Science.gov

Sample records for large spacing loop-loop

  1. Observational Evidence for Loop-Loop Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiping, W.; Guangli, H.; Yuhua, T.; Aoao, X.

    2004-01-01

    Through analysis of the data including the hard x-ray(BASTE) microwave(NoRP) and magnetogram(MDI from SOHO) as well as the images of soft x-ray(YHKOH) and EIT(SOHO) on Apr. 151998 solar flare in the active region 8203(N30W12) we found: (1) there are similar quasi period oscillation in the profile of hard x-ray flux (25-5050-100keV) and microwave flux(1GHz) with duration of 85+/-25s every peak includes two sub-peak structures; (2) in the preheat phase of the flare active magnetic field changes apparently and a s-pole spot emerges ; (3) several EIT and soft x-ray loops exist and turn into bright . All of these may suggest that loop-loop interaction indeed exist. Through reconnection the electrons may be accelerated and the hard x-ray and microwave emission take place.

  2. Large space structures testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waites, Henry; Worley, H. Eugene

    1987-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of testing concepts and facilities that accurately simulate the pathologies believed to exist in future spacecraft. Both the Government and Industry have participated in the development of facilites over the past several years. The progress and problems associated with the development of the Large Space Structure Test Facility at the Marshall Flight Center are presented. This facility was in existence for a number of years and its utilization has run the gamut from total in-house involvement, third party contractor testing, to the mutual participation of other Government Agencies in joint endeavors.

  3. Large size space construction for space exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondyurin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Space exploitation is impossible without large space structures. We need to make sufficient large volume of pressurized protecting frames for crew, passengers, space processing equipment, & etc. We have to be unlimited in space. Now the size and mass of space constructions are limited by possibility of a launch vehicle. It limits our future in exploitation of space by humans and in development of space industry. Large-size space construction can be made with using of the curing technology of the fibers-filled composites and a reactionable matrix applied directly in free space. For curing the fabric impregnated with a liquid matrix (prepreg) is prepared in terrestrial conditions and shipped in a container to orbit. In due time the prepreg is unfolded by inflating. After polymerization reaction, the durable construction can be fitted out with air, apparatus and life support systems. Our experimental studies of the curing processes in the simulated free space environment showed that the curing of composite in free space is possible. The large-size space construction can be developed. A project of space station, Moon base, Mars base, mining station, interplanet space ship, telecommunication station, space observatory, space factory, antenna dish, radiation shield, solar sail is proposed and overviewed. The study was supported by Humboldt Foundation, ESA (contract 17083/03/NL/SFe), NASA program of the stratospheric balloons and RFBR grants (05-08-18277, 12-08-00970 and 14-08-96011).

  4. Large Space Antenna Systems Technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Mission applications for large space antenna systems; large space antenna structural systems; materials and structures technology; structural dynamics and control technology, electromagnetics technology, large space antenna systems and the Space Station; and flight test and evaluation were examined.

  5. Low Cost Large Space Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, Artur B.; Freeland, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The mobile communication community could significantly benefit from the availability of low-cost, large space-deployable antennas. A new class of space structures, called inflatable deployable structures, will become an option for this industry in the near future. This new technology recently made significant progress with respect to reducing the risk of flying large inflatable structures in space. This progress can be attributed to the successful space flight of the Inflatable Antenna Experiment in May of 1996, which prompted the initiation of the NASA portion of the joint NASA/DOD coordinated Space Inflatables Program, which will develop the technology to be used in future mobile communications antennas along with other users. The NASA/DOD coordinated Space Inflatables Program was initiated in 1997 as a direct result of the Inflatable Antenna Experiment. The program adds a new NASA initiative to a substantial DOD program that involves developing a series of ground test hardware, starting with 3 meter diameter units and advancing the manufacturing techniques to fabricate a 25 meter ground demonstrator unit with surface accuracy exceeding the requirements for mobile communication applications. Simultaneously, the program will be advancing the state of the art in several important inflatable technology areas, such as developing rigidizable materials for struts and tori and investigating thin film technology issues, such as application of coatings, property measurement and materials processing and assembly techniques. A very important technology area being addressed by the program is deployment control techniques. The program will sponsor activities that will lead to understanding the effects of material strain energy release, residual air in the stowed structure, and the design of the launch restraint and release system needed to control deployment dynamics. Other technology areas directly applicable to developing inflatable mobile communication antennas in the near

  6. Large space structure damping design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, W. D.; Haviland, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Several FORTRAN subroutines and programs were developed which compute complex eigenvalues of a damped system using different approaches, and which rescale mode shapes to unit generalized mass and make rigid bodies orthogonal to each other. An analytical proof of a Minimum Constrained Frequency Criterion (MCFC) for a single damper is presented. A method to minimize the effect of control spill-over for large space structures is proposed. The characteristic equation of an undamped system with a generalized control law is derived using reanalysis theory. This equation can be implemented in computer programs for efficient eigenvalue analysis or control quasi synthesis. Methods to control vibrations in large space structure are reviewed and analyzed. The resulting prototype, using electromagnetic actuator, is described.

  7. Large aperture diffractive space telescope

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Roderick A.

    2001-01-01

    A large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary objective lens functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass "aiming" at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The objective lens includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the objective lens, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets which may be either earth bound or celestial.

  8. Uncertainties in large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuh, Jon-Shen

    1988-01-01

    Uncertainties of a large space system (LSS) can be deterministic or stochastic in nature. The former may result in, for example, an energy spillover problem by which the interaction between unmodeled modes and controls may cause system instability. The stochastic uncertainties are responsible for mode localization and estimation errors, etc. We will address the effects of uncertainties on structural model formulation, use of available test data to verify and modify analytical models before orbiting, and how the system model can be further improved in the on-orbit environment.

  9. Large Space Antenna Systems Technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Papers are presented which provide a comprehensive review of space missions requiring large antenna systems and of the status of key technologies required to enable these missions. Topic areas include mission applications for large space antenna systems, large space antenna structural systems, materials and structures technology, structural dynamics and control technology, electromagnetics technology, large space antenna systems and the space station, and flight test and evaluation.

  10. Large space systems technology, 1981. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    A total systems approach including structures, analyses, controls, and antennas is presented as a cohesive, programmatic plan for large space systems. Specifically, program status, structures, materials, and analyses, and control of large space systems are addressed.

  11. Large N reduction on coset spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Hikaru; Shimasaki, Shinji; Tsuchiya, Asato

    2010-04-15

    As an extension of our previous work concerning the large N reduction on group manifolds, we study the large N reduction on coset spaces. We show that large N field theories on coset spaces are described by certain corresponding matrix models. We also construct Chern-Simons-like theories on group manifolds and coset spaces, and give their reduced models.

  12. Control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gran, R.; Rossi, M.; Moyer, H. G.; Austin, F.

    1979-01-01

    The control of large space structures was studied to determine what, if any, limitations are imposed on the size of spacecraft which may be controlled using current control system design technology. Using a typical structure in the 35 to 70 meter size category, a control system design that used actuators that are currently available was designed. The amount of control power required to maintain the vehicle in a stabilized gravity gradient pointing orientation that also damped various structural motions was determined. The moment of inertia and mass properties of this structure were varied to verify that stability and performance were maintained. The study concludes that the structure's size is required to change by at least a factor of two before any stability problems arise. The stability margin that is lost is due to the scaling of the gravity gradient torques (the rigid body control) and as such can easily be corrected by changing the control gains associated with the rigid body control. A secondary conclusion from the study is that the control design that accommodates the structural motions (to damp them) is a little more sensitive than the design that works on attitude control of the rigid body only.

  13. Large Space Antenna Systems Technology, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightner, E. B. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    A compilation of the unclassified papers presented at the NASA Conference on Large Space Antenna Systems Technology covers the following areas: systems, structures technology, control technology, electromagnetics, and space flight test and evaluation.

  14. Large space systems technology, 1980, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriver, F., III (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    The technological and developmental efforts in support of the large space systems technology are described. Three major areas of interests are emphasized: (1) technology pertient to large antenna systems; (2) technology related to large space systems; and (3) activities that support both antenna and platform systems.

  15. Shape control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagan, M. T.

    1982-01-01

    A survey has been conducted to determine the types of control strategies which have been proposed for controlling the vibrations in large space structures. From this survey several representative control strategies were singled out for detailed analyses. The application of these strategies to a simplified model of a large space structure has been simulated. These simulations demonstrate the implementation of the control algorithms and provide a basis for a preliminary comparison of their suitability for large space structure control.

  16. Analysis of EM dataset with several sensor configurations obtained by the loop-loop EM survey on magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHOI, J.; Yi, M. J.; Sasaki, Y.; Son, J.; Nam, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Most of mineral mines in Korea are located in rugged mountain area embedding small-scale anomalies. Loop-loop EM survey system can be a better choice for exploring those mines because no ground contact is required and portable loops are freely positioned. Survey design is very important for detecting small amount of mineral deposits efficiently and spatial limits of survey lines should be considered. Along a same survey line, surveys with different separations between a transmitter and a receiver are applicable. EM responses are calculated in a layered-earth model embedding magnetic anomalies and analyses considering electric conductivity and magnetic permeability are made for the loop-loop EM survey data. Combining EM dataset with multi-frequency and multi-separation slightly enhanced a reconstructed image. Loop-loop EM survey using PROMOIS system was conducted on a small magnetite mine. Inversion with and without considering magnetic permeability was conducted for EM data with multi-frequency and multi-separation between a transmitter and a receiver.

  17. Large Space Systems Technology, Part 2, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Four major areas of interest are covered: technology pertinent to large antenna systems; technology related to the control of large space systems; basic technology concerning structures, materials, and analyses; and flight technology experiments. Large antenna systems and flight technology experiments are described. Design studies, structural testing results, and theoretical applications are presented with accompanying validation data. These research studies represent state-of-the art technology that is necessary for the development of large space systems. A total systems approach including structures, analyses, controls, and antennas is presented as a cohesive, programmatic plan for large space systems.

  18. The Large Space Telescope program.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    The 1980's should see the establishment of the first major observatory in space. This observatory will contain a long-lifetime reflecting telescope of about 120 inches clear aperture. Advantages of an orbiting telescope include the elimination of astronomical seeing effects and improvements in resolving power. The small images and darker sky will permit low-dispersion spectrographs to avoid more of the contaminating background. The crispness of the images also has potential for very efficient high-dispersion spectroscopy. A further advantage lies in the accessibility of all the sky and nearly around-the-clock observing.

  19. A case for Large Space Systems Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huckins, E. K., III

    1980-01-01

    The NASA Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) program, devoted to the development of Space Shuttle-deployable orbiting structures, is reviewed. The LSST program elements are: antennas, space platforms, assembly equipment and devices, surface sensors and control, control and stabilization, and analysis and design systems. Among the specific prospective applications for this technology base may be counted: multipurpose platforms, materials experimentation facilities, energy satellites, large optical and radio arrays, and communications platforms.

  20. Large space structures - Fantasies and facts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, M. F.; Boyer, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    A review of large space structures activities from 1973 to 1979 is presented. Long-range studies of space colonies, gigantic solar power stations and projected earth applications revived interest in space activities. Studies suggest opportunities for advanced antenna and platform applications. Matching low-thrust propulsion to large flexible vehicles will be a key technology. Current structures technology investigations include deployable and erectable structures and assembly techniques. Based on orbited structures experience, deployment reliability is a critical issue for deployable structures. For erectable structures, concepts for earth-fabricated and space-fabricated memb

  1. Primary propulsion/large space system interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dergance, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Three generic types of structural concepts and nonstructural surface densities were selected and combined to represent potential LSS applications. The design characteristics of various classes of large space systems that are impacted by primary propulsion thrust required to effect orbit transfer were identified. The effects of propulsion system thrust-to-mass ratio, thrust transients, and performance on the mass, area, and orbit transfer characteristics of large space systems were determined.

  2. Ground test experiment for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tollison, D. K.; Waites, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years a new body of control theory has been developed for the design of control systems for Large Space Structures (LSS). The problems of testing this theory on LSS hardware are aggravated by the expense and risk of actual in orbit tests. Ground tests on large space structures can provide a proving ground for candidate control systems, but such tests require a unique facility for their execution. The current development of such a facility at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is the subject of this report.

  3. Construction and assembly of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, J. W.; Miller, R. H.; Bowden, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Three aspects of the construction and assembly of large space structures, namely transportation costs, human productivity in space and the source of materials (lunar vs terrestrial), are considered. Studies on human productivity have been so encouraging that the cost of human labor is now regarded as much less important than transportation costs. It is pointed out that these costs, although high, are extremely demand-sensitive. Even with high demand, however, the construction of several large systems would warrant the use of lunar materials and space manufacturing. The importance of further research is stressed in order to establish the optimum tradeoff between automation and manual assembly.

  4. Advances in Structures for Large Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith

    2004-01-01

    The development of structural systems for scientific remote sensing and space exploration has been underway for four decades. The seminal work from 1960 to 1980 provided the basis for many of the design principles of modern space systems. From 1980- 2000 advances in active materials and structures and the maturing of composites technology led to high precision active systems such those used in the Space Interferometry Mission. Recently, thin-film membrane or gossamer structures are being investigated for use in large area space systems because of their low mass and high packaging efficiency. Various classes of Large Space Systems (LSS) are defined in order to describe the goals and system challenges in structures and materials technologies. With an appreciation of both past and current technology developments, future technology challenges are used to develop a list of technology investments that can have significant impacts on LSS development.

  5. Learning to build large structures in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagler, T.; Patterson, H. G.; Nathan, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The paper examines some of the key technologies and forms of construction know-how that will have to be developed and tested for eventual application to building large structures in space. Construction of a shuttle-tended space construction/demonstration platform would comprehensively demonstrate large structure technology, develop construction capability, and furnish a construction platform for a variety of operational large structures. Completion of this platform would lead to demonstrations of the Satellite Power System (SPS) concept, including microwave transmission, fabrication of 20-m-deep beams, conductor installation, rotary joint installation, and solar blanket installation.

  6. 2-D and 3-D joint inversion of loop-loop electromagnetic and electrical data for resistivity and magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Myeong-Jong; Sasaki, Yutaka

    2015-11-01

    Frequency-domain loop-loop electromagnetic (EM) methods are sensitive to the magnetic susceptibility of the Earth as well as its resistivity. Thus, inversion techniques have been used to simultaneously reconstruct both resistivity and susceptibility models from EM data. However, to take full advantage of inversion methods, calibration errors must be assessed and removed because ignoring them can result in misleading models. We present a multidimensional inversion method that jointly inverts EM and direct current (DC) resistivity data to derive offset errors as well as resistivity and susceptibility models, assuming that calibration errors can be represented by in-phase and quadrature offsets at each frequency. Addition of independent data such as DC data is effective for more accurately estimating the offsets, resulting in more reliable subsurface models. Synthetic examples involving small-loop EM data show that simultaneous inversion for resistivity and susceptibility is not stable, because of strong correlations between in-phase offset parameters and background susceptibility, but that the offsets are well determined when the data misfit is reduced rapidly in the early iteration step. Improvements achieved by joint inversion are mainly on the resistivity model. For airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data, the inversion process is stable, because AEM data are acquired using more loop-loop geometries and a wider range of frequencies. As a result, both the resistivity and susceptibility models are significantly improved by joint inversion.

  7. Analysis incorporating electric conductivity and magnetic permeability on loop-loop EM data for detecting the magnetite ore body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jihyang; Yi, Myeong-Jong; Son, Jeong-Sul; Kim, Jung-Ho; Park, Sam-Gyu

    2013-04-01

    As the price of mineral resources goes up, exploring small amount of mineral deposits, which have been considered non-economic in the past, is getting more economic. Loop-loop EM survey system can be the best choice for exploring small mineral mines because no ground contact is required and portable loops are freely positioned. EM responses are affected by electric conductivity, magnetic permeability and electric permittivity. In many cases, variation ranges of latter two components are so small and ignorable. However, changes of magnetic permeability affect the data in a serious way. Multidimensional EM inversion technique incorporating both electric conductivity and magnetic susceptibility is on the developing stage. EM responses are calculated in a model of layered earth embedding a magnetic anomaly. Considering the size of the reactions, changes of relative magnetic permeability are frequency-independent effects that can be seen as static. Loop-loop EM survey using PROMIS system was conducted on a small magnetite mine. Inversion with and without considering magnetic permeability was conducted for EM data with multi-frequency and multi-separation between a transmitter and a receiver. Ferromagnetic anomalous feature was distinguishable from the subsurface media, though, enhancement by incorporating magnetic permeability was not sufficiently noticeable.

  8. Environmental effects and large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.

    1981-01-01

    When planning large scale operations in space, environmental impact must be considered in addition to radiation, spacecraft charging, contamination, high power and size. Pollution of the atmosphere and space is caused by rocket effluents and by photoelectrons generated by sunlight falling on satellite surfaces even light pollution may result (the SPS may reflect so much light as to be a nuisance to astronomers). Large (100 Km 2) structures also will absorb the high energy particles that impinge on them. Altogether, these effects may drastically alter the Earth's magnetosphere. It is not clear if these alterations will in any way affect the Earth's surface climate. Large structures will also generate large plasma wakes and waves which may cause interference with communications to the vehicle. A high energy, microwave beam from the SPS will cause ionospheric turbulence, affecting UHF and VHF communications. Although none of these effects may ultimately prove critical, they must be considered in the design of large structures.

  9. NASA technology for large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.; Campbell, T. G.; Freeland, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Technology developed by NASA in conjunction with industry for potential large, deployable space antennas with applications in communication, radio astronomy and earth observation is reviewed. Concepts for deployable antennas that have been developed to the point of detail design are summarized, including the advanced sunflower precision antenna, the radial rib antenna, the maypole (hoop/column) antenna and the parabolic erectable truss antenna. The assessment of state-of-the-art deployable antenna technology is discussed, and the approach taken by the NASA Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) Program to the development of technology for large space antenna systems is outlined. Finally, the further development of the wrap-rib antenna and the maypole (hoop/column) concept, which meet mission model requirements, to satisfy LSST size and frequency requirements is discussed.

  10. Construction and control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, M. F.; Heard, W. L., Jr.; Akin, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    Recent NASA research efforts on space construction are reviewed. Preliminary results of the EASE/ACCESS Shuttle experiments are discussed. A 45-foot beam was constructed on orbit in 30 minutes using a manual assembly technique at a work station. A large tetrahedron was constructed several times using a free floating technique. The capability of repair, utilities installation, and handling the structures using a mobile foot restraint on the RMS was also demonstrated. Implications of the experiments for space station are presented. Models of 5-meter space station structure together with neutral buoyancy simulations suggest manual assembly techniques are feasible. Selected research on control of flexible structures is discussed.

  11. Indian LSSC (Large Space Simulation Chamber) facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brar, A. S.; Prasadarao, V. S.; Gambhir, R. D.; Chandramouli, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Indian Space Agency has undertaken a major project to acquire in-house capability for thermal and vacuum testing of large satellites. This Large Space Simulation Chamber (LSSC) facility will be located in Bangalore and is to be operational in 1989. The facility is capable of providing 4 meter diameter solar simulation with provision to expand to 4.5 meter diameter at a later date. With such provisions as controlled variations of shroud temperatures and availability of infrared equipment as alternative sources of thermal radiation, this facility will be amongst the finest anywhere. The major design concept and major aspects of the LSSC facility are presented here.

  12. Zone generator for Large Space Telescope technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, K. E.

    1974-01-01

    A concept is presented for monitoring the optical adjustment and performance of a Large Space Telescope which consists of a 1.2m diameter turntable with a laser stylus to operate at speeds up to 30 rpm. The focus of the laser stylus is under closed loop control. A technique for scribing zones of suitable depth, width, and uniformity applicable to large telescope mirrors is also reported.

  13. Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Roderick Allen

    1998-04-20

    A very large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass ''aiming'' at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The magnifying glass includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the magnifying glass, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets.

  14. Planning for large construction projects in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disher, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses briefly some broad plans for developing the technology needed for large construction projects in space ranging from orbiting solar power stations to large communications antennas. Space construction classes include assembly of modules, deployment of compacted structures, assembly of passive preformed pieces, and fabrication of structures from sheet stock. Technological areas related to structural concepts include (1) analyses for prediction of structural behavior, structural/control interaction, electromagnetic and control performance, and integrated design development; (2) electronics for signal conditioning and data acquisition, power distribution, and signal channel interference and multipaction; (3) concepts for shape control, attitude/pointing control, and orbital transfer and station keeping; and (4) materials and techniques for 30-year dimensional stable composites, thermal control, thin-lightweight structural alloys, and material joining in space. The concept of a power module for the construction operations is discussed along with a concept for a habitability module.

  15. Large area space solar cell assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.; Nowlan, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    Development of a large area space solar cell assembly is presented. The assembly consists of an ion implanted silicon cell and glass cover. The important attributes of fabrication are (1) use of a back surface field which is compatible with a back surface reflector, and (2) integration of coverglass application and call fabrication.

  16. Microwave performance characterization of large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathker, D. A. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Performance capabilities of large microwave space antenna configurations with apertures generally from 100 wavelengths upwards are discussed. Types of antennas considered include: phased arrays, lenses, reflectors, and hybrid combinations of phased arrays with reflectors or lenses. The performance characteristics of these broad classes of antennas are examined and compared in terms of applications.

  17. EVA assembly of large space structure element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Bush, H. G.; Heard, W. L., Jr.; Stokes, J. W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a test program to assess the potential of manned extravehicular activity (EVA) assembly of erectable space trusses are described. Seventeen tests were conducted in which six "space-weight" columns were assembled into a regular tetrahedral cell by a team of two "space"-suited test subjects. This cell represents the fundamental "element" of a tetrahedral truss structure. The tests were conducted under simulated zero-gravity conditions. Both manual and simulated remote manipulator system modes were evaluated. Articulation limits of the pressure suit and zero gravity could be accommodated by work stations with foot restraints. The results of this study have confirmed that astronaut EVA assembly of large, erectable space structures is well within man's capabilities.

  18. Construction and control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, M. F.; Heard, W. L., Jr.; Akin, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    Recent NASA research efforts on space construction are reviewed. Preliminary results of the EASE/ACCESS Shuttle experiments are discussed. A 45-foot beam was constructed on orbit in 30 minutes using a manual assembly technique at a work station. A large tetrahedron was constructed several times using a free floating technique. The capability of repair, utilities installation, and handling the structures using a mobile foot restraint on the RMS was also demonstrated. Implications of the experiments for Space Station are presented. Models of 5-meter Space Station structure together with neutral buoyancy simulations suggest manual assembly techniques are feasible. Selected research on control of flexible structures is discussed. To support planned flight experiments, studies of the design and optimal placement of distributed active dampers are underway.

  19. Data management for Large Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hope, G. R., Jr.; Rasser, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    The data management system for the Large Space Telescope (LST) must be capable of meeting requirements of 160 million bits per 95 min orbit with a bit error rate of less than 0.00001 for data. The system will be supported by the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System of the Space Tracking and Data Network. The on-board system includes a general purpose computer that controls the vehicle as a stable observation platform and the array of instruments used for data collection. The ground-based system comprises a Mission Operations Center (MOC), a Science Institute where instrument data is processed, and a communications service for the space and point-to-point data flow. The allocation of hardware and software between on-board and ground-based components to achieve design objectives of maximum flexibility at minimum cost is discussed.

  20. Large space structures control algorithm characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogel, E.

    1983-01-01

    Feedback control algorithms are developed for sensor/actuator pairs on large space systems. These algorithms have been sized in terms of (1) floating point operation (FLOP) demands; (2) storage for variables; and (3) input/output data flow. FLOP sizing (per control cycle) was done as a function of the number of control states and the number of sensor/actuator pairs. Storage for variables and I/O sizing was done for specific structure examples.

  1. Accuracy potentials for large space antenna structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    The relationships among materials selection, truss design, and manufacturing techniques in the interest of surface accuracies for large space antennas are discussed. Among the antenna configurations considered are: tetrahedral truss, pretensioned truss, and geodesic dome and radial rib structures. Comparisons are made of the accuracy achievable by truss and dome structure types for a wide variety of diameters, focal lengths, and wavelength of radiated signal, taking into account such deforming influences as solar heating-caused thermal transients and thermal gradients.

  2. Some design considerations for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G.; Mikulas, M. M., Jr.; Heard, W. L., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Physical characteristics of large skeletal frameworks for space applications are investigated by analyzing one concept: the tetrahedral truss, which is idealized as a sandwich plate with isotropic faces. Appropriate analytical relations are presented in terms of the truss column-element properties, which for calculations were taken as slender graphite/epoxy tubes. Column loads, resulting from gravity-gradient control and orbital transfer, are found to be small for the class structure investigated. Fundamental frequencies of large truss structures are shown to be an order of magnitude lower than large earth-based structures. Permissible loads are shown to result in small lateral deflections of the truss due to low strain at Euler buckling of the slender graphite/epoxy truss column elements. Lateral thermal deflections are found to be a fraction of the truss depth using graphite/epoxy columns.

  3. Survey of future requirements for large space structures. [space platforms, large antennas, and power surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The future requirements for large space structures were examined and the foundation for long range planning of technology development for such structures is provided. Attention is concentrated on a period after 1985 for actual use. Basic ground rule of the study was that applications be of significant importance and have promise of direct economic benefit to mankind. The inputs to the study came from visits to a large number of government and industrial organizations, written studies in current literature, and approximate analyses of potential applications. The paper identifies diverse space applications for large area structures in three general categories: (1) large surfaces for power, (2) large antenna to receive and transmit energy over the radio frequency bandwidth, and (3) space platforms to provide area for general utilizations.

  4. Adaptive momentum management for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, E.

    1987-01-01

    Momentum management is discussed for a Large Space Structure (LSS) with the structure selected configuration being the Initial Orbital Configuration (IOC) of the dual keel space station. The external forces considered were gravity gradient and aerodynamic torques. The goal of the momentum management scheme developed is to remove the bias components of the external torques and center the cyclic components of the stored angular momentum. The scheme investigated is adaptive to uncertainties of the inertia tensor and requires only approximate knowledge of principle moments of inertia. Computational requirements are minimal and should present no implementation problem in a flight type computer and the method proposed is shown to be effective in the presence of attitude control bandwidths as low as .01 radian/sec.

  5. Passive stabilization for large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sesak, J. R.; Gronet, M. J.; Marinos, G. M.

    1987-01-01

    The optimal tuning of multiple tuned-mass dampers for the transient vibration damping of large space structures is investigated. A multidisciplinary approach is used. Structural dynamic techniques are applied to gain physical insight into absorber/structure interaction and to optimize specific cases. Modern control theory and parameter optimization techniques are applied to the general optimization problem. A design procedure for multi-absorber multi-DOF vibration damping problems is presented. Classical dynamic models are extended to investigate the effects of absorber placement, existing structural damping, and absorber cross-coupling on the optimal design synthesis. The control design process for the general optimization problem is formulated as a linear output feedback control problem via the development of a feedback control canonical form. The techniques are applied to sample micro-g and pointing problems on the NASA dual keel space station.

  6. In-space construction and dynamics of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The types of equipment and structures that will be required to construct very large spacecraft in space are discussed. One of the basic issues that must be resolved is the appropriate mix of humans and machines in the construction process. While the use of robots offers the potential for reducing the number of extra-vehicular activity (EVA) hours required for particular construction operations, the availability of humans greatly increases the reliability of complex construction tasks. A hybrid system is described which makes the best use of man and machine to provide a highly reliable and versatile construction approach. Such a system will provide an efficient method for constructing large spacecraft until fully automated, robotic devices can be perfected. Details are given on an extensive ground test program which was designed to evaluate and demonstrate large spacecraft construction. A discussion is presented on the use of the Space Station Freedom, or an appropriate derivative, as a construction facility. Finally, a construction scenario and assembly timelines are presented for constructing a 20-meter-diameter high precision reflector.

  7. Cooling Technology for Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, Michael; Cleveland, Paul; Durand, Dale; Klavins, Andy; Muheim, Daniella; Paine, Christopher; Petach, Mike; Tenerelli, Domenick; Tolomeo, Jason; Walyus, Keith

    2007-01-01

    NASA's New Millennium Program funded an effort to develop a system cooling technology, which is applicable to all future infrared, sub-millimeter and millimeter cryogenic space telescopes. In particular, this technology is necessary for the proposed large space telescope Single Aperture Far-Infrared Telescope (SAFIR) mission. This technology will also enhance the performance and lower the risk and cost for other cryogenic missions. The new paradigm for cooling to low temperatures will involve passive cooling using lightweight deployable membranes that serve both as sunshields and V-groove radiators, in combination with active cooling using mechanical coolers operating down to 4 K. The Cooling Technology for Large Space Telescopes (LST) mission planned to develop and demonstrate a multi-layered sunshield, which is actively cooled by a multi-stage mechanical cryocooler, and further the models and analyses critical to scaling to future missions. The outer four layers of the sunshield cool passively by radiation, while the innermost layer is actively cooled to enable the sunshield to decrease the incident solar irradiance by a factor of more than one million. The cryocooler cools the inner layer of the sunshield to 20 K, and provides cooling to 6 K at a telescope mounting plate. The technology readiness level (TRL) of 7 will be achieved by the active cooling technology following the technology validation flight in Low Earth Orbit. In accordance with the New Millennium charter, tests and modeling are tightly integrated to advance the technology and the flight design for "ST-class" missions. Commercial off-the-shelf engineering analysis products are used to develop validated modeling capabilities to allow the techniques and results from LST to apply to a wide variety of future missions. The LST mission plans to "rewrite the book" on cryo-thermal testing and modeling techniques, and validate modeling techniques to scale to future space telescopes such as SAFIR.

  8. Robust Control Design for Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, W. L.; Bossi, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The control design problem for the class of future spacecraft referred to as large space structures (LSS) is by now well known. The issue is the reduced order control of a very high order, lightly damped system with uncertain system parameters, particularly in the high frequency modes. A design methodology which incorporates robustness considerations as part of the design process is presented. Combining pertinent results from multivariable systems theory and optimal control and estimation, LQG eigenstructure assignment and LQG frequency shaping, were used to improve singular value robustness measures in the presence of control and observation spillover.

  9. Distributed control of large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, J. M.; Hamidi, M.; Lin, Y. H.; Wang, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    A systematic way to choose control design parameters and to evaluate performance for large space antennas is presented. The structural dynamics and control properties for a Hoop and Column Antenna and a Wrap-Rib Antenna are characterized. Some results of the effects of model parameter uncertainties to the stability, surface accuracy, and pointing errors are presented. Critical dynamics and control problems for these antenna configurations are identified and potential solutions are discussed. It was concluded that structural uncertainties and model error can cause serious performance deterioration and can even destabilize the controllers. For the hoop and column antenna, large hoop and long meat and the lack of stiffness between the two substructures result in low structural frequencies. Performance can be improved if this design can be strengthened. The two-site control system is more robust than either single-site control systems for the hoop and column antenna.

  10. Large space antenna concepts for ESGP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Allan W.

    1989-07-01

    It is appropriate to note that 1988 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of the reflector antenna. It was in 1888 that Heinrich Hertz constructed the first one, a parabolic cylinder made of sheet zinc bent to shape and supported by a wooden frame. Hertz demonstrated the existence of the electromagnetic waves that had been predicted theoretically by James Clerk Maxwell some 22 years earlier. In the 100 years since Hertz's pioneering work the field of electromagnetics has grown explosively: one of the technologies is that of remote sensing of planet Earth by means of electromagnetic waves, using both passive and active sensors located on an Earth Science Geostationary Platform (ESEP). For these purposes some exquisitely sensitive instruments were developed, capable of reaching to the fringes of the known universe, and relying on large reflector antennas to collect the minute signals and direct them to appropriate receiving devices. These antennas are electrically large, with diameters of 3000 to 10,000 wavelengths and with gains approaching 80 to 90 dB. Some of the reflector antennas proposed for ESGP are also electrically large. For example, at 220 GHz a 4-meter reflector is nearly 3000 wavelengths in diameter, and is electrically quite comparable with a number of the millimeter wave radiotelescopes that are being built around the world. Its surface must meet stringent requirements on rms smoothness, and ability to resist deformation. Here, however, the environmental forces at work are different. There are no varying forces due to wind and gravity, but inertial forces due to mechanical scanning must be reckoned with. With this form of beam scanning, minimizing momentum transfer to the space platform is a problem that demands an answer. Finally, reflector surface distortion due to thermal gradients caused by the solar flux probably represents the most challenging problem to be solved if these Large Space Antennas are to achieve the gain and resolution required of

  11. Large space antenna concepts for ESGP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Allan W.

    1989-01-01

    It is appropriate to note that 1988 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of the reflector antenna. It was in 1888 that Heinrich Hertz constructed the first one, a parabolic cylinder made of sheet zinc bent to shape and supported by a wooden frame. Hertz demonstrated the existence of the electromagnetic waves that had been predicted theoretically by James Clerk Maxwell some 22 years earlier. In the 100 years since Hertz's pioneering work the field of electromagnetics has grown explosively: one of the technologies is that of remote sensing of planet Earth by means of electromagnetic waves, using both passive and active sensors located on an Earth Science Geostationary Platform (ESEP). For these purposes some exquisitely sensitive instruments were developed, capable of reaching to the fringes of the known universe, and relying on large reflector antennas to collect the minute signals and direct them to appropriate receiving devices. These antennas are electrically large, with diameters of 3000 to 10,000 wavelengths and with gains approaching 80 to 90 dB. Some of the reflector antennas proposed for ESGP are also electrically large. For example, at 220 GHz a 4-meter reflector is nearly 3000 wavelengths in diameter, and is electrically quite comparable with a number of the millimeter wave radiotelescopes that are being built around the world. Its surface must meet stringent requirements on rms smoothness, and ability to resist deformation. Here, however, the environmental forces at work are different. There are no varying forces due to wind and gravity, but inertial forces due to mechanical scanning must be reckoned with. With this form of beam scanning, minimizing momentum transfer to the space platform is a problem that demands an answer. Finally, reflector surface distortion due to thermal gradients caused by the solar flux probably represents the most challenging problem to be solved if these Large Space Antennas are to achieve the gain and resolution required of

  12. Large space systems auxiliary propulsion requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, J. E.; Smith, W. W.

    1983-05-01

    To meet the needs of a variety of civilian and military missions objectives large space systems (LSS) will become a greater percentage of our orbiting hardware. These LSS's will be transported to low Earth orbit (LEO) by the space transportation system (STS Shuttle). Concurrently, for LSS missions to orbit higher than LEO, the predominant mission scenario is that the LSS will be deployed or assembled in LEO and then transferred to a higher orbit. In support of the LSS concepts, the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) has sponsored studies to determine LSS mission propulsion requirements. Since the fall of 1979, the Boeing Aerospace Company, under contract to NASA and Lewis Research Center, has been studying the disturbance forces and torques that will be experienced by LSS, and they have identified some of the associated auxiliary propulsion systems (APS) requirements. This presentation provides an insight into the results of some of the APS studies, focusing primarily on the APS requirements of single Shuttle launchable LSS's.

  13. Structural sizing considerations for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, W. L., Jr.; Bush, H. G.; Walz, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A number of missions for the space shuttle were proposed which involve placing large truss platforms on-orbit. These platforms range in size from tens of meters in span for reflector application to several thousand meters for solar power collector application. These proposed sizes and the operational requirements considered are unconventional in comparison to Earthbound structures and little information exists concerning efficient proportions of the structural elements forming the framework of the platforms. Such proportions are of major concern because they have a strong influence on the packaging efficiency and, thus, the transportation effectiveness of the shuttle. The present study is undertaken to: (1) identify efficient ranges of application of deployable and erectable platforms configured for shuttle transport to orbit, and (2) determine sensitivity to key parameters of minimum mass deployable and erectable platform designs.

  14. Large active retrodirective arrays for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    An active retrodirective array (ARA) transmits a beam toward the apparent source of an illuminating signal called the pilot. The term active implies that the array produces, not merely reflects, RF power. Retrodirectivity is achieved by retransmitting from each element of the array a signal whose phase is the conjugate of that received by the element. The problem of supplying the correct phase reference to the phase conjugation circuit (PCC) is solved by central phasing. A new form of central phasing suitable for very large arrays is outlined. ARAs may serve simultaneously as transmitting and receiving satellite antennas for space applications. Precision pointing and input-output isolation is provided by exact frequency-translating PCCs. A two-element ARA breadboard has been built and tested.

  15. Travelling wave effects in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonflotow, A.

    1983-01-01

    Several aspects of travelling waves in Large Space Structures(LSS) are discussed. The dynamic similarity among LSS's, electric power systems, microwave circuits and communications network is noted. The existence of time lag between actuation and response is illuminated with the aid of simple examples, and their prediction is demonstrated. To prevent echoes, communications lines have matched terminations; this idea is applied to the design of dampers of one dimensional structures. Periodic structures act as mechanical band pass filters. Implications of this behavior are examined on a simple example. It is noted that the implication is twofold; continuum models of periodic lattice structures may err considerably; on the other hand, it is possible to design favorable transmission (and resonance) characteristics into the structure.

  16. Space transportation alternatives for large space programs: The International Space University Summer Session, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1993-01-01

    In 1992, the International Space University (ISU) held its Summer Session in Kitakyushu, Japan. This paper summarizes and expands upon some aspects of space solar power and space transportation that were considered during that session. The issues discussed in this paper are the result of a 10-week study by the Space Solar Power Program design project members and the Space Transportation Group to investigate new paradigms in space propulsion and how those paradigms might reduce the costs for large space programs. The program plan was to place a series of power satellites in Earth orbit. Several designs were studied where many kW, MW, or GW of power would be transmitted to Earth or to other spacecraft in orbit. During the summer session, a space solar power system was also detailed and analyzed. A high-cost space transportation program is potentially the most crippling barrier to such a space power program. At ISU, the focus of the study was to foster and develop some of the new paradigms that may eliminate the barriers to low cost for space exploration and exploitation. Many international and technical aspects of a large multinational program were studied. Environmental safety, space construction and maintenance, legal and policy issues of frequency allocation, technology transfer and control and many other areas were addressed. Over 120 students from 29 countries participated in this summer session. The results discussed in this paper, therefore, represent the efforts of many nations.

  17. Offloading techniques for large deployable space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caravaggio, Levino; Golob, Alex

    1992-01-01

    The validation and verification of large deployable space structures are continual challenges which face the integration and test engineer today. Spar Aerospace Limited has worked on various programs in which such structure validation was required and faces similar tasks in the future. This testing is reported and the different offloading and deployment methods which were used, as well as the proposed methods which will be used on future programs, are described. Past programs discussed include the Olympus solar array ambient and thermal vacuum deployments, and the Anik-E array and reflector deployments. The proposed MSAT reflector and boom ambient deployment tests, as well as the proposed RADARSAT Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) ambient and thermal vacuum deployment tests will also be presented. A series of tests relating to various component parts of the offloading equipment systems was required. These tests included the characterization and understanding of linear bearings and large (180 in-lbf) constant force spring motors in a thermal vacuum environment, and the results from these tests are presented.

  18. International space station. Large scale integration approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Brad

    The International Space Station is the most complex large scale integration program in development today. The approach developed for specification, subsystem development, and verification lay a firm basis on which future programs of this nature can be based. International Space Station is composed of many critical items, hardware and software, built by numerous International Partners, NASA Institutions, and U.S. Contractors and is launched over a period of five years. Each launch creates a unique configuration that must be safe, survivable, operable, and support ongoing assembly (assemblable) to arrive at the assembly complete configuration in 2003. The approaches to integrating each of the modules into a viable spacecraft and continue the assembly is a challenge in itself. Added to this challenge are the severe schedule constraints and lack of an "Iron Bird", which prevents assembly and checkout of each on-orbit configuration prior to launch. This paper will focus on the following areas: 1) Specification development process explaining how the requirements and specifications were derived using a modular concept driven by launch vehicle capability. Each module is composed of components of subsystems versus completed subsystems. 2) Approach to stage (each stage consists of the launched module added to the current on-orbit spacecraft) specifications. Specifically, how each launched module and stage ensures support of the current and future elements of the assembly. 3) Verification approach, due to the schedule constraints, is primarily analysis supported by testing. Specifically, how are the interfaces ensured to mate and function on-orbit when they cannot be mated before launch. 4) Lessons learned. Where can we improve this complex system design and integration task?

  19. Toward large space systems. [Space Construction Base development from shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daros, C. J.; Freitag, R. F.; Kline, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    The design of the Space Transportation System, consisting of the Space Shuttle, Spacelab, and upper stages, provides experience for the development of more advanced space systems. The next stage will involve space stations in low earth orbit with limited self-sufficiency, characterized by closed ecological environments, space-generated power, and perhaps the first use of space materials. The third phase would include manned geosynchronous space-station activity and a return to lunar operations. Easier access to space will encourage the use of more complex, maintenance-requiring satellites than those currently used. More advanced space systems could perform a wide range of public services such as electronic mail, personal and police communication, disaster control, earthquake detection/prediction, water availability indication, vehicle speed control, and burglar alarm/intrusion detection. Certain products, including integrated-circuit chips and some enzymes, can be processed to a higher degree of purity in space and might eventually be manufactured there. Hardware including dishes, booms, and planar surfaces necessary for advanced space systems and their development are discussed.

  20. Large Space Systems Technology, 1979. [antenna and space platform systems conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. C., Jr. (Compiler)

    1980-01-01

    Items of technology and developmental efforts in support of the large space systems technology programs are described. The major areas of interest are large antennas systems, large space platform systems, and activities that support both antennas and platform systems.

  1. Definition of technology development missions for early space stations: Large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The testbed role of an early (1990-95) manned space station in large space structures technology development is defined and conceptual designs for large space structures development missions to be conducted at the space station are developed. Emphasis is placed on defining requirements and benefits of development testing on a space station in concert with ground and shuttle tests.

  2. Definition of technology development missions for early space stations. Large space structures, phase 2, midterm review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The large space structures technology development missions to be performed on an early manned space station was studied and defined and the resources needed and the design implications to an early space station to carry out these large space structures technology development missions were determined. Emphasis is being placed on more detail in mission designs and space station resource requirements.

  3. Space transportation alternatives for large space programs - The International Space University summer session - 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    1993-01-01

    The issues discussed in this paper are the result of a 10-week study by the Space Solar Power Program design project members and the Space Transportation Group at the International Space University (ISU) summer session of 1992 to investigate new paradigms in space propulsion and how those paradigms might reduce the costs for large space programs. The program plan was to place a series of power satellites in Earth orbit. Several designs were studied where many kW, MW or GW of power would be transmitted to Earth or to other spacecraft in orbit. During the summer session, a space solar power system was also detailed and analyzed. At ISU, the focus of the study was to foster and develop some of the new paradigms that may eliminate the barriers to low cost for space exploration and exploitation. Many international and technical aspects of a large multinational program were studied. Environmental safety, space construction and maintenance, legal and policy issues of frequency allocation, technology transfer and control and many other areas were addressed.

  4. A technology program for large area space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guastaferro, A.; Jenkins, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    The large space systems technology program (LSST) is discussed. The purpose of LSST is to define and develop technology for large space systems and associated subsystems required for projected NASA space missions. Goals involving structural concepts and supporting technology are surveyed. The application of LSST to the design of the solar power satellite is considered.

  5. Large space systems in global change mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Lyle M.

    1990-01-01

    The monitoring from space of such processes as the greenhouse effect and depletion of the ozone layer is discussed, as well as possibilities for active intervention in them, using space systems. Possibilities include the use of the Solar Power Satellite to reduce dependence on the burning of fossil fuels, dispersal of materials to neutralize chemicals responsible for ozone depletion, and measures to reduce the impact of local disasters, both natural and man-made.

  6. Technical issues in dynamics and control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, M. F.; Anderson, W. W.

    1983-01-01

    Examples of large space systems currently being considered by NASA include a large communications antenna system (the Land Mobile Satellite System), a precision antenna system (the Large Deployable Reflector System), and a preliminary concept for NASA's space station. Each system has low natural vibration frequencies, stringent pointing requirements, and, for the antennas, demanding surface accuracy requirements. A review is provided of the progress being made in structural ground tests with respect to surface accuracy, deployment, and erection of large structures. Attention is given to the dynamic loads on large space structures, on-orbit testing, space vibration control devices, and the characteristics of distributed control.

  7. The 1980 Large space systems technology. Volume 2: Base technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriver, F., III (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    Technology pertinent to large antenna systems, technology related to large space platform systems, and base technology applicable to both antenna and platform systems are discussed. Design studies, structural testing results, and theoretical applications are presented with accompanying validation data. A total systems approach including controls, platforms, and antennas is presented as a cohesive, programmatic plan for large space systems.

  8. Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Issues for Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, L. D. (Compiler); Amos, A. K. (Compiler); Venkayya, V. B. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Topics concerning the modeling, analysis, and optimization of large space structures are discussed including structure-control interaction, structural and structural dynamics modeling, thermal analysis, testing, and design.

  9. Spacecraft momentum management procedures. [large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, L. C.; Davenport, P. B.; Sturch, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques appropriate for implementation onboard the space telescope and other spacecraft to manage the accumulation of momentum in reaction wheel control systems using magnetic torquing coils are described. Generalized analytical equations are derived for momentum control laws that command the magnetic torquers. These control laws naturally fall into two main categories according to the methods used for updating the magnetic dipole command: closed loop, in which the update is based on current measurements to achieve a desired torque instantaneously, and open-loop, in which the update is based on predicted information to achieve a desired momentum at the end of a period of time. Physical interpretations of control laws in general and of the Space Telescope cross product and minimum energy control laws in particular are presented, and their merits and drawbacks are discussed. A technique for retaining the advantages of both the open-loop and the closed-loop control laws is introduced. Simulation results are presented to compare the performance of these control laws in the Space Telescope environment.

  10. Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope- GLAST Mission Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander A.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), and the instrumentation that will be on the spacecraft: Large Area Telescope (LAT) and GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). The presentation revierws in detail the LAT instrument.

  11. Structural Dynamics and Control of Large Space Structures, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brumfield, M. L. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Basic research in the control of large space structures is discussed. Active damping and control of flexible beams, active stabilization of flexible antenna feed towers, spacecraft docking, and robust pointing control of large space platform payloads are among the topics discussed.

  12. Learning Theory for Collaborative Large Shared Digital Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGivern, Daniela; Morgan, Michael; Butler, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This research applies Socio-Cultural theory and Distributed Cognition/Activity theory to conceptualize the design of collaborative learning activities in large shared digital spaces. The paper begins by providing a summary of previous work in the creation of a technology platform for large shared digital spaces. It then details how Socio-Cultural…

  13. A technology program for large area space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guastaferro, A.

    1979-01-01

    The broad objective of the Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) program is to define and develop the necessary technology for large space systems and associated subsystems required for projected NASA space missions. It is a goal of LSST to make these systems economically and technically feasible by focusing on those technical activities believed to provide the greatest benefit to a variety of future systems. Emphasis is placed on two principal structural configurations: antennas and platforms.

  14. Large Active Retrodirective Arrays for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    An active retrodirective array (ARA) electronically points a microwave beam back at the apparent source of an incident pilot signal. Retrodirectivity is the result of phase conjugation of the pilot signal received by each element of the array. The problem of supplying the correct phase reference to the phase conjugation circuit (PCC) associated with each element of the array is solved by central phasing. By eliminating the need for structural rigidity, central phasing confers a decisive advantage on ARA's as large spaceborne antennas. A new form of central phasing suitable for very large arrays is described. ARA's may easily be modified to serve both as transmitting and receiving arrays simultaneously. Two new kinds of exact, frequency translating PCC's are described. Such PCC's provide the ARA with input-output isolation and freedom from squint. The pointing errors caused by the radial and transverse components of the ARA's velocity, by the propagation medium, and by multipath are discussed. A two element ARA breadboard was built and tested at JPL. Its performance is limited primarily by multipath induced errors.

  15. Astronomers, Congress, and the Large Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanle, P. A.

    1985-04-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) project was initiated near the end of the Apollo program and immediately encountered fiscal contraints. Planned as a long-term facility, the HST had to be continually justified to the public, astronomers and Congress from 1973 onward. Budgetary restraints caused design reductions which for a while threatened the practicality of the HST and changed it from a pressurized, manned unit to an automatic mode, teleoperated, intermittently visited spacecraft. It is noted that numerous exaggerations were made of both the power of the HST for scientific research and the total support of the astronomical community during promotion of the HST program, although the HST is the most powerful visual wavelength telescope ever to be built due to its unique operating environment. NASA's consistent and steadily more detailed definitions of the design features and missions of the HST proved to be a decisive factor in repeated requests for information by funding committees who were deliberating in the presence of severe fiscal difficulties.

  16. The Space Station as a Construction Base for Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of using the Space Station as a construction site for large space structures is examined. An overview is presented of the results of a program entitled Definition of Technology Development Missions (TDM's) for Early Space Stations - Large Space Structures. The definition of LSS technology development missions must be responsive to the needs of future space missions which require large space structures. Long range plans for space were assembled by reviewing Space System Technology Models (SSTM) and other published sources. Those missions which will use large space structures were reviewed to determine the objectives which must be demonstrated by technology development missions. The three TDM's defined during this study are: (1) a construction storage/hangar facility; (2) a passive microwave radiometer; and (3) a precision optical system.

  17. Weight control of a large space booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metheny, Gary R.

    1989-05-01

    The Titan IV vehicle, a stretching of the Titan III to possess longer fuel and oxidizer tanks on both stages while retaining the constant, 10-ft diameter, would have to withstand larger P-equivalent loads due to the increased weight of skin, stringer, and frame structure strengthening. Upon analysis, it was established that increased vehicle and payload fairing lengths imparted a large bending moment to the booster at design Q-alpha total flight conditions, so that stiffness rather than axial load became the design driver. Weight problems thus incurred were addressed by critical structural element analyses using target weight vs stress margin comparisons. Items were thus identified for successful weight reduction treatment.

  18. NASA/Howard University Large Space Structures Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broome, T. H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Basic research on the engineering behavior of large space structures is presented. Methods of structural analysis, control, and optimization of large flexible systems are examined. Topics of investigation include the Load Correction Method (LCM) modeling technique, stabilization of flexible bodies by feedback control, mathematical refinement of analysis equations, optimization of the design of structural components, deployment dynamics, and the use of microprocessors in attitude and shape control of large space structures. Information on key personnel, budgeting, support plans and conferences is included.

  19. Developing closed life support systems for large space habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. M.; Harlan, A. D.; Krumhar, K. C.

    1978-01-01

    In anticipation of possible large-scale, long-duration space missions which may be conducted in the future, NASA has begun to investigate the research and technology development requirements to create life support systems for large space habitats. An analysis suggests the feasibility of a regeneration of food in missions which exceed four years duration. Regeneration of food in space may be justified for missions of shorter duration when large crews must be supported at remote sites such as lunar bases and space manufacturing facilities. It is thought that biological components consisting principally of traditional crop and livestock species will prove to be the most acceptable means of closing the food cycle. A description is presented of the preliminary results of a study of potential biological components for large space habitats. Attention is given to controlled ecosystems, Russian life support system research, controlled-environment agriculture, and the social aspects of the life-support system.

  20. Risk to space sustainability from large constellations of satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastida Virgili, B.; Dolado, J. C.; Lewis, H. G.; Radtke, J.; Krag, H.; Revelin, B.; Cazaux, C.; Colombo, C.; Crowther, R.; Metz, M.

    2016-09-01

    The number of artificial objects in orbit continues to increase and, with it, a key threat to space sustainability. In response, space agencies have identified a set of mitigation guidelines aimed at enabling space users to reduce the generation of space debris by, for example, limiting the orbital lifetime of their spacecraft and launcher stages after the end of their mission. Planned, large constellations of satellites in low Earth orbit (LEO), though addressing the lack of basic internet coverage in some world regions, may disrupt the sustainability of the space environment enabled by these mitigation practices. We analyse the response of the space object population to the introduction of a large constellation conforming to the post-mission disposal guideline with differing levels of success and with different disposal orbit options. The results show that a high success rate of post-mission disposal by constellation satellites is a key driver for space sustainability.

  1. The Deep Space Network Large Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, M. S.

    2004-05-01

    In recent years it has become evident that, if future science needs are to be met, the capacity of the telecommunications link between planetary spacecraft and the Earth must be increased by orders of magnitude. Both the number of spacecraft and higher data rates demand the increased capacity. Technologies to support the increased capacity include even larger antennas, optical receiving systems, or arrays of antennas. This article describes a large array of small antennas that would be implemented for a fraction of the cost of an equivalent 70-m aperture. Adding additional antennas can increase the sensitivity many fold over current capabilities. The array will consist of 400 parabolic reflector antennas, each of which will be 12 m in diameter. Each antenna will operate simultaneously at both X-band (8 to 8.8 GHz) and Ka-band (31 to 38 GHz) and will be configured with radio frequency (RF) electronics, including the feeds, low-noise amplifiers, and frequency converters, as well as the appropriate servo controls and drives. The array also includes the signal transmission and signal processing to enable the system to track from between 1 and 16 different signals. A significant feature of this system is that it will be done for relatively very low cost compared to the current antenna paradigms. This is made possible by the use of low-cost antenna reflector technology, the extensive use of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs), and, finally, by using commercially available equipment to the maximum extent possible. Cost can be further reduced by the acceptance of lower antenna element reliability. High system availability will be maintained by a design paradigm that provides for a marginal set of excess antenna elements for any particular tracking period. Thus, the same total system availability is achieved for lower element availability. The "plug-and-play" aspects of the assemblies will enhance maintainability and operability. The project plans include a

  2. Artwork By: Don Davis Space Colony: Torus Wheel - Large assemblies can be put togetherin space. Here

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Artwork By: Don Davis Space Colony: Torus Wheel - Large assemblies can be put togetherin space. Here panels of a colony are being fitted in place. The small vehicles are called ANTS for Assembly non-thethered ships

  3. A near term space demonstration program for large structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    For applications involving an employment of ultralarge structures in space, it would be necessary to have some form of space fabrication and assembly in connection with launch vehicle payload and volume limitations. The findings of a recently completed NASA sponsored study related to an orbital construction demonstration are reported. It is shown how a relatively small construction facility which is assembled in three shuttle flights can substantially advance space construction know-how and provide the nation with a permanent shuttle tended facility that can further advance large structures technologies and provide a construction capability for deployment of large structural systems envisioned for the late 1980s. The large structures applications identified are related to communications, navigation, earth observation, energy systems, radio astronomy, illumination, space colonization, and space construction.

  4. Large size greenhouse for long-term space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondyurin, Alexey

    Crew space flights require on-going delivery of food, air and water from Earth. A long time missions in far space cannot be realized without self-supported life system, when food, air and water will be reused. For ecological self-regulated life support system a large volume of green house is needed. An inflatable construction of composite materials cured directly in free space environment is a way for development of large greenhouse. The rigidization of the frame by the way of chemical reaction of polymerization is viewed as real way. The large volume greenhouse created on Earth orbit is proposed. The construction and material of space greenhouse are considered based on results of biological investigations in space flights.

  5. Nonterrestrial material processing and manufacturing of large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G. F.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt is made to provide pertinent and readily usable information on the extraterrestrial processing of materials and manufacturing of components and elements of these planned large space systems from preprocessed lunar materials which are made available at a processing and manufacturing site in space. Required facilities, equipment, machinery, energy and manpower are defined.

  6. Distributed active control of large flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, C. C.; Baz, A.

    1986-01-01

    This progress report summarizes the research work performed at the Catholic University of America on the research grant entitled Distributed Active Control of Large Flexible Space Structures, funded by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, under grant number NAG5-749, during the period of March 15, 1986 to September 15, 1986.

  7. An improved output feedback control of flexible large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Y. H.; Lin, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    A special output feedback control design technique for flexible large space structures is proposed. It is shown that the technique will increase both the damping and frequency of selected modes for more effective control. It is also able to effect integrated control of elastic and rigid-body modes and, in particular, closed-loop system stability and robustness to modal truncation and parameter variation. The technique is seen as marking an improvement over previous work concerning large space structures output feedback control.

  8. NASA/MSFC Large Space Structures Ground Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Victoria L.; Bukley, Angelia P.; Patterson, Alan F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the NASA/MSFC Large Space Structures Ground Test Facility (LSS GTF) which has been developed for the purpose of implementing, testing, and evaluating LSS control and system identification techniques on representative large space structures. The facility presently consists of two laboratories: the Single Structure Control (SSC) Laboratory, which has been operational since 1984, and the Controls and Structures Experiment in Space (CASES) GTF which is presently under development. Test results from several experiments in the SSC laboratory are presented. The results of component testing and boom modal tests are presented for the CASES facility.

  9. Benchmarking processes for managing large international space programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, Humboldt C., Jr.; Duke, Michael B.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between management style and program costs is analyzed to determine the feasibility of financing large international space missions. The incorporation of management systems is considered to be essential to realizing low cost spacecraft and planetary surface systems. Several companies ranging from large Lockheed 'Skunk Works' to small companies including Space Industries, Inc., Rocket Research Corp., and Orbital Sciences Corp. were studied. It is concluded that to lower the prices, the ways in which spacecraft and hardware are developed must be changed. Benchmarking of successful low cost space programs has revealed a number of prescriptive rules for low cost managements, including major changes in the relationships between the public and private sectors.

  10. Potential Large Decadal Missions Enabled by Nasas Space Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.; Schnell, Andrew; Smith, David Alan; Jackman, Angela; Warfield, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Large space telescope missions have always been limited by their launch vehicle's mass and volume capacities. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was specifically designed to fit inside the Space Shuttle and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is specifically designed to fit inside an Ariane 5. Astrophysicists desire even larger space telescopes. NASA's "Enduring Quests Daring Visions" report calls for an 8- to 16-m Large UV-Optical-IR (LUVOIR) Surveyor mission to enable ultra-high-contrast spectroscopy and coronagraphy. AURA's "From Cosmic Birth to Living Earth" report calls for a 12-m class High-Definition Space Telescope to pursue transformational scientific discoveries. NASA's "Planning for the 2020 Decadal Survey" calls for a Habitable Exoplanet Imaging (HabEx) and a LUVOIR as well as Far-IR and an X-Ray Surveyor missions. Packaging larger space telescopes into existing launch vehicles is a significant engineering complexity challenge that drives cost and risk. NASA's planned Space Launch System (SLS), with its 8 or 10-m diameter fairings and ability to deliver 35 to 45-mt of payload to Sun-Earth-Lagrange-2, mitigates this challenge by fundamentally changing the design paradigm for large space telescopes. This paper reviews the mass and volume capacities of the planned SLS, discusses potential implications of these capacities for designing large space telescope missions, and gives three specific mission concept implementation examples: a 4-m monolithic off-axis telescope, an 8-m monolithic on-axis telescope and a 12-m segmented on-axis telescope.

  11. Research on numerical algorithms for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, E. D.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical algorithms for large space structures were investigated with particular emphasis on decoupling method for analysis and design. Numerous aspects of the analysis of large systems ranging from the algebraic theory to lambda matrices to identification algorithms were considered. A general treatment of the algebraic theory of lambda matrices is presented and the theory is applied to second order lambda matrices.

  12. Large space systems requirements, deployable concepts, and technology issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, U. M.; Garrett, L. B.

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes some of the future civil missions requiring large space systems technologies. Antenna, collector, and reflector missions are generalized to define a similar set of system requirements and characteristics. Although many concepts exist for both deployable and space assemblable large structures, four technically mature deployable concepts are reviewed. Two of these concepts are probably applicable to only antenna/collector missions, whereas the other two employ continuous trusses which can be configured for a broad range of planar, linear, or curved structures. Finally, technology problems or needs associated with large deployable systems are reviewed to highlight additional research and development, both analytical and experimental, required to reduce mission risk.

  13. Shuttle considerations for the design of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebuck, J. A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Shuttle related considerations (constraints and guidelines) are compiled for use by designers of a potential class of large space structures which are transported to orbit and, deployed, fabricated or assembled in space using the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Considerations of all phases of shuttle operations from launch to ground turnaround operations are presented. Design of large space structures includes design of special construction fixtures and support equipment, special stowage cradles or pallets, special checkout maintenance, and monitoring equipment, and planning for packaging into the orbiter of all additional provisions and supplies chargeable to payload. Checklists of design issues, Shuttle capabilities constraints and guidelines, as well as general explanatory material and references to source documents are included.

  14. Critical requirements for the design of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The requirements for the design of a large space structure which will be deployed, erected, assembled or fabricated in space are delineated in terms of operational loads, stiffness requirements, structure-control interaction, deformations, precision requirements and member slenderness. Design examples for a truss antenna reflector, interorbit propulsion loads and free-flying solar reflectors are given. It is concluded that the demand for dimensional accuracy and stability form the primary requirements.

  15. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Accomplishments include: Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry and government with expertise in science and space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications for monolithic primary mirror from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Pursuing long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Successfully demonstrated capability to make 0.5 m deep mirror substrate and polish it to UVOIR traceable figure specification.

  16. Large space systems technology electronics: Data and power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, W. G.

    1980-01-01

    The development of hardware technology and manufacturing techniques required to meet space platform and antenna system needs in the 1980s is discussed. Preliminary designs for manned and automatically assembled space power system cables, connectors, and grounding and bonding materials and techniques are reviewed. Connector concepts, grounding design requirements, and bonding requirements are discussed. The problem of particulate debris contamination for large structure spacecraft is addressed.

  17. Large space observatories of the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nein, M.; Howell, J.; Morgan, S.; de Sanctis, C.; Koch, D.

    1987-01-01

    Early in the 21st century, advanced space telescopes will be readied to continue the astronomical observations of the Great Observatories currently under development. This paper describes representative concepts from the very large UV/optical and gamma-ray telescopes under study by NASA, the scientific community, and industry. These studies demonstrate that historical approaches to improving the resolution and sensitivity of space telescopes have reached technology barriers which can only be overcome by innovative solutions to the telescope design. Some of the key technology issues which are guiding the approaches for advanced space telescopes are discussed, and arguments are presented that enabling technology development for these future systems must commence now.

  18. Note on dynamic response of large space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elishakoff, I.; Abramovich, H.

    1992-07-01

    The dynamic behavior of large space structures, modeled as a Bresse-Timoshenko beam, was analyzed using the Bresse-Timoshenko beam model, but with the 4th-order derivative of the beam deflection with respect to time not included in the dynamical equations. In particular, the forced vibration response of symmetric large space structures was calculated for various parameters of the system. It is shown that a direct modal analysis yielding an exact solution is applicable due to the absence of the 4th-order time derivative in the Bresse-Timoshenko beam equations.

  19. Structural dynamics and control of large space structures. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightner, E. B. (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was the basic research program assembled by LaRC to address the fundamental technology deficiencies that were identified in several studies on large space systems (LSS) conducted by NASA in the last several years. The staffs of the respective participants were assembled at the workshop to review the current state of research in the control technology for large structural systems and to plan the efforts that would be pursued by their respective organizations.

  20. A technology development program for large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.; Campbell, T. G.; Freeland, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Recent studies sponsored by NASA and United States industry indicate a need for technology to handle large space-based antenna systems. These systems will require apertures of up to 100 m and more in order to be capable of radio frequency operation up to Ku-band for communications, earth observations, and radio astronomy applications. They must also be cost-effective and compatible with the Space Transportation System. Selection criteria for the antennas which include such considerations as surface precision in the intended service environment and mechanical packaging efficiency, are enumerated. Space testing of the antennas will be carried out as part of NASA's Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) Program, which will be continued through fiscal year 1984. Deployable antennas have been selected for development by the LSST Program. The maturity of this class of antennas is such that a significant number of near-term space based applications will be satisfied (mobile communications, submillimeter radio astronomy, orbiting deep space relay station ODSRS, orbiting VLBI, earth-looking radiometry). Two antenna concepts selected for development are the offset wrap-rib configuration and the maypole (hoop/column) configuration with details for these concepts presented.

  1. Development of space stable thermal control coatings for use on large space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A reserach project to develop space stable thermal control coatings for large surfaces is discussed. Four major tasks are considered: (1) pigment development, (2) binder development, (3) environmental effects evaluations, and (4) general coatings investigations.

  2. NASA/MSFC Large Space Structures Ground Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Victoria L.; Waites, Henry B.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA/MFSC Large Space Structures Ground Test Facility (LSS GTF) is described in terms of the testing, evaluation, and implementation of control and system identification techniques for typical large space structures. The GTF comprises Control, Astrophysics, and Structures Experiment in Space (CASES) GTF which is being developed and the operational Single Structure Control (SSC) laboratory (an LSS flexible beam suspended vertically with sensor and actuator systems, a real-time computer system, a disturbance system, and an optical pointing system). The configuration of the laboratory and the systems used are set forth in terms of monitoring simulated disturbances. The Shuttle-based CASES experiment involves a 105-foot boom as part of an X-ray experiment, and the control of this structure will be tested at the CASES GTF. The actuation, measurement, sensor, and computer systems are described, and the configuration of the GTF is given.

  3. Scientific Instrument Package for the large space telescope (SIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of a scientific instrument package (SIP) that will satisfy the requirements of the large space telescope was established. A reference configuration serving as a study model and data which will aid in the trade-off studies leading to the final design configuration are reported.

  4. Eyeglass: A Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R; Dixit, S; Weisberg, A; Rushford, M

    2002-07-29

    Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100 meter) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope's large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently fieldable (lightweight and flat, hence packagable and deployable) and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight, surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope's eyepiece. The Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band, multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. Broadband diffractive telescopes have been built at LLNL and have demonstrated diffraction-limited performance over a 40% spectral bandwidth (0.48-0.72 {micro}m). As one approach to package a large aperture for launch, a foldable lens has been built and demonstrated. A 75 cm aperture diffractive lens was constructed from 6 panels of 1 m thick silica; it achieved diffraction-limited performance both before and after folding. This multiple panel, folding lens, approach is currently being scaled-up at LLNL. We are building a 5 meter aperture foldable lens, involving 72 panels of 700 {micro}m thick glass sheets, diffractively patterned to operate as coherent f/50 lens.

  5. Active control of large space structures: An introduction and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, G. B., III; Tollison, D. K.; Waites, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the large space structure (LSS) control system design problem is presented. The LSS is defined as a class of system, and LSS modeling techniques are discussed. Model truncation, control system objectives, current control law design techniques, and particular problem areas are discussed.

  6. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 3: Optical telescope assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the optical telescope assembly for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The systems considerations are based on mission-related parameters and optical equipment requirements. Information is included on: (1) structural design and analysis, (2) thermal design, (3) stabilization and control, (4) alignment, focus, and figure control, (5) electronic subsystem, and (6) scientific instrument design.

  7. Methodology for evaluating modular assembly of large space platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey H.; Wertz, Julie; Caroff, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for analytically comparing approaches to modular assembly of large space platforms. the methodology combines a physical model of the modules, a life-cycle cost model, and a risk model to capture influential trade-offs.

  8. Residual mode filters and adaptive control in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Roger A.; Balas, Mark J.

    1989-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems in controlling large systems and structures is compensating for the destructive interaction which can occur between the reduced-order model (ROM) of the plant, which is used by the controller, and the unmodeled dynamics of the plant, often called the residual modes. The problem is more significant in the case of large space structures because their naturally light damping and high performance requirements lead to more frequent, destructive residual mode interaction (RMI). Using the design/compensation technique of residual mode filters (RMF's), effective compensation of RMI can be accomplished in a straightforward manner when using linear controllers. The use of RMF's has been shown to be effective for a variety of large structures, including a space-based laser and infinite dimensional systems. However, the dynamics of space structures is often uncertain and may even change over time due to on-orbit erosion from space debris and corrosive chemicals in the upper atmosphere. In this case, adaptive control can be extremely beneficial in meeting the performance requirements of the structure. Adaptive control for large structures is also based on ROM's and so destructive RMI may occur. Unfortunately, adaptive control is inherently nonlinear, and therefore the known results of RMF's cannot be applied. The purpose is to present the results of new research showing the effects of RMI when using adaptive control and the work which will hopefully lead to RMF compensation of this problem.

  9. Low-authority control synthesis for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubrun, J. N.; Margulies, G.

    1982-01-01

    The control of vibrations of large space structures by distributed sensors and actuators is studied. A procedure is developed for calculating the feedback loop gains required to achieve specified amounts of damping. For moderate damping (Low Authority Control) the procedure is purely algebraic, but it can be applied iteratively when larger amounts of damping are required and is generalized for arbitrary time invariant systems.

  10. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 5: Support systems module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the support systems module for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The following systems and described: (1) thermal control, (2) electrical, (3) communication and data landing, (4) attitude control system, and (5) structural features. Analyses of maintainability and reliability considerations are included.

  11. A Warm Magnetoactive Plasma in a Large Volume of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiles, C.

    1984-01-01

    A diffuse ionized warm gas fills a large volume of space in the general direction of Radio Loop II. There are three types of observational evidence: Faraday rotation measures (RM's) of extragalactic sources; emission measures (EM's) derived from the H alpha emission line in the diffuse interstellar medium; and magnetic field strengths in HI clouds derived from Zeeman splitting observations.

  12. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 4: Scientific instrument package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design and characteristics of the scientific instrument package for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The subjects include: (1) general scientific objectives, (2) package system analysis, (3) scientific instrumentation, (4) imaging photoelectric sensors, (5) environmental considerations, and (6) reliability and maintainability.

  13. In-space production of large space systems from extraterrestrial materials: A program implementation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G. F.

    1977-01-01

    A program implementation model is presented which covers the in-space construction of certain large space systems from extraterrestrial materials. The model includes descriptions of major program elements and subelements and their operational requirements and technology readiness requirements. It provides a structure for future analysis and development.

  14. Solar furnace satellite for large diameter crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overfelt, Tony; Wells, Mark; Blake, John

    1993-01-01

    Investigators worldwide are preparing experiments to test the influence of low gravity found in space on the growth of many crystalline materials. However, power limitations prevent existing space crystal growth furnaces from being able to process samples any larger than about 2 cm, and in addition, the background microgravity levels found on the Space Shuttle are not low enough to significantly benefit samples much larger than 2 cm. This paper describes a novel concept of a free-flying platform utilizing well-established solar furnace technology to enable materials processing in space experiments on large-diameter crystals. The conceptual design of this Solar Furnace Satellite is described along with its operational scenario and the anticipated g levels.

  15. Discharge transient coupling in large space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. John; Stillwell, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments have shown that plasma environments can induce discharges in solar arrays. These plasmas simulate the environments found in low earth orbits where current plans call for operation of very large power systems. The discharges could be large enough to couple into the power system and possibly disrupt operations. Here, the general concepts of the discharge mechanism and the techniques of coupling are discussed. Data from both ground and flight experiments are reviewed to obtain an expected basis for the interactions. These concepts were applied to the Space Station solar array and distribution system as an example of the large space power system. The effect of discharges was found to be a function of the discharge site. For most sites in the array discharges would not seriously impact performance. One location at the negative end of the array was identified as a position where discharges could couple to charge stored in system capacitors. This latter case could impact performance.

  16. Formation metrology and control for large separated optics space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, E.; Quadrelli, M.; Breckenridge, W.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present formation flying performance analysis initial results for a representative large space telescope composed of separated optical elements [Mett 02]. A virtual-structure construct (an equivalent rigid body) is created by unique metrology and control that combines both centralized and decentralized methods. The formation may be in orbit at GEO for super-resolution Earth observation, as in the case of Figure 1, or it may be in an Earth-trailing orbit for astrophysics, Figure 2. Extended applications are envisioned for exo-solar planet interferometric imaging by a formation of very large separated optics telescopes, Figure 3. Space telescopes, with such large apertures and f/10 to f/100 optics, are not feasible if connected by massive metering structures. Instead, the new virtual-structure paradigm of information and control connectivity between the formation elements provides the necessary spatial rigidity and alignment precision for the telescope.

  17. Enabling the 2nd Generation in Space: Building Blocks for Large Scale Space Endeavours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhardt, D.; Garretson, P.; Will, P.

    Today the world operates within a "first generation" space industrial enterprise, i.e. all industry is on Earth, all value from space is from bits (data essentially), and the focus is Earth-centric, with very limited parts of our population and industry participating in space. We are limited in access, manoeuvring, on-orbit servicing, in-space power, in-space manufacturing and assembly. The transition to a "Starship culture" requires the Earth to progress to a "second generation" space industrial base, which implies the need to expand the economic sphere of activity of mankind outside of an Earth-centric zone and into CIS-lunar space and beyond, with an equal ability to tap the indigenous resources in space (energy, location, materials) that will contribute to an expanding space economy. Right now, there is no comfortable place for space applications that are not discovery science, exploration, military, or established earth bound services. For the most part, space applications leave out -- or at least leave nebulous, unconsolidated, and without a critical mass -- programs and development efforts for infrastructure, industrialization, space resources (survey and process maturation), non-traditional and persistent security situational awareness, and global utilities -- all of which, to a far greater extent than a discovery and exploration program, may help determine the elements of a 2nd generation space capability. We propose a focus to seed the pre-competitive research that will enable global industry to develop the necessary competencies that we currently lack to build large scale space structures on-orbit, that in turn would lay the foundation for long duration spacecraft travel (i.e. key technologies in access, manoeuvrability, etc.). This paper will posit a vision-to-reality for a step wise approach to the types of activities the US and global space providers could embark upon to lay the foundation for the 2nd generation of Earth in space.

  18. Suspension systems for ground testing large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, Ronald R.; Friedman, Inger P.; Reed, Wilmer H., III; Hallauer, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    A research program is documented for the development of improved suspension techniques for ground vibration testing of large, flexible space structures. The suspension system must support the weight of the structure and simultaneously allow simulation of the unconstrained rigid-body movement as in the space environment. Exploratory analytical and experimental studies were conducted for suspension systems designed to provide minimum vertical, horizontal, and rotational degrees of freedom. The effects of active feedback control added to the passive system were also investigated. An experimental suspension apparatus was designed, fabricated, and tested. This test apparatus included a zero spring rate mechanism (ZSRM) designed to support a range of weights from 50 to 300 lbs and provide vertical suspension mode frequencies less than 0.1 Hz. The lateral suspension consisted of a pendulum suspended from a moving cart (linear bearing) which served to increase the effective length of the pendulum. The torsion suspension concept involved dual pendulum cables attached from above to a pivoting support (bicycle wheel). A simple test structure having variable weight and stiffness characteristics was used to simulate the vibration characteristics of a large space structure. The suspension hardware for the individual degrees of freedom was analyzed and tested separately and then combined to achieve a 3 degree of freedom suspension system. Results from the exploratory studies should provide useful guidelines for the development of future suspension systems for ground vibration testing of large space structures.

  19. Refurbishment of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Large Space Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrell, J.; Johnson, K.

    1993-01-01

    The JPL large space simulator has recently undergone a major refurbishment to restore and enhance its capabilities to provide high fidelity space simulation. The nearly completed refurbishment has included upgrading the vacuum pumping system by replacing old oil diffusion pumps with new cryogenic and turbomolecular pumps; modernizing the entire control system to utilize computerized, distributed control technology; replacing the Xenon arc lamp power supplies with new upgraded units; refinishing the primary collimating mirror; and replacing the existing integrating lens unit and the fused quartz penetration window.

  20. Verification of large beam-type space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-F.; Chen, J. C.; Garba, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The verification approach here proposed for large, beam-type space structures consists of a first part, which removes the gravity effect on the substructure tested and identifies its on-orbit dynamic characteristics, on the basis of ground test measurements, and a second part which develops an adequate scaling law that extrapolates the dynamic characteristics of the prototype structure by using results from the substructure. These approaches are presently demonstrated for the cases of a wrap-rib antenna's feed support structure and a candidate Space Shuttle flight experiment.

  1. Power conditioning for large dc motors for space flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veatch, Martin S.; Anderson, Paul M.; Eason, Douglas J.; Landis, David M.

    1988-01-01

    The design and performance of a prototype power-conditioning system for use with large brushless dc motors on NASA space missions are discussed in detail and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, and graphs. The 5-kW 8-phase parallel module evaluated here would be suitable for use in the Space Shuttle Orbiter cargo bay. A current-balancing magnetic assembly with low distributed inductance permits high-speed current switching from a low-voltage bus as well as current balancing between parallel MOSFETs.

  2. Thermal expansion of composites: Methods and results. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, D. E.; Tenney, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    The factors controlling the dimensional stability of various components of large space structures were investigated. Cyclic, thermal and mechanical loading were identified as the primary controlling factors of the dimensional stability of cables. For organic matrix composites, such as graphite-epoxy, it was found that these factors include moisture desorption in the space environment, thermal expansion as the structure moves from the sunlight to shadow in its orbit, mechanical loading, and microyielding of the material caused by microcracking of the matrix material. The major focus was placed on the thermal expansion of composites and in particular the development and testing of a method for its measurement.

  3. Orbital transfer of large space structures with nuclear electric rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, T. H.; Byers, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential application of electric propulsion for orbit transfer of a large spacecraft structure from low earth orbit to geosynchronous altitude in a deployed configuration. The electric power was provided by the spacecraft nuclear reactor space power system on a shared basis during transfer operations. Factors considered with respect to system effectiveness included nuclear power source sizing, electric propulsion thruster concept, spacecraft deployment constraints, and orbital operations and safety. It is shown that the favorable total impulse capability inherent in electric propulsion provides a potential economic advantage over chemical propulsion orbit transfer vehicles by reducing the number of Space Shuttle flights in ground-to-orbit transportation requirements.

  4. Overview of the large space systems technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guastaferro, A.

    1978-01-01

    A multicenter management approach which provides the opportunity to work across many disciplines and match the roles and expertise of various NASA facilities is described for the large space system technology (LSST) program which was established to define, develop, and verify structural concepts, analyses, and design procedures for a range of sizes and configurations to be deployed, erected, or fabricated in orbit during projected space missions utilizing shuttle in the 1985 to 2000 time period. Benefits from the program include reduced costs for transporting structures having low mass, high packageability, and multimission capabilities. Technologies identified by the LSST program will contribute to the solutions of problems in other sectors of the economy.

  5. Space Spider - A concept for fabrication of large structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, W. R.; Johnston, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The Space Spider concept for the automated fabrication of large space structures involves a specialized machine which roll-forms thin gauge material such as aluminum and develops continuous spiral structures with radial struts to sizes of 600-1,000 feet in diameter by 15 feet deep. This concept allows the machine and raw material to be integrated using the Orbiter capabilities, then boosting the rigid system to geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO) without high sensitivity to acceleration forces. As a teleoperator controlled device having repetitive operations, the fabrication process can be monitored and verified from a ground-based station without astronaut involvement in GEO. The resultant structure will be useful as an intermediate size platform or as a structural element to be used with other elements such as the space-fabricated beams or composite nested tubes.

  6. Optimal control of large space structures via generalized inverse matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Fang, Xiaowen

    1987-01-01

    Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) is a control scheme that decouples the space structure into n independent second-order subsystems according to n controlled modes and controls each mode independently. It is well-known that the IMSC eliminates control and observation spillover caused when the conventional coupled modal control scheme is employed. The independent control of each mode requires that the number of actuators be equal to the number of modelled modes, which is very high for a faithful modeling of large space structures. A control scheme is proposed that allows one to use a reduced number of actuators to control all modeled modes suboptimally. In particular, the method of generalized inverse matrices is employed to implement the actuators such that the eigenvalues of the closed-loop system are as closed as possible to those specified by the optimal IMSC. Computer simulation of the proposed control scheme on a simply supported beam is given.

  7. Large space antennas: A systems analysis case history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, Lloyd S. (Compiler); Lovelace, U. M. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    The value of systems analysis and engineering is aptly demonstrated by the work on Large Space Antennas (LSA) by the NASA Langley Spacecraft Analysis Branch. This work was accomplished over the last half-decade by augmenting traditional system engineering, analysis, and design techniques with computer-aided engineering (CAE) techniques using the Langley-developed Interactive Design and Evaluation of Advanced Spacecraft (IDEAS) system. This report chronicles the research highlights and special systems analyses that focused the LSA work on deployable truss antennas. It notes developmental trends toward greater use of CAE techniques in their design and analysis. A look to the future envisions the application of improved systems analysis capabilities to advanced space systems such as an advanced space station or to lunar and Martian missions and human habitats.

  8. Visualising very large phylogenetic trees in three dimensional hyperbolic space

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Timothy; Hyun, Young; Liberles, David A

    2004-01-01

    Background Common existing phylogenetic tree visualisation tools are not able to display readable trees with more than a few thousand nodes. These existing methodologies are based in two dimensional space. Results We introduce the idea of visualising phylogenetic trees in three dimensional hyperbolic space with the Walrus graph visualisation tool and have developed a conversion tool that enables the conversion of standard phylogenetic tree formats to Walrus' format. With Walrus, it becomes possible to visualise and navigate phylogenetic trees with more than 100,000 nodes. Conclusion Walrus enables desktop visualisation of very large phylogenetic trees in 3 dimensional hyperbolic space. This application is potentially useful for visualisation of the tree of life and for functional genomics derivatives, like The Adaptive Evolution Database (TAED). PMID:15117420

  9. Recent advances in structural dynamics of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Larry D.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the area of structural dynamics of large space structures is reviewed. Topics include system identification, large angle slewing of flexible structures, definition of scaling limitations in structural models, and recent results on a tension-stabilized antenna concept known as the hoop-column. Increasingly complex laboratory experiments guide most of the activities leading to realistic technological developments. Theoretical progress in system identification based on system realization theory resulting in unification of several methods is reviewed. Experimental results from implementation of a theoretical large-angle slewing control approach are shown. Status and results of the development of a research computer program for analysis of the transient dynamics of large angle motion of flexible structures are presented. Correlation of results from analysis and vibration tests of the hoop-column antenna concepts are summarized.

  10. Recent advances in structural dynamics of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Larry D.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the area of structural dynamics of large space structures is reviewed. Topics include system identification, large angle slewing of flexible structures, definition of scaling limitations in structural models, and recent results on a tension-stabilized antenna concept known as the hoop-column. Increasingly complex laboratory experiments guide most of the activities leading to realistic technological developments. Theoretical progress in system identification based on system realization theory resulting in unification of several methods is reviewed. Experimental results from implementation of a theoretical large-angle slewing control approach are shown. Status and results of the development of a research computer program for analysis of the transient dynamics of large angle motion of flexible structures are presented. Correlation of results from analysis and vibration tests of the hoop-column antenna concept are summarized.

  11. Visual Data Mining of Large, Multivariate Space-Time Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, D.

    2001-12-01

    Interest in understanding global climate change is generating monitoring efforts that yield a huge amount of multivariate space-time data. While analytical methods for univariate space-time data may be mature and substantial, methods for multivariate space-time data analysis are still in their infancy. The urgency of understanding climate change on a global scale begs for input from data analysts, and to work effectively they need new tools to explore multivariate aspects of climate. This talk describes interactive and dynamic visual tools for mining information from multivariate space-time data. Methods for small amounts of data will be discussed, followed by approaches to scaling up methods for large quantities of data. We focus on the ``multiple views'' approach for viewing multivariate data, and how these extend to include space-time contextual information. We also will describe dynamic graphics methods such as tours in the space-time context. Data mining is the current terminology for exploratory analyses of data, typically associated with large databases. Exploratory analysis has a goal of finding anomalies, quirks and deviations from a trend, and basically extracting unexpected information from data. It oft-times emphasizes model-free methods, although model-based approaches are also integral components to the analysis process. Visual data mining concentrates on the use of visual tools in the exploratory process. As such it often involves highly interactive and dynamic graphics environments which facilitate quick queries and visual responses. Visual methods are especially important in exploratory analysis because they provide an interface for using the human eye to digest complex information. A good plot can convey far more information than a numerical summary. Visual tools enhance the chances of discovering the unexpected, and detecting the anomalous events.

  12. Integrated structure electromagnetic optimization of large space antenna reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Adelman, Howard M.; Bailey, M. C.

    1987-01-01

    The requirements for extremely precise and powerful large space antenna reflectors have motivated the development of a procedure for shape control of the reflector surface. A mathematical optimization procedure has been developed which improves antenna performance while minimizing necessary shape correction effort. In contrast to previous work which proposed controlling the rms distortion error of the surface thereby indirectly improving antenna performance, the current work includes electromagnetic (EM) performance calculations as an integral of the control procedure. The application of the procedure to a radiometer design with a tetrahedral truss backup structure demonstrates the potential for significant improvement. The results indicate the benefit of including EM performance calculations in procedures for shape control of large space antenna reflectors.

  13. Advanced actuators for the control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James; Hockney, Richard; Johnson, Bruce; Misovec, Kathleen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop advanced six-degree-of-freedom actuators employing magnetic suspensions suitable for the control of structural vibrations in large space structures. The advanced actuators consist of a magnetically suspended mass that has three-degrees-of-freedom in both translation and rotation. The most promising of these actuators featured a rotating suspended mass providing structural control torques in a manner similar to a control moment gyro (CMG). These actuators employ large-angle-magnetic suspensions that allow gimballing of the suspended mass without mechanical gimbals. Design definitions and sizing algorithms for these CMG type as well as angular reaction mass actuators based on multi-degree-of-freedom magnetic suspensions were developed. The performance of these actuators was analytically compared with conventional reaction mass actuators for a simple space structure model.

  14. Lagrangian space consistency relation for large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Bart; Hui, Lam; Xiao, Xiao

    2015-09-01

    Consistency relations, which relate the squeezed limit of an (N+1)-point correlation function to an N-point function, are non-perturbative symmetry statements that hold even if the associated high momentum modes are deep in the nonlinear regime and astrophysically complex. Recently, Kehagias & Riotto and Peloso & Pietroni discovered a consistency relation applicable to large scale structure. We show that this can be recast into a simple physical statement in Lagrangian space: that the squeezed correlation function (suitably normalized) vanishes. This holds regardless of whether the correlation observables are at the same time or not, and regardless of whether multiple-streaming is present. The simplicity of this statement suggests that an analytic understanding of large scale structure in the nonlinear regime may be particularly promising in Lagrangian space.

  15. Large-viewing-angle electroholography by space projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Koki; Obana, Kazuki; Okumura, Toshimichi; Kanaoka, Takumi; Nishikawa, Satoko; Takano, Kunihiko

    2004-06-01

    The specification of hologram image is the full parallax 3D image. In this case we can get more natural 3D image because focusing and convergence are coincident each other. We try to get practical electro-holography system because for conventional electro-holography the image viewing angle is very small. This is due to the limited display pixel size. Now we are developing new method for large viewing angle by space projection method. White color laser is irradiated to single DMD panel ( time shared CGH of RGB three colors ). 3D space screen constructed by very small water particle is used to reconstruct the 3D image with large viewing angle by scattering of water particle.

  16. Shape determination and control for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    An integral operator approach is used to derive solutions to static shape determination and control problems associated with large space structures. Problem assumptions include a linear self-adjoint system model, observations and control forces at discrete points, and performance criteria for the comparison of estimates or control forms. Results are illustrated by simulations in the one dimensional case with a flexible beam model, and in the multidimensional case with a finite model of a large space antenna. Modal expansions for terms in the solution algorithms are presented, using modes from the static or associated dynamic mode. These expansions provide approximated solutions in the event that a used form analytical solution to the system boundary value problem is not available.

  17. A perspective of power management for large space platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Graves, J.

    1982-01-01

    NASA and military applications for high power spacecraft are presently being planned. A perspective of autonomous power management for low earth orbit large space platforms is presented. A multichannel 250 kWe utility-type power subsystem is used as a baseline system. The need for automation is reviewed, based on power subsystem complexity, survivability requirements, and cost benefits. On-board versus ground management is discussed with respect to these needs. In addition, the utilization of autonomous power management to enable technology readiness of large complex power subsystems is described. Recommendations are made for further technology thrusts.

  18. Considerations in the design of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Macneal, R. H.; Knapp, K.; Macgillivray, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    Several analytical studies of topics relevant to the design of large space structures are presented. Topics covered are: the types and quantitative evaluation of the disturbances to which large Earth-oriented microwave reflectors would be subjected and the resulting attitude errors of such spacecraft; the influence of errors in the structural geometry of the performance of radiofrequency antennas; the effect of creasing on the flatness of tensioned reflector membrane surface; and an analysis of the statistics of damage to truss-type structures due to meteoroids.

  19. A new approach for vibration control in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K.; Cochran, J. E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An approach for augmenting vibration damping characteristics in space structures with large panels is presented. It is based on generation of bending moments rather than forces. The moments are generated using bimetallic strips, suitably mounted at selected stations on both sides of the large panels, under the influence of differential solar heating, giving rise to thermal gradients and stresses. The collocated angular velocity sensors are utilized in conjunction with mini-servos to regulate the control moments by flipping the bimetallic strips. A simple computation of the rate of dissipation of vibrational energy is undertaken to assess the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  20. A telerobotic system for automated assembly of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Marvin D.; Will, Ralph W.; Wise, Marion A.

    1989-01-01

    Future space missions such as polar platforms and antennas are anticipated to require large truss structures as their primary support system. During the past several years considerable research has been conducted to develop hardware and construction techniques suitable for astronaut assembly of truss structures in space. A research program has recently been initiated to develop the technology and to demonstrate the potential for automated in-space assembly of large erectable structures. The initial effort will be focussed on automated assembly of a tetrahedral truss composed of 2-meter members. The facility is designed as a ground based system to permit evaluation of assembly concepts and was not designed for space qualification. The system is intended to be used as a tool from which more sophisticated procedures and operations can be developed. The facility description includes a truss structure, motionbases and a robot arm equipped with an end effector. Other considerations and requirements of the structural assembly describe computer control systems to monitor and control the operations of the assembly facility.

  1. Technology for large space systems: A special bibliography with indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This bibliography lists 460 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system between January 1, 1968 and December 31, 1978. Its purpose is to provide helpful information to the researcher, manager, and designer in technology development and mission design in the area of the Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) Program. Subject matter is grouped according to systems, interactive analysis and design, structural concepts, control systems, electronics, advanced materials, assembly concepts, propulsion, and flight experiments.

  2. Controlled multibody dynamics simulation for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Wu, S. C.; Chang, C. W.

    1989-01-01

    Multibody dynamics discipline, and dynamic simulation in control structure interaction (CSI) design are discussed. The use, capabilities, and architecture of the Large Angle Transient Dynamics (LATDYN) code as a simulation tool are explained. A generic joint body with various types of hinge connections; finite element and element coordinate systems; results of a flexible beam spin-up on a plane; mini-mast deployment; space crane and robotic slewing manipulations; a potential CSI test article; and multibody benchmark experiments are also described.

  3. Planning Assembly Of Large Truss Structures In Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Mello, Luiz S. Homem; Desai, Rajiv S.

    1992-01-01

    Report dicusses developmental algorithm used in systematic planning of sequences of operations in which large truss structures assembled in outer space. Assembly sequence represented by directed graph called "assembly graph", in which each arc represents joining of two parts or subassemblies. Algorithm generates assembly graph, working backward from state of complete assembly to initial state, in which all parts disassembled. Working backward more efficient than working forward because it avoids intermediate dead ends.

  4. Research on numerical algorithms for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, E. D.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical algorithms for analysis and design of large space structures are investigated. The sign algorithm and its application to decoupling of differential equations are presented. The generalized sign algorithm is given and its application to several problems discussed. The Laplace transforms of matrix functions and the diagonalization procedure for a finite element equation are discussed. The diagonalization of matrix polynomials is considered. The quadrature method and Laplace transforms is discussed and the identification of linear systems by the quadrature method investigated.

  5. Composite material technology requirements for large precision space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, P. M.; Helms, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The development of dimensionally stable, precision composite structures has been recognized as a high risk technology driver in NASA's continuing large space structures research. Attempts are being made to understand the influences controlling thermal performance in such composites, and specifically in composite sandwich panels. The necessary tools for such composite panels' deployment, the experimental verification of analytical predictions, and the demonstration of technology in small scale hardware, are presently addressed.

  6. Study of composites as substrate materials in large space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, A. V.

    1979-01-01

    Nonmetallic composites such as the graphite/epoxy system were investigated as possible substrates for the primary mirror of the large space telescope. The possible use of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites was reviewed in the literature. Problems arising out of the use of composites as substrate materials such as grinding, polishing, adherence of reflective coatings, rigidity of substrate, hygrospcopici tendency of the composites, thermal and temporal stability and other related problems were examined.

  7. On the possibility of large axion moduli spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rudelius, Tom

    2015-04-28

    We study the diameters of axion moduli spaces, focusing primarily on type IIB compactifications on Calabi-Yau three-folds. In this case, we derive a stringent bound on the diameter in the large volume region of parameter space for Calabi-Yaus with simplicial Kähler cone. This bound can be violated by Calabi-Yaus with non-simplicial Kähler cones, but additional contributions are introduced to the effective action which can restrict the field range accessible to the axions. We perform a statistical analysis of simulated moduli spaces, finding in all cases that these additional contributions restrict the diameter so that these moduli spaces are no more likely to yield successful inflation than those with simplicial Kähler cone or with far fewer axions. Further heuristic arguments for axions in other corners of the duality web suggest that the difficulty observed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1475-7516/2003/06/001 of finding an axion decay constant parametrically larger than M{sub p} applies not only to individual axions, but to the diagonals of axion moduli space as well. This observation is shown to follow from the weak gravity conjecture of http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1126-6708/2007/06/060, so it likely applies not only to axions in string theory, but also to axions in any consistent theory of quantum gravity.

  8. Conceptual study of the damping of large space structures using large-stroke adaptive stiffness cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorwald, Gregory; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of a large-stroke adaptive stiffness cable-device for damping control of space structures with large mass is introduced. The cable is used to provide damping in several examples, and its performance is shown through numerical simulation results. Displacement and velocity information of how the structure moves is used to determine when to modify the cable's stiffness in order to provide a damping force.

  9. Large space structures and systems in the space station era: A bibliography with indexes (supplement 03)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Bibliographies and abstracts are listed for 1221 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system between January 1, 1991 and June 30, 1991. Topics covered include large space structures and systems, space stations, extravehicular activity, thermal environments and control, tethering, spacecraft power supplies, structural concepts and control systems, electronics, advanced materials, propulsion, policies and international cooperation, vibration and dynamic controls, robotics and remote operations, data and communication systems, electric power generation, space commercialization, orbital transfer, and human factors engineering.

  10. Definition of technology development missions for early space stations: Large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.; Reid, G.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives studied are the definition of the tested role of an early Space Station for the construction of large space structures. This is accomplished by defining the LSS technology development missions (TDMs) identified in phase 1. Design and operations trade studies are used to identify the best structural concepts and procedures for each TDMs. Details of the TDM designs are then developed along with their operational requirements. Space Station resources required for each mission, both human and physical, are identified. The costs and development schedules for the TDMs provide an indication of the programs needed to develop these missions.

  11. Novel In-Space Manufacturing Concepts for the Development of Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, James T.; Reardon, Patrick; Gregory Don; Manning, Andrew; Blackmon, Jim; Howsman, Tom; Williams, Philip; Brantley, Whitt; Rakoczy, John; Herren, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    There is a continuous demand for larger, lighter, and higher quality telescopes. Over the past several decades, we have seen the evolution from launchable 2 meter-class telescopes (such as Hubble), to today s demand for deployable 6 meter-class telescopes (such as JWST), to tomorrow s need for up to 150 meter-class telescopes. As the apertures continue to grow, it will become much more difficult and expensive to launch assembled telescope structures. To address this issue, we are seeing the emergence of new novel structural concepts, such as inflatable structures and membrane optics. While these structural concepts do show promise, it is very difficult to achieve and maintain high surface figure quality. Another potential solution to develop large space telescopes is to move the fabrication facility into space and launch the raw materials. In this paper we present initial in-space manufacturing concepts to enable the development of large telescopes. This includes novel approaches for the fabrication of both the optical elements and the telescope support structure. We will also discuss potential optical designs for large space telescopes and describe their relation to the fabrication methods. These concepts are being developed to meet the demanding requirements of DARPA s LASSO (Large Aperture Space Surveillance Optic) program which currently requires a 150 meter optical aperture with a 17 degree field of view.

  12. Static shape determination and control for large space structures. I - The flexible beam. II - A large space antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A method for determining and controlling the shape of large, continuous space structures by means of discrete or pointwise observations and control devices is presented. The general linear boundary value problem satisfied by a one-dimensional shape function is defined, and the existence of solutions is studied. The static shape control problems for one-dimensional systems with and without rigid body modes and the static shape estimation problem are presented and solved. Eigenfunction expansions are presented which provide approximations to the algorithm terms when the associated Green's function is not known. An integral operator approach is applied to the multidimensional static problem, and the results are illustrated with a finite element model of the disk of a large space antenna which assumes no rigid body modes. It is shown that the shape control algorithm must be modified for systems with rigid body modes.

  13. Inflatable Hangar for Assembly of Large Structures in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Human Space Flight program is interested in projects where humans, beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO), can make an important and unique contribution that cannot be reasonably accomplished purely by robotic means, and is commensurate with the effort and cost associated with human spaceflight. Robotic space telescope missions have been conceived and launched as completed assemblies (e.g., Hubble) or as jack-in-the-box one-time deployments (e.g., James Webb). If it were possible to assemble components of a very large telescope from one or two launches into a telescope that was vastly greater in light-gathering power and resolution, that would constitute a breakthrough. Large telescopes on Earth, like all one-off precision assembly tasks, are done by humans. Humans in shirtsleeves (or cleanroom bunny suits) can perform tasks of remarkable dexterity and precision. Unfortunately, astronauts in pressure suits cannot perform such dexterous and precise tasks because of the limitations of the pressurized gloves. If a large, inflatable hangar were placed in high orbit, along with all the components needed for a large assembly such as a large telescope, then humans in bunny suits could perform the same sorts of extremely precise and dexterous assembly that they could be expected to perform on Earth. Calculations show that such an inflatable hangar, and the necessary gas to make it safe to occupy by shirtsleeves humans wearing oxygen masks, fits within the mass and volume limitations of the proposed "Space Launch System" heavy-lift rocket. A second launch could bring up all the components of an approximately 100-meter-diameter or larger telescope. A large [200 ft (approximately 61 m) in diameter] inflated fabric sphere (or hangar) would contain four humans in bunny suits. The sphere would contain sufficient atmospheric pressure so that spacesuits would not be necessary [about 3.2 psi (approximately 22 kPa)]. The humans would require only oxygen masks and small backpacks

  14. A robot in space as a large space structures control experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gran, R.

    1983-01-01

    The control systems design issues for large space structures can be addressed by a robotics experiment which defines a teleoperator or a robot or uses the RMS. The robotics control demonstration brings the large space structures control technology to an effective state of readiness and provides a useful robot when the experiment is finished. Three major options in such an experiment are the RMS, a flexible arm that is going to be put on the Shuttle for other reasons, or a dexetrous manipulator or teleoperator.

  15. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Kumar, V. K.; Krishna, R.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Diarra, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Large, flexible orbiting systems proposed for possible use in communications, electronic orbital based mail systems, and solar energy collection are discussed. The size and low weight to area ratio of such systems indicate that system flexibility is now the main consideration in the dynamics and control problem. For such large, flexible systems, both orientation and surface shape control will often be required. A conceptual development plan of a system software capability for use in analysis of the dynamics and control of large space structures technology (LSST) systems is discussed. This concept can be subdivided into four different stages: (1) system dynamics; (2) structural dynamics; (3) application of control algorithms; and (4) simulation of environmental disturbances. Modeling the system dynamics of such systems in orbit is the most fundamental component. Solar radiation pressure effects and orbital and gravity gradient effects are discussed.

  16. Primary propulsion/large space system interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V.; Dergance, R. H.; Robertson, R. I.; Wiggins, J. V.

    1981-01-01

    An interaction study was conducted between propulsion systems and large space structures to determine the effect of low thrust primary propulsion system characteristics on the mass, area, and orbit transfer characteristics of large space systems (LSS). The LSS which were considered would be deployed from the space shuttle orbiter bay in low Earth orbit, then transferred to geosynchronous equatorial orbit by their own propulsion systems. The types of structures studied were the expandable box truss, hoop and column, and wrap radial rib each with various surface mesh densities. The impact of the acceleration forces on system sizing was determined and the effects of single point, multipoint, and transient thrust applications were examined. Orbit transfer strategies were analyzed to determine the required velocity increment, burn time, trip time, and payload capability over a range of final acceleration levels. Variables considered were number of perigee burns, delivered specific impulse, and constant thrust and constant acceleration modes of propulsion. Propulsion stages were sized for four propellant combinations; oxygen/hydrogen, oxygen/methane, oxygen/kerosene, and nitrogen tetroxide/monomethylhydrazine, for pump fed and pressure fed engine systems. Two types of tankage configurations were evaluated, minimum length to maximize available payload volume and maximum performance to maximize available payload mass.

  17. Development of television tubes for the large space telescope.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrance, J. L.; Zucchino, P.

    1971-01-01

    Princeton Observatory has been working for several years under NASA sponsorship to develop television type sensors to use in place of photographic film for space astronomy. This paper discusses the performance of an SEC-vidicon with a 25 mm x 25 mm active area, MgF2 window, and bi-alkali photocathode. Results from ground based use on the Coude spectrograph of the 200-inch Hale telescope are included. The intended use of this tube in an echelle spectrograph sounding rocket payload and on Stratoscope II for direct high resolution imagery is also discussed. The paper also discusses the Large Space Telescope image sensor requirements and the development of a larger television tube for this mission.

  18. Ground facility for large space structures dynamics and control verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waites, Henry

    1986-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a facility in which closed loop control of Large Space Structures (LSS) can be demonstrated and verified. The main objective of the facility is to verify LSS control system techniques so that on-orbit performance can be unsured. The facility consists of an LSS test article or payload which is connected to a 3-axis angular pointing mount assembly that provides control torque commands. The angular pointing mount assembly is attached to a base excitation system which will simulate disturbances most likely to occur for Orbiter and DOD payloads. The control computer contains the calibration software, the reference systems, the alignment procedures, the telemetry software, and the control algorithms. The total system is suspended in such a fashion that the LSS test article has the characteristics common to all LSS.

  19. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Phase A study of the Large Space Telescope (LST) is reported. The study defines an LST concept based on the broad mission guidelines provided by the Office of Space Science (OSS), the scientific requirements developed by OSS with the scientific community, and an understanding of long range NASA planning current at the time the study was performed. The LST is an unmanned astronomical observatory facility, consisting of an optical telescope assembly (OTA), scientific instrument package (SIP), and a support systems module (SSM). The report consists of five volumes. The report describes the constraints and trade off analyses that were performed to arrive at a reference design for each system and for the overall LST configuration. A low cost design approach was followed in the Phase A study. This resulted in the use of standard spacecraft hardware, the provision for maintenance at the black box level, growth potential in systems designs, and the sharing of shuttle maintenance flights with other payloads.

  20. Large area emulsion chamber experiments for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parnell, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    Emulsion-chamber experiments employing nuclear-track emulsions, etchable plastic detectors, metal plates, and X-ray films continue to demonstrate high productivity and potential in the study of cosmic-ray primaries and their interactions. Emulsions, with unsurpassed track-recording capability, provide an appropriate medium for the study of nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energy, which will likely produce observations of a phase change in nuclear matter. The many advantages of emulsion chambers (excellent multitrack recording capability, large geometry factor, low apparatus cost, simplicity of design and construction) are complemented by the major advantages of the Space Shuttle as an experiment carrier. A Shuttle experiment which could make a significant advance in both cosmic-ray primary and nucleus-nucleus interaction studies is described. Such an experiment would serve as a guide for use of emulsions during the Space Station era. Some practical factors that must be considered in planning a Shuttle exposure of emulsion chambers are discussed.

  1. Camera memory study for large space telescope. [charge coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. P.; Brewer, J. E.; Brager, E. A.; Farnsworth, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Specifications were developed for a memory system to be used as the storage media for camera detectors on the large space telescope (LST) satellite. Detectors with limited internal storage time such as intensities charge coupled devices and silicon intensified targets are implied. The general characteristics are reported of different approaches to the memory system with comparisons made within the guidelines set forth for the LST application. Priority ordering of comparisons is on the basis of cost, reliability, power, and physical characteristics. Specific rationales are provided for the rejection of unsuitable memory technologies. A recommended technology was selected and used to establish specifications for a breadboard memory. Procurement scheduling is provided for delivery of system breadboards in 1976, prototypes in 1978, and space qualified units in 1980.

  2. Expert systems for adaptive control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, Charles F.

    1988-01-01

    It is expected that space systems for the future will evolve to structures of unprecedented size with associated extreme control requirements. A method is necessary that is sufficiently general to initiate stable control of a vehicle and subsequently learn the true nature of the structure. It is suggested that a suitable constructed expert system (ES) would be capable of learning by appending observations to a knowledge base. To verify that an ES can control a large space structure, numerical simulations of a simple structure subjected to periodic vibrations and the performance of a classical controllers were performed. The ES was then exercised to show its ability to truthfully mimic nominal control and to demonstrate its superiority to the classical controller, given sensor failures. An ES generating software package, The Intelligent Machine Model, was employed. It uses the pattern matching technique. Results of this program are discussed.

  3. Thermal/structural design verification strategies for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, David

    1988-01-01

    Requirements for space structures of increasing size, complexity, and precision have engendered a search for thermal design verification methods that do not impose unreasonable costs, that fit within the capabilities of existing facilities, and that still adequately reduce technical risk. This requires a combination of analytical and testing methods. This requires two approaches. The first is to limit thermal testing to sub-elements of the total system only in a compact configuration (i.e., not fully deployed). The second approach is to use a simplified environment to correlate analytical models with test results. These models can then be used to predict flight performance. In practice, a combination of these approaches is needed to verify the thermal/structural design of future very large space systems.

  4. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2011-01-01

    Objective of this work is to define and initiate a long-term program to mature six inter-linked critical technologies for future UVOIR space telescope mirrors to TRL6 by 2018 so that a viable flight mission can be proposed to the 2020 Decadal Review. (1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirrors: 4 to 8 m monolithic & 8 to 16 m segmented primary mirrors require larger, thicker, stiffer substrates. (2) Support System:Large-aperture mirrors require large support systems to ensure that they survive launch and deploy on orbit in a stress-free and undistorted shape. (3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error:A very smooth mirror is critical for producing a high-quality point spread function (PSF) for high-contrast imaging. (4) Segment Edges:Edges impact PSF for high-contrast imaging applications, contributes to stray light noise, and affects the total collecting aperture. (5) Segment-to-Segment Gap Phasing:Segment phasing is critical for producing a high-quality temporally stable PSF. (6) Integrated Model Validation:On-orbit performance is determined by mechanical and thermal stability. Future systems require validated performance models. We are pursuing multiple design paths give the science community the option to enable either a future monolithic or segmented space telescope.

  5. Investigation of Secondary Neutron Production in Large Space Vehicles for Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Koontz, Steve; Reddell, Brandon; Atwell, William; Boeder, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Future NASA missions will focus on deep space and Mars surface operations with large structures necessary for transportation of crew and cargo. In addition to the challenges of manufacturing these large structures, there are added challenges from the space radiation environment and its impacts on the crew, electronics, and vehicle materials. Primary radiation from the sun (solar particle events) and from outside the solar system (galactic cosmic rays) interact with materials of the vehicle and the elements inside the vehicle. These interactions lead to the primary radiation being absorbed or producing secondary radiation (primarily neutrons). With all vehicles, the high-energy primary radiation is of most concern. However, with larger vehicles, there is more opportunity for secondary radiation production, which can be significant enough to cause concern. In a previous paper, we embarked upon our first steps toward studying neutron production from large vehicles by validating our radiation transport codes for neutron environments against flight data. The following paper will extend the previous work to focus on the deep space environment and the resulting neutron flux from large vehicles in this deep space environment.

  6. Large Space Telescope support systems module thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapter, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    In 1982, an unmanned three-meter class Cassegrainian telescopic system referred to as the Large Space Telescope (LST) will be placed in earth orbit by the Shuttle. The LST consists of a telescope system and surrounding support structure that is referred to as the support system module (SSM). This paper summarizes the thermal control subsystem for several candidate SSM designs. Major emphasis has been given to the LST/SSM design concept that includes a thermally isolated aft cylinder compartment that contains subsystem components. Requirements, interfaces and thermal math modeling methods are presented. Analysis results demonstrate that a cold-biased thermal design using electrical heaters is promising.

  7. On the nonlinear dynamics and control of large space structures

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, V.J.

    1994-12-31

    The paper reviews, using the Lagrangian approach, dynamics of flexible multibody systems, of contemporary interest, and their control. To begin with, a relatively general formulation for studying the dynamics and control of an arbitrary spacecraft with interconnected flexible bodies is developed accounting for thermal deflection, transient system properties, shift in the center of mass, shear deformations, rotary inertias and geometric nonlinearities. A rather self-contained, comprehensive, numerical algorithm using system as well as component modes follows which is applicable to a large class of spacecraft configurations. In particular, versatility of the approach is demonstrated through the dynamics and control studies aimed at the proposed Space Station and the associated mobile manipulator system.

  8. Large area low-cost space solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barona, C. R.; Cioni, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A development program to produce 5.9 x 5.9 cm space quality silicon solar cells with a cost goal of 30 $/W is described. Cell types investigated include wraparound dielectric, mechanical wraparound and conventional contact configurations with combinations of 2 or 10 ohm/cm resistivity, back surface reflectors and/or fields, and diffused or ion implanted junctions. A single step process to cut cell and cover glass simultaneously is being developed. Results for cell and array tests are given. Large solar arrays that might use cells of this type are discussed.

  9. Mission planning parameters for the Space Shuttle large format camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses the impact of various Space Shuttle mission parameters on the efficient and meaningful utilization of the large format camera (LFC) as a photographic acquisition system. Some of the LFC's vital statistics and its mounting within the Orbiter payload are described. LFC characteristics and mounting dictate certain mission parameters. The controlling parameters are orbit inclinations, launch time of year, launch time of day, orbital altitude, mission duration, overlap selection, film capacity, and climatological prediction. A mission case is evaluated relative to controlling parameters and geographical area(s) of interest.

  10. Large space erectable structures - building block structures study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. H.; Skoumal, D. E.; Straayer, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A modular planar truss structure and a long slender boom concept identified as building block approaches to construction of large spacecraft configurations are described. The concepts are compatible in weight and volume goals with the Space Transportation System, use standard structural units, and represent high on-orbit productivity in terms of structural area or beam length. Results of structural trade studies involving static and dynamic analyses of a single module and rigid body deployment analyses to assess kinetics and kinematics of automatic deployment of the building block modules are presented.

  11. Analysis and design of ion thrusters for large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    This study undertakes the analysis and conceptual design of a 0.5 Newton electrostatic ion thruster suitable for use on large space system missions in the next decade. Either argon or xenon gas shall be used as propellant. A 50 cm diameter discharge chamber was selected to meet stipulated performance goals. The discharge plasma is contained at the boundary by a periodic structure of alternating permanent magnets generating a series of line cusps. Anode strips between the magnets collect Maxwellian electrons generated by a central cathode. Ion extraction utilizes either two or three grid optics at the user's choice. An extensive analysis was undertaken to investigate optics behavior in the high power environment of this large thruster. A plasma bridge neutralizer operating on inert gas provides charge neutralizing electrons to complete the design. The resulting conceptual thruster and the necessary power management and control requirements are described.

  12. Large area low-cost space solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baraona, C. R.; Cioni, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A development program to produce large-area (5.9 x 5.9 cm) space quality silicon solar cells with a cost goal of 30 $/watt is descibed. Five cell types under investigation include wraparound dielectric, mechanical wraparound and conventional contact configurations with combinations of 2 or 10 ohm-cm resistivity, back surface reflectors and/or fields, and diffused or ion implanted junctions. A single step process to cut cell and cover-glass simultaneously is being developed. A description of cell developments by Applied Solar Energy Corp., Spectrolab and Spire is included. Results are given for cell and array tests, performed by Lockheed, TRW and NASA. Future large solar arrays that might use cells of this type are discussed.

  13. The damper placement problem for large flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1992-01-01

    The damper placement problem for large flexible space truss structures is formulated as a combinatorial optimization problem. The objective is to determine the p truss members of the structure to replace with active (or passive) dampers so that the modal damping ratio is as large as possible for all significant modes of vibration. Equivalently, given a strain energy matrix with rows indexed on the modes and the columns indexed on the truss members, we seek to find the set of p columns such that the smallest row sum, over the p columns, is maximized. We develop a tabu search heuristic for the damper placement problems on the Controls Structures Interaction (CSI) Phase 1 Evolutionary Model (10 modes and 1507 truss members). The resulting solutions are shown to be of high quality.

  14. Large Space Telescope - Orbital crew EV maintenance operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, H. T.

    1975-01-01

    The paper shows that orbital EV maintenance by the crew has a tremendous impact on several areas of the program, including operations, Shuttle interfaces, support equipment rendezvous and berthing, checkout and verification, levels of servicing achievable, logistics and spares and scientific instruments in order to permit changeout and possible future refurbishment. To achieve on-orbit EV maintenance, such challenges as designing for suited-astronaut access to all subsystem equipment elements, minimization for contamination, handling of extremely sensitive instruments, development of translation techniques, and use of existing GFE and hardware must be faced early in the preliminary design and operations analysis phases. All studies to date indicate that on-orbit EV manned maintenance of the LST (Large Space Telescope) is not only feasible but can be designed to be readily within the capability of the EV functioning astronaut. Both 1-g and neutral buoyancy man-in-the-loop simulations further support this point.

  15. Coalescent simulation in continuous space: algorithms for large neighbourhood size.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, J; Etheridge, A M; Barton, N H

    2014-08-01

    Many species have an essentially continuous distribution in space, in which there are no natural divisions between randomly mating subpopulations. Yet, the standard approach to modelling these populations is to impose an arbitrary grid of demes, adjusting deme sizes and migration rates in an attempt to capture the important features of the population. Such indirect methods are required because of the failure of the classical models of isolation by distance, which have been shown to have major technical flaws. A recently introduced model of extinction and recolonisation in two dimensions solves these technical problems, and provides a rigorous technical foundation for the study of populations evolving in a spatial continuum. The coalescent process for this model is simply stated, but direct simulation is very inefficient for large neighbourhood sizes. We present efficient and exact algorithms to simulate this coalescent process for arbitrary sample sizes and numbers of loci, and analyse these algorithms in detail. PMID:24910324

  16. GLAST, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 10 keV to 25 MeV. With its upcoming launch in 2008, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations and Lorentz invariance violation. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the collaboration between particle physicists and astrophysicists, the opportunities for guest observers, and the mission status.

  17. Adaptive control of large space structures using recursive lattice filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundararajan, N.; Goglia, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    The use of recursive lattice filters for identification and adaptive control of large space structures is studied. Lattice filters were used to identify the structural dynamics model of the flexible structures. This identification model is then used for adaptive control. Before the identified model and control laws are integrated, the identified model is passed through a series of validation procedures and only when the model passes these validation procedures is control engaged. This type of validation scheme prevents instability when the overall loop is closed. Another important area of research, namely that of robust controller synthesis, was investigated using frequency domain multivariable controller synthesis methods. The method uses the Linear Quadratic Guassian/Loop Transfer Recovery (LQG/LTR) approach to ensure stability against unmodeled higher frequency modes and achieves the desired performance.

  18. Controllability of inherently damped large flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Bainum, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    Graph theoretic techniques are used to study controllability of linear systems which represent large flexible orbiting space systems with inherent damping. The controllability of the pair of matrices representing the system state and control influence matrices is assured when all states in the model are reachable in a digraph sense from at least one input and also when the term rank of a Boolean matrix whose non trivial components are based on the state and control influence matrices has a term rank of the order of the state vector. The damping matrix does not influence the required number of actuators but gives flexibility to the possibility locations of the actuators for which the system is controllable.

  19. Model verification of large structural systems. [space shuttle model response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. T.; Hasselman, T. K.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program for the application of parameter identification on the structural dynamic models of space shuttle and other large models with hundreds of degrees of freedom is described. Finite element, dynamic, analytic, and modal models are used to represent the structural system. The interface with math models is such that output from any structural analysis program applied to any structural configuration can be used directly. Processed data from either sine-sweep tests or resonant dwell tests are directly usable. The program uses measured modal data to condition the prior analystic model so as to improve the frequency match between model and test. A Bayesian estimator generates an improved analytical model and a linear estimator is used in an iterative fashion on highly nonlinear equations. Mass and stiffness scaling parameters are generated for an improved finite element model, and the optimum set of parameters is obtained in one step.

  20. Frequency domain identification for robust large space structure control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Bayard, D. S.; Scheid, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is demonstrated for frequency domain identification of large space structures which systematically transforms experimental raw data into a form required for synthesizing H(infinity) controllers using modern robust control design software (e.g., Matlab Toolboxes). A unique feature of this approach is that the additive uncertainty is characterized to a specified statistic confidence rather than with hard bounds. In this study, the difference in robust performance is minimal between the two levels of confidence. In general cases, the present methodology provides a tool for performance/confidence level tradeoff studies. For simplicity, the additive uncertainty on a frequency grid is considered and the interpolation error in between grid points is neglected.

  1. A future large-aperture UVOIR space observatory: reference designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Norman; Thronson, Harley; Feinberg, Lee; Stahl, H. Philip; Redding, Dave; Jones, Andrew; Sturm, James; Collins, Christine; Liu, Alice

    2015-09-01

    Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. We describe the feasibility assessment of system thermal and dynamic stability for supporting coronagraphy. The observatory is in a Sun-Earth L2 orbit providing a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Reference designs include a 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of reference designs including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  2. Large area CCD image sensors for space astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarzschild, M.

    1979-01-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has a substantial program to develop a 2200 x 2200 pixel CCD (Charge Coupled Device) mosaic array made up of 400 individual CCD's, 110 x 110 pixels square. This type of image sensor appeared to have application in space and ground-based astronomy. Under this grant a CCD television camera system was built which was capable of operating an array of 4 CCD's to explore the suitability of the CCD's to explore the suitability of the CCD for astronomical applications. Two individual packaged CCD's were received and evaluated. Evaluation of the basic characteristics of the best individual chips was encouraging, but the manufacturer found that their yield in manufacturing this design is two low to supply sufficient CDD's for the DARPA mosaic array. The potential utility of large mosaic arrays in astronomy is still substantial and continued monitoring of the manufacturers progress in the coming year is recommended.

  3. Adaptive control of large space structures using recursive lattice filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    The use of recursive lattice filters for identification and adaptive control of large space structures was studied. Lattice filters are used widely in the areas of speech and signal processing. Herein, they are used to identify the structural dynamics model of the flexible structures. This identified model is then used for adaptive control. Before the identified model and control laws are integrated, the identified model is passed through a series of validation procedures and only when the model passes these validation procedures control is engaged. This type of validation scheme prevents instability when the overall loop is closed. The results obtained from simulation were compared to those obtained from experiments. In this regard, the flexible beam and grid apparatus at the Aerospace Control Research Lab (ACRL) of NASA Langley Research Center were used as the principal candidates for carrying out the above tasks. Another important area of research, namely that of robust controller synthesis, was investigated using frequency domain multivariable controller synthesis methods.

  4. A Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory: Reference Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley; Rioux, Norman; Feinberg, Lee; Stahl, H. Philip; Redding, Dave; Jones, Andrew; Sturm, James; Collins, Christine; Liu, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. We describe the feasibility assessment of system thermal and dynamic stability for supporting coronagraphy. The observatory is in a Sun-Earth L2 orbit providing a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Reference designs include a 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of reference designs including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  5. Human exposure to large solar particle events in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Curtis, S. B.

    1992-01-01

    Whenever energetic solar protons produced by solar particle events traverse bulk matter, they undergo various nuclear and atomic collision processes which significantly alter the physical characteristics and biologically important properties of their transported radiation fields. These physical interactions and their effect on the resulting radiation field within matter are described within the context of a recently developed deterministic, coupled neutron-proton space radiation transport computer code (BRYNTRN). Using this computer code, estimates of human exposure in interplanetary space, behind nominal (2 g/sq cm) and storm shelter (20 g/sq cm) thicknesses of aluminum shielding, are made for the large solar proton event of August 1972. Included in these calculations are estimates of cumulative exposures to the skin, ocular lens, and bone marrow as a function of time during the event. Risk assessment in terms of absorbed dose and dose equivalent is discussed for these organs. Also presented are estimates of organ exposures for hypothetical, worst-case flare scenarios. The rate of dose equivalent accumulation places this situation in an interesting region of dose rate between the very low values of usual concern in terrestrial radiation environments and the high-dose-rate values prevalent in radiation therapy.

  6. Pupil Alignment Considerations for Large, Deployable Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bos, Brent J.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Kubalak, Daivd A.

    2011-01-01

    For many optical systems the properties and alignment of the internal apertures and pupils are not critical or controlled with high precision during optical system design, fabrication or assembly. In wide angle imaging systems, for instance, the entrance pupil position and orientation is typically unconstrained and varies over the system s field of view in order to optimize image quality. Aperture tolerances usually do not receive the same amount of scrutiny as optical surface aberrations or throughput characteristics because performance degradation is typically graceful with misalignment, generally only causing a slight reduction in system sensitivity due to vignetting. But for a large deployable space-based observatory like the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), we have found that pupil alignment is a key parameter. For in addition to vignetting, JWST pupil errors cause uncertainty in the wavefront sensing process that is used to construct the observatory on-orbit. Furthermore they also open stray light paths that degrade the science return from some of the telescope s instrument channels. In response to these consequences, we have developed several pupil measurement techniques for the cryogenic vacuum test where JWST science instrument pupil alignment is verified. These approaches use pupil alignment references within the JWST science instruments; pupil imaging lenses in three science instrument channels; and unique pupil characterization features in the optical test equipment. This will allow us to verify and crosscheck the lateral pupil alignment of the JWST science instruments to approximately 1-2% of their pupil diameters.

  7. A Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory: Study Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postman, Marc; Thronson, Harley A.; Feinberg, Lee; Redding, David; Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    The scientific drivers for very high angular resolution coupled with very high sensitivity and wavefront stability in the UV and optical wavelength regime have been well established. These include characterization of exoplanets in the habitable zones of solar type stars, probing the physical properties of the circumgalactic medium around z < 2 galaxies, and resolving stellar populations across a broad range of galactic environments. The 2010 NRC Decadal Survey and the 2013 NASA Science Mission Directorate 30-Year Roadmap identified a large-aperture UVOIR observatory as a priority future space mission. Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI team has extended several earlier studies of the technology and engineering requirements needed to design and build a single filled aperture 10-meter class space-based telescope that can enable these ambitious scientific observations. We present here an overview of our new technical work including a brief summary of the reference science drivers as well as in-depth investigations of the viable telescope architectures, the requirements on thermal control and active wavefront control systems, and the range of possible launch configurations.

  8. Growth Chambers on the International Space Station for Large Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, G. D.; Wheeler, R. M.; Morrow, R. C.; Levine, H. G.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) now has platforms for conducting research on horticultural plant species under LED lighting, and those capabilities continue to expand. The 'Veggie' vegetable production system was deployed to the ISS as an applied research platform for food production in space. Veggie is capable of growing a wide array of horticultural crops. It was designed for low power usage, low launch mass and stowage volume, and minimal crew time requirements. The Veggie flight hardware consists of a light cap containing red (630 nm), blue, (455 nm) and green (530 nm) LEDs. Interfacing with the light cap is an extendable bellows/baseplate for enclosing the plant canopy. A second large plant growth chamber, the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH), is will fly to the ISS in 2017. APH will be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. APH will control light (quality, level, and timing), temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing any cabin or plant-derived ethylene and other volatile organic compounds. Additional capabilities include sensing of leaf temperature and root zone moisture, root zone temperature, and oxygen concentration. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs (4100K). There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations. Veggie and APH are available for research proposals.

  9. Growth Chambers on the International Space Station for Large Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Gioia D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Morrow, Robert C.; Levine, Howard G.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) now has platforms for conducting research on horticultural plant species under LED (Light Emitting Diodes) lighting, and those capabilities continue to expand. The Veggie vegetable production system was deployed to the ISS as an applied research platform for food production in space. Veggie is capable of growing a wide array of horticultural crops. It was designed for low power usage, low launch mass and stowage volume, and minimal crew time requirements. The Veggie flight hardware consists of a light cap containing red (630 nanometers), blue, (455 nanometers) and green (530 nanometers) LEDs. Interfacing with the light cap is an extendable bellowsbaseplate for enclosing the plant canopy. A second large plant growth chamber, the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH), is will fly to the ISS in 2017. APH will be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. APH will control light (quality, level, and timing), temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing any cabin or plant-derived ethylene and other volatile organic compounds. Additional capabilities include sensing of leaf temperature and root zone moisture, root zone temperature, and oxygen concentration. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs (4100K). There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations. Veggie and APH are available for research proposals.

  10. Advanced Mirror Technology Development for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. P.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a NASA Strategic Astrophysics Technology project to mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. The developed mirror technology must enable missions capable of both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. Just as JWST’s architecture was driven by launch vehicle, a future UVOIR mission’s architectures (monolithic, segmented or interferometric) will depend on capacities of future launch vehicles (and budget). Since we cannot predict the future, we must prepare for all potential futures. Therefore, to provide the science community with options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We derived engineering specifications for potential future monolithic or segmented space telescopes based on science needs and implement constraints. And we are maturing six inter-linked critical technologies to enable potential future large aperture UVOIR space telescope: 1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirrors, 2) Support Systems, 3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error, 4) Segment Edges, 5) Segment-to-Segment Gap Phasing, and 6) Integrated Model Validation Science Advisory Team and a Systems Engineering Team. We are maturing all six technologies simultaneously because all are required to make a primary mirror assembly (PMA); and, it is the PMA’s on-orbit performance which determines science return. PMA stiffness depends on substrate and support stiffness. Ability to cost-effectively eliminate mid/high spatial figure errors and polishing edges depends on substrate stiffness. On-orbit thermal and mechanical performance depends on substrate stiffness, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and thermal mass. And, segment-to-segment phasing depends on substrate & structure stiffness

  11. Judgments of exocentric direction in large-scale space.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jonathan W; Loomis, Jack M; Beall, Andrew C

    2004-01-01

    Judgments of exocentric direction are quite common, especially when judging where others are looking or pointing. To investigate these judgments in large-scale space, observers were shown two targets in a large open field and were asked to judge the exocentric direction specified by the targets. The targets ranged in egocentric distance from 5 to 20 m with target-to-target angular separations of 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and 135 degrees. Observers judged exocentric direction using two methods: (i) by judging which point on a distant fence appeared collinear with the two targets, and (ii) by orienting their body in a direction parallel with the perceived line segment. In the collinearity task, observers had to imagine the line connecting the targets and then extrapolate this imagined line out to the fence. Observers indicated the perceived point of collinearity on a handheld 360 degrees panoramic cylinder representing their vista. The two judgment methods gave similar results except for a constant bias associated with the body-pointing response. Aside from this bias, the results of these two methods agree with other existing research indicating an effect of relative egocentric distance to the targets on judgment error--line segments are perceived as being rotated in depth. Additionally, verbal estimates of egocentric and exocentric distance suggest that perceived distance is not the cause for the systematic errors in judging exocentric direction. PMID:15222392

  12. Study of large adaptive arrays for space technology applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, R. S.; Steinberg, B.; Powers, E.; Lim, T.

    1977-01-01

    The research in large adaptive antenna arrays for space technology applications is reported. Specifically two tasks were considered. The first was a system design study for accurate determination of the positions and the frequencies of sources radiating from the earth's surface that could be used for the rapid location of people or vehicles in distress. This system design study led to a nonrigid array about 8 km in size with means for locating the array element positions, receiving signals from the earth and determining the source locations and frequencies of the transmitting sources. It is concluded that this system design is feasible, and satisfies the desired objectives. The second task was an experiment to determine the largest earthbound array which could simulate a spaceborne experiment. It was determined that an 800 ft array would perform indistinguishably in both locations and it is estimated that one several times larger also would serve satisfactorily. In addition the power density spectrum of the phase difference fluctuations across a large array was measured. It was found that the spectrum falls off approximately as f to the minus 5/2 power.

  13. Effects of Turbine Spacing in Very Large Wind Farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Søren Juhl; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2015-11-01

    The Dynamic Wake Meandering model(DWM) by Larsen et al. (2007) is considered state of the art for modelling the wake behind a wind turbine. DWM assumes a quasi-steady wake deficit transported as a passive tracer by large atmospheric scales. The approach is also applied to wake interaction within wind farms, although certain aspects of the complex wake interaction are not captured, see Churchfield et al. (2014). Recent studies have shown how turbines introduce low frequencies in the wake, which could describe some of the shortcomings. Chamorro et al. (2015) identified three regions of different lengths scales. Iungo et al. (2013) related low frequencies to the hub vortex instability. Okulov et al. (2014) found Strouhal numbers in the far wake stemming from the rotating helical vortex core. Simulations by Andersen et al. (2013) found low frequencies to be inherent in the flow inside an infinite wind farm. LES simulations of large wind farms are performed with full aero-elastic Actuator Lines. The simulations investigate the inherent dynamics inside wind farms in the absence of atmospheric turbulence compared to cases with atmospheric turbulence. Resulting low frequency structures are inherent in wind farms for certain turbine spacings and affect both power production and loads. Funded by Danish Council for Strategic Research (grant 2104-09-067216/DSF), the Nordic Consortium on Optimization and Control of Wind Farms, and EuroTech wind project. The proprietary data for Vestas' NM80 turbine has been used.

  14. Space Shuttle Large Format Camera Photography And Resource Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Jerry D.

    1988-02-01

    In October, 1984, the Space Shuttle Challenger carrying the Itek Large Format Camera took 2134 photographs of the Earth's land, oceans, and clouds. In this experiment, the precision cartographic large format camera was used to take vertical aerial photographs on a strip of film made up of four different emulsions. An exceptionally cloudy weather system in North America and Europe caused most of the primary photography sites to be obscured. Many photographs were therefore taken of secondary sites. The United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service participated in this experiment by identifying many photographic test sites in the United States. When the mission was flown, most of the National Forests selected were obscured by clouds. The Forest Service is interested in the potential uses of the photography in resource management. To the extent possible, the photographs of the National Forests areas have been evaluated. The imagery is suitable for some management activities and is currently being used. During the evaluation, all imagery worldwide, was examined, and a list of potential uses was developed. With increased use, more applications will be developed.

  15. Large Space Optics: From Hubble to JWST and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    If necessity truly is the mother of invention, then advances in lightweight space mirror technology have been driven by launch vehicle mass and volume constraints. In the late 1970 s, at the start of Hubble development, the state of the art in ground based telescopes was 3 to 4 meter monolithic primary mirrors with masses of 6000 to 10,000 kg - clearly too massive for the planned space shuttle 25,000 kg capability to LEO. Necessity led Hubble to a different solution. Launch vehicle mass constraints (and cost) resulted in the development of a 2.4 meter lightweight eggcrate mirror. At 810 kg (180 kg/m2), this mirror was approximately 7.4% of HST s total 11,110 kg mass. And, the total observatory structure at 4.3 m x 13.2 m fit snuggly inside the space shuttle 4.6 m x 18.3 m payload bay. In the early 1990 s, at the start of JWST development, the state of the art in ground based telescopes was 8 meter class monolithic primary mirrors (16,000 to 23,000 kg) and 10 meter segmented mirrors (14,400 kg). Unfortunately, launch vehicles were still constrained to 4.5 meter payloads and 25,000 kg to LEO or 6,600 kg to L2. Furthermore, science now demanded a space telescope with 6 to 8 meter aperture operating at L2. Mirror technology was identified as a critical capability necessary to enable the next generation of large aperture space telescopes. Specific telescope architectures were explored via three independent design concept studies conducted during the summer of 1996 (1). These studies identified two significant architectural constraints: segmentation and areal density. Because the launch vehicle fairing payload dynamic envelop diameter is approximately 4.5 meters, the only way to launch an 8 meter class mirror is to segment it, fold it and deploy it on orbit - resulting in actuation and control requirements. And, because of launch vehicle mass limits, the primary mirror allocation was only 1000 kg - resulting in a maximum areal density of 20 kg/m2. At the inception of

  16. An adaptive identification and control scheme for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, J. V.

    1988-01-01

    A unified identification and control scheme capable of achieving space at form performance objectives under nominal or failure conditions is described. Preliminary results are also presented, showing that the methodology offers much promise for effective robust control of large space structures. The control method is a multivariable, adaptive, output predictive controller called Model Predictive Control (MPC). MPC uses a state space model and input reference trajectories of set or tracking points to adaptively generate optimum commands. For a fixed model, MPC processes commands with great efficiency, and is also highly robust. A key feature of MPC is its ability to control either nonminimum phase or open loop unstable systems. As an output controller, MPC does not explicitly require full state feedback, as do most multivariable (e.g., Linear Quadratic) methods. Its features are very useful in LSS operations, as they allow non-collocated actuators and sensors. The identification scheme is based on canonical variate analysis (CVA) of input and output data. The CVA technique is particularly suited for the measurement and identification of structural dynamic processes - that is, unsteady transient or dynamically interacting processes such as between aerodynamics and structural deformation - from short, noisy data. CVA is structured so that the identification can be done in real or near real time, using computationally stable algorithms. Modeling LSS dynamics in 1-g laboratories has always been a major impediment not only to understanding their behavior in orbit, but also to controlling it. In cases where the theoretical model is not confirmed, current methods provide few clues concerning additional dynamical relationships that are not included in the theoretical models. CVA needs no a priori model data, or structure; all statistically significant dynamical states are determined using natural, entropy-based methods. Heretofore, a major limitation in applying adaptive

  17. Inflatable Space Structures Technology Development for Large Radar Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.; Helms, Richard G.; Willis, Paul B.; Mikulas, M. M.; Stuckey, Wayne; Steckel, Gary; Watson, Judith

    2004-01-01

    There has been recent interest in inflatable space-structures technology for possible applications on U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) missions because of the technology's potential for high mechanical-packaging efficiency, variable stowed geometry, and deployment reliability. In recent years, the DOD sponsored Large Radar Antenna (LRA) Program applied this new technology to a baseline concept: a rigidizable/inflatable (RI) perimeter-truss structure supporting a mesh/net parabolic reflector antenna. The program addressed: (a) truss concept development, (b) regidizable materials concepts assessment, (c) mesh/net concept selection and integration, and (d) developed potential mechanical-system performance estimates. Critical and enabling technologies were validated, most notably the orbital radiation durable regidized materials and the high modulus, inflatable-deployable truss members. These results in conjunction with conclusions from previous mechanical-packaging studies by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Special Program Office (SPO) were the impetus for the initiation of the DARPA/SPO Innovative Space-based Antenna Technology (ISAT) Program. The sponsor's baseline concept consisted of an inflatable-deployable truss structure for support of a large number of rigid, active radar panels. The program's goal was to determine the risk associated with the application of these new RI structures to the latest in radar technologies. The approach used to define the technology maturity level of critical structural elements was to: (a) develop truss concept baseline configurations (s), (b) assess specific inflatable-rigidizable materials technologies, and (c) estimate potential mechanical performance. The results of the structures portion of the program indicated there was high risk without the essential materials technology flight experiments, but only moderate risk if the appropriate on-orbit demonstrations were performed. This paper covers both

  18. Cryogenic techniques for large superconducting magnets in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    A large superconducting magnet is proposed for use in a particle astrophysics experiment, ASTROMAG, which is to be mounted on the United States Space Station. This experiment will have a two-coil superconducting magnet with coils which are 1.3 to 1.7 meters in diameter. The two-coil magnet will have zero net magnetic dipole moment. The field 15 meters from the magnet will approach earth's field in low earth orbit. The issue of high Tc superconductor will be discussed in the paper. The reasons for using conventional niobium-titanium superconductor cooled with superfluid helium will be presented. Since the purpose of the magnet is to do particle astrophysics, the superconducting coils must be located close to the charged particle detectors. The trade off between the particle physics possible and the cryogenic insulation around the coils is discussed. As a result, the ASTROMAG magnet coils will be operated outside of the superfluid helium storage tank. The fountain effect pumping system which will be used to cool the coil is described in the report. Two methods for extending the operating life of the superfluid helium dewar are discussed. These include: operation with a third shield cooled to 90 K with a sterling cycle cryocooler, and a hybrid cryogenic system where there are three hydrogen-cooled shields and cryostat support heat intercept points.

  19. Replacing a technology - The Large Space Telescope and CCDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. W.; Tatarewicz, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The technological improvements, design choices and mission goals which led to the inclusion of CCD detectors in the wide field camera of the Large Space Telescope (LST) to be launched by the STS are recounted. Consideration of CCD detectors began before CCDs had seen wide astronomical applications. During planning for the ST, in the 1960s, photographic methods and a vidicon were considered, and seemed feasible provided that periodic manual maintenance could be performed. The invention of CCDs was first reported in 1970 and by 1973 the CCDs were receiving significant attention as potential detectors instead of a vidicon, which retained its own technological challenges. The CCD format gained new emphasis when success was achieved in developments for planetary-imaging spacecraft. The rapidity of progress in CCD capabilities, coupled with the continued shortcomings of the vidicon, resulted in a finalized choice for a CCD device by 1977. The decision was also prompted by continuing commercial and military interest in CCDs, which was spurring the development of the technology and improving the sensitivities and reliability while lowering the costs.

  20. A Unique Hybrid Propulsion System Design for Large Space Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, Frederick C.

    1990-01-01

    A study was made of the application of hybrid rocket propulsion technology to large space boosters. Safety, reliability, cost, and performance comprised the evaluation criteria, in order of relative importance, for this study. The effort considered the so called classic hybrid design approach versus a novel approach which utilizes a fuel-rich gas generator for the fuel source. Other trades included various fuel/oxidizer combinations, pressure-fed versus pump fed oxidizer delivery systems, and reusable versus expandable booster systems. Following this initial trade study, a point design was generated. A gas generated-type fuel grain with pump fed liquid oxygen comprised the basis of this point design. This design study provided a mechanism for considering the means of implementing the gas generator approach for further defining details of the design. Subsequently, a system trade study was performed which determined the sensitivity of the design to various design parameters and predicted optimum values for these same parameters. The study concluded that a gas generator hybrid booster design offers enhanced safety and reliability over current of proposed solid booster designs while providing equal or greater performance levels. These improvements can be accomplished at considerably lower cost than for the liquid booster designs of equivalent capability.

  1. Structures-propulsion interactions and requirements. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of low-thrust primary propulsion system characteristics on the mass, area, and orbit transfer characteristics of large space systems (LSS) were determined. Three general structural classes of LSS were considered, each with a broad range of diameters and nonstructural surface densities. While transferring the deployed structure from LEO and to GEO, an acceleration range of 0.02 to 0.1 g's was found to maximize deliverable payload based on structural mass impact. After propulsion system parametric analyses considering four propellant combinations produced values for available payload mass, length and volume, a thrust level range which maximizes deliverable LSS diameter was determined corresponding to a structure and propulsion vehicle. The engine start and/or shutdown thrust transients on the last orbit transfer (apogee) burn can impose transient loads which would be greater than the steady-state loads at the burnout acceleration. The effect of the engine thrust transients on the LSS was determined from the dynamic models upon which various engine ramps were imposed.

  2. New Specimen Access Device for the Large Space Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzarini, P.; Ratti, F.

    2004-08-01

    The Large Space Simulator (LSS) is used to simulate in- orbit environmental conditions for spacecraft (S/C) testing. The LSS is intended to be a flexible facility: it can accommodate test articles that can differ significantly in shape and weight and carry various instruments. To improve the accessibility to the S/C inside the LSS chamber a new Specimen Access Device (SAD) has been procured. The SAD provides immediate and easy access to the S/C, thus reducing the amount of time necessary for the installations of set-ups in the LSS. The SAD has been designed as bridge crane carrying a basket to move the operator into the LSS. Such a crane moves on parallel rails on the top floor of the LSS building. The SAD is composed by three subsystems: the main bridge, the trolley that moves along the main bridge and the telescopic mast. A trade off analysis has been carried out for what concerns the telescopic mast design. The choice between friction pads vs rollers, to couple the different sections of the mast, has been evaluated. The resulting design makes use of a four sections square mast, with rollers driven deployment. This design has been chosen for the higher stiffness of the mast, due to the limited number of sections, and because it reduces radically the risk of contamination related to a solution based on sliding bushings. Analyses have been performed to assess the mechanical behaviour both in static and in dynamic conditions. In particular the telescopic mast has been studied in detail to optimise its stiffness and to check the safety margins in the various operational conditions. To increase the safety of the operations an anticollision system has been implemented by positioning on the basket two kind of sensors, ultrasonic and contact ones. All the translations are regulated by inverters with acceleration and deceleration ramps controlled by a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). An absolute encoder is installed on each motor to provide the actual position of the

  3. Systems definition study for shuttle demonstration flights of large space structures. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The development of large space structure technology is discussed, with emphasis on space fabricated structures which are automatically manufactured in space from sheet-strip materials and assembled on-orbit. Definition of a flight demonstration involving an Automated Beam Builder and the building and assembling of large structures is presented.

  4. Erectable/deployable concepts for large space system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agan, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    Erectable/deployable space structure concepts particularly relating to the development of a science and applications space platform are presented. Design and operating features for an automatic coupler clevis joint, a side latching detent joint, and a module-to-module auto lock coupler are given. An analysis of the packaging characteristics of stacked subassembly, single fold, hybrid, and double fold concepts is given for various platform structure configurations. Payload carrier systems and assembly techniques are also discussed.

  5. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator - NB32 - Large Space Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a cooperative program of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) to operate a long-lived space-based observatory; it was the flagship mission of NASA's Great Observatories program. The HST program began as an astronomical dream in the 1940s. During the 1970s and 1980s, HST was finally designed and built; and it finally became operational in the 1990s. HST was deployed into a low-Earth orbit on April 25, 1990 from the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31). The design of the HST took into consideration its length of service and the necessity of repairs and equipment replacement by making the body modular. In doing so, subsequent shuttle missions could recover the HST, replace faulty or obsolete parts and be re-released. MSFC's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator served as the training facility for shuttle astronauts for Hubble related missions. Shown is astronaut Sharnon Lucid having her life support system being checked prior to entering the NBS to begin training on the space telescope axial scientific instrument changeout.

  6. Industry/government seminar on Large Space systems technology: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scala, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    The critical technology developments which the participating experts recommend as being required to support the early generation large space systems envisioned as space missions during the years 1985-2000 are summarized.

  7. Remote surface inspection system. [of large space platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayati, Samad; Balaram, J.; Seraji, Homayoun; Kim, Won S.; Tso, Kam S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on an on-going research and development effort in remote surface inspection of space platforms such as the Space Station Freedom (SSF). It describes the space environment and identifies the types of damage for which to search. This paper provides an overview of the Remote Surface Inspection System that was developed to conduct proof-of-concept demonstrations and to perform experiments in a laboratory environment. Specifically, the paper describes three technology areas: (1) manipulator control for sensor placement; (2) automated non-contact inspection to detect and classify flaws; and (3) an operator interface to command the system interactively and receive raw or processed sensor data. Initial findings for the automated and human visual inspection tests are reported.

  8. Thermal storage analysis for large manned space platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, A. M.; Sadunas, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    High electrical power and waste heat rejection is projected for future manned low earth orbit space platforms, such as Space Station. The high heat rejection, optical coating degradation, long operating life with minimum maintenance requirements pose a challenging thermal management design problem. System optimization, with respect to radiator area and weight, indicate the requirement for thermal storage. This paper examines the thermal storage benefits, determines the characteristics as applied to different TMS concepts (e.g., centralized, decentralized), and examines the similarities and differences of thermal storage integration with single-phase and two-phase systems for a study baseline 75 kWe low earth orbit platform.

  9. SAFE II: Large systems space plasma evaluation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Purvis, C. K.; Stevens, N. J.

    1983-01-01

    A shuttle flight experiment, the purpose of which is to obtain space data on the interaction of a high voltage solar array with the ambient space plasma is addressed. This flight experiment is a reflight of the solar array flight experiment, SAFE, except that three active solar array panels, electron release devices and plasma diagnostics are added. This experiment, SAFE 2, evaluates power loss due to parasitic current collected by the solar array, arcing on the solar array and perturbations to the plasma which may increase power loss and disturb plasma and charged particle science acquisition.

  10. Integrated control of thermally distorted large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolson, Robert H.; Huang, Jen-Kuang

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to develop a control system design method that (1) recognizes the time dependence of the thermal distortion due to orbital motion and (2) controls variables that are directly related to far field performance for earth pointing space antennas. The first objective is accomplished by expanding the distortion into principal components that are orthogonal in space and time. The approach for the second objective is to expand the far zone electric field in a Zernike-Bessel series. The method accommodates tapered feeds and arbitrary polarizations. Simulations are performed for a geosynchronous radiometer to determine the effectiveness of the control system under variations in solar geometry, structure materials and thermal properties.

  11. Large Space Systems/Low-Thrust Propulsion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The potentially critical interactions that occur between propulsion, structures and materials, and controls for large spacecraft are considered, the technology impacts within these fields are defined and the net effect on large systems and the resulting missions is determined. Topical areas are systems/mission analysis, LSS static and dynamic characterization, and propulsion systems characterization.

  12. Adaptive structures for precision controlled large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garba, John A.; Wada, Ben K.; Fanson, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The stringent accuracy and ground test validation requirements of some of the future space missions will require new approaches in structural design. Adaptive structures, structural systems that can vary their geometric congiguration as well as their physical properties, are primary candidates for meeting the functional requirements for such missions. Research performed in the development of such adaptive structural systems is described.

  13. Frame for large self-regulated ecological system for space exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondyurin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Future long term space activity with human crew requires self-regulated ecological system to provide water, air and food for crew. Modern theoretical and experimental investigation results show that a sustainable ecological system can be made, but it requires large enough area and volume, which cannot be provided with modern space ship and space station technologies. The large volume frame can be created with using of inflatable construction, which can be directly cured in space environment. Problems of the large constructions in space for self-ecological system are discussed.

  14. Large-scale quantization in space plasmas (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    n plasmas, Debye screening structures correlations between particles. In our recent paper [Livadiotis & McComas, Entropy, 15, 1118; Nature, doi:10.1038/nature.2013.13159], we identify a phase-space minimum h* that connects the energy of particles within a Debye sphere to an equivalent wave frequency. In theory, there was no a priori reason to expect a single value of h* across different plasmas. However, we find that this quantity remains constant across a wide range of space plasmas, from the solar wind and the planetary magnetospheres in the inner heliosphere to the distant plasma in the inner heliosheath and the local interstellar medium. We used four independent methods to derive the value of h* 2π(1.2×0.4)×10^{-22} Js: (1) Ulysses solar wind measurements, (2) a variety of space plasmas spanning a broad range of physical properties, (3) the entropic limit emerging from statistical mechanics applied to space plasmas, (4) waiting-time distributions of explosive events in space plasmas. Finding a constant value for h* in a variety of different of systems, similar to the classical Planck constant but 12 orders of magnitude larger, reveals a possible type of new quantization in plasmas but in a larger scale. The value of h* calculated for the solar wind ion-electron plasma using Ulysses daily measurements. (a) Diagram of the smallest particle energy ɛc vs. the particle lifetime tc in a Debye sphere (log-log scale). (b) Their product, 2ɛctc, depicted as a function of heliocentric distance r. (c) Histogram of the values of log h*. Four Different Methods of the Estimation of h* Four independent methods to calculate the value of h* 2π(1.2×0.4)×10-22 Js.

  15. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator-NB32-Large Space Structure Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. Construction methods had to be efficient due to the limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. As part of this experimentation, the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity (EASE) project was developed as a joint effort between MFSC and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The EASE experiment required that crew members assemble small components to form larger components, working from the payload bay of the space shuttle. Pictured is an entire unit that has been constructed and is sitting in the bottom of a mock-up shuttle cargo bay pallet.

  16. Large-size monodisperse latexes as a commercial space product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornfeld, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed spacelab production of large-size (2-40 micron diameter) monodispersed latexes is discussed. Explanations are given for the present lack of monodisperse particles in this size range. The four main topics discussed are: (1) the potential uses of these large particle size latexes, (2) why it is necessary for the particles to have a very narrow size distribution, (3) why large amounts of these monodisperse latexes are needed, and (4) why it is necessary to go to microgravity to prepare these latexes.

  17. Radiation-conduction interaction in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, A. F.; Mortazavi, H. R.; Smith, S. O.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of a penumbra due to the long wave radiation emitted by the earth or to solar energy reflected from the earth on temperature distributions, deflections and stresses in plates are studied to determine their importance in the design of space structures. An examination of the state of stress in a thin plate exposed to the sun suggests that deflections are only slightly modified by the penumbra, but that stresses in the vicinity of the shadow line are more affected. Even with the smoothing due to the penumbra, these stresses should be considered in the design of space structures. A simple relationship is given by which albedo viewfactors can be easily derived from the direct viewfactor, thus simplifying the radiation analysis.

  18. Automated frequency domain system identification of a large space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Bayard, D. S.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Mettler, E.; Milman, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the development and experimental results of an automated on-orbit system identification method for large flexible spacecraft that yields estimated quantities to support on-line design and tuning of robust high performance control systems. The procedure consists of applying an input to the plant, obtaining an output, and then conducting nonparametric identification to yield the spectral estimate of the system transfer function. A parametric model is determined by curve fitting the spectral estimate to a rational transfer function. The identification method has been demonstrated experimentally on the Large Spacecraft Control Laboratory in JPL.

  19. Evolution of the large Deep Space Network antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbriale, William A.

    1991-12-01

    The evolution of the largest antenna of the US NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) is described. The design, performance analysis, and measurement techniques, beginning with its initial 64-m operation at S-band (2295 MHz) in 1966 and continuing through the present ka-band (32-GHz) operation at 70 m, is described. Although their diameters and mountings differ, these parabolic antennas all employ a Cassegrainian feed system, and each antenna dish surface is constructed of precision-shaped perforated-aluminum panels that are secured to an open steel framework

  20. Tradespace investigation of strategic design factors for large space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlow, Brandon; Jewison, Christopher; Sternberg, David; Hall, Sherrie; Golkar, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Future large telescope arrays require careful balancing of satisfaction across the stakeholders' community. Development programs usually cannot afford to explicitly address all stakeholder tradeoffs during the conceptual design stage, but rather confine the analysis to performance, cost, and schedule discussions, treating policy and budget as constraints defining the envelope of the investigation. Thus, it is of interest to develop an integrated stakeholder analysis approach to explicitly address the impact of all stakeholder interactions on the design of large telescope arrays to address future science and exploration needs. This paper offers a quantitative approach for modeling some of the stakeholder influences relevant to large telescope array designs-the linkages between a given mission and the wider NASA community. The main goal of the analysis is to explore the tradespace of large telescope designs and understand the effects of different design decisions in the stakeholders' network. Proposed architectures that offer benefits to existing constellations of systems, institutions, and mission plans are expected to yield political and engineering benefits for NASA stakeholders' wider objectives. If such synergistic architectures are privileged in subsequent analysis, regions of the tradespace that better meet the needs of the wider NASA community can be selected for further development.

  1. Advanced technology requirements for large space structures. Part 5: Atlas program requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, E.; Lillenas, A. N.; Broddy, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a special study which identifies and assigns priorities to technology requirements needed to accomplish a particular scenario of future large area space systems are described. Proposed future systems analyzed for technology requirements included large Electronic Mail, Microwave Radiometer, and Radar Surveillance Satellites. Twenty technology areas were identified as requirements to develop the proposed space systems.

  2. Validation of large space structures by ground tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, B. K.; Kuo, C. P.; Glaser, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    The paper presents concepts designed to validate, through the use of ground tests, mathematical models of continuous type structures and structures comprised of interconnecting subsystems. For continuous-type structures, a multiple boundary condition test approach is considered in which the basic idea is to perform a large number of tests using artificial boundary conditions from which good ground test data can be obtained. The test ensures an arbitrarily large number of test data for use in the validation and updating of the mathematical model. Another approach, applicable to structures comprised of subsystems, involves the identification of significant structural elements for the system dynamic model which are not validated by standard modal tests of the subsystems.

  3. Economics of ion propulsion for large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, T. D.; Ward, J. W.; Rawlin, V. K.

    1978-01-01

    This study of advanced electrostatic ion thrusters for space propulsion was initiated to determine the suitability of the baseline 30-cm thruster for future missions and to identify other thruster concepts that would better satisfy mission requirements. The general scope of the study was to review mission requirements, select thruster designs to meet these requirements, assess the associated thruster technology requirements, and recommend short- and long-term technology directions that would support future thruster needs. Preliminary design concepts for several advanced thrusters were developed to assess the potential practical difficulties of a new design. This study produced useful general methodologies for assessing both planetary and earth orbit missions. For planetary missions, the assessment is in terms of payload performance as a function of propulsion system technology level. For earth orbit missions, the assessment is made on the basis of cost (cost sensitivity to propulsion system technology level).

  4. Dual structural-control optimization of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messac, A.; Turner, J.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach is proposed for solving dual structural-control optimization problems for high-order flexible space structures where reduced-order structural models are employed. For a given initial structural dessign, a quadratic control cost is minimized subject to a constant-mass constraint. The sensitivity of the optimal control cost with respect to the stuctural design variables is then determined and used to obtain successive structural redesigns using a contrained gradient optimization algorithm. This process is repeated until the constrained control cost sensitivity becomes negligible. A numerical example is presented which demonstrates that this new approach effectively addresses the problem of dual optimization for potentially very high-order structures.

  5. Ground/bonding for Large Space System Technology (LSST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, W. G.

    1980-04-01

    The influence of the environment and extravehicular activity remote assembly operations on the grounding and bonding of metallic and nonmetallic structures is discussed. Grounding and bonding philosophy is outlined for the electrical systems and electronic compartments which contain high voltage, high power electrical and electronic equipment. The influence of plasma and particulate on the system was analyzed and the effects of static buildup on the spacecraft electrical system discussed. Conceptual grounding bonding designs are assessed for capability to withstand high current arcs to ground from a high voltage conductor and electromagnetic interference. Also shown were the extravehicular activities required of the space station and or supply spacecraft crew members to join and inspect the ground system using manual on remote assembly construction.

  6. Osmotic pumped heat pipes for large space platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzer, H.J.; Fleischman, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    A thermal bus will be required as a thermal control source for future space platforms. The osmotic heat pipe is one candidate device with potential significant payoff toward serving growing thermal management needs. Results of a study evaluating osmotic heat pipes for thermal bus applications are presented. Electrostatic and other techniques are proposed for flow control and solution circulation in zero-gravity. Baseline size and performance design parameters of cellulose acetate membrane/sugar-water solution and other combinations were scaled up to predict osmotic pump performance for heat loads and temperatures of 4 to 120 C. A compact hollow-fiber membrane module measuring 20 inches in diameter by 12 inches long and weighing 190 pounds is projected for 50-kW heat loads.

  7. Stabilization of large space structures by linear reluctance actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Saroj K.; Sendaula, Henry M.

    1991-01-01

    Application of magnetic forces are considered for stabilization of vibrations of flexible space structures. Three electromagnetic phenomena are studied, such as: (1) magnetic body force; (2) reluctance torque; and (3) magnetostriction, and their application is analyzed for stabilization of a beam. The magnetic body force actuator uses the force that exists between poles of magnets. The reluctance actuator is configured in such a way that the reluctance of the magnetic circuit will be minimum when the beam is straight. Any bending of the beam increases the reluctance and hence generates a restoring torque that reduces bending. The gain of the actuator is controlled by varying the magnetizing current. Since the energy density of a magnetic device is much higher compared to piezoelectric or thermal actuators, it is expected that the reluctance actuator will be more effective in controlling the structural vibrations.

  8. Cables and connectors for Large Space System Technology (LSST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, W. G.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the environment and extravehicular activity/remote assembly operations on the cables and connectors for spacecraft with metallic and/or nonmetallic structures was examined. Cable and connector philosophy was outlined for the electrical systems and electronic compartments which contain high-voltage, high-power electrical and electronic equipment. The influence of plasma and particulates on the system is analyzed and the effect of static buildup on the spacecraft electrical system discussed. Conceptual cable and connector designs are assessed for capability to withstand high current and high voltage without danger of arcs and electromagnetic interference. The extravehicular activites required of the space station and/or supply spacecraft crew members to join and inspect the electrical system, using manual or remote assembly construction are also considered.

  9. Recent developments in thermal analysis of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical procedure for analysis of shadowed space heating of sparse structures, SSQ, is discussed. The SSQ program avoids inordinate computational complexity by confining attention to a single elemental location on a structural member of interest throughout an entire orbital period, proceeding then to similar treatment of individual alternate locations. The procedure considers a spacecraft in circular orbit and assumes fixed-Earth orientation of the spacecraft. Shadow orientation and interval duration, merged shadows, and computation of solar heat flux and thermal response are addressed. The output options of the SSQ FORTRAN 5 program and its efficiency are discussed. Application of the system to the analysis of a parabolic expandable truss antenna is considered.

  10. Dynamic Identification for Control of Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    This is a compilation of reports by the one author on one subject. It consists of the following five journal articles: (1) A Parametric Study of the Ibrahim Time Domain Modal Identification Algorithm; (2) Large Modal Survey Testing Using the Ibrahim Time Domain Identification Technique; (3) Computation of Normal Modes from Identified Complex Modes; (4) Dynamic Modeling of Structural from Measured Complex Modes; and (5) Time Domain Quasi-Linear Identification of Nonlinear Dynamic Systems.

  11. Space transportation booster engine thrust chamber technology, large scale injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the Large Scale Injector (LSI) program was to deliver a 21 inch diameter, 600,000 lbf thrust class injector to NASA/MSFC for hot fire testing. The hot fire test program would demonstrate the feasibility and integrity of the full scale injector, including combustion stability, chamber wall compatibility (thermal management), and injector performance. The 21 inch diameter injector was delivered in September of 1991.

  12. Controls for orbital assembly of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark J.; Davidson, Roger; Gooyabadi, Ali A.; Quan, Ralph; Reisenauer, Brian; Robertson, L.; Mohl, James; Good, Philip; Vredevoogd, Loren; Galvez, Jose

    1991-01-01

    The topics covered are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: flexible structure control; decentralized control for flexible multi-body systems; control of structures during assembly; decentralized control using structural partitioning; reduced-orded model-based controller design; ROM/residual mode filters (RMF) control of large flexible structures;RMF in a distributed parameter system (DPS); LSS active control simulation; 3-D truss beam; mobile transporter with RMS; and flexible robot manipulator.

  13. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Krishna, R.; Kumar, V. K.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamics and attitude and shape control of very large, inherently flexible spacecraft systems were investigated. Increasingly more complex examples were examined, beginning with a uniform free-free beam, next a free-free uniform plate/platform and finally by considering a thin shallow spherical shell structure in orbit. The effects devices were modeled. For given sets of assumed actuator locations, the controllability of these systems was first established. Control laws for each of the actuators were developed based on decoupling techniques (including distributed modal control) pole placement algorithms and a application of the linear regulator problem for optical control theory.

  14. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures - 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, Peter M.; Li, Feiyue; Xu, Jianke

    1990-01-01

    The optimal control of three-dimensional large angle maneuvers and vibrations of a Shuttle-mast-reflector system is considered. The nonlinear equations of motion are formulated by using Lagrange's formula, with the mast modeled as a continuous beam subject to three-dimensional deformations. Pontryagin's Maximum Principle is applied to the slewing problem, to derive the necessary conditions for the optimal controls, which are bounded by given saturation levels. The resulting two point boundary value problem is then solved by using the quasilinearization algorithm and the method of particular solutions. The study of the large angle maneuvering of the Shuttle-beam-reflector spacecraft in the plane of a circular earth orbit is extended to consider the effects of the structural offset connection, the axial shortening, and the gravitational torque on the slewing motion. Finally the effect of additional design parameters (such as related to additional payload requirement) on the linear quadratic regulator based design of an orbiting control/structural system is examined.

  15. Pushbroom radiometry and its potential using large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, R. F.; Keafer, L. S., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation is emitted by matter which was heated to a temperature above absolute zero. The amount of blackbody radiation in the microwave frequency region of interest (10 to the 8th power f 10 to the 10th power Hz) emitted by matter can be determined from the Rayleigh-Jeans approximation to Planck's Radiation Law. The amount of electromagnetic radiation from matter which is not a blackbody is a function of the emissivity of the material. The emissivity is a factor less than unity and is a function of several parameters including chemical composition, temperature, frequency, surface characteristics, and viewing angle. A radiometer is an instrument which detects and provides a measure of the electromagnetic radiation being emitted by a material or surface area within the radiometer's antenna beamwidth. Microwave radiometers provide the capability for remote measurements from Earth orbits of geophysical parameters. These measurements will require the use of a microwave imaging radiometer using a large aperture deployable antenna with multiple beams in a pushbroom mode to achieve high spatial resolution and large swath width.

  16. Formation Flying of Components of a Large Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Edward; Quadrelli, Marco; Breckenridge, William

    2009-01-01

    A conceptual space telescope having an aperture tens of meters wide and a focal length of hundreds of meters would be implemented as a group of six separate optical modules flying in formation: a primary-membrane-mirror module, a relay-mirror module, a focal-plane-assembly module containing a fast steering mirror and secondary and tertiary optics, a primary-mirror-figure-sensing module, a scanning-electron-beam module for controlling the shape of the primary mirror, and a sunshade module. Formation flying would make it unnecessary to maintain the required precise alignments among the modules by means of an impractically massive rigid structure. Instead, a control system operating in conjunction with a metrology system comprising optical and radio subsystems would control the firing of small thrusters on the separate modules to maintain the formation, thereby acting as a virtual rigid structure. The control system would utilize a combination of centralized- and decentralized-control methods according to a leader-follower approach. The feasibility of the concept was demonstrated in computational simulations that showed that relative positions could be maintained to within a fraction of a millimeter and orientations to within several microradians.

  17. Large Energy Development Projects: Lessons Learned from Space and Politics

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Harrison H.

    2005-04-15

    The challenge to global energy future lies in meeting the needs and aspirations of the ten to twelve billion earthlings that will be on this planet by 2050. At least an eight-fold increase in annual production will be required by the middle of this century. The energy sources that can be considered developed and 'in the box' for consideration as sources for major increases in supply over the next half century are fossil fuels, nuclear fission, and, to a lesser degree, various forms of direct and stored solar energy and conservation. None of these near-term sources of energy will provide an eight-fold or more increase in energy supply for various technical, environmental and political reasons.Only a few potential energy sources that fall 'out of the box' appear worthy of additional consideration as possible contributors to energy demand in 2050 and beyond. These particular candidates are deuterium-tritium fusion, space solar energy, and lunar helium-3 fusion. The primary advantage that lunar helium-3 fusion will have over other 'out of the box' energy sources in the pre-2050 timeframe is a clear path into the private capital markets. The development and demonstration of new energy sources will require several development paths, each of Apollo-like complexity and each with sub-paths of parallel development for critical functions and components.

  18. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  19. Integrated structural control design of large space structures

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Lauffer, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Active control of structures has been under intensive development for the last ten years. Reference 2 reviews much of the identification and control technology for structural control developed during this time. The technology was initially focused on space structure and weapon applications; however, recently the technology is also being directed toward applications in manufacturing and transportation. Much of this technology focused on multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) identification and control methodology because many of the applications require a coordinated control involving multiple disturbances and control objectives where multiple actuators and sensors are necessary for high performance. There have been many optimal robust control methods developed for the design of MIMO robust control laws; however, there appears to be a significant gap between the theoretical development and experimental evaluation of control and identification methods to address structural control applications. Many methods have been developed for MIMO identification and control of structures, such as the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA), Q-Markov Covariance Equivalent Realization (Q-Markov COVER) for identification; and, Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG), Frequency Weighted LQG and H-/ii-synthesis methods for control. Upon implementation, many of the identification and control methods have shown limitations such as the excitation of unmodelled dynamics and sensitivity to system parameter variations. As a result, research on methods which address these problems have been conducted.

  20. Systems identification technology development for large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    A methodology for synthesizinng systems identification, both parameter and state, estimation and related control schemes for flexible aerospace structures is developed with emphasis on the Maypole hoop column antenna as a real world application. Modeling studies of the Maypole cable hoop membrane type antenna are conducted using a transfer matrix numerical analysis approach. This methodology was chosen as particularly well suited for handling a large number of antenna configurations of a generic type. A dedicated transfer matrix analysis, both by virtue of its specialization and the inherently easy compartmentalization of the formulation and numerical procedures, is significantly more efficient not only in computer time required but, more importantly, in the time needed to review and interpret the results.

  1. Large craters on the meteoroid and space debris impact experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, Donald H.

    1992-01-01

    Examination of 29.37 sq m of thick aluminum plates from the LDEF, which were exposed to the meteoroid and man-made orbital debris environments for 5.8 years, revealed 606 craters that were 0.5 mm in diameter or larger. Most were nearly hemispherical. There was a large variation in the number density of craters around the three axis gravity gradient stabilized spacecraft. A new model of the near-Earth meteoroid environment gives good agreement with the crater fluxes measured on the fourteen faces of the LDEF. The man-made orbital debris model of Kessler, which predicts that 16 pct. of the craters would be caused by man-made debris, is plausible. No chemical analyses of impactor residue that will distinguish between meteoroids and man-made debris is yet available.

  2. Mass Efficiencies for Common Large-Scale Precision Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. Brett; Agnes, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a mass-based trade study for large-scale deployable triangular trusses, where the longerons can be monocoque tubes, isogrid tubes, or coilable longeron trusses. Such structures are typically used to support heavy reflectors, solar panels, or other instruments, and are subject to thermal gradients that can vary a great deal based on orbital altitude, location in orbit, and self-shadowing. While multi layer insulation (MLI) blankets are commonly used to minimize the magnitude of these thermal disturbances, they subject the truss to a nonstructural mass penalty. This paper investigates the impact of these add-on thermal protection layers on selecting the lightest precision structure for a given loading scenario.

  3. Testing gravity using large-scale redshift-space distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Bertacca, Daniele; Pietrobon, Davide; Schmidt, Fabian; Samushia, Lado; Bartolo, Nicola; Doré, Olivier; Matarrese, Sabino; Percival, Will J.

    2013-11-01

    We use luminous red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II to test the cosmological structure growth in two alternatives to the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM)+general relativity (GR) cosmological model. We compare observed three-dimensional clustering in SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7) with theoretical predictions for the standard vanilla ΛCDM+GR model, unified dark matter (UDM) cosmologies and the normal branch Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (nDGP). In computing the expected correlations in UDM cosmologies, we derive a parametrized formula for the growth factor in these models. For our analysis we apply the methodology tested in Raccanelli et al. and use the measurements of Samushia et al. that account for survey geometry, non-linear and wide-angle effects and the distribution of pair orientation. We show that the estimate of the growth rate is potentially degenerate with wide-angle effects, meaning that extremely accurate measurements of the growth rate on large scales will need to take such effects into account. We use measurements of the zeroth and second-order moments of the correlation function from SDSS DR7 data and the Large Suite of Dark Matter Simulations (LasDamas), and perform a likelihood analysis to constrain the parameters of the models. Using information on the clustering up to rmax = 120 h-1 Mpc, and after marginalizing over the bias, we find, for UDM models, a speed of sound c∞ ≤ 6.1e-4, and, for the nDGP model, a cross-over scale rc ≥ 340 Mpc, at 95 per cent confidence level.

  4. Development of a large area space solar cell assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a large area high efficiency solar cell assembly is described. The assembly consists of an ion implanted silicon solar cell and glass cover. The important attributes of fabrication are the use of a back surface field which is compatible with a back surface reflector, and integration of coverglass application and cell fabrications. Cell development experiments concerned optimization of ion implantation processing of 2 ohm-cm boron-doped silicon. Process parameters were selected based on these experiments and cells with area of 34.3 sq cm wre fabricated. The average AMO efficiency of the twenty-five best cells was 13.9% and the best bell had an efficiency of 14.4%. An important innovation in cell encapsulation was also developed. In this technique, the coverglass is applied before the cell is sawed to final size. The coverglass and cell are then sawed as a unit. In this way, the cost of the coverglass is reduced, since the tolerance on glass size is relaxed, and costly coverglass/cell alignment procedures are eliminated. Adhesive investigated were EVA, FEP-Teflon sheet and DC 93-500. Details of processing and results are reported.

  5. Space-plasma campaign on UCLA's Large Plasma Device (LAPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, M. E.; Finnegan, S. M.; Knudsen, D. J.; Vincena, S.

    2007-05-01

    Knudsen [JGR, 1996] describes a potential role for stationary Alfvén (StA) waves in auroral arcs' frequency dependence. Magnetized plasmas are predicted to support electromagnetic perturbations that are static in a fixed frame if there is uniform background plasma convection. These stationary waves should not be confused with standing waves that oscillate in time with a fixed, spatially varying envelope. Stationary waves have no time variation in the fixed frame. In the drifting frame, there is an apparent time dependence as plasma convects past fixed electromagnetic structures. We describe early results from an experimental campaign to reproduce in the lab the basic conditions necessary for the creation of StA waves, namely quasi-steady-state convection across magnetic field-aligned current channels. We show that an off-axis, fixed channel of electron current (and depleted density) is created in the Large Plasma Device Upgrade (LAPD) at UCLA, using a small, heated, oxide-coated electrode at one plasma-column end and we show that the larger plasma column rotates about its cylindrical axis from a radial electric field imposed by a special termination electrode on the same end. Initial experimentation with plasma-rotation-inducing termination electrodes began in May 2006 in the West Virginia Q Machine, leading to two designs that, in January 2007, were tested in LAPD. The radial profile of azimuthal velocity was consistent with predictions of rigid-body rotation. Current-channel experiments in LAPD, in August 2006, showed that inertial Alfvén waves could be concentrated in an off-axis channel of electron current and depleted plasma density. These experimental results will be presented and discussed. This research is supported by DOE and NSF.

  6. Innovative research in the design and operation of large telescopes for space: Aspects of giant telescopes in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.

    1985-01-01

    The capability and understanding of how to finish the reflector surfaces needed for large space telescopes is discussed. The technology for making very light glass substrates for mirrors is described. Other areas of development are in wide field imaging design for very fast primaries, in data analysis and retrieval methods for astronomical images, and in methods for making large area closely packed mosaics of solid state array detectors.

  7. Extraterrestrial processing and manufacturing of large space systems. Volume 3: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Facilities and equipment are defined for refining processes to commercial grade of lunar material that is delivered to a 'space manufacturing facility' in beneficiated, primary processed quality. The manufacturing facilities and the equipment for producing elements of large space systems from these materials and providing programmatic assessments of the concepts are also defined. In-space production processes of solar cells (by vapor deposition) and arrays, structures and joints, conduits, waveguides, RF equipment radiators, wire cables, converters, and others are described.

  8. Extraterrestrial processing and manufacturing of large space systems, volume 1, chapters 1-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Space program scenarios for production of large space structures from lunar materials are defined. The concept of the space manufacturing facility (SMF) is presented. The manufacturing processes and equipment for the SMF are defined and the conceptual layouts are described for the production of solar cells and arrays, structures and joints, conduits, waveguides, RF equipment radiators, wire cables, and converters. A 'reference' SMF was designed and its operation requirements are described.

  9. Development of precision structure of a large-size space radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astavin, A. S.; Kovalev, V. S.; Komaev, R. V.; Moisheev, A. A.; Tsvelev, V. M.; Serebrennikov, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents methods for the design and engineering concepts, which made it possible to develop and manufacture the space radio telescope with a large size and high accuracy of the effective reflector area and focal assembly position.

  10. Some interdisciplinary trade-offs in the design of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The constraints placed on the design of large space structures by acceleration, attitude control, and stationkeeping forces are discussed. Stiffness requirements for the structures are derived. The use of active versus passive accuracy control methods is also addressed.