Science.gov

Sample records for large scale plasma

  1. Scaled Laboratory Collisionless Shock Experiments in the Large Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. E.; Schaeffer, D.; Everson, E.; Bondarenko, A.; Winske, D.; Constantin, C.; Niemann, C.

    2013-12-01

    Collisionless shocks in space plasmas have been investigated since the fifties and are typically studied via in-situ satellite observations, which are limited due to the large structure of collisionless shocks in space environments relative to the satellite observation platform. Scaled, repeatable experiments in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA provide a test bed for studying collisionless shocks in the laboratory, where questions of ion and electron heating and acceleration can be addressed and examined in detail. The experiments are performed by ablating a graphite or plastic target using the Raptor kilojoule-class laser facility at UCLA. The laser provides an on-target energy in the range of 100-500 J that drives a super-Alfvénic (MA > 1) debris plasma across a background magnetic field (200-800 G) into the ambient, magnetized LAPD plasma. Typical plasma parameters in the LAPD consist of a H+ or He+ ambient plasma with a core column (diameter > 20 cm ) density ni ~ 1013 cm-3 and electron temperature Te ~ 10 eV embedded in a larger plasma discharge (diameter ~ 80 cm) of density ni ~ 1012 cm-3 and Te ~ 5 eV. The ambient ion temperature is Ti ~ 1 eV. Experimental results from the latest collisionless shock campaign will be presented and compared with two dimensional hybrid simulations of the experiment. Fielded diagnostics include Thomson scattering, ion spectroscopy, magnetic flux probes, Langmuir probes, and microwave reflectometry.

  2. The Conversion of Large-Scale Turbulent Energy to Plasma Heat In Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Turbulence in space and astrophysical plasmas plays a key role in the conversion of the energy of violent events and instabilities at large scales into plasma heat. The turbulent cascade transfers this energy from the large scales at which the motions are driven down to small scales, and this essentially fluid process can be understood in terms of nonlinear wave-wave interactions. At sufficiently small scales, for which the dynamics is often weakly collisional, collisionless mechanisms damp the turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations, and this essentially kinetic process can be understood in terms of linear wave-particle interactions. In this talk, I will summarize the possible channels of the turbulent dissipation in a weakly collisional plasma, and present recent results from kinetic numerical simulations of plasma turbulence. Finally, I will discuss strategies for the definitive identification of the dominant dissipation channels using spacecraft measurements of turbulence in the solar wind.

  3. Large-scale quantization in space plasmas (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    n plasmas, Debye screening structures correlations between particles. In our recent paper [Livadiotis & McComas, Entropy, 15, 1118; Nature, doi:10.1038/nature.2013.13159], we identify a phase-space minimum h* that connects the energy of particles within a Debye sphere to an equivalent wave frequency. In theory, there was no a priori reason to expect a single value of h* across different plasmas. However, we find that this quantity remains constant across a wide range of space plasmas, from the solar wind and the planetary magnetospheres in the inner heliosphere to the distant plasma in the inner heliosheath and the local interstellar medium. We used four independent methods to derive the value of h* 2π(1.2×0.4)×10^{-22} Js: (1) Ulysses solar wind measurements, (2) a variety of space plasmas spanning a broad range of physical properties, (3) the entropic limit emerging from statistical mechanics applied to space plasmas, (4) waiting-time distributions of explosive events in space plasmas. Finding a constant value for h* in a variety of different of systems, similar to the classical Planck constant but 12 orders of magnitude larger, reveals a possible type of new quantization in plasmas but in a larger scale. The value of h* calculated for the solar wind ion-electron plasma using Ulysses daily measurements. (a) Diagram of the smallest particle energy ɛc vs. the particle lifetime tc in a Debye sphere (log-log scale). (b) Their product, 2ɛctc, depicted as a function of heliocentric distance r. (c) Histogram of the values of log h*. Four Different Methods of the Estimation of h* Four independent methods to calculate the value of h* 2π(1.2×0.4)×10-22 Js.

  4. Modeling parametric scattering instabilities in large-scale expanding plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Hüller, S.; Pesme, D.; Casanova, M.; Loiseau, P.; Labaune, Ch.

    2006-06-01

    We present results from two-dimensional simulations of long scale-length laser-plasma interaction experiments performed at LULI. With the goal of predictive modeling of such experiments with our code Harmony2D, we take into account realistic plasma density and velocity profiles, the propagation of the laser light beam and the scattered light, as well as the coupling with the ion acoustic waves in order to describe Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). Laser pulse shaping is taken into account to follow the evolution ofthe SBS reflectivity as close as possible to the experiment. The light reflectivity is analyzed by distinguishing the backscattered light confined in the solid angle defined by the aperture of the incident light beam and the scattered light outside this cone. As in the experiment, it is observed that the aperture of the scattered light tends to increase with the mean intensity of the RPP-smoothed laser beam. A further common feature between simulations and experiments is the observed localization of the SBS-driven ion acoustic waves (IAW) in the front part of the target (with respect to the incoming laser beam).

  5. Collective backscattering of gyrotron radiation by small-scale plasma density fluctuations in large helical device.

    PubMed

    Kharchev, Nikolay; Tanaka, Kenji; Kubo, Shin; Igami, Hiroe; Batanov, German; Petrov, Alexandr; Sarksyan, Karen; Skvortsova, Nina; Azuma, Yoshifumi; Tsuji-Iio, Shunji

    2008-10-01

    A version of the collective backscattering diagnostic using gyrotron radiation for small-scale turbulence is described. The diagnostic is used to measure small-scale (k(s) approximately 34 cm(-1)) plasma density fluctuations in large helical device experiments on the electron cyclotron heating of plasma with the use of 200 kW 82.7 GHz heating gyrotron. A good signal to noise ratio during plasma production phase was obtained, while contamination of stray light increased during plasma build-up phase. The effect of the stray radiation was investigated. The available quasioptical system of the heating system was utilized for this purpose. PMID:19044538

  6. Collective backscattering of gyrotron radiation by small-scale plasma density fluctuations in large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Kharchev, Nikolay; Batanov, German; Petrov, Alexandr; Sarksyan, Karen; Skvortsova, Nina; Tanaka, Kenji; Kubo, Shin; Igami, Hiroe; Azuma, Yoshifumi; Tsuji-Iio, Shunji

    2008-10-15

    A version of the collective backscattering diagnostic using gyrotron radiation for small-scale turbulence is described. The diagnostic is used to measure small-scale (k{sub s}{approx_equal}34 cm{sup -1}) plasma density fluctuations in large helical device experiments on the electron cyclotron heating of plasma with the use of 200 kW 82.7 GHz heating gyrotron. A good signal to noise ratio during plasma production phase was obtained, while contamination of stray light increased during plasma build-up phase. The effect of the stray radiation was investigated. The available quasioptical system of the heating system was utilized for this purpose.

  7. Meter-Scale Large-Area Plasma Sources for Next-Generation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setsuhara, Yuichi

    Development of large-area high-density plasma sources with a scale length of meters is strongly desired for a variety of plasma processes, especially the flat panel display fabrications. Considering design issues for plasma production with high-frequency power sources to satisfy the requirements for enlargement of source-size exceeding a meter, the power deposition profile and hence the plasma distribution become inherently non-uniform, largely due to standing wave effects, which cannot be avoided with increasing source size when the source employs power-coupling devices (inductive antennas or capacitive electrodes) with a scale-length equivalent to or as long as the 1/4 wavelength of the HF-power transmission. In this article, these constraints associated with large-area sources are reviewed, and an inductively coupled RF plasma source with multiple low-inductance antenna (LIA) units is presented as a promising candidate to avoid the problems with conventional sources.

  8. Assimilative Modeling of Large-Scale Equatorial Plasma Trenches Observed by C/NOFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Retterer, J. M.; de La Beaujardiere, O.; Burke, W. J.; Roddy, P. A.; Pfaff, R. F.; Hunton, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    Low-latitude plasma irregularities commonly observed during post sunset local times have been studied extensively by ground-based measurements such as coherent and incoherent scatter radars and ionosondes, as well as by satellite observations. The pre-reversal enhancement in the upward plasma drift due to eastward electric fields has been identified as the primary cause of these irregularities. Reports of plasma depletions at post-midnight and early morning local times are scarce and are typically limited to storm time conditions. Such dawn plasma depletions were frequently observed by C/NOFS in June 2008 [de La Beaujardière et al., 2009]. We are able to qualitatively reproduce the large-scale density depletion observed by the Planar Langmuir Probe (PLP) on June 17, 2008 [Su et al., 2009], based on the assimilative physics-based ionospheric model (PBMOD) using available electric field data obtained from the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) as the model input. In comparison, no plasma depletion or irregularity is obtained from the climatology version of our model when large upward drift velocities caused by observed eastward electric fields were absent. In this presentation, we extend our study for the entire month of June 2008 to exercise the forecast capability of large-scale density trenches by PBMOD with available VEFI data. Geophys. Res. Lett, 36, L00C06, doi:10.1029/2009GL038884, 2009.Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L00C02, doi:10.1029/ 2009GL038946, 2009.

  9. Large-scale jets in the magnetosheath and plasma penetration across the magnetopause: THEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. V.; Suvorova, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms multipoint observation of the plasma and magnetic fields, conducted simultaneously in the dayside magnetosheath and magnetosphere, were used to collect 646 large-scale magnetosheath plasma jets interacting with the magnetopause. The jets were identified as dense and fast streams of the magnetosheath plasma whose energy density is higher than that of the upstream solar wind. The jet interaction with the magnetopause was revealed from sudden inward motion of the magnetopause and an enhancement in the geomagnetic field. The penetration was determined as appearance of the magnetosheath plasma against the background of the hot magnetospheric particle population. We found that almost 60% of the jets penetrated through the magnetopause. Vast majority of the penetrating jets was characterized by high velocities V > 220 km/s and kinetic βk > 1 that corresponded to a combination of finite Larmor radius effect with a mechanism of impulsive penetration. The average plasma flux in the penetrating jets was found to be 1.5 times larger than the average plasma flux of the solar wind. The average rate of jet-related penetration of the magnetosheath plasma into the dayside magnetosphere was estimated to be ~1029 particles/d. The rate varies highly with time and can achieve values of 1.5 × 1029 particles/h that is comparable with estimates of the total amount of plasma entering the dayside magnetosphere.

  10. Large-scale plasma transport in the magnetotail during different solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myllys, Minna; Kilpua, Emilia; Pulkkinen, Tuija

    2015-04-01

    We present results from a study on how solar wind conditions affect the energy and plasma transport in the geomagnetic tail and how they modify the large-scale magnetotail configuration. We study the large-scale plasma transport in the magnetotail using tail observations from the five THEMIS spacecrafts during 2008-2011. During this period the THEMIS spacecraft spent a considerable time in the geomagnetic tail allowing us to compile statistical maps of plasma flow and energy transport properties. Furthermore, this time period corresponds to the extended and prolonged solar activity minimum between solar cycle 23 and 24 and relatively quiet rising phase of cycle 24. This allowed us to investigate magnetospheric processes and solar wind-magnetospheric coupling during relatively quiet state of the magnetosphere. In order to separate the role of different solar wind parameters and their activity level on the average sunward and tailward plasma flows and the occurrence rate of fast plasma bursts, the magnetospheric data was binned according to solar wind speed, dynamic pressure and IMF measurements. Our results show that the tailward flow bursts are not dependent on the solar wind conditions, but that the sign of the IMF z-component (GSM coordinates) causes the most visible effect to the occurence rate and pattern of sunward flows.

  11. Hybrid-PIC Algorithms for Simulation of Large-Scale Plasma Jet Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale

    2009-11-01

    Merging coaxial plasma jets are envisioned for use in magneto-inertial fusion schemes as the source of an imploding plasma liner. An experimental program at HyperV is considering the generation of large plasma jets (length scales on the order of centimeters) at high densities (10^16-10^17 cm-3) in long coaxial accelerators. We describe the Hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) methods implemented in the code LSP for this parameter regime and present simulation results of the HyperV accelerator. A radiation transport algorithm has also been implemented into LSP so that the effect of radiation cooling on the jet mach number can be included self-consistently into the Hybrid PIC formalism.

  12. Bursts of Terahertz Radiation from Large-Scale Plasmas Irradiated by Relativistic Picosecond Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Liao, G Q; Li, Y T; Li, C; Su, L N; Zheng, Y; Liu, M; Wang, W M; Hu, Z D; Yan, W C; Dunn, J; Nilsen, J; Hunter, J; Liu, Y; Wang, X; Chen, L M; Ma, J L; Lu, X; Jin, Z; Kodama, R; Sheng, Z M; Zhang, J

    2015-06-26

    Powerful terahertz (THz) radiation is observed from large-scale underdense preplasmas in front of a solid target irradiated obliquely with picosecond relativistic intense laser pulses. The radiation covers an extremely broad spectrum with about 70% of its energy located in the high frequency regime over 10 THz. The pulse energy of the radiation is found to be above 100  μJ per steradian in the laser specular direction at an optimal preplasma scale length around 40-50  μm. Particle-in-cell simulations indicate that the radiation is mainly produced by linear mode conversion from electron plasma waves, which are excited successively via stimulated Raman scattering instability and self-modulated laser wakefields during the laser propagation in the preplasma. This radiation can be used not only as a powerful source for applications, but also as a unique diagnostic of parametric instabilities of laser propagation in plasmas. PMID:26197129

  13. Initial operation of a large-scale Plasma Source Ion Implantation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.P.; Henins, I.; Gribble, R.J.; Reass, W.A.; Faehl, R.J.; Nastasi, M.A.; Rej, D.J.

    1993-10-01

    In Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII), a workpiece to be implanted is immersed in a weakly ionized plasma and pulsed to a high negative voltage. Plasma ions are accelerated toward the workpiece and implanted in its surface. Experimental PSII results reported in the literature have been for small workpieces. A large scale PSII experiment has recently been assembled at Los Alamos, in which stainless steel and aluminum workpieces with surface areas over 4 m{sup 2} have been implanted in a 1.5 m-diameter, 4.6 m-length cylindrical vacuum chamber. Initial implants have been performed at 50 kV with 20 {mu}s pulses of 53 A peak current, repeated at 500 Hz, although the pulse modulator will eventually supply 120 kV pulses of 60 A peak current at 2 kHz. A 1,000 W, 13.56 MHz capacitively-coupled source produces nitrogen plasma densities in the 10{sup 15} m{sup {minus}3} range at neutral pressures as low as 0.02 mtorr. A variety of antenna configurations have been tried, with and without axial magnetic fields of up to 60 gauss. Measurements of sheath expansion, modulator voltage and current, and plasma density fill-in following a pulse are presented. The authors consider secondary electron emission, x-ray production, workpiece arcing, implant conformality, and workpiece and chamber heating.

  14. Large-scale plasma patterning of transparent graphene electrode on flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hye; Ko, Euna; Hwang, Joonki; Pham, Xuan-Hung; Lee, Joo Heon; Lee, Sung Hwan; Tran, Van-Khue; Kim, Jong-Ho; Park, Jin-Goo; Choo, Jaebum; Han, Kwi Nam; Seong, Gi Hun

    2015-03-10

    Graphene, a two-dimensional carbon material, has attracted significant interest for applications in flexible electronics as an alternative transparent electrode to indium tin oxide. However, it still remains a challenge to develop a simple, reproducible, and controllable fabrication technique for producing homogeneous large-scale graphene films and creating uniform patterns with desired shapes at defined positions. Here, we present a simple route to scalable fabrication of flexible transparent graphene electrodes using an oxygen plasma etching technique in a capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) system. Ascorbic acid-assisted chemical reduction enables the large-scale production of graphene with solution-based processability. Oxygen plasma in the CCP system facilitates the reproducible patterning of graphene electrodes, which allows controllable feature sizes and shapes on flexible plastic substrates. The resulting graphene electrode exhibits a high conductivity of 80 S cm(-1) and a transparency of 76% and retains excellent flexibility upon hard bending at an angle of ±175° and after repeated bending cycles. A simple LED circuit integrated on the patterned graphene film demonstrates the feasibility of graphene electrodes for use in flexible transparent electrodes. PMID:25692852

  15. Plasma turbulence driven by transversely large-scale standing shear Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Nagendra; Rao, Sathyanarayan

    2012-12-15

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study generation of turbulence consisting of transversely small-scale dispersive Alfven and electrostatic waves when plasma is driven by a large-scale standing shear Alfven wave (LS-SAW). The standing wave is set up by reflecting a propagating LS-SAW. The ponderomotive force of the standing wave generates transversely large-scale density modifications consisting of density cavities and enhancements. The drifts of the charged particles driven by the ponderomotive force and those directly caused by the fields of the standing LS-SAW generate non-thermal features in the plasma. Parametric instabilities driven by the inherent plasma nonlinearities associated with the LS-SAW in combination with the non-thermal features generate small-scale electromagnetic and electrostatic waves, yielding a broad frequency spectrum ranging from below the source frequency of the LS-SAW to ion cyclotron and lower hybrid frequencies and beyond. The power spectrum of the turbulence has peaks at distinct perpendicular wave numbers (k{sub Up-Tack }) lying in the range d{sub e}{sup -1}-6d{sub e}{sup -1}, d{sub e} being the electron inertial length, suggesting non-local parametric decay from small to large k{sub Up-Tack }. The turbulence spectrum encompassing both electromagnetic and electrostatic fluctuations is also broadband in parallel wave number (k{sub ||}). In a standing-wave supported density cavity, the ratio of the perpendicular electric to magnetic field amplitude is R(k{sub Up-Tack }) = |E{sub Up-Tack }(k{sub Up-Tack })/|B{sub Up-Tack }(k{sub Up-Tack })| Much-Less-Than V{sub A} for k{sub Up-Tack }d{sub e} < 0.5, where V{sub A} is the Alfven velocity. The characteristic features of the broadband plasma turbulence are compared with those available from satellite observations in space plasmas.

  16. Global properties of the plasma in the outer heliosphere. I - Large-scale structure and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, A.; Mihalov, J. D.; Gazis, P. R.; Lazarus, A. J.; Belcher, J. W.; Gordon, G. S., Jr.; Mcnutt, R. L., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Pioneers 10 and 11, and Voyager 2, have active plasma analyzers as they proceed through heliocentric distances of the order of 30-50 AU, facilitating comparative studies of the global character of the outer solar wind and its variation over the solar cycle. Careful study of these data show that wind ion temperature remains constant beyond 15 AU, and that there may be large-scale variations of temperature with celestial longitude and heliographic latitude. There has thus far been no indication of a heliospheric terminal shock.

  17. Observation of the saturation of Langmuir waves driven by ponderomotive force in a large scale plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkwood, R. K.; Moody, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kruer, W. L.; Estabrook, K. G.; Wharton, K. B.; Williams, E. A.; Berger, R. L.

    1997-06-22

    We report the observation of amplification of a probe laser beam (I {le} 1 {times} 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) in a large scale ({approximately} 1 mm) plasma by interaction with a pumping laser beam (I = 2 {times} 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) and a stimulated Langmuir wave. When the plasma density is adjusted to allow the Langmuir wave dispersion to match the difference frequency and wave number of the two beams, amplification factors as high as {times} 2.5 result. Interpretation of this amplification as scattering of pump beam energy by the Langmuir wave that is produced by the ponderomotive force of the two beams, allows the dependence of Langmuir wave amplitude on ponderomotive force to be measured. It is found that the Langmuir wave amplitude saturates at a level that depends on ion wave damping, and is generally consistent with secondary ion wave instabilities limiting its growth. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  18. The formation of small-scale irregularities as a result of ionospheric plasma mixing by large-scale drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, S. V.

    1990-08-01

    This paper reports some results derived by studying statistical characteristics of irregularities which are produced as a result of plasma mixing by random drifts. It is found that as time progresses, the irregularity amplitude grows in proportion to sq rt of t. Characteristics of the irregularity spectrum undergo more violent changes. For example, the spectrum width grows according to a law close to the exponential one. Thus, relatively large-scale random motions rapidly generate a broad spectrum of small-scale irregularities as small as meter scales. A broadening of the spectrum is stopped by the transverse diffusion or by the longitudinal diffusion and recombination. An assessment is made of the influence of these processes.

  19. Properties of large scale plasma flow during the early stage of the plasmaspheric refilling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Craven, P.; Torr, D. G.; Richards, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to better characterize the macroscopic properties of the interhemisphere plasma flow by solving a more complete set of hydrodynamic equations than that solved previously. Specifically, the ion continuity, momentum and energy equations were solved for the plasma flow along the closed magnetic field lines. During the initial stage of the supersonic outflow in the equatorial region, the ions cool substantially. Using the hydrodynamic model for the large-scale plasma flow, the dynamics of shocks was examined which form in the geomagnetic flux tubes during the early stages of refilling. These shocks are more like those forming in neutral gases than the electrostatic shocks driven by microinstabilities involving ion-ion interaction. Therefore, the shocks seen in the hydrodynamic model are termed as hydrodynamic shocks. Such shocks are generally unsteady and therefore the usual shock jump conditions given by Rankine-Hugoniot relations are not strictly applicable to them. The density, flow velocity and temperature structures associated with the shocks are examined for both asymmetrical and symmetrical flows. In the asymmetrical flow the outflow from one of two conjugate ionospheres is dominant. On the other hand, in the symmetrical case outflows from the two ionospheric sources are identical. Both cases are treated by a two-stream model. In the late type of flow, the early-time refilling shows a relaxation type of oscillation, which is driven by the large-scale interactions between the two identical streams. After this early stage, the resulting temperature structure shows some interesting features. In the equatorial region the streams are isothermal, but in the off-equatorial regions the streams have quite different temperatures, and also densities and flow velocities. The dense and slow stream is found to be warmer than the low-density fast stream. In the late stage of refilling, the temperature is found to steadily increase from the conjugate

  20. Self-organization of the large-scale planetary and plasma drift vortices.

    PubMed

    Nezlin, Mikhail V.; Chernikov, Gennady P.; Rylov, Andrey Yu.; Titishov, Kirill B.

    1996-09-01

    This paper is a semi-review. A new understanding of the self-organization mechanism of solitary (i.e., long-lived and, in this sense, soliton-like) large-scale vortices in geophysical fluid dynamics, as well as that of drift vortices in the magnetized plasma is discussed. This understanding differs from that described in a review paper by Nezlin [Chaos 4, 187-202 (1994)]. Earlier it was believed that formation of the solitary Rossby (and plasma drift) vortices was a result of equilibrium between wave dispersion and KdV-type nonlinearity. Under the influence of experimental data obtained by our team [M. V. Nezlin and E. N. Snezhkin, Rossby Vortices, Spiral Structures, Solitons (Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg, 1993)], it became obvious that the self-organization of the structures inevitably includes an essential effect of other nonlinearities; first, that presented by the Jacobian in the equations. (We replace the term "Rossby soliton" by the more exact one "the Rossby solitary vortex.") It must be noted from the very beginning that the term "self-organization" is used mainly in context with an explanation which factors (dispersion and nonlinearities of different kind) condition formation of the solitary (stable, long-lived) Rossby structures. Although, the experimental fact (see below) that the size of solitary vortices turns out to be close to the Rossby-Obukhov radius, independently of the size of the vortex local source, calls to mind the formation of an attractor. In essence, the Rossby solitary vortex self-organization process (although, only for the case of anticyclones) was described by Nycander and Sutyrin [Dyn. Atmos. Oceans 16, 473-498 (1992)]. Unfortunately, however, the authors did not use the term "self-organization." Our description, being in accord with Nycander and Sutyrin, relates not only to anticyclones, but also to anticyclones and cyclones. Second, a description of the experimental discovery of "anomalous" cyclonic-anticyclonic asymmetry is given

  1. Plasma transport at the dayside magnetopause: observations and large-scale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berchem, Jean; Richard, Robert; Escoubet, C. Philippe; Pitout, Frederic; Taylor, Matthew G.; Laasko, Harri; Masson, Arnaud; Dandouras, Iannis; Reme, Henri

    2013-04-01

    Multipoint observations made by the Cluster spacecraft as they cross the polar cusps can provide significant insight into the plasma transport that occurs at the magnetospheric boundary. In particular, the formation of discrete structures in the energy-latitude dispersion of ions observed in the cusp reflects fundamental properties of the entry and acceleration of solar wind ions at the dayside magnetopause. We present the results of a study that uses large-scale numerical simulations to determine the relationship between the structures observed in ion dispersions in the cusp and the injection process at the magnetopause. This study uses the time-dependent electric and magnetic fields predicted by three-dimensional global MHD simulations to compute the trajectories of large samples of ions launched upstream of the bow shock for different solar wind conditions. Particle information collected in the simulations is then used to reconstruct ion dispersions that are compared with Cluster observations in the cusp. Individual particle trajectories are subsequently analyzed to determine the relationship between the structures observed in the cusp and the entry and acceleration process at the dayside magnetopause.

  2. Extraction of large-scale coherent structure from plasma turbulence using rake probe and wavelet analysis in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Zhang, W.

    2006-06-15

    In fusion plasmas, intermittently occurring large-scale coherent structures in electrostatic turbulence sometimes contribute more than 50% of total transport, so the investigation on these coherent structures is important for understanding plasma confinement. New experimental techniques are required to extract these coherent structures from fluctuating signals. In this work a 12-tip poloidal rake probe was used on the HT-7 superconducting tokamak to measure plasma turbulence in the plasma edge region. Several signal analysis methods based on a biorthogonal wavelet were developed and applied to the probe data. Since the structure of the selected wavelet is every similar to that of the turbulence wave packet, information about large-scale coherent structures can be selectively extracted from the ambient turbulence. The spatiotemporal patterns of the large-scale coherent structures were reconstructed using the selected wavelets as well as those of small-scale details. These wavelet-based techniques can be applied to all kinds of plasma fluctuation diagnostics, so they possibly present a new opportunity for uncovering the mechanism underlying plasma turbulent transport.

  3. X-ray imaging of uniform large scale-length plasmas created from gas-filled targets on Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D.H.; MacGowan, B.J.; Bernat, T.P.; Klem, D.E.; Montgomery, D.S.; Moody, J.D.; Munro, D.H.; Stone, G.F. ); Hsing, W.W. ); Failor, B.H. )

    1995-01-01

    We report on the production and characterization of large scale-length plasmas created by illuminating gas-filled thin-walled balloonlike targets using the Nova laser. The targets consisted of a 5--6000 A skin surrounding 1 atm of neopentane which when ionized becomes a plasma with 10[sup 21] electrons/cm[sup 3]. Results are presented from x-ray imaging used to evaluate the uniformity of the plasma. The most uniform plasmas were produced by illuminating the target with large converging beams that overlapped to cover most of the surface of the gas bag. An alternate focus geometry using small beam spots resulted in a less uniform plasma with low density holes in it.

  4. Simultaneous excitation of large-scale geomagnetic field fluctuations and plasma density irregularities by powerful radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Kuo, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    The physical mechanism of thermal filamentation instability of radio waves whose frequencies can be as low as in the VLF band and as high as in the SHF band are investigated. This instability can excite large-scale magnetic and plasma density fluctuations simultaneously in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Relevant experiments are reviewed in terms of this instability and other mechanisms.

  5. Evolution of large-scale plasma structures in comets: Kinematics and physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Cometary and solar wind data from December 1985 through April 1986 are presented for the purpose of determining the solar wind conditions associated with comet plasma tail disconnection events (DE's). The cometary data are from The International Halley Watch Atlas of Large-Scale Phenomena (Brandt, Niedner, and Rahe, 1992). In addition, we present the kinematic analysis of 4 DE's, those of Dec. 13.5 and 31.2, 1985, and Feb. 21.7 and 28.7, 1986. The circumstances of these DE's clearly illustrate the need to analyze DE's in groups. In situ solar wind measurements from IMP-8, ICE, and PVO were used to construct the variation of solar wind speed, density, and dynamic pressure during this interval. Data from these same spacecraft plus Vega-1 were used to determine the time of 48 current sheet crossings. These data were fitted to heliospheric current sheet curves extrapolated from the corona into the heliosphere in order to determine the best-fit source surface radius for each Carrington rotation. Comparison of the solar wind conditions and 16 DE's in Halley's comet (the four DE's discussed in this paper and 12 DE's in the literature) leaves little doubt that DE's are associated primarily with crossings of the heliospheric current sheet and apparently not with any other property of the solar wind. If we assume that there is a single or primary physical mechanism and that Halley's DE's are representative, efforts at simulation should concentrate on conditions at current sheet crossings. The mechanisms consistent with this result are sunward magnetic reconnection and tailward magnetic reconnection, if tailward reconnection can be triggered by the sector boundary crossing.

  6. Fabrication and testing of gas-filled targets for large-scale plasma experiments on nova

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G.F.; Rivers, C.J.; Spragge, M.R.; Wallace, R.J.

    1996-06-01

    The proposed next-generation ICF facility, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to produce energy gain from x-ray heated {open_quotes}indirect-drive{close_quotes} fuel capsules. For indirect-drive targets, laser light heats the inside of the Au hohlraum wall and produces x rays which in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Unlike Nova targets, in NIF-scale targets laser light will propagate through several millimeters of gas, producing a plasma, before impinging upon the Au hohlraum wall. The purpose of the gas-produced plasma is to provide sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively into the hohlraum cavity. Excessive expansion of the Au wall interacts with the laser pulse and degrades the drive symmetry of the capsule implosion. The authors have begun an experimental campaign on the Nova laser to study the effect of hohlraum gas on both laser-plasma interaction and implosion symmetry. In their current NIF target design, the calculated plasma electron temperature is T{sub e} {approx} 3 keV and the electron density is N{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}.

  7. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by vortex density structures associated with interchange instability: Analytical and large scale plasma simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Lundberg, J.; Paraschiv, I.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2014-05-01

    The presence of plasma turbulence can strongly influence propagation properties of electromagnetic signals used for surveillance and communication. In particular, we are interested in the generation of low frequency plasma density irregularities in the form of coherent vortex structures. Interchange or flute type density irregularities in magnetized plasma are associated with Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. These types of density irregularities play an important role in refraction and scattering of high frequency electromagnetic signals propagating in the earth ionosphere, in high energy density physics, and in many other applications. We will discuss scattering of high frequency electromagnetic waves on low frequency density irregularities due to the presence of vortex density structures associated with interchange instability. We will also present particle-in-cell simulation results of electromagnetic scattering on vortex type density structures using the large scale plasma code LSP and compare them with analytical results.

  8. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by vortex density structures associated with interchange instability: Analytical and large scale plasma simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Lundberg, J.; Paraschiv, I.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2014-05-15

    The presence of plasma turbulence can strongly influence propagation properties of electromagnetic signals used for surveillance and communication. In particular, we are interested in the generation of low frequency plasma density irregularities in the form of coherent vortex structures. Interchange or flute type density irregularities in magnetized plasma are associated with Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. These types of density irregularities play an important role in refraction and scattering of high frequency electromagnetic signals propagating in the earth ionosphere, in high energy density physics, and in many other applications. We will discuss scattering of high frequency electromagnetic waves on low frequency density irregularities due to the presence of vortex density structures associated with interchange instability. We will also present particle-in-cell simulation results of electromagnetic scattering on vortex type density structures using the large scale plasma code LSP and compare them with analytical results.

  9. Recent results and future challenges for large scale Particle-In-Cell simulations of plasma-based accelerator concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; An, W.; Decyk, V.K.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; Tsung, F.S.; Tzoufras, M.; Morshed, S.; Antomsen, T.; Feng, B.; Katsouleas, T; Fonseca, R.A.; Martins, S.F.; Vieira, J.; Silva, L.O.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E; Vay, J.-L.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Cowan, B.; Cary, J.R.; Paul, K.

    2009-05-01

    The concept and designs of plasma-based advanced accelerators for high energy physics and photon science are modeled in the SciDAC COMPASS project with a suite of Particle-In-Cell codes and simulation techniques including the full electromagnetic model, the envelope model, the boosted frame approach and the quasi-static model. In this paper, we report the progress of the development of these models and techniques and present recent results achieved with large-scale parallel PIC simulations. The simulation needs for modeling the plasma-based advanced accelerator at the energy frontier is discussed and a path towards this goal is outlined.

  10. Generation of Large-Scale Zonal Structures by Drift Flute Waves in High-Beta HED Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Essam; Sotnikov, Vladmir; Kindel, Joseph; Onishchenko, O. G.; Leboeuf, J. N.

    2009-05-01

    Our aim is to develop a more general analysis of nonlinear dynamics of drift-flute waves, applicable to arbitrary plasma beta and arbitrary spatial scales in comparison with the ion Larmor radius. This study is of interest for fundamental plasma theory as well as for the interpretation of Z-pinch and laboratory astrophysics experiments. Description of low-frequency waves and in particular drift flute waves in a high beta plasma, generally speaking, requires a kinetic approach, based on the Vlasov-Maxwell set of equations. In the present work we show that the alternative two-fluid description can adequately describe the ion perturbations with arbitrary ratio of the characteristic spatial scales to the ion Larmor radius in so-called Pade approximation. For this purpose reduced two-fluid hydrodynamic equations which describe nonlinear dynamics of the flute waves with arbitrary spatial scales and arbitrary plasma beta are derived. The linear dispersion relation of the flute waves and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are analyzed. A general nonlinear dispersion relation which describes generation of large-scale zonal structures by the flute waves is presented and analyzed.

  11. Confocal microscopy: A new tool for erosion measurements on large scale plasma facing components in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, E.; Brosset, C.; Roche, H.; Tsitrone, E.; Pégourié, B.; Martinez, A.; Languille, P.; Courtois, X.; Lallier, Y.; Salami, M.

    2013-07-01

    A diagnostic based on confocal microscopy was developed at CEA Cadarache in order to measure erosion on large plasma facing components during shutdown in situ in Tore Supra. This paper describes the diagnostic and presents results obtained on Beryllium and Carbon Fibre Composite (CFC) materials. Erosion in the range of 800 μm was found on one sector of the Toroidal Pumped Limiter (TPL) which provides, by integration to the full limiter a net carbon erosion of about 900 g over the period 2002-2007.

  12. Turbulence and transport suppression scaling with flow shear on the Large Plasma Device

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffner, D. A.; Carter, T. A.; Rossi, G. D.; Guice, D. S.; Maggs, J. E.; Vincena, S.; Friedman, B.

    2013-05-15

    Continuous control over azimuthal flow and shear in the edge of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instr. 62, 2875 (1991)] has been achieved using a biasable limiter. This flow control has allowed a careful study of the effect of flow shear on pressure-gradient-driven turbulence and particle transport in LAPD. The combination of externally controllable shear in a turbulent plasma along with the detailed spatial diagnostic capabilities on LAPD makes the experiment a useful testbed for validation of shear suppression models. Motivated by these models, power-law fits are made to the density and radial velocity fluctuation amplitudes, particle flux, density-potential crossphase, and radial correlation length. The data show a break in the trend of these quantities when the shearing rate (γ{sub s}=∂V{sub θ}/∂r) is comparable to the turbulent decorrelation rate (1/τ{sub ac}). No one model captures the trends in the all turbulent quantities for all values of the shearing rate, but some models successfully match the trend in either the weak (γ{sub s}τ{sub ac}<1) or strong (γ{sub s}τ{sub ac}>1) shear limits.

  13. Quenching of the beam-plasma instability by 3-D spectra of large scale density fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muschietti, L.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D.

    1984-01-01

    A model is presented to explain the highly variable yet low level of Langmuir waves measured in situ by spacecraft when electron beams associated with Type III solar bursts are passing by; the low level of excited waves allows the propagation of such streams from the Sun to well past 1 AU without catastrophic energy losses. The model is based, first, on the existence of large scale density fluctuations that are able to efficiently diffuse small k beam unstable Langmuir waves in phase space, and, second, on the presence of a significantly isotropic nonthermal tail in the distribution function of the background electron population, which is capable of stabilizing larger k modes. The strength of the model lies in its ability to predict various levels of Langmuir waves depending on the parameters. This feature is consistent with the high variability actually observed in the measurements.

  14. Synthesis of large scale graphene oxide using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method and its application in humidity sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Yuming

    2016-03-01

    Large scale graphene oxide (GO) is directly synthesized on copper (Cu) foil by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method under 500 °C and even lower temperature. Compared to the modified Hummer's method, the obtained GO sheet in this article is large, and it is scalable according to the Cu foil size. The oxygen-contained groups in the GO are introduced through the residual gas of methane (99.9% purity). To prevent the Cu surface from the bombardment of the ions in the plasma, we use low intensity discharge. Our experiment reveals that growth temperature has important influence on the carbon to oxygen ratio (C/O ratio) in the GO; and it also affects the amount of π-π* bonds between carbon atoms. Preliminary experiments on a 6 mm × 12 mm GO based humidity sensor prove that the synthesized GO reacts well to the humidity change. Our GO synthesis method may provide another channel for obtaining large scale GO in gas sensing or other applications.

  15. The solar wind structure that caused a large-scale disturbance of the plasma tail of comet Austin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozuka, Yukio; Konno, Ichishiro; Saito, Takao; Numazawa, Shigemi

    1992-12-01

    The plasma tail of Comet Austin (1989c1) showed remarkable disturbances because of the solar maximum periods and its orbit. Figure 1 shows photographs of Comet Austin taken in Shibata, Japan, on 29 Apr. 1990 UT, during about 20 minutes with the exposure times of 90 to 120 s. There are two main features in the disturbance; one is many bowed structures, which seem to move tailwards; and the other is a large-scale wavy structure. The bowed structures can be interpreted as arcade structures brushing the surface of both sides of the cometary plasma surrounding the nucleus. We identified thirteen structures of the arcades from each of the five photographs and calculated the relation between the distance of each structure from the cometary nucleus, chi, and the velocity, upsilon. The result is shown. This indicates that the velocity of the structures increases with distance. This is consistent with the result obtained from the observation at the Kiso Observatory.

  16. Large-scale MD simulations investigating H plasma interactions with Tungsten surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusentino, Mary Alice; Wirth, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Tungsten is a prime candidate material for the divertor in future fusion reactors such as ITER. However, the tungsten divertor will need to be able to withstand high fluxes, on the order of 1024m-2s-1, of low energy hydrogen. It is crucial to understand both the tungsten surface response as well as the hydrogen retention and recycling for the divertor region. Molecular dynamics (MD) is a useful tool to study these effects. One issue with MD is that implantation fluxes tend to be very high, on the order of 1027 m-2s-1, due to time and computational limitations. By performing large scale MD on supercomputers, it is possible to reach more realistic fluxes of 1025 m-2s-1. Results will be presented from MD simulations from a 50 nm x 50 nm x 25 nm tungsten box at 1200 K and 2000 K. Hydrogen is implanted every 10 ps based on the 60 eV depth distribution calculated by SRIM, which amounts to a flux of 4 x 1025 m-2s-1. A modified version of the Juslin bond order W-H potential is used to describe the W-H interactions. Preliminary results show an initially high retention of hydrogen that accumulates in a sub-surface region. These simulations provide insight into the early stages of surface deformation as well as hydrogen retention for the tungsten divertor.

  17. Large-Scale Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Slough, J.; Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Adrian, M. L.; Gallagher, D.; Craven, P.; Tomlinson, W.; Cravens, J.; Burch, J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) is an innovative plasma propulsion system that has the potential to propel spacecraft at unprecedented speeds of 50 to 80 km per second with a low-power requirement of approx. 1 kW per 100 kg of payload and approx. 1 kg of neutral gas [fuel] consumption per day of acceleration. Acceleration periods from several days to a few months are envisioned. High specific impulse and efficiency are achieved through coupling of the spacecraft to the 400 km per second solar wind through an artificial magnetosphere. The mini-magnetosphere or inflated magnetic bubble is produced by the injection of cold dense plasma into a spacecraft-generated magnetic field envelope. Magnetic bubble inflation is driven by electromagnetic processes thereby avoiding the material and deployment problems faced by mechanical solar sail designs, Here, we present the theoretical design of M2P2 as well as initial results from experimental testing of an M2P2 prototype demonstrating: 1) inflation of the dipole magnetic field geometry through the internal injection of cold plasma; and 2) deflection of and artificial solar wind by the prototype M2P2 system. In addition, we present plans for direct laboratory measurement of thrust imparted to a prototype M2P2 by an artificial solar wind during the summer of 2001.

  18. Large-Scale Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Slough, J.; Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Gallagher, D.; Craven, P.; Adrian, M. L.; Tomlinson, W.; Cravens, J.; Burch, J.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) is an innovative plasma propulsion system that has the potential to propel spacecraft at unprecedented speeds of 50 to 80 km/s, with a low power requirement of approx. 1 kW per 100 kg of payload and -1 kg of neutral gas [fuel] consumption per day of acceleration. Acceleration periods from several days to a few months are envisioned. High specific impulse and efficiency are achieved through coupling of the spacecraft to the 400 km/s. solar wind through an artificial magnetosphere. The mini-magnetosphere or inflated magnetic bubble is produced by the injection of cold dense plasma into a spacecraft-generated magnetic field envelope. Magnetic bubble inflation is driven by electromagnetic processes thereby avoiding the material and deployment problems faced by mechanical solar sail designs. Here, we present the theoretical design of M2P2 as well as initial results from experimental testing of an M2P2 prototype demonstrating: 1) inflation of the dipole magnetic field geometry through the internal injection of cold plasma; and 2) deflection of and artificial solar wind by the prototype M2P2 system. In addition, we present plans for direct laboratory measurement of thrust imparted to a prototype M2P2 by an artificial solar wind during the summer of 2001.

  19. Physics of the interaction of ultra intense laser pulses with cold collisional plasma using large scale kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Héron, A.; Adam, J. C.

    2015-07-15

    We present a set of 2D collisional particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with over-dense cold collisional plasmas. The size of these simulations is about 100 times as large as those previously published. This allows studying the transport of energetic particles on time scale of the order of 400 fs without perturbations due to the influence of boundary effects and performing a very detailed analysis of the physics of the transport. We confirm the existence of a threshold in intensity close to the relativistic threshold above which the beam of energetic particles diverges when it penetrates the cold plasma. We also study the applicability of Ohm's law to compute the electric field, which is the method commonly used in hybrid codes. The heating of the cold plasma is then studied and we show that half of the heating is anomalous, i.e., not given by standard Joule effect. We discuss the previously published results in the light of these new simulations.

  20. Physics of the interaction of ultra intense laser pulses with cold collisional plasma using large scale kinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Héron, A.; Adam, J. C.

    2015-07-01

    We present a set of 2D collisional particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with over-dense cold collisional plasmas. The size of these simulations is about 100 times as large as those previously published. This allows studying the transport of energetic particles on time scale of the order of 400 fs without perturbations due to the influence of boundary effects and performing a very detailed analysis of the physics of the transport. We confirm the existence of a threshold in intensity close to the relativistic threshold above which the beam of energetic particles diverges when it penetrates the cold plasma. We also study the applicability of Ohm's law to compute the electric field, which is the method commonly used in hybrid codes. The heating of the cold plasma is then studied and we show that half of the heating is anomalous, i.e., not given by standard Joule effect. We discuss the previously published results in the light of these new simulations.

  1. Electron Transport and Related Nonequilibrium Distribution Functions in Large Scale ICF Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Chapman, T.; Brantov, A. V.; Winjum, B.; Berger, R.; Brunner, S.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Tableman, A.

    2014-10-01

    Using the Vlasov-Fokker Fokker-Planck (VFP) code OSHUN and higher order perturbative solutions to the VFP equation, we have studied electron distribution functions (EDF) in inhomogeneous and hot hohlraum plasmas of relevant to the current ICF experiments. For these inhomogeneous ICF plasmas characterized by with the temperature and density gradients consistent with the high flux model [M. D. Rosen et al., HEDP 7, 180 (2011)], nonequilibrium EDF often display unphysical properties related to first and second order derivatives at larger velocities. These EDF strongly modify the linear plasma response, including Lanadau damping of Langmuir waves, electrostatic fluctuation levels, and instability gain coefficients We have found that Langmuir waves propagating in the direction of the heat flow have increased Lanadau damping compared to damping calculated from a Maxwellian EDF, while Langmuir waves propagating in the direction of the temperature gradients are far less damped as compared to damping calculated from the Maxwellian EDF. These effects have been discussed in the context of stimulated Raman scattering, Langmuir decay instability and Thomson scattering experiments.

  2. Fabrication and testing of gas filled targets for large scale plasma experiments on Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G.F.; Spragge, M.; Wallace, R.J.; Rivers, C.J. |

    1995-03-06

    An experimental campaign on the Nova laser was started in July 1993 to study one st of target conditions for the point design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The targets were specified to investigate the current NIF target conditions--a plasma of {approximately}3 keV electron temperature and an electron density of {approximately}1.0 E + 21 cm{sup {minus}3}. A gas cell target design was chosen to confine as gas of {approximately}0.01 cm{sup 3} in volume at {approximately} 1 atmosphere. This paper will describe the major steps and processes necessary in the fabrication, testing and delivery of these targets for shots on the Nova Laser at LLNL.

  3. Transition form collisional to kinetic reconnection in large-scale plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Daughton, William S; Roytershteyn, Vadim S; Albright, Brian J; Yin, Lin; Bowers, Kevin J; Karimabadi, Homa

    2009-01-01

    Using first-principles fully kinetic simulations with a Fokker-Planck collision operator, it is demonstrated that Sweet-Parker reconnection layers are unstable to a chain of plasmoids (secondary islands) for Lundquist numbers beyond S >{approx} 1000. The instability is increasingly violent at higher Lundquist number, both in terms of the number of plasmoids produced and the super-Alfvenic growth rate. A dramatic enhancement in the reconnection rate is observed when the half-thickness of the current sheet between two plasmoids approaches the ion inertial length. During this transition, the reconnection electric field rapidly exceeds the runaway limit, resulting in the formation of electron-scale current layers that are unstable to the continual formation of new plasmoids.

  4. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lee Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-14

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  5. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lee; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  6. Large area plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John (Inventor); Patterson, Michael (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An all permanent magnet Electron Cyclotron Resonance, large diameter (e.g., 40 cm) plasma source suitable for ion/plasma processing or electric propulsion, is capable of producing uniform ion current densities at its exit plane at very low power (e.g., below 200 W), and is electrodeless to avoid sputtering or contamination issues. Microwave input power is efficiently coupled with an ionizing gas without using a dielectric microwave window and without developing a throat plasma by providing a ferromagnetic cylindrical chamber wall with a conical end narrowing to an axial entrance hole for microwaves supplied on-axis from an open-ended waveguide. Permanent magnet rings are attached inside the wall with alternating polarities against the wall. An entrance magnet ring surrounding the entrance hole has a ferromagnetic pole piece that extends into the chamber from the entrance hole to a continuing second face that extends radially across an inner pole of the entrance magnet ring.

  7. State-of-the-art for large area high resolution gray scale and full color AC plasma flat panel displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoller, Ray A.; Wedding, Donald K.; Friedman, Peter S.

    1993-01-01

    A development status evaluation is presented for gas plasma display technology, noting how tradeoffs among the parameters of size, resolution, speed, portability, color, and image quality can yield cost-effective solutions for medical imaging, CAD, teleconferencing, multimedia, and both civil and military applications. Attention is given to plasma-based large-area displays' suitability for radar, sonar, and IR, due to their lack of EM susceptibility. Both monochrome and color displays are available.

  8. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  9. Large Scale Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capiluppi, Paolo

    2005-04-01

    Large Scale Computing is acquiring an important role in the field of data analysis and treatment for many Sciences and also for some Social activities. The present paper discusses the characteristics of Computing when it becomes "Large Scale" and the current state of the art for some particular application needing such a large distributed resources and organization. High Energy Particle Physics (HEP) Experiments are discussed in this respect; in particular the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Experiments are analyzed. The Computing Models of LHC Experiments represent the current prototype implementation of Large Scale Computing and describe the level of maturity of the possible deployment solutions. Some of the most recent results on the measurements of the performances and functionalities of the LHC Experiments' testing are discussed.

  10. Peculiarities of Excitation of Large-Scale Plasma Density Irregularities During Modification of the Ionospheric F 2 Region by High-Power HF Radio Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. L.; Schorokhova, E. A.; Kunitsyn, V. E.; Andreeva, E. S.; Padokhin, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    We present the experimental results concerning the features of large-scale artificial plasma-density irregularities excited in the ionospheric F2 region by high-power HF radio waves. The experiments were performed in recent years using the SURA heating facility. It is shown that at the altitude of the pump-wave reflection, these irregularities are most efficiently generated in the magnetic zenith region. The effect of enhancement of the large-scale irregularity generation at the edge of the pump-wave beam is revealed. The results of studying large-scale irregularities recorded at the altitudes of the topside ionosphere are presented. Experimental results concerning the features of the internal gravity waves generated at the ionospheric altitudes during periodic heating of the ionospheric plasma by high-power HF radio waves are summarized and their possible influence on generation of artificial ionospheric irregularities at a long distance from the heater is discussed.

  11. Observations of Reduced Electron Gyro-scale Fluctuations in National Spherical Torus Experiment H-mode Plasmas with Large E × B Flow Shear

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.; Kaye, S. M.; Lee, W.; Mazzucato, E.; Park, H. K.; Bell, R. E.; Domier, C. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Levinton, F. M.; Luhmann, Jr., N. C.; Menard, J. E.; Yu, H.

    2009-02-13

    Electron gyro-scale fluctuation measurements in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) H-mode plasmas with large toroidal rotation reveal fluctuations consistent with electron temper- ature gradient (ETG) turbulence. Large toroidal rotation in NSTX plasmas with neutral beam injection generates E × B flow shear rates comparable to ETG linear growth rates. Enhanced fluctuations occur when the electron temperature gradient is marginally stable with respect to the ETG linear critical gradient. Fluctuation amplitudes decrease when the E × B flow shear rate exceeds ETG linear growth rates. The observations indicate E × B flow shear can be an effective suppression mechanism for ETG turbulence.

  12. Large-Scale Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad-El-Hak, Mohamed

    "Extreme" events - including climatic events, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and drought - can cause massive disruption to society, including large death tolls and property damage in the billions of dollars. Events in recent years have shown the importance of being prepared and that countries need to work together to help alleviate the resulting pain and suffering. This volume presents a review of the broad research field of large-scale disasters. It establishes a common framework for predicting, controlling and managing both manmade and natural disasters. There is a particular focus on events caused by weather and climate change. Other topics include air pollution, tsunamis, disaster modeling, the use of remote sensing and the logistics of disaster management. It will appeal to scientists, engineers, first responders and health-care professionals, in addition to graduate students and researchers who have an interest in the prediction, prevention or mitigation of large-scale disasters.

  13. Chemical vapour deposition enhanced by atmospheric microwave plasmas: a large-scale industrial process or the next nanomanufacturing tool?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, T.; Gries, T.; Cardoso, R. P.; Arnoult, G.; Kosior, F.; Henrion, G.

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes several specific aspects of atmospheric plasma deposition carried out with a microwave resonant cavity. Deposition over a wide substrate is first studied. We show that high deposition rates (several hundreds of μm h-1) are due to localization of fluxes on the substrate by convection when slightly turbulent flows are used. Next, we describe possible routes to localize deposition over a nanometre-sized area. Scaling down atmospheric plasma deposition is possible and two strategies to reach nanometre scales are described. Finally, we study self-organization of SiO2 nanodots deposited by chemical vapour deposition at atmospheric pressure enhanced by an Ar-O2 micro-afterglow operating at high temperature (>1200 K). When the film being deposited is thin enough (~500 nm) nanodots are obtained and they can be assembled into threads to create patterned surfaces. When the coating becomes thicker (~1 µm), and for relatively high content in HMDSO, SiO2 walls forming hexagonal cells are obtained.

  14. Generation of large-scale, barrier-free diffuse plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure using array wire electrodes and nanosecond high-voltage pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Yun; Li, Lee Liu, Yun-Long; Liu, Lun; Liu, Minghai

    2014-10-15

    This paper introduces a method to generate large-scale diffuse plasmas by using a repetition nanosecond pulse generator and a parallel array wire-electrode configuration. We investigated barrier-free diffuse plasmas produced in the open air in parallel and cross-parallel array line-line electrode configurations. We found that, when the distance between the wire-electrode pair is small, the discharges were almost extinguished. Also, glow-like diffuse plasmas with little discharge weakening were obtained in an appropriate range of line-line distances and with a cathode-grounding cross-electrode configuration. As an example, we produced a large-scale, stable diffuse plasma with volumes as large as 18 × 15 × 15 cm{sup 3}, and this discharge region can be further expanded. Additionally, using optical and electrical measurements, we showed that the electron temperature was higher than the gas temperature, which was almost the same as room temperature. Also, an array of electrode configuration with more wire electrodes had helped to prevent the transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge. Comparing the current waveforms of configurations with 1 cell and 9 cells, we found that adding cells significantly increased the conduction current and the electrical energy delivered in the electrode gaps.

  15. Generation of large-scale, barrier-free diffuse plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure using array wire electrodes and nanosecond high-voltage pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Yun; Li, Lee; Liu, Yun-Long; Liu, Lun; Liu, Minghai

    2014-10-01

    This paper introduces a method to generate large-scale diffuse plasmas by using a repetition nanosecond pulse generator and a parallel array wire-electrode configuration. We investigated barrier-free diffuse plasmas produced in the open air in parallel and cross-parallel array line-line electrode configurations. We found that, when the distance between the wire-electrode pair is small, the discharges were almost extinguished. Also, glow-like diffuse plasmas with little discharge weakening were obtained in an appropriate range of line-line distances and with a cathode-grounding cross-electrode configuration. As an example, we produced a large-scale, stable diffuse plasma with volumes as large as 18 × 15 × 15 cm3, and this discharge region can be further expanded. Additionally, using optical and electrical measurements, we showed that the electron temperature was higher than the gas temperature, which was almost the same as room temperature. Also, an array of electrode configuration with more wire electrodes had helped to prevent the transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge. Comparing the current waveforms of configurations with 1 cell and 9 cells, we found that adding cells significantly increased the conduction current and the electrical energy delivered in the electrode gaps.

  16. Attribution of ionospheric vertical plasma drift perturbations to large-scale waves and the dependence on solar activity (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Richmond, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we quantify the contribution of individual large-scale waves to ionospheric electrodynamics, and examine the dependence of the ionospheric perturbations on solar activity. We focus on migrating diurnal tide (DW1) plus mean winds, migrating semidiurnal tide (SW2), quasi-stationary planetary wave 1 (QSPW1), and nonmigrating semidiurnal westward wave 1 (SW1) under northern winter conditions, when QSPW1 and SW1 are climatologically strong. From TIME-GCM simulations under solar minimum conditions, we calculate equatorial vertical ExB drifts due to mean winds and DW1, SW2, SW1 and QSPW1. In particular, wind components of both SW2 and SW1 become large at mid to high latitudes in the E-region, and kernel functions obtained from numerical experiments reveal that they can significantly affect the equatorial ion drift, likely through modulating the E-region wind dynamo. The most evident changes of total ionospheric vertical drift when solar activity is increased are seen around dawn and dusk, reflecting the more dominant role of large F-region Pedersen conductivity and of the F-region dynamo under high solar activity. Therefore, the lower atmosphere driving of the ionospheric variability is more evident under solar minimum conditions, not only because variability is more identifiable in a quieter background, but also because the E-region wind dynamo is more significant. These numerical experiments also demonstrate that the amplitudes, phases and latitudinal and vertical structures of large-scale waves are important in quantifying the ionospheric responses.

  17. In vitro Stability of Heat Shock Protein 27 in Serum and Plasma Under Different Pre-analytical Conditions: Implications for Large-Scale Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Matthias; Traxler, Denise; Simader, Elisabeth; Bekos, Christine; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Lainscak, Mitja; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan; Mueller, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The effects of storage temperatures, repeated freeze-thaw cycles, or delays in separating plasma or serum from blood samples are largely unknown for heat shock protein 27 (HSP27). We evaluated (1) the imprecision of the HSP27 assay used in this study; (2) the in vitro stability of HSP27 in blood samples stored at 4°C for up to 6 hr with immediate and delayed serum/plasma separation from cells; and (3) the in vitro stability of HSP27 in blood samples stored at -80°C after repeated freeze-thaw cycles. The ELISA to detect HSP27 in this study showed a within-run CV of <9% and a total CV of <15%. After 4-6 hr of storage at 4°C, HSP27 concentrations remained stable when using serum tubes irrespective of sample handling, but HSP27 concentrations decreased by 25-45% when using EDTA plasma tubes. Compared with baseline HSP27, one freeze-thaw cycle had no effect on serum concentrations. However, plasma concentrations increased by 3.1-fold after one freeze-thaw cycle and by 7.3-fold after five freeze-thaw cycles. In conclusion, serum is an appropriate biological sample type for use in epidemiological and large-scale clinical studies. PMID:27139608

  18. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  19. Large scale traffic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Barrett, C.L.; Rickert, M.

    1997-04-01

    Large scale microscopic (i.e. vehicle-based) traffic simulations pose high demands on computational speed in at least two application areas: (i) real-time traffic forecasting, and (ii) long-term planning applications (where repeated {open_quotes}looping{close_quotes} between the microsimulation and the simulated planning of individual person`s behavior is necessary). As a rough number, a real-time simulation of an area such as Los Angeles (ca. 1 million travellers) will need a computational speed of much higher than 1 million {open_quotes}particle{close_quotes} (= vehicle) updates per second. This paper reviews how this problem is approached in different projects and how these approaches are dependent both on the specific questions and on the prospective user community. The approaches reach from highly parallel and vectorizable, single-bit implementations on parallel supercomputers for Statistical Physics questions, via more realistic implementations on coupled workstations, to more complicated driving dynamics implemented again on parallel supercomputers. 45 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Large-scale inference of protein tissue origin in gram-positive sepsis plasma using quantitative targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Erik; Kilsgård, Ola; Hauri, Simon; Smeds, Emanuel; Herwald, Heiko; Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The plasma proteome is highly dynamic and variable, composed of proteins derived from surrounding tissues and cells. To investigate the complex processes that control the composition of the plasma proteome, we developed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy to infer the origin of proteins detected in murine plasma. The strategy relies on the construction of a comprehensive protein tissue atlas from cells and highly vascularized organs using shotgun mass spectrometry. The protein tissue atlas was transformed to a spectral library for highly reproducible quantification of tissue-specific proteins directly in plasma using SWATH-like data-independent mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the method can determine drastic changes of tissue-specific protein profiles in blood plasma from mouse animal models with sepsis. The strategy can be extended to several other species advancing our understanding of the complex processes that contribute to the plasma proteome dynamics. PMID:26732734

  1. Large-scale inference of protein tissue origin in gram-positive sepsis plasma using quantitative targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Malmström, Erik; Kilsgård, Ola; Hauri, Simon; Smeds, Emanuel; Herwald, Heiko; Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The plasma proteome is highly dynamic and variable, composed of proteins derived from surrounding tissues and cells. To investigate the complex processes that control the composition of the plasma proteome, we developed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy to infer the origin of proteins detected in murine plasma. The strategy relies on the construction of a comprehensive protein tissue atlas from cells and highly vascularized organs using shotgun mass spectrometry. The protein tissue atlas was transformed to a spectral library for highly reproducible quantification of tissue-specific proteins directly in plasma using SWATH-like data-independent mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the method can determine drastic changes of tissue-specific protein profiles in blood plasma from mouse animal models with sepsis. The strategy can be extended to several other species advancing our understanding of the complex processes that contribute to the plasma proteome dynamics. PMID:26732734

  2. Precision high-throughput proton NMR spectroscopy of human urine, serum, and plasma for large-scale metabolic phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Dona, Anthony C; Jiménez, Beatriz; Schäfer, Hartmut; Humpfer, Eberhard; Spraul, Manfred; Lewis, Matthew R; Pearce, Jake T M; Holmes, Elaine; Lindon, John C; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2014-10-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolic phenotyping of urine and blood plasma/serum samples provides important prognostic and diagnostic information and permits monitoring of disease progression in an objective manner. Much effort has been made in recent years to develop NMR instrumentation and technology to allow the acquisition of data in an effective, reproducible, and high-throughput approach that allows the study of general population samples from epidemiological collections for biomarkers of disease risk. The challenge remains to develop highly reproducible methods and standardized protocols that minimize technical or experimental bias, allowing realistic interlaboratory comparisons of subtle biomarker information. Here we present a detailed set of updated protocols that carefully consider major experimental conditions, including sample preparation, spectrometer parameters, NMR pulse sequences, throughput, reproducibility, quality control, and resolution. These results provide an experimental platform that facilitates NMR spectroscopy usage across different large cohorts of biofluid samples, enabling integration of global metabolic profiling that is a prerequisite for personalized healthcare. PMID:25180432

  3. Observations of a large-scale vortex-like structure in the deep-tail plasma sheet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, T. R.; Daly, P.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Smith, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    ISEE-3 observations of a large-scale vortexlike structure in the deep tail of the magnetosphere at X(GSM) = -217 earth radii are reported. The structure is characterized by two clockwise rotations of the energetic-ion anisotropy vector. Variations in the magnetic-field vector approximately 180 deg out of phase with the ion variations are observed. This structure is most likely the signature within the magnetosphere of a surface wave at the magnetopause driven by a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Conditions inside and outside of the magnetosphere, as observed by ISEE-3 and ISEE-2, respectively, are examined; these conditions suggest that the surface wave is most likely propagating in the slow mode.

  4. Influence of quenching gas injection on the temperature field in pulse-modulated induction thermal plasma for large scale nanopowder synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yasunori; Guo, Weixuan; Kodama, Naoto; Kita, Kentaro; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Shu; Nakamura, Keitaro

    2015-09-01

    We have so far developed a unique and original method for a large-scale nanopowder synthesis method using pulse-modulated induction thermal plasmas with time-controlled feedstock feeding (PMITP-TCFF). The PMITP is sustained by the coil current modulated into a rectangular waveform. Such the current modulation produces an extremely high-temperature thermal plasma in on-time, and in off-time relatively low-temperature thermal plasma. In PMITP-TCFF method, feedstock powder is intermittently injected to the PMITP synchronously during only on-time for its efficient and complete evaporation. That evaporated materials are rapidly cooled down to promote nucleation of nanoparticles during off-time. This report deals with a numerical approach on influence of quenching gas injection on the temperature field in the PMITP. The thermofluid model for the PMITP was developed on the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). This model accounted for the pulse-modulation of the coil current and the quenching gas injection. It was found that the quenching gas injection works to increase the PMITP temperature inside the plasma torch during on-time, and then to decrease it effectively in the reaction chamber. This work is partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 26249034.

  5. Plasma surface figuring of large optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdain, R.; Castelli, M.; Morantz, P.; Shore, P.

    2012-04-01

    Fast figuring of large optical components is well known as a highly challenging manufacturing issue. Different manufacturing technologies including: magnetorheological finishing, loose abrasive polishing, ion beam figuring are presently employed. Yet, these technologies are slow and lead to expensive optics. This explains why plasma-based processes operating at atmospheric pressure have been researched as a cost effective means for figure correction of metre scale optical surfaces. In this paper, fast figure correction of a large optical surface is reported using the Reactive Atom Plasma (RAP) process. Achievements are shown following the scaling-up of the RAP figuring process to a 400 mm diameter area of a substrate made of Corning ULE®. The pre-processing spherical surface is characterized by a 3 metres radius of curvature, 2.3 μm PVr (373nm RMS), and 1.2 nm Sq nanometre roughness. The nanometre scale correction figuring system used for this research work is named the HELIOS 1200, and it is equipped with a unique plasma torch which is driven by a dedicated tool path algorithm. Topography map measurements were carried out using a vertical work station instrumented by a Zygo DynaFiz interferometer. Figuring results, together with the processing times, convergence levels and number of iterations, are reported. The results illustrate the significant potential and advantage of plasma processing for figuring correction of large silicon based optical components.

  6. The ion acoustic decay instability in a large scale, hot plasma relevant to direct drive laser fusion -- Application to a critical surface diagnostic. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Estabrook, K.G.

    1996-08-01

    The authors have studied the ion acoustic decay instability in a large ({approximately} 1 mm) scale, hot ({approximately} 1 keV) plasma, which is relevant to a laser fusion reactor target. They have shown that the instability threshold is low. They have developed a novel collective Thomson scattering diagnostic at a 90{degree} scattering angle. The scattering is nonetheless coherent, because of the modest ratio of the frequency of the probe laser to that of the pump laser, such that even for such a large angle, (k{lambda}{sub De}){sup 2} is much less than one. With this system they have measured the electron plasma wave excited by the ion acoustic decay instability near the critical density (n{sub e} {approximately} 0.86 n{sub c}). This allows them to use the frequency of the detected wave to measure the electron temperature in the interaction region, obtaining a result reasonably close to that predicted by the SAGE computer code.

  7. LARGE SCALE PURIFICATION OF BUTYRYLCHOLINESTERASE FROM HUMAN PLASMA SUITABLE FOR INJECTION INTO MONKEYS; A POTENTIAL NEW THERAPEUTIC FOR PROTECTION AGAINST COCAINE AND NERVE AGENT TOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Lockridge, Oksana; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Winger, Gail; Woods, James H.

    2005-01-01

    Pretreatment of animals with butyrylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8 BChE) provides complete protection from the acute effects of organophosphorus nerve agents. Butyrylcholinesterase has also been shown to protect from cocaine toxicity. Large amounts of highly purified butyrylcholinesterase are needed to test the effectiveness of this new therapeutic agent in monkeys. Only a minimum amount of endotoxin can be present in a therapeutic intended for injection into monkeys. Our goal was to develop a large scale purification method for human BChE from human plasma with precautions to minimize endotoxin content. A protocol was developed that processed up to 100 L of human plasma at a time. Dialysis in pH 4.0 buffer, ion exchange chromatography at pH 4, affinity chromatography on procainamide-Sepharose, and HPLC ion exchange at pH 7.4 yielded highly purified human BChE containing a low endotoxin level of about 800 EU/ml. The purified BChE produced by this method had a mean residence time of 56 h in mice and 93 h in monkeys, and caused no toxic effects. The absence of a toxic effect in monkeys demonstrates that the endotoxin level of 800 EU/ml was well tolerated by monkeys. PMID:16788731

  8. Very Large Scale Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, Garrett; Townsend, James C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this research under the NASA Small Business Innovative Research program was to develop algorithms and associated software to solve very large nonlinear, constrained optimization tasks. Key issues included efficiency, reliability, memory, and gradient calculation requirements. This report describes the general optimization problem, ten candidate methods, and detailed evaluations of four candidates. The algorithm chosen for final development is a modern recreation of a 1960s external penalty function method that uses very limited computer memory and computational time. Although of lower efficiency, the new method can solve problems orders of magnitude larger than current methods. The resulting BIGDOT software has been demonstrated on problems with 50,000 variables and about 50,000 active constraints. For unconstrained optimization, it has solved a problem in excess of 135,000 variables. The method includes a technique for solving discrete variable problems that finds a "good" design, although a theoretical optimum cannot be guaranteed. It is very scalable in that the number of function and gradient evaluations does not change significantly with increased problem size. Test cases are provided to demonstrate the efficiency and reliability of the methods and software.

  9. Measurement of Electron Density near Plasma Grid of Large-scaled Negative Ion Source by Means of Millimeter-Wave Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tsumori, K.; Nakano, H.; Ito, Y.; Osakabe, M.; Ikeda, K.; Kisaki, M.; Shibuya, M.; Sato, M.; Komada, S.; Kondo, T.; Hayashi, H.; Asano, E.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.

    2011-09-26

    A millimeter-wave interferometer with the frequency of 39 GHz ({lambda} 7.7 mm) was newly installed to a large-scaled negative ion source. The measurable line-integrated electron density (n{sub e}l) is from 2x10{sup 16} to 7x10{sup 18} m{sup -2}, where n{sub e} and l represent an electron density and the plasma length along the millimeter-wave path, respectively. Our interest in this study is behavior of negative ions and reduction of electron density in the beam extraction region near the plasma grid. The first results show the possibility of the electron density measurement by the millimeter-wave interferometer in this region. The line-averaged electron density increases proportional to the arc power under the condition without cesium seeding. The significant decrease of the electron density and significant increase of the negative ion density were observed just after the cesium seeding. The electron density measured with the interferometer agrees well with that observed with a Langmuir probe. The very high negative ion ratio of n{sub H-}/(n{sub e}+n{sub H-}) = 0.85 was achieved within 400 min. after the cesium seeding.

  10. X6.9-CLASS FLARE-INDUCED VERTICAL KINK OSCILLATIONS IN A LARGE-SCALE PLASMA CURTAIN AS OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A. K.; Goossens, M.

    2013-11-01

    We present rare observational evidence of vertical kink oscillations in a laminar and diffused large-scale plasma curtain as observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The X6.9-class flare in active region 11263 on 2011 August 9 induces a global large-scale disturbance that propagates in a narrow lane above the plasma curtain and creates a low density region that appears as a dimming in the observational image data. This large-scale propagating disturbance acts as a non-periodic driver that interacts asymmetrically and obliquely with the top of the plasma curtain and triggers the observed oscillations. In the deeper layers of the curtain, we find evidence of vertical kink oscillations with two periods (795 s and 530 s). On the magnetic surface of the curtain where the density is inhomogeneous due to coronal dimming, non-decaying vertical oscillations are also observed (period ≈ 763-896 s). We infer that the global large-scale disturbance triggers vertical kink oscillations in the deeper layers as well as on the surface of the large-scale plasma curtain. The properties of the excited waves strongly depend on the local plasma and magnetic field conditions.

  11. Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeaman, Andrew R. J.

    Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI), the state-of-the-art production techniques for computer chips, promises such powerful, inexpensive computing that, in the future, people will be able to communicate with computer devices in natural language or even speech. However, before full-scale VLSI implementation can occur, certain salient factors must be…

  12. Galaxy clustering on large scales.

    PubMed

    Efstathiou, G

    1993-06-01

    I describe some recent observations of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution. The best constraints come from two-dimensional galaxy surveys and studies of angular correlation functions. Results from galaxy redshift surveys are much less precise but are consistent with the angular correlations, provided the distortions in mapping between real-space and redshift-space are relatively weak. The galaxy two-point correlation function, rich-cluster two-point correlation function, and galaxy-cluster cross-correlation function are all well described on large scales ( greater, similar 20h-1 Mpc, where the Hubble constant, H0 = 100h km.s-1.Mpc; 1 pc = 3.09 x 10(16) m) by the power spectrum of an initially scale-invariant, adiabatic, cold-dark-matter Universe with Gamma = Omegah approximately 0.2. I discuss how this fits in with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite detection of large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation and other measures of large-scale structure in the Universe. PMID:11607400

  13. The ion acoustic decay instability, and anomalous laser light absorption for the OMEGA upgrade, large scale hot plasma application to a critical surface diagnostic, and instability at the quarter critical density. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Seka, W.

    1996-11-01

    It is shown that laser light can be anomalously absorbed with a moderate intensity laster (I{lambda}{sup 2}{approx}10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}-{mu}m{sup 2}) in a large scale, laser produced plasma. The heating regime, which is characterized by a relatively weak instability in a large region, is different from the regime studied previously, which is characterized by a strong instability in a narrow region. The two dimensional geometrical effect (lateral heating) has an important consequence on the anomalous electron heating. The characteristics of the IADI, and the anomalous absorption of the laser light were studied in a large scale, hot plasma applicable to OMEGA upgrade plasma. These results are important for the diagnostic application of the IADI.

  14. Challenges for Large Scale Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Matthias

    2010-03-01

    With computational approaches becoming ubiquitous the growing impact of large scale computing on research influences both theoretical and experimental work. I will review a few examples in condensed matter physics and quantum optics, including the impact of computer simulations in the search for supersolidity, thermometry in ultracold quantum gases, and the challenging search for novel phases in strongly correlated electron systems. While only a decade ago such simulations needed the fastest supercomputers, many simulations can now be performed on small workstation clusters or even a laptop: what was previously restricted to a few experts can now potentially be used by many. Only part of the gain in computational capabilities is due to Moore's law and improvement in hardware. Equally impressive is the performance gain due to new algorithms - as I will illustrate using some recently developed algorithms. At the same time modern peta-scale supercomputers offer unprecedented computational power and allow us to tackle new problems and address questions that were impossible to solve numerically only a few years ago. While there is a roadmap for future hardware developments to exascale and beyond, the main challenges are on the algorithmic and software infrastructure side. Among the problems that face the computational physicist are: the development of new algorithms that scale to thousands of cores and beyond, a software infrastructure that lifts code development to a higher level and speeds up the development of new simulation programs for large scale computing machines, tools to analyze the large volume of data obtained from such simulations, and as an emerging field provenance-aware software that aims for reproducibility of the complete computational workflow from model parameters to the final figures. Interdisciplinary collaborations and collective efforts will be required, in contrast to the cottage-industry culture currently present in many areas of computational

  15. Microfluidic large-scale integration.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Todd; Maerkl, Sebastian J; Quake, Stephen R

    2002-10-18

    We developed high-density microfluidic chips that contain plumbing networks with thousands of micromechanical valves and hundreds of individually addressable chambers. These fluidic devices are analogous to electronic integrated circuits fabricated using large-scale integration. A key component of these networks is the fluidic multiplexor, which is a combinatorial array of binary valve patterns that exponentially increases the processing power of a network by allowing complex fluid manipulations with a minimal number of inputs. We used these integrated microfluidic networks to construct the microfluidic analog of a comparator array and a microfluidic memory storage device whose behavior resembles random-access memory. PMID:12351675

  16. Large Scale Nanolaminate Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Miles, R; Chang, K

    2005-11-30

    This work concerns the development of a technology that uses Nanolaminate foils to form light-weight, deformable mirrors that are scalable over a wide range of mirror sizes. While MEMS-based deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators have considerably reduced the cost and increased the capabilities of adaptive optic systems, there has not been a way to utilize the advantages of lithography and batch-fabrication to produce large-scale deformable mirrors. This technology is made scalable by using fabrication techniques and lithography that are not limited to the sizes of conventional MEMS devices. Like many MEMS devices, these mirrors use parallel plate electrostatic actuators. This technology replicates that functionality by suspending a horizontal piece of nanolaminate foil over an electrode by electroplated nickel posts. This actuator is attached, with another post, to another nanolaminate foil that acts as the mirror surface. Most MEMS devices are produced with integrated circuit lithography techniques that are capable of very small line widths, but are not scalable to large sizes. This technology is very tolerant of lithography errors and can use coarser, printed circuit board lithography techniques that can be scaled to very large sizes. These mirrors use small, lithographically defined actuators and thin nanolaminate foils allowing them to produce deformations over a large area while minimizing weight. This paper will describe a staged program to develop this technology. First-principles models were developed to determine design parameters. Three stages of fabrication will be described starting with a 3 x 3 device using conventional metal foils and epoxy to a 10-across all-metal device with nanolaminate mirror surfaces.

  17. Large scale topography of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskell, R. W.; Synnott, S. P.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the large scale topography of the Jovian satellite Io, both limb observations and stereographic techniques applied to landmarks are used. The raw data for this study consists of Voyager 1 images of Io, 800x800 arrays of picture elements each of which can take on 256 possible brightness values. In analyzing this data it was necessary to identify and locate landmarks and limb points on the raw images, remove the image distortions caused by the camera electronics and translate the corrected locations into positions relative to a reference geoid. Minimizing the uncertainty in the corrected locations is crucial to the success of this project. In the highest resolution frames, an error of a tenth of a pixel in image space location can lead to a 300 m error in true location. In the lowest resolution frames, the same error can lead to an uncertainty of several km.

  18. Large-Scale Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Nicol; H. R. Ammerlahn; M. E. Goldsby; M. M. Johnson; D. E. Rhodes; A. S. Yoshimura

    2000-12-01

    Large enterprises are ever more dependent on their Large-Scale Information Systems (LSLS), computer systems that are distinguished architecturally by distributed components--data sources, networks, computing engines, simulations, human-in-the-loop control and remote access stations. These systems provide such capabilities as workflow, data fusion and distributed database access. The Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) contains many examples of LSIS components, a fact that motivates this research. However, most LSIS in use grew up from collections of separate subsystems that were not designed to be components of an integrated system. For this reason, they are often difficult to analyze and control. The problem is made more difficult by the size of a typical system, its diversity of information sources, and the institutional complexities associated with its geographic distribution across the enterprise. Moreover, there is no integrated approach for analyzing or managing such systems. Indeed, integrated development of LSIS is an active area of academic research. This work developed such an approach by simulating the various components of the LSIS and allowing the simulated components to interact with real LSIS subsystems. This research demonstrated two benefits. First, applying it to a particular LSIS provided a thorough understanding of the interfaces between the system's components. Second, it demonstrated how more rapid and detailed answers could be obtained to questions significant to the enterprise by interacting with the relevant LSIS subsystems through simulated components designed with those questions in mind. In a final, added phase of the project, investigations were made on extending this research to wireless communication networks in support of telemetry applications.

  19. Large Scale Homing in Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Pahl, Mario; Zhu, Hong; Tautz, Jürgen; Zhang, Shaowu

    2011-01-01

    Honeybee foragers frequently fly several kilometres to and from vital resources, and communicate those locations to their nest mates by a symbolic dance language. Research has shown that they achieve this feat by memorizing landmarks and the skyline panorama, using the sun and polarized skylight as compasses and by integrating their outbound flight paths. In order to investigate the capacity of the honeybees' homing abilities, we artificially displaced foragers to novel release spots at various distances up to 13 km in the four cardinal directions. Returning bees were individually registered by a radio frequency identification (RFID) system at the hive entrance. We found that homing rate, homing speed and the maximum homing distance depend on the release direction. Bees released in the east were more likely to find their way back home, and returned faster than bees released in any other direction, due to the familiarity of global landmarks seen from the hive. Our findings suggest that such large scale homing is facilitated by global landmarks acting as beacons, and possibly the entire skyline panorama. PMID:21602920

  20. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, C.C.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Berry, L.A.

    1991-07-16

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm[sup 2]. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity. 3 figures.

  1. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, Chin-Chi; Gorbatkin, Steven M.; Berry, Lee A.

    1991-01-01

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm.sup.2. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity.

  2. Production of a large, quiescent, magnetized plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landt, D. L.; Ajmera, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental device is described which produces a large homogeneous quiescent magnetized plasma. In this device, the plasma is created in an evacuated brass cylinder by ionizing collisions between electrons emitted from a large-diameter electron gun and argon atoms in the chamber. Typical experimentally measured values of the electron temperature and density are presented which were obtained with a glass-insulated planar Langmuir probe. It is noted that the present device facilitates the study of phenomena such as waves and diffusion in magnetized plasmas.

  3. Plasma focus ion beam-scaling laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saw, S. H.

    2014-08-01

    Measurements on plasma focus ion beams include various advanced techniques producing a variety of data which has yet to produce benchmark numbers. Recent numerical experiments using an extended version of the Lee Code has produced reference numbers and scaling trends for number and energy fluence of deuteron beams as functions of stored energy E0. At the pinch exit the ion number fluence (ions m-2) and energy fluence (J m-2) computed as 2.4-7.8×1020 and 2.2-33×106 respectively were found to be independent of E0 from 0.4 - 486 kJ. This work was extended to the ion beams for various gases. The results show that, for a given plasma focus, the fluence, flux, ion number and ion current decrease from the lightest to the heaviest gas except for trend-breaking higher values for Ar fluence and flux. The energy fluence, energy flux, power flow and damage factors are relatively constant from H2 to N2 but increase for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe due to radiative cooling and collapse effects. This paper reviews this work and in a concluding section attempts to put the accumulating large amounts of data into the form of a scaling law of beam energy Ebeam versus storage energy E0 taking the form for deuteron as: {Ebeam} = 18.2{E}01.23; where Ebeam is in J and E0 is in kJ. It is hoped that the establishment of such scaling laws places on a firm footing the reference quantitative ideas for plasma focus ion beams.

  4. Quantification of soy isoflavones and their conjugative metabolites in plasma and urine: an automated and validated UHPLC-MS/MS method for use in large-scale studies.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Sebastian T; Al-Maharik, Nawaf; Botting, Nigel; Kulling, Sabine E

    2014-09-01

    The biotransformation of isoflavones by gut microbiota and by drug metabolizing enzymes plays a crucial role in the understanding of their potential health-promoting effects. The purpose of our work was to develop a simultaneous, sensitive, and robust automated ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method to quantify the soy isoflavones daidzein and genistein, their conjugative metabolites, as well as their major microbial degradation products in order to provide a method for use in large clinical trials or animal studies. An automated, 96-well solid-phase extraction method was used to extract the isoflavone analytes from plasma and urine. Separation of genistein, daidzein, and 19 of its metabolites, including five glucuronides, seven sulfates, and two sulfoglucuronides, as well as five microbial metabolites, was achieved in less than 25 min using a sub-2 μm particle column and a gradient elution with acetonitrile/methanol/water as mobile phases. Analysis was performed under negative ionization electrospray MS via the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Validation was performed according to the analytical method validation guidelines of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) consisting of selectivity, accuracy, precision, linearity, limit of detection, recovery, matrix effect, and robustness. All validated parameters essentially matched the FDA and ICH requirements. The application of this method to a pharmacokinetic study in postmenopausal women showed that isoflavones are extensively metabolized in vivo. A robust automated analytical approach was developed, which allows the handling of large sample sizes but nevertheless provides detailed information on the isoflavone metabolite profile leading to a better understanding and interpretation of clinical and animal studies. PMID:25103528

  5. Quenching of the beam-plasma instability by large-scale density fluctuations in 3 dimensions. [Langmuir waves in type 3 solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muschietti, L.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D.

    1985-01-01

    The highly variable, yet low, level of Langmuir waves measured in situ by spacecraft when electron beams associated with type III solar bursts are passing by are addressed by a model based on the existence of large scale density fluctuations capable of sufficiently diffusing small-k beam-unstable Langmuir waves in phase space. The model is also informed by the presence of a significant isotropic nonthermal tail in the distribution function of the background electron population, which is capable of stabilizing larger k modes. The model is able to predict various levels of Langmuir waves, depending on the parameters; calculations indicate that, for realistic parameters, the most unstable small k modes are fully stabilized, while some oblique mode with higher k and lower growth rate may remain unstable.

  6. Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.; Henins, Ivars; Babayan, Steve E.; Hicks, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two planar, parallel electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the volume therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly spacing the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, there is a negligible density of ions surviving for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike the situation for low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  7. Quasisymmetric toroidal plasmas with large mean flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Nunami, M.; Nishimura, S.

    2011-08-15

    Geometric conditions for quasisymmetric toroidal plasmas with large mean flows on the order of the ion thermal speed are investigated. Equilibrium momentum balance equations including the inertia term due to the large flow velocity are used to show that, for rotating quasisymmetric plasmas with no local currents crossing flux surfaces, all components of the metric tensor should be independent of the toroidal angle in the Boozer coordinates, and consequently these systems need to be rigorously axisymmetric. Unless the local radial currents vanish, the Boozer coordinates do not exist and the toroidal flow velocity cannot take any value other than a very limited class of eigenvalues corresponding to very rapid rotation especially for low beta plasmas.

  8. Laser propagation in underdense plasmas: Scaling arguments

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    The propagation of an intense laser beam in the underdense plasma is modelled by treating the plasma as a relativistic, zero temperature, charged fluid. For paraxial propagation and a sufficiently underdense plasma ({omega}p/{omega} {much_lt} 1), a multiple-scales technique is used to expand the exact equations in powers of the small parameter {theta} {equivalent_to} {omega}p/{omega}. The zeroth order equations are used in a critical examination of previous work on this problem, and to derive a scaling law for the threshold power required for cavitation.

  9. Space-plasma campaign on UCLA's Large Plasma Device (LAPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, M. E.; Finnegan, S. M.; Knudsen, D. J.; Vincena, S.

    2007-05-01

    Knudsen [JGR, 1996] describes a potential role for stationary Alfvén (StA) waves in auroral arcs' frequency dependence. Magnetized plasmas are predicted to support electromagnetic perturbations that are static in a fixed frame if there is uniform background plasma convection. These stationary waves should not be confused with standing waves that oscillate in time with a fixed, spatially varying envelope. Stationary waves have no time variation in the fixed frame. In the drifting frame, there is an apparent time dependence as plasma convects past fixed electromagnetic structures. We describe early results from an experimental campaign to reproduce in the lab the basic conditions necessary for the creation of StA waves, namely quasi-steady-state convection across magnetic field-aligned current channels. We show that an off-axis, fixed channel of electron current (and depleted density) is created in the Large Plasma Device Upgrade (LAPD) at UCLA, using a small, heated, oxide-coated electrode at one plasma-column end and we show that the larger plasma column rotates about its cylindrical axis from a radial electric field imposed by a special termination electrode on the same end. Initial experimentation with plasma-rotation-inducing termination electrodes began in May 2006 in the West Virginia Q Machine, leading to two designs that, in January 2007, were tested in LAPD. The radial profile of azimuthal velocity was consistent with predictions of rigid-body rotation. Current-channel experiments in LAPD, in August 2006, showed that inertial Alfvén waves could be concentrated in an off-axis channel of electron current and depleted plasma density. These experimental results will be presented and discussed. This research is supported by DOE and NSF.

  10. Generation of Large-Scale Magnetic Fields by Small-Scale Dynamo in Shear Flows.

    PubMed

    Squire, J; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-10-23

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic nature of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects. PMID:26551120

  11. Generation of large-scale magnetic fields by small-scale dynamo in shear flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-10-20

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Furthermore, given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic naturemore » of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects.« less

  12. Generation of large-scale magnetic fields by small-scale dynamo in shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-10-20

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Furthermore, given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic nature of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects.

  13. Large-Scale Reform Comes of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullan, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the history of large-scale education reform and makes the case that large-scale or whole system reform policies and strategies are becoming increasingly evident. The review briefly addresses the pre 1997 period concluding that while the pressure for reform was mounting that there were very few examples of deliberate or…

  14. Large-scale infrared scene projectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Darin A.

    1999-07-01

    Large-scale infrared scene projectors, typically have unique opto-mechanical characteristics associated to their application. This paper outlines two large-scale zoom lens assemblies with different environmental and package constraints. Various challenges and their respective solutions are discussed and presented.

  15. Large area cold plasma applicator for decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konesky, G. A.

    2008-04-01

    Cold plasma applicators have been used in the Medical community for several years for uses ranging from hemostasis ("stop bleeding") to tumor removal. An added benefit of this technology is enhanced wound healing by the destruction of infectious microbial agents without damaging healthy tissue. The beam is typically one millimeter to less than a centimeter in diameter. This technology has been adapted and expanded to large area applicators of potentially a square meter or more. Decontamination applications include both biological and chemical agents, and assisting in the removal of radiological agents, with minimal or no damage to the contaminated substrate material. Linear and planar multiemitter array plasma applicator design and operation is discussed.

  16. Synthesis of small and large scale dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    Using a closure model for the evolution of magnetic correlations, we uncover an interesting plausible saturated state of the small-scale fluctuation dynamo (SSD) and a novel analogy between quantum mechanical tunnelling and the generation of large-scale fields. Large scale fields develop via the α-effect, but as magnetic helicity can only change on a resistive timescale, the time it takes to organize the field into large scales increases with magnetic Reynolds number. This is very similar to the results which obtain from simulations using the full MHD equations.

  17. Large-scale inhomogeneities and galaxy statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffer, R.; Silk, J.

    1984-01-01

    The density fluctuations associated with the formation of large-scale cosmic pancake-like and filamentary structures are evaluated using the Zel'dovich approximation for the evolution of nonlinear inhomogeneities in the expanding universe. It is shown that the large-scale nonlinear density fluctuations in the galaxy distribution due to pancakes modify the standard scale-invariant correlation function xi(r) at scales comparable to the coherence length of adiabatic fluctuations. The typical contribution of pancakes and filaments to the J3 integral, and more generally to the moments of galaxy counts in a volume of approximately (15-40 per h Mpc)exp 3, provides a statistical test for the existence of large scale inhomogeneities. An application to several recent three dimensional data sets shows that despite large observational uncertainties over the relevant scales characteristic features may be present that can be attributed to pancakes in most, but not all, of the various galaxy samples.

  18. Meter scale plasma source for plasma wakefield experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Hogan, M. J.

    2012-12-21

    High accelerating gradients generated by a high density electron beam moving through plasma has been used to double the energy of the SLAC electron beam [1]. During that experiment, the electron current density was high enough to generate its own plasma without significant head erosion. In the newly commissioned FACET facility at SLAC, the peak current will be lower and without pre-ionization, head erosion will be a significant challenge for the planned experiments. In this work we report on our design of a meter scale plasma source for these experiments to effectively avoid the problem of head erosion. The plasma source is based on a homogeneous metal vapor gas column that is generated in a heat pipe oven [2]. A lithium oven over 30 cm long at densities over 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} has been constructed and tested at UCLA. The plasma is then generated by coupling a 10 TW short pulse Ti:Sapphire laser into the gas column using an axicon lens setup. The Bessel profile of the axicon setup creates a region of high intensity that can stretch over the full length of the gas column with approximately constant diameter. In this region of high intensity, the alkali metal vapor is ionized through multi-photon ionization process. In this manner, a fully ionized meter scale plasma of uniform density can be formed. Methods for controlling the plasma diameter and length will also be discussed.

  19. Meter scale plasma source for plasma wakefield experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Hogan, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    High accelerating gradients generated by a high density electron beam moving through plasma has been used to double the energy of the SLAC electron beam [1]. During that experiment, the electron current density was high enough to generate its own plasma without significant head erosion. In the newly commissioned FACET facility at SLAC, the peak current will be lower and without pre-ionization, head erosion will be a significant challenge for the planned experiments. In this work we report on our design of a meter scale plasma source for these experiments to effectively avoid the problem of head erosion. The plasma source is based on a homogeneous metal vapor gas column that is generated in a heat pipe oven [2]. A lithium oven over 30 cm long at densities over 1017 cm-3 has been constructed and tested at UCLA. The plasma is then generated by coupling a 10 TW short pulse Ti:Sapphire laser into the gas column using an axicon lens setup. The Bessel profile of the axicon setup creates a region of high intensity that can stretch over the full length of the gas column with approximately constant diameter. In this region of high intensity, the alkali metal vapor is ionized through multi-photon ionization process. In this manner, a fully ionized meter scale plasma of uniform density can be formed. Methods for controlling the plasma diameter and length will also be discussed.

  20. Eruption of a plasma blob, associated M-class flare, and large-scale extreme-ultraviolet wave observed by SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Manoharan, P. K.

    2013-05-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the formation and ejection of a plasma blob and associated extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves in active region (AR) NOAA 11176, observed by SDO/AIA and STEREO on 25 March 2011. The EUV images observed with the AIA instrument clearly show the formation and ejection of a plasma blob from the lower atmosphere of the Sun at ~9 min prior to the onset of the M1.0 flare. This onset of the M-class flare happened at the site of the blob formation, while the blob was rising in a parabolic path with an average speed of ~300 km s. The blob also showed twisting and de-twisting motion in the lower corona, and the blob speed varied from ~10-540 km s. The faster and slower EUV wavefronts were observed in front of the plasma blob during its impulsive acceleration phase. The faster EUV wave propagated with a speed of ~785 to 1020 km s, whereas the slower wavefront speed varied in between ~245 and 465 km s. The timing and speed of the faster wave match the shock speed estimated from the drift rate of the associated type II radio burst. The faster wave experiences a reflection by the nearby AR NOAA 11177. In addition, secondary waves were observed (only in the 171 Å channel), when the primary fast wave and plasma blob impacted the funnel-shaped coronal loops. The Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) magnetograms revealed the continuous emergence of new magnetic flux along with shear flows at the site of the blob formation. It is inferred that the emergence of twisted magnetic fields in the form of arch-filaments/"anemone-type" loops is the likely cause for the plasma blob formation and associated eruption along with the triggering of M-class flare. Furthermore, the faster EUV wave formed ahead of the blob shows the signature of fast-mode MHD wave, whereas the slower wave seems to be generated by the field line compression by the plasma blob. The secondary wave trains originated from the funnel-shaped loops are probably the fast magnetoacoustic waves

  1. The large-scale landslide risk classification in catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Che-Hsin; Wu, Tingyeh; Chen, Lien-Kuang; Lin, Sheng-Chi

    2013-04-01

    The landslide disasters caused heavy casualties during Typhoon Morakot, 2009. This disaster is defined as largescale landslide due to the casualty numbers. This event also reflects the survey on large-scale landslide potential is so far insufficient and significant. The large-scale landslide potential analysis provides information about where should be focused on even though it is very difficult to distinguish. Accordingly, the authors intend to investigate the methods used by different countries, such as Hong Kong, Italy, Japan and Switzerland to clarify the assessment methodology. The objects include the place with susceptibility of rock slide and dip slope and the major landslide areas defined from historical records. Three different levels of scales are confirmed necessarily from country to slopeland, which are basin, catchment, and slope scales. Totally ten spots were classified with high large-scale landslide potential in the basin scale. The authors therefore focused on the catchment scale and employ risk matrix to classify the potential in this paper. The protected objects and large-scale landslide susceptibility ratio are two main indexes to classify the large-scale landslide risk. The protected objects are the constructions and transportation facilities. The large-scale landslide susceptibility ratio is based on the data of major landslide area and dip slope and rock slide areas. Totally 1,040 catchments are concerned and are classified into three levels, which are high, medium, and low levels. The proportions of high, medium, and low levels are 11%, 51%, and 38%, individually. This result represents the catchments with high proportion of protected objects or large-scale landslide susceptibility. The conclusion is made and it be the base material for the slopeland authorities when considering slopeland management and the further investigation.

  2. Survey on large scale system control methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercadal, Mathieu

    1987-01-01

    The problem inherent to large scale systems such as power network, communication network and economic or ecological systems were studied. The increase in size and flexibility of future spacecraft has put those dynamical systems into the category of large scale systems, and tools specific to the class of large systems are being sought to design control systems that can guarantee more stability and better performance. Among several survey papers, reference was found to a thorough investigation on decentralized control methods. Especially helpful was the classification made of the different existing approaches to deal with large scale systems. A very similar classification is used, even though the papers surveyed are somehow different from the ones reviewed in other papers. Special attention is brought to the applicability of the existing methods to controlling large mechanical systems like large space structures. Some recent developments are added to this survey.

  3. The Large-Scale Plasmaspheric Density Trough Associated With the 24 May 2000 Geomagnetic Storm: IMAGE EUV Observations and Global Core Plasma Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adrian, M. L.; Gallagher, D. L.; Green, J. L.; Sandel, B. R.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The IMAGE EUV imager observed a plasmaspheric density, trough in association with a geomagnetically active period on 24 May 2000. In EUV, this density, trough appears as an Archimedes spiral extending from Earth's shadow to approximately 1900 MLT. We present an analysis of this density trough using simulated EUV images, Observational EUV images are subjected to edge analysis to establish the plasmapause L-shell and the location of the density trough in terms of L-shell, MLT extent, and radial width. The plasmaspheric density distribution is modeled using both static and dynamic models for the plasmasphere. The background plasmasphere is then numerically simulated using the 4-parameter plasmaspheric density model contained within the Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) and the Dynamic Global Core Plasma Model (DGCPM). Simulated EUV images of the model plasmasphere are produced once an artificial density, depletion, matching the observed MLT extent and width, has been removed. Once the azimuthal extent and width of the trough have been simulated, the depth of the artificial density depletion is iteratively adjusted to produce simulated EUV images that approximate observation. The results of this analysis and discussion of possible origins for this density trough will be presented.

  4. Large-scale regions of antimatter

    SciTech Connect

    Grobov, A. V. Rubin, S. G.

    2015-07-15

    Amodified mechanism of the formation of large-scale antimatter regions is proposed. Antimatter appears owing to fluctuations of a complex scalar field that carries a baryon charge in the inflation era.

  5. Performance of large electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Kaw, P. K.; Singh, R.

    2014-03-15

    This paper describes an in-house designed large Electron Energy Filter (EEF) utilized in the Large Volume Plasma Device (LVPD) [S. K. Mattoo, V. P. Anita, L. M. Awasthi, and G. Ravi, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 3864 (2001)] to secure objectives of (a) removing the presence of remnant primary ionizing energetic electrons and the non-thermal electrons, (b) introducing a radial gradient in plasma electron temperature without greatly affecting the radial profile of plasma density, and (c) providing a control on the scale length of gradient in electron temperature. A set of 19 independent coils of EEF make a variable aspect ratio, rectangular solenoid producing a magnetic field (B{sub x}) of 100 G along its axis and transverse to the ambient axial field (B{sub z} ∼ 6.2 G) of LVPD, when all its coils are used. Outside the EEF, magnetic field reduces rapidly to 1 G at a distance of 20 cm from the center of the solenoid on either side of target and source plasma. The EEF divides LVPD plasma into three distinct regions of source, EEF and target plasma. We report that the target plasma (n{sub e} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} and T{sub e} ∼ 2 eV) has no detectable energetic electrons and the radial gradients in its electron temperature can be established with scale length between 50 and 600 cm by controlling EEF magnetic field. Our observations reveal that the role of the EEF magnetic field is manifested by the energy dependence of transverse electron transport and enhanced transport caused by the plasma turbulence in the EEF plasma.

  6. Unification and large-scale structure.

    PubMed Central

    Laing, R A

    1995-01-01

    The hypothesis of relativistic flow on parsec scales, coupled with the symmetrical (and therefore subrelativistic) outer structure of extended radio sources, requires that jets decelerate on scales observable with the Very Large Array. The consequences of this idea for the appearances of FRI and FRII radio sources are explored. PMID:11607609

  7. Stimulated Raman scattering in large plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D.W.; Banner, D.L.

    1980-11-06

    Stimulated Raman scattering is of concern to laser fusion since it can create a hot electron environment which can increase the difficulty of achieving high final fuel densities. In earlier experiments with one micron laser light, the energy measured in Raman-scattered light has been insignificant. But these experiments were done with, at most, about 100 joules of laser energy. The Raman instability has a high threshold which also requires a large plasma to be irradiated with a large diameter spot. Only with a long interaction length can the Raman-scattered light wave convectively grow to a large amplitude, and only in recent long pulse, high energy experiments (4000 joules in 2 ns) at the Shiva laser facility have we observed as much as several percent of the laser light to be Raman-scattered. We find that the Raman instability has a much lower intensity threshold for longer laser pulselength and larger laser spot size on a solid target.

  8. Evaluating Large-Scale Interactive Radio Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Charles; Naidoo, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the challenges involved in conducting evaluations of interactive radio programmes in South Africa with large numbers of schools, teachers, and learners. It focuses on the role such large-scale evaluation has played during the South African radio learning programme's development stage, as well as during its subsequent…

  9. ARPACK: Solving large scale eigenvalue problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehoucq, Rich; Maschhoff, Kristi; Sorensen, Danny; Yang, Chao

    2013-11-01

    ARPACK is a collection of Fortran77 subroutines designed to solve large scale eigenvalue problems. The package is designed to compute a few eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors of a general n by n matrix A. It is most appropriate for large sparse or structured matrices A where structured means that a matrix-vector product w

  10. Laser{endash}plasma interactions in ignition-scale hohlraum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    MacGowan, B.J.; Afeyan, B.B.; Back, C.A.; Berger, R.L.; Bonnaud, G.; Casanova, M.; Cohen, B.I.; Desenne, D.E.; DuBois, D.F.; Dulieu, A.G.; Estabrook, K.G.; Fernandez, J.C.; Glenzer, S.H.; Hinkel, D.E.; Kaiser, T.B.; Kalantar, D.H.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kirkwood, R.K.; Kruer, W.L.; Langdon, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; Montgomery, D.S.; Moody, J.D.; Munro, D.H.; Powers, L.V.; Rose, H.A.; Rousseaux, C.; Turner, R.E.; Wilde, B.H.; Wilks, S.C.; Williams, E.A.

    1996-05-01

    Scattering of laser light by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is a concern for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The hohlraum designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) raise particular concerns due to the large scale and homogeneity of the plasmas within them. Experiments at Nova have studied laser{endash}plasma interactions within large scale length plasmas that mimic many of the characteristics of the NIF hohlraum plasmas. Filamentation and scattering of laser light by SBS and SRS have been investigated as a function of beam smoothing and plasma conditions. Narrowly collimated SRS backscatter has been observed from low density, low-{ital Z}, plasmas, which are representative of the plasma filling most of the NIF hohlraum. SBS backscatter is found to occur in the high-{ital Z} plasma of gold ablated from the wall. Both SBS and SRS are observed to be at acceptable levels in experiments using smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Scaling laws in magnetized plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2015-06-28

    Interactions of plasma motion with magnetic fields occur in nature and in the laboratory in an impressively broad range of scales, from megaparsecs in astrophysical systems to centimeters in fusion devices. The fact that such an enormous array of phenomena can be effectively studied lies in the existence of fundamental scaling laws in plasma turbulence, which allow one to scale the results of analytic and numerical modeling to the sized of galaxies, velocities of supernovae explosions, or magnetic fields in fusion devices. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provides the simplest framework for describing magnetic plasma turbulence. Recently, a number of new features of MHD turbulence have been discovered and an impressive array of thought-provoking phenomenological theories have been put forward. However, these theories have conflicting predictions, and the currently available numerical simulations are not able to resolve the contradictions. MHD turbulence exhibits a variety of regimes unusual in regular hydrodynamic turbulence. Depending on the strength of the guide magnetic field it can be dominated by weakly interacting Alfv\\'en waves or strongly interacting wave packets. At small scales such turbulence is locally anisotropic and imbalanced (cross-helical). In a stark contrast with hydrodynamic turbulence, which tends to ``forget'' global constrains and become uniform and isotropic at small scales, MHD turbulence becomes progressively more anisotropic and unbalanced at small scales. Magnetic field plays a fundamental role in turbulent dynamics. Even when such a field is not imposed by external sources, it is self-consistently generated by the magnetic dynamo action. This project aims at a comprehensive study of universal regimes of magnetic plasma turbulence, combining the modern analytic approaches with the state of the art numerical simulations. The proposed study focuses on the three topics: weak MHD turbulence, which is relevant for laboratory devices, the solar

  12. Large-scale Alfvén vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishchenko, O. G.; Pokhotelov, O. A.; Horton, W.; Scullion, E.; Fedun, V.

    2015-12-01

    The new type of large-scale vortex structures of dispersionless Alfvén waves in collisionless plasma is investigated. It is shown that Alfvén waves can propagate in the form of Alfvén vortices of finite characteristic radius and characterised by magnetic flux ropes carrying orbital angular momentum. The structure of the toroidal and radial velocity, fluid and magnetic field vorticity, the longitudinal electric current in the plane orthogonal to the external magnetic field are discussed.

  13. Large-scale Alfvén vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Onishchenko, O. G.; Horton, W.; Scullion, E.; Fedun, V.

    2015-12-15

    The new type of large-scale vortex structures of dispersionless Alfvén waves in collisionless plasma is investigated. It is shown that Alfvén waves can propagate in the form of Alfvén vortices of finite characteristic radius and characterised by magnetic flux ropes carrying orbital angular momentum. The structure of the toroidal and radial velocity, fluid and magnetic field vorticity, the longitudinal electric current in the plane orthogonal to the external magnetic field are discussed.

  14. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Complements Plasma Epstein-Barr Virus Deoxyribonucleic Acid Prognostication in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Large-Scale Retrospective and Prospective Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Lin-Quan; Li, Chao-Feng; Chen, Qiu-Yan; Zhang, Lu; Lai, Xiao-Ping; He, Yun; Xu, Yun-Xiu-Xiu; Hu, Dong-Peng; Wen, Shi-Hua; Peng, Yu-Tuan; Chen, Wen-Hui; Liu, Huai; Guo, Shan-Shan; Liu, Li-Ting; Li, Jing; Zhang, Jing-Ping; and others

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of combining the assessment of circulating high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) with that of Epstein-Barr virus DNA (EBV DNA) in the pretherapy prognostication of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Patients and Methods: Three independent cohorts of NPC patients (training set of n=3113, internal validation set of n=1556, and prospective validation set of n=1668) were studied. Determinants of disease-free survival, distant metastasis–free survival, and overall survival were assessed by multivariate analysis. Hazard ratios and survival probabilities of the patient groups, segregated by clinical stage (T1-2N0-1M0, T3-4N0-1M0, T1-2N2-3M0, and T3-4N2-3M0) and EBV DNA load (low or high) alone, and also according to hs-CRP level (low or high), were compared. Results: Elevated hs-CRP and EBV DNA levels were significantly correlated with poor disease-free survival, distant metastasis–free survival, and overall survival in both the training and validation sets. Associations were similar and remained significant after excluding patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and chronic hepatitis B. Patients with advanced-stage disease were segregated by high EBV DNA levels and high hs-CRP level into a poorest-risk group, and participants with either high EBV DNA but low hs-CRP level or high hs-CRP but low EBV DNA values had poorer survival compared with the bottom values for both biomarkers. These findings demonstrate a significant improvement in the prognostic ability of conventional advanced NPC staging. Conclusion: Baseline plasma EBV DNA and serum hs-CRP levels were significantly correlated with survival in NPC patients. The combined interpretation of EBV DNA with hs-CRP levels led to refinement of the risks for the patient subsets, with improved risk discrimination in patients with advanced-stage disease.

  15. Large-scale simulations of reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Katharina; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Hamilton, Andrew J.S.; /JILA, Boulder

    2005-11-01

    We use cosmological simulations to explore the large-scale effects of reionization. Since reionization is a process that involves a large dynamic range--from galaxies to rare bright quasars--we need to be able to cover a significant volume of the universe in our simulation without losing the important small scale effects from galaxies. Here we have taken an approach that uses clumping factors derived from small scale simulations to approximate the radiative transfer on the sub-cell scales. Using this technique, we can cover a simulation size up to 1280h{sup -1} Mpc with 10h{sup -1} Mpc cells. This allows us to construct synthetic spectra of quasars similar to observed spectra of SDSS quasars at high redshifts and compare them to the observational data. These spectra can then be analyzed for HII region sizes, the presence of the Gunn-Peterson trough, and the Lyman-{alpha} forest.

  16. "Cosmological Parameters from Large Scale Structure"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    2005-01-01

    This grant has provided primary support for graduate student Mark Neyrinck, and some support for the PI and for colleague Nick Gnedin, who helped co-supervise Neyrinck. This award had two major goals. First, to continue to develop and apply methods for measuring galaxy power spectra on large, linear scales, with a view to constraining cosmological parameters. And second, to begin try to understand galaxy clustering at smaller. nonlinear scales well enough to constrain cosmology from those scales also. Under this grant, the PI and collaborators, notably Max Tegmark. continued to improve their technology for measuring power spectra from galaxy surveys at large, linear scales. and to apply the technology to surveys as the data become available. We believe that our methods are best in the world. These measurements become the foundation from which we and other groups measure cosmological parameters.

  17. The large-scale distribution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Margaret J.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial distribution of galaxies in the universe is characterized on the basis of the six completed strips of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics redshift-survey extension. The design of the survey is briefly reviewed, and the results are presented graphically. Vast low-density voids similar to the void in Bootes are found, almost completely surrounded by thin sheets of galaxies. Also discussed are the implications of the results for the survey sampling problem, the two-point correlation function of the galaxy distribution, the possibility of detecting large-scale coherent flows, theoretical models of large-scale structure, and the identification of groups and clusters of galaxies.

  18. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. Here I discuss how magnetic helicity has come to help us understand the saturation of and sustenance of large scale dynamos, the need for either local or global helicity fluxes to avoid dynamo quenching, and the associated observational consequences. I also discuss how magnetic helicity acts as a hindrance to turbulent diffusion of large scale fields, and thus a helper for fossil remnant large scale field origin models in some contexts. I briefly discuss the connection between large scale fields and accretion disk theory as well. The goal here is to provide a conceptual primer to help the reader efficiently penetrate the literature.

  19. Progress in Long Scale Length Laser-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S H; Arnold, P; Bardsley, G; Berger, R L; Bonanno, G; Borger, T; Bower, D E; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S; Burkhart, S C; Campbell, K; Chrisp, M P; Cohen, B I; Constantin, G; Cooper, F; Cox, J; Dewald, E; Divol, L; Dixit, S; Duncan, J; Eder, D; Edwards, J; Erbert, G; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Froula, D H; Gardner, S D; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Gregori, G; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Hall, T; Hammel, B A; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermes, G; Hinkel, D; Holder, J; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hsing, W; Huber, S; James, T; Johnson, S; Jones, O S; Kalantar, D; Kamperschroer, J H; Kauffman, R; Kelleher, T; Knight, J; Kirkwood, R K; Kruer, W L; Labiak, W; Landen, O L; Langdon, A B; Langer, S; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lee, F D; Lund, D; MacGowan, B; Marshall, S; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Mackinnon, A J; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K; Marshall, C; Mertens, E; Meezan, N; Miller, G; Montelongo, S; Moody, J D; Moses, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Ng, E; Niemann, C; Nikitin, A; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rekow, V; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Rhodes, M

    2003-11-11

    The first experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have employed the first four beams to measure propagation and laser backscattering losses in large ignition-size plasmas. Gas-filled targets between 2 mm and 7 mm length have been heated from one side by overlapping the focal spots of the four beams from one quad operated at 351 nm (3{omega}) with a total intensity of 2 x 10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}. The targets were filled with 1 atm of CO{sub 2} producing of up to 7 mm long homogeneously heated plasmas with densities of n{sub e} = 6 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} and temperatures of T{sub e} = 2 keV. The high energy in a NIF quad of beams of 16kJ, illuminating the target from one direction, creates unique conditions for the study of laser plasma interactions at scale lengths not previously accessible. The propagation through the large-scale plasma was measured with a gated x-ray imager that was filtered for 3.5 keV x rays. These data indicate that the beams interact with the full length of this ignition-scale plasma during the last {approx}1 ns of the experiment. During that time, the full aperture measurements of the stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering show scattering into the four focusing lenses of 6% for the smallest length ({approx}2 mm). increasing to 12% for {approx}7 mm. These results demonstrate the NIF experimental capabilities and further provide a benchmark for three-dimensional modeling of the laser-plasma interactions at ignition-size scale lengths.

  20. Management of large-scale technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two major themes are addressed in this assessment of the management of large-scale NASA programs: (1) how a high technology agency was a decade marked by a rapid expansion of funds and manpower in the first half and almost as rapid contraction in the second; and (2) how NASA combined central planning and control with decentralized project execution.

  1. A Large Scale Computer Terminal Output Controller.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Paul Thomas

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a large scale computer terminal output controller which supervises the transfer of information from a Control Data 6400 Computer to a PLATO IV data network. It discusses the cost considerations leading to the selection of educational television channels rather than telephone lines for…

  2. Large Scale Commodity Clusters for Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    A. Pochinsky; W. Akers; R. Brower; J. Chen; P. Dreher; R. Edwards; S. Gottlieb; D. Holmgren; P. Mackenzie; J. Negele; D. Richards; J. Simone; W. Watson

    2002-06-01

    We describe the construction of large scale clusters for lattice QCD computing being developed under the umbrella of the U.S. DoE SciDAC initiative. We discuss the study of floating point and network performance that drove the design of the cluster, and present our plans for future multi-Terascale facilities.

  3. Large-scale CFB combustion demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, P.T.; Hebb, J.L.; Aquino, R.

    1998-07-01

    The Jacksonville Electric Authority's large-scale CFB demonstration project is described. Given the early stage of project development, the paper focuses on the project organizational structure, its role within the Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program, and the projected environmental performance. A description of the CFB combustion process in included.

  4. Large-scale CFB combustion demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, P.T.; Hebb, J.L.; Aquino, R.

    1998-04-01

    The Jacksonville Electric Authority`s large-scale CFB demonstration project is described. Given the early stage of project development, the paper focuses on the project organizational structure, its role within the Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program, and the projected environmental performance. A description of the CFB combustion process is included.

  5. Experimental Simulations of Large-Scale Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, Kevin R.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes research on the effects of target porosity on the mechanics of impact cratering. Impact experiments conducted on a centrifuge provide direct simulations of large-scale cratering on porous asteroids. The experiments show that large craters in porous materials form mostly by compaction, with essentially no deposition of material into the ejecta blanket that is a signature of cratering in less-porous materials. The ratio of ejecta mass to crater mass is shown to decrease with increasing crater size or target porosity. These results are consistent with the observation that large closely-packed craters on asteroid Mathilde appear to have formed without degradation to earlier craters.

  6. Numerical modeling of the large-scale neutral and plasma responses to the body forces created by the dissipation of gravity waves from 6 h of deep convection in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, S. L.; Liu, H.-L.

    2013-05-01

    We study the response of the thermosphere and ionosphere to gravity waves (GWs) excited by 6 h of deep convection in Brazil on the evening of 01 October 2005 via the use of convective plume, ray trace, and global models. We find that primary GWs excited by convection having horizontal wavelengths of λH˜70-300 km, periods of 10-60 min, and phase speeds of cH˜50-225 m/s propagate well into the thermosphere. Their density perturbations are ρ'/ρ300 km. The dissipation of these GWs creates spatially and temporally localized body forces with amplitudes of 0.2- 1.0 m/s2at z˜120-230 km. These forces generate two counter-rotating circulation cells with horizontal velocities of 50-350 m/s. They also excite secondary GWs; those resolved by our global model have λH˜4000-5000 km and cH˜500-600 m/s. These secondary GWs propagate globally and have ρ'/ρplasma perturbations of foF2'˜0.2-1.0 MHz, TEC'˜0.4- 1.5 TECU (total electron content unit, 1TECU =1016 elm-2), and hmF2'˜5-50 km. The large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (LSTIDs) induced by the secondary GWs have amplitudes of foF2'˜0.2-0.5 MHz, TEC'˜0.2- 0.6 TECU, and hmF2'˜5-10 km. In a companion paper, we discuss changes to the prereversal enhancement and plasma drift from these forces.

  7. Large-scale extraction of proteins.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Teresa; Aires-Barros, Raquel

    2002-01-01

    The production of foreign proteins using selected host with the necessary posttranslational modifications is one of the key successes in modern biotechnology. This methodology allows the industrial production of proteins that otherwise are produced in small quantities. However, the separation and purification of these proteins from the fermentation media constitutes a major bottleneck for the widespread commercialization of recombinant proteins. The major production costs (50-90%) for typical biological product resides in the purification strategy. There is a need for efficient, effective, and economic large-scale bioseparation techniques, to achieve high purity and high recovery, while maintaining the biological activity of the molecule. Aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) allow process integration as simultaneously separation and concentration of the target protein is achieved, with posterior removal and recycle of the polymer. The ease of scale-up combined with the high partition coefficients obtained allow its potential application in large-scale downstream processing of proteins produced by fermentation. The equipment and the methodology for aqueous two-phase extraction of proteins on a large scale using mixer-settlerand column contractors are described. The operation of the columns, either stagewise or differential, are summarized. A brief description of the methods used to account for mass transfer coefficients, hydrodynamics parameters of hold-up, drop size, and velocity, back mixing in the phases, and flooding performance, required for column design, is also provided. PMID:11876297

  8. Ferroelectric opening switches for large-scale pulsed power drivers.

    SciTech Connect

    Brennecka, Geoffrey L.; Rudys, Joseph Matthew; Reed, Kim Warren; Pena, Gary Edward; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew; Glover, Steven Frank

    2009-11-01

    Fast electrical energy storage or Voltage-Driven Technology (VDT) has dominated fast, high-voltage pulsed power systems for the past six decades. Fast magnetic energy storage or Current-Driven Technology (CDT) is characterized by 10,000 X higher energy density than VDT and has a great number of other substantial advantages, but it has all but been neglected for all of these decades. The uniform explanation for neglect of CDT technology is invariably that the industry has never been able to make an effective opening switch, which is essential for the use of CDT. Most approaches to opening switches have involved plasma of one sort or another. On a large scale, gaseous plasmas have been used as a conductor to bridge the switch electrodes that provides an opening function when the current wave front propagates through to the output end of the plasma and fully magnetizes the plasma - this is called a Plasma Opening Switch (POS). Opening can be triggered in a POS using a magnetic field to push the plasma out of the A-K gap - this is called a Magnetically Controlled Plasma Opening Switch (MCPOS). On a small scale, depletion of electron plasmas in semiconductor devices is used to affect opening switch behavior, but these devices are relatively low voltage and low current compared to the hundreds of kilo-volts and tens of kilo-amperes of interest to pulsed power. This work is an investigation into an entirely new approach to opening switch technology that utilizes new materials in new ways. The new materials are Ferroelectrics and using them as an opening switch is a stark contrast to their traditional applications in optics and transducer applications. Emphasis is on use of high performance ferroelectrics with the objective of developing an opening switch that would be suitable for large scale pulsed power applications. Over the course of exploring this new ground, we have discovered new behaviors and properties of these materials that were here to fore unknown. Some of

  9. Large-scale drift and Rossby wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, K. L.; Nazarenko, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    We study drift/Rossby wave turbulence described by the large-scale limit of the Charney–Hasegawa–Mima equation. We define the zonal and meridional regions as Z:= \\{{k} :| {k}y| \\gt \\sqrt{3}{k}x\\} and M:= \\{{k} :| {k}y| \\lt \\sqrt{3}{k}x\\} respectively, where {k}=({k}x,{k}y) is in a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field such that k x is along the isopycnals and k y is along the plasma density gradient. We prove that the only types of resonant triads allowed are M≤ftrightarrow M+Z and Z≤ftrightarrow Z+Z. Therefore, if the spectrum of weak large-scale drift/Rossby turbulence is initially in Z it will remain in Z indefinitely. We present a generalised Fjørtoft’s argument to find transfer directions for the quadratic invariants in the two-dimensional {k}-space. Using direct numerical simulations, we test and confirm our theoretical predictions for weak large-scale drift/Rossby turbulence, and establish qualitative differences with cases when turbulence is strong. We demonstrate that the qualitative features of the large-scale limit survive when the typical turbulent scale is only moderately greater than the Larmor/Rossby radius.

  10. Large-Scale PV Integration Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Diao, Ruisheng; Ma, Jian; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin; Hafen, Ryan P.; Jin, Chunlian; Kirkham, Harold; Shlatz, Eugene; Frantzis, Lisa; McClive, Timothy; Karlson, Gregory; Acharya, Dhruv; Ellis, Abraham; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford; Chadliev, Vladimir; Smart, Michael; Salgo, Richard; Sorensen, Rahn; Allen, Barbara; Idelchik, Boris

    2011-07-29

    This research effort evaluates the impact of large-scale photovoltaic (PV) and distributed generation (DG) output on NV Energy’s electric grid system in southern Nevada. It analyzes the ability of NV Energy’s generation to accommodate increasing amounts of utility-scale PV and DG, and the resulting cost of integrating variable renewable resources. The study was jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy and NV Energy, and conducted by a project team comprised of industry experts and research scientists from Navigant Consulting Inc., Sandia National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and NV Energy.

  11. Fast figuring of large optics by reactive atom plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Marco; Jourdain, Renaud; Morantz, Paul; Shore, Paul

    2012-09-01

    The next generation of ground-based astronomical observatories will require fabrication and maintenance of extremely large segmented mirrors tens of meters in diameter. At present, the large production of segments required by projects like E-ELT and TMT poses time frames and costs feasibility questions. This is principally due to a bottleneck stage in the optical fabrication chain: the final figuring step. State-of-the-art figure correction techniques, so far, have failed to meet the needs of the astronomical community for mass production of large, ultra-precise optical surfaces. In this context, Reactive Atom Plasma (RAP) is proposed as a candidate figuring process that combines nanometer level accuracy with high material removal rates. RAP is a form of plasma enhanced chemical etching at atmospheric pressure based on Inductively Coupled Plasma technology. The rapid figuring capability of the RAP process has already been proven on medium sized optical surfaces made of silicon based materials. In this paper, the figure correction of a 3 meters radius of curvature, 400 mm diameter spherical ULE mirror is presented. This work demonstrates the large scale figuring capability of the Reactive Atom Plasma process. The figuring is carried out by applying an in-house developed procedure that promotes rapid convergence. A 2.3 μm p-v initial figure error is removed within three iterations, for a total processing time of 2.5 hours. The same surface is then re-polished and the residual error corrected again down to λ/20 nm rms. These results highlight the possibility of figuring a metre-class mirror in about ten hours.

  12. Fractals and cosmological large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Xiaochun; Schramm, David N.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of galaxy-galaxy and cluster-cluster correlations as well as other large-scale structure can be fit with a 'limited' fractal with dimension D of about 1.2. This is not a 'pure' fractal out to the horizon: the distribution shifts from power law to random behavior at some large scale. If the observed patterns and structures are formed through an aggregation growth process, the fractal dimension D can serve as an interesting constraint on the properties of the stochastic motion responsible for limiting the fractal structure. In particular, it is found that the observed fractal should have grown from two-dimensional sheetlike objects such as pancakes, domain walls, or string wakes. This result is generic and does not depend on the details of the growth process.

  13. Condition Monitoring of Large-Scale Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the research conducted for the NASA Ames Research Center under grant NAG2-1182 (Condition-Based Monitoring of Large-Scale Facilities). The information includes copies of view graphs presented at NASA Ames in the final Workshop (held during December of 1998), as well as a copy of a technical report provided to the COTR (Dr. Anne Patterson-Hine) subsequent to the workshop. The material describes the experimental design, collection of data, and analysis results associated with monitoring the health of large-scale facilities. In addition to this material, a copy of the Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory data fusion visual programming tool kit was also provided to NASA Ames researchers.

  14. Laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.E.; Powers, L.V.; Berger, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive targets planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser consist of spherical fuel capsules enclosed in cylindrical Au hohlraums. Laser beams, arranged in cylindrical rings, heat the inside of the Au wall to produce x rays that in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Detailed calculations show that adequate implosion symmetry can be maintained by filling the hohlraum interior with low-density, low-Z gases. The plasma produced from the heated gas provides sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively. As the laser heats this gas, the gas becomes a relatively uniform plasma with small gradients in velocity and density. Such long-scale-length plasmas can be ideal mediums for stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). SBS can reflect a large fraction of the incident laser light before it is absorbed by the hohlraum; therefore, it is undesirable in an inertial confinement fusion target. To examine the importance of SBS in NIF targets, the authors used Nova to measure SBS from hohlraums with plasma conditions similar to those predicted for high-gain NIF targets. The plasmas differ from the more familiar exploding foil or solid targets as follows: they are hot (3 keV); they have high electron densities (n{sub e}=10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}); and they are nearly stationary, confined within an Au cylinder, and uniform over large distances (>2 mm). These hohlraums have <3% peak SBS backscatter for an interaction beam with intensities of 1-4 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a laser wavelength of 0.351{micro}m, f/4 or f/8 focusing optics, and a variety of beam smoothing implementations. Based on these conditions the authors conclude that SBS does not appear to be a problem for NIF targets.

  15. Large scale processes in the solar nebula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, A. P.

    Most proposed chondrule formation mechanisms involve processes occurring inside the solar nebula, so the large scale (roughly 1 to 10 AU) structure of the nebula is of general interest for any chrondrule-forming mechanism. Chondrules and Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) might also have been formed as a direct result of the large scale structure of the nebula, such as passage of material through high temperature regions. While recent nebula models do predict the existence of relatively hot regions, the maximum temperatures in the inner planet region may not be high enough to account for chondrule or CAI thermal processing, unless the disk mass is considerably greater than the minimum mass necessary to restore the planets to solar composition. Furthermore, it does not seem to be possible to achieve both rapid heating and rapid cooling of grain assemblages in such a large scale furnace. However, if the accretion flow onto the nebula surface is clumpy, as suggested by observations of variability in young stars, then clump-disk impacts might be energetic enough to launch shock waves which could propagate through the nebula to the midplane, thermally processing any grain aggregates they encounter, and leaving behind a trail of chondrules.

  16. Large-scale polarimetry of large optical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholomitskii, G. B.; Maslov, I. A.; Vitrichenko, E. A.

    1999-11-01

    We present preliminary results of wide-field visual CCD polarimetry for large optical galaxies through a concentric multisector radial-tangential polaroid analyzer mounted at the intermediate focus of a Zeiss-1000 telescope. The mean degree of tangential polarization in a 13-arcmin field, which was determined by processing images with imprinted ``orthogonal'' sectors, ranges from several percent (M 82) and 0.51% (the spirals M 51, M 81) to lower values for elliptical galaxies (M 49, M 87). It is emphasized that the parameters of large-scale polarization can be properly determined by using physical models for galaxies; inclination and azimuthal dependences of the degree of polarization are given for spirals.

  17. Penetration of Large Scale Electric Field to Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Fok, M. C. H.; Sibeck, D. G.; Wygant, J. R.; Spence, H. E.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    The direct penetration of large scale global electric field to the inner magnetosphere is a critical element in controlling how the background thermal plasma populates within the radiation belts. These plasma populations provide the source of particles and free energy needed for the generation and growth of various plasma waves that, at critical points of resonances in time and phase space, can scatter or energize radiation belt particles to regulate the flux level of the relativistic electrons in the system. At high geomagnetic activity levels, the distribution of large scale electric fields serves as an important indicator of how prevalence of strong wave-particle interactions extend over local times and radial distances. To understand the complex relationship between the global electric fields and thermal plasmas, particularly due to the ionospheric dynamo and the magnetospheric convection effects, and their relations to the geomagnetic activities, we analyze the electric field and cold plasma measurements from Van Allen Probes over more than two years period and simulate a geomagnetic storm event using Coupled Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Model (CIMI). Our statistical analysis of the measurements from Van Allan Probes and CIMI simulations of the March 17, 2013 storm event indicate that: (1) Global dawn-dusk electric field can penetrate the inner magnetosphere inside the inner belt below L~2. (2) Stronger convections occurred in the dusk and midnight sectors than those in the noon and dawn sectors. (3) Strong convections at multiple locations exist at all activity levels but more complex at higher activity levels. (4) At the high activity levels, strongest convections occur in the midnight sectors at larger distances from the Earth and in the dusk sector at closer distances. (5) Two plasma populations of distinct ion temperature isotropies divided at L-Shell ~2, indicating distinct heating mechanisms between inner and outer radiation belts. (6) CIMI

  18. Supporting large-scale computational science

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R

    1998-10-01

    A study has been carried out to determine the feasibility of using commercial database management systems (DBMSs) to support large-scale computational science. Conventional wisdom in the past has been that DBMSs are too slow for such data. Several events over the past few years have muddied the clarity of this mindset: 1. 2. 3. 4. Several commercial DBMS systems have demonstrated storage and ad-hoc quer access to Terabyte data sets. Several large-scale science teams, such as EOSDIS [NAS91], high energy physics [MM97] and human genome [Kin93] have adopted (or make frequent use of) commercial DBMS systems as the central part of their data management scheme. Several major DBMS vendors have introduced their first object-relational products (ORDBMSs), which have the potential to support large, array-oriented data. In some cases, performance is a moot issue. This is true in particular if the performance of legacy applications is not reduced while new, albeit slow, capabilities are added to the system. The basic assessment is still that DBMSs do not scale to large computational data. However, many of the reasons have changed, and there is an expiration date attached to that prognosis. This document expands on this conclusion, identifies the advantages and disadvantages of various commercial approaches, and describes the studies carried out in exploring this area. The document is meant to be brief, technical and informative, rather than a motivational pitch. The conclusions within are very likely to become outdated within the next 5-7 years, as market forces will have a significant impact on the state of the art in scientific data management over the next decade.

  19. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriange, Tobias; Aamir, Ali; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Denis, Kevin; Moseley, Samuel H.; Rostem, Karwan; Wollack, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  20. Precision Measurement of Large Scale Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to develop and to start to apply new precision methods for measuring the power spectrum and redshift distortions from the anticipated new generation of large redshift surveys. A highlight of work completed during the award period was the application of the new methods developed by the PI to measure the real space power spectrum and redshift distortions of the IRAS PSCz survey, published in January 2000. New features of the measurement include: (1) measurement of power over an unprecedentedly broad range of scales, 4.5 decades in wavenumber, from 0.01 to 300 h/Mpc; (2) at linear scales, not one but three power spectra are measured, the galaxy-galaxy, galaxy-velocity, and velocity-velocity power spectra; (3) at linear scales each of the three power spectra is decorrelated within itself, and disentangled from the other two power spectra (the situation is analogous to disentangling scalar and tensor modes in the Cosmic Microwave Background); and (4) at nonlinear scales the measurement extracts not only the real space power spectrum, but also the full line-of-sight pairwise velocity distribution in redshift space.

  1. Large-scale quasi-geostrophic magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Balk, Alexander M.

    2014-12-01

    We consider the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of a shallow fluid layer on a rapidly rotating planet or star. The presence of a background toroidal magnetic field is assumed, and the 'shallow water' beta-plane approximation is used. We derive a single equation for the slow large length scale dynamics. The range of validity of this equation fits the MHD of the lighter fluid at the top of Earth's outer core. The form of this equation is similar to the quasi-geostrophic (Q-G) equation (for usual ocean or atmosphere), but the parameters are essentially different. Our equation also implies the inverse cascade; but contrary to the usual Q-G situation, the energy cascades to smaller length scales, while the enstrophy cascades to the larger scales. We find the Kolmogorov-type spectrum for the inverse cascade. The spectrum indicates the energy accumulation in larger scales. In addition to the energy and enstrophy, the obtained equation possesses an extra (adiabatic-type) invariant. Its presence implies energy accumulation in the 30° sector around zonal direction. With some special energy input, the extra invariant can lead to the accumulation of energy in zonal magnetic field; this happens if the input of the extra invariant is small, while the energy input is considerable.

  2. Estimation of large-scale dimension densities.

    PubMed

    Raab, C; Kurths, J

    2001-07-01

    We propose a technique to calculate large-scale dimension densities in both higher-dimensional spatio-temporal systems and low-dimensional systems from only a few data points, where known methods usually have an unsatisfactory scaling behavior. This is mainly due to boundary and finite-size effects. With our rather simple method, we normalize boundary effects and get a significant correction of the dimension estimate. This straightforward approach is based on rather general assumptions. So even weak coherent structures obtained from small spatial couplings can be detected with this method, which is impossible by using the Lyapunov-dimension density. We demonstrate the efficiency of our technique for coupled logistic maps, coupled tent maps, the Lorenz attractor, and the Roessler attractor. PMID:11461376

  3. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriage, Tobias; Ali, A.; Amiri, M.; Appel, J. W.; Araujo, D.; Bennett, C. L.; Boone, F.; Chan, M.; Cho, H.; Chuss, D. T.; Colazo, F.; Crowe, E.; Denis, K.; Dünner, R.; Eimer, J.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Gothe, D.; Halpern, M.; Harrington, K.; Hilton, G.; Hinshaw, G. F.; Huang, C.; Irwin, K.; Jones, G.; Karakla, J.; Kogut, A. J.; Larson, D.; Limon, M.; Lowry, L.; Mehrle, N.; Miller, A. D.; Miller, N.; Moseley, S. H.; Novak, G.; Reintsema, C.; Rostem, K.; Stevenson, T.; Towner, D.; U-Yen, K.; Wagner, E.; Watts, D.; Wollack, E.; Xu, Z.; Zeng, L.

    2014-01-01

    Some of the most compelling inflation models predict a background of primordial gravitational waves (PGW) detectable by their imprint of a curl-like "B-mode" pattern in the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a novel array of telescopes to measure the B-mode signature of the PGW. By targeting the largest angular scales (>2°) with a multifrequency array, novel polarization modulation and detectors optimized for both control of systematics and sensitivity, CLASS sets itself apart in the field of CMB polarization surveys and opens an exciting new discovery space for the PGW and inflation. This poster presents an overview of the CLASS project.

  4. The XMM Large Scale Structure Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Marguerite

    2005-10-01

    We propose to complete, by an additional 5 deg2, the XMM-LSS Survey region overlying the Spitzer/SWIRE field. This field already has CFHTLS and Integral coverage, and will encompass about 10 deg2. The resulting multi-wavelength medium-depth survey, which complements XMM and Chandra deep surveys, will provide a unique view of large-scale structure over a wide range of redshift, and will show active galaxies in the full range of environments. The complete coverage by optical and IR surveys provides high-quality photometric redshifts, so that cosmological results can quickly be extracted. In the spirit of a Legacy survey, we will make the raw X-ray data immediately public. Multi-band catalogues and images will also be made available on short time scales.

  5. Estimation of large-scale dimension densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Corinna; Kurths, Jürgen

    2001-07-01

    We propose a technique to calculate large-scale dimension densities in both higher-dimensional spatio-temporal systems and low-dimensional systems from only a few data points, where known methods usually have an unsatisfactory scaling behavior. This is mainly due to boundary and finite-size effects. With our rather simple method, we normalize boundary effects and get a significant correction of the dimension estimate. This straightforward approach is based on rather general assumptions. So even weak coherent structures obtained from small spatial couplings can be detected with this method, which is impossible by using the Lyapunov-dimension density. We demonstrate the efficiency of our technique for coupled logistic maps, coupled tent maps, the Lorenz attractor, and the Roessler attractor.

  6. Scaling relations for large Martian valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Sanjoy M.; Montgomery, David R.; Greenberg, Harvey M.

    2009-02-01

    The dendritic morphology of Martian valley networks, particularly in the Noachian highlands, has long been argued to imply a warmer, wetter early Martian climate, but the character and extent of this period remains controversial. We analyzed scaling relations for the 10 large valley systems incised in terrain of various ages, resolvable using the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) and the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). Four of the valleys originate in point sources with negligible contributions from tributaries, three are very poorly dissected with a few large tributaries separated by long uninterrupted trunks, and three exhibit the dendritic, branching morphology typical of terrestrial channel networks. We generated width-area and slope-area relationships for each because these relations are identified as either theoretically predicted or robust terrestrial empiricisms for graded precipitation-fed, perennial channels. We also generated distance-area relationships (Hack's law) because they similarly represent robust characteristics of terrestrial channels (whether perennial or ephemeral). We find that the studied Martian valleys, even the dendritic ones, do not satisfy those empiricisms. On Mars, the width-area scaling exponent b of -0.7-4.7 contrasts with values of 0.3-0.6 typical of terrestrial channels; the slope-area scaling exponent $\\theta$ ranges from -25.6-5.5, whereas values of 0.3-0.5 are typical on Earth; the length-area, or Hack's exponent n ranges from 0.47 to 19.2, while values of 0.5-0.6 are found on Earth. None of the valleys analyzed satisfy all three relations typical of terrestrial perennial channels. As such, our analysis supports the hypotheses that ephemeral and/or immature channel morphologies provide the closest terrestrial analogs to the dendritic networks on Mars, and point source discharges provide terrestrial analogs best suited to describe the other large Martian valleys.

  7. Colloquium: Large scale simulations on GPU clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernaschi, Massimo; Bisson, Mauro; Fatica, Massimiliano

    2015-06-01

    Graphics processing units (GPU) are currently used as a cost-effective platform for computer simulations and big-data processing. Large scale applications require that multiple GPUs work together but the efficiency obtained with cluster of GPUs is, at times, sub-optimal because the GPU features are not exploited at their best. We describe how it is possible to achieve an excellent efficiency for applications in statistical mechanics, particle dynamics and networks analysis by using suitable memory access patterns and mechanisms like CUDA streams, profiling tools, etc. Similar concepts and techniques may be applied also to other problems like the solution of Partial Differential Equations.

  8. Nonthermal Components in the Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco

    2004-12-01

    I address the issue of nonthermal processes in the large scale structure of the universe. After reviewing the properties of cosmic shocks and their role as particle accelerators, I discuss the main observational results, from radio to γ-ray and describe the processes that are thought be responsible for the observed nonthermal emissions. Finally, I emphasize the important role of γ-ray astronomy for the progress in the field. Non detections at these photon energies have already allowed us important conclusions. Future observations will tell us more about the physics of the intracluster medium, shocks dissipation and CR acceleration.

  9. Large-scale planar lightwave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidnyk, Serge; Zhang, Hua; Pearson, Matt; Balakrishnan, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    By leveraging advanced wafer processing and flip-chip bonding techniques, we have succeeded in hybrid integrating a myriad of active optical components, including photodetectors and laser diodes, with our planar lightwave circuit (PLC) platform. We have combined hybrid integration of active components with monolithic integration of other critical functions, such as diffraction gratings, on-chip mirrors, mode-converters, and thermo-optic elements. Further process development has led to the integration of polarization controlling functionality. Most recently, all these technological advancements have been combined to create large-scale planar lightwave circuits that comprise hundreds of optical elements integrated on chips less than a square inch in size.

  10. Neutrinos and large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-07-15

    I review the use of cosmological large-scale structure to measure properties of neutrinos and other relic populations of light relativistic particles. With experiments to measure the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave anisotropies and the clustering of matter at low redshift, we now have securely measured a relativistic background with density appropriate to the cosmic neutrino background. Our limits on the mass of the neutrino continue to shrink. Experiments coming in the next decade will greatly improve the available precision on searches for the energy density of novel relativistic backgrounds and the mass of neutrinos.

  11. Large scale phononic metamaterials for seismic isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Aravantinos-Zafiris, N.; Sigalas, M. M.

    2015-08-14

    In this work, we numerically examine structures that could be characterized as large scale phononic metamaterials. These novel structures could have band gaps in the frequency spectrum of seismic waves when their dimensions are chosen appropriately, thus raising the belief that they could be serious candidates for seismic isolation structures. Different and easy to fabricate structures were examined made from construction materials such as concrete and steel. The well-known finite difference time domain method is used in our calculations in order to calculate the band structures of the proposed metamaterials.

  12. Large-Scale Organization of Glycosylation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pan-Jun; Lee, Dong-Yup; Jeong, Hawoong

    2009-03-01

    Glycosylation is a highly complex process to produce a diverse repertoire of cellular glycans that are frequently attached to proteins and lipids. Glycans participate in fundamental biological processes including molecular trafficking and clearance, cell proliferation and apoptosis, developmental biology, immune response, and pathogenesis. N-linked glycans found on proteins are formed by sequential attachments of monosaccharides with the help of a relatively small number of enzymes. Many of these enzymes can accept multiple N-linked glycans as substrates, thus generating a large number of glycan intermediates and their intermingled pathways. Motivated by the quantitative methods developed in complex network research, we investigate the large-scale organization of such N-glycosylation pathways in a mammalian cell. The uncovered results give the experimentally-testable predictions for glycosylation process, and can be applied to the engineering of therapeutic glycoproteins.

  13. Scaling and Criticality in Large-Scale Neuronal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkenkaer-Hansen, K.

    The human brain during wakeful rest spontaneously generates large-scale neuronal network oscillations at around 10 and 20 Hz that can be measured non-invasively using magnetoencephalography (MEG) or electroencephalography (EEG). In this chapter, spontaneous oscillations are viewed as the outcome of a self-organizing stochastic process. The aim is to introduce the general prerequisites for stochastic systems to evolve to the critical state and to explain their neurophysiological equivalents. I review the recent evidence that the theory of self-organized criticality (SOC) may provide a unifying explanation for the large variability in amplitude, duration, and recurrence of spontaneous network oscillations, as well as the high susceptibility to perturbations and the long-range power-law temporal correlations in their amplitude envelope.

  14. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmuth, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the "classical" interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which "pseudo waves" are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  15. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  16. Territorial Polymers and Large Scale Genome Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosberg, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    Chromatin fiber in interphase nucleus represents effectively a very long polymer packed in a restricted volume. Although polymer models of chromatin organization were considered, most of them disregard the fact that DNA has to stay not too entangled in order to function properly. One polymer model with no entanglements is the melt of unknotted unconcatenated rings. Extensive simulations indicate that rings in the melt at large length (monomer numbers) N approach the compact state, with gyration radius scaling as N^1/3, suggesting every ring being compact and segregated from the surrounding rings. The segregation is consistent with the known phenomenon of chromosome territories. Surface exponent β (describing the number of contacts between neighboring rings scaling as N^β) appears only slightly below unity, β 0.95. This suggests that the loop factor (probability to meet for two monomers linear distance s apart) should decay as s^-γ, where γ= 2 - β is slightly above one. The later result is consistent with HiC data on real human interphase chromosomes, and does not contradict to the older FISH data. The dynamics of rings in the melt indicates that the motion of one ring remains subdiffusive on the time scale well above the stress relaxation time.

  17. Introducing Large-Scale Innovation in Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Riviou, Katherina; Cherouvis, Stephanos; Chelioti, Eleni; Bogner, Franz X.

    2016-08-01

    Education reform initiatives tend to promise higher effectiveness in classrooms especially when emphasis is given to e-learning and digital resources. Practical changes in classroom realities or school organization, however, are lacking. A major European initiative entitled Open Discovery Space (ODS) examined the challenge of modernizing school education via a large-scale implementation of an open-scale methodology in using technology-supported innovation. The present paper describes this innovation scheme which involved schools and teachers all over Europe, embedded technology-enhanced learning into wider school environments and provided training to teachers. Our implementation scheme consisted of three phases: (1) stimulating interest, (2) incorporating the innovation into school settings and (3) accelerating the implementation of the innovation. The scheme's impact was monitored for a school year using five indicators: leadership and vision building, ICT in the curriculum, development of ICT culture, professional development support, and school resources and infrastructure. Based on about 400 schools, our study produced four results: (1) The growth in digital maturity was substantial, even for previously high scoring schools. This was even more important for indicators such as vision and leadership" and "professional development." (2) The evolution of networking is presented graphically, showing the gradual growth of connections achieved. (3) These communities became core nodes, involving numerous teachers in sharing educational content and experiences: One out of three registered users (36 %) has shared his/her educational resources in at least one community. (4) Satisfaction scores ranged from 76 % (offer of useful support through teacher academies) to 87 % (good environment to exchange best practices). Initiatives such as ODS add substantial value to schools on a large scale.

  18. Introducing Large-Scale Innovation in Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Riviou, Katherina; Cherouvis, Stephanos; Chelioti, Eleni; Bogner, Franz X.

    2016-02-01

    Education reform initiatives tend to promise higher effectiveness in classrooms especially when emphasis is given to e-learning and digital resources. Practical changes in classroom realities or school organization, however, are lacking. A major European initiative entitled Open Discovery Space (ODS) examined the challenge of modernizing school education via a large-scale implementation of an open-scale methodology in using technology-supported innovation. The present paper describes this innovation scheme which involved schools and teachers all over Europe, embedded technology-enhanced learning into wider school environments and provided training to teachers. Our implementation scheme consisted of three phases: (1) stimulating interest, (2) incorporating the innovation into school settings and (3) accelerating the implementation of the innovation. The scheme's impact was monitored for a school year using five indicators: leadership and vision building, ICT in the curriculum, development of ICT culture, professional development support, and school resources and infrastructure. Based on about 400 schools, our study produced four results: (1) The growth in digital maturity was substantial, even for previously high scoring schools. This was even more important for indicators such as vision and leadership" and "professional development." (2) The evolution of networking is presented graphically, showing the gradual growth of connections achieved. (3) These communities became core nodes, involving numerous teachers in sharing educational content and experiences: One out of three registered users (36 %) has shared his/her educational resources in at least one community. (4) Satisfaction scores ranged from 76 % (offer of useful support through teacher academies) to 87 % (good environment to exchange best practices). Initiatives such as ODS add substantial value to schools on a large scale.

  19. Multi-Scale Multi-Species Modeling for Plasma Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Samuel Jun

    This dissertation describes three computational models developed to simulate important aspects of low-temperature plasma devices, most notably ring-cusp ion discharges and thrusters. The main findings of this dissertation are related to (1) the mechanisms of cusp confinement for micro-scale plasmas, (2) the implementation and merits of magnetic field aligned meshes, and (3) an improved method for describing heavy species interactions. The Single Cusp (SC) model focuses on the near-cusp region of the discharge chamber to investigate the near surface cusp confinement of a micro-scale plasma. The model employs the multi-species iterative Monte Carlo method and uses various advanced methods such as electric field calculation and particle weighting algorithm that are compatible with a non-uniform mesh in cylindrical coordinates. Three different plasma conditions are simulated with the SC model, including an electron plasma, a sparse plasma, and a weakly ionized plasma. It is found that the scaling of plasma loss to the cusp for a sparse plasma can be similar to that for a weakly ionized plasma, while the loss mechanism is significantly different; the primary electrons strongly influence the loss structure of the sparse plasma. The model is also used, along with experimental results, to describe the importance of the local magnetic field on the primary electron loss behavior at the cusp. Many components of the 2D/3D hybrid fluid/particle model (DC-ION) are improved from the original version. The DC-ION code looks at the macroscopic structure of the discharge plasma and can be used to address the design and optimization challenges of miniature to micro discharges on the order of 3 cm to 1 cm in diameter. Among the work done for DC-ION, detailed steps for the magnetic field aligned (MFA) mesh are provided. Solving the plasma diffusion equation in the ring-cusp configuration, the benefit of the MFA mesh has been fully investigated by comparing the solution with a uniform

  20. Large-amplitude solitons in gravitationally balanced quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-08-15

    Using the quantum fluid model for self-gravitating quantum plasmas with the Bernoulli pseudopotential method and taking into account the relativistic degeneracy effect, it is shown that gravity-induced large-amplitude density rarefaction solitons can exist in gravitationally balanced quantum plasmas. These nonlinear solitons are generated due to the force imbalance between the gravity and the quantum fluid pressure via local density perturbations, similar to that on shallow waters. It is found that both the fluid mass-density and the atomic-number of the constituent ions have significant effect on the amplitude and width of these solitonic profiles. Existence of a large-scale gravity-induced solitonic activities on neutron-star surface, for instance, can be a possible explanation for the recently proposed resonant shattering mechanism [D. Tsang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 011102 (2012)] causing the intense short gamma ray burst phenomenon, in which release of ≃10{sup 46}–10{sup 47} ergs would be possible from the surface. The resonant shattering of the crust in a neutron star has been previously attributed to the crust-core interface mode and the tidal surface tensions. We believe that current model can be a more natural explanation for the energy liberation by solitonic activities on the neutron star surfaces, without a requirement for external mergers like other neutron stars or black holes for the crustal shatter.

  1. Large-amplitude solitons in gravitationally balanced quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Using the quantum fluid model for self-gravitating quantum plasmas with the Bernoulli pseudopotential method and taking into account the relativistic degeneracy effect, it is shown that gravity-induced large-amplitude density rarefaction solitons can exist in gravitationally balanced quantum plasmas. These nonlinear solitons are generated due to the force imbalance between the gravity and the quantum fluid pressure via local density perturbations, similar to that on shallow waters. It is found that both the fluid mass-density and the atomic-number of the constituent ions have significant effect on the amplitude and width of these solitonic profiles. Existence of a large-scale gravity-induced solitonic activities on neutron-star surface, for instance, can be a possible explanation for the recently proposed resonant shattering mechanism [D. Tsang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 011102 (2012)] causing the intense short gamma ray burst phenomenon, in which release of ≃1046-1047 ergs would be possible from the surface. The resonant shattering of the crust in a neutron star has been previously attributed to the crust-core interface mode and the tidal surface tensions. We believe that current model can be a more natural explanation for the energy liberation by solitonic activities on the neutron star surfaces, without a requirement for external mergers like other neutron stars or black holes for the crustal shatter.

  2. Large-scale databases of proper names.

    PubMed

    Conley, P; Burgess, C; Hage, D

    1999-05-01

    Few tools for research in proper names have been available--specifically, there is no large-scale corpus of proper names. Two corpora of proper names were constructed, one based on U.S. phone book listings, the other derived from a database of Usenet text. Name frequencies from both corpora were compared with human subjects' reaction times (RTs) to the proper names in a naming task. Regression analysis showed that the Usenet frequencies contributed to predictions of human RT, whereas phone book frequencies did not. In addition, semantic neighborhood density measures derived from the HAL corpus were compared with the subjects' RTs and found to be a better predictor of RT than was frequency in either corpus. These new corpora are freely available on line for download. Potentials for these corpora range from using the names as stimuli in experiments to using the corpus data in software applications. PMID:10495803

  3. The challenge of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, S. A.

    1996-03-01

    The tasks that I have assumed for myself in this presentation include three separate parts. The first, appropriate to the particular setting of this meeting, is to review the basic work of the founding of this field; the appropriateness comes from the fact that W. G. Tifft made immense contributions that are not often realized by the astronomical community. The second task is to outline the general tone of the observational evidence for large scale structures. (Here, in particular, I cannot claim to be complete. I beg forgiveness from any workers who are left out by my oversight for lack of space and time.) The third task is to point out some of the major aspects of the field that may represent the clues by which some brilliant sleuth will ultimately figure out how galaxies formed.

  4. Engineering management of large scale systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Serita; Gill, Tepper L.; Paul, Arthur S.

    1989-01-01

    The organization of high technology and engineering problem solving, has given rise to an emerging concept. Reasoning principles for integrating traditional engineering problem solving with system theory, management sciences, behavioral decision theory, and planning and design approaches can be incorporated into a methodological approach to solving problems with a long range perspective. Long range planning has a great potential to improve productivity by using a systematic and organized approach. Thus, efficiency and cost effectiveness are the driving forces in promoting the organization of engineering problems. Aspects of systems engineering that provide an understanding of management of large scale systems are broadly covered here. Due to the focus and application of research, other significant factors (e.g., human behavior, decision making, etc.) are not emphasized but are considered.

  5. Large scale cryogenic fluid systems testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Cryogenic Fluid Systems Branch (CFSB) within the Space Propulsion Technology Division (SPTD) has the ultimate goal of enabling the long term storage and in-space fueling/resupply operations for spacecraft and reusable vehicles in support of space exploration. Using analytical modeling, ground based testing, and on-orbit experimentation, the CFSB is studying three primary categories of fluid technology: storage, supply, and transfer. The CFSB is also investigating fluid handling, advanced instrumentation, and tank structures and materials. Ground based testing of large-scale systems is done using liquid hydrogen as a test fluid at the Cryogenic Propellant Tank Facility (K-site) at Lewis' Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. A general overview of tests involving liquid transfer, thermal control, pressure control, and pressurization is given.

  6. Batteries for Large Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Soloveichik, Grigorii L.

    2011-07-15

    In recent years, with the deployment of renewable energy sources, advances in electrified transportation, and development in smart grids, the markets for large-scale stationary energy storage have grown rapidly. Electrochemical energy storage methods are strong candidate solutions due to their high energy density, flexibility, and scalability. This review provides an overview of mature and emerging technologies for secondary and redox flow batteries. New developments in the chemistry of secondary and flow batteries as well as regenerative fuel cells are also considered. Advantages and disadvantages of current and prospective electrochemical energy storage options are discussed. The most promising technologies in the short term are high-temperature sodium batteries with β”-alumina electrolyte, lithium-ion batteries, and flow batteries. Regenerative fuel cells and lithium metal batteries with high energy density require further research to become practical.

  7. Large scale water lens for solar concentration.

    PubMed

    Mondol, A S; Vogel, B; Bastian, G

    2015-06-01

    Properties of large scale water lenses for solar concentration were investigated. These lenses were built from readily available materials, normal tap water and hyper-elastic linear low density polyethylene foil. Exposed to sunlight, the focal lengths and light intensities in the focal spot were measured and calculated. Their optical properties were modeled with a raytracing software based on the lens shape. We have achieved a good match of experimental and theoretical data by considering wavelength dependent concentration factor, absorption and focal length. The change in light concentration as a function of water volume was examined via the resulting load on the foil and the corresponding change of shape. The latter was extracted from images and modeled by a finite element simulation. PMID:26072893

  8. Large Scale Quantum Simulations of Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Horowitz, Charles J.; Schuetrumpf, Bastian

    2016-03-01

    Complex and exotic nuclear geometries collectively referred to as ``nuclear pasta'' are expected to naturally exist in the crust of neutron stars and in supernovae matter. Using a set of self-consistent microscopic nuclear energy density functionals we present the first results of large scale quantum simulations of pasta phases at baryon densities 0 . 03 < ρ < 0 . 10 fm-3, proton fractions 0 . 05

  9. Grid sensitivity capability for large scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Wallerstein, David V.

    1989-01-01

    The considerations and the resultant approach used to implement design sensitivity capability for grids into a large scale, general purpose finite element system (MSC/NASTRAN) are presented. The design variables are grid perturbations with a rather general linking capability. Moreover, shape and sizing variables may be linked together. The design is general enough to facilitate geometric modeling techniques for generating design variable linking schemes in an easy and straightforward manner. Test cases have been run and validated by comparison with the overall finite difference method. The linking of a design sensitivity capability for shape variables in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful, automated tool to carry out practical optimization design of real life, complicated structures.

  10. Large-Scale Astrophysical Visualization on Smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becciani, U.; Massimino, P.; Costa, A.; Gheller, C.; Grillo, A.; Krokos, M.; Petta, C.

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays digital sky surveys and long-duration, high-resolution numerical simulations using high performance computing and grid systems produce multidimensional astrophysical datasets in the order of several Petabytes. Sharing visualizations of such datasets within communities and collaborating research groups is of paramount importance for disseminating results and advancing astrophysical research. Moreover educational and public outreach programs can benefit greatly from novel ways of presenting these datasets by promoting understanding of complex astrophysical processes, e.g., formation of stars and galaxies. We have previously developed VisIVO Server, a grid-enabled platform for high-performance large-scale astrophysical visualization. This article reviews the latest developments on VisIVO Web, a custom designed web portal wrapped around VisIVO Server, then introduces VisIVO Smartphone, a gateway connecting VisIVO Web and data repositories for mobile astrophysical visualization. We discuss current work and summarize future developments.

  11. Supporting large-scale computational science

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R., LLNL

    1998-02-19

    Business needs have driven the development of commercial database systems since their inception. As a result, there has been a strong focus on supporting many users, minimizing the potential corruption or loss of data, and maximizing performance metrics like transactions per second, or TPC-C and TPC-D results. It turns out that these optimizations have little to do with the needs of the scientific community, and in particular have little impact on improving the management and use of large-scale high-dimensional data. At the same time, there is an unanswered need in the scientific community for many of the benefits offered by a robust DBMS. For example, tying an ad-hoc query language such as SQL together with a visualization toolkit would be a powerful enhancement to current capabilities. Unfortunately, there has been little emphasis or discussion in the VLDB community on this mismatch over the last decade. The goal of the paper is to identify the specific issues that need to be resolved before large-scale scientific applications can make use of DBMS products. This topic is addressed in the context of an evaluation of commercial DBMS technology applied to the exploration of data generated by the Department of Energy`s Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The paper describes the data being generated for ASCI as well as current capabilities for interacting with and exploring this data. The attraction of applying standard DBMS technology to this domain is discussed, as well as the technical and business issues that currently make this an infeasible solution.

  12. Large-scale sequential quadratic programming algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Eldersveld, S.K.

    1992-09-01

    The problem addressed is the general nonlinear programming problem: finding a local minimizer for a nonlinear function subject to a mixture of nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. The methods studied are in the class of sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithms, which have previously proved successful for problems of moderate size. Our goal is to devise an SQP algorithm that is applicable to large-scale optimization problems, using sparse data structures and storing less curvature information but maintaining the property of superlinear convergence. The main features are: 1. The use of a quasi-Newton approximation to the reduced Hessian of the Lagrangian function. Only an estimate of the reduced Hessian matrix is required by our algorithm. The impact of not having available the full Hessian approximation is studied and alternative estimates are constructed. 2. The use of a transformation matrix Q. This allows the QP gradient to be computed easily when only the reduced Hessian approximation is maintained. 3. The use of a reduced-gradient form of the basis for the null space of the working set. This choice of basis is more practical than an orthogonal null-space basis for large-scale problems. The continuity condition for this choice is proven. 4. The use of incomplete solutions of quadratic programming subproblems. Certain iterates generated by an active-set method for the QP subproblem are used in place of the QP minimizer to define the search direction for the nonlinear problem. An implementation of the new algorithm has been obtained by modifying the code MINOS. Results and comparisons with MINOS and NPSOL are given for the new algorithm on a set of 92 test problems.

  13. Large-Scale Statistics for Cu Electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschildt, M.; Gall, M.; Hernandez, R.

    2009-06-01

    Even after the successful introduction of Cu-based metallization, the electromigration failure risk has remained one of the important reliability concerns for advanced process technologies. The observation of strong bimodality for the electron up-flow direction in dual-inlaid Cu interconnects has added complexity, but is now widely accepted. The failure voids can occur both within the via ("early" mode) or within the trench ("late" mode). More recently, bimodality has been reported also in down-flow electromigration, leading to very short lifetimes due to small, slit-shaped voids under vias. For a more thorough investigation of these early failure phenomena, specific test structures were designed based on the Wheatstone Bridge technique. The use of these structures enabled an increase of the tested sample size close to 675000, allowing a direct analysis of electromigration failure mechanisms at the single-digit ppm regime. Results indicate that down-flow electromigration exhibits bimodality at very small percentage levels, not readily identifiable with standard testing methods. The activation energy for the down-flow early failure mechanism was determined to be 0.83±0.02 eV. Within the small error bounds of this large-scale statistical experiment, this value is deemed to be significantly lower than the usually reported activation energy of 0.90 eV for electromigration-induced diffusion along Cu/SiCN interfaces. Due to the advantages of the Wheatstone Bridge technique, we were also able to expand the experimental temperature range down to 150° C, coming quite close to typical operating conditions up to 125° C. As a result of the lowered activation energy, we conclude that the down-flow early failure mode may control the chip lifetime at operating conditions. The slit-like character of the early failure void morphology also raises concerns about the validity of the Blech-effect for this mechanism. A very small amount of Cu depletion may cause failure even before a

  14. CLASS: The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Ali, Aamir; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Crowe, Erik; Denis, Kevin; Dunner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Gothe, Dominik; Halpern, Mark; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Nathan; Moseley, Samuel; Rostem, Karwan; Stevenson, Thomas; Towner, Deborah; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an experiment to measure the signature of a gravitational wave background from inflation in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). CLASS is a multi-frequency array of four telescopes operating from a high-altitude site in the Atacama Desert in Chile. CLASS will survey 70% of the sky in four frequency bands centered at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz, which are chosen to straddle the Galactic-foreground minimum while avoiding strong atmospheric emission lines. This broad frequency coverage ensures that CLASS can distinguish Galactic emission from the CMB. The sky fraction of the CLASS survey will allow the full shape of the primordial B-mode power spectrum to be characterized, including the signal from reionization at low-length. Its unique combination of large sky coverage, control of systematic errors, and high sensitivity will allow CLASS to measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio at a level of r = 0:01 and make a cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to the surface of last scattering, tau. (c) (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  15. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  16. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-05-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  17. Large-Scale Spacecraft Fire Safety Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Olson, Sandra; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T'ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam J.; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Jomaas, Grunde

    2014-01-01

    An international collaborative program is underway to address open issues in spacecraft fire safety. Because of limited access to long-term low-gravity conditions and the small volume generally allotted for these experiments, there have been relatively few experiments that directly study spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample sizes and environment conditions typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. The major constraint has been the size of the sample, with prior experiments limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. This lack of experimental data forces spacecraft designers to base their designs and safety precautions on 1-g understanding of flame spread, fire detection, and suppression. However, low-gravity combustion research has demonstrated substantial differences in flame behavior in low-gravity. This, combined with the differences caused by the confined spacecraft environment, necessitates practical scale spacecraft fire safety research to mitigate risks for future space missions. To address this issue, a large-scale spacecraft fire experiment is under development by NASA and an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status, and concept of this collaborative international project (Saffire). The project plan is to conduct fire safety experiments on three sequential flights of an unmanned ISS re-supply spacecraft (the Orbital Cygnus vehicle) after they have completed their delivery of cargo to the ISS and have begun their return journeys to earth. On two flights (Saffire-1 and Saffire-3), the experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter-scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. On one of the flights (Saffire-2), 9 smaller (5 x 30 cm) samples will be tested to evaluate NASAs material flammability screening tests

  18. Generation of solution plasma over a large electrode surface area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Genki; Nakasugi, Yuki; Akiyama, Tomohiro

    2015-07-01

    Solution plasma has been used in a variety of fields such as nanomaterials synthesis, the degradation of harmful substances, and solution analysis. However, as existing methods are ineffective in generating plasma over a large surface area, this study investigated the contact glow discharge electrolysis, in which the plasma was generated on the electrode surface. To clarify the condition of plasma generation, the effect of electrolyte concentration and temperature on plasma formation was studied. The electrical energy needed for plasma generation is higher than that needed to sustain a plasma, and when the electrolyte temperature was increased from 32 to 90 °C at 0.01 M NaOH solution, the electric power density for vapor formation decreased from 2005 to 774 W/cm2. From these results, we determined that pre-warming of the electrolyte is quite effective in generating plasma at lower power density. In addition, lower electrolyte concentrations required higher power density for vapor formation owing to lower solution conductivity. On the basis these results, a method for large-area and flat-plate plasma generation is proposed in which an initial small area of plasma generation is extended. When used with a plate electrode, a concentration of current to the edge of the plate meant that plasma could be formed by covering the edge of the electrode plate.

  19. Gravity and large-scale nonlocal bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwan Chuen; Scoccimarro, Román; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2012-04-01

    For Gaussian primordial fluctuations the relationship between galaxy and matter overdensities, bias, is most often assumed to be local at the time of observation in the large-scale limit. This hypothesis is however unstable under time evolution, we provide proofs under several (increasingly more realistic) sets of assumptions. In the simplest toy model galaxies are created locally and linearly biased at a single formation time, and subsequently move with the dark matter (no velocity bias) conserving their comoving number density (no merging). We show that, after this formation time, the bias becomes unavoidably nonlocal and nonlinear at large scales. We identify the nonlocal gravitationally induced fields in which the galaxy overdensity can be expanded, showing that they can be constructed out of the invariants of the deformation tensor (Galileons), the main signature of which is a quadrupole field in second-order perturbation theory. In addition, we show that this result persists if we include an arbitrary evolution of the comoving number density of tracers. We then include velocity bias, and show that new contributions appear; these are related to the breaking of Galilean invariance of the bias relation, a dipole field being the signature at second order. We test these predictions by studying the dependence of halo overdensities in cells of fixed dark matter density: measurements in simulations show that departures from the mean bias relation are strongly correlated with the nonlocal gravitationally induced fields identified by our formalism, suggesting that the halo distribution at the present time is indeed more closely related to the mass distribution at an earlier rather than present time. However, the nonlocality seen in the simulations is not fully captured by assuming local bias in Lagrangian space. The effects on nonlocal bias seen in the simulations are most important for the most biased halos, as expected from our predictions. Accounting for these

  20. Population generation for large-scale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, Andrew C.; King, Gary; Morrison, Clayton; Galstyan, Aram; Cohen, Paul

    2005-05-01

    Computer simulation is used to research phenomena ranging from the structure of the space-time continuum to population genetics and future combat.1-3 Multi-agent simulations in particular are now commonplace in many fields.4, 5 By modeling populations whose complex behavior emerges from individual interactions, these simulations help to answer questions about effects where closed form solutions are difficult to solve or impossible to derive.6 To be useful, simulations must accurately model the relevant aspects of the underlying domain. In multi-agent simulation, this means that the modeling must include both the agents and their relationships. Typically, each agent can be modeled as a set of attributes drawn from various distributions (e.g., height, morale, intelligence and so forth). Though these can interact - for example, agent height is related to agent weight - they are usually independent. Modeling relations between agents, on the other hand, adds a new layer of complexity, and tools from graph theory and social network analysis are finding increasing application.7, 8 Recognizing the role and proper use of these techniques, however, remains the subject of ongoing research. We recently encountered these complexities while building large scale social simulations.9-11 One of these, the Hats Simulator, is designed to be a lightweight proxy for intelligence analysis problems. Hats models a "society in a box" consisting of many simple agents, called hats. Hats gets its name from the classic spaghetti western, in which the heroes and villains are known by the color of the hats they wear. The Hats society also has its heroes and villains, but the challenge is to identify which color hat they should be wearing based on how they behave. There are three types of hats: benign hats, known terrorists, and covert terrorists. Covert terrorists look just like benign hats but act like terrorists. Population structure can make covert hat identification significantly more

  1. Large Scale Computer Simulation of Erthocyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Cameron; Revalee, Joel; Laradji, Mohamed

    2007-11-01

    The cell membrane is crucial to the life of the cell. Apart from partitioning the inner and outer environment of the cell, they also act as a support of complex and specialized molecular machinery, important for both the mechanical integrity of the cell, and its multitude of physiological functions. Due to its relative simplicity, the red blood cell has been a favorite experimental prototype for investigations of the structural and functional properties of the cell membrane. The erythrocyte membrane is a composite quasi two-dimensional structure composed essentially of a self-assembled fluid lipid bilayer and a polymerized protein meshwork, referred to as the cytoskeleton or membrane skeleton. In the case of the erythrocyte, the polymer meshwork is mainly composed of spectrin, anchored to the bilayer through specialized proteins. Using a coarse-grained model, recently developed by us, of self-assembled lipid membranes with implicit solvent and using soft-core potentials, we simulated large scale red-blood-cells bilayers with dimensions ˜ 10-1 μm^2, with explicit cytoskeleton. Our aim is to investigate the renormalization of the elastic properties of the bilayer due to the underlying spectrin meshwork.

  2. Large-scale carbon fiber tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pride, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A realistic release of carbon fibers was established by burning a minimum of 45 kg of carbon fiber composite aircraft structural components in each of five large scale, outdoor aviation jet fuel fire tests. This release was quantified by several independent assessments with various instruments developed specifically for these tests. The most likely values for the mass of single carbon fibers released ranged from 0.2 percent of the initial mass of carbon fiber for the source tests (zero wind velocity) to a maximum of 0.6 percent of the initial carbon fiber mass for dissemination tests (5 to 6 m/s wind velocity). Mean fiber lengths for fibers greater than 1 mm in length ranged from 2.5 to 3.5 mm. Mean diameters ranged from 3.6 to 5.3 micrometers which was indicative of significant oxidation. Footprints of downwind dissemination of the fire released fibers were measured to 19.1 km from the fire.

  3. Curvature constraints from large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Dio, Enea; Montanari, Francesco; Raccanelli, Alvise; Durrer, Ruth; Kamionkowski, Marc; Lesgourgues, Julien

    2016-06-01

    We modified the CLASS code in order to include relativistic galaxy number counts in spatially curved geometries; we present the formalism and study the effect of relativistic corrections on spatial curvature. The new version of the code is now publicly available. Using a Fisher matrix analysis, we investigate how measurements of the spatial curvature parameter ΩK with future galaxy surveys are affected by relativistic effects, which influence observations of the large scale galaxy distribution. These effects include contributions from cosmic magnification, Doppler terms and terms involving the gravitational potential. As an application, we consider angle and redshift dependent power spectra, which are especially well suited for model independent cosmological constraints. We compute our results for a representative deep, wide and spectroscopic survey, and our results show the impact of relativistic corrections on spatial curvature parameter estimation. We show that constraints on the curvature parameter may be strongly biased if, in particular, cosmic magnification is not included in the analysis. Other relativistic effects turn out to be subdominant in the studied configuration. We analyze how the shift in the estimated best-fit value for the curvature and other cosmological parameters depends on the magnification bias parameter, and find that significant biases are to be expected if this term is not properly considered in the analysis.

  4. Large scale digital atlases in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawrylycz, M.; Feng, D.; Lau, C.; Kuan, C.; Miller, J.; Dang, C.; Ng, L.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging in neuroscience has revolutionized our current understanding of brain structure, architecture and increasingly its function. Many characteristics of morphology, cell type, and neuronal circuitry have been elucidated through methods of neuroimaging. Combining this data in a meaningful, standardized, and accessible manner is the scope and goal of the digital brain atlas. Digital brain atlases are used today in neuroscience to characterize the spatial organization of neuronal structures, for planning and guidance during neurosurgery, and as a reference for interpreting other data modalities such as gene expression and connectivity data. The field of digital atlases is extensive and in addition to atlases of the human includes high quality brain atlases of the mouse, rat, rhesus macaque, and other model organisms. Using techniques based on histology, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging as well as gene expression data, modern digital atlases use probabilistic and multimodal techniques, as well as sophisticated visualization software to form an integrated product. Toward this goal, brain atlases form a common coordinate framework for summarizing, accessing, and organizing this knowledge and will undoubtedly remain a key technology in neuroscience in the future. Since the development of its flagship project of a genome wide image-based atlas of the mouse brain, the Allen Institute for Brain Science has used imaging as a primary data modality for many of its large scale atlas projects. We present an overview of Allen Institute digital atlases in neuroscience, with a focus on the challenges and opportunities for image processing and computation.

  5. Food appropriation through large scale land acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulli, Maria Cristina; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The increasing demand for agricultural products and the uncertainty of international food markets has recently drawn the attention of governments and agribusiness firms toward investments in productive agricultural land, mostly in the developing world. The targeted countries are typically located in regions that have remained only marginally utilized because of lack of modern technology. It is expected that in the long run large scale land acquisitions (LSLAs) for commercial farming will bring the technology required to close the existing crops yield gaps. While the extent of the acquired land and the associated appropriation of freshwater resources have been investigated in detail, the amount of food this land can produce and the number of people it could feed still need to be quantified. Here we use a unique dataset of land deals to provide a global quantitative assessment of the rates of crop and food appropriation potentially associated with LSLAs. We show how up to 300-550 million people could be fed by crops grown in the acquired land, should these investments in agriculture improve crop production and close the yield gap. In contrast, about 190-370 million people could be supported by this land without closing of the yield gap. These numbers raise some concern because the food produced in the acquired land is typically exported to other regions, while the target countries exhibit high levels of malnourishment. Conversely, if used for domestic consumption, the crops harvested in the acquired land could ensure food security to the local populations.

  6. Scaling Relations for Plasma Streamwise Vortex Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, F. O.; Wicks, M.; Corke, T. C.; Patel, M.

    2012-11-01

    A parametric investigation into the performance of plasma streamwise vortex generators (PSVG) for flow control was performed. The study utilized an array of PSVGs, which were flush mounted to a flat, zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer development plate. This work focused on characterizing the effect of freestream velocity, peak-to-peak applied voltage, inter-electrode spacing and covered electrode length on the streamwise vorticity produced by these devices. The performance of the PSVGs was also compared to that of passive vortex generators under identical flow conditions. Based upon the results of the parametric study, the flow physics of streamwise vorticity production by the PSVGs was discerned and the mechanisms are described in this paper. In addition, scaling relations are developed and presented for PSVGs, which, can be used in order to design actuator arrays for specific flow control applications. This work was supported by Innovative Technology Applications Company (ITAC), LLC under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II Contract No. N00014-11-C-0267 issued by the U.S. Department of the Navy.

  7. Large-scale assembly of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongta

    This study reports a simple, roll-to-roll compatible coating technology for producing three-dimensional highly ordered colloidal crystal-polymer composites, colloidal crystals, and macroporous polymer membranes. A vertically beveled doctor blade is utilized to shear align silica microsphere-monomer suspensions to form large-area composites in a single step. The polymer matrix and the silica microspheres can be selectively removed to create colloidal crystals and self-standing macroporous polymer membranes. The thickness of the shear-aligned crystal is correlated with the viscosity of the colloidal suspension and the coating speed, and the correlations can be qualitatively explained by adapting the mechanisms developed for conventional doctor blade coating. Five important research topics related to the application of large-scale three-dimensional highly ordered macroporous films by doctor blade coating are covered in this study. The first topic describes the invention in large area and low cost color reflective displays. This invention is inspired by the heat pipe technology. The self-standing macroporous polymer films exhibit brilliant colors which originate from the Bragg diffractive of visible light form the three-dimensional highly ordered air cavities. The colors can be easily changed by tuning the size of the air cavities to cover the whole visible spectrum. When the air cavities are filled with a solvent which has the same refractive index as that of the polymer, the macroporous polymer films become completely transparent due to the index matching. When the solvent trapped in the cavities is evaporated by in-situ heating, the sample color changes back to brilliant color. This process is highly reversible and reproducible for thousands of cycles. The second topic reports the achievement of rapid and reversible vapor detection by using 3-D macroporous photonic crystals. Capillary condensation of a condensable vapor in the interconnected macropores leads to the

  8. Research and Development of Large Area Color AC Plasma Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Tsutae

    1998-10-01

    Plasma display is essentially a gas discharge device using discharges in small cavities about 0. 1 m. The color plasma displays utilize the visible light from phosphors excited by the ultra-violet by discharge in contrast to monochrome plasma displays utilizing visible light directly from gas discharges. At the early stage of the color plasma display development, the degradation of the phosphors and unstable operating voltage prevented to realize a practical color plasma display. The introduction of the three-electrode surface-discharge technology opened the way to solve the problems. Two key technologies of a simple panel structure with a stripe rib and phosphor alignment and a full color image driving method with an address-and-display-period-separated sub-field method have realized practically available full color plasma displays. A full color plasma display has been firstly developed in 1992 with a 21-in.-diagonal PDP and then a 42-in.-diagonal PDP in 1995 Currently a 50-in.-diagonal color plasma display has been developed. The large area color plasma displays have already been put into the market and are creating new markets, such as a wall hanging TV and multimedia displays for advertisement, information, etc. This paper will show the history of the surface-discharge color plasma display technologies and current status of the color plasma display.

  9. An informal paper on large-scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. C.

    1975-01-01

    Large scale systems are defined as systems requiring more than one decision maker to control the system. Decentralized control and decomposition are discussed for large scale dynamic systems. Information and many-person decision problems are analyzed.

  10. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M.; Welch, D.; Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C.

    2014-10-15

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  11. Metal ion implantation for large scale surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.

    1992-10-01

    Intense energetic beams of metal ions can be produced by using a metal vapor vacuum arc as the plasma discharge from which the ion beam is formed. We have developed a number of ion sources of this kind and have built a metal ion implantation facility which can produce repetitively pulsed ion beams with mean ion energy up to several hundred key, pulsed beam current of more than an ampere, and time averaged current of several tens of milliamperes delivered onto a downstream target. We've also done some preliminary work on scaling up this technology to very large size. For example, a 50-cm diameter (2000 cm[sup 2]) set of beam formation electrodes was used to produce a pulsed titanium beam with ion current over 7 amperes at a mean ion energy of 100 key. Separately, a dc embodiment has been used to produce a dc titanium ion beam with current over 600 mA, power supply limited in this work, and up to 6 amperes of dc plasma ion current was maintained for over an hour. In a related program we've developed a plasma immersion method for applying thin metallic and compound films in which the added species is atomically mixed to the substrate. By adding a gas flow to the process, well-bonded compound films can also be formed; metallic films and multilayers as well as oxides and nitrides with mixed transition zones some hundreds of angstroms thick have been synthesized. Here we outline these parallel metal-plasma-based research programs and describe the hardware that we've developed and some of the surface modification research that we've done with it.

  12. Sensitivity technologies for large scale simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Collis, Samuel Scott; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Smith, Thomas Michael; Heinkenschloss, Matthias; Wilcox, Lucas C.; Hill, Judith C.; Ghattas, Omar; Berggren, Martin Olof; Akcelik, Volkan; Ober, Curtis Curry; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Keiter, Eric Richard

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is critically important to numerous analysis algorithms, including large scale optimization, uncertainty quantification,reduced order modeling, and error estimation. Our research focused on developing tools, algorithms and standard interfaces to facilitate the implementation of sensitivity type analysis into existing code and equally important, the work was focused on ways to increase the visibility of sensitivity analysis. We attempt to accomplish the first objective through the development of hybrid automatic differentiation tools, standard linear algebra interfaces for numerical algorithms, time domain decomposition algorithms and two level Newton methods. We attempt to accomplish the second goal by presenting the results of several case studies in which direct sensitivities and adjoint methods have been effectively applied, in addition to an investigation of h-p adaptivity using adjoint based a posteriori error estimation. A mathematical overview is provided of direct sensitivities and adjoint methods for both steady state and transient simulations. Two case studies are presented to demonstrate the utility of these methods. A direct sensitivity method is implemented to solve a source inversion problem for steady state internal flows subject to convection diffusion. Real time performance is achieved using novel decomposition into offline and online calculations. Adjoint methods are used to reconstruct initial conditions of a contamination event in an external flow. We demonstrate an adjoint based transient solution. In addition, we investigated time domain decomposition algorithms in an attempt to improve the efficiency of transient simulations. Because derivative calculations are at the root of sensitivity calculations, we have developed hybrid automatic differentiation methods and implemented this approach for shape optimization for gas dynamics using the Euler equations. The hybrid automatic differentiation method was applied to a first

  13. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  14. Synchronization of coupled large-scale Boolean networks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fangfei

    2014-03-15

    This paper investigates the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of two large-scale Boolean networks. First, the aggregation algorithm towards large-scale Boolean network is reviewed. Second, the aggregation algorithm is applied to study the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of large-scale Boolean networks. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to show the efficiency of the proposed results.

  15. International space station. Large scale integration approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Brad

    The International Space Station is the most complex large scale integration program in development today. The approach developed for specification, subsystem development, and verification lay a firm basis on which future programs of this nature can be based. International Space Station is composed of many critical items, hardware and software, built by numerous International Partners, NASA Institutions, and U.S. Contractors and is launched over a period of five years. Each launch creates a unique configuration that must be safe, survivable, operable, and support ongoing assembly (assemblable) to arrive at the assembly complete configuration in 2003. The approaches to integrating each of the modules into a viable spacecraft and continue the assembly is a challenge in itself. Added to this challenge are the severe schedule constraints and lack of an "Iron Bird", which prevents assembly and checkout of each on-orbit configuration prior to launch. This paper will focus on the following areas: 1) Specification development process explaining how the requirements and specifications were derived using a modular concept driven by launch vehicle capability. Each module is composed of components of subsystems versus completed subsystems. 2) Approach to stage (each stage consists of the launched module added to the current on-orbit spacecraft) specifications. Specifically, how each launched module and stage ensures support of the current and future elements of the assembly. 3) Verification approach, due to the schedule constraints, is primarily analysis supported by testing. Specifically, how are the interfaces ensured to mate and function on-orbit when they cannot be mated before launch. 4) Lessons learned. Where can we improve this complex system design and integration task?

  16. Large Scale Flame Spread Environmental Characterization Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayman, Lauren K.; Olson, Sandra L.; Gokoghi, Suleyman A.; Brooker, John E.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Kacher, Henry F.

    2013-01-01

    Under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration Project (SFSDP), as a risk mitigation activity in support of the development of a large-scale fire demonstration experiment in microgravity, flame-spread tests were conducted in normal gravity on thin, cellulose-based fuels in a sealed chamber. The primary objective of the tests was to measure pressure rise in a chamber as sample material, burning direction (upward/downward), total heat release, heat release rate, and heat loss mechanisms were varied between tests. A Design of Experiments (DOE) method was imposed to produce an array of tests from a fixed set of constraints and a coupled response model was developed. Supplementary tests were run without experimental design to additionally vary select parameters such as initial chamber pressure. The starting chamber pressure for each test was set below atmospheric to prevent chamber overpressure. Bottom ignition, or upward propagating burns, produced rapid acceleratory turbulent flame spread. Pressure rise in the chamber increases as the amount of fuel burned increases mainly because of the larger amount of heat generation and, to a much smaller extent, due to the increase in gaseous number of moles. Top ignition, or downward propagating burns, produced a steady flame spread with a very small flat flame across the burning edge. Steady-state pressure is achieved during downward flame spread as the pressure rises and plateaus. This indicates that the heat generation by the flame matches the heat loss to surroundings during the longer, slower downward burns. One heat loss mechanism included mounting a heat exchanger directly above the burning sample in the path of the plume to act as a heat sink and more efficiently dissipate the heat due to the combustion event. This proved an effective means for chamber overpressure mitigation for those tests producing the most total heat release and thusly was determined to be a feasible mitigation

  17. Large scale radio/X-ray jets in microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Fender, Rob; Kaaret, Philip; Orosz, Jerry; Tomsick, John

    2012-10-01

    The discovery with ATCA of large scale radio lobes around the microquasar XTE J1550-564 has led to the discovery with Chandra (for the first time) of moving relativistic X-ray jets in a galactic accreting source. The lobes are likely due to the interaction of relativistic plasma with the ISM. This ATCA proposal has allowed similar discovery in H 1743-322, and therefore that it maybe a common occurrence in the Galaxy. Recently, we have witnessed with ATCA the formation of similar lobes in the black hole GX 339-4. We propose to use the Compact Array to continue our search for radio lobes in microquasars that have been active in the past years.

  18. Large scale radio/X-ray jets in microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Fender, Rob; Kaaret, Philip; Tomsick, John; Orosz, Jerry

    2011-10-01

    The discovery with ATCA of large scale radio lobes around the microquasar XTE J1550-564 has led to the discovery with Chandra (for the first time) of moving relativistic X-ray jets in a galactic accreting source. The lobes are likely due to the interaction of relativistic plasma with the ISM. This ATCA proposal has allowed similar discovery in H 1743-322, and therefore that it maybe a common occurrence in the Galaxy. Recently, we have witnessed with ATCA the formation of similar lobes in the black hole GX 339-4. We propose to use the Compact Array to continue our search for radio lobes in microquasars that have been active in the past years.

  19. Large scale radio/X-ray jets in microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Fender, Rob; Kaaret, Philip; Orosz, Jerry; Tomsick, John

    2013-10-01

    The discovery with ATCA of large scale radio lobes around the microquasar XTE J1550-564 has led to the discovery with Chandra (for the first time) of moving relativistic X-ray jets in a galactic accreting source. The lobes are likely due to the interaction of relativistic plasma with the ISM. This ATCA proposal has allowed similar discovery in H 1743-322, and therefore that it maybe a common occurrence in the Galaxy. Recently, we have witnessed with ATCA the formation of similar lobes in the black hole GX 339-4. We propose to use the Compact Array to continue our search for radio lobes in microquasars that have been active in the past years.

  20. Large scale radio/X-ray jets in microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Fender, Rob; Kaaret, Philip; Tomsick, John; Orosz, Jerry

    2011-04-01

    The discovery with ATCA of large scale radio lobes around the microquasar XTE J1550-564 has led to the discovery with Chandra (for the first time) of moving relativistic X-ray jets in a galactic accreting source. The lobes are likely due to the interaction of relativistic plasma with the ISM. This ATCA proposal has allowed similar discovery in H 1743-322, and therefore that it maybe a common occurrence in the Galaxy. Recently, we have witnessed with ATCA the formation of similar lobes in the black hole GX 339-4. We propose to use the Compact Array to continue our search for radio lobes in microquasars that have been active in the past years.

  1. Large scale radio/X-ray jets in microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Fender, Rob; Kaaret, Philip; Orosz, Jerry; Tomsick, John

    2013-04-01

    The discovery with ATCA of large scale radio lobes around the microquasar XTE J1550-564 has led to the discovery with Chandra (for the first time) of moving relativistic X-ray jets in a galactic accreting source. The lobes are likely due to the interaction of relativistic plasma with the ISM. This ATCA proposal has allowed similar discovery in H 1743-322, and therefore that it maybe a common occurrence in the Galaxy. Recently, we have witnessed with ATCA the formation of similar lobes in the black hole GX 339-4. We propose to use the Compact Array to continue our search for radio lobes in microquasars that have been active in the past years.

  2. Large scale radio/X-ray jets in microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Fender, Rob; Kaaret, Philip; Tomsick, John; Orosz, Jerry

    2012-04-01

    The discovery with ATCA of large scale radio lobes around the microquasar XTE J1550-564 has led to the discovery with Chandra (for the first time) of moving relativistic X-ray jets in a galactic accreting source. The lobes are likely due to the interaction of relativistic plasma with the ISM. This ATCA proposal has allowed similar discovery in H 1743-322, and therefore that it maybe a common occurrence in the Galaxy. Recently, we have witnessed with ATCA the formation of similar lobes in the black hole GX 339-4. We propose to use the Compact Array to continue our search for radio lobes in microquasars that have been active in the past years.

  3. Nearly incompressible fluids: hydrodynamics and large scale inhomogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hunana, P; Zank, G P; Shaikh, D

    2006-08-01

    A system of hydrodynamic equations in the presence of large-scale inhomogeneities for a high plasma beta solar wind is derived. The theory is derived under the assumption of low turbulent Mach number and is developed for the flows where the usual incompressible description is not satisfactory and a full compressible treatment is too complex for any analytical studies. When the effects of compressibility are incorporated only weakly, a new description, referred to as "nearly incompressible hydrodynamics," is obtained. The nearly incompressible theory, was originally applied to homogeneous flows. However, large-scale gradients in density, pressure, temperature, etc., are typical in the solar wind and it was unclear how inhomogeneities would affect the usual incompressible and nearly incompressible descriptions. In the homogeneous case, the lowest order expansion of the fully compressible equations leads to the usual incompressible equations, followed at higher orders by the nearly incompressible equations, as introduced by Zank and Matthaeus. With this work we show that the inclusion of large-scale inhomogeneities (in this case time-independent and radially symmetric background solar wind) modifies the leading-order incompressible description of solar wind flow. We find, for example, that the divergence of velocity fluctuations is nonsolenoidal and that density fluctuations can be described to leading order as a passive scalar. Locally (for small lengthscales), this system of equations converges to the usual incompressible equations and we therefore use the term "locally incompressible" to describe the equations. This term should be distinguished from the term "nearly incompressible," which is reserved for higher-order corrections. Furthermore, we find that density fluctuations scale with Mach number linearly, in contrast to the original homogeneous nearly incompressible theory, in which density fluctuations scale with the square of Mach number. Inhomogeneous nearly

  4. Multitree Algorithms for Large-Scale Astrostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, William B.; Ozakin, Arkadas; Lee, Dongryeol; Riegel, Ryan; Gray, Alexander G.

    2012-03-01

    Common astrostatistical operations. A number of common "subroutines" occur over and over again in the statistical analysis of astronomical data. Some of the most powerful, and computationally expensive, of these additionally share the common trait that they involve distance comparisons between all pairs of data points—or in some cases, all triplets or worse. These include: * All Nearest Neighbors (AllNN): For each query point in a dataset, find the k-nearest neighbors among the points in another dataset—naively O(N2) to compute, for O(N) data points. * n-Point Correlation Functions: The main spatial statistic used for comparing two datasets in various ways—naively O(N2) for the 2-point correlation, O(N3) for the 3-point correlation, etc. * Euclidean Minimum Spanning Tree (EMST): The basis for "single-linkage hierarchical clustering,"the main procedure for generating a hierarchical grouping of the data points at all scales, aka "friends-of-friends"—naively O(N2). * Kernel Density Estimation (KDE): The main method for estimating the probability density function of the data, nonparametrically (i.e., with virtually no assumptions on the functional form of the pdf)—naively O(N2). * Kernel Regression: A powerful nonparametric method for regression, or predicting a continuous target value—naively O(N2). * Kernel Discriminant Analysis (KDA): A powerful nonparametric method for classification, or predicting a discrete class label—naively O(N2). (Note that the "two datasets" may in fact be the same dataset, as in two-point autocorrelations, or the so-called monochromatic AllNN problem, or the leave-one-out cross-validation needed in kernel estimation.) The need for fast algorithms for such analysis subroutines is particularly acute in the modern age of exploding dataset sizes in astronomy. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey yielded hundreds of millions of objects, and the next generation of instruments such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope will yield roughly

  5. THE LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS OF THIN ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Xinwu; Spruit, Hendrik C. E-mail: henk@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-03-10

    Large-scale magnetic field threading an accretion disk is a key ingredient in the jet formation model. The most attractive scenario for the origin of such a large-scale field is the advection of the field by the gas in the accretion disk from the interstellar medium or a companion star. However, it is realized that outward diffusion of the accreted field is fast compared with the inward accretion velocity in a geometrically thin accretion disk if the value of the Prandtl number P{sub m} is around unity. In this work, we revisit this problem considering the angular momentum of the disk to be removed predominantly by the magnetically driven outflows. The radial velocity of the disk is significantly increased due to the presence of the outflows. Using a simplified model for the vertical disk structure, we find that even moderately weak fields can cause sufficient angular momentum loss via a magnetic wind to balance outward diffusion. There are two equilibrium points, one at low field strengths corresponding to a plasma-beta at the midplane of order several hundred, and one for strong accreted fields, {beta} {approx} 1. We surmise that the first is relevant for the accretion of weak, possibly external, fields through the outer parts of the disk, while the latter one could explain the tendency, observed in full three-dimensional numerical simulations, of strong flux bundles at the centers of disk to stay confined in spite of strong magnetororational instability turbulence surrounding them.

  6. Multi-Scale Investigation of Sheared Flows In Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Edward, Jr., Thomas

    2014-09-19

    Flows parallel and perpendicular to magnetic fields in a plasma are important phenomena in many areas of plasma science research. The presence of these spatially inhomogeneous flows is often associated with the stability of the plasma. In fusion plasmas, these sheared flows can be stabilizing while in space plasmas, these sheared flows can be destabilizing. Because of this, there is broad interest in understanding the coupling between plasma stability and plasma flows. This research project has engaged in a study of the plasma response to spatially inhomogeneous plasma flows using three different experimental devices: the Auburn Linear Experiment for Instability Studies (ALEXIS) and the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) stellarator devices at Auburn University, and the Space Plasma Simulation Chamber (SPSC) at the Naval Research Laboratory. This work has shown that there is a commonality of the plasma response to sheared flows across a wide range of plasma parameters and magnetic field geometries. The goal of this multi-device, multi-scale project is to understand how sheared flows established by the same underlying physical mechanisms lead to different plasma responses in fusion, laboratory, and space plasmas.

  7. Validating Large Scale Networks Using Temporary Local Scale Networks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA NRCS Soil Climate Analysis Network and NOAA Climate Reference Networks are nationwide meteorological and land surface data networks with soil moisture measurements in the top layers of soil. There is considerable interest in scaling these point measurements to larger scales for validating ...

  8. Large-Scale Processing of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John; Sridhar, K. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Scale-up difficulties and high energy costs are two of the more important factors that limit the availability of various types of nanotube carbon. While several approaches are known for producing nanotube carbon, the high-powered reactors typically produce nanotubes at rates measured in only grams per hour and operate at temperatures in excess of 1000 C. These scale-up and energy challenges must be overcome before nanotube carbon can become practical for high-consumption structural and mechanical applications. This presentation examines the issues associated with using various nanotube production methods at larger scales, and discusses research being performed at NASA Ames Research Center on carbon nanotube reactor technology.

  9. Multi-scale gyrokinetic simulation of tokamak plasmas: enhanced heat loss due to cross-scale coupling of plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; Holland, C.; White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Candy, J.

    2016-01-01

    The transport of heat in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is dominated by the complex nonlinear dynamics of plasma turbulence. In magnetically confined plasmas used for fusion energy research, turbulence is responsible for cross-field transport that limits the performance of tokamak reactors. We report a set of novel gyrokinetic simulations that capture ion and electron-scale turbulence simultaneously, revealing the dynamics of cross-scale energy transfer and zonal flow modification that give rise to heat losses. Multi-scale simulations are required to match experimental ion and electron heat fluxes and electron profile stiffness, establishing the applicability of the newly discovered physics to experiment. Importantly, these results provide a likely explanation for the loss of electron heat from tokamak plasmas, the ‘great unsolved problem’ (Bachelor et al (2007 Plasma Sci. Technol. 9 312-87)) in plasma turbulence and the projected dominant loss channel in ITER.

  10. Intermittent dissipation at kinetic scales in collisionless plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Karimabadi, H; Roytershteyn, V; Shay, M; Wu, P; Daughton, W; Loring, B; Chapman, S C

    2012-11-01

    High resolution kinetic simulations of collisionless plasma driven by shear show the development of turbulence characterized by dynamic coherent sheetlike current density structures spanning a range of scales down to electron scales. We present evidence that these structures are sites for heating and dissipation, and that stronger current structures signify higher dissipation rates. Evidently, kinetic scale plasma, like magnetohydrodynamics, becomes intermittent due to current sheet formation, leading to the expectation that heating and dissipation in astrophysical and space plasmas may be highly nonuniform and patchy. PMID:23215389

  11. Large scale structure from viscous dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blas, Diego; Floerchinger, Stefan; Garny, Mathias; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2015-11-01

    Cosmological perturbations of sufficiently long wavelength admit a fluid dynamic description. We consider modes with wavevectors below a scale km for which the dynamics is only mildly non-linear. The leading effect of modes above that scale can be accounted for by effective non-equilibrium viscosity and pressure terms. For mildly non-linear scales, these mainly arise from momentum transport within the ideal and cold but inhomogeneous fluid, while momentum transport due to more microscopic degrees of freedom is suppressed. As a consequence, concrete expressions with no free parameters, except the matching scale km, can be derived from matching evolution equations to standard cosmological perturbation theory. Two-loop calculations of the matter power spectrum in the viscous theory lead to excellent agreement with N-body simulations up to scales k=0.2 h/Mpc. The convergence properties in the ultraviolet are better than for standard perturbation theory and the results are robust with respect to variations of the matching scale.

  12. Extreme Scale Computing for First-Principles Plasma Physics Research

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Choogn-Seock

    2011-10-12

    World superpowers are in the middle of the “Computnik” race. US Department of Energy (and National Nuclear Security Administration) wishes to launch exascale computer systems into the scientific (and national security) world by 2018. The objective is to solve important scientific problems and to predict the outcomes using the most fundamental scientific laws, which would not be possible otherwise. Being chosen into the next “frontier” group can be of great benefit to a scientific discipline. An extreme scale computer system requires different types of algorithms and programming philosophy from those we have been accustomed to. Only a handful of scientific codes are blessed to be capable of scalable usage of today’s largest computers in operation at petascale (using more than 100,000 cores concurrently). Fortunately, a few magnetic fusion codes are competing well in this race using the “first principles” gyrokinetic equations.These codes are beginning to study the fusion plasma dynamics in full-scale realistic diverted device geometry in natural nonlinear multiscale, including the large scale neoclassical and small scale turbulence physics, but excluding some ultra fast dynamics. In this talk, most of the above mentioned topics will be introduced at executive level. Representative properties of the extreme scale computers, modern programming exercises to take advantage of them, and different philosophies in the data flows and analyses will be presented. Examples of the multi-scale multi-physics scientific discoveries made possible by solving the gyrokinetic equations on extreme scale computers will be described. Future directions into “virtual tokamak experiments” will also be discussed.

  13. On the scaling of small-scale jet noise to large scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Allen, Christopher S.

    1992-01-01

    An examination was made of several published jet noise studies for the purpose of evaluating scale effects important to the simulation of jet aeroacoustics. Several studies confirmed that small conical jets, one as small as 59 mm diameter, could be used to correctly simulate the overall or PNL noise of large jets dominated by mixing noise. However, the detailed acoustic spectra of large jets are more difficult to simulate because of the lack of broad-band turbulence spectra in small jets. One study indicated that a jet Reynolds number of 5 x 10 exp 6 based on exhaust diameter enabled the generation of broad-band noise representative of large jet mixing noise. Jet suppressor aeroacoustics is even more difficult to simulate at small scale because of the small mixer nozzles with flows sensitive to Reynolds number. Likewise, one study showed incorrect ejector mixing and entrainment using small-scale, short ejector that led to poor acoustic scaling. Conversely, fairly good results were found with a longer ejector and, in a different study, with a 32-chute suppressor nozzle. Finally, it was found that small-scale aeroacoustic resonance produced by jets impacting ground boards does not reproduce at large scale.

  14. On the scaling of small-scale jet noise to large scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Allen, Christopher S.

    1992-01-01

    An examination was made of several published jet noise studies for the purpose of evaluating scale effects important to the simulation of jet aeroacoustics. Several studies confirmed that small conical jets, one as small as 59 mm diameter, could be used to correctly simulate the overall or perceived noise level (PNL) noise of large jets dominated by mixing noise. However, the detailed acoustic spectra of large jets are more difficult to simulate because of the lack of broad-band turbulence spectra in small jets. One study indicated that a jet Reynolds number of 5 x 10(exp 6) based on exhaust diameter enabled the generation of broad-band noise representative of large jet mixing noise. Jet suppressor aeroacoustics is even more difficult to simulate at small scale because of the small mixer nozzles with flows sensitive to Reynolds number. Likewise, one study showed incorrect ejector mixing and entrainment using a small-scale, short ejector that led to poor acoustic scaling. Conversely, fairly good results were found with a longer ejector and, in a different study, with a 32-chute suppressor nozzle. Finally, it was found that small-scale aeroacoustic resonance produced by jets impacting ground boards does not reproduce at large scale.

  15. On the scaling of small-scale jet noise to large scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Allen, Christopher S.

    1992-05-01

    An examination was made of several published jet noise studies for the purpose of evaluating scale effects important to the simulation of jet aeroacoustics. Several studies confirmed that small conical jets, one as small as 59 mm diameter, could be used to correctly simulate the overall or perceived noise level (PNL) noise of large jets dominated by mixing noise. However, the detailed acoustic spectra of large jets are more difficult to simulate because of the lack of broad-band turbulence spectra in small jets. One study indicated that a jet Reynolds number of 5 x 10(exp 6) based on exhaust diameter enabled the generation of broad-band noise representative of large jet mixing noise. Jet suppressor aeroacoustics is even more difficult to simulate at small scale because of the small mixer nozzles with flows sensitive to Reynolds number. Likewise, one study showed incorrect ejector mixing and entrainment using a small-scale, short ejector that led to poor acoustic scaling. Conversely, fairly good results were found with a longer ejector and, in a different study, with a 32-chute suppressor nozzle. Finally, it was found that small-scale aeroacoustic resonance produced by jets impacting ground boards does not reproduce at large scale.

  16. On the scaling of small-scale jet noise to large scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Allen, Christopher S.

    An examination was made of several published jet noise studies for the purpose of evaluating scale effects important to the simulation of jet aeroacoustics. Several studies confirmed that small conical jets, one as small as 59 mm diameter, could be used to correctly simulate the overall or PNL noise of large jets dominated by mixing noise. However, the detailed acoustic spectra of large jets are more difficult to simulate because of the lack of broad-band turbulence spectra in small jets. One study indicated that a jet Reynolds number of 5 x 10 exp 6 based on exhaust diameter enabled the generation of broad-band noise representative of large jet mixing noise. Jet suppressor aeroacoustics is even more difficult to simulate at small scale because of the small mixer nozzles with flows sensitive to Reynolds number. Likewise, one study showed incorrect ejector mixing and entrainment using small-scale, short ejector that led to poor acoustic scaling. Conversely, fairly good results were found with a longer ejector and, in a different study, with a 32-chute suppressor nozzle. Finally, it was found that small-scale aeroacoustic resonance produced by jets impacting ground boards does not reproduce at large scale.

  17. Plasma beta control of scaling of solar wind turbulent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Nemec, Frantisek; Prech, Lubomir; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Zastenker, Georgy N.

    2016-04-01

    The high-time resolution of Spektr-R plasma measurements allows us to make direct observations of solar wind turbulence below ion kinetic length scales. The paper analyzes solar wind power spectra of bulk and thermal speeds that are computed with a time resolution of 32 ms in the frequency range of 0.001-2 Hz. The statistics based on more than 5000 of individual spectra shows that: (1) the spectra of bulk and thermal speeds can be fitted by two power-law segments; (2) despite their large variations, the parameters characterizing frequency spectra fits computed on each particular time interval are very similar for both quantities; (3) the median slopes of the segment attributed to the MHD scale are ‑1.43 and ‑1.38, respectively for the bulk and thermal speeds, whereas those in the kinetic scale are ‑3.08 and ‑2.43, respectively; (4) the break between both MHD and kinetic scales is controlled the ion beta; and (5) the power index corresponding to kinetic turbulence depends on a level of the density variations in the high beta solar wind, whereas the ion gyromotion determines it for low beta intervals.

  18. Electrically driving large magnetic Reynolds number flows on the Madison plasma dynamo experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisberg, David; Wallace, John; Peterson, Ethan; Endrezzi, Douglass; Forest, Cary B.; Desangles, Victor

    2015-11-01

    Electrically-driven plasma flows, predicted to excite a large-scale dynamo instability, have been generated in the Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX), at the Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory. Numerical simulations show that certain topologies of these simply-connected flows may be optimal for creating a plasma dynamo and predict critical thresholds as low as Rmcrit =μ0 σLV = 250 . MPDX plasmas are shown to exceed this critical Rm , generating large (L = 1 . 4 m), warm (Te > 10 eV), unmagnetized (MA > 1) plasmas where Rm < 600 . Plasma flow is driven using ten thermally emissive LaB6 cathodes which generate a J × B torque in Helium plasmas. Detailed Mach probe measurements of plasma velocity for two flow topologies will be presented: edge-localized drive using the multi-cusp boundary field, and volumetric drive using an axial Helmholtz field. Radial velocity profiles show that edge-driven flow is established via ion viscosity but is limited by a volumetric neutral drag force (χ ~ 1 / (ντin)), and measurements of velocity shear compare favorably to Braginskii transport theory. Volumetric flow drive is shown to produce stronger velocity shear, and is characterized by the radial potential gradient as determined by global charge balance.

  19. Honeycomblike large area LaB6 plasma source for Multi-Purpose Plasma facility.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hyun-Jong; Chung, Kyu-Sun; You, Hyun-Jong; Lee, Myoung-Jae; Lho, Taihyeop; Choh, Kwon Kook; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Yong Ho; Lee, Bongju; Yoo, Suk Jae; Kwon, Myeon

    2007-10-01

    A Multi-Purpose Plasma (MP(2)) facility has been renovated from Hanbit mirror device [Kwon et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 686 (2003)] by adopting the same philosophy of diversified plasma simulator (DiPS) [Chung et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 46, 354 (2006)] by installing two plasma sources: LaB(6) (dc) and helicon (rf) plasma sources; and making three distinct simulators: divertor plasma simulator, space propulsion simulator, and astrophysics simulator. During the first renovation stage, a honeycomblike large area LaB(6) (HLA-LaB(6)) cathode was developed for the divertor plasma simulator to improve the resistance against the thermal shock fragility for large and high density plasma generation. A HLA-LaB(6) cathode is composed of the one inner cathode with 4 in. diameter and the six outer cathodes with 2 in. diameter along with separate graphite heaters. The first plasma is generated with Ar gas and its properties are measured by the electric probes with various discharge currents and magnetic field configurations. Plasma density at the middle of central cell reaches up to 2.6 x 10(12) cm(-3), while the electron temperature remains around 3-3.5 eV at the low discharge current of less than 45 A, and the magnetic field intensity of 870 G. Unique features of electric property of heaters, plasma density profiles, is explained comparing with those of single LaB(6) cathode with 4 in. diameter in DiPS. PMID:17979417

  20. Honeycomblike large area LaB6 plasma source for Multi-Purpose Plasma facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Hyun-Jong; Chung, Kyu-Sun; You, Hyun-Jong; Lee, Myoung-Jae; Lho, Taihyeop; Choh, Kwon Kook; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Yong Ho; Lee, Bongju; Yoo, Suk Jae; Kwon, Myeon

    2007-10-01

    A Multi-Purpose Plasma (MP2) facility has been renovated from Hanbit mirror device [Kwon et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 686 (2003)] by adopting the same philosophy of diversified plasma simulator (DiPS) [Chung et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 46, 354 (2006)] by installing two plasma sources: LaB6 (dc) and helicon (rf) plasma sources; and making three distinct simulators: divertor plasma simulator, space propulsion simulator, and astrophysics simulator. During the first renovation stage, a honeycomblike large area LaB6 (HLA-LaB6) cathode was developed for the divertor plasma simulator to improve the resistance against the thermal shock fragility for large and high density plasma generation. A HLA-LaB6 cathode is composed of the one inner cathode with 4in. diameter and the six outer cathodes with 2in. diameter along with separate graphite heaters. The first plasma is generated with Ar gas and its properties are measured by the electric probes with various discharge currents and magnetic field configurations. Plasma density at the middle of central cell reaches up to 2.6×1012 cm-3, while the electron temperature remains around 3-3.5eV at the low discharge current of less than 45A, and the magnetic field intensity of 870G. Unique features of electric property of heaters, plasma density profiles, is explained comparing with those of single LaB6 cathode with 4in. diameter in DiPS.

  1. Evolution of magnetically rotating arc into large area arc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Li, Wan-Wan; Zhang, Xiao-Ning; Zha, Jun; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2015-06-01

    An arc channel tends to shrink due to its conductivity increasing with the increase of temperature. In this study, to generate large area arc plasma, we construct a magnetically rotating arc plasma generator, which mainly consists of a lanthanide tungsten cathode (13 mm in diameter), a concentric cylindrical graphite anode chamber (60 mm in diameter) and a solenoid coil for producing an axial magnet field. By controlling the cold gas flow, the magnetically rotating arc evolves from constricted mode to diffuse mode, which almost fills the whole arc chamber cross section. Results show that the diffuse arc plasma has better uniformity and stability. The formation mechanism of large area arc plasma is discussed in this paper. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11035005, 11475174, and 50876101) and the Science Instrument Foundation of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. Y201162).

  2. Analysis of plasma instabilities and verification of the BOUT code for the Large Plasma Device

    SciTech Connect

    Popovich, P.; Carter, T. A.; Friedman, B.; Umansky, M. V.

    2010-10-15

    The properties of linear instabilities in the Large Plasma Device [W. Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] are studied both through analytic calculations and solving numerically a system of linearized collisional plasma fluid equations using the three-dimensional fluid code BOUT[M. Umansky et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 180, 887 (2009)], which has been successfully modified to treat cylindrical geometry. Instability drive from plasma pressure gradients and flows is considered, focusing on resistive drift waves and the Kelvin-Helmholtz and rotational interchange instabilities. A general linear dispersion relation for partially ionized collisional plasmas including these modes is derived and analyzed. For Large Plasma Device relevant profiles including strongly driven flows, it is found that all three modes can have comparable growth rates and frequencies. Detailed comparison with solutions of the analytic dispersion relation demonstrates that BOUT accurately reproduces all characteristics of linear modes in this system.

  3. Real or virtual large-scale structure?

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, August E.

    1999-01-01

    Modeling the development of structure in the universe on galactic and larger scales is the challenge that drives the field of computational cosmology. Here, photorealism is used as a simple, yet expert, means of assessing the degree to which virtual worlds succeed in replicating our own. PMID:10200243

  4. Current Scientific Issues in Large Scale Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. L. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Topics in large scale atmospheric dynamics are discussed. Aspects of atmospheric blocking, the influence of transient baroclinic eddies on planetary-scale waves, cyclogenesis, the effects of orography on planetary scale flow, small scale frontal structure, and simulations of gravity waves in frontal zones are discussed.

  5. Generation of Diffuse Large Volume Plasma by an Ionization Wave from a Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, Mounir; Razavi, Hamid

    2015-09-01

    Low temperature plasma jets emitted in ambient air are the product of fast ionization waves that are guided within a channel of a gas flow, such as helium. This guided ionization wave can be transmitted through a dielectric material and under some conditions can ignite a discharge behind the dielectric material. Here we present a novel way to produce large volume diffuse low pressure plasma inside a Pyrex chamber that does not have any electrodes or electrical energy directly applied to it. The diffuse plasma is ignited inside the chamber by a plasma jet located externally to the chamber and that is physically and electrically unconnected to the chamber. Instead, the plasma jet is just brought in close proximity to the external wall/surface of the chamber or to a dielectric tubing connected to the chamber. The plasma thus generated is diffuse, large volume and with physical and chemical characteristics that are different than the external plasma jet that ignited it. So by using a plasma jet we are able to ``remotely'' ignite volumetric plasma under controlled conditions. This novel method of ``remote'' generation of a low pressure, low temperature diffuse plasma can be useful for various applications including material processing and biomedicine.

  6. Investigation of large-area multicoil inductively coupled plasma sources using three-dimensional fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brcka, Jozef

    2016-07-01

    A multi inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system can be used to maintain the plasma uniformity and increase the area processed by a high-density plasma. This article presents a source in two different configurations. The distributed planar multi ICP (DM-ICP) source comprises individual ICP sources that are not overlapped and produce plasma independently. Mutual coupling of the ICPs may affect the distribution of the produced plasma. The integrated multicoil ICP (IMC-ICP) source consists of four low-inductance ICP antennas that are superimposed in an azimuthal manner. The identical geometry of the ICP coils was assumed in this work. Both configurations have highly asymmetric components. A three-dimensional (3D) plasma model of the multicoil ICP configurations with asymmetric features is used to investigate the plasma characteristics in a large chamber and the operation of the sources in inert and reactive gases. The feasibility of the computational calculation, the speed, and the computational resources of the coupled multiphysics solver are investigated in the framework of a large realistic geometry and complex reaction processes. It was determined that additional variables can be used to control large-area plasmas. Both configurations can form a plasma, that azimuthally moves in a controlled manner, the so-called “sweeping mode” (SM) or “polyphase mode” (PPM), and thus they have the potential for large-area and high-density plasma applications. The operation in the azimuthal mode has the potential to adjust the plasma distribution, the reaction chemistry, and increase or modulate the production of the radicals. The intrinsic asymmetry of the individual coils and their combined operation were investigated within a source assembly primarily in argon and CO gases. Limited investigations were also performed on operation in CH4 gas. The plasma parameters and the resulting chemistry are affected by the geometrical relation between individual antennas. The aim of

  7. Light propagation and large-scale inhomogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Brouzakis, Nikolaos; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Tzavara, Eleftheria E-mail: ntetrad@phys.uoa.gr

    2008-04-15

    We consider the effect on the propagation of light of inhomogeneities with sizes of order 10 Mpc or larger. The Universe is approximated through a variation of the Swiss-cheese model. The spherical inhomogeneities are void-like, with central underdensities surrounded by compensating overdense shells. We study the propagation of light in this background, assuming that the source and the observer occupy random positions, so that each beam travels through several inhomogeneities at random angles. The distribution of luminosity distances for sources with the same redshift is asymmetric, with a peak at a value larger than the average one. The width of the distribution and the location of the maximum increase with increasing redshift and length scale of the inhomogeneities. We compute the induced dispersion and bias of cosmological parameters derived from the supernova data. They are too small to explain the perceived acceleration without dark energy, even when the length scale of the inhomogeneities is comparable to the horizon distance. Moreover, the dispersion and bias induced by gravitational lensing at the scales of galaxies or clusters of galaxies are larger by at least an order of magnitude.

  8. Large-scale sparse singular value computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Michael W.

    1992-01-01

    Four numerical methods for computing the singular value decomposition (SVD) of large sparse matrices on a multiprocessor architecture are presented. Lanczos and subspace iteration-based methods for determining several of the largest singular triplets (singular values and corresponding left and right-singular vectors) for sparse matrices arising from two practical applications: information retrieval and seismic reflection tomography are emphasized. The target architectures for implementations are the CRAY-2S/4-128 and Alliant FX/80. The sparse SVD problem is well motivated by recent information-retrieval techniques in which dominant singular values and their corresponding singular vectors of large sparse term-document matrices are desired, and by nonlinear inverse problems from seismic tomography applications which require approximate pseudo-inverses of large sparse Jacobian matrices.

  9. Timing signatures of large scale solar eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Hock-Mysliwiec, Rachel; Henry, Timothy; Kirk, Michael S.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the timing signatures of large solar eruptions resulting in flares, CMEs and Solar Energetic Particle events. We probe solar active regions from the chromosphere through the corona, using data from space and ground-based observations, including ISOON, SDO, GONG, and GOES. Our studies include a number of flares and CMEs of mostly the M- and X-strengths as categorized by GOES. We find that the chromospheric signatures of these large eruptions occur 5-30 minutes in advance of coronal high temperature signatures. These timing measurements are then used as inputs to models and reconstruct the eruptive nature of these systems, and explore their utility in forecasts.

  10. Implicit solvers for large-scale nonlinear problems

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D E; Reynolds, D; Woodward, C S

    2006-07-13

    Computational scientists are grappling with increasingly complex, multi-rate applications that couple such physical phenomena as fluid dynamics, electromagnetics, radiation transport, chemical and nuclear reactions, and wave and material propagation in inhomogeneous media. Parallel computers with large storage capacities are paving the way for high-resolution simulations of coupled problems; however, hardware improvements alone will not prove enough to enable simulations based on brute-force algorithmic approaches. To accurately capture nonlinear couplings between dynamically relevant phenomena, often while stepping over rapid adjustments to quasi-equilibria, simulation scientists are increasingly turning to implicit formulations that require a discrete nonlinear system to be solved for each time step or steady state solution. Recent advances in iterative methods have made fully implicit formulations a viable option for solution of these large-scale problems. In this paper, we overview one of the most effective iterative methods, Newton-Krylov, for nonlinear systems and point to software packages with its implementation. We illustrate the method with an example from magnetically confined plasma fusion and briefly survey other areas in which implicit methods have bestowed important advantages, such as allowing high-order temporal integration and providing a pathway to sensitivity analyses and optimization. Lastly, we overview algorithm extensions under development motivated by current SciDAC applications.

  11. Numerically modelling the large scale coronal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Mayukh; Nandi, Dibyendu

    2016-07-01

    The solar corona spews out vast amounts of magnetized plasma into the heliosphere which has a direct impact on the Earth's magnetosphere. Thus it is important that we develop an understanding of the dynamics of the solar corona. With our present technology it has not been possible to generate 3D magnetic maps of the solar corona; this warrants the use of numerical simulations to study the coronal magnetic field. A very popular method of doing this, is to extrapolate the photospheric magnetic field using NLFF or PFSS codes. However the extrapolations at different time intervals are completely independent of each other and do not capture the temporal evolution of magnetic fields. On the other hand full MHD simulations of the global coronal field, apart from being computationally very expensive would be physically less transparent, owing to the large number of free parameters that are typically used in such codes. This brings us to the Magneto-frictional model which is relatively simpler and computationally more economic. We have developed a Magnetofrictional Model, in 3D spherical polar co-ordinates to study the large scale global coronal field. Here we present studies of changing connectivities between active regions, in response to photospheric motions.

  12. Probes of large-scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suto, Yasushi; Gorski, Krzysztof; Juszkiewicz, Roman; Silk, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    A general formalism is developed which shows that the gravitational instability theory for the origin of the large-scale structure of the universe is now capable of critically confronting observational results on cosmic background radiation angular anisotropies, large-scale bulk motions, and large-scale clumpiness in the galaxy counts. The results indicate that presently advocated cosmological models will have considerable difficulty in simultaneously explaining the observational results.

  13. Linking Large-Scale Reading Assessments: Comment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanushek, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    E. A. Hanushek points out in this commentary that applied researchers in education have only recently begun to appreciate the value of international assessments, even though there are now 50 years of experience with these. Until recently, these assessments have been stand-alone surveys that have not been linked, and analysis has largely focused on…

  14. Large-Scale Organizational Performance Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilotto, Rudy; Young, Jonathan O'Donnell

    1999-01-01

    Describes the steps involved in a performance improvement program in the context of a large multinational corporation. Highlights include a training program for managers that explained performance improvement; performance matrices; divisionwide implementation, including strategic planning; organizationwide training of all personnel; and the…

  15. Plasma response to electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    An electron energy filter (EEF) is embedded in the Large Volume Plasma Device plasma for carrying out studies on excitation of plasma turbulence by a gradient in electron temperature (ETG) described in the paper of Mattoo et al. [S. K. Mattoo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255007 (2012)]. In this paper, we report results on the response of the plasma to the EEF. It is shown that inhomogeneity in the magnetic field of the EEF switches on several physical phenomena resulting in plasma regions with different characteristics, including a plasma region free from energetic electrons, suitable for the study of ETG turbulence. Specifically, we report that localized structures of plasma density, potential, electron temperature, and plasma turbulence are excited in the EEF plasma. It is shown that structures of electron temperature and potential are created due to energy dependence of the electron transport in the filter region. On the other hand, although structure of plasma density has origin in the particle transport but two distinct steps of the density structure emerge from dominance of collisionality in the source-EEF region and of the Bohm diffusion in the EEF-target region. It is argued and experimental evidence is provided for existence of drift like flute Rayleigh-Taylor in the EEF plasma.

  16. Plasma response to electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    An electron energy filter (EEF) is embedded in the Large Volume Plasma Device plasma for carrying out studies on excitation of plasma turbulence by a gradient in electron temperature (ETG) described in the paper of Mattoo et al. [S. K. Mattoo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255007 (2012)]. In this paper, we report results on the response of the plasma to the EEF. It is shown that inhomogeneity in the magnetic field of the EEF switches on several physical phenomena resulting in plasma regions with different characteristics, including a plasma region free from energetic electrons, suitable for the study of ETG turbulence. Specifically, we report that localized structures of plasma density, potential, electron temperature, and plasma turbulence are excited in the EEF plasma. It is shown that structures of electron temperature and potential are created due to energy dependence of the electron transport in the filter region. On the other hand, although structure of plasma density has origin in the particle transport but two distinct steps of the density structure emerge from dominance of collisionality in the source-EEF region and of the Bohm diffusion in the EEF-target region. It is argued and experimental evidence is provided for existence of drift like flute Rayleigh-Taylor in the EEF plasma.

  17. Wavelength scaling of laser plasma coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.L.

    1983-11-03

    The use of shorter wavelength laser light both enhances collisional absorption and reduces deleterious collective plasma effects. Coupling processes which can be important in reactor-size targets are briefly reviewed. Simple estimates are presented for the intensity-wavelength regime in which collisional absorption is high and collective effects are minimized.

  18. MicroScale - Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Mohan

    2012-01-25

    Low-temperature plasmas play an essential role in the manufacturing of integrated circuits which are ubiquitous in modern society. In recent years, these top-down approaches to materials processing have reached a physical limit. As a result, alternative approaches to materials processing are being developed that will allow the fabrication of nanoscale materials from the bottom up. The aim of our research is to develop a new class of plasmas, termed “microplasmas” for nanomaterials synthesis. Microplasmas are a special class of plasmas formed in geometries where at least one dimension is less than 1 mm. Plasma confinement leads to several unique properties including high-pressure stability and non-equilibrium that make microplasams suitable for nanomaterials synthesis. Vapor-phase precursors can be dissociated to homogeneously nucleate nanometer-sized metal and alloyed nanoparticles. Alternatively, metal salts dispersed in liquids or polymer films can be electrochemically reduced to form metal nanoparticles. In this talk, I will discuss these topics in detail, highlighting the advantages of microplasma-based systems for the synthesis of well-defined nanomaterials.

  19. Simulation of Large-Scale HPC Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Ian S; Engelmann, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The Extreme-scale Simulator (xSim) is a recently developed performance investigation toolkit that permits running high-performance computing (HPC) applications in a controlled environment with millions of concurrent execution threads. It allows observing parallel application performance properties in a simulated extreme-scale HPC system to further assist in HPC hardware and application software co-design on the road toward multi-petascale and exascale computing. This paper presents a newly implemented network model for the xSim performance investigation toolkit that is capable of providing simulation support for a variety of HPC network architectures with the appropriate trade-off between simulation scalability and accuracy. The taken approach focuses on a scalable distributed solution with latency and bandwidth restrictions for the simulated network. Different network architectures, such as star, ring, mesh, torus, twisted torus and tree, as well as hierarchical combinations, such as to simulate network-on-chip and network-on-node, are supported. Network traffic congestion modeling is omitted to gain simulation scalability by reducing simulation accuracy.

  20. Large-scale linear rankSVM.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Pei; Lin, Chih-Jen

    2014-04-01

    Linear rankSVM is one of the widely used methods for learning to rank. Although its performance may be inferior to nonlinear methods such as kernel rankSVM and gradient boosting decision trees, linear rankSVM is useful to quickly produce a baseline model. Furthermore, following its recent development for classification, linear rankSVM may give competitive performance for large and sparse data. A great deal of works have studied linear rankSVM. The focus is on the computational efficiency when the number of preference pairs is large. In this letter, we systematically study existing works, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and propose an efficient algorithm. We discuss different implementation issues and extensions with detailed experiments. Finally, we develop a robust linear rankSVM tool for public use. PMID:24479776

  1. Large scale properties of the Webgraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, D.; Laura, L.; Leonardi, S.; Millozzi, S.

    2004-03-01

    In this paper we present an experimental study of the properties of web graphs. We study a large crawl from 2001 of 200M pages and about 1.4 billion edges made available by the WebBase project at Stanford[CITE]. We report our experimental findings on the topological properties of such graphs, such as the number of bipartite cores and the distribution of degree, PageRank values and strongly connected components.

  2. Infrasonic observations of large scale HE events

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, R.W.; Mutschlecner, J.P.; Davidson, M.B.; Noel, S.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Los Alamos Infrasound Program has been operating since about mid-1982, making routine measurements of low frequency atmospheric acoustic propagation. Generally, we work between 0.1 Hz to 10 Hz; however, much of our work is concerned with the narrower range of 0.5 to 5.0 Hz. Two permanent stations, St. George, UT, and Los Alamos, NM, have been operational since 1983, collecting data 24 hours a day. This discussion will concentrate on measurements of large, high explosive (HE) events at ranges of 250 km to 5330 km. Because the equipment is well suited for mobile deployments, it can easily establish temporary observing sites for special events. The measurements in this report are from our permanent sites, as well as from various temporary sites. In this short report will not give detailed data from all sites for all events, but rather will present a few observations that are typical of the full data set. The Defense Nuclear Agency sponsors these large explosive tests as part of their program to study airblast effects. A wide variety of experiments are fielded near the explosive by numerous Department of Defense (DOD) services and agencies. This measurement program is independent of this work; use is made of these tests as energetic known sources, which can be measured at large distances. Ammonium nitrate and fuel oil (ANFO) is the specific explosive used by DNA in these tests. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Plasma Boundaries and Kinetic-Scale Electric Field Structures in the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaspina, David; Larsen, Brian; Ergun, R. E.; Skoug, Ruth; Wygant, John; Reeves, Geoffrey; Jaynes, Allison

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in spacecraft instrumentation have enabled fresh examination of coupling between macro-scale and micro-scale physics in the terrestrial magnetosphere, demonstrating not only that cross-scale interactions are a key component of magnetospheric dynamics, but also that plasma boundaries play a crucial role in mediating cross-scale coupling. We use Van Allen Probe observations to study the cross-scale interaction between inner magnetospheric plasma boundaries (including the plasmapause and injection fronts) and kinetic-scale electric field structures including kinetic Alfven waves, double layers, phase space holes, and nonlinear whistler mode waves. We focus on the spatial distribution of these kinetic structures in the inner magnetosphere and their interaction with plasma boundaries. We demonstrate that both the occurrence probability and amplitude of these structures peak at plasma boundaries. Further, it is found that regions of kinetic-scale electric field structure activity travel with plasma boundaries. These observations imply that kinetic-scale electric field structures are continually generated by instabilities localized to these boundaries, constraining their ability to energize radiation belt particles over large spatial regions.

  4. A complex plasma device of large surface area

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Y.; Ishihara, O.

    2008-03-15

    A novel complex plasma device (YCOPEX) to create two-dimensional monolayer plasma crystals of a large surface area of 15x90 cm{sup 2} is described. The YCOPEX, in which a plasma is produced by a rf discharge of argon gas, is designed to utilize gravitational force to study fundamental physics of complex plasmas. The device may be used for observation of spatial change of a phase state, propagation of waves, and collisions of flowing dust particles with an obstacle. As an example of experiments, neutral drag forces on microspheres are measured using the gravitational force on those particles. The obtained neutral drag force agrees reasonably with the values estimated from Epstein's formula.

  5. Long-pulse plasma discharge on the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Saito, K.; Seki, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ohkubo, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Oka, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Osakabe, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Kaneko, O.; Miyazawa, J.; Morita, S.; Narihara, K.; Shoji, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Ogawa, H.; Goto, M.; Morisaki, T.; Peterson, B. J.; Sato, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Ashikawa, N.; Nishimura, K.; Funaba, H.; Chikaraishi, H.; Watari, T.; Watanabe, T.; Sakamoto, M.; Ichimura, M.; Takase, Y.; Notake, T.; Takeuchi, N.; Torii, Y.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Takahashi, C.; Yokota, M.; Kato, A.; Zhao, Y.; Kwak, J. G.; Yoon, J. S.; Yamada, H.; Kawahata, K.; Ohyabu, N.; Ida, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Noda, N.; Komori, A.; Sudo, S.; Motojima, O.; LHD experiment Group

    2006-03-01

    A long-pulse plasma discharge of more than 30 min duration was achieved on the Large Helical Device (LHD). A plasma of ne = 0.8 × 1019 m-3 and Ti0 = 2.0 keV was sustained with PICH = 0.52 MW, PECH = 0.1 MW and averaged PNBI = 0.067 MW. The total injected heating energy was 1.3 GJ. One of the keys to the success of the experiment was a dispersion of the local plasma heat load to divertors, accomplished by sweeping the magnetic axis inward and outward. Causes limiting the long pulse plasma discharge are discussed. An ion impurity penetration limited further long-pulse discharge in the 8th experimental campaign (2004).

  6. Test of an argon cusp plasma for tin LPP power scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2015-03-01

    Scaling the power of the tin droplet laser-produced-plasma (LPP) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source to 500W has eluded the industry after a decade of effort. In 2014 we proposed [2] a solution: placing the laser-plasma interaction region within an argon plasma in a magnetic cusp. This would serve to ionize tin atoms and guide them to a large area annular beam dump. We have since demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. We present first results from a full-scale test plasma at power levels relevant to the generation of at least 200W, showing both that the argon cusp plasma is very stable, and that its geometrical properties are ideal for the transport of exhaust power and tin to the beam dump.

  7. Large scale surface heat fluxes. [through oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarachik, E. S.

    1984-01-01

    The heat flux through the ocean surface, Q, is the sum of the net radiation at the surface, the latent heat flux into the atmosphere, and the sensible heat flux into the atmosphere (all fluxes positive upwards). A review is presented of the geographical distribution of Q and its constituents, and the current accuracy of measuring Q by ground based measurements (both directly and by 'bulk formulae') is assessed. The relation of Q to changes of oceanic heat content, heat flux, and SST is examined and for each of these processes, the accuracy needed for Q is discussed. The needed accuracy for Q varies from process to process, varies geographically, and varies with the time and space scale considered.

  8. Energy Loss of a High Charge Bunched Electron Beam in Plasma: Nonlinear Plasma Response and Linear Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Barov, N.; Thompson, M. C.; Yoder, R.

    2002-12-01

    There has been much experimental and theoretical interest in blowout regime of plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA), which features ultra-high accelerating fields, linear transverse focusing forces, and nonlinear plasma motion. Using an exact analysis, we examine here a fundamental limit of nonlinear PWFA excitation, by an infinitesimally short, relativistic electron beam. The beam energy loss in this case is shown to be linear in charge even for nonlinear plasma response, where a normalized, unitless charge exceeds unity, and relativistic plasma effects become important or dominant. The physical bases for this persistence of linear response are pointed out. As a byproduct of our analysis, we re-examine the issue of field divergence as the point-charge limit is approached, suggesting an important modification of commonly held views of evading unphysical energy loss. Deviations from linear behavior are investigated using simulations with finite length beams. The peak accelerating field in the plasma wave excited behind a finite-length beam is also examined, with the artifact of wave spiking adding to the apparent persistence of linear scaling of the peak field amplitude well into the nonlinear regime. On the other hand, at large enough normalized charge, linear scaling of fields collapses, with serious consequences for plasma wave excitation efficiency. The dramatic implications of these results for observing the collapse of linear scaling in planned experiments are discussed.

  9. Picosecond laser-driven terahertz radiation from large scale preplasmas of solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, G. Q.; Li, Y. T.; Li, C.; Su, L. N.; Zheng, Y.; Liu, M.; Dunn, J.; Nilsen, J.; Hunter, J.; Wang, W. M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2016-05-01

    The terahertz (THz) radiation from the front of solid targets with a large-scale preplasma irradiated by relativistic picosecond laser pulses has been studied. The THz radiation measured at the specular direction nonlinearly increases with laser energy and an optimal plasma density scalelength is observed. Particle-in-cell simulations indicate that the radiation can be attributed to the model of mode conversion. While the THz radiation near the target normal direction is saturated with laser energy and plasma scalelength. Unlike the radiation in the specular direction’ the transient current formed at the plasma-vacuum interface could be responsible for the radiation near the target normal.

  10. Large-scale motions in a plane wall jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanamanickam, Ebenezer; Jonathan, Latim; Shibani, Bhatt

    2015-11-01

    The dynamic significance of large-scale motions in turbulent boundary layers have been the focus of several recent studies, primarily focussing on canonical flows - zero pressure gradient boundary layers, flows within pipes and channels. This work presents an investigation into the large-scale motions in a boundary layer that is used as the prototypical flow field for flows with large-scale mixing and reactions, the plane wall jet. An experimental investigation is carried out in a plane wall jet facility designed to operate at friction Reynolds numbers Reτ > 1000 , which allows for the development of a significant logarithmic region. The streamwise turbulent intensity across the boundary layer is decomposed into small-scale (less than one integral length-scale δ) and large-scale components. The small-scale energy has a peak in the near-wall region associated with the near-wall turbulent cycle as in canonical boundary layers. However, eddies of large-scales are the dominating eddies having significantly higher energy, than the small-scales across almost the entire boundary layer even at the low to moderate Reynolds numbers under consideration. The large-scales also appear to amplitude and frequency modulate the smaller scales across the entire boundary layer.