, propulsion, aerodynamics, trajectory analysis, and cost analysis. Also discussed is the need for using approximations in optimizing a large-scale system. Designed experiments and response surface techniques were employed in creating approximation models for the problem at hand. Using these approximations to evaluate the responses was found to be useful at points in the design space where one or more responses could not otherwise be evaluated. Different optimization schemes were studied including response surface analysis of different resolutions in conjunction with higher fidelity optimization and higher fidelity optimization without approximation models. The contributions of this work are the application of MDO capabilities to a large-scale missile design system modeled in an object-oriented dependency-tracking environment, the use of response surface approximations to fit areas in the design

  12. Optically visible post-AGB stars, post-RGB stars and young stellar objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, D.; Wood, P. R.; Van Winckel, H.

    2015-12-01

    We have carried out a search for optically visible post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). First, we selected candidates with a mid-IR excess and then obtained their optical spectra. We disentangled contaminants with unique spectra such as M stars, C stars, planetary nebulae, quasi-stellar objects and background galaxies. Subsequently, we performed a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the remaining candidates to estimate their stellar parameters such as effective temperature, surface gravity (log g), metallicity ([Fe/H]), reddening and their luminosities. This resulted in a sample of 35 likely post-AGB candidates with late-G to late-A spectral types, low log g, and [Fe/H] < -0.5. Furthermore, our study confirmed the existence of the dusty post-red giant branch (post-RGB) stars, discovered previously in our Small Magellanic Cloud survey, by revealing 119 such objects in the LMC. These objects have mid-IR excesses and stellar parameters (Teff, log g, [Fe/H]) similar to those of post-AGB stars except that their luminosities (< 2500 L⊙), and hence masses and radii, are lower. These post-RGB stars are likely to be products of binary interaction on the RGB. The post-AGB and post-RGB objects show spectral energy distribution properties similar to the Galactic post-AGB stars, where some have a surrounding circumstellar shell, while some others have a surrounding stable disc similar to the Galactic post-AGB binaries. This study also resulted in a new sample of 162 young stellar objects, identified based on a robust log g criterion. Other interesting outcomes include objects with an UV continuum and an emission line spectrum; luminous supergiants; hot main-sequence stars; and 15 B[e] star candidates, 12 of which are newly discovered in this study.

  13. X-ray 3D computed tomography of large objects: investigation of an ancient globe created by Vincenzo Coronelli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morigi, Maria Pia; Casali, Franco; Berdondini, Andrea; Bettuzzi, Matteo; Bianconi, Davide; Brancaccio, Rosa; Castellani, Alice; D'Errico, Vincenzo; Pasini, Alessandro; Rossi, Alberto; Labanti, C.; Scianna, Nicolangelo

    2007-07-01

    X-ray cone-beam Computed Tomography is a powerful tool for the non-destructive investigation of the inner structure of works of art. With regard to Cultural Heritage conservation, different kinds of objects have to be inspected in order to acquire significant information such as the manufacturing technique or the presence of defects and damages. The knowledge of these features is very useful for determining adequate maintenance and restoration procedures. The use of medical CT scanners gives good results only when the investigated objects have size and density similar to those of the human body, however this requirement is not always fulfilled in Cultural Heritage diagnostics. For this reason a system for Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography of large objects, especially works of art, has been recently developed by researchers of the Physics Department of the University of Bologna. The design of the system is very different from any commercial available CT machine. The system consists of a 200 kVp X-ray source, a detector and a motorized mechanical structure for moving the detector and the object in order to collect the required number of radiographic projections. The detector is made up of a 450x450 mm2 structured CsI(Tl) scintillating screen, optically coupled to a CCD camera. In this paper we will present the results of the tomographic investigation recently performed on an ancient globe, created by the famous cosmographer, cartographer and encyclopedist Vincenzo Coronelli.

  14. Documentation for the machine-readable version of a deep objective-prism survey for large Magellanic cloud members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This catalog contains 1273 proven or probable Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) members, as found on deep objective-prism plates taken with the Curtis Schmidt telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The stars are generally brighter than about photographic magnitude 14. Approximate spectral types were determined by examination of the 580 A/mm objective-prism spectra; approximate 1975 positions were obtained by measuring relative to the 1975 coordinate grids on the Uppsala-Mount Stromlo Atlas of the LMC (Gascoigne and Westerlund 1961), and approximate photographic magnitudes were determined by averaging image density measures from the plates and image-diameter measures on the 'B' charts. The machine-readable version of the LMC survey catalog is described to enable users to read and process the tape file without problems or guesswork.

  15. Cryogenic Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-15

    IMPACCT Project: SES is developing a process to capture CO2 from the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants by desublimation - the conversion of a gas to a solid. Capturing CO2 as a solid and delivering it as a liquid avoids the large energy cost of CO2 gas compression. SES’ capture technology facilitates the prudent use of available energy resources. Coal is our most abundant energy resource and is an excellent fuel for baseline power production. SES capture technology can capture 99% of the CO2 emissions in addition to a wide range of other pollutants more efficiently and at lower costs than existing capture technologies. SES’ capture technology can be readily added to our existing energy infrastructure.

  16. Genetic fingerprinting proves cross-correlated automatic photo-identification of individuals as highly efficient in large capture-mark-recapture studies.

    PubMed

    Drechsler, Axel; Helling, Tobias; Steinfartz, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Capture-mark-recapture (CMR) approaches are the backbone of many studies in population ecology to gain insight on the life cycle, migration, habitat use, and demography of target species. The reliable and repeatable recognition of an individual throughout its lifetime is the basic requirement of a CMR study. Although invasive techniques are available to mark individuals permanently, noninvasive methods for individual recognition mainly rest on photographic identification of external body markings, which are unique at the individual level. The re-identification of an individual based on comparing shape patterns of photographs by eye is commonly used. Automated processes for photographic re-identification have been recently established, but their performance in large datasets (i.e., > 1000 individuals) has rarely been tested thoroughly. Here, we evaluated the performance of the program AMPHIDENT, an automatic algorithm to identify individuals on the basis of ventral spot patterns in the great crested newt (Triturus cristatus) versus the genotypic fingerprint of individuals based on highly polymorphic microsatellite loci using GENECAP. Between 2008 and 2010, we captured, sampled and photographed adult newts and calculated for 1648 samples/photographs recapture rates for both approaches. Recapture rates differed slightly with 8.34% for GENECAP and 9.83% for AMPHIDENT. With an estimated rate of 2% false rejections (FRR) and 0.00% false acceptances (FAR), AMPHIDENT proved to be a highly reliable algorithm for CMR studies of large datasets. We conclude that the application of automatic recognition software of individual photographs can be a rather powerful and reliable tool in noninvasive CMR studies for a large number of individuals. Because the cross-correlation of standardized shape patterns is generally applicable to any pattern that provides enough information, this algorithm is capable of becoming a single application with broad use in CMR studies for many species

  17. A Large Number of Hα Emission Stars and Herbig-Haro Objects in and around Bright-Rimmed Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, K.; Sugitani, K.

    We present the results of our Hα grism spectroscopy and narrow-band imaging observations of bright-rimmed clouds (BRCs) in search of candidate pre-main sequence stars of the T Tauri, Herbig Ae/Be and related types, and of Herbig-Haro (HH) objects. We have detected altogether 460 Hα emission stars down to about R = 20, around all but two of the 28 BRCs observed. The present study has, for the first time, reached down nearly to the faintest classical T Tauri stars in OB associations. Twelve new HH objects have also been found. Most are of small apparent size, emphasizing the need for deep searches at high spatial resolution. These stars and HH objects are concentrated near the tip of BRCs, thus supporting our hypothesis of ``small-scale sequential star formation''. The presence of such a large number of Hα emission stars around BRCs implies that second-generation formation of low-mass stars in HII regions is relatively extensive, and further supports the notion of cohabitation of high- and low-mass populations in OB associations.

  18. Design of high-performance adaptive objective lens with large optical depth scanning range for ultrabroad near infrared microscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Gongpu; Mauger, Thomas F.; Li, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    We report on the theory and design of adaptive objective lens for ultra broadband near infrared light imaging with large dynamic optical depth scanning range by using an embedded tunable lens, which can find wide applications in deep tissue biomedical imaging systems, such as confocal microscope, optical coherence tomography (OCT), two-photon microscopy, etc., both in vivo and ex vivo. This design is based on, but not limited to, a home-made prototype of liquid-filled membrane lens with a clear aperture of 8mm and the thickness of 2.55mm ~3.18mm. It is beneficial to have an adaptive objective lens which allows an extended depth scanning range larger than the focal length zoom range, since this will keep the magnification of the whole system, numerical aperture (NA), field of view (FOV), and resolution more consistent. To achieve this goal, a systematic theory is presented, for the first time to our acknowledgment, by inserting the varifocal lens in between a front and a back solid lens group. The designed objective has a compact size (10mm-diameter and 15mm-length), ultrabroad working bandwidth (760nm - 920nm), a large depth scanning range (7.36mm in air) — 1.533 times of focal length zoom range (4.8mm in air), and a FOV around 1mm × 1mm. Diffraction-limited performance can be achieved within this ultrabroad bandwidth through all the scanning depth (the resolution is 2.22 μm - 2.81 μm, calculated at the wavelength of 800nm with the NA of 0.214 - 0.171). The chromatic focal shift value is within the depth of focus (field). The chromatic difference in distortion is nearly zero and the maximum distortion is less than 0.05%. PMID:26417508

  19. Large Scale Discovery and De Novo-Assisted Sequencing of Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides (CAMPs) by Microparticle Capture and Electron-Transfer Dissociation (ETD) Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Juba, Melanie L; Russo, Paul S; Devine, Megan; Barksdale, Stephanie; Rodriguez, Carlos; Vliet, Kent A; Schnur, Joel M; van Hoek, Monique L; Bishop, Barney M

    2015-10-01

    The identification and sequencing of novel cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) have proven challenging due to the limitations associated with traditional proteomics methods and difficulties sequencing peptides present in complex biomolecular mixtures. We present here a process for large-scale identification and de novo-assisted sequencing of newly discovered CAMPs using microparticle capture followed by tandem mass spectrometry equipped with electron-transfer dissociation (ETD). This process was initially evaluated and verified using known CAMPs with varying physicochemical properties. The effective parameters were then applied in the analysis of a complex mixture of peptides harvested from American alligator plasma using custom-made (Bioprospector) functionalized hydrogel particles. Here, we report the successful sequencing process for CAMPs that has led to the identification of 340 unique peptides and the discovery of five novel CAMPs from American alligator plasma. PMID:26327436

  20. Improved Technologies for Decontamination of Crated Large Metal Objects LANL Release No: LA-UR-02-0072

    SciTech Connect

    McFee, J.; Stallings, E.; Barbour, K.

    2002-02-26

    The Los Alamos Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) is identifying and demonstrating technologies to reduce the cost and risk of management of transuranic element contaminated large metal objects, i.e. gloveboxes. The previously conducted demonstrations supported characterization and ''front end'' aspects of the Los Alamos Decontamination and Volume Reduction System (DVRS) project. The first demonstration was shown to save the DVRS project approximately $200,000 per year and characterization technologies have been estimated to save DVRS a month of DVRS operation per year. In FY01 demonstrations for decontamination technologies, communication systems, and waste data collection systems have provided additional savings equivalent to another $200K per year of operation. The Los Alamos Large Scale demonstration and Deployment Project continues to provide substantial cost savings to the DVRS process in this second round of demonstrations. DVRS cost savings of $400K per year can now be counted, with additional efficiency savings of up to 30% on many tasks.

  1. Stellar Archaeology and Galaxy Genesis: The Need for Large Area Multi-Object Spectrograph on 8 m-Class Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Mike J.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    The origin and evolution of galaxies like the Milky Way and M31 remain among the key questions in astrophysics. The galaxies we see today in and around the Local Group are representatives of the general field population of the Universe and have been evolving for the majority of cosmic time. As our nearest neighbour systems they can be studied in far more detail than their distant counterparts and hence provide our best hope for understanding star formation and prototypical galaxy evolution over the lifetime of the Universe [K. Freeman, J. Bland-Hawthorn in Annu. Rev. Astron. Astrophys. 40, 487 (2002)]. Significant observational progress has been made, but we are still a long way from understanding galaxy genesis. To unravel this formative epoch, detailed large area multi-object spectroscopy of spatial, kinematic and chemical structures on 8 m-class telescopes are required, to provide the link between local near-field cosmology and predictions from the high-redshift Universe.

  2. Separation and capture of CO2 from large stationary sources and sequestration in geological formations--coalbeds and deep saline aquifers.

    PubMed

    White, Curt M; Strazisar, Brian R; Granite, Evan J; Hoffman, James S; Pennline, Henry W

    2003-06-01

    The topic of global warming as a result of increased atmospheric CO2 concentration is arguably the most important environmental issue that the world faces today. It is a global problem that will need to be solved on a global level. The link between anthropogenic emissions of CO2 with increased atmospheric CO2 levels and, in turn, with increased global temperatures has been well established and accepted by the world. International organizations such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have been formed to address this issue. Three options are being explored to stabilize atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and global temperatures without severely and negatively impacting standard of living: (1) increasing energy efficiency, (2) switching to less carbon-intensive sources of energy, and (3) carbon sequestration. To be successful, all three options must be used in concert. The third option is the subject of this review. Specifically, this review will cover the capture and geologic sequestration of CO2 generated from large point sources, namely fossil-fuel-fired power gasification plants. Sequestration of CO2 in geological formations is necessary to meet the President's Global Climate Change Initiative target of an 18% reduction in GHG intensity by 2012. Further, the best strategy to stabilize the atmospheric concentration of CO2 results from a multifaceted approach where sequestration of CO2 into geological formations is combined with increased efficiency in electric power generation and utilization, increased conservation, increased use of lower carbon-intensity fuels, and increased use of nuclear energy and renewables. This review covers the separation and capture of CO2 from both flue gas and fuel gas using wet scrubbing technologies, dry regenerable sorbents, membranes, cryogenics, pressure and temperature swing adsorption, and other advanced concepts. Existing

  3. Fluorescent dyes with large Stokes shifts for super-resolution optical microscopy of biological objects: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sednev, Maksim V.; Belov, Vladimir N.; Hell, Stefan W.

    2015-12-01

    The review deals with commercially available organic dyes possessing large Stokes shifts and their applications as fluorescent labels in optical microscopy based on stimulated emission depletion (STED). STED microscopy breaks Abbe’s diffraction barrier and provides optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit. STED microscopy is non-invasive and requires photostable fluorescent markers attached to biomolecules or other objects of interest. Up to now, in most biology-related STED experiments, bright and photoresistant dyes with small Stokes shifts of 20-40 nm were used. The rapid progress in STED microscopy showed that organic fluorophores possessing large Stokes shifts are indispensable in multi-color super-resolution techniques. The ultimate result of the imaging relies on the optimal combination of a dye, the bio-conjugation procedure and the performance of the optical microscope. Modern bioconjugation methods, basics of STED microscopy, as well as structures and spectral properties of the presently available fluorescent markers are reviewed and discussed. In particular, the spectral properties of the commercial dyes are tabulated and correlated with the available depletion wavelengths found in STED microscopes produced by LEICA Microsytems, Abberior Instruments and Picoquant GmbH.

  4. Unsupervised self-organized mapping: a versatile empirical tool for object selection, classification and redshift estimation in large surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geach, James E.

    2012-01-01

    We present an application of unsupervised machine learning - the self-organized map (SOM) - as a tool for visualizing, exploring and mining the catalogues of large astronomical surveys. Self-organization culminates in a low-resolution representation of the 'topology' of a parameter volume, and this can be exploited in various ways pertinent to astronomy. Using data from the Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS), we demonstrate two key astronomical applications of the SOM: (i) object classification and selection, using galaxies with active galactic nuclei as an example, and (ii) photometric redshift estimation, illustrating how SOMs can be used as totally empirical predictive tools. With a training set of ˜3800 galaxies with zspec≤ 1, we achieve photometric redshift accuracies competitive with other (mainly template fitting) techniques that use a similar number of photometric bands [σ(Δz) = 0.03 with a ˜2 per cent outlier rate when using u* band to 8 ?m photometry]. We also test the SOM as a photo-z tool using the PHoto-z Accuracy Testing (PHAT) synthetic catalogue of Hildebrandt et al., which compares several different photo-z codes using a common input/training set. We find that the SOM can deliver accuracies that are competitive with many of the established template fitting and empirical methods. This technique is not without clear limitations, which are discussed, but we suggest it could be a powerful tool in the era of extremely large -'petabyte'- data bases where efficient data mining is a paramount concern.

  5. Tracking a large number of closely spaced objects based on the particle probability hypothesis density filter via optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangkui; Xu, Hui; An, Wei; Sheng, Weidong; Xu, Dan

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to tracking a large number of closely spaced objects (CSO) in image sequences that is based on the particle probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter and multiassignment data association. First, the particle PHD filter is adopted to eliminate most of the clutters and to estimate multitarget states. In the particle PHD filter, a noniterative multitarget estimation technique is introduced to reliably estimate multitarget states, and an improved birth particle sampling scheme is present to effectively acquire targets among clutters. Then, an integrated track management method is proposed to realize multitarget track continuity. The core of the track management is the track-to-estimation multiassignment association, which relaxes the traditional one-to-one data association restriction due to the unresolved focal plane CSO measurements. Meanwhile, a unified technique of multiple consecutive misses for track deletion is used jointly to cope with the sensitivity of the PHD filter to the missed detections and to eliminate false alarms further, as well as to initiate tracks of large numbers of CSO. Finally, results of two simulations and one experiment show that the proposed approach is feasible and efficient.

  6. Targeted Capture Sequencing in Whitebark Pine Reveals Range-Wide Demographic and Adaptive Patterns Despite Challenges of a Large, Repetitive Genome.

    PubMed

    Syring, John V; Tennessen, Jacob A; Jennings, Tara N; Wegrzyn, Jill; Scelfo-Dalbey, Camille; Cronn, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) inhabits an expansive range in western North America, and it is a keystone species of subalpine environments. Whitebark is susceptible to multiple threats - climate change, white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle, and fire exclusion - and it is suffering significant mortality range-wide, prompting the tree to be listed as 'globally endangered' by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and 'endangered' by the Canadian government. Conservation collections (in situ and ex situ) are being initiated to preserve the genetic legacy of the species. Reliable, transferrable, and highly variable genetic markers are essential for quantifying the genetic profiles of seed collections relative to natural stands, and ensuring the completeness of conservation collections. We evaluated the use of hybridization-based target capture to enrich specific genomic regions from the 27 GB genome of whitebark pine, and to evaluate genetic variation across loci, trees, and geography. Probes were designed to capture 7,849 distinct genes, and screening was performed on 48 trees. Despite the inclusion of repetitive elements in the probe pool, the resulting dataset provided information on 4,452 genes and 32% of targeted positions (528,873 bp), and we were able to identify 12,390 segregating sites from 47 trees. Variations reveal strong geographic trends in heterozygosity and allelic richness, with trees from the southern Cascade and Sierra Range showing the greatest distinctiveness and differentiation. Our results show that even under non-optimal conditions (low enrichment efficiency; inclusion of repetitive elements in baits), targeted enrichment produces high quality, codominant genotypes from large genomes. The resulting data can be readily integrated into management and gene conservation activities for whitebark pine, and have the potential to be applied to other members of 5-needle pine group (Pinus subsect. Quinquefolia) due to their

  7. Targeted Capture Sequencing in Whitebark Pine Reveals Range-Wide Demographic and Adaptive Patterns Despite Challenges of a Large, Repetitive Genome

    PubMed Central

    Syring, John V.; Tennessen, Jacob A.; Jennings, Tara N.; Wegrzyn, Jill; Scelfo-Dalbey, Camille; Cronn, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) inhabits an expansive range in western North America, and it is a keystone species of subalpine environments. Whitebark is susceptible to multiple threats – climate change, white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle, and fire exclusion – and it is suffering significant mortality range-wide, prompting the tree to be listed as ‘globally endangered’ by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and ‘endangered’ by the Canadian government. Conservation collections (in situ and ex situ) are being initiated to preserve the genetic legacy of the species. Reliable, transferrable, and highly variable genetic markers are essential for quantifying the genetic profiles of seed collections relative to natural stands, and ensuring the completeness of conservation collections. We evaluated the use of hybridization-based target capture to enrich specific genomic regions from the 27 GB genome of whitebark pine, and to evaluate genetic variation across loci, trees, and geography. Probes were designed to capture 7,849 distinct genes, and screening was performed on 48 trees. Despite the inclusion of repetitive elements in the probe pool, the resulting dataset provided information on 4,452 genes and 32% of targeted positions (528,873 bp), and we were able to identify 12,390 segregating sites from 47 trees. Variations reveal strong geographic trends in heterozygosity and allelic richness, with trees from the southern Cascade and Sierra Range showing the greatest distinctiveness and differentiation. Our results show that even under non-optimal conditions (low enrichment efficiency; inclusion of repetitive elements in baits), targeted enrichment produces high quality, codominant genotypes from large genomes. The resulting data can be readily integrated into management and gene conservation activities for whitebark pine, and have the potential to be applied to other members of 5-needle pine group (Pinus subsect. Quinquefolia) due to

  8. Polarized light field microscopy: an analytical method using a microlens array to simultaneously capture both conoscopic and orthoscopic views of birefringent objects

    PubMed Central

    Oldenbourg, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    For the comprehensive analysis of anisotropic materials, a new approach, called “polarized light field microscopy” is introduced. It uses an LC-PolScope to which a microlens array was added at the image plane of the objective lens. The system is patterned after the “light field microscope” that achieves both lateral and axial resolution in thick specimens in a single camera exposure. In polarized light field microscopy, the microlens array generates a hybrid image consisting of an array of small conoscopic images, each sampling a different object area. Analysis of the conoscopic images reveals the birefringence of each object area as a function of the propagation direction of transmitted light rays. The principles and utility of the instrument that we are calling “light field LC-PolScope” are demonstrated with images of a thin, polycrystalline calcite film, revealing the azimuth and inclination angle of the optic axis for many crystals simultaneously, including crystals with diameters as small as 2 µm. Compared to traditional conoscopy and related methods, the vastly improved throughput and quantitative analysis afforded by the light field LC-PolScope make it the instrument of choice for measuring 3-dimensional birefringence parameters of complex structures. PMID:18754996

  9. An objective approach to determining the weight ranges of prey preferred by and accessible to the five large African carnivores.

    PubMed

    Clements, Hayley S; Tambling, Craig J; Hayward, Matt W; Kerley, Graham I H

    2014-01-01

    Broad-scale models describing predator prey preferences serve as useful departure points for understanding predator-prey interactions at finer scales. Previous analyses used a subjective approach to identify prey weight preferences of the five large African carnivores, hence their accuracy is questionable. This study uses a segmented model of prey weight versus prey preference to objectively quantify the prey weight preferences of the five large African carnivores. Based on simulations of known predator prey preference, for prey species sample sizes above 32 the segmented model approach detects up to four known changes in prey weight preference (represented by model break-points) with high rates of detection (75% to 100% of simulations, depending on number of break-points) and accuracy (within 1.3±4.0 to 2.7±4.4 of known break-point). When applied to the five large African carnivores, using carnivore diet information from across Africa, the model detected weight ranges of prey that are preferred, killed relative to their abundance, and avoided by each carnivore. Prey in the weight ranges preferred and killed relative to their abundance are together termed "accessible prey". Accessible prey weight ranges were found to be 14-135 kg for cheetah Acinonyx jubatus, 1-45 kg for leopard Panthera pardus, 32-632 kg for lion Panthera leo, 15-1600 kg for spotted hyaena Crocuta crocuta and 10-289 kg for wild dog Lycaon pictus. An assessment of carnivore diets throughout Africa found these accessible prey weight ranges include 88±2% (cheetah), 82±3% (leopard), 81±2% (lion), 97±2% (spotted hyaena) and 96±2% (wild dog) of kills. These descriptions of prey weight preferences therefore contribute to our understanding of the diet spectrum of the five large African carnivores. Where datasets meet the minimum sample size requirements, the segmented model approach provides a means of determining, and comparing, the prey weight range preferences of any carnivore species. PMID

  10. An Objective Approach to Determining the Weight Ranges of Prey Preferred by and Accessible to the Five Large African Carnivores

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Hayley S.; Tambling, Craig J.; Hayward, Matt W.; Kerley, Graham I. H.

    2014-01-01

    Broad-scale models describing predator prey preferences serve as useful departure points for understanding predator-prey interactions at finer scales. Previous analyses used a subjective approach to identify prey weight preferences of the five large African carnivores, hence their accuracy is questionable. This study uses a segmented model of prey weight versus prey preference to objectively quantify the prey weight preferences of the five large African carnivores. Based on simulations of known predator prey preference, for prey species sample sizes above 32 the segmented model approach detects up to four known changes in prey weight preference (represented by model break-points) with high rates of detection (75% to 100% of simulations, depending on number of break-points) and accuracy (within 1.3±4.0 to 2.7±4.4 of known break-point). When applied to the five large African carnivores, using carnivore diet information from across Africa, the model detected weight ranges of prey that are preferred, killed relative to their abundance, and avoided by each carnivore. Prey in the weight ranges preferred and killed relative to their abundance are together termed “accessible prey”. Accessible prey weight ranges were found to be 14–135 kg for cheetah Acinonyx jubatus, 1–45 kg for leopard Panthera pardus, 32–632 kg for lion Panthera leo, 15–1600 kg for spotted hyaena Crocuta crocuta and 10–289 kg for wild dog Lycaon pictus. An assessment of carnivore diets throughout Africa found these accessible prey weight ranges include 88±2% (cheetah), 82±3% (leopard), 81±2% (lion), 97±2% (spotted hyaena) and 96±2% (wild dog) of kills. These descriptions of prey weight preferences therefore contribute to our understanding of the diet spectrum of the five large African carnivores. Where datasets meet the minimum sample size requirements, the segmented model approach provides a means of determining, and comparing, the prey weight range preferences of any carnivore

  11. Object-Based Classification of Ikonos Imagery for Mapping Large-Scale Vegetation Communities in Urban Areas

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Renaud; Aryal, Jagannath; Chong, Albert K.

    2007-01-01

    Effective assessment of biodiversity in cities requires detailed vegetation maps. To date, most remote sensing of urban vegetation has focused on thematically coarse land cover products. Detailed habitat maps are created by manual interpretation of aerial photographs, but this is time consuming and costly at large scale. To address this issue, we tested the effectiveness of object-based classifications that use automated image segmentation to extract meaningful ground features from imagery. We applied these techniques to very high resolution multispectral Ikonos images to produce vegetation community maps in Dunedin City, New Zealand. An Ikonos image was orthorectified and a multi-scale segmentation algorithm used to produce a hierarchical network of image objects. The upper level included four coarse strata: industrial/commercial (commercial buildings), residential (houses and backyard private gardens), vegetation (vegetation patches larger than 0.8/1ha), and water. We focused on the vegetation stratum that was segmented at more detailed level to extract and classify fifteen classes of vegetation communities. The first classification yielded a moderate overall classification accuracy (64%, κ = 0.52), which led us to consider a simplified classification with ten vegetation classes. The overall classification accuracy from the simplified classification was 77% with a κ value close to the excellent range (κ = 0.74). These results compared favourably with similar studies in other environments. We conclude that this approach does not provide maps as detailed as those produced by manually interpreting aerial photographs, but it can still extract ecologically significant classes. It is an efficient way to generate accurate and detailed maps in significantly shorter time. The final map accuracy could be improved by integrating segmentation, automated and manual classification in the mapping process, especially when considering important vegetation classes with limited

  12. Integral field spectroscopy of massive young stellar objects in the N113 H II region in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, J. L.; Oliveira, J. M.; van Loon, J. Th.; Sewiło, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) survey has allowed the identification and analysis of significant samples of Young Stellar Object (YSO) candidates in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). However, the angular resolution of Spitzer is relatively poor meaning that at the distance of the LMC, it is likely that many of the Spitzer YSO candidates in fact contain multiple components. We present high-resolution K-band integral field spectroscopic observations of the three most prominent massive YSO candidates in the N113 H II region using Very Large Telescope/Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observations in the Near Infrared (VLT/SINFONI). We have identified six K-band continuum sources within the three Spitzer sources and we have mapped the morphology and velocity fields of extended line emission around these sources. Br γ, He I and H2 emission is found at the position of all six K-band sources; we discuss whether the emission is associated with the continuum sources or whether it is ambient emission. H2 emission appears to be mostly ambient emission and no evidence of CO emission arising in the discs of YSOs has been found. We have mapped the centroid velocities of extended Br γ emission and He I emission and found evidence of two expanding compact H II regions. One source shows compact and strong H2 emission suggestive of a molecular outflow. The diversity of spectroscopic properties observed is interpreted in the context of a range of evolutionary stages associated with massive star formation.

  13. Attention Capture by Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langton, Stephen R. H.; Law, Anna S.; Burton, A. Mike; Schweinberger, Stefan R.

    2008-01-01

    We report three experiments that investigate whether faces are capable of capturing attention when in competition with other non-face objects. In Experiment 1a participants took longer to decide that an array of objects contained a butterfly target when a face appeared as one of the distracting items than when the face did not appear in the array.…

  14. The Large Sky Area Multi-object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope Quasar Survey: Quasar Properties from the First Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Y. L.; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Wang, Feige; Guo, Rui; Zuo, Wenwen; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Y.-X.; Yuan, H.-L.; Song, Y.-H.; Wang, Jianguo; Dong, Xiaobo; Yang, M.; -Wu, H.; Shen, S.-Y.; Shi, J.-R.; He, B.-L.; Lei, Y.-J.; Li, Y.-B.; Luo, A.-L.; Zhao, Y.-H.; Zhang, H.-T.

    2016-02-01

    We present preliminary results of the quasar survey in the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) first data release (DR1), which includes the pilot survey and the first year of the regular survey. There are 3921 quasars reliably identified, among which 1180 are new quasars discovered in the survey. These quasars are at low to median redshifts, with a highest z of 4.83. We compile emission line measurements around the Hα, Hβ, Mg ii, and C iv regions for the new quasars. The continuum luminosities are inferred from SDSS photometric data with model fitting, as the spectra in DR1 are non-flux-calibrated. We also compile the virial black hole mass estimates, with flags indicating the selection methods, and broad absorption line quasars. The catalog and spectra for these quasars are also available. Of the 3921 quasars, 28% are independently selected with optical-infrared colors, indicating that the method is quite promising for the completeness of the quasar survey. LAMOST DR1 and the ongoing quasar survey will provide valuable data for studies of quasars.

  15. A Large-Particle Monte Carlo Code for Simulating Non-Linear High-Energy Processes Near Compact Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Boris E.; Svensson, Roland; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Sikora, Marek

    1995-01-01

    High-energy radiation processes in compact cosmic objects are often expected to have a strongly non-linear behavior. Such behavior is shown, for example, by electron-positron pair cascades and the time evolution of relativistic proton distributions in dense radiation fields. Three independent techniques have been developed to simulate these non-linear problems: the kinetic equation approach; the phase-space density (PSD) Monte Carlo method; and the large-particle (LP) Monte Carlo method. In this paper, we present the latest version of the LP method and compare it with the other methods. The efficiency of the method in treating geometrically complex problems is illustrated by showing results of simulations of 1D, 2D and 3D systems. The method is shown to be powerful enough to treat non-spherical geometries, including such effects as bulk motion of the background plasma, reflection of radiation from cold matter, and anisotropic distributions of radiating particles. It can therefore be applied to simulate high-energy processes in such astrophysical systems as accretion discs with coronae, relativistic jets, pulsar magnetospheres and gamma-ray bursts.

  16. Data-Driven Objectness.

    PubMed

    Hongwen Kang; Hebert, Martial; Efros, Alexei A; Kanade, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    We propose a data-driven approach to estimate the likelihood that an image segment corresponds to a scene object (its "objectness") by comparing it to a large collection of example object regions. We demonstrate that when the application domain is known, for example, in our case activity of daily living (ADL), we can capture the regularity of the domain specific objects using millions of exemplar object regions. Our approach to estimating the objectness of an image region proceeds in two steps: 1) finding the exemplar regions that are the most similar to the input image segment; 2) calculating the objectness of the image segment by combining segment properties, mutual consistency across the nearest exemplar regions, and the prior probability of each exemplar region. In previous work, parametric objectness models were built from a small number of manually annotated objects regions, instead, our data-driven approach uses 5 million object regions along with their metadata information. Results on multiple data sets demonstrates our data-driven approach compared to the existing model based techniques. We also show the application of our approach in improving the performance of object discovery algorithms. PMID:26353218

  17. Rain Characteristics and Large-Scale Environments of Precipitation Objects with Extreme Rain Volumes from TRMM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Yaping; Lau, William K M.; Liu, Chuntao

    2013-01-01

    This study adopts a "precipitation object" approach by using 14 years of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Feature (PF) and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis data to study rainfall structure and environmental factors associated with extreme heavy rain events. Characteristics of instantaneous extreme volumetric PFs are examined and compared to those of intermediate and small systems. It is found that instantaneous PFs exhibit a much wider scale range compared to the daily gridded precipitation accumulation range. The top 1% of the rainiest PFs contribute over 55% of total rainfall and have 2 orders of rain volume magnitude greater than those of the median PFs. We find a threshold near the top 10% beyond which the PFs grow exponentially into larger, deeper, and colder rain systems. NCEP reanalyses show that midlevel relative humidity and total precipitable water increase steadily with increasingly larger PFs, along with a rapid increase of 500 hPa upward vertical velocity beyond the top 10%. This provides the necessary moisture convergence to amplify and sustain the extreme events. The rapid increase in vertical motion is associated with the release of convective available potential energy (CAPE) in mature systems, as is evident in the increase in CAPE of PFs up to 10% and the subsequent dropoff. The study illustrates distinct stages in the development of an extreme rainfall event including: (1) a systematic buildup in large-scale temperature and moisture, (2) a rapid change in rain structure, (3) explosive growth of the PF size, and (4) a release of CAPE before the demise of the event.

  18. Strategies for efficient scanning and reconstruction methods on very large objects with high-energy x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reims, Nils; Schoen, Tobias; Boehnel, Michael; Sukowski, Frank; Firsching, Markus

    2014-09-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is an established tool for industrial non-destructive testing purposes. Yet conventional CT devices pose limitations regarding specimen dimensions and material thicknesses. Here we introduce a novel CT system capable of inspecting very large objects (VLO) like automobiles or sea freight containers in 3-D and discuss strategies for efficient scanning and reconstruction methods. The system utilizes a 9 MeV linear accelerator to achieve high penetration lengths in both dense and high-Z materials. The line detector array has an overall length of 4 meters. The presented system allows for reconstruction volumes of 3.2 meters in diameter and 5 meters in height. First we outline the general capabilities of high energy CT imaging and compare it with state of the art 450 kV X-ray systems. The imaging performance is shown based on experimental results. The second part addresses the problem of considerably higher scanning times when using line detectors compared to area detectors. Reducing the number of projections considerably causes image artifacts with standard reconstruction methods like filtered back projection (FBP). Alternative methods which can provide significantly better results are algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART). One of these is compressed sensing (CS) based ART which we discuss regarding its suitability in respect to FBP. We could prove the feasibility of inspecting VLOs like complete automobiles based on experimental data. CS allows for achieving sufficient image quality in terms of spatial and contrast resolution while reducing the number of projections significantly resulting in faster scanning times.

  19. Regional Opportunities for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in China: A Comprehensive CO2 Storage Cost Curve and Analysis of the Potential for Large Scale Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the People’s Republic of China

    SciTech Connect

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Li, Xiaochun; Davidson, Casie L.; Wei, Ning; Dooley, James J.

    2009-12-01

    This study presents data and analysis on the potential for carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies to deploy within China, including a survey of the CO2 source fleet and potential geologic storage capacity. The results presented here indicate that there is significant potential for CCS technologies to deploy in China at a level sufficient to deliver deep, sustained and cost-effective emissions reductions for China over the course of this century.

  20. Capturing Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) captured these two images of Jupiter's outermost large moon, Callisto, as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter in late February. New Horizons' closest approach distance to Jupiter was 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles), not far outside Callisto's orbit, which has a radius of 1.9 million kilometers (1.2 million miles). However, Callisto happened to be on the opposite side of Jupiter during the spacecraft's pass through the Jupiter system, so these images, taken from 4.7 million kilometers (3.0 million miles) and 4.2 million kilometers (2.6 million miles) away, are the closest of Callisto that New Horizons obtained.

    Callisto's ancient, crater-scarred surface makes it very different from its three more active sibling satellites, Io, Europa and Ganymede. Callisto, 4,800 kilometers (3000 miles) in diameter, displays no large-scale geological features other than impact craters, and every bright spot in these images is a crater. The largest impact feature on Callisto, the huge basin Valhalla, is visible as a bright patch at the 10 o'clock position. The craters are bright because they have excavated material relatively rich in water ice from beneath the dark, dusty material that coats most of the surface.

    The two images show essentially the same side of Callisto -- the side that faces Jupiter -- under different illumination conditions. The images accompanied scans of Callisto's infrared spectrum with New Horizons' Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA). The New Horizons science team designed these scans to study how the infrared spectrum of Callisto's water ice changes as lighting and viewing conditions change, and as the ice cools through Callisto's late afternoon. The infrared spectrum of water ice depends slightly on its temperature, and a goal of New Horizons when it reaches the Pluto system (in 2015) is to use the water ice features in the spectrum of Pluto's moon Charon, and

  1. Heterotic Haplotype Capture: precision breeding for hybrid performance.

    PubMed

    Snowdon, Rod J; Abbadi, Amine; Kox, Tobias; Schmutzer, Thomas; Leckband, Gunhild

    2015-07-01

    The need to improve hybrid performance, abiotic stress tolerance, and disease resistance without compromising seed quality makes the targeted capture of untapped diversity a major objective for crop breeders. Here we introduce the concept of Heterotic Haplotype Capture (HHC), in which genome sequence imputation is used to trace novel heterozygous chromosome blocks contributing to hybrid performance in large, structured populations of interrelated F1 hybrids containing interesting new diversity for breeding. PMID:26027461

  2. Reflective Object: Capturing the Look of Metal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Very often, secondary art students feel most comfortable drawing from photographs or images they find in books or magazines. Although the author does find these drawing experiences play an important role in the introduction to drawing, and that these images keep students interested in art, it is important to encourage lessons in drawing from life.…

  3. Capturing Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Lynda

    2007-01-01

    The idea for the art lesson presented in this article grew out of watching the lively actions of fourth grade students. Since drawing is the author's first love, she is always looking for new ways to teach it. This time, instead of setting up a still life, she decided to teach students how to capture their actions on paper. (Contains 5 online…

  4. Laser capture.

    PubMed

    Potter, S Steven; Brunskill, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes detailed methods used for laser capture microdissection (LCM) of discrete subpopulations of cells. Topics covered include preparing tissue blocks, cryostat sectioning, processing slides, performing the LCM, and purification of RNA from LCM samples. Notes describe the fine points of each operation, which can often mean the difference between success and failure. PMID:22639264

  5. Shlaer-Mellor object-oriented analysis and recursive design, an effective modern software development method for development of computing systems for a large physics detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowski, T.; Carey, T.A.; Maguire, C.F.

    1995-10-01

    After evaluation of several modern object-oriented methods for development of the computing systems for the PHENIX detector at RHIC, we selected the Shlaer-Mellor Object-Oriented Analysis and Recursive Design method as the most appropriate for the needs and development environment of a large nuclear or high energy physics detector. This paper discusses our specific needs and environment, our method selection criteria, and major features and components of the Shlaer-Mellor method.

  6. Objectives and layout of a high-resolution x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for the large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K.; Gates, D.; Monticello, D.; Neilson, H.; Reiman, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Yamada, H.; Rice, J. E.

    2010-10-15

    A high-resolution x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, whose concept was tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, is being designed for the large helical device (LHD). This instrument will record spatially resolved spectra of helium-like Ar{sup 16+} and will provide ion temperature profiles with spatial and temporal resolutions of <2 cm and {>=}10 ms, respectively. The spectrometer layout and instrumental features are largely determined by the magnetic field structure of LHD. The stellarator equilibrium reconstruction codes, STELLOPT and PIES, will be used for the tomographic inversion of the spectral data.

  7. Large-Scale Utilization of Biomass Energy and Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the Transport and Electricity Sectors under Stringent CO2 Concentration Limit Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

    2010-08-05

    This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to meet atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm by the end of the century. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. A key aspect of the research presented here is that the costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are explicitly incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced globally by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the majority source, along with growing utilization of waste-to-energy. The ability to draw on a diverse set of biomass based feedstocks helps to reduce the pressure for drastic large-scale changes in land use and the attendant environmental, ecological, and economic consequences those changes would unleash. In terms of the conversion of bioenergy feedstocks into value added energy, this paper demonstrates that biomass is and will continue to be used to generate electricity as well as liquid transportation fuels. A particular focus of this paper is to show how climate policies and technology assumptions - especially the availability of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies - affect the decisions made about where the biomass is used in the energy system. The potential for net-negative electric sector emissions through the use of CCS with biomass feedstocks provides an attractive part of the solution for meeting stringent

  8. Large MEMS-based programmable reflective slit mask for multi-object spectroscopy fabricated using multiple wafer-level bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canonica, Michael; Zamkotsian, Frederic; Lanzoni, Patrick; Noell, Wilfried; de Rooij, Nico

    2012-03-01

    Multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) allows measuring infrared spectra of faint astronomical objects that provides information on the evolution of the Universe. MOS requires a slit mask for object selection at the focal plane of the telescope. We are developing MEMS-based programmable reflective slit masks composed of 2048 individually addressable micromirrors. Each micromirror measures 100 × 200 μm2 and is electrostatically tilted by a precise angle of at least 20°. The main requirements for these arrays are precise and uniform tilt angle over the whole device, uniformity of the mirror electromechanical behavior, a flat mirror deformation and individual addressing capability of each mirror. This capability of our array is achieved using a line-column algorithm based on an optimized tilt angle/voltage hysteresis of the electrostatic actuator. Micromirror arrays composed of 2048 micromirrors (32 × 64) and modeled for individual addressing were fabricated using fusion and eutectic wafer-level bonding. These micromirrors without coating demonstrated a peak-to-valley deformation less than 8 nm and a tilt angle of 24° for an actuation voltage of 130 V. A first experiment of the linecolumn algorithm was demonstrated by actuating individually 2 × 2 micromirrors. In order, to avoid spoiling of the optical source by the thermal emission of the instrument, the micromirror array has to work in a cryogenic environment. Therefore, these devices were characterized in a cryogenic environment at -111°C and several lines of micromirrors were tilted successfully under these conditions.

  9. Enhancement of low-quality reconstructed digital hologram images based on frequency extrapolation of large objects under the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Li, Weiliang; Zhao, Dongxue

    2016-03-01

    During the reconstruction of a digital hologram, the reconstructed image is usually degraded by speckle noise, which makes it hard to observe the original object pattern. In this paper, a new reconstructed image enhancement method is proposed, which first reduces the speckle noise using an adaptive Gaussian filter, then calculates the high frequencies that belong to the object pattern based on a frequency extrapolation strategy. The proposed frequency extrapolation first calculates the frequency spectrum of the Fourier-filtered image, which is originally reconstructed from the +1 order of the hologram, and then gives the initial parameters for an iterative solution. The analytic iteration is implemented by continuous gradient threshold convergence to estimate the image level and vertical gradient information. The predicted spectrum is acquired through the analytical iteration of the original spectrum and gradient spectrum analysis. Finally, the reconstructed spectrum of the restoration image is acquired from the synthetic correction of the original spectrum using the predicted gradient spectrum. We conducted our experiment very close to the diffraction limit and used low-quality equipment to prove the feasibility of our method. Detailed analysis and figure demonstrations are presented in the paper.

  10. Enhancement of low-quality reconstructed digital hologram images based on frequency extrapolation of large objects under the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Li, Weiliang; Zhao, Dongxue

    2016-06-01

    During the reconstruction of a digital hologram, the reconstructed image is usually degraded by speckle noise, which makes it hard to observe the original object pattern. In this paper, a new reconstructed image enhancement method is proposed, which first reduces the speckle noise using an adaptive Gaussian filter, then calculates the high frequencies that belong to the object pattern based on a frequency extrapolation strategy. The proposed frequency extrapolation first calculates the frequency spectrum of the Fourier-filtered image, which is originally reconstructed from the +1 order of the hologram, and then gives the initial parameters for an iterative solution. The analytic iteration is implemented by continuous gradient threshold convergence to estimate the image level and vertical gradient information. The predicted spectrum is acquired through the analytical iteration of the original spectrum and gradient spectrum analysis. Finally, the reconstructed spectrum of the restoration image is acquired from the synthetic correction of the original spectrum using the predicted gradient spectrum. We conducted our experiment very close to the diffraction limit and used low-quality equipment to prove the feasibility of our method. Detailed analysis and figure demonstrations are presented in the paper.

  11. Capture of terrestrial-sized moons by gas giant planets.

    PubMed

    Williams, Darren M

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial moons with masses >0.1 M (symbol in text) possibly exist around extrasolar giant planets, and here we consider the energetics of how they might form. Binary-exchange capture can occur if a binary-terrestrial object (BTO) is tidally disrupted during a close encounter with a giant planet and one of the binary members is ejected while the other remains as a moon. Tidal disruption occurs readily in the deep gravity wells of giant planets; however, the large encounter velocities in the wells make binary exchange more difficult than for planets of lesser mass. In addition, successful capture favors massive binaries with large rotational velocities and small component mass ratios. Also, since the interaction tends to leave the captured moons on highly elliptical orbits, permanent capture is only possible around planets with sizable Hill spheres that are well separated from their host stars. PMID:23537110

  12. Objectives and Layout of a High-Resolution X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for the Large Helical Device (LHD)

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M; Gates, D; Monticello, D; Neilson, H; Reiman, A; Roquemore, A L; Morita, S; Goto, M; Yamada, H

    2010-07-29

    A high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, whose concept was tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, is being designed for LHD. This instrument will record spatially resolved spectra of helium-like Ar16+ and provide ion temperature profiles with spatial and temporal resolutions of < 2 cm and ≥ 10 ms. The stellarator equilibrium reconstruction codes, STELLOPT and PIES, will be used for the tomographic inversion of the spectral data. The spectrometer layout and instrumental features are largely determined by the magnetic field structure of LHD.

  13. One-sided imaging of large, dense objects using the 511 keV photons from induced pair production

    SciTech Connect

    Tavora, L.M.; Gilboy, W.B.; Morton, E.J.; Morgado, R.E.; Estep, R.J.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.

    1998-03-01

    The use of annihilation photons from photon-induced electron-positron pair production as a means of inspecting objects when only one side is accessible is described. The Z2 dependence of the pair production cross section and the high penetration of 511 keV photons suggest that this method should be capable of localizing high Z materials in lower Z matrices. The experimental results for the dependence of the back streaming photon yield on Z indicate that dynamic ranges of the order of 20 may be obtained for materials with 4 < Z < 82. Results for point to point images obtained in line scans of representative geometries are also shown. Simulation studies based on the EGS4 Monte Carlo code were also performed and their results show an agreement with experimental data of the order of 5%.

  14. Brownfield site investigation: a new technology for the detection of large objects based on passive seismic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pytharouli, S.; Aspray, T. J.; Grojean, Q.; Steirou, E.

    2013-12-01

    In assessing brownfield sites for redevelopment, intrusive investigations are carried out to assess contamination, geology and hydrogeology. Such investigations are expensive, requiring the hire of expensive equipment, which incur standing charges when not in use. In addition, they provide information for discrete sample ';windows'. Non-intrusive methods have the ability to gather information across an entire area. Methods including electrical resistivity/conductivity and ground penetrating radar (GRP), and have been applied to brownfield sites. Their ability in detecting pollution e.g. buried canisters, is often restricted due to unfavourable on-site conditions e.g. GRP is not useful in cases where a layer of clay or reinforced concrete is present. This study is focused on the use, for the first time, of short period seismometers as an alternative, non-intrusive, passive seismic method to detect the presence of objects buried under the ground surface even when on-site conditions are not favourable. We used five low detection threshold seismometers with a flat response within the frequency range 1 - 80 Hz. We conducted experiments both in the lab and in the field. Three series of lab experiments were conducted in sand, under controlled conditions, using ambient noise as the only source of generating seismic waves. Results revealed that there is a distinct difference in the amplitude of the power density spectra of the recorded signals in cases where objects e.g. concrete block, polystyrene block, wood, were present. To validate these results in field scale, we conducted a series of experiments that took place in Heriot-Watt University campus on a field for which we had information for the subsurface from an electromagnetic survey. We used the same monitoring equipment to try and detect the presence of a 6m long PVC pipe buried 0.5m below the ground surface. Results were consistent with those obtained from lab experiments. This supports our initial hypothesis on the

  15. A novel hybrid reconstruction algorithm for first generation incoherent scatter CT (ISCT) of large objects with potential medical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Alpuche Aviles, Jorge E; Pistorius, Stephen; Gordon, Richard; Elbakri, Idris A

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a first generation incoherent scatter CT (ISCT) hybrid (analytic-iterative) reconstruction algorithm for accurate ρ{e}imaging of objects with clinically relevant sizes. The algorithm reconstructs quantitative images of ρ{e} within a few iterations, avoiding the challenges of optimization based reconstruction algorithms while addressing the limitations of current analytical algorithms. A 4π detector is conceptualized in order to address the issue of directional dependency and is then replaced with a ring of detectors which detect a constant fraction of the scattered photons. The ISCT algorithm corrects for the attenuation of photons using a limited number of iterations and filtered back projection (FBP) for image reconstruction. This results in a hybrid reconstruction algorithm that was tested with sinograms generated by Monte Carlo (MC) and analytical (AN) simulations. Results show that the ISCT algorithm is weakly dependent on the ρ{e} initial estimate. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm reconstruct ρ{e} images with a mean error of -1% ± 3% for the AN model and from -6% to -8% for the MC model. Finally, the algorithm is capable of reconstructing qualitatively good images even in the presence of multiple scatter. The proposed algorithm would be suitable for in-vivo medical imaging as long as practical limitations can be addressed. PMID:21422588

  16. Nonresonant and resonant cloaking of an electrically large dielectric spherical object by a multilayer isotropic metamaterial cover.

    PubMed

    Abouelsaood, Ahmed; Afifi, Islam; Eshrah, Islam

    2015-07-20

    Mie theory and genetic algorithms are used to determine the parameters and performance of cloaks made of homogeneous isotropic metamaterials that would hide a spherical dielectric object of size comparable to the incident radiation wavelength. A single-layer (SL) cover with negative permittivity and permeability can produce a much greater reduction in the extinction efficiency than one with the permittivity and permeability of positive or opposite signs. Minimization of the extinction efficiency in the former case leads to both nonresonant and resonant solutions. Adding a second layer to the cover can lead to a significant enhancement of the bandwidth, but only to a modest reduction in the extinction efficiency at the design wavelength. In the SL case, Debye's scattering series is used to show that the nonresonant and resonant minima of the extinction efficiency correspond to scattering phase shifts approximately equal to zero and -π, respectively, and to understand the simple approximate expressions for the cloak parameters of the nonresonant solutions. The series also explains the value of the outer radius of a multilayer cloak, provides a link to a previously studied isotropic approximation to a transformation optics cloak, and indicates that a cloak consisting of an odd number of alternate double-negative and double-positive layers will probably give the best possible performance. PMID:26367849

  17. A Study of Parameters of the Counterpropagating Leader and its Influence on the Lightning Protection of Objects Using Large-Scale Laboratory Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syssoev, V. S.; Kostinskiy, A. Yu.; Makalskiy, L. M.; Rakov, A. V.; Andreev, M. G.; Bulatov, M. U.; Sukharevsky, D. I.; Naumova, M. U.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, the results of experiments on initiating the upward and descending leaders during the development of a long spark when studying lightning protection of objects with the help of large-scale models are shown. The influence of the counterpropagating leaders on the process of the lightning strike of ground-based and insulated objects is discussed. In the first case, the upward negative leader is initiated by the positive downward leader, which propagates from the high-voltage electrode of the "rod-rod"-type Marx generator (the rod is located on the plane and is 3-m high) in the gap with a length of 9-12 m. The positive-voltage pulse with a duration of 7500 μs had an amplitude of up to 3 MV. In the second case, initiation of the positive upward leader was performed in the electric field created by a cloud of negatively charged aerosol, which simulates the charged thunderstorm cell. In this case, all the phases characteristic of the ascending lightnings initiated by the tall ground-based objects and the triggered lightnings during the experiments with an actual thunderstorm cloud were observed in the forming spark discharge with a length of 1.5-2.0 m. The main parameters of the counterpropagating leader, which is initiated by the objects during the large-scale model experiments with a long spark, are shown.

  18. Object Oriented Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We apply the object oriented software engineering (OOSE) design methodology for software objects (SOs) to learning objects (LOs). OOSE extends and refines design principles for authoring dynamic reusable LOs. Our learning object class (LOC) is a template from which individualised LOs can be dynamically created for, or by, students. The properties…

  19. A Paradigm for the Nondestructive Assay of Spent Fuel Assemblies and Similar Large Objects, with Emphasis on the Role of Photon-Based Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolind, Alan Michael

    2015-10-01

    The practice of nondestructive assay (NDA) of nuclear materials has, until now, been focused primarily (1) on smaller objects (2) with less fissile material and (3) with less self-generated radiation. The transition to the application of NDA to spent fuel assemblies and similar large objects violates these three conditions, thereby bringing the assumptions and paradigm of traditional NDA practice into question for the new applications. In this paper, a new paradigm for these new applications is presented which is based on the fundamental principles of nuclear engineering. It is shown that the NDA of spent fuel assemblies is mostly a three-dimensional problem that requires the integration of three independent NDA measurements in order to achieve a unique and accurate assay. The only NDA techniques that can avoid this requirement are those that analyze signals that are characteristic to specific isotopes (such as those caused by characteristic resonance interactions), and that are neither distorted nor overly attenuated by the other surrounding material. Some photon-based NDA techniques fall into this exceptional category. Such exceptional NDA techniques become essential to employ when assaying large objects that, unlike spent fuel assemblies, do not have a consistent geometry. With this new NDA paradigm, the advanced photon-based NDA techniques can be put into their proper context, and their development can thereby be properly motivated.

  20. Development of large-field high-resolution hard x-ray imaging microscopy and microtomography with Fresnel zone plate objective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Terada, Yasuko; Uesugi, Kentaro; Tamura, Shigeharu

    2013-09-01

    A hard x-ray imaging microscope system of high spatial resolution and large field of view (FOV) has been developed at the beamline 37 XU of SPring-8. By utilizing the 30 m-long experimental station, large magnification can be attained with a large diameter Fresnel zone plate (FZP) objective. Some configurations of microscope systems were tested. In a typical condition, a magnification of 133 and a FOV of 123 μm are attained using a FZP with a diameter of 310 μm and an outermost zone width of 100 nm, and the spatial resolution evaluated by observing resolution test chart is 160 nm in full pitch of periodic object with an exposure time of 1 s. When a FZP with an outermost zone width of 50 nm is used, a spatial resolution better than 100 nm is achieved. Phase-contrast imaging by Zernike's method was also tested, and three dimensional measurement by computer tomography (CT) method was also carried out.

  1. See-Through Imaging of Laser-Scanned 3d Cultural Heritage Objects Based on Stochastic Rendering of Large-Scale Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Hasegawa, K.; Okamoto, N.; Umegaki, R.; Wang, S.; Uemura, M.; Okamoto, A.; Koyamada, K.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method for the precise 3D see-through imaging, or transparent visualization, of the large-scale and complex point clouds acquired via the laser scanning of 3D cultural heritage objects. Our method is based on a stochastic algorithm and directly uses the 3D points, which are acquired using a laser scanner, as the rendering primitives. This method achieves the correct depth feel without requiring depth sorting of the rendering primitives along the line of sight. Eliminating this need allows us to avoid long computation times when creating natural and precise 3D see-through views of laser-scanned cultural heritage objects. The opacity of each laser-scanned object is also flexibly controllable. For a laser-scanned point cloud consisting of more than 107 or 108 3D points, the pre-processing requires only a few minutes, and the rendering can be executed at interactive frame rates. Our method enables the creation of cumulative 3D see-through images of time-series laser-scanned data. It also offers the possibility of fused visualization for observing a laser-scanned object behind a transparent high-quality photographic image placed in the 3D scene. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by applying it to festival floats of high cultural value. These festival floats have complex outer and inner 3D structures and are suitable for see-through imaging.

  2. Mono and multi-objective optimization techniques applied to a large range of industrial test cases using Metamodel assisted Evolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourment, Lionel; Ducloux, Richard; Marie, Stéphane; Ejday, Mohsen; Monnereau, Dominique; Massé, Thomas; Montmitonnet, Pierre

    2010-06-01

    The use of material processing numerical simulation allows a strategy of trial and error to improve virtual processes without incurring material costs or interrupting production and therefore save a lot of money, but it requires user time to analyze the results, adjust the operating conditions and restart the simulation. Automatic optimization is the perfect complement to simulation. Evolutionary Algorithm coupled with metamodelling makes it possible to obtain industrially relevant results on a very large range of applications within a few tens of simulations and without any specific automatic optimization technique knowledge. Ten industrial partners have been selected to cover the different area of the mechanical forging industry and provide different examples of the forming simulation tools. It aims to demonstrate that it is possible to obtain industrially relevant results on a very large range of applications within a few tens of simulations and without any specific automatic optimization technique knowledge. The large computational time is handled by a metamodel approach. It allows interpolating the objective function on the entire parameter space by only knowing the exact function values at a reduced number of "master points". Two algorithms are used: an evolution strategy combined with a Kriging metamodel and a genetic algorithm combined with a Meshless Finite Difference Method. The later approach is extended to multi-objective optimization. The set of solutions, which corresponds to the best possible compromises between the different objectives, is then computed in the same way. The population based approach allows using the parallel capabilities of the utilized computer with a high efficiency. An optimization module, fully embedded within the Forge2009 IHM, makes possible to cover all the defined examples, and the use of new multi-core hardware to compute several simulations at the same time reduces the needed time dramatically. The presented examples

  3. River Capture in Disequilibrium Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, S. W.; Perron, J.; Willett, S.; Goren, L.

    2013-12-01

    The process of river piracy or river capture has long drawn interest as a potential mechanism by which drainage basins large and small evolve towards an equilibrium state. River capture transfers both drainage area and drainage lines from one river basin to another, which can cause large, abrupt shifts in network topology, drainage divide positions, and river incision rates. Despite numerous case studies in which river capture has been proposed to have occurred, there is no general, mechanistic framework for understanding the controls on river capture, nor are there quantitative criteria for determining if capture has occurred. Here we use new metrics of landscape disequilibrium to first identify landscapes in which drainage reorganization is occurring. These metrics are based on a balance between an integral of the contributing drainage area and elevation. In an analysis of rivers in the Eastern United States we find that many rivers are in a state of disequilibrium and are experiencing recent or ongoing area exchange between basins. In these disequilibrium basins we find widespread evidence for network rearrangement via river capture at multiple scales. We then conduct numerical experiments with a 2-D landscape evolution model to explore the conditions in which area exchange among drainage basins is likely to occur as discrete capture events as opposed to continuous divide migration. These experiments indicate that: (1) capture activity increases with the degree of disequilibrium induced by persistent spatial gradients in tectonic forcing or by temporal changes in climate or tectonic forcing; (2) capture activity is strongly controlled by the initial planform drainage network geometry; and (3) capture activity scales with the fluvial incision rate constant in the river power erosion law.

  4. Dynamical capture in the Pluto-Charon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires dos Santos, P. M.; Morbidelli, A.; Nesvorný, D.

    2012-12-01

    This paper explores the possibility that the progenitors of the small satellites of Pluto got captured in the Pluto-Charon system from the massive heliocentric planetesimal disk in which Pluto was originally embedded into. We find that, if the dynamical excitation of the disk is small, temporary capture in the Pluto-Charon system can occur with non- negligible probability, due to the dynamical perturbations exerted by the binary nature of the Pluto-Charon pair. However, the captured objects remain on very elliptic orbits and the typical capture time is only ~ 100 years. In order to explain the origin of the small satellites of Pluto, we conjecture that some of these objects got disrupted during their Pluto-bound phase by a collision with a planetesimal of the disk. This could have generated a debris disk, which damped under internal collisional evolution, until turning itself into an accretional disk that could form small satellites on circular orbits, co-planar with Charon. Unfortunately, we find that objects large enough to carry a sufficient amount of mass to generate the small satellites of Pluto have collisional lifetimes orders of magnitude longer than the capture time. Thus, this scenario cannot explain the origin of the small satellites of Pluto, which remains elusive.

  5. Smart grid initialization reduces the computational complexity of multi-objective image registration based on a dual-dynamic transformation model to account for large anatomical differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosman, Peter A. N.; Alderliesten, Tanja

    2016-03-01

    We recently demonstrated the strong potential of using dual-dynamic transformation models when tackling deformable image registration problems involving large anatomical differences. Dual-dynamic transformation models employ two moving grids instead of the common single moving grid for the target image (and single fixed grid for the source image). We previously employed powerful optimization algorithms to make use of the additional flexibility offered by a dual-dynamic transformation model with good results, directly obtaining insight into the trade-off between important registration objectives as a result of taking a multi-objective approach to optimization. However, optimization has so far been initialized using two regular grids, which still leaves a great potential of dual-dynamic transformation models untapped: a-priori grid alignment with image structures/areas that are expected to deform more. This allows (far) less grid points to be used, compared to using a sufficiently refined regular grid, leading to (far) more efficient optimization, or, equivalently, more accurate results using the same number of grid points. We study the implications of exploiting this potential by experimenting with two new smart grid initialization procedures: one manual expert-based and one automated image-feature-based. We consider a CT test case with large differences in bladder volume with and without a multi-resolution scheme and find a substantial benefit of using smart grid initialization.

  6. Large-scale hydropower system optimization using dynamic programming and object-oriented programming: the case of the Northeast China Power Grid.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Qing; Zhang, Yu-Shan; Ji, Chang-Ming; Wang, Ai-Jing; Lund, Jay R

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines long-term optimal operation using dynamic programming for a large hydropower system of 10 reservoirs in Northeast China. Besides considering flow and hydraulic head, the optimization explicitly includes time-varying electricity market prices to maximize benefit. Two techniques are used to reduce the 'curse of dimensionality' of dynamic programming with many reservoirs. Discrete differential dynamic programming (DDDP) reduces the search space and computer memory needed. Object-oriented programming (OOP) and the ability to dynamically allocate and release memory with the C++ language greatly reduces the cumulative effect of computer memory for solving multi-dimensional dynamic programming models. The case study shows that the model can reduce the 'curse of dimensionality' and achieve satisfactory results. PMID:24334896

  7. Impact Detections of Temporarily Captured Natural Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, David L.; Spurný, Pavel; Wiegert, Paul; Brown, Peter; Borovička, Jiří; Tagliaferri, Ed; Shrbený, Lukáš

    2016-06-01

    Temporarily captured orbiters (TCOs) are near-Earth objects (NEOs) that make a few orbits of Earth before returning to heliocentric orbits. Only one TCO has been observed to date, 2006 RH120, captured by Earth for one year before escaping. Detailed modeling predicts that capture should occur from the NEO population predominantly through the Sun–Earth L1 and L2 points, with 1% of TCOs impacting Earth and approximately 0.1% of meteoroids being TCOs. Although thousands of meteoroid orbits have been measured, none until now have conclusively exhibited TCO behavior, largely due to difficulties in measuring initial meteoroid speed with sufficient precision. We report on a precise meteor observation of 2014 January 13 with a new generation of all-sky fireball digital camera systems operated in the Czech Republic as part of the European Fireball Network, providing the lowest natural object entry speed observed in decades-long monitoring by networks worldwide. Modeling atmospheric deceleration and fragmentation yields an initial mass of ∼5 kg and diameter of 15 cm, with a maximum Earth-relative velocity just over 11.0 km s‑1. Spectral observations prove its natural origin. Back integration across observational uncertainties yields a 92%–98% probability of TCO behavior, with close lunar dynamical interaction. The capture duration varies across observational uncertainties from 48 days to 5+ years. We also report on two low-speed impacts recorded by US Government sensors, and we examine Prairie Network event PN39078 from 1965 with an extremely low entry speed of 10.9 km s‑1. In these cases uncertainties in measurement and origin make TCO designation uncertain.

  8. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  9. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  10. Distributed Large Data-Object Environments: End-to-End Performance Analysis of High Speed Distributed Storage Systems in Wide Area ATM Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William; Tierney, Brian; Lee, Jason; Hoo, Gary; Thompson, Mary

    1996-01-01

    We have developed and deployed a distributed-parallel storage system (DPSS) in several high speed asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) wide area networks (WAN) testbeds to support several different types of data-intensive applications. Architecturally, the DPSS is a network striped disk array, but is fairly unique in that its implementation allows applications complete freedom to determine optimal data layout, replication and/or coding redundancy strategy, security policy, and dynamic reconfiguration. In conjunction with the DPSS, we have developed a 'top-to-bottom, end-to-end' performance monitoring and analysis methodology that has allowed us to characterize all aspects of the DPSS operating in high speed ATM networks. In particular, we have run a variety of performance monitoring experiments involving the DPSS in the MAGIC testbed, which is a large scale, high speed, ATM network and we describe our experience using the monitoring methodology to identify and correct problems that limit the performance of high speed distributed applications. Finally, the DPSS is part of an overall architecture for using high speed, WAN's for enabling the routine, location independent use of large data-objects. Since this is part of the motivation for a distributed storage system, we describe this architecture.

  11. Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission: Robotic Boulder Capture Option Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Merrill, Raymond G.; Belbin, Scott P.; Reeves, David M.; Earle, Kevin D.; Naasz, Bo J.; Abell, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently studying an option for the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission (ARRM) that would capture a multi-ton boulder (typically 2-4 meters in size) from the surface of a large (is approximately 100+ meter) Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) and return it to cislunar space for subsequent human and robotic exploration. This alternative mission approach, designated the Robotic Boulder Capture Option (Option B), has been investigated to determine the mission feasibility and identify potential differences from the initial ARRM concept of capturing an entire small NEA (4-10 meters in size), which has been designated the Small Asteroid Capture Option (Option A). Compared to the initial ARRM concept, Option B allows for centimeter-level characterization over an entire large NEA, the certainty of target NEA composition type, the ability to select the boulder that is captured, numerous opportunities for mission enhancements to support science objectives, additional experience operating at a low-gravity planetary body including extended surface contact, and the ability to demonstrate future planetary defense strategies on a hazardous-size NEA. Option B can leverage precursor missions and existing Agency capabilities to help ensure mission success by targeting wellcharacterized asteroids and can accommodate uncertain programmatic schedules by tailoring the return mass.

  12. Neutron-Resonance Capture Analysis of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, H.; Bode, P.; Blaauw, M.; Corvi, F.

    1999-11-14

    Epithermal neutron activation analysis is a well-established approach to improve the sensitivity for certain elements by suppressing the activation of interfering elements. If epithermal neutrons of a given energy could be selected, the signal-to-noise ratio might be further improved by taking advantage of resonance capture. This reaction occurs mainly by intermediate and heavy nuclei. Moreover, most of these reactions take place with epithermal or fast neutrons. Intense epithermal neutrons are available as ''white'' beams at accelerator-driven neutron sources. Neutron resonance capture offers interesting analytical opportunities. Low-Z elements have little capture of epithermal neutrons and are thus virtually absent in the time-of-flight spectrum. Relatively large objects can be placed in the neutron beam and analyzed nondestructively. The induced radioactivity is relatively low. If an element has several stable isotopes, each of these isotopes can be recognized by its specific resonances. This would allow for multitracer studies with several isotopically labeled compounds. Different from mass spectrometry, the sample remains intact and can be used for further studies after analysis. Applications may be in the field of archaeology, metallurgy, and certification of reference materials.

  13. Robust automated knowledge capture.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Abbott, Robert G.; Forsythe, James Chris; Trumbo, Michael Christopher Stefan; Haass, Michael Joseph; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes research conducted through the Sandia National Laboratories Robust Automated Knowledge Capture Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. The objective of this project was to advance scientific understanding of the influence of individual cognitive attributes on decision making. The project has developed a quantitative model known as RumRunner that has proven effective in predicting the propensity of an individual to shift strategies on the basis of task and experience related parameters. Three separate studies are described which have validated the basic RumRunner model. This work provides a basis for better understanding human decision making in high consequent national security applications, and in particular, the individual characteristics that underlie adaptive thinking.

  14. Resonance capture at arbitrary inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namouni, F.; Morais, M. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Resonance capture is studied numerically in the three-body problem for arbitrary inclinations. Massless particles are set to drift from outside the 1:5 resonance with a Jupiter-mass planet thereby encountering the web of the planet's diverse mean motion resonances. Randomly constructed samples explore parameter space for inclinations from 0 to 180° with 5° increments totalling nearly 6 × 105 numerical simulations. 30 resonances internal and external to the planet's location are monitored. We find that retrograde resonances are unexpectedly more efficient at capture than prograde resonances and that resonance order is not necessarily a good indicator of capture efficiency at arbitrary inclination. Capture probability drops significantly at moderate sample eccentricity for initial inclinations in the range [10°,110°]. Orbit inversion is possible for initially circular orbits with inclinations in the range [60°,130°]. Capture in the 1:1 co-orbital resonance occurs with great likelihood at large retrograde inclinations. The planet's orbital eccentricity, if larger than 0.1, reduces the capture probabilities through the action of the eccentric Kozai-Lidov mechanism. A capture asymmetry appears between inner and outer resonances as prograde orbits are preferentially trapped in inner resonances. The relative capture efficiency of retrograde resonance suggests that the dynamical lifetimes of Damocloids and Centaurs on retrograde orbits must be significantly larger than those on prograde orbits implying that the recently identified asteroids in retrograde resonance, 2006 BZ8, 2008 SO218, 2009 QY6 and 1999 LE31 may be among the oldest small bodies that wander between the outer giant planets.

  15. Capture-ejector satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macconochie, I. O.; Eldred, C. H.; Martin, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A satellite in the form of a large rotating rim which can be used to boost spacecraft from low-Earth orbit to higher orbits is described. The rim rotates in the plane of its orbit such that the lower portion of the rim is traveling at suborbital velocity, while the upper portion is travelling at greater than orbital velocity. Ascending spacecraft or payloads arrive at the lowest portion of the rim at suborbital velocities, where the payloads are released on a trajectory for higher orbits; descending payloads employ the reverse procedure. Electric thrusters placed on the rim maintain rim rotational speed and altitude. From the standpoint of currently known materials, the capture-ejector concept may be useful for relatively small velocity increments.

  16. A novel method for capturing and monitoring a small neotropical primate, the squirrel monkey (Saimiri collinsi).

    PubMed

    Stone, Anita I; Castro, Paulo H G; Monteiro, Frederico O B; Ruivo, Luana P; de Sousa e Silva Júnior, José

    2015-03-01

    Squirrel monkeys (genus Saimiri) are agile, arboreal primates that are seldom captured in the wild due to their small body size (<1 kg) and large, non-cohesive social groups (40-50 individuals). However, long-term studies on these primates often require captures and permanent identification of individuals, in order to monitor their behavior and health. Here we report on a novel trapping method successfully used to capture Saimiri collinsi, in Eastern Amazonia, Brazil. Our objective was to capture as many individuals as possible from one social group of approximately 50 individuals, ranging over 150 ha of terra firme forest. Captures occurred in November and December 2013. We habituated animals to feed on a large platform located in a 123.5 m(2) area enclosed by a green net (3 m high). Multiple individuals could freely enter and exit the area via four ropes affixed from surrounding trees to the platform. Once individuals were feeding inside the netted area on selected trapping days, the ropes were dropped remotely, eliminating their escape routes. We successfully trapped 21 different individuals of the social group (14 adults and 7 immatures) with this method. We conclude that this is a conceptually simple, effective method for trapping squirrel monkeys in most habitats, and possibly other small arboreal primates that live in large social groups. The present method was more effective than previous methods utilized to capture squirrel monkeys in the field, and has the advantages of: allowing for safe capture of several individuals simultaneously; enabling re-captures; releasing of animals as a group at the site of capture; use of soft netting which facilitates safe capture of the monkeys. PMID:25231238

  17. Video Screen Capture Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  18. A simple method for the analysis of neutron resonance capture spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Clarijs, Martijn C.; Bom, Victor R.; Eijk, Carel W. E. van

    2009-03-15

    Neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA) is a method used to determine the bulk composition of various kinds of objects and materials. It is based on analyzing direct capture resonance peaks. However, the analysis is complicated by scattering followed by capture effects in the object itself. These effects depend on the object's shape and size. In this paper the new Delft elemental analysis program (DEAP) is presented which can automatically and quickly analyze multiple NRCA spectra in a practical and simple way, yielding the elemental bulk composition of an object, largely independent of its shape and size. The DEAP method is demonstrated with data obtained with a Roman bronze water tap excavated in Nijmegen (The Netherlands). DEAP will also be used in the framework of the Ancient Charm project as data analysis program for neutron resonance capture imaging (NRCI) experiments. NRCI provides three-dimensional visualization and quantification of the internal structure of archaeological objects by performing scanning measurements with narrowly collimated neutron beams on archaeological objects in computed tomography based experimental setups. The large amounts (hundreds to thousands) of spectra produced during a NRCI experiment can automatically and quickly be analyzed by DEAP.

  19. Membrane-based systems for carbon capture and hydrogen purification

    SciTech Connect

    Berchtold, Kathryn A

    2010-11-24

    This presentation describes the activities being conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory to develop carbon capture technologies for power systems. This work is aimed at continued development and demonstration of a membrane based pre- and post-combustion carbon capture technology and separation schemes. Our primary work entails the development and demonstration of an innovative membrane technology for pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide that operates over a broad range of conditions relevant to the power industry while meeting the US DOE's Carbon Sequestration Program goals of 90% CO{sub 2} capture at less than a 10% increase in the cost of energy services. Separating and capturing carbon dioxide from mixed gas streams is a first and critical step in carbon sequestration. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic temperatures and pressures as well as be compatible with large gas volumes. Our project team is developing polymer membranes based on polybenzimidazole (PBI) chemistries that can purify hydrogen and capture CO{sub 2} at industrially relevant temperatures. Our primary objectives are to develop and demonstrate polymer-based membrane chemistries, structures, deployment platforms, and sealing technologies that achieve the critical combination of high selectivity, high permeability, chemical stability, and mechanical stability all at elevated temperatures (> 150 C) and packaged in a scalable, economically viable, high area density system amenable to incorporation into an advanced Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) plant for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. Stability requirements are focused on tolerance to the primary synthesis gas components and impurities at various locations in the IGCC process. Since the process stream compositions and conditions (temperature and pressure) vary throughout the IGCC process, the project is focused on the

  20. Development of an integrated hydrological modeling system for near-real-time multi-objective reservoir operation in large river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Koike, T.

    2010-12-01

    The climate change-induced variability in hydrological cycles directly affects regional water resources management. For improved multiple multi-objective reservoir operation, an integrated modeling system has been developed by incorporating a global optimization system (SCE-UA) into a distributed biosphere hydrological model (WEB-DHM) coupled with the reservoir routing module. The reservoir storage change is estimated from the difference between the simulated inflows and outflows; while the reservoir water level can be defined from the updated reservoir storage by using the H-V curve. According to the reservoir water level, the new operation rule can be decided. For optimization: (1) WEB-DHM is calibrated for each dam’s inflows separately; (2) then the calibrated WEB-DHM is used to simulate inflows and outflows by assuming outflow proportional to inflow; and (3) the proportion coefficients are optimized with Shuffle Complex Evolution method (SCE-UA), to fulfill an objective function towards minimum flood risk at downstream and maximum reservoir water storage for future use. The GSMaP product offers hourly global precipitation maps in near real-time (about four hours after observation). Aiming at near real-time reservoir operation in large river basins, the integrated modeling system takes the inputs from both an operational global quantitative precipitation forecast (JMA-GPV; to achieve an optimal operation rule in the assumed lead time period) and the GSMaP product (to perform current operation with the obtained optimal rule, after correction by gauge rainfall). The newly-developed system was then applied to the Red River Basin, with an area of 160,000 km2, to test its performance for near real-time dam operation. In Vietnam, three reservoirs are located in the upstream of Hanoi city, with Hoa Binh the largest (69% of total volume). After calibration with the gauge rainfall, the inflows to three reservoirs are well simulated; the discharge and water level at

  1. Capture Their Attention: Capturing Lessons Using Screen Capture Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drumheller, Kristina; Lawler, Gregg

    2011-01-01

    When students miss classes for university activities such as athletic and academic events, they inevitably miss important class material. Students can get notes from their peers or visit professors to find out what they missed, but when students miss new and challenging material these steps are sometimes not enough. Screen capture and recording…

  2. Model of Large-format EO-IR sensor for calculating the probability of true and false detection and tracking for moving and fixed objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korb, Andrew R.; Grossman, Stanley I.

    2015-05-01

    A model was developed to understand the effects of spatial resolution and Signal to Noise ratio on the detection and tracking performance of wide-field, diffraction-limited electro-optic and infrared motion imagery systems. False positive detection probability and false positive rate per frame were calculated as a function of target-to-background contrast and object size. Results showed that moving objects are fundamentally more difficult to detect than stationary objects because SNR for fixed objects increases and false positive probability detection rates diminish rapidly with successive frames whereas for moving objects the false detection rate remains constant or increases with successive frames. The model specifies that the desired performance of a detection system, measured by the false positive detection rate, can be achieved by image system designs with different combinations of SNR and spatial resolution, usually requiring several pixels resolving the object; this capability to tradeoff resolution and SNR enables system design trades and cost optimization. For operational use, detection thresholds required to achieve a particular false detection rate can be calculated. Interestingly, for moderate size images the model converges to the Johnson Criteria. Johnson found that an imaging system with an SNR >3.5 has a probability of detection >50% when the resolution on the object is 4 pixels or more. Under these conditions our model finds the false positive rate is less than one per hundred image frames, and the ratio of the probability of object detection to false positive detection is much greater than one. The model was programmed into Matlab to generate simulated images frames for visualization.

  3. Overriding auditory attentional capture.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Polly; Lavie, Nilli

    2007-02-01

    Attentional capture by color singletons during shape search can be eliminated when the target is not a feature singleton (Bacon & Egeth, 1994). This suggests that a "singleton detection" search strategy must be adopted for attentional capture to occur. Here we find similar effects on auditory attentional capture. Irrelevant high-intensity singletons interfered with an auditory search task when the target itself was also a feature singleton. However, singleton interference was eliminated when the target was not a singleton (i.e., when nontargets were made heterogeneous, or when more than one target sound was presented). These results suggest that auditory attentional capture depends on the observer's attentional set, as does visual attentional capture. The suggestion that hearing might act as an early warning system that would always be tuned to unexpected unique stimuli must therefore be modified to accommodate these strategy-dependent capture effects. PMID:17557587

  4. Adaptive capture of expert behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.D.; Barrett, C.L.; Hand, U.; Gordon, R.C.

    1994-08-01

    The authors smoothed and captured a set of expert rules with adaptive networks. The motivation for doing this is discussed. (1) Smoothing leads to stabler control actions. (2) For some sets of rules, the evaluation of the rules can be sped up. This is important in large-scale simulations where many intelligent elements are present. (3) Variability of the intelligent elements can be achieved by adjusting the weights in an adaptive network. (4) After capture has occurred, the weights can be adjusted based on performance criteria. The authors thus have the capability of learning a new set of rules that lead to better performance. The set of rules the authors chose to capture were based on a set of threat determining rules for tank commanders. The approach in this paper: (1) They smoothed the rules. The rule set was converted into a simple set of arithmetic statements. Continuous, non-binary inputs, are now permitted. (2) An operational measure of capturability was developed. (3) They chose four candidate networks for the rule set capture: (a) multi-linear network, (b) adaptive partial least squares, (c) connectionist normalized local spline (CNLS) network, and (d) CNLS net with a PLS preprocessor. These networks were able to capture the rule set to within a few percent. For the simple tank rule set, the multi-linear network performed the best. When the rules were modified to include more nonlinear behavior, CNLS net performed better than the other three nets which made linear assumptions. (4) The networks were tested for robustness to input noise. Noise levels of plus or minus 10% had no real effect on the network performance. Noise levels in the plus or minus 30% range degraded performance by a factor of two. Some performance enhancement occurred when the networks were trained with noisy data. (5) The scaling of the evaluation time was calculated. (6) Human variation can be mimicked in all the networks by perturbing the weights.

  5. Testing the Capture Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image of a model capture magnet was taken after an experiment in a Mars simulation chamber at the University of Aarhus, Denmark. It has some dust on it, but not as much as that on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's capture magnet. The capture and filter magnets on both Mars Exploration Rovers were delivered by the magnetic properties team at the Center for Planetary Science, Copenhagen, Denmark.

  6. Spatial capture-recapture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Chandler, Richard B.; Sollmann, Rahel; Gardner, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Spatial Capture-Recapture provides a revolutionary extension of traditional capture-recapture methods for studying animal populations using data from live trapping, camera trapping, DNA sampling, acoustic sampling, and related field methods. This book is a conceptual and methodological synthesis of spatial capture-recapture modeling. As a comprehensive how-to manual, this reference contains detailed examples of a wide range of relevant spatial capture-recapture models for inference about population size and spatial and temporal variation in demographic parameters. Practicing field biologists studying animal populations will find this book to be a useful resource, as will graduate students and professionals in ecology, conservation biology, and fisheries and wildlife management.

  7. Capturing the semiotic relationship between terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargood, Charlie; Millard, David E.; Weal, Mark J.

    2010-04-01

    Tags describing objects on the web are often treated as facts about a resource, whereas it is quite possible that they represent more subjective observations. Existing methods of term expansion expand terms based on dictionary definitions or statistical information on term occurrence. Here we propose the use of a thematic model for term expansion based on semiotic relationships between terms; this has been shown to improve a system's thematic understanding of content and tags and to tease out the more subjective implications of those tags. Such a system relies on a thematic model that must be made by hand. In this article, we explore a method to capture a semiotic understanding of particular terms using a rule-based guide to authoring a thematic model. Experimentation shows that it is possible to capture valid definitions that can be used for semiotic term expansion but that the guide itself may not be sufficient to support this on a large scale. We argue that whilst the formation of super definitions will mitigate some of these problems, the development of an authoring support tool may be necessary to solve others.

  8. Large proper motion of the Thorne-Żytkow object candidate HV 2112 reveals its likely nature as foreground Galactic S-star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarone, Thomas J.; de Mink, Selma E.

    2016-05-01

    Using the Southern Proper Motion (SPM) catalogue, we show that the candidate Thorne-Żytkow object HV 2112 has a proper motion implying a space velocity of about 3000 {km} {s}^{-1}if the object is located at the distance of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The proper motion is statistically different from that of the SMC at approximately 4σ in SPM, although the result can drop to about 3σ significance by including the UCAC4 data and considering systematic uncertainties in addition to the statistical ones. Assuming the measurement is robust, this proper motion is sufficient to exclude its proposed membership of the SMC and to argue instead that it is likely to be a foreground star in the Milky Way halo. The smaller distance and therefore lower brightness argue against its proposed nature as a Thorne-Żytkow object (the hypothesized star-like object formed when a normal star and a neutron star merge) or a Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) star. Instead we propose a binary scenario where this star is the companion of a former massive AGB star, which polluted the object with via its stellar wind, i.e. a special case of an extrinsic S star. Our new scenario solves two additional problems with the two existing scenarios for its nature as Thorne-Żytkow object or present-day super AGB star. The puzzling high ratio of the strength of calcium to iron absorption lines is unexpected for SMC supergiants, but is fully consistent with the expectations for halo abundances. Secondly, its strong variability can now be explained naturally as a manifestation of the Mira phenomenon. We discuss further observational tests that could distinguish between the foreground and SMC scenarios in advance of the improved proper motion measurements likely to come from Gaia.

  9. EDOS Data Capture for ALOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLemore, Bruce; Cordier, Guy R.; Wood, Terri; Gamst, Harek

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, NASA's Earth Sciences Missions Operations (ESMO) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) directed the Earth Observing System Data Operations System (EDOS) project to provide a prototype system to assess the feasibility of high rate data capture for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) spacecraft via NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The key objective of this collaborative effort between NASA and JAXA was to share science data collected over North and South America previously unavailable due to limitations in ALOS downlink capacity. EDOS provided a single system proof-of-concept in 4 months at White Sands TDRS Ground Terminal The system captured 6 ALOS events error-free at 277 Mbps and delivered the data to the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) within 3 hours (May/June '08). This paper describes the successful rapid prototyping approach which led to a successful demonstration and agreement between NASA and JAXA for operational support. The design of the operational system will be discussed with emphasis on concurrent high-rate data capture, Level-O processing, real-time display and high-rate delivery with stringent latency requirements. A similar solution was successfully deployed at Svalbard, Norway to support the Suomi NPP launch (October 2011) and capture all X-band data and provide a 30-day backup archive.

  10. Demonstrating carbon capture

    SciTech Connect

    Qader, A.; Hooper, B.; Stevens, G.

    2009-11-15

    Australia is at the forefront of advancing CCS technology. The CO2CRC's H3 (Post-combustion) and Mulgrave (pre-combustion) capture projects are outlined. The capture technologies for these 2 demonstration projects are described. 1 map., 2 photos.

  11. Intelsat VI Capture Attempt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The first single crewmember EVA capture attempt of the Intelsat VI as seen from Endeavour's aft flight deck windows. EVA Mission Specialist Pierre Thuot standing on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) end effector platform, with the satellite capture bar attempting to attach it to the free floating communications satellite.

  12. Large Size and Slow Rotation of the Trans-Neptunian Object (225088) 2007 OR10 Discovered from Herschel and K2 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pál, András; Kiss, Csaba; Müller, Thomas G.; Molnár, László; Szabó, Róbert; Szabó, Gyula M.; Sárneczky, Krisztián; Kiss, László L.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first comprehensive thermal and rotational analysis of the second most distant trans-Neptunian object (TNOs) (225088) 2007 OR10. We combined optical light curves provided by the Kepler Space Telescope–K2 extended mission and thermal infrared data provided by the Herschel Space Observatory. We found that (225088) 2007 OR10 is likely to be larger and darker than derived by earlier studies: we obtained a diameter of d={1535}-225+75 {{km}} which places (225088) 2007 OR10 in the biggest top three TNOs. The corresponding visual geometric albedo is {p}V={0.089}-0.009+0.031. The light-curve analysis revealed a slow rotation rate of Prot = 44.81 ± 0.37 hr, superseded by very few objects. The most likely light-curve solution is double-peaked with a slight asymmetry; however, we cannot safely rule out the possibility of having a rotation period of Prot = 22.40 ± 0.18 hr, which corresponds to a single-peaked solution. Due to the size and slow rotation, the shape of the object should be a MacLaurin ellipsoid, so the light variation should be caused by surface inhomogeneities. Its newly derived larger diameter also implies larger surface gravity and a more likely retention of volatiles—CH4, CO, and N2—on the surface.

  13. Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, S

    2007-10-03

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several

  14. Lunar Sulfur Capture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berggren, Mark; Zubrin, Robert; Bostwick-White, Emily

    2013-01-01

    The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) protects in situ resource utilization (ISRU) hardware from corrosion, and reduces contaminant levels in water condensed for electrolysis. The LSCS uses a lunar soil sorbent to trap over 98 percent of sulfur gases and about two-thirds of halide gases evolved during hydrogen reduction of lunar soils. LSCS soil sorbent is based on lunar minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that trap sulfur and halide gas contaminants in a fixed-bed reactor held at temperatures between 250 and 400 C, allowing moisture produced during reduction to pass through in vapor phase. Small amounts of Earth-based polishing sorbents consisting of zinc oxide and sodium aluminate are used to reduce contaminant concentrations to one ppm or less. The preferred LSCS configuration employs lunar soil beneficiation to boost concentrations of reactive sorbent minerals. Lunar soils contain sulfur in concentrations of about 0.1 percent, and halogen compounds including chlorine and fluorine in concentrations of about 0.01 percent. These contaminants are released as gases such as H2S, COS, CS2,HCl, and HF during thermal ISRU processing with hydrogen or other reducing gases. Removal of contaminant gases is required during ISRU processing to prevent hardware corrosion, electrolyzer damage, and catalyst poisoning. The use of Earth-supplied, single-use consumables to entirely remove contaminants at the levels existing in lunar soils would make many ISRU processes unattractive due to the large mass of consumables relative to the mass of oxygen produced. The LSCS concept of using a primary sorbent prepared from lunar soil was identified as a method by which the majority of contaminants could be removed from process gas streams, thereby substantially reducing the required mass of Earth-supplied consumables. The LSCS takes advantage of minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that are present in lunar soil to trap sulfur and halide gases in a fixedbed reactor

  15. Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Sudowe, Ralf; Folden, Charles M., III; Nitsche, Heino; Hoffman, Darleane C.

    2005-01-15

    The overall objective of this project is the measurement of neutron capture cross sections of importance to stewardship science and astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis, while at the same time helping to train the next generation of scientists with expertise relevant to U.S. national nuclear security missions and to stewardship science. A primary objective of this project is to study neutron capture cross sections for various stable and unstable isotopes that will contribute to the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program by providing improved data for modeling and interpretation of nuclear device performance. Much of the information obtained will also be important in astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis. Measurements of these neutron capture cross sections are being conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility using the unique Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). In our early discussions with the DANCE group, decisions were made on the first cross sections to be measured and how our expertise in target preparation, radiochemical separations chemistry, and data analysis could best be applied. The initial emphasis of the project was on preparing suitable targets of both natural and separated stable europium isotopes in preparation for the ultimate goal of preparing a sufficiently large target of radioactive 155Eu (t1/2 = 4.7 years) and other radioactive and stable species for neutron cross-section measurements at DANCE. Our Annual Report, ''Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei'' by J. M. Schwantes, R. Sudowe, C. M. Folden III, H. Nitsche, and D. C. Hoffman, submitted to NNSA in December 2003, gives details about the initial considerations and scope of the project. During the current reporting period, electroplated targets of natural Eu together with valuable, stable, and isotopically pure 151Eu and 153Eu, and isotopically separated 154Sm were measured for

  16. Encapsulated liquid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Vericella, John J; Baker, Sarah E; Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Duoss, Eric B; Hardin, James O; Lewicki, James; Glogowski, Elizabeth; Floyd, William C; Valdez, Carlos A; Smith, William L; Satcher, Joe H; Bourcier, William L; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Lewis, Jennifer A; Aines, Roger D

    2015-01-01

    Drawbacks of current carbon dioxide capture methods include corrosivity, evaporative losses and fouling. Separating the capture solvent from infrastructure and effluent gases via microencapsulation provides possible solutions to these issues. Here we report carbon capture materials that may enable low-cost and energy-efficient capture of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Polymer microcapsules composed of liquid carbonate cores and highly permeable silicone shells are produced by microfluidic assembly. This motif couples the capacity and selectivity of liquid sorbents with high surface area to facilitate rapid and controlled carbon dioxide uptake and release over repeated cycles. While mass transport across the capsule shell is slightly lower relative to neat liquid sorbents, the surface area enhancement gained via encapsulation provides an order-of-magnitude increase in carbon dioxide absorption rates for a given sorbent mass. The microcapsules are stable under typical industrial operating conditions and may be used in supported packing and fluidized beds for large-scale carbon capture. PMID:25652243

  17. Encapsulated liquid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vericella, John J.; Baker, Sarah E.; Stolaroff, Joshuah K.; Duoss, Eric B.; Hardin, James O.; Lewicki, James; Glogowski, Elizabeth; Floyd, William C.; Valdez, Carlos A.; Smith, William L.; Satcher, Joe H.; Bourcier, William L.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Lewis, Jennifer A.; Aines, Roger D.

    2015-02-01

    Drawbacks of current carbon dioxide capture methods include corrosivity, evaporative losses and fouling. Separating the capture solvent from infrastructure and effluent gases via microencapsulation provides possible solutions to these issues. Here we report carbon capture materials that may enable low-cost and energy-efficient capture of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Polymer microcapsules composed of liquid carbonate cores and highly permeable silicone shells are produced by microfluidic assembly. This motif couples the capacity and selectivity of liquid sorbents with high surface area to facilitate rapid and controlled carbon dioxide uptake and release over repeated cycles. While mass transport across the capsule shell is slightly lower relative to neat liquid sorbents, the surface area enhancement gained via encapsulation provides an order-of-magnitude increase in carbon dioxide absorption rates for a given sorbent mass. The microcapsules are stable under typical industrial operating conditions and may be used in supported packing and fluidized beds for large-scale carbon capture.

  18. Capture of neon atoms by sup 4 He clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Scheidemann, A.; Toennies, J.P. ); Northby, J.A. )

    1990-04-16

    Neon atoms are captured by helium clusters in a crossed-beam experiment. The capture process depends strongly on the cluster beam source conditions. We identify a sharply defined region corresponding to expansions passing near the critical point for which the capture probability is anomalously large.

  19. Adaptive Objectness for Object Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Pengpeng; Pang, Yu; Liao, Chunyuan; Mei, Xue; Ling, Haibin

    2016-07-01

    Object tracking is a long standing problem in vision. While great efforts have been spent to improve tracking performance, a simple yet reliable prior knowledge is left unexploited: the target object in tracking must be an object other than non-object. The recently proposed and popularized objectness measure provides a natural way to model such prior in visual tracking. Thus motivated, in this paper we propose to adapt objectness for visual object tracking. Instead of directly applying an existing objectness measure that is generic and handles various objects and environments, we adapt it to be compatible to the specific tracking sequence and object. More specifically, we use the newly proposed BING objectness as the base, and then train an object-adaptive objectness for each tracking task. The training is implemented by using an adaptive support vector machine that integrates information from the specific tracking target into the BING measure. We emphasize that the benefit of the proposed adaptive objectness, named ADOBING, is generic. To show this, we combine ADOBING with seven top performed trackers in recent evaluations. We run the ADOBING-enhanced trackers with their base trackers on two popular benchmarks, the CVPR2013 benchmark (50 sequences) and the Princeton Tracking Benchmark (100 sequences). On both benchmarks, our methods not only consistently improve the base trackers, but also achieve the best known performances. Noting that the way we integrate objectness in visual tracking is generic and straightforward, we expect even more improvement by using tracker-specific objectness.

  20. IMPACCT: Carbon Capture Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    IMPACCT Project: IMPACCT’s 15 projects seek to develop technologies for existing coal-fired power plants that will lower the cost of carbon capture. Short for “Innovative Materials and Processes for Advanced Carbon Capture Technologies,” the IMPACCT Project is geared toward minimizing the cost of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plant exhaust by developing materials and processes that have never before been considered for this application. Retrofitting coal-fired power plants to capture the CO2 they produce would enable greenhouse gas reductions without forcing these plants to close, shifting away from the inexpensive and abundant U.S. coal supply.

  1. Love Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cusack, Lynne

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the role of "security" or "transition" objects, such as a blanket or stuffed toy, in children's development of self-comfort and autonomy. Notes the influence of parents in the child-object relationship, and discusses children's responses to losing a security object, and the developmental point at which a child will give up such an…

  2. Comparison of Ring-Buffer-Based Packet Capture Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Steven Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Traditional packet-capture solutions using commodity hardware incur a large amount of overhead as packets are copied multiple times by the operating system. This overhead slows sensor systems to a point where they are unable to keep up with high bandwidth traffic, resulting in dropped packets. Incomplete packet capture files hinder network monitoring and incident response efforts. While costly commercial hardware exists to capture high bandwidth traffic, several software-based approaches exist to improve packet capture performance using commodity hardware.

  3. A survey of urban noise annoyance in a large Brazilian city: the importance of a subjective analysis in conjunction with an objective analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zannin, Paulo H.T.; Calixto, Alfredo; Diniz, Fabiano B.; Ferreira, Jose A.C

    2003-03-01

    This study describes the reaction to environmental noise of the population of Curitiba ({approx}1.6 million inhabitants). Out of 1000 distributed forms, 860 were returned. The main isolated noise sources revealed by the survey as disturbing were traffic (73%) and neighbors (38%). As a class, neighborhood noise was pointed out as the most disturbing type of noise as 100% of the surveyed people indicated at least one of the items belonging to this class: neighbors, animals, sirens, civil construction, religion temples, night clubs, toys and domestic electric appliances. The main outcomes of exposure to noise were: irritability (58%), difficulty to concentrate (42%), sleeping disorders (20%) and headaches (20%). In this survey, the importance of the realization of objective surveys, in other words, noise emission measurements in conjunction with the subjective evaluation of the reaction of the urban population to the environmental noise, is also discussed. The present survey shows that in the subjective evaluation performed in the city of Curitiba, the perception of the population is that the urban noise has increased. On the other hand, another study conducted in the same city, where only the noise emission levels were evaluated, has showed a decrease on the urban noise.

  4. An object-oriented C++ implementation of Davidson method for finding a few selected extreme eigenpairs of a large, sparse, real, symmetric matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziubak, Tomasz; Matulewski, Jacek

    2007-10-01

    A C++ class named Davidson is presented for determining a few eigenpairs with lowest or alternatively highest values of a large, real, symmetric matrix. The algorithm described by Stathopoulos and Fischer is used. The exception mechanism is involved to report the errors. The class is written in ANSI C++, so it is fully portable. In addition a console program as well as a program with graphical user interface for Microsoft Windows is attached, which allow one to calculate the lowest eigenstates of time-independent Schrödinger equation for a given binding potential in one, two or three spatial dimensions. The package contains the classes providing often used potential functions (model atom potential, Coulomb potential, square well potential and Kramers-Henneberger well potential) as well as a possibility to use any potential stored in a file (then any dimensionality of the problem is allowed). The described code is the subject of M.Sc. thesis of T.D. prepared under the supervision of J.M. Program summaryProgram title: Davidson Catalogue identifier: ADZM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3 037 055 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 20 002 609 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: All Operating system: Any RAM: User's parameters dependent Word size: 32 and 64 bits Supplementary material: Test results for the 2D and 3D cases is available Classification: 4, 4.8 Nature of problem: Finding a few extreme eigenpairs of a real, symmetric, sparse matrix. Examples in quantum optics (interaction of matter with a laser field). Solution method: Davidson algorithm Running time: The test example included in the distribution package (1D matrix) takes

  5. Objective lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olczak, Eugene G. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An objective lens and a method for using same. The objective lens has a first end, a second end, and a plurality of optical elements. The optical elements are positioned between the first end and the second end and are at least substantially symmetric about a plane centered between the first end and the second end.

  6. Spatial Knowledge Capture Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-05-16

    The Spatial Knowledge Capture Library is a set of algorithms to capture regularities in shapes and trajectories through space and time. We have applied Spatial Knowledge Capture to model the actions of human experts in spatial domains, such as an AWACS Weapons Director task simulation. The library constructs a model to predict the expert’s response to sets of changing cues, such as the movements and actions of adversaries on a battlefield, The library includes amore » highly configurable feature extraction functionality, which supports rapid experimentation to discover causative factors. We use k-medoid clustering to group similar episodes of behavior, and construct a Markov model of system state transitions induced by agents’ actions.« less

  7. AKM capture device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwell, William D.

    1987-01-01

    In an effort to recover the Westar and Palapa satellites and the considerable investment each represented, NASA and Hughes undertook the Satellite Retrieval Mission. The mechanism used to capture each of the errant satellites was the AKM (Apogee Kick Motor) Capture Device (ACD), also referred to as the Stinger. The ACD had three interface requirements: interface with the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) for transportation to and stabilization of the spacecrafts; interface with each satellite for retrieval; and finally, interface with the Shuttle's Remote Manipulator System (RMS or robot arm) for satellite transport back to the Orbiter's payload bay. The majority of the design requirements were associated with the capture and release of the satellites. In addition to these unique requirements, the general EVA, RMS grapple, and RMS manipulation requirements applied. These requirements included thermal, glare, snag, RMS runaway and crewman safety considerations.

  8. Contingent Attentional Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger; Folk, Charles L.

    1994-01-01

    Four experiments address the degree of top-down selectivity in attention capture by feature singletons through manipulations of the spatial relationship and featural similarity of target and distractor singletons in a modified spatial cuing paradigm. Contrary to previous studies, all four experiments show that when searching for a singleton target, an irrelevant featural singleton captures attention only when defined by the same feature value as the target. Experiments 2, 3, and 4 provide a potential explanation for this empirical discrepancy by showing that irrelevant singletons can produce distraction effects that are independent of shifts of spatial attention. The results further support the notion that attentional capture is contingent on top-down attention control settings but indicates that such settings can be instantiated at the level of feature values.

  9. US Spacesuit Knowledge Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Thomas, Ken; McMann, Joe; Dolan, Kristi; Bitterly, Rose; Lewis, Cathleen

    2011-01-01

    The ability to learn from both the mistakes and successes of the past is vital to assuring success in the future. Due to the close physical interaction between spacesuit systems and human beings as users, spacesuit technology and usage lends itself rather uniquely to the benefits realized from the skillful organization of historical information; its dissemination; the collection and identification of artifacts; and the education of those in the field. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), other organizations and individuals have been performing United States (U.S.) Spacesuit Knowledge Capture since the beginning of space exploration. Avenues used to capture the knowledge have included publication of reports; conference presentations; specialized seminars; and classes usually given by veterans in the field. More recently the effort has been more concentrated and formalized whereby a new avenue of spacesuit knowledge capture has been added to the archives in which videotaping occurs engaging both current and retired specialists in the field presenting technical scope specifically for education and preservation of knowledge. With video archiving, all these avenues of learning can now be brought to life with the real experts presenting their wealth of knowledge on screen for future learners to enjoy. Scope and topics of U.S. spacesuit knowledge capture have included lessons learned in spacesuit technology, experience from the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab and Shuttle programs, hardware certification, design, development and other program components, spacesuit evolution and experience, failure analysis and resolution, and aspects of program management. Concurrently, U.S. spacesuit knowledge capture activities have progressed to a level where NASA, the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Hamilton Sundstrand (HS) and the spacesuit community are now working together to provide a comprehensive closed-looped spacesuit knowledge capture system which includes

  10. Theoretical Screening of Mixed Solid Sorbents for CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Y; Sorescu, D C; Luebke, D; Li, B Y; Zhang, K; King, D

    2013-05-16

    We are establishing a theoretical procedure to identify most potential candidates of CO{sub 2} solid sorbents from a large solid material databank to meet the DOE programmatic goal for energy conversion; A further objective is to explore the optimal working conditions for the promised CO{sub 2} solid sorbents, especially from room to warm T ranges with optimal energy usage, used for both pre- and post-combustion capture technologies.