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Sample records for large subsonic transports

  1. Technology benefits for very large subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcara, Philip C., Jr.; Bartlett, Dennis W.; Mcgraw, Marvin E., Jr.; Geiselhart, Karl A.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented for a study conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center which examined the effects of advanced technologies on the performance and size of very large, long-range subsonic transports. The study was performed using the Flight Optimization System (FLOPS). a multidisciplinary system of computer programs for conceptual and preliminary design and evaluation of advanced aircraft concepts. A four-engine, baseline configuration representative of existing transport technology was defined having a payload of 412 passengers plus baggage and a design range of 7300 nmi. New 600, 800 and 1000-passenger advanced transport concepts were then developed and compared to the baseline configuration. The technologies examined include 1995 entry-into-service (ELS) engines, high aspect ratio supercritical wings, composite materials for the wing, fuselage and empennage, and hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC). All operational and regulatory requirements and constraints, such as fuel reserves, balanced field length, and second segment climb gradient were satisfied during the design process. The effect of the advanced technologies on the size, weight and performance of the advanced transport concepts are presented. In addition, the sensitivity of the takeoff gross weight of the advanced transport concepts to increases in design range and payload, and designing for stretch capability are also discussed.

  2. The future of very large subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, R. Steven; Hays, Anthony P.; Parrott, Ed L.

    1996-01-01

    The Very Large Subsonic Transport (VLST) is a multi-use commercial passenger, commercial cargo, and military airlifter roughly 50% larger than the current Lockheed C-5 and Boeing 747. Due to the large size and cost of the VLST, it is unlikely that the commercial market can support more than one aircraft production line, while declining defense budgets will not support a dedicated military VLST. A successful VLST must therefore meet airline requirements for more passenger and cargo capacity on congested routes into slot-limited airports and also provide a cost effective heavy airlift capacity to support the overseas deployment of US military forces. A successful VLST must satisfy three key missions: commercial passenger service with nominal seating capacity at a minimum of 650 passengers with a range capability of 7,000 to 10,000 miles; commercial air cargo service for containerized cargo to support global manufacturing of high value added products, 'just-in-time' parts delivery, and the general globalization of trade; and military airlift with adequate capacity to load current weapon systems, with minimal break-down, over global ranges (7,000 to 10,000 miles) required to reach the operational theater without need of overseas bases and midair refueling. The development of the VLST poses some technical issues specific to large aircraft, but also key technologies applicable to a wide range of subsonic transport aircraft. Key issues and technologies unique to the VLST include: large composite structures; dynamic control of a large, flexible structure; aircraft noise requirements for aircraft over 850,000 pounds; and increased aircraft separation due to increased wake vortex generation. Other issues, while not unique to the VLST, will critically impact the ability to build an efficient and affordable aircraft include: active control systems: Fly-By-Light/Power-By-Wire (FBL/PBW); high lift systems; flight deck associate systems; laminar flow; emergency egress; and

  3. Application of advanced technologies to very large subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, Dennis W.; Mcgraw, Marvin E., Jr.; Arcara, Philip C., Jr.; Geiselhart, Karl A.

    1992-01-01

    A NASA-Langley study has used the interdisciplinary Flight Optimization System to examine the impact of advanced technologies on the performance and plausible size of large, long-range subsonic transport aircraft. The baseline, four-engine configuration studied would carry 412 passengers over 7300 n. mi.; the technologies evaluated encompass high aspect ratio supercritical-airfoil wings, a composite wing structure, an all-composite primary structure, and hybrid laminar flow control. The results obtained indicate that 600-passenger transports, whose takeoff gross weight is no greater than that of the 412-passenger baseline, are made possible by the new technologies.

  4. Advanced Configurations for Very Large Subsonic Transport Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMasters, John H.; Paisley, David J.; Hubert, Richard J.; Kroo, Ilan; Bofah, Kwasi K.; Sullivan, John P.; Drela, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Recent aerospace industry interest in developing a subsonic commercial transport airplane with 50 percent greater passenger capacity than the largest existing aircraft in this category (the Boeing 747-400 with approximately 400-450 seats) has generated a range of proposals based largely on the configuration paradigm established nearly 50 years ago with the Boeing B-47 bomber. While this basic configuration paradigm has come to dominate subsonic commercial airplane development since the advent of the Boeing 707/Douglas DC-8 in the mid-1950's, its extrapolation to the size required to carry more than 600-700 passengers raises several questions. To explore these and a number of related issues, a team of Boeing, university, and NASA engineers was formed under the auspices of the NASA Advanced Concepts Program. The results of a Research Analysis focused on a large, unconventional transport airplane configuration for which Boeing has applied for a patent are the subject of this report. It should be noted here that this study has been conducted independently of the Boeing New Large Airplane (NLA) program, and with the exception of some generic analysis tools which may be common to this effort and the NLA (as will be described later), no explicit Boeing NLA data other than that published in the open literature has been used in the conduct of the study reported here.

  5. Takeoff certification considerations for large subsonic and supersonic transport airplanes using the Ames flight simulator for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, C. T.; Drinkwater, F. J., III; Fry, E. B.; Forrest, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Data for use in development of takeoff airworthiness standards for new aircraft designs such as the supersonic transport (SST) and the large wide-body subsonic jet transport are provided. An advanced motion simulator was used to compare the performance and handling characteristics of three representative large jet transports during specific flight certification tasks. Existing regulatory constraints and methods for determining rotation speed were reviewed, and the effects on takeoff performance of variations in rotation speed, pitch attitude, and pitch attitude rate during the rotation maneuver were analyzed. A limited quantity of refused takeoff information was obtained. The aerodynamics, wing loading, and thrust-to-weight ratio of the subject SST resulted in takeoff speeds limited by climb (rather than lift-off) considerations. Take-off speeds based on U.S. subsonic transport requirements were found unacceptable because of the criticality of rotation-abuse effects on one-engine-inoperative climb performance. Adequate safety margin was provided by takeoff speeds based on proposed Anglo-French supersonic transport (TSS) criteria, with the limiting criterion being that takeoff safety speed be at least 1.15 times the one-engine-inoperative zero-rate-of-climb speed. Various observations related to SST certification are presented.

  6. A Probabilistic Assessment of NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technologies for a Large Subsonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Michael T.; Jones, Scott M.; Arcara, Philip C., Jr.; Haller, William J.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program features advanced aeropropulsion technologies that include highly loaded turbomachinery, an advanced low-NOx combustor, high-temperature materials, intelligent propulsion controls, aspirated seal technology, and an advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) design tool to help reduce airplane drag. A probabilistic system assessment is performed to evaluate the impact of these technologies on aircraft fuel burn and NOx reductions. A 300-passenger aircraft, with two 396-kN thrust (85,000-pound) engines is chosen for the study. The results show that a large subsonic aircraft equipped with the UEET technologies has a very high probability of meeting the UEET Program goals for fuel-burn (or equivalent CO2) reduction (15% from the baseline) and LTO (landing and takeoff) NOx reductions (70% relative to the 1996 International Civil Aviation Organization rule). These results are used to provide guidance for developing a robust UEET technology portfolio, and to prioritize the most promising technologies required to achieve UEET program goals for the fuel-burn and NOx reductions.

  7. Incorporating biplane wing theory into a large, subsonic, all-cargo transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zyskowski, Michael K.

    1994-01-01

    If the air-cargo market increases at the pace predicted, a new conceptual aircraft will be demanded to meet the needs of the air-cargo industry. Furthermore, it has been found that not only should this aircraft be optimized to carry the intermodal containers used by the current shipping industry, but it should also be be able to operate at existing airports. The best solution to these problems is a configuration incorporating a bi-wing planform, which has resulted in significant improvements over the monoplane in lift/drag, weight reduction, and span reduction. The future of the air-cargo market, biplane theory, wind tunnel tests, and a comparison of the aerodynamic characteristics of the biplane and monoplane are discussed. The factors pertaining to a biplane cargo transport are then examined, resulting in biplane geometric parameters.

  8. Propulsion technology for an advanced subsonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, M. A.; Antl, R. J.; Povolny, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Engine design studies for future subsonic commercial transport aircraft were conducted in parallel with airframe studies. These studies surveyed a broad distribution of design variables, including aircraft configuration, payload, range, and speed, with particular emphasis on reducing noise and exhaust emissions without severe economic and performance penalties. The results indicated that an engine for an advanced transport would be similar to the currently emerging turbofan engines. Application of current technology in the areas of noise suppression and combustors imposed severe performance and economic penalties.

  9. Vortex Wakes of Subsonic Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A historical overview will be presented of the research conducted on the structure and modification of the vortices generated by the lifting surfaces of subsonic transport aircraft. The seminar will describe the three areas of vortex research; namely, the magnitude of the hazard posed, efforts to reduce the hazard to an acceptable level, and efforts to develop a systematic means for avoiding vortex wakes. It is first pointed out that the characteristics of lift-generated vortices are related to the aerodynamic shapes that produce them and that various arrangements of surfaces can be used to produce different vortex structures. The largest portion of the research conducted to date has been directed at finding ways to reduce the hazard potential of lift-generated vortices shed by subsonic transport aircraft in the vicinity of airports during landing and takeoff operations. It is stressed that lift-generated vortex wakes are so complex that progress towards a solution requires application of a combined theoretical and experimental research program because either alone often leads to incorrect conclusions. It is concluded that a satisfactory aerodynamic solution to the wake-vortex problem at airports has not yet been found but a reduction in the impact of the wake-vortex hazard on airport capacity may become available in the foreseeable future through wake-vortex avoidance concepts currently under study. The material to be presented in this overview is drawn from articles published in aerospace journals that are available publicly.

  10. NASA's Subsonic Jet Transport Noise Reduction Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Clemans A.; Preisser, John S.

    2000-01-01

    Although new jet transport airplanes in today s fleet are considerably quieter than the first jet transports introduced about 40 years ago, airport community noise continues to be an important environmental issue. NASA s Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) Noise Reduction program was begun in 1994 as a seven-year effort to develop technology to reduce jet transport noise 10 dB relative to 1992 technology. This program provides for reductions in engine source noise, improvements in nacelle acoustic treatments, reductions in the noise generated by the airframe, and improvements in the way airplanes are operated in the airport environs. These noise reduction efforts will terminate at the end of 2001 and it appears that the objective will be met. However, because of an anticipated 3-8% growth in passenger and cargo operations well into the 21st Century and the slow introduction of new the noise reduction technology into the fleet, world aircraft noise impact will remain essentially constant until about 2020 to 2030 and thereafter begin to rise. Therefore NASA has begun planning with the Federal Aviation Administration, industry, universities and environmental interest groups in the USA for a new noise reduction initiative to provide technology for significant further reductions.

  11. Tabulated pressure measurements on a large subsonic transport model airplane with high bypass ratio, powered, fan jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flechner, S. G.; Patterson, J. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental wind-tunnel investigation to determine the aerodynamic interference and the jet-wake interference associated with the wing, pylon, and high-bypass-ratio, powered, fan-jet model engines has been conducted on a typical high-wing logistics transport airplane configuration. Pressures were measured on the wing and pylons and on the surfaces of the engine fan cowl, turbine cowl, and plug. Combinations of wing, pylons, engines, and flow-through nacelles were tested, and the pressure coefficients are presented in tabular form. Tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.700 to 0.825 and angles of attack from -2 to 4 deg.

  12. The Liquid Hydrogen Option for the Subsonic Transport: A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korycinski, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    Continued subsonic air transport design studies include the option for a liquid hydrogen fuel system as an aircraft fuel conservation measure. Elements of this option discussed include: (1) economical production of hydrogen; (2) efficient liquefaction of hydrogen; (3) materials for long service life LH2 fuel tanks; (4) insulation materials; (5) LH2 fuel service and installations at major air terminals; (6) assessment of LH2 hazards; and (7) the engineering definition of an LH2 fuel system for a large subsonic passenger air transport.

  13. Follow-On Technology Requirement Study for Advanced Subsonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendus, Bruce E.; Stark, Donald F.; Holler, Richard P.; Funkhouser, Merle E.

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to define and assess the critical or enabling technologies required for a year 2005 entry into service (EIS) engine for subsonic commercial aircraft, with NASA Advanced Subsonic Transport goals used as benchmarks. The year 2005 EIS advanced technology engine is an Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) engine. Performance analysis showed that the ADP design offered many advantages compared to a baseline turbofan engine. An airplane/ engine simulation study using a long range quad aircraft quantified the effects of the ADP engine on the economics of typical airline operation. Results of the economic analysis show the ADP propulsion system provides a 6% reduction in direct operating cost plus interest, with half the reduction resulting from reduced fuel consumption. Critical and enabling technologies for the year 2005 EIS ADP were identified and prioritized.

  14. Study of LH2 fueled subsonic passenger transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The potential of using liquid hydrogen as fuel in subsonic transport aircraft was investigated to explore an expanded matrix of passenger aircraft sizes. Aircraft capable of carrying 130 passengers 2,780 km (1500 n.mi.); 200 passengers 5,560 km (3000 n.mi.); and 400 passengers on a 9,265 km (5000 n.mi.) radius mission, were designed parametrically. Both liquid hydrogen and conventionally fueled versions were generated for each payload/range in order that comparisons could be made. Aircraft in each mission category were compared on the basis of weight, size, cost, energy utilization, and noise.

  15. Evaluation of viscous drag reduction schemes for subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marino, A.; Economos, C.; Howard, F. G.

    1975-01-01

    The results are described of a theoretical study of viscous drag reduction schemes for potential application to the fuselage of a long-haul subsonic transport aircraft. The schemes which were examined included tangential slot injection on the fuselage and various synergetic combinations of tangential slot injection and distributed suction applied to wing and fuselage surfaces. Both passive and mechanical (utilizing turbo-machinery) systems were examined. Overall performance of the selected systems was determined at a fixed subsonic cruise condition corresponding to a flight Mach number of free stream M = 0.8 and an altitude of 11,000 m. The nominal aircraft to which most of the performance data was referenced was a wide-body transport of the Boeing 747 category. Some of the performance results obtained with wing suction are referenced to a Lockheed C-141 Star Lifter wing section. Alternate designs investigated involved combinations of boundary layer suction on the wing surfaces and injection on the fuselage, and suction and injection combinations applied to the fuselage only.

  16. Advanced subsonic long-haul transport terminal area compatibility study. Volume 1: Compatibility assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An analysis was made to identify airplane research and technology necessary to ensure advanced transport aircraft the capability of accommodating forecast traffic without adverse impact on airport communities. Projections were made of the delay, noise, and emissions impact of future aircraft fleets on typical large urban airport. Design requirements, based on these projections, were developed for an advanced technology, long-haul, subsonic transport. A baseline aircraft was modified to fulfill the design requirements for terminal area compatibility. Technical and economic comparisons were made between these and other aircraft configured to support the study.

  17. Power-by-Wire Development and Demonstration for Subsonic Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    During the last decade, three significant studies by the Lockheed Martin Corporation, the NASA Lewis Research Center, and McDonnell Douglas Corporation have clearly shown operational, weight, and cost advantages for commercial subsonic transport aircraft that use all-electric or more-electric technologies in the secondary electric power systems. Even though these studies were completed on different aircraft, used different criteria, and applied a variety of technologies, all three have shown large benefits to the aircraft industry and to the nation's competitive position. The Power-by-Wire (PBW) program is part of the highly reliable Fly-By-Light/Power-By-Wire (FBL/PBW) Technology Program, whose goal is to develop the technology base for confident application of integrated FBL/PBW systems for transport aircraft. This program is part of the NASA aeronautics strategic thrust in subsonic aircraft/national airspace (Thrust 1) to "develop selected high-leverage technologies and explore new means to ensure the competitiveness of U.S. subsonic aircraft and to enhance the safety and productivity of the national aviation system" (The Aeronautics Strategic Plan). Specifically, this program is an initiative under Thrust 1, Key Objective 2, to "develop, in cooperation with U.S. industry, selected high-payoff technologies that can enable significant improvements in aircraft efficiency and cost."

  18. An Analytical Study for Subsonic Oblique Wing Transport Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, E. S.; Honrath, J.; Tomlin, K. H.; Swift, G.; Shumpert, P.; Warnock, W.

    1976-01-01

    The oblique wing concept has been investigated for subsonic transport application for a cruise Mach number of 0.95. Three different mission applications were considered and the concept analyzed against the selected mission requirements. Configuration studies determined the best area of applicability to be a commercial passenger transport mission. The critical parameter for the oblique wing concept was found to be aspect ratio which was limited to a value of 6.0 due to aeroelastic divergence. Comparison of the concept final configuration was made with fixed winged configurations designed to cruise at Mach 0.85 and 0.95. The crossover Mach number for the oblique wing concept was found to be Mach 0.91 for takeoff gross weight and direct operating cost. Benefits include reduced takeoff distance, installed thrust and mission block fuel and improved community noise characteristics. The variable geometry feature enables the final configuration to increase range by 10% at Mach 0.712 and to increase endurance by as much as 44%.

  19. Technologies and Concepts for Reducing the Fuel Burn of Subsonic Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickol, Craig L.

    2012-01-01

    There are many technologies under development that have the potential to enable large fuel burn reductions in the 2025 timeframe for subsonic transport aircraft relative to the current fleet. This paper identifies a potential technology suite and analyzes the fuel burn reduction potential of these technologies when integrated into advanced subsonic transport concepts. Advanced tube-and-wing concepts are developed in the single aisle and large twin aisle class, and a hybrid-wing-body concept is developed for the large twin aisle class. The resulting fuel burn reductions for the advanced tube-and-wing concepts range from a 42% reduction relative to the 777-200 to a 44% reduction relative to the 737-800. In addition, the hybrid-wingbody design resulted in a 47% fuel burn reduction relative to the 777-200. Of course, to achieve these fuel burn reduction levels, a significant amount of technology and concept maturation is required between now and 2025. A methodology for capturing and tracking concept maturity is also developed and presented in this paper.

  20. Advanced subsonic transport approach noise: The relative contribution of airframe noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr.; Garber, Donald P.

    1992-01-01

    With current engine technology, airframe noise is a contributing source for large commercial aircraft on approach, but not the major contributor. With the promise of much quieter jet engines with the planned new generation of high-by-pass turbofan engines, airframe noise has become a topic of interest in the advanced subsonic transport research program. The objective of this paper is to assess the contribution of airframe noise relative to the other aircraft noise sources on approach. The assessment will be made for a current technology large commercial transport aircraft and for an envisioned advanced technology aircraft. NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) will be used to make total aircraft noise predictions for these two aircraft types. Predicted noise levels and areas of noise contours will be used to determine the relative importance of the contributing approach noise sources. The actual set-up decks used to make the ANOPP runs for the two aircraft types are included in appendixes.

  1. Formal representation of the requirements for an Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frincke, Deborah; Wolber, Dave; Fisher, Gene; Cohen, Gerald C.; Mclees, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    A partial requirement specification for an Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) Flight Control System is described. The example was adopted from requirements given in a NASA Contractor report. The language used to describe the requirements, Requirements Specification Language (RSL), is described in a companion document.

  2. Comparison of solutions to bi-Maxwellian and Maxwellian transport equations for subsonic flows. [in terrestrial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demars, H. G.; Schunk, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Conditions corresponding to the steady state subsonic flow of a fully ionized electron-proton plasma in the terrestrial ionosphere are presently characterized by systematically comparing the solutions to the bi-Maxwellian-based 16-moment and Maxwellian-based 13-moment transport equations. The former can account for large temperature anisotropies and the flow of both parallel and perpendicular thermal energy, while the latter account for small temperature anisotropies and only a total heat flow. The comparison is conducted for 2000-10,000 K lower boundary temperatures and 1-4-K/km temperature gradients, over the 1500-13,000-km altitude range.

  3. Study of methane fuel for subsonic transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, L. K.; Davis, G. W.; Versaw, E. F.; Cunnington, G. R., Jr.; Daniels, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    The cost and performance were defined for commercial transport using liquid methane including its fuel system and the ground facility complex required for the processing and storage of methane. A cost and performance comparison was made with Jet A and hydrogen powered aircraft of the same payload and range capability. Extensive design work was done on cryogenic fuel tanks, insulation systems as well as the fuel system itself. Three candidate fuel tank locations were evaluated, i.e., fuselage tanks, wing tanks or external pylon tanks.

  4. Aviation safety and automation technology for subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, James A.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed here are aviation safety human factors and air traffic control (ATC) automation research conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center. Research results are given in the areas of flight deck and ATC automations, displays and warning systems, crew coordination, and crew fatigue and jet lag. Accident investigation and an incident reporting system that is used to guide the human factors research is discussed. A design philosophy for human-centered automation is given, along with an evaluation of automation on advanced technology transports. Intelligent error tolerant systems such as electronic checklists are discussed along with design guidelines for reducing procedure errors. The data on evaluation of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training indicates highly significant positive changes in appropriate flight deck behavior and more effective use of available resources for crew members receiving the training.

  5. Subsonic Aerodynamic Assessment of Vortex Flow Management Devices on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Applin, Zachary T.; Kemmerly, Guy T.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of leading-edge vortex management devices on the subsonic performance of a high-speed civil transport (HSCT) configuration was conducted in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.14 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 3.08 x 10 (sup 6) to 5.47 x 10 (sup 6). The test model was designed for a cruise Mach number of 2.7. During the subsonic high-lift phase of flight, vortical flow dominates the upper surface flow structure, and during vortex breakdown, this flow causes adverse pitch-up and a reduction of usable lift. The experimental results showed that the beneficial effects of small leading-edge vortex management devices located near the model reference center were insufficient to substantially affect the resulting aerodynamic forces and moments. However, devices located at or near the wiring apex region demonstrated potential for pitch control with little effect on overall lift.

  6. Guidelines for Computing Longitudinal Dynamic Stability Characteristics of a Subsonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Joseph R.; Frank, Neal T.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic study is presented to guide the selection of a numerical solution strategy for URANS computation of a subsonic transport configuration undergoing simulated forced oscillation about its pitch axis. Forced oscillation is central to the prevalent wind tunnel methodology for quantifying aircraft dynamic stability derivatives from force and moment coefficients, which is the ultimate goal for the computational simulations. Extensive computations are performed that lead in key insights of the critical numerical parameters affecting solution convergence. A preliminary linear harmonic analysis is included to demonstrate the potential of extracting dynamic stability derivatives from computational solutions.

  7. Evaluation of laminar flow control systems for subsonic commercial transport aircraft: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    An evaluation was made of laminar flow control (LFC) system concepts for subsonic commercial transport aircraft. Configuration design studies, performance analyses, fabrication development, structural testing, wind tunnel testing, and contamination-avoidance techniques were included. As a result of trade studies, a configuration with LFC on the upper wing surface only, utilizing an electron beam-perforated suction surface, and employing a retractable high-lift shield for contamination avoidance, was selected as the most practical LFC system. The LFC aircraft was then compared with an advanced turbulent aircraft designed for the same mission. This comparison indicated significant fuel savings.

  8. Trim and Structural Optimization of Subsonic Transport Wings Using Nonconventional Aeroelastic Tailoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    Several minimum-mass aeroelastic optimization problems are solved to evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of novel tailoring schemes for subsonic transport wings. Aeroelastic strength and panel buckling constraints are imposed across a variety of trimmed maneuver loads. Tailoring with metallic thickness variations, functionally graded materials, composite laminates, tow steering, and distributed trailing edge control effectors are all found to provide reductions in structural wing mass with varying degrees of success. The question as to whether this wing mass reduction will offset the increased manufacturing cost is left unresolved for each case.

  9. Study of the application of hydrogen fuel to long-range subsonic transport aircraft, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.; Lange, R. H.; Moore, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility, practicability, and potential advantages/disadvantages of using liquid hydrogen as fuel in long range, subsonic transport aircraft of advanced design were studied. Both passenger and cargo-type aircraft were investigated. To provide a valid basis for comparison, conventional hydrocarbon (Jet A) fueled aircraft were designed to perform identical missions using the same advanced technology and meeting the same operational constraints. The liquid hydrogen and Jet A fueled aircraft were compared on the basis of weight, size, energy utilization, cost, noise, emissions, safety, and operational characteristics. A program of technology development was formulated.

  10. An example of requirements for Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) flight control system using structured techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclees, Robert E.; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements are presented for an Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) flight control system generated using structured techniques. The requirements definition starts from initially performing a mission analysis to identify the high level control system requirements and functions necessary to satisfy the mission flight. The result of the study is an example set of control system requirements partially represented using a derivative of Yourdon's structured techniques. Also provided is a research focus for studying structured design methodologies and in particular design-for-validation philosophies.

  11. Evaluation of laminar flow control systems concepts for subsonic commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation was made of laminar flow control (LFC) system concepts for subsonic commercial transport aircraft. Configuration design studies, performance analyses, fabrication development, structural testing, wind tunnel testing, and contamination-avoidance techniques were included. As a result of trade studies, a configuration with LFC on the upper wing surface only, utilizing an electron beam-perforated suction surface, and employing a retractable high-lift shield for contamination avoidance, was selected as the most practical LFC system. The LFC aircraft was then compared with an advanced turbulent aircraft designed for the same mission. This comparison indicated significant fuel savings and reduced direct operating cost benefits would result from using LFC.

  12. Subsonic high-lift flight research on the NASA Transport System Research Vehicle (TSRV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, Long P.; Vijgen, Paul M. H. W.; Hardin, Jay D.; Van Dam, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    Flight tests are being conducted as part of a multiphased subsonic transport high-lift research project for correlation with ground based wind tunnel and computational results. The NASA Langley TSRV 737-100 airplane is utilized to obtain flow characteristics at full-scale Reynolds numbers to contribute to the knowledge of several dominant high-lift flow issues such as boundary layer transition, confluent boundary layer development, and 3D flow separation. Recent test results obtained for a full-chord wing section including the slat, main-wing, and flap elements are presented.

  13. Evaluation of Laminar Flow Control System Concepts for Subsonic Commercial Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgeon, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Alternatives in the design of laminar flow control (LFC) subsonic commerical transport aircraft for opeation in the 1980's period were studied. Analyses were conducted to select mission parameters and define optimum aircraft configurational parameters for the selected mission, defined by a passenger payload of 400 and a design range of 12, 038 km (6500 n mi). The baseline aircraft developed for this mission was used as a vehicle for the evaluation and development of alternative LFC system concepts. Alternatices in the areas of aerodynamics, structures and materials, LFC systems, leading-edge region cleaning, and integration of auxiliary systems were studied. Relative to a similarly-optimized advanced technology turbulent transport, the final LFC configuration is approximately equal in DOC but provides descreases of 8.2% in gross weight and 21.7% in fuel consumption.

  14. Vehicle design considerations for active control application to subsonic transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, L. G.; Clement, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    The state of the art in active control technology is summarized. How current design criteria and airworthiness regulations might restrict application of this emerging technology to subsonic CTOL transports of the 1980's are discussed. Facets of active control technology considered are: (1) augmentation of relaxed inherent stability; (2) center-of-gravity control; (3) ride quality control; (4) load control; (5) flutter control; (6) envelope limiting, and (7) pilot interface with the control system. A summary and appraisal of the current state of the art, design criteria, and recommended practices, as well as a projection of the risk in applying each of these facets of active control technology is given. A summary of pertinent literature and technical expansions is included.

  15. Comparison of all-electric secondary power systems for civil subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, David D.

    1992-01-01

    Three separate studies have shown operational, weight, and cost advantages for commercial subsonic transport aircraft using an all-electric secondary power system. The first study in 1982 showed that all-electric secondary power systems produced the second largest benefit compared to four other technology upgrades. The second study in 1985 showed a 10 percent weight and fuel savings using an all-electric high frequency (20 kHz) secondary power system. The last study in 1991 showed a 2 percent weight savings using today's technology (400 Hz) in an all-electric secondary power system. This paper will compare the 20 kHz and 400 Hz studies, analyze the 2 to 10 percent difference in weight savings and comment on the common benefits of the all-electric secondary power system.

  16. CFD Assessment of Aerodynamic Degradation of a Subsonic Transport Due to Airframe Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.; Atkins, Harold L.; Viken, Sally A.; Morrison, Joseph H.

    2010-01-01

    A computational study is presented to assess the utility of two NASA unstructured Navier-Stokes flow solvers for capturing the degradation in static stability and aerodynamic performance of a NASA General Transport Model (GTM) due to airframe damage. The approach is to correlate computational results with a substantial subset of experimental data for the GTM undergoing progressive losses to the wing, vertical tail, and horizontal tail components. The ultimate goal is to advance the probability of inserting computational data into the creation of advanced flight simulation models of damaged subsonic aircraft in order to improve pilot training. Results presented in this paper demonstrate good correlations with slope-derived quantities, such as pitch static margin and static directional stability, and incremental rolling moment due to wing damage. This study further demonstrates that high fidelity Navier-Stokes flow solvers could augment flight simulation models with additional aerodynamic data for various airframe damage scenarios.

  17. The development and evaluation of advanced technology laminar-flow-control subsonic transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgeon, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of applying laminar flow control (LFC) to the wings and empennage of long-range subsonic transport aircraft for initial operation in 1985. For a design mission range of 5500 n mi, advanced technology LFC and turbulent-flow aircraft were developed for a 200-passenger payload, and compared on the basis of production costs, direct operating costs, and fuel efficiency. Parametric analyses were conducted to establish optimum geometry, advanced system concepts were evaluated, and configuration variations maximizing the effectiveness of LFC were developed. The final comparisons include consideation of maintenance costs and procedures, manufacturing costs and procedures, and operational considerations peculiar to LFC aircraft.

  18. Durability of foam insulation for LH2 fuel tanks of future subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, E. L.; Helenbrook, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    Organic foams were tested to determine their suitability for insulating liquid hydrogen tanks of subsonic aircraft. The specimens, including nonreinforced foams and foams with chopped glass reinforcements, flame retardants, and vapor barriers, were scaled to simulate stress conditions in large tanks. The tests were conducted within aluminum tank compartments filled with liquid hydrogen and the boil-off rate was used as the criterion of thermal performance. It was found that while all insulations deteriorated with increased cycles, two nonreinforced polyurethane foams showed no structural deterioration after 4200 thermal cycles (equivalent to 15 years of airline service). It was also found that fiberglass reinforcement and flame retardants impaired thermal performance and reduced useful life of the foams. Vapor barriers enhanced structural integrity without any deterioration in thermal properties.

  19. On the use of controls for subsonic transport performance improvement: Overview and future directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn; Espana, Martin

    1994-01-01

    Increasing competition among airline manufacturers and operators has highlighted the issue of aircraft efficiency. Fewer aircraft orders have led to an all-out efficiency improvement effort among the manufacturers to maintain if not increase their share of the shrinking number of aircraft sales. Aircraft efficiency is important in airline profitability and is key if fuel prices increase from their current low. In a continuing effort to improve aircraft efficiency and develop an optimal performance technology base, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center developed and flight tested an adaptive performance seeking control system to optimize the quasi-steady-state performance of the F-15 aircraft. The demonstrated technology is equally applicable to transport aircraft although with less improvement. NASA Dryden, in transitioning this technology to transport aircraft, is specifically exploring the feasibility of applying adaptive optimal control techniques to performance optimization of redundant control effectors. A simulation evaluation of a preliminary control law optimizes wing-aileron camber for minimum net aircraft drag. Two submodes are evaluated: one to minimize fuel and the other to maximize velocity. This paper covers the status of performance optimization of the current fleet of subsonic transports. Available integrated controls technologies are reviewed to define approaches using active controls. A candidate control law for adaptive performance optimization is presented along with examples of algorithm operation.

  20. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Program review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology to an Advanced Subsonic Transport Project, established as one element of the NASA/Boeing Energy Efficient Transport Technology Program. The performance assessment showed that incorporating ACT into an airplane designed to fly approximately 200 passengers approximately 2,000 nmi could yield block fuel savings from 6 to 10 percent at the design range. The principal risks associated with incorporating these active control functions into a commercial airplane are those involved with the ACT system implementation. The Test and Evaluation phase of the IAAC Project focused on the design, fabrication, and test of a system that implemented pitch axis fly-by-wire, pitch axis augmentation, and wing load alleviation. The system was built to be flight worthy, and was planned to be experimentally flown on the 757. The system was installed in the Boeing Digital Avionics Flight Controls Laboratory (DAFCL), where open loop hardware and software tests, and a brief examination of a direct drive valve (DDV) actuation concept were accomplished. The IAAC Project has shown that ACT can be beneficially incorporated into a commercial transport airplane. Based on the results achieved during the testing phase, there appears to be no fundamental reason(s) that would preclude the commercial application of ACT, assuming an appropriate development effort is included.

  1. Evaluation of laminar flow control system concepts for subsonic commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate alternatives in the design of laminar flow control (LFC) subsonic commercial transport aircraft for operation in the 1980's period. Analyses were conducted to select mission parameters and define optimum aircraft configurational parameters for the selected mission, defined by a passenger payload of 400 and a design range of 12,038 km (6500 n mi). The baseline aircraft developed for this mission was used as a vehicle for the evaluation and development of alternative LFC system concepts. Alternatives were evaluated in the areas of aerodynamics structures, materials, LFC systems, leading-edge region cleaning and integration of auxiliary systems. Based on these evaluations, concept in each area were selected for further development and testing and ultimate incorporation in the final study aircraft. Relative to a similarly-optimized advanced technology turbulent transport, the final LFC configuration is approximately equal in direct operating cost but provides decreases of 8.2% in gross weight and 21.7% in fuel consumption.

  2. In-flight surface-flow measurements on a subsonic transport high-lift flap system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, Long P.; Vijgen, Paul M. H. W.; Hardin, Jay D.

    1992-01-01

    As part of a multiphased program for subsonic transport high-lift flight research, flight tests were conducted on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (B737-100 aircraft) at the NASA Langley Research Center, to obtain detailed flow characteristics of the high-lift flap system for correlation with computational and wind-tunnel investigations. Pressure distributions, skin friction, and flow-visualization measurements were made on a triple-slotted flap system for a range of flap deflections, chord Reynolds numbers (10 to 21 million), and Mach numbers (0.16 to 0.36). Experimental test results are given for representative flap settings indicating flow separation on the fore-flap element for the largest flap deflection. Comparisons of the in-flight flow measurements were made with predictions from available viscous multielement computational methods modified with simple-sweep theory. Computational results overpredicted the experimentally measured pressures, particularly in the case involving separation of the fore lap, indicating the need for better modeling of confluent boundary layers and three-dimensional sweep effects.

  3. Influence of Inflow Forcing on Large-Eddy Simulation of High Subsonic Jet Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yuya; Teramoto, Susumu; Okamoto, Koji; Nakanishi, Yuta; Nagashima, Toshio

    Subsonic jets at Mach number Mj = 0.9 are computed using compressible Large Eddy Simulation and Kirchhoff method in order to investigate the effects of the inflow forcing on the flow and sound field. Four parameters are varied in the jet inflow: the use of the first modes in the ring vortex excitation involving several azimuthal modes, the forcing amplitude, the thickness of disturbances, and the existence of the inflow forcing. It is confirmed that there are significant differences whether the disturbances are added or not. The inflow forcing parameter that has the most influence on the flow and sound field is the azimuthal modes. It is shown that the inflow forcing takes an important role to destroy the coherence of velocity disturbances on the shear layer and prevents high amplitude velocity and pressure fluctuations that are caused due to axisymmetric vortices. When first modes in several azimuthal modes are removed, the flow field and far field sound pressure levels are relatively consistent with experimental data.

  4. Analysis of noise radiation mechanisms in hot subsonic jet from a validated large eddy simulation solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lorteau, Mathieu Cléro, Franck Vuillot, François

    2015-07-15

    In the framework of jet noise computation, a numerical simulation of a subsonic turbulent hot jet is performed using large-eddy simulation. A geometrical tripping is used in order to trigger the turbulence at the nozzle exit. In a first part, the validity of the simulation is assessed by comparison with experimental measurements. The mean and rms velocity fields show good agreement, so do the azimuthal composition of the near pressure field and the far field spectra. Discrepancies remain close to the nozzle exit which lead to a limited overestimation of the pressure levels in both near and far fields, especially near the 90{sup ∘} angular sector. Two point correlation analyses are then applied to the data obtained from the simulation. These enable to link the downstream acoustic radiation, which is the main direction of radiation, to pressure waves developing in the shear layer and propagating toward the potential core end. The intermittency of the downstream acoustic radiation is evidenced and related to the coherent structures developing in the shear layer.

  5. Optimized aerodynamic design process for subsonic transport wing fitted with winglets. [wind tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of a wind-tunnel model of a wing representative of that of a subsonic jet transport aircraft, fitted with winglets, was performed using two recently developed optimal wing-design computer programs. Both potential flow codes use a vortex lattice representation of the near-field of the aerodynamic surfaces for determination of the required mean camber surfaces for minimum induced drag, and both codes use far-field induced drag minimization procedures to obtain the required spanloads. One code uses a discrete vortex wake model for this far-field drag computation, while the second uses a 2-D advanced panel wake model. Wing camber shapes for the two codes are very similar, but the resulting winglet camber shapes differ widely. Design techniques and considerations for these two wind-tunnel models are detailed, including a description of the necessary modifications of the design geometry to format it for use by a numerically controlled machine for the actual model construction.

  6. Longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a subsonic, energy-efficient transport configuration in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Peter F.; Gloss, Blair B.

    1989-01-01

    The Reynolds number, aeroelasticity, boundary layer transition, and nonadiabatic wall temperature effects, and data repeatability was determined in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) for a subsonic, energy efficient transport model. The model was tested over a Mach number range of 0.50 to 0.86 and a Reynolds number range of 1.9 million to approximately 23.0 million (based on mean geometric chord). The majority of the data was taken using cryogenic nitrogen (data at 1.9 million Reynolds number was taken in air). Force and moment, wing pressure, and wing thermocouple data are presented. The data indicate that increasing Reynolds number resulted in greater effective camber of the supercritical wing and horizontal tail, resulting in greater lift and pitching moment coefficients at nearly all angles of attack for M = 0.82. As Reynolds number was increased, untrimmed L/D increased, the angle of attack for maximum L/D decreased, drag creep was reduced significantly, and drag divergence Mach number increased slightly. Data repeatability for both modes of operation of the NTF (air and cryogenic nitrogen) was generally very good, and nonadiabatic wall effects were estimated to be small. Transition-free and transition-fixed configurations had significantly different force and moment data at M = 0.82 for low Reynolds number, and very small differences were noted at high Reynolds numbers.

  7. Propulsion system studies for an advanced high subsonic, long range jet commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Propulsion system characteristics for a long range, high subsonic (Mach 0.90 - 0.98), jet commercial transport aircraft are studied to identify the most desirable cycle and engine configuration and to assess the payoff of advanced engine technologies applicable to the time frame of the late 1970s to the mid 1980s. An engine parametric study phase examines major cycle trends on the basis of aircraft economics. This is followed by the preliminary design of two advanced mixed exhaust turbofan engines pointed at two different technology levels (1970 and 1985 commercial certification for engines No. 1 and No. 2, respectively). The economic penalties of environmental constraints - noise and exhaust emissions - are assessed. The highest specific thrust engine (lowest bypass ratio for a given core technology) achievable with a single-stage fan yields the best economics for a Mach 0.95 - 0.98 aircraft and can meet the noise objectives specified, but with significant economic penalties. Advanced technologies which would allow high temperature and cycle pressure ratios to be used effectively are shown to provide significant improvement in mission performance which can partially offset the economic penalties incurred to meet lower noise goals. Advanced technology needs are identified; and, in particular, the initiation of an integrated fan and inlet aero/acoustic program is recommended.

  8. Design Methodology for Multi-Element High-Lift Systems on Subsonic Civil Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. S.; vanDam, C. P.

    1996-01-01

    The choice of a high-lift system is crucial in the preliminary design process of a subsonic civil transport aircraft. Its purpose is to increase the allowable aircraft weight or decrease the aircraft's wing area for a given takeoff and landing performance. However, the implementation of a high-lift system into a design must be done carefully, for it can improve the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft but may also drastically increase the aircraft empty weight. If designed properly, a high-lift system can improve the cost effectiveness of an aircraft by increasing the payload weight for a given takeoff and landing performance. This is why the design methodology for a high-lift system should incorporate aerodynamic performance, weight, and cost. The airframe industry has experienced rapid technological growth in recent years which has led to significant advances in high-lift systems. For this reason many existing design methodologies have become obsolete since they are based on outdated low Reynolds number wind-tunnel data and can no longer accurately predict the aerodynamic characteristics or weight of current multi-element wings. Therefore, a new design methodology has been created that reflects current aerodynamic, weight, and cost data and provides enough flexibility to allow incorporation of new data when it becomes available.

  9. Subsonic Euler Flows with Large Vorticity Through an Infinitely Long Axisymmetric Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lili; Duan, Ben

    2016-04-01

    This paper is a sequel to the earlier work Du and Duan (J Diff Equ 250:813-847, 2011) on well-posedness of steady subsonic Euler flows through infinitely long three-dimensional axisymmetric nozzles. In Du and Duan (J Diff Equ 250:813-847, 2011), the authors showed the existence and uniqueness of the global subsonic Euler flows through an infinitely long axisymmetric nozzle, when the variation of Bernoulli's function in the upstream is sufficiently small and the mass flux of the incoming flow is less than some critical value. The smallness of the variation of Bernoulli's function in the upstream prevents the attendance of the possible singularity in the nozzles, however, at the same time it also leads that the vorticity of the ideal flow is sufficiently small in the whole nozzle and the flows are indeed adjacent to axisymmetric potential flows. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of the vorticity for the smooth subsonic ideal flows in infinitely long axisymmetric nozzles. We modify the formulation of the problem in the previous work Du and Duan (J Diff Equ 250:813-847, 2011) and the existence and uniqueness results on the smooth subsonic ideal polytropic flows in infinitely long axisymmetric nozzles without the restriction on the smallness of the vorticity are shown in this paper.

  10. Wing pressure distributions from subsonic tests of a high-wing transport model. [in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.; Takallu, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted on a generic, high-wing transport model in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. This report contains pressure data that document effects of various model configurations and free-stream conditions on wing pressure distributions. The untwisted wing incorporated a full-span, leading-edge Krueger flap and a part-span, double-slotted trailing-edge flap system. The trailing-edge flap was tested at four different deflection angles (20 deg, 30 deg, 40 deg, and 60 deg). Four wing configurations were tested: cruise, flaps only, Krueger flap only, and high lift (Krueger flap and flaps deployed). Tests were conducted at free-stream dynamic pressures of 20 psf to 60 psf with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.22 x 10(exp 6) to 2.11 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers of 0.12 to 0.20. The angles of attack presented range from 0 deg to 20 deg and were determined by wing configuration. The angle of sideslip ranged from minus 20 deg to 20 deg. In general, pressure distributions were relatively insensitive to free-stream speed with exceptions primarily at high angles of attack or high flap deflections. Increasing trailing-edge Krueger flap significantly reduced peak suction pressures and steep gradients on the wing at high angles of attack. Installation of the empennage had no effect on wing pressure distributions. Unpowered engine nacelles reduced suction pressures on the wing and the flaps.

  11. Multivariate Analysis, Retrieval, and Storage System (MARS). Volume 6: MARS System - A Sample Problem (Gross Weight of Subsonic Transports)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hague, D. S.; Woodbury, N. W.

    1975-01-01

    The Mars system is a tool for rapid prediction of aircraft or engine characteristics based on correlation-regression analysis of past designs stored in the data bases. An example of output obtained from the MARS system, which involves derivation of an expression for gross weight of subsonic transport aircraft in terms of nine independent variables is given. The need is illustrated for careful selection of correlation variables and for continual review of the resulting estimation equations. For Vol. 1, see N76-10089.

  12. Study of the application of hydrogen fuel to long-range subsonic transport aircraft. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.; Lange, R. H.; Moore, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of using liquid hydrogen as fuel in advanced designs of long range, subsonic transport aircraft is assessed. Both passenger and cargo type aircraft are investigated. Comparisons of physical, performance, and economic parameters of the LH2 fueled designs with conventionally fueled aircraft are presented. Design studies are conducted to determine appropriate characteristics for the hydrogen related systems required on board the aircraft. These studies included consideration of material, structural, and thermodynamic requirements of the cryogenic fuel tanks and fuel systems with the structural support and thermal protection systems.

  13. Acoustic Prediction Methodology and Test Validation for an Efficient Low-Noise Hybrid Wing Body Subsonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Ronald T. (Compiler)

    2011-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to: (1) Develop a hybrid wing body subsonic transport configuration with noise prediction methods to meet the circa 2007 NASA Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) N+2 noise goal of -52 dB cum relative to FAR 36 Stage 3 (-42 dB cum re: Stage 4) while achieving a -25% fuel burned compared to current transports (re :B737/B767); (2) Develop improved noise prediction methods for ANOPP2 for use in predicting FAR 36 noise; (3) Design and fabricate a wind tunnel model for testing in the LaRC 14 x 22 ft low speed wind tunnel to validate noise predictions and determine low speed aero characteristics for an efficient low noise Hybrid Wing Body configuration. A medium wide body cargo freighter was selected to represent a logical need for an initial operational capability in the 2020 time frame. The Efficient Low Noise Hybrid Wing Body (ELNHWB) configuration N2A-EXTE was evolved meeting the circa 2007 NRA N+2 fuel burn and noise goals. The noise estimates were made using improvements in jet noise shielding and noise shielding prediction methods developed by UC Irvine and MIT. From this the Quiet Ultra Integrated Efficient Test Research Aircraft #1 (QUIET-R1) 5.8% wind tunnel model was designed and fabricated.

  14. Research requirements for a real-time flight measurements and data analysis system for subsonic transport high-lift research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Julia H.; Harris, Franklin K.; Lytle, Carroll D.

    1993-01-01

    A multiphased research program to obtain detailed flow characteristics on a multielement high-lift flap system is being conducted on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (B737-100 aircraft) at NASA Langley Research Center. Upcoming flight tests have required the development of a highly capable and flexible flight measurement and data analysis instrumentation system. This instrumentation system will be more comprehensive than any of the systems used on previous high-lift flight experiment at NASA Langley. The system will provide the researcher near-real-time information for decision making needed to modify a flight test in order to further examine unexpected flow conditions. This paper presents the research requirements and instrumentation design concept for an upcoming flight experiment for the subsonic transport high-lift research program. The flight experiment objectives, the measurement requirements, the data acquisition system, and the onboard data analysis and display capabilities are described.

  15. Subsonic aerodynamic characteristic of semispan commercial transport model with wing-mounted advanced ducted propeller operating in reverse thrust. [conducted in the Langley 14 by 22 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Jones, Kenneth M.; Gile, Brenda E.; Quinto, P. Frank

    1994-01-01

    A test was conducted in the Langley 14 by 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel to determine the effect of the reverse-thrust flow field of a wing-mounted advanced ducted propeller on the aerodynamic characteristics of a semispan subsonic high-lift transport model. The advanced ducted propeller (ADP) model was mounted separately in position alongside the wing so that only the aerodynamic interference of the propeller and nacelle affected the aerodynamic performance of the transport model. Mach numbers ranged from 0.14 to 0.26; corresponding Reynolds numbers ranged from 2.2 to 3.9 x 10(exp 6). The reverse-thrust flow field of the ADP shielded a portion of the wing from the free-stream airflow and reduced both lift and drag. The reduction in lift and drag was a function of ADP rotational speed and free-stream velocity. Test results included ground effects data for the transport model and ADP configuration. The ground plane caused a beneficial increase in drag and an undesirable slight increase in lift. The ADP and transport model performance in ground effect was similar to performance trends observed for out of ground effect. The test results form a comprehensive data set that supports the application of the ADP engine and airplane concept on the next generation of advanced subsonic transports. Before this investigation, the engine application was predicted to have detrimental ground effect characteristics. Ground effect test measurements indicated no critical problems and were the first step in proving the viability of this engine and airplane configuration.

  16. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. ACT/Control/Guidance System study. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport is reported. Supplementary technical data on the following topics are included: (1) 1990's avionics technology assessment; (2) function criticality assessment; (3) flight deck system for total control and functional features list; (4) criticality and reliability assessment of units; (5) crew procedural function task analysis; and (6) recommendations for simulation mechanization.

  17. Subsonic Investigation of a Leading-Edge Boundary Layer Control Suction System on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Applin, Zachary T.; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Coe, Paul L., Jr.; Owens, D. Bruce; Gile, Brenda E.; Parikh, Pradip G.; Smith, Don

    1999-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of a leading edge boundary layer control system was conducted on a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.08 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.79 x 10(exp 6) to 5.76 x 10(exp 6). Variations in the amount of suction, as well as the size and location of the suction area, were tested with outboard leading edge flaps deflected 0 and 30 deg and trailing-edge flaps deflected 0 and 20 deg. The longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic data are presented without analysis. A complete tabulated data listing is also presented herein.

  18. Analysis for the application of hybrid laminar flow control to a long-range subsonic transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcara, P. C., Jr.; Bartlett, D. W.; Mccullers, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    The FLOPS aircraft conceptual design/analysis code has been used to evaluate the effects of incorporating hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) in a 300-passenger, 6500 n. mi. range, twin-engine subsonic transport aircraft. The baseline configuration was sized to account for 50 percent chord laminar flow on the wing upper surface as well as both surfaces of the empennage airfoils. Attention is given to the additional benefits of achieving various degrees of laminar flow on the engine nacelles, and the horsepower extraction and initial weight and cost increments entailed by the HLFC system. The sensitivity of the results obtained to fuel-price and off-design range are also noted.

  19. In-flight pressure distributions and skin-friction measurements on a subsonic transport high-lift wing section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, Long P.; Vijgen, Paul M. H. W.; Hardin, Jay D.; Vandam, C. P.

    1993-01-01

    Flight experiments are being conducted as part of a multiphased subsonic transport high-lift research program for correlation with wind-tunnel and computational results. The NASA Langley Transport Systems Research Vehicle (B737-100 aircraft) is used to obtain in-flight flow characteristics at full-scale Reynolds numbers to contribute to the understanding of 3-D high-lift, multi-element flows including attachment-line transition and relaminarization, confluent boundary-layer development, and flow separation characteristics. Flight test results of pressure distributions and skin friction measurements were obtained for a full-chord wing section including the slat, main-wing, and triple-slotted, Fowler flap elements. Test conditions included a range of flap deflections, chord Reynolds numbers (10 to 21 million), and Mach numbers (0.16 to 0.40). Pressure distributions were obtained at 144 chordwise locations of a wing section (53-percent wing span) using thin pressure belts over the slat, main-wing, and flap elements. Flow characteristics observed in the chordwise pressure distributions included leading-edge regions of high subsonic flows, leading-edge attachment-line locations, slat and main-wing cove-flow separation and reattachment, and trailing-edge flap separation. In addition to the pressure distributions, limited skin-friction measurements were made using Preston-tube probes. Preston-tube measurements on the slat upper surface suggested relaminarization of the turbulent flow introduced by the pressure belt on the slat leading-edge surface when the slat attachment line was laminar. Computational analysis of the in-flight pressure measurements using two-dimensional, viscous multielement methods modified with simple-sweep theory showed reasonable agreement. However, overprediction of the pressures on the flap elements suggests a need for better detailed measurements and improved modeling of confluent boundary layers as well as inclusion of three-dimensional viscous

  20. Durability of foam insulation for LH2 fuel tanks of future subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, E. L.; Helenbrook, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    In connection with the potential short-supply of petroleum based fuels, NASA has initiated investigations concerning the feasibility of aircraft using as fuel hydrogen which is to be stored in liquid form. One of the problems to be solved for an operation of such aircraft is related to the possibility of a suitable storage of the liquid hydrogen. A description is presented of an experimental study regarding the suitability of commercially available organic foams as cryogenic insulation for liquid hydrogen tanks under extensive thermal cycling typical of subsonic airline type operation. Fourteen commercially available organic foam insulations were tested. The thermal performance of all insulations was found to deteriorate with increased simulated flight cycles. Two unreinforced polyurethane foams survived over 4200 thermal cycles (representative of approximately 15 years of airline service) without evidence of structural deterioration. The polyurethane foam insulations also exhibited excellent thermal performance.

  1. Study of the application of advanced technologies to laminar flow control systems for subsonic transports. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgeon, R. F.; Bennett, J. A.; Etchberger, F. R.; Ferrill, R. S.; Meade, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of applying laminar flow control to the wings and empennage of long-range subsonic transport aircraft compatible with initial operation in 1985. For a design mission range of 10,186 km (5500 n mi), advanced technology laminar-flow-control (LFC) and turbulent-flow (TF) aircraft were developed for both 200 and 400-passenger payloads, and compared on the basis of production costs, direct operating costs, and fuel efficiency. Parametric analyses were conducted to establish the optimum geometry for LFC and TF aircraft, advanced LFC system concepts and arrangements were evaluated, and configuration variations maximizing the effectiveness of LFC were developed. For the final LFC aircraft, analyses were conducted to define maintenance costs and procedures, manufacturing costs and procedures, and operational considerations peculiar to LFC aircraft. Compared to the corresponding advanced technology TF transports, the 200- and 400-passenger LFC aircraft realized reductions in fuel consumption up to 28.2%, reductions in direct operating costs up to 8.4%, and improvements in fuel efficiency, in ssm/lb of fuel, up to 39.4%. Compared to current commercial transports at the design range, the LFC study aircraft demonstrate improvements in fuel efficiency up to 131%. Research and technology requirements requisite to the development of LFC transport aircraft were identified.

  2. Design of Supersonic Transport Flap Systems for Thrust Recovery at Subsonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Michael J.; Carlson, Harry W.; Domack, Christopher S.

    1999-01-01

    A study of the subsonic aerodynamics of hinged flap systems for supersonic cruise commercial aircraft has been conducted using linear attached-flow theory that has been modified to include an estimate of attainable leading edge thrust and an approximate representation of vortex forces. Comparisons of theoretical predictions with experimental results show that the theory gives a reasonably good and generally conservative estimate of the performance of an efficient flap system and provides a good estimate of the leading and trailing-edge deflection angles necessary for optimum performance. A substantial reduction in the area of the inboard region of the leading edge flap has only a minor effect on the performance and the optimum deflection angles. Changes in the size of the outboard leading-edge flap show that performance is greatest when this flap has a chord equal to approximately 30 percent of the wing chord. A study was also made of the performance of various combinations of individual leading and trailing-edge flaps, and the results show that aerodynamic efficiencies as high as 85 percent of full suction are predicted.

  3. Development and validation of cryogenic foam insulation for LH2 subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, F. M.; Colt, J. Z.; Helenbrook, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    Fourteen foam insulation specimens were tested. Some were plain foam while others contained flame retardants, chopped fiberglass reinforcement and/or vapor barriers. The thermal performance of the insulation was determined by measuring the rate at which LH2 boiled from an aluminum tank insulated with the test material. The test specimens were approximately 50 mm (2 in.) thick. They were structurally scaled so that the test cycle would duplicate the maximum thermal stresses predicted for the thicker insulation of an aircraft liquid hydrogen fuel tank during a typical subsonic flight. The simulated flight cycle of approximately 10 minutes duration heated the other insulation surface to 316 K (110 F) and cooled it to 226 K (20 F) while the inner insulation surface remained at liquid hydrogen temperature of 20 K (-423 F). Two urethane foam insulations exceeded the initial life goal of 2400 simulated flight cycles and sustained 4400 cycles with only minor damage. The addition of fiberglass reinforcement of flame retardant materials to an insulation degraded thermal performance and/or the life of the foam material. Installation of vapor barriers enhanced the structural integrity of the material but did not improve thermal performance. All of the foams tested were available materials; none were developed specifically for LH2 service.

  4. An experimental study of the aeroacoustics of a subsonic jet impinging normal to a large rigid surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preisser, J. S.; Block, P. J. W.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents results from an experimental study of unsteady surface pressures and far-field noise produced by a subsonic jet impinging normal to a large, rigid, flat surface. The tests were performed in an anechoic room for jet Mach numbers from 0.54 to 0.85, and for jet-to-surface heights of from 5 to 10 jet diameters. Results showed that the root-mean-square surface pressure levels were proportional to jet dynamic pressure and were independent of jet height for radial distances from the stagnation point greater than 3 jet diameters. Far-field measurements indicated a significant increase in noise over that of a free jet for all cases of impingement. Cross spectral calculations between the surface and the far field suggested that at a Mach number of 0.70 and a height of 5 jet diameters the additional noise originated mainly in the outer edge of the impingement region between 1 and 3 jet diameters from the stagnation point.

  5. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Dethman, H. A.; Gratzer, L. B.; Maeshiro, A.; Gangsaas, D.; Blight, J. D.; Buchan, S. M.; Crumb, C. B.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The current status of the Active Controls Technology (ACT) for the advanced subsonic transport project is investigated through analysis of the systems technical data. Control systems technologies under examination include computerized reliability analysis, pitch axis fly by wire actuator, flaperon actuation system design trade study, control law synthesis and analysis, flutter mode control and gust load alleviation analysis, and implementation of alternative ACT systems. Extensive analysis of the computer techniques involved in each system is included.

  6. Analysis of a high speed civil transport configuration at subsonic flow conditions using a Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Victor R.

    1993-01-01

    Computations of three dimensional vortical flows over a generic High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration with an aspect ratio of 3.04 are performed using a thin-layer Navier-Stokes solver. The HSCT cruise configuration is modeled without leading or trailing edge flap deflections and without engine nacelles. The flow conditions, which correspond to tests done in the NASA Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel (TPT), are a subsonic Mach number of 0.3 and Reynolds number of 4.4 million for a range-of-attack (-.23 deg to 17.78 deg). The effects of the farfield boundary location with respect to the body are investigated. The boundary layer is assumed turbulent and simulated using an algebraic turbulence model. The key features of the vortices and their interactions are captured. Grid distribution in the vortex regions is critical for predicting the correct induced lift. Computed forces and surface pressures compare reasonably well with the experimental TPT data.

  7. An experimental study of the turbulent boundary layer on a transport wing in subsonic and transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaid, Frank W.; Roos, Frederick W.; Hicks, Raymond M.

    1990-01-01

    The upper surface boundary layer on a transport wing model was extensively surveyed with miniature yaw probes at a subsonic and a transonic cruise condition. Additional data were obtained at a second transonic test condition, for which a separated region was present at mid-semispan, aft of mid-chord. Significant variation in flow direction with distance from the surface was observed near the trailing edge except at the wing root and tip. The data collected at the transonic cruise condition show boundary layer growth associated with shock wave/boundary layer interaction, followed by recovery of the boundary layer downstream of the shock. Measurements of fluctuating surface pressure and wingtip acceleration were also obtained. The influence of flow field unsteadiness on the boundary layer data is discussed. Comparisons among the data and predictions from a variety of computational methods are presented. The computed predictions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data in the outboard regions where 3-D effects are moderate and adverse pressure gradients are mild. In the more highly loaded mid-span region near the trailing edge, displacement thickness growth was significantly underpredicted, except when unrealistically severe adverse pressure gradients associated with inviscid calculations were used to perform boundary layer calculations.

  8. Investigation of downstream and sideline subsonic jet noise using Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogey, Christophe; Bailly, Christophe

    2006-02-01

    The sound fields radiated by Mach number 0.6 and 0.9, circular jets with Reynolds numbers varying from 1.7×103 to 4×105 are investigated using Large Eddy Simulations. As the Reynolds number decreases, the properties of the sound radiation do not change significantly in the downstream direction, whereas they are modified in the sideline direction. At low Reynolds numbers, for large angles downstream from the jet axis, the acoustic levels are indeed remarkably lower and a large high-frequency part of the sound spectra vanishes. For all Reynolds numbers, the downstream and the sideline sound spectra both appear to scale in frequency with the Strouhal number. However their peak amplitudes vary following two different velocity exponents according to the radiation direction. The present observations suggest the presence of two sound sources: a Reynolds number-dependent source, predominant for large radiation angles, connected to the randomly-developing turbulence, and a deterministic source, radiating downstream, related to a mechanism intrinsic to the jet geometry, which is still to be comprehensively described. This view agrees well with the experimental results displaying two distinguishable components in turbulent mixing noise [1, 2].

  9. Evaluation of laminar flow control system concepts for subsonic commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A two-year study conducted to establish a basis for industry decisions on the application of laminar flow control (LFC) to future commercial transports was presented. Areas of investigation included: (1) mission definition and baseline selection; (2) concepts evaluations; and (3) LFC transport configuration selection and component design. The development and evaluation of competing design concepts was conducted in the areas of aerodynamics, structures and materials, and systems. The results of supporting wind tunnel and laboratory testing on a full-scale LFC wing panel, suction surface opening concepts and structural samples were included. A final LFC transport was configured in incorporating the results of concept evaluation studies and potential performance improvements were assessed. Remaining problems together with recommendations for future research are discussed.

  10. Evaluation of laminar flow control system concepts for subsonic commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Results of a 2-year study are reported which were carried out to extend the development of laminar flow control (LFC) technology and evaluate LFC systems concepts. The overall objective of the LFC program is to provide a sound basis for industry decisions on the application of LFC to future commercial transports. The study was organized into major tasks to support the stated objectives through application of LFC systems concepts to a baseline LFC transport initially generated for the study. Based on competitive evaluation of these concepts, a final selection was made for incorporation into the final design of an LFC transport which also included other advanced technology elements appropriate to the 1990 time period.

  11. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology to an Advanced Subsonic Transport: Project Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The state of the art of active controls technology (ACT) and a recommended ACT development program plan are reviewed. The performance benefits and cost of ownership of an integrated application of ACT to civil transport aircraft is to be assessed along with the risk and laboratory and/or flight experiments designed to reduce the technical risks to a commercially acceptable level.

  12. Assessment of the application of advanced technologies to subsonic CTOL transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graef, J. D.; Sallee, G. P.; Verges, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Design studies of the application of advanced technologies to future transport aircraft were conducted. These studies were reviewed from the perspective of an air carrier. A fundamental study of the elements of airplane operating cost was performed, and the advanced technologies were ranked in order of potential profit impact. Recommendations for future study areas are given.

  13. Investigations of Subsonic Compressible Boundary Layer Flows using Hybrid Large Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Sara Jo

    The objective of this thesis is to investigate the spatially developing turbulent compressible boundary layer on a flat plate using the Spalart-Allmaras Detached Eddy Simulation (SA-DES) model [22] and the Nichols-Nelson hybrid Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes/Large Eddy Simulation (RANS/LES) model [13] which have been implemented into the Wind-US 3.0 computational fluid dynamics code [30]; both of the hybrid approaches involve RANS modeling in the near-wall region and LES treatment in the outer region. Generation of unsteady turbulent inflow data is achieved via the prescribed energy spectrum method. The studies illustrated dependence on Reynolds number based on momentum thickness, Reθ, ranging from 3018 to 19430, and dependence on Mach number, M = 0.5 and M = 0.9. The SA-DES model predicted mean flow profiles to a satisfactory degree, and the Nichols-Nelson hybrid RANS/LES model adequately predicted density field fluctuations; the aero-thermal effects captured by the Nichols-Nelson model can be useful for near-field aero optics applications.

  14. A Full Navier-Stokes Analysis of Subsonic Diffuser of a Bifurcated 70/30 Supersonic Inlet for High Speed Civil Transport Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A full Navier-Stokes analysis was performed to evaluate the performance of the subsonic diffuser of a NASA Lewis Research Center 70/30 mixed-compression bifurcated supersonic inlet for high speed civil transport application. The PARC3D code was used in the present study. The computations were also performed when approximately 2.5 percent of the engine mass flow was allowed to bypass through the engine bypass doors. The computational results were compared with the available experimental data which consisted of detailed Mach number and total pressure distribution along the entire length of the subsonic diffuser. The total pressure recovery, flow distortion, and crossflow velocity at the engine face were also calculated. The computed surface ramp and cowl pressure distributions were compared with experiments. Overall, the computational results compared well with experimental data. The present CFD analysis demonstrated that the bypass flow improves the total pressure recovery and lessens flow distortions at the engine face.

  15. Use of constrained optimization in the conceptual design of a medium-range subsonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    Constrained parameter optimization was used to perform the optimal conceptual design of a medium range transport configuration. The impact of choosing a given performance index was studied, and the required income for a 15 percent return on investment was proposed as a figure of merit. A number of design constants and constraint functions were systematically varied to document the sensitivities of the optimal design to a variety of economic and technological assumptions. A comparison was made for each of the parameter variations between the baseline configuration and the optimally redesigned configuration.

  16. Reynolds Number Effects on a Supersonic Transport at Subsonic High-Lift Conditions (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L.R.; Wahls, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    A High Speed Civil Transport configuration was tested in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of NASA's High Speed Research Program. The primary purposes of the tests were to assess Reynolds number scale effects and high Reynolds number aerodynamic characteristics of a realistic, second generation supersonic transport while providing data for the assessment of computational methods. The tests included longitudinal and lateral/directional studies at transonic and low-speed, high-lift conditions across a range of Reynolds numbers from that available in conventional wind tunnels to near flight conditions. Results are presented which focus on Reynolds number and static aeroelastic sensitivities of longitudinal characteristics at Mach 0.30 for a configuration without an empennage. A fundamental change in flow-state occurred between Reynolds numbers of 30 to 40 million, which is characterized by significantly earlier inboard leading-edge separation at the high Reynolds numbers. Force and moment levels change but Reynolds number trends are consistent between the two states.

  17. Subsonic aerodynamic characteristics of a circular body earth-to-orbit transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepsch, R. A., Jr.; Macconochie, I. O.

    1986-01-01

    To reduce the weight and improve the performance of future earth-to-orbit transports, the use of circular cross sections in the fuselage bodies of these vehicles is being considered at the Langley Research Center. Structurally, circular cross sections are stronger and lighter than other shapes. A study has been made applying the circular body concept to a vertical-takeoff, delta-winged, single-stage-to-orbit transport. A 52 in., 0.022-scale model of the circular body vehicle was tested at a Mach number of 0.3 in the 7 x 10 ft High Speed Wind Tunnel at the Langley Research Center to obtain aerodynamic forces and moments. Oil-flow photographs were taken at several angles of attack to aid in the aerodynamic analysis. Model control surfaces included elevons and ailerons for the evaluation of pitch and roll characteristics and either wing-tip fins, a nose mounted dorsal fin, or a conventional vertical tail for the evaluation of yaw characteristics. Other deflecting surfaces included speedbrakes and body flaps. Basic data on longitudinal flight characteristics are shown, including lift, drag, and pitching moments. Comparisons of the directional stability and control effectiveness of the three directional control devices are also shown.

  18. Cost/benefit assessment of the application of composite materials to subsonic commercial transport engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Results from a number of studies concerned with the cost and benefits of applying advanced composite materials to commercial turbofan engines are summarized. For each application area the optimistic and pessimistic benefit projections were averaged to arrive at a projected yearly percentage fuel savings for a commercial fleet of advanced technology transport aircraft. Engine components included in the summary are the fan section which includes fan blades, fan frame/case, and the blade containment ring; the nacelle; and the high pressure turbine blades and vanes. The projected fuel savings resulting from the application of composites are 1.85 percent for the fan section, 1.75 percent for the nacelle, and 2.35 percent for the high pressure turbine.

  19. Technology developments for laminar boundary layer control on subsonic transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. D.; Maddalon, D. V.; Fischer, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of laminar flow control (LFC) technology developments is presented, along with a description of NASA's broadened program concerning laminar flow concepts for commercial transports. Topics covered include developments in LFC airfoils, wing surface panels, and leading-edge systems, as well as the effects of high altitude ice particles and insect impacts. It is suggested that the electron beam perforated titanium surface is superior to the Dynapore surface. The Douglas LFC wing design, the Krueger flap, the Lockheed, and the Douglas leading-edge concepts are covered. Future research includes an evaluation of a hybrid LFC concept, which combines LFC suction in the leading-edge region with natural laminar flow over the wing box.

  20. Study of fuel systems for LH2-fueled subsonic transport aircraft, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.; Davis, G. W.; Versaw, E. F.; Cunnington, G. R., Jr.; Riple, J. C.; Baerst, C. F.; Garmong, G.

    1978-01-01

    Several engine concepts examined to determine a preferred design which most effectively exploits the characteristics of hydrogen fuel in aircraft tanks received major emphasis. Many candidate designs of tank structure and cryogenic insulation systems were evaluated. Designs of all major elements of the aircraft fuel system including pumps, lines, valves, regulators, and heat exchangers received attention. Selected designs of boost pumps to be mounted in the LH2 tanks, and of a high pressure pump to be mounted on the engine were defined. A final design of LH2-fueled transport aircraft was established which incorporates a preferred design of fuel system. That aircraft was then compared with a conventionally fueled counterpart designed to equivalent technology standards.

  1. Wing Configuration Impact on Design Optimums for a Subsonic Passenger Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Douglas P.

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to compare four aircraft wing configurations at a conceptual level using a multi-disciplinary optimization (MDO) process. The MDO framework used was created by Georgia Institute of Technology and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. They created a multi-disciplinary design and optimization environment that could capture the unique features of the truss-braced wing (TBW) configuration. The four wing configurations selected for the study were a low wing cantilever installation, a high wing cantilever, a strut-braced wing, and a single jury TBW. The mission that was used for this study was a 160 passenger transport aircraft with a design range of 2,875 nautical miles at the design payload, flown at a cruise Mach number of 0.78. This paper includes discussion and optimization results for multiple design objectives. Five design objectives were chosen to illustrate the impact of selected objective on the optimization result: minimum takeoff gross weight (TOGW), minimum operating empty weight, minimum block fuel weight, maximum start of cruise lift-to-drag ratio, and minimum start of cruise drag coefficient. The results show that the design objective selected will impact the characteristics of the optimized aircraft. Although minimum life cycle cost was not one of the objectives, TOGW is often used as a proxy for life cycle cost. The low wing cantilever had the lowest TOGW followed by the strut-braced wing.

  2. Effects of Nacelle configuration/position on performance of subsonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, L. H.; Krivec, D. K.; Segall, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to explore possible reductions in installed propulsion system drag due to underwing aft nacelle locations. Both circular (C) and D inlet cross section nacelles were tested. The primary objectives were: to determine the relative installed drag of the C and D nacelle installations; and, to compare the drag of each aft nacelle installation with that of a conventional underwing forward, drag of each aft nacelle installation with that of a conventional underwing forward, pylon mounted (UTW) nacelle installation. The tests were performed in the NASA-Langley Research Center 16-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.85, airplane angles of attack from -2.5 to 4.1 degrees, and Reynolds numbers per foot from 3.4 to 4.0 million. The nacelles were installed on the NASA USB full span transonic transport model with horizontal tail on. The D nacelle installation had the smallest drag of those tested. The UTW nacelle installation had the largest drag, at 6.8 percent larger than the D at Mach number 0.80 and lift coefficient (C sub L) 0.45. Each tested configuration still had some interference drag, however. The effect of the aft nacelles on airplane lift was to increase C sub L at a fixed angle of attack relative to the wing body. There was higher lift on the inboard wing sections because of higher pressures on the wing lower surface. The effects of the UTW installation on lift were opposite to those of the aft nacelles.

  3. High-lift flow-physics flight experiments on a subsonic civil transport aircraft (B737-100)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, Cornelis P.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the subsonic transport high-lift program, flight experiments are being conducted using NASA Langley's B737-100 to measure the flow characteristics of the multi-element high-lift system at full-scale high-Reynolds-number conditions. The instrumentation consists of hot-film anemometers to measure boundary-layer states, an infra-red camera to detect transition from laminar to turbulent flow, Preston tubes to measure wall shear stress, boundary-layer rakes to measure off-surface velocity profiles, and pressure orifices to measure surface pressure distributions. The initial phase of this research project was recently concluded with two flights on July 14. This phase consisted of a total of twenty flights over a period of about ten weeks. In the coming months the data obtained in this initial set of flight experiments will be analyzed and the results will be used to finalize the instrumentation layout for the next set of flight experiments scheduled for Winter and Spring of 1995. The main goal of these upcoming flights will be: (1) to measure more detailed surface pressure distributions across the wing for a range of flight conditions and flap settings; (2) to visualize the surface flows across the multi-element wing at high-lift conditions using fluorescent mini tufts; and (3) to measure in more detail the changes in boundary-layer state on the various flap elements as a result of changes in flight condition and flap deflection. These flight measured results are being correlated with experimental data measured in ground-based facilities as well as with computational data calculated with methods based on the Navier-Stokes equations or a reduced set of these equations. Also these results provide insight into the extent of laminar flow that exists on actual multi-element lifting surfaces at full-scale high-life conditions. Preliminary results indicate that depending on the deflection angle, the slat and flap elements have significant regions of laminar flow over

  4. Three-dimensional aerodynamic analysis of a subsonic transport high-lift configuration and comparisons with wind-tunnel test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edge, D. Christian; Perkins, John N.

    1995-01-01

    The sizing and efficiency of an aircraft is largely determined by the performance of its high-lift system. Subsonic civil transports most often use deployable multi-element airfoils to achieve the maximum-lift requirements for landing, as well as the high lift-to-drag ratios for take-off. However, these systems produce very complex flow fields which are not fully understood by the scientific community. In order to compete in today's market place, aircraft manufacturers will have to design better high-lift systems. Therefore, a more thorough understanding of the flows associated with these systems is desired. Flight and wind-tunnel experiments have been conducted on NASA Langley's B737-100 research aircraft to obtain detailed full-scale flow measurements on a multi-element high-lift system at various flight conditions. As part of this effort, computational aerodynamic tools are being used to provide preliminary flow-field information for instrumentation development, and to provide additional insight during the data analysis and interpretation process. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the ability and usefulness of a three-dimensional low-order potential flow solver, PMARC, by comparing computational results with data obtained from 1/8 scale wind-tunnel tests. Overall, correlation of experimental and computational data reveals that the panel method is able to predict reasonably well the pressures of the aircraft's multi-element wing at several spanwise stations. PMARC's versatility and usefulness is also demonstrated by accurately predicting inviscid three-dimensional flow features for several intricate geometrical regions.

  5. Accelerated development and flight evaluation of active controls concepts for subsonic transport aircraft. Volume 2: AFT C.G. simulation and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urie, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    Relaxed static stability and stability augmentation with active controls were investigated for subsonic transport aircraft. Analytical and simulator evaluations were done using a contemporary wide body transport as a baseline. Criteria for augmentation system performance and unaugmented flying qualities were evaluated. Augmentation control laws were defined based on selected frequency response and time history criteria. Flying qualities evaluations were conducted by pilots using a moving base simulator with a transport cab. Static margin and air turbulence intensity were varied in test with and without augmentation. Suitability of a simple pitch control law was verified at neutral static margin in cruise and landing flight tasks. Neutral stability was found to be marginally acceptable in heavy turbulence in both cruise and landing conditions.

  6. Large capacity oblique all-wing transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, Thomas L.; Phillips, James A.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Waters, Mark H.

    1996-01-01

    Dr. R. T. Jones first developed the theory for oblique wing aircraft in 1952, and in subsequent years numerous analytical and experimental projects conducted at NASA Ames and elsewhere have established that the Jones' oblique wing theory is correct. Until the late 1980's all proposed oblique wing configurations were wing/body aircraft with the wing mounted on a pivot. With the emerging requirement for commercial transports with very large payloads, 450-800 passengers, Jones proposed a supersonic oblique flying wing in 1988. For such an aircraft all payload, fuel, and systems are carried within the wing, and the wing is designed with a variable sweep to maintain a fixed subsonic normal Mach number. Engines and vertical tails are mounted on pivots supported from the primary structure of the wing. The oblique flying wing transport has come to be known as the Oblique All-Wing (OAW) transport. This presentation gives the highlights of the OAW project that was to study the total concept of the OAW as a commercial transport.

  7. Hybrid-Electric and Distributed Propulsion Technologies for Large Commercial Transports: A NASA Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.; Del Rosario, Ruben; Jankovsky, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Develop and demonstrate technologies that will revolutionize commercial transport aircraft propulsion and accelerate development of all-electric aircraft architectures. Enable radically different propulsion systems that can meet national environmental and fuel burn reduction goals for subsonic commercial aircraft. Focus on future large regional jets and single-aisle twin (Boeing 737- class) aircraft for greatest impact on fuel burn, noise and emissions. Research horizon is long-term but with periodic spinoff of technologies for introduction in aircraft with more- and all-electric architectures. Research aligned with new NASA Aeronautics strategic R&T thrusts in areas of transition to low-carbon propulsion and ultra-efficient commercial transports.

  8. Development of a Large Field-of-View PIV System for Rotorcraft Testing in the 14- x 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.; Harris, Jerome; Allan, Brian; Wong, Oliver; Mace, W. Derry

    2009-01-01

    A Large Field-of-View Particle Image Velocimetry (LFPIV) system has been developed for rotor wake diagnostics in the 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The system has been used to measure three components of velocity in a plane as large as 1.524 meters by 0.914 meters in both forward flight and hover tests. Overall, the system performance has exceeded design expectations in terms of accuracy and efficiency. Measurements synchronized with the rotor position during forward flight and hover tests have shown that the system is able to capture the complex interaction of the body and rotor wakes as well as basic details of the blade tip vortex at several wake ages. Measurements obtained with traditional techniques such as multi-hole pressure probes, Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV), and 2D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) show good agreement with LFPIV measurements.

  9. Effect of Winglets on a First-Generation Jet Transport Wing. 2: Pressure and Spanwise Load Distributions for a Semispan Model at High Subsonic Speeds. [in the Langley 8 ft transonic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, L. C.; Flechner, S. G.; Jacobs, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    Pressure and spanwise load distributions on a first-generation jet transport semispan model at high subsonic speeds are presented for the basic wing and for configurations with an upper winglet only, upper and lower winglets, and a simple wing-tip extension. Selected data are discussed to show the general trends and effects of the various configurations.

  10. Infrared Images of Boundary Layer Transition on the D8 Transport Configuration in the LaRC 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Michelle L.; Gatlin, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Grit, trip tape, or trip dots are routinely applied on the leading-edge regions of the fuselage, wings, tails or nacelles of wind tunnel models to trip the flow from laminar to turbulent. The thickness of the model's boundary layer is calculated for nominal conditions in the wind tunnel test to determine the effective size of the trip dots, but the flow over the model may not transition as intended for runs with different flow conditions. Temperature gradients measured with an infrared camera can be used to detect laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition on a wind tunnel model. This non-intrusive technique was used in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel to visualize the behavior of the flow over a D8 transport configuration model. As the flow through the wind tunnel either increased to or decreased from the run conditions, a sufficient temperature difference existed between the air and the model to visualize the transition location (due to different heat transfer rates through the laminar and the turbulent boundary layers) for several runs in this test. Transition phenomena were visible without active temperature control in the atmospheric wind tunnel, whether the air was cooler than the model or vice-versa. However, when the temperature of the model relative to the air was purposely changed, the ability to detect transition in the infrared images was enhanced. Flow characteristics such as a wing root horseshoe vortex or the presence of fore-body vortical flows also were observed in the infrared images. The images of flow features obtained for this study demonstrate the usefulness of current infrared technology in subsonic wind tunnel tests.

  11. Hydrogen fueled subsonic aircraft - A prospective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witcofski, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    The performance characteristics of hydrogen-fueled subsonic transport aircraft are compared with those of aircraft using conventional aviation kerosene. Results of the Cryogenically Fueled Aircraft Technology Program sponsored by NASA indicate that liquid hydrogen may be particularly efficient for subsonic transport craft when ranges of 4000 km or more are involved; however, development of advanced cryogenic tanks for liquid hydrogen fuel is required. The NASA-sponsored program also found no major technical obstacles for international airports converting the liquid hydrogen fueling systems. Resource utilization efficiency and fuel production costs for hydrogen produced by coal gasification or for liquid methane or synthetic aviation kerosene are also assessed.

  12. Subsonic Investigation of Leading-Edge Flaps Designed for Vortex- and Attached-Flow on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Kjerstad, Kevin J.; Lessard, Victor R.

    1999-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of two separate leading-edge flaps, designed for vortex and attached-flow, respectively, were conducted on a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.12 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 2.50 x 10 (sup 6) to 5.50 x 10 (sup 6). Variations of the leading-edge flap deflection angle were tested with outboard leading-edge flaps deflected 0 deg. and 26.4 deg. Trailing-edge flaps were deflected 0 deg., 10 deg., 12.9 deg., and 20 deg. The longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic data are presented without analysis. A complete tabulated data listing is also presented herein. The data associated with each deflected leading-edge flap indicate L/D improvements over the undeflected configuration. These improvements may be instrumental in providing the necessary lift augmentation required by an actual HSCT during the climb-out and landing phases of the flight envelope. However, further tests will have to be done to assess their full potential.

  13. Aeronautical fuel conservation possibilities for advanced subsonic transports. [application of aeronautical technology for drag and weight reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braslow, A. L.; Whitehead, A. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The anticipated growth of air transportation is in danger of being constrained by increased prices and insecure sources of petroleum-based fuel. Fuel-conservation possibilities attainable through the application of advances in aeronautical technology to aircraft design are identified with the intent of stimulating NASA R and T and systems-study activities in the various disciplinary areas. The material includes drag reduction; weight reduction; increased efficiency of main and auxiliary power systems; unconventional air transport of cargo; and operational changes.

  14. Large Payload Transportation and Test Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Pope, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Ironically, the limiting factor to a national heavy lift strategy may not be the rocket technology needed to throw a heavy payload, but rather the terrestrial infrastructure - roads, bridges, airframes, and buildings - necessary to transport, acceptance test, and process large spacecraft. Failure to carefully consider how large spacecraft are designed, and where they are manufactured, tested, or launched, could result in unforeseen cost to modify/develop infrastructure, or incur additional risk due to increased handling or elimination of key verifications. During test and verification planning for the Altair project, a number of transportation and test issues related to the large payload diameter were identified. Although the entire Constellation Program - including Altair - was canceled in the 2011 NASA budget, issues identified by the Altair project serve as important lessons learned for future payloads that may be developed to support national "heavy lift" strategies. A feasibility study performed by the Constellation Ground Operations (CxGO) project found that neither the Altair Ascent nor Descent Stage would fit inside available transportation aircraft. Ground transportation of a payload this large over extended distances is generally not permitted by most states, so overland transportation alone would not have been an option. Limited ground transportation to the nearest waterway may be permitted, but water transportation could take as long as 66 days per production unit, depending on point of origin and acceptance test facility; transportation from the western United States would require transit through the Panama Canal to access the Kennedy Space Center launch site. Large payloads also pose acceptance test and ground processing challenges. Although propulsion, mechanical vibration, and reverberant acoustic test facilities at NASA s Plum Brook Station have been designed to accommodate large spacecraft, special handling and test work-arounds may be necessary

  15. Large-Eddy/Lattice Boltzmann Simulations of Micro-blowing Strategies for Subsonic and Supersonic Drag Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress made in the first 8 to 9 months of this research. The Lattice Boltzmann Equation (LBE) methodology for Large-eddy Simulations (LES) of microblowing has been validated using a jet-in-crossflow test configuration. In this study, the flow intake is also simulated to allow the interaction to occur naturally. The Lattice Boltzmann Equation Large-eddy Simulations (LBELES) approach is capable of capturing not only the flow features associated with the flow, such as hairpin vortices and recirculation behind the jet, but also is able to show better agreement with experiments when compared to previous RANS predictions. The LBELES is shown to be computationally very efficient and therefore, a viable method for simulating the injection process. Two strategies have been developed to simulate multi-hole injection process as in the experiment. In order to allow natural interaction between the injected fluid and the primary stream, the flow intakes for all the holes have to be simulated. The LBE method is computationally efficient but is still 3D in nature and therefore, there may be some computational penalty. In order to study a large number or holes, a new 1D subgrid model has been developed that will simulate a reduced form of the Navier-Stokes equation in these holes.

  16. Large Payload Ground Transportation and Test Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Many spacecraft concepts under consideration by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Evolvable Mars Campaign take advantage of a Space Launch System payload shroud that may be 8 to 10 meters in diameter. Large payloads can theoretically save cost by reducing the number of launches needed--but only if it is possible to build, test, and transport a large payload to the launch site in the first place. Analysis performed previously for the Altair project identified several transportation and test issues with an 8.973 meters diameter payload. Although the entire Constellation Program—including Altair—has since been canceled, these issues serve as important lessons learned for spacecraft designers and program managers considering large payloads for future programs. A transportation feasibility study found that, even broken up into an Ascent and Descent Module, the Altair spacecraft would not fit inside available aircraft. Ground transportation of such large payloads over extended distances is not generally permitted, so overland transportation alone would not be an option. Limited ground transportation to the nearest waterway may be possible, but water transportation could take as long as 67 days per production unit, depending on point of origin and acceptance test facility; transportation from the western United States would require transit through the Panama Canal to access the Kennedy Space Center launch site. Large payloads also pose acceptance test and ground processing challenges. Although propulsion, mechanical vibration, and reverberant acoustic test facilities at NASA’s Plum Brook Station have been designed to accommodate large spacecraft, special handling and test work-arounds may be necessary, which could increase cost, schedule, and technical risk. Once at the launch site, there are no facilities currently capable of accommodating the combination of large payload size and hazardous processing such as hypergolic fuels

  17. Mean velocity, turbulence intensity, and scale in a subsonic turbulent jet impinging normal to a large flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldman, D. R.; Brinich, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    To explain the increase in noise when a jet impinges on a large flat plate, mean velocity, turbulence intensity, and scale were measured at nominal nozzle-exit velocities of 61, 138, and 192 meters per second with the plate located 7.1 nozzle-exit diameters from the nozzle. The maximum turbulence intensities in free and impinging jets were about the same; however, the integral length scale near the plate surface was only about one-half the free jet scale. The measured intensities and length scales, in conjunction with a contemporary theory of aerodynamic noise, provided a good explanation for the observed increase in noise associated with the impinging jet. An increase in the volume of highly turbulent flow could be the principal reason for the increase in noise.

  18. A study of subsonic transport aircraft configurations using hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) as fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, D. B.; Avery, B. D.; Bodin, L. A.; Baldasare, P.; Washburn, G. F.

    1974-01-01

    The acceptability of alternate fuels for future commercial transport aircraft are discussed. Using both liquid hydrogen and methane, several aircraft configurations are developed and energy consumption, aircraft weights, range and payload are determined and compared to a conventional Boeing 747-100 aircraft. The results show that liquid hydrogen can be used to reduce aircraft energy consumption and that methane offers no advantage over JP or hydrogen fuel.

  19. Large Payload Ground Transportation and Test Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    During test and verification planning for the Altair lunar lander project, a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) study team identified several ground transportation and test issues related to the large payload diameter. Although the entire Constellation Program-including Altair-has since been canceled, issues identified by the Altair project serve as important lessons learned for payloads greater than 7 m diameter being considered for NASA's new Space Launch System (SLS). A transportation feasibility study found that Altair's 8.97 m diameter Descent Module would not fit inside available aircraft. Although the Ascent Module cabin was only 2.35 m diameter, the long reaction control system booms extended nearly to the Descent Module diameter, making it equally unsuitable for air transportation without removing the booms and invalidating assembly workmanship screens or acceptance testing that had already been performed. Ground transportation of very large payloads over extended distances is not generally permitted by most states, so overland transportation alone would not be an option. Limited ground transportation to the nearest waterway may be possible, but water transportation could take as long as 66 days per production unit, depending on point of origin and acceptance test facility; transportation from the western United States would require transit through the Panama Canal to access the Kennedy Space Center launch site. Large payloads also pose acceptance test and ground processing challenges. Although propulsion, mechanical vibration, and reverberant acoustic test facilities at NASA's Plum Brook Station have been designed to accommodate large spacecraft, special handling and test work-arounds may be necessary, which could increase cost, schedule, and technical risk. Once at the launch site, there are no facilities currently capable of accommodating the combination of large payload size and hazardous processing such as hypergolic fuels

  20. Subsonic Aircraft Safety Icing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Sharon Monica; Reveley, Mary S.; Evans, Joni K.; Barrientos, Francesca A.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) Project is one of four projects within the agency s Aviation Safety Program (AvSafe) in the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD). The IRAC Project, which was redesigned in the first half of 2007, conducts research to advance the state of the art in aircraft control design tools and techniques. A "Key Decision Point" was established for fiscal year 2007 with the following expected outcomes: document the most currently available statistical/prognostic data associated with icing for subsonic transport, summarize reports by subject matter experts in icing research on current knowledge of icing effects on control parameters and establish future requirements for icing research for subsonic transports including the appropriate alignment. This study contains: (1) statistical analyses of accident and incident data conducted by NASA researchers for this "Key Decision Point", (2) an examination of icing in other recent statistically based studies, (3) a summary of aviation safety priority lists that have been developed by various subject-matter experts, including the significance of aircraft icing research in these lists and (4) suggested future requirements for NASA icing research. The review of several studies by subject-matter experts was summarized into four high-priority icing research areas. Based on the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) Project goals and objectives, the IRAC project was encouraged to conduct work in all of the high-priority icing research areas that were identified, with the exception of the developing of methods to sense and document actual icing conditions.

  1. NASA N+3 Subsonic Fixed Wing Silent Efficient Low-Emissions Commercial Transport (SELECT) Vehicle Study. Revision A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Sam; Baber, Scott; Harris,Chris; Caldwell, Nicholas; Keding, Peter; Rahrig, Kyle; Pho, Luck; Wlezian, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A conceptual commercial passenger transport study was performed to define a single vehicle for entry into service in the 2030 to 2035 timeframe, meeting customer demands as well as NASA goals for improved fuel economy, NOx emissions, noise, and operability into smaller airports. A study of future market and operational scenarios was used to guide the design of an advanced tube-and-wing configuration that utilized advanced material and structural concepts, an advanced three-shaft high-bypass turbofan engine, natural laminar flow technology, and a suite of other advanced technologies. This configuration was found to meet the goals for NOx emissions, noise, and field length. A 64 percent improvement in fuel economy compared to a current state-of-the-art airliner was achieved, which fell slightly short of the desired 70 percent goal. Technology maturation plans for the technologies used in the design were developed to help guide future research and development activities.

  2. Integrative application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Initial act configuration design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The performance and economic benefits of a constrained application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) are identified, and the approach to airplane design is established for subsequent steps leading to the development of a less constrained final ACT configuration. The active controls configurations are measured against a conventional baseline configuration, a state-of-the-art transport, to determine whether the performance and economic changes resulting from ACT merit proceeding with the project. The technology established by the conventional baseline configuration was held constant except for the addition of ACT. The wing, with the same planform, was moved forward on the initial ACT configuration to move the loading range aft relative to the wing mean aerodynamic chord. Wing trailing-edge surfaces and surface controls also were reconfigured for load alleviation and structural stabilization.

  3. Viscous-flow analysis of a subsonic transport aircraft high-lift system and correlation with flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, R. C.; Vandam, C. P.

    1995-01-01

    High-lift system aerodynamics has been gaining attention in recent years. In an effort to improve aircraft performance, comprehensive studies of multi-element airfoil systems are being undertaken in wind-tunnel and flight experiments. Recent developments in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) offer a relatively inexpensive alternative for studying complex viscous flows by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations. Current limitations in computer resources restrict practical high-lift N-S computations to two dimensions, but CFD predictions can yield tremendous insight into flow structure, interactions between airfoil elements, and effects of changes in airfoil geometry or free-stream conditions. These codes are very accurate when compared to strictly 2D data provided by wind-tunnel testing, as will be shown here. Yet, additional challenges must be faced in the analysis of a production aircraft wing section, such as that of the NASA Langley Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV). A primary issue is the sweep theory used to correlate 2D predictions with 3D flight results, accounting for sweep, taper, and finite wing effects. Other computational issues addressed here include the effects of surface roughness of the geometry, cove shape modeling, grid topology, and transition specification. The sensitivity of the flow to changing free-stream conditions is investigated. In addition, the effects of Gurney flaps on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil system are predicted.

  4. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Final ACT configuration evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Final ACT Configuration Evaluation Task of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology project within the energy efficient transport program is summarized. The Final ACT Configuration, through application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span, exhibits significant performance improvements over the conventional baseline configuration. At the design range for these configurations, 3590 km, the block fuel used is 10% less for the Final ACT Configuration, with significant reductions in fuel usage at all operational ranges. Results of this improved fuel usage and additional system and airframe costs and the complexity required to achieve it were analyzed to determine its economic effects. For a 926 km mission, the incremental return on investment is nearly 25% at 1980 fuel prices. For longer range missions or increased fuel prices, the return is greater. The technical risks encountered in the Final ACT Configuration design and the research and development effort required to reduce these risks to levels acceptable for commercial airplane design are identified.

  5. Integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Conventional baseline configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Characteristics of the U.S. domestic fleet were evaluated to determine the mission characteristics that would have the most impact on U. S. transport fuel use in the future. This resulted in selection of a 197-passenger (plus cargo), about 3710-km (2000 nmi) mission. The existing data base was reviewed and additional analysis was conducted as necessary to complete the technical descriptions. The resulting baseline configuration utilizes a double-lobe, but nearly circular, body with seven-abreast seating. External characteristics feature an 8.71 aspect ratio, 31.5-degree sweep wing, a T-tail empennage, and a dual CF6-6D2, wing-mounted engine arrangement. It provides for 22 LD-2 or 11 LD-3 containers plus bulk cargo in the lower lobe. Passenger/cargo loading, servicing provisions, taxi/takeoff speeds, and field length characteristics are all compatible with accepted airline operations and regulatory provisions. The baseline configuration construction uses conventional aluminum structure except for advanced aluminum alloys and a limited amount of graphite epoxy secondary structure. Modern systems are used, including advanced guidance, navigation, and controls which emphasize application of digital electronics and advanced displays.

  6. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Wing planform study and final configuration selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes the Wing Planform Study Task and Final Configuration Selection of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology Project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program. Application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span resulted in significant improvements over the Conventional Baseline Configuration (Baseline) and the Initial ACT Configuration previously established. The configurations use the same levels of technology (except for ACT), takeoff gross weight, and payload as the Baseline. The Final ACT Configuration (Model 768-107) incorporates pitch-augmented stability (which enabled an approximately 10% aft shift in cruise center of gravity and a 45% reduction in horizontal tail sizes), lateral/directional-augmented stability, an angle-of-attack limiter, and wing-load alleviation. Flutter-mode control was not beneficial for this configuration. This resulted in an 890 kg (1960 lb) reduction in airplane takeoff gross weight and a 9.8% improvement in cruise lift/drag. At the Baseline mission range (3590 km) (1938 nmi), this amounts to 10% block fuel reduction. Good takeoff performance at high-altitude airports on a hot day was also achieved. Results of this task strongly indicate that the IAAC Project should proceed with the Final ACT evaluation and begin the required control system development and testing.

  7. Integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Initial ACT configuration design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The initial ACT configuration design task of the integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program is summarized. A constrained application of active controls technology (ACT) resulted in significant improvements over a conventional baseline configuration previously established. The configuration uses the same levels of technology, takeoff gross weight, payload, and design requirements/objectives as the baseline, except for flying qualities, flutter, and ACT. The baseline wing is moved forward 1.68 m. The configuration incorporates pitch-augmented stability (which enabled an approximately 10% aft shift in cruise center of gravity and a 45% reduction in horizontal tail size), lateral/directional-augmented stability, an angle of attack limiter, wing load alleviation, and flutter mode control. This resulted in a 930 kg reduction in airplane operating empty weight and a 3.6% improvement in cruise efficiency, yielding a 13% range increase. Adjusted to the 3590 km baseline mission range, this amounts to 6% block fuel reduction and a 15.7% higher incremental return on investment, using 1978 dollars and fuel cost.

  8. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Wing planform study and final configuration selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Wing Planform Study and Final Configuration Selection Task of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology Project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program is documented. Application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span resulted in significant improvements over the Conventional Baseline Configuration (Baseline) and the Initial ACT Configuration previously established. The configurations use the same levels of technology, takeoff gross weight, and payload as the Baseline. The Final ACT Configuration (Model 768-107) incorporates pitch-augmented stability (which enabled an approximately 10% aft shift in cruise center of gravity and a 44% reduction in horizontal tail size), lateral/directional-augmented stability, an angle-of-attack limiter, and wing-load alleviation. Flutter-mode control was not beneficial for this configuration. This resulted in an 890 kg (1960 lb) reduction in airplane takeoff gross weight and a 9.8% improvement in cruise lift/drag. At the Baseline mission range (3589 km 1938 nmi), this amounts to 10% block-fuel reduction. Results of this task strongly indicate that the IAAC Project should proceed with the Final ACT evaluation, and begin the required control system development and test.

  9. Large wood recruitment and transport during large floods: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comiti, F.; Lucía, A.; Rickenmann, D.

    2016-09-01

    Large wood (LW) elements transported during large floods are long known to have the capacity to induce dangerous obstructions along the channel network, mostly at bridges and at hydraulic structures such as weirs. However, our current knowledge of wood transport dynamics during high-magnitude flood events is still very scarce, mostly because these are (locally) rare and thus unlikely to be directly monitored. Therefore, post-event surveys are invaluable ways to get insights (although indirectly) on LW recruitment processes, transport distance, and factors inducing LW deposition - all aspects that are crucial for the proper management of river basins related to flood hazard mitigation. This paper presents a review of the (quite limited) literature available on LW transport during large floods, drawing extensively on the authors' own experience in mountain and piedmont rivers, published and unpublished. The overall picture emerging from these studies points to a high, catchment-specific variability in all the different processes affecting LW dynamics during floods. Specifically, in the LW recruitment phase, the relative floodplain (bank erosion) vs. hillslope (landslide and debris flows) contribution in mountain rivers varies substantially, as it relates to the extent of channel widening (which depends on many variables itself) but also to the hillslope-channel connectivity of LW mobilized on the slopes. As to the LW transport phase within the channel network, it appears to be widely characterized by supply-limited conditions; whereby LW transport rates (and thus volumes) are ultimately constrained by the amount of LW that is made available to the flow. Indeed, LW deposition during floods was mostly (in terms of volume) observed at artificial structures (bridges) in all the documented events. This implies that the estimation of LW recruitment and the assessment of clogging probabilities for each structure (for a flood event of given magnitude) are the most important

  10. Holographic subsonic flow visualization.

    PubMed

    Reinheimer, C J; Wiswall, C E; Schmiege, R A; Harris, R J; Dueker, J E

    1970-09-01

    A pulsed ruby laser holographic interferometer was used to detect density gradients in the airflow around an airfoil at subsonic speeds in a low speed wind tunnel. These experiments proved that vibration of the optical components or object between exposures of the interferometric hologram does not destroy the detection of density gradients but actually can aid in the flow visualization. The density gradients determined from the fringe pattern analysis are consistent with the anticipated flow pattern. PMID:20094197

  11. Design of Large Momentum Acceptance Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D.R. Douglas

    2005-05-01

    The use of energy recovery to enable high power linac operation often gives rise to an attendant challenge--the transport of high power beams subtending large phase space volumes. In particular applications--such as FEL driver accelerators--this manifests itself as a requirement for beam transport systems with large momentum acceptance. We will discuss the design, implementation, and operation of such systems. Though at times counterintuitive in behavior (perturbative descriptions may, for example, be misleading), large acceptance systems have been successfully utilized for generations as spectrometers and accelerator recirculators [1]. Such systems are in fact often readily designed using appropriate geometric descriptions of beam behavior; insight provided using such a perspective may in addition reveal inherent symmetries that simplify construction and improve operability. Our discussion will focus on two examples: the Bates-clone recirculator used in the Jefferson Lab 10 kW IR U pgrade FEL (which has an observed acceptance of 10% or more) and a compaction-managed mirror-bend achromat concept with an acceptance ranging from 50 to 150 MeV.

  12. The transition from subsonic to supersonic cracks

    PubMed Central

    Behn, Chris; Marder, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the full analytical solution for steady-state in-plane crack motion in a brittle triangular lattice. This allows quick numerical evaluation of solutions for very large systems, facilitating comparisons with continuum fracture theory. Cracks that propagate faster than the Rayleigh wave speed have been thought to be forbidden in the continuum theory, but clearly exist in lattice systems. Using our analytical methods, we examine in detail the motion of atoms around a crack tip as crack speed changes from subsonic to supersonic. Subsonic cracks feature displacement fields consistent with a stress intensity factor. For supersonic cracks, the stress intensity factor disappears. Subsonic cracks are characterized by small-amplitude, high-frequency oscillations in the vertical displacement of an atom along the crack line, while supersonic cracks have large-amplitude, low-frequency oscillations. Thus, while supersonic cracks are no less physical than subsonic cracks, the connection between microscopic and macroscopic behaviour must be made in a different way. This is one reason supersonic cracks in tension had been thought not to exist. PMID:25713443

  13. Cost Analysis for Large Civil Transport Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, John J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents cost analysis of purchase price and DOC+I (direct operating cost plus interest) that supports NASA s study of three advanced rotorcraft concepts that could enter commercial transport service within 10 to 15 years. The components of DOC+I are maintenance, flight crew, fuel, depreciation, insurance, and finance. The cost analysis aims at VTOL (vertical takeoff and landing) and CTOL (conventional takeoff and landing) aircraft suitable for regional transport service. The resulting spreadsheet-implemented cost models are semi-empirical and based on Department of Transportation and Army data from actual operations of such aircraft. This paper describes a rationale for selecting cost tech factors without which VTOL is more costly than CTOL by a factor of 10 for maintenance cost and a factor of two for purchase price. The three VTOL designs selected for cost comparisons meet the mission requirement to fly 1,200 nautical miles at 350 knots and 30,000 ft carrying 120 passengers. The lowest cost VTOL design is a large civil tilt rotor (LCTR) aircraft. With cost tech factors applied, the LCTR is reasonably competitive with the Boeing 737-700 when operated in economy regional service following the business model of the selected baseline operation, that of Southwest Airlines.

  14. Composites for large transports - Facing the challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohon, H. L.; Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    NASA has undertaken development and test programs in collaboration with the large transport aircraft construction industry, in order to remove existing barriers to the use of composite material primary structures and to assess their advantages in terms of both acquisition cost and mission performance. These programs are expected to reach design technology readiness for wing and fuselage structures by 1988, paving the way for the validation of design and manufacturing methods in the early 1990s. While composites promise a reduction in fuselage manufacturing costs, it is judged that the relative cost of a metallic wing will be more difficult to surpass. Nevertheless, a 40 percent wing weight saving may more than compensate for increased wing structure cost.

  15. Derivation and evaluation of an approximate analysis for three-dimensional viscous subsonic flow with large secondary velocities. [finite difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.; Briley, W. R.; Mcdonald, H.

    1978-01-01

    An approximate analysis is presented for calculating three-dimensional, low Mach number, laminar viscous flows in curved passages with large secondary flows and corner boundary layers. The analysis is based on the decomposition of the overall velocity field into inviscid and viscous components with the overall velocity being determined from superposition. An incompressible vorticity transport equation is used to estimate inviscid secondary flow velocities to be used as corrections to the potential flow velocity field. A parabolized streamwise momentum equation coupled to an adiabatic energy equation and global continuity equation is used to obtain an approximate viscous correction to the pressure and longitudinal velocity fields. A collateral flow assumption is invoked to estimate the viscous correction to the transverse velocity fields. The approximate analysis is solved numerically using an implicit ADI solution for the viscous pressure and velocity fields. An iterative ADI procedure is used to solve for the inviscid secondary vorticity and velocity fields. This method was applied to computing the flow within a turbine vane passage with inlet flow conditions of M = 0.1 and M = 0.25, Re = 1000 and adiabatic walls, and for a constant radius curved rectangular duct with R/D = 12 and 14 and with inlet flow conditions of M = 0.1, Re = 1000, and adiabatic walls.

  16. Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming

    1998-01-01

    Researchers from the NASA Lewis Research Center have obtained the first combustion/emissions data under extreme future engine operating conditions. In Lewis' new world-class 60-atm combustor research facility--the Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig (ASCR)--a flametube was used to conduct combustion experiments in environments as extreme as 900 psia and 3400 F. The greatest challenge for combustion researchers is the uncertainty of the effects of pressure on the formation of nitrogen oxides (NOx). Consequently, U.S. engine manufacturers are using these data to guide their future combustor designs. The flametube's metal housing has an inside diameter of 12 in. and a length of 10.5 in. The flametube can be used with a variety of different flow paths. Each flow path is lined with a high-temperature, castable refractory material (alumina) to minimize heat loss. Upstream of the flametube is the injector section, which has an inside diameter of 13 in. and a length of 0.5-in. It was designed to provide for quick changeovers. This flametube is being used to provide all U.S. engine manufacturers early assessments of advanced combustion concepts at full power conditions prior to engine production. To date, seven concepts from engine manufacturers have been evaluated and improved. This collaborated development can potentially give U.S. engine manufacturers the competitive advantage of being first in the market with advanced low-emission technologies.

  17. Large-Scale Stratospheric Transport Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, R. Alan

    2001-01-01

    The paper discusses the following: 1. The Brewer-Dobson circulation: tropical upwelling. 2. Mixing into polar vortices. 3. The latitudinal structure of "age" in the stratosphere. 4. The subtropical "tracer edges". 5. Transport in the lower troposphere. 6. Tracer modeling during SOLVE. 7. 3D modeling of "mean age". 8. Models and measurements II.

  18. Large-scale Atmospheric Transport Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, R. Alan

    2004-01-01

    Continuing earlier work, we continued an investigation of the seasonal behavior of the edges of the stratospheric surf zone. These edges form a barrier between the rapidly mixed surf zone and the relatively isolated tropics. In collaboration with Dr Lynn Sparling at GSFC, we used a statistical analysis of HALOE and CLAES trace gas data from UARS to identify and locate these edges during each UARS observing period. We found that the edges on both sides of the equator are present all year (a fact that is important for conceptual models of stratospheric transport), though that on the summer side of the equator is much less sharp than the winter edge. The edges migrate seasonally into the summer hemisphere. Their location also shows influence of the QBO, together with the SAO at higher altitudes. Comparisons with effective diffusivities, and the edge locations, suggest that the edge is sustained by surf zone entrainment during winter, but by the residual circulation during summer.

  19. Large-scale Stratospheric Transport Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, R. Alan

    2003-01-01

    The PI has undertaken a theoretical analysis of the existence and nature of compact tracer-tracer relationships of the kind observed in the stratosphere, augmented with three-dimensional model simulations of stratospheric tracers (the latter being an extension of modeling work the group did during the SOLVE experiment). This work achieves a rigorous theoretical basis for the existence and shape of these relationships, as well as a quantitative theory of their width and evolution, in terms of the joint tracer-tracer PDF distribution. A paper on this work is almost complete and will soon be submitted to Rev. Geophys. We have analyzed lower stratospheric water in simulations with an isentropic-coordinate version of the MATCH transport model which we recently helped to develop. The three-dimensional structure of lower stratospheric water, in particular, attracted our attention: dry air is, below about 400K potential temperature, localized in the regions of the west Pacific and equatorial South America. We have been analyzing air trajectories to determine how air passes through the tropopause cold trap. This work is now being completed, and a paper will be submitted to Geophys. Res. Lett. before the end of summer. We are continuing to perform experiments with the 'MATCH' CTM, in both sigma- and entropy-coordinate forms. We earlier found (in collaboration with Dr Natalie Mahowald, and as part of an NSF-funded project) that switching to isentropic coordinates made a substantial improvement to the simulation of the age of stratospheric air. We are now running experiments with near-tropopause sources in both versions of the model, to see if and to what extent the simulation of stratosphere-troposphere transport is dependent on the model coordinate. Personnel Research is supervised by the PI, Prof. Alan Plumb. Mr William Heres conducts the tracer modeling work and performs other modeling tasks. Two graduate students, Ms Irene Lee and Mr Michael Ring, have been participating

  20. Transport of large solids in sewer pipes.

    PubMed

    Walski, Thomas; Edwards, Bryce; Helfer, Emil; Whitman, Brian E

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a method for determining the conditions under which large solids (i.e., solids with a vertical dimension greater than the depth of water) are able to move in a pipe. Depending on the value of a dimensionless number [s(d/y) - 1], where s = specific gravity of the solids, d = water depth, and y = height of solids, motion will occur if a sufficient velocity (also reported as a Froude number or modified "solids" Froude number) is exceeded. Flume experiments were used to determine the coefficients to be used in the design. The velocity required to reach fluid movement was approximately 0.6 to 1.0 m/s (2 to 3 ft/s), which is consistent, although slightly higher than values generally used in conventional sewer design practice. However, it was demonstrated that increasing the pipe slope to achieve a higher velocity does not ensure that the solid will move. PMID:19691252

  1. Robust, Optimal Subsonic Airfoil Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2014-01-01

    A method has been developed to create an airfoil robust enough to operate satisfactorily in different environments. This method determines a robust, optimal, subsonic airfoil shape, beginning with an arbitrary initial airfoil shape, and imposes the necessary constraints on the design. Also, this method is flexible and extendible to a larger class of requirements and changes in constraints imposed.

  2. The requirements for a new full scale subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. W.; Mckinney, M. O.; Luidens, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Justification and requirements are presented for a large subsonic wind tunnel capable of testing full scale aircraft, rotor systems, and advanced V/STOL propulsion systems. The design considerations and constraints for such a facility are reviewed, and the trades between facility test capability and costs are discussed.

  3. INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE, COMPLETED VALVEMOLD BEING TRANSPORTED BY THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE, COMPLETED VALVE-MOLD BEING TRANSPORTED BY THE "BOX FLOOR" OVERHEAD RAIL CRANE TO THE POURING AREA. (THE BOX FLOOR AREA IS WHERE THE COMPANY PREPARES MOLDS TOO LARGE TO BE MADE ON MOLDING MACHINES OR POURED ON THE CONVEYOR) - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Ductile Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  4. Large Eddy Simulation of the fuel transport and mixing process in a scramjet combustor with rearwall-expansion cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zun; Liu, Xiao; Gong, Cheng; Sun, Mingbo; Wang, Zhenguo; Bai, Xue-Song

    2016-09-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) was employed to investigate the fuel/oxidizer mixing process in an ethylene fueled scramjet combustor with a rearwall-expansion cavity. The numerical solver was first validated for an experimental flow, the DLR strut-based scramjet combustor case. Shock wave structures and wall-pressure distribution from the numerical simulations were compared with experimental data and the numerical results were shown in good agreement with the available experimental data. Effects of the injection location on the flow and mixing process were then studied. It was found that with a long injection distance upstream the cavity, the fuel is transported much further into the main flow and a smaller subsonic zone is formed inside the cavity. Conversely, with a short injection distance, the fuel is entrained more into the cavity and a larger subsonic zone is formed inside the cavity, which is favorable for ignition in the cavity. For the rearwall-expansion cavity, it is suggested that the optimized ignition location with a long upstream injection distance should be in the bottom wall in the middle part of the cavity, while the optimized ignition location with a short upstream injection distance should be in the bottom wall in the front side of the cavity. By employing a cavity direct injection on the rear wall, the fuel mass fraction inside the cavity and the local turbulent intensity will both be increased due to this fueling, and it will also enhance the mixing process which will also lead to increased mixing efficiency. For the rearwall-expansion cavity, the combined injection scheme is expected to be an optimized injection scheme.

  5. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project-longitudinal handling qualities study of a relaxed-stability airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The results of a piloted simulation of longitudinal handling qualities of an airplane with relaxed static stability are described. This task was performed under the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology Project within the NASA Energy Efficient Transport Program. A representative medium range transport airplane, the Boeing Model 757, was simulated. Evaluations were made of the unaugmented airplane and of the airplane with an Essential Pitch Augmented Stability (PAS) System and with a Primary PAS System at various center of gravity (cg) conditions. Level 2 pilot ratings were attained with cg locations aft to about 57% mean aerodynamic chord (MAC) or 6% aft of the neutral point for unaugmented landing approach. For Mach = 0.80, unaugmented cruise Level 2 ratings were attained to 47% MAC or 5% forward of the maneuver point. The augmented airplane model provided handling qualities close to or within the Level 1 boundary at all cg locations for both Essential and Primary PAS. Analyses of the test conditions when compared with existing handling qualities criteria based on classical unaugmented airplane characteristics agreed well with the pilot ratings. The unaugmented results are comparable to those reported by both the Douglas Aircraft Company and Lockheed California Company from simulation investigations of transport configurations with roughly similar dimensional and mass characteristics.

  6. The shape of the future long-haul transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clay, C. W.; Sigalla, A.

    1975-01-01

    Long-haul transport plane configurations are discussed that are considered technically feasible within a practical level of near-term technology. Supersonic and transonic aircraft are considered, as well as different types of subsonic transports. It is indicated that superior second-generation supersonic transports are quite feasible technically; in particular, it is shown that problems of fuel consumption, efficient overland flight, and questions on noise and nitric oxides have straightforward engineering solutions. Transonic aircraft are practical but would have to have a different geometry than subsonic aircraft to provide the versatility necessary to compete at one end of their capability with supersonic transports and at the other end, for shorter ranges, with subsonic transports. The shape of subsonic transports is not expected to change noticeably, although recent advances of airfoil technology imply that new subsonic transports would have wings with higher aspect ratios and somewhat less sweep. But large specialized freighter aircraft and very long range laminar flow control or nuclear-powered aircraft with radically new shapes are possible.

  7. Large-eddy simulation of the flow and acoustic fields of a Reynolds number 105 subsonic jet with tripped exit boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogey, Christophe; Marsden, Olivier; Bailly, Christophe

    2011-03-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LESs) of isothermal round jets at a Mach number of 0.9 and a diameter-based Reynolds number ReD of 105 originating from a pipe are performed using low-dissipation schemes in combination with relaxation filtering. The aim is to carefully examine the capability of LES to compute the flow and acoustic fields of initially nominally turbulent jets. As in experiments on laboratory-scale jets, the boundary layers inside the pipe are tripped in order to obtain laminar mean exit velocity profiles with high perturbation levels. At the pipe outlet, their momentum thickness is δθ(0)=0.018 times the jet radius, yielding a Reynolds number Reθ=900, and peak turbulence intensities are around 9% of the jet velocity. Two methods of boundary-layer tripping and five grids are considered. The results are found to vary negligibly with the tripping procedure but appreciably with the grid resolution. Based on analyses of the LES quality and on comparisons with measurements at high Reynolds numbers, fine discretizations appear necessary in the three coordinate directions over the entire jet flow. The final LES carried out using 252×106 points with minimum radial, azimuthal, and axial mesh spacings, respectively, of 0.20, 0.34, and 0.40×δθ(0) is also shown to provide shear-layer solutions that are practically grid converged and, more generally, results that can be regarded as numerically accurate as well as physically relevant. They suggest that the mixing-layer development in the present tripped jet, while exhibiting a wide range of turbulent scales, is characterized by persistent coherent vortex pairings.

  8. Robust, optimal subsonic airfoil shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Method system, and product from application of the method, for design of a subsonic airfoil shape, beginning with an arbitrary initial airfoil shape and incorporating one or more constraints on the airfoil geometric parameters and flow characteristics. The resulting design is robust against variations in airfoil dimensions and local airfoil shape introduced in the airfoil manufacturing process. A perturbation procedure provides a class of airfoil shapes, beginning with an initial airfoil shape.

  9. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: current and advanced act control system definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The Current and Advanced Technology ACT control system definition tasks of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program are summarized. The systems mechanize six active control functions: (1) pitch augmented stability (2) angle of attack limiting (3) lateral/directional augmented stability (4) gust load alleviation (5) maneuver load control and (6) flutter mode control. The redundant digital control systems meet all function requirements with required reliability and declining weight and cost as advanced technology is introduced.

  10. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Current and Advanced Technology ACT control system definition tasks of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program are summarized. The systems mechanize six active control functions: (1) pitch augmented stability; (2) angle of attack limiting; (3) lateral/directional augmented stability; (4) gust load alleviation; (5) maneuver load control; and (6) flutter mode control. The redundant digital control systems meet all function requirements with required reliability and declining weight and cost as advanced technology is introduced.

  11. Large scale motions of thermal transport in a turbulent channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmarathne, Suranga; Tutkun, Murat; Araya, Guillermo; Leonardi, Stefano; Castillo, Luciano

    2015-11-01

    The importance of large scale motions (LSMs) on thermal transport in a turbulent channel flow at friction number of 394 is investigated. Two-point correlation analysis reveals that LSM which significantly contribute to turbulence kinetic energy and scalar transport is a reminiscent of a hairpin packet. Low-order mode representation of the original fields using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) unveils that the most dominant mode that transports is 3-4 channel half-heights long and such structure which contribute to scalar transport is 2-4 channel half-heights long. Consequently, the study discloses that LSMs are effective in transporting both streamwise component of turbulence kinetic energy and scalar variances.

  12. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. ACT/Control/Guidance System study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The active control technology (ACT) control/guidance system task of the integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology project within the NASA energy efficient transport program was documented. The air traffic environment of navigation and air traffic control systems and procedures were extrapolated. An approach to listing flight functions which will be performed by systems and crew of an ACT configured airplane of the 1990s, and a determination of function criticalities to safety of flight, are the basis of candidate integrated ACT/Control/Guidance System architecture. The system mechanizes five active control functions: pitch augmented stability, angle of attack limiting, lateral/directional augmented stability, gust load alleviation, and maneuver load control. The scope and requirements of a program for simulating the integrated ACT avionics and flight deck system, with pilot in the loop, are defined, system and crew interface elements are simulated, and mechanization is recommended. Relationships between system design and crew roles and procedures are evaluated.

  13. Lattice thermal transport in large-area polycrystalline graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksamija, Z.; Knezevic, I.

    2014-07-01

    We study lattice thermal transport in large-area polycrystalline graphene, such as the samples grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of carbon on Cu. These systems are composed of single-crystalline grains with a broad range of sizes and crystal orientations, separated by atomically rough grain boundaries. We solve the phonon Boltzmann transport equation and calculate the thermal conductivity in each grain, including scattering from the grain boundary roughness. Thermal transport in the large-area sample is considered in the Corbino-membrane geometry, with heat flowing through a network of thermal resistors and away from a pointlike heat source. The thermal transport in polycrystalline graphene is shown to be highly anisotropic, depending on the individual properties of the grains (their size and boundary roughness), as well as on grain connectivity. Strongest heat conduction occurs along large-grain filaments, while the heat flow is blocked through regions containing predominantly small grains. We discuss how thermal transport in CVD graphene can be tailored by controlling grain disorder.

  14. Transport of Carbon-14 in a Large, Unsaturated Soil Column

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell Plummer; Don Fox; Larry Hull

    2004-03-01

    Wastes buried at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) include activated metals that release radioactive 14C as they corrode. To test and refine transport predictions that describe releases to the environment with time, we conducted a series of transport experiments with nonreactive gas- and aqueous-phase tracers and inorganic 14C species in a large unsaturated soil column filled with sediment representative of that at the RWMC. The tracer tests, hydraulic measurements, and chemical monitoring provided constraints on physical transport parameters, water content, and aqueous–gas partitioning behavior. With those constraints, we estimated a solid–aqueous distribution coefficient for the sediment through inverse modeling of the 14C transport data, using both a simple gas-diffusion model and a multiphase flow and transport simulator (STOMP). Results indicate that 14C transport in this system is well described by a reactive gas diffusion model, with a pH-dependent retardation factor. Fitting transport simulations to the early-time transport data yielded Kd 0.5 ± 0.1 mL g–1, while soil samples removed approximately 1 yr later yielded Kd values of 0.8 to 2.4 mL g–1. These values are consistent with those derived from smaller-scale experiments, demonstrating that laboratory-based measurements provide a valid means of estimating transport behavior at much larger spatial and temporal scales. Assuming that 14CO2 migration in the RWMC is dominated by gas transport, our results suggest that most 14C released from the RWMC would discharge to the atmosphere rather than to the underlying Snake River Plain aquifer

  15. LARGE-SCALE CO2 TRANSPORTATION AND DEEP OCEAN SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid Sarv

    1999-03-01

    Technical and economical feasibility of large-scale CO{sub 2} transportation and ocean sequestration at depths of 3000 meters or grater was investigated. Two options were examined for transporting and disposing the captured CO{sub 2}. In one case, CO{sub 2} was pumped from a land-based collection center through long pipelines laid on the ocean floor. Another case considered oceanic tanker transport of liquid carbon dioxide to an offshore floating structure for vertical injection to the ocean floor. In the latter case, a novel concept based on subsurface towing of a 3000-meter pipe, and attaching it to the offshore structure was considered. Budgetary cost estimates indicate that for distances greater than 400 km, tanker transportation and offshore injection through a 3000-meter vertical pipe provides the best method for delivering liquid CO{sub 2} to deep ocean floor depressions. For shorter distances, CO{sub 2} delivery by parallel-laid, subsea pipelines is more cost-effective. Estimated costs for 500-km transport and storage at a depth of 3000 meters by subsea pipelines and tankers were 1.5 and 1.4 dollars per ton of stored CO{sub 2}, respectively. At these prices, economics of ocean disposal are highly favorable. Future work should focus on addressing technical issues that are critical to the deployment of a large-scale CO{sub 2} transportation and disposal system. Pipe corrosion, structural design of the transport pipe, and dispersion characteristics of sinking CO{sub 2} effluent plumes have been identified as areas that require further attention. Our planned activities in the next Phase include laboratory-scale corrosion testing, structural analysis of the pipeline, analytical and experimental simulations of CO{sub 2} discharge and dispersion, and the conceptual economic and engineering evaluation of large-scale implementation.

  16. THE LARGE ASPECT RATIO LIMIT OF NEOCLASSICAL TRANSPORT THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    WONG,SK; CHAN,VS

    2002-11-01

    OAK B202 THE LARGE ASPECT RATIO LIMIT OF NEOCLASSICAL TRANSPORT THEORY. This article presents a comprehensive description of neoclassical transport theory in the banana regime for large aspect ratio flux surfaces of arbitrary shapes. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to obtain analytical solutions for plasma distribution functions and to compute transport coefficients. The method provides justification for retaining only the part of the Fokker-Planck operator that involves the second derivative with respect to the cosine of the pitch angle for the trapped and barely circulating particles. It leads to a simple equation for the freely circulating particles with boundary conditions that embody a discontinuity separating particles moving in opposite directions. Corrections to the transport coefficients are obtained by generalizing an existing boundary layer analysis. The system of moment and field equations is consistently taken in the cylinder limit, which facilitates discussion of the treatment of dynamical constraints. it is shown that the nonlocal nature of Ohm's law in neoclassical theory renders the mathematical problem of plasma transport with changing flux surfaces nonstandard.

  17. New Algorithms for Large-scale 3D Radiation Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, Eric J.

    2009-05-01

    Radiation transport is critical not only for analysis of astrophysical objects but also for the dynamical transport of energy within. Increased fidelity and dimensionality of the other components of such models requires a similar improvement in the radiation transport. Modern astrophysical simulations can be large enough that the values for a single variable for the entire computational domain cannot be stored on a single compute node. The natural solution is to decompose the physical domain into pieces with each node responsible for a single sub-domain. Using localized plus "ghost" zone data works well for problems like explicit hydrodynamics or nuclear reaction networks with modest impact from inter-process communication. Unfortunately, radiation transport is an inherently non-local process that couples the entire model domain together and efficient algorithms are needed to conquer this problem. In this poster, I present the early development of a new parallel, 3-D transport code using ray tracing to formally solve the transport equation across numerically decomposed domains. The algorithm model takes advantage of one-sided communication to develop a scalable, parallel formal solver. Other aspects and future direction of the parallel code development such as scalability and the inclusion of scattering will also be discussed.

  18. Wind tunnel investigation of a large-scale 25 deg swept-wing jet transport model with an external blowing triple-slotted flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoyagi, K.; Falarski, M. D.; Koenig, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale subsonic jet transport model with an externally blown triple-slotted flap. The lift of the model was augmented by the turbofan engine exhaust impingement on the flap surface. The model had a 25 deg swept wing of aspect ratio 7.28 and four turbofan engines. The model was tested with two flap extents. One extended from 0.11 to 1.00 of the wing semispan, and the other extended from 0.11 to 0.75 of the wing semispan with a single-slotted aileron from 0.75 to 1.00 of the wing semispan. The results were obtained for several flap deflections with and without the horizontal tail at gross thrust coefficients from 0 to 4.0. Longitudinal and lateral data are presented with three and four engines operating.

  19. Fast and efficient transport of large ion clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamsap, M. R.; Pedregosa-Gutierrez, J.; Champenois, C.; Guyomarc'h, D.; Houssin, M.; Knoop, M.

    2015-10-01

    The manipulation of trapped charged particles by electric fields is an accurate, robust, and reliable technique for many applications or experiments in high-precision spectroscopy. The transfer of an ion sample between multiple traps allows the use of a tailored environment in quantum information, cold chemistry, or frequency metrology experiments. In this article, we experimentally study the transport of ion clouds of up to 80 000 ions over a distance of 20 mm inside a linear radio-frequency trap. Ion transport is controlled by a transfer function, which is designed taking into account the local electric potentials. We observe that the ion response is very sensitive to the details of the description of the electric potential. Nevertheless, we show that fast transport—with a total duration of 100 μ s —results in transport efficiencies attaining values higher than 90% of the ion number, even with large ion clouds. For clouds smaller than 2000 ions, a 100% transfer efficiency is observed. Transport induced heating, which depends on the transport duration, is also analyzed.

  20. Technology Assessment for Large Vertical-Lift Transport Tiltrotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germanowski, Peter J.; Stille, Brandon L.; Strauss, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    The technical community has identified rotor efficiency as a critical enabling technology for large vertical-lift transport (LVLT) rotorcraft. The size and performance of LVLT aircraft will be far beyond current aircraft capabilities, enabling a transformational change in cargo transport effectiveness. Two candidate approaches for achieving high efficiency were considered for LVLT applications: a variable-diameter tiltrotor (VDTR) and a variable-speed tiltrotor (VSTR); the former utilizes variable-rotor geometry and the latter utilizes variable-rotor speed. Conceptual aircraft designs were synthesized for the VDTR and VSTR and compared to a conventional tiltrotor (CTR). The aircraft were optimized to a common objective function and bounded by a set of physical- and requirements-driven constraints. The resulting aircraft were compared for weight, size, performance, handling qualities, and other attributes. These comparisons established a measure of the relative merits of the variable-diameter and -speed rotor systems as enabling technologies for LVLT capability.

  1. Large Eddy Simulation of Flow and Sediment Transport over Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agegnehu, G.; Smith, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the nature of flow over bedforms has a great importance in fluvial and coastal environments. For example, a bedform is one source of energy dissipation in water waves outside the surf zone in coastal environments. In rivers, the migration of dunes often affects the stability of the river bed and banks. In general, when a fluid flows over a sediment bed, the sediment transport generated by the interaction of the flow field with the bed results in the periodic deformation of the bed in the form of dunes. Dunes generally reach an equilibrium shape, and slowly propagate in the direction of the flow, as sand is lifted in the high shear regions, and redeposited in the separated flow areas. Different numerical approaches have been used in the past to study the flow and sediment transport over bedforms. In most research works, Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations are employed to study fluid motions over ripples and dunes. However, evidences suggests that these models can not represent key turbulent quantities in unsteady boundary layers. The use of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) can resolve a much larger range of smaller scales than RANS. Moreover, unsteady simulations using LES give vital turbulent quantities which can help to study fluid motion and sediment transport over dunes. For this steady, we use a three-dimensional, non-hydrostatic model, OpenFOAM. It is a freely available tool which has different solvers to simulate specific problems in engineering and fluid mechanics. Our objective is to examine the flow and sediment transport from numerical stand point for bed geometries that are typical of fixed dunes. At the first step, we performed Large Eddy Simulation of the flow over dune geometries based on the experimental data of Nelson et al. (1993). The instantaneous flow field is investigated with special emphasis on the occurrence of coherent structures. To assess the effect of bed geometries on near bed turbulence, we considered different

  2. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Droney, Christopher K.

    2011-01-01

    This Final Report summarizes the work accomplished by the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team in Phase 1, which includes the time period of October 2008 through March 2010. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, General Electric, and Georgia Tech. The team completed the development of a comprehensive future scenario for world-wide commercial aviation, selected baseline and advanced configurations for detailed study, generated technology suites for each configuration, conducted detailed performance analysis, calculated noise and emissions, assessed technology risks, and developed technology roadmaps. Five concepts were evaluated in detail: 2008 baseline, N+3 reference, N+3 high span strut braced wing, N+3 gas turbine battery electric concept, and N+3 hybrid wing body. A wide portfolio of technologies was identified to address the NASA N+3 goals. Significant improvements in air traffic management, aerodynamics, materials and structures, aircraft systems, propulsion, and acoustics are needed. Recommendations for Phase 2 concept and technology projects have been identified.

  3. Competing mechanisms of momentum transport in large wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles

    2011-11-01

    In very large wind farms in the atmospheric boundary layer, energy, and momentum are on average transported from layers above the farm downward towards the turbines (Calaf, Meneveau, Meyers, Phys. Fluids 2010). In the current work, we investigate in more detail the three-dimensional flows of mass, momentum and energy towards individual turbines, based on a suite of large-eddy simulations. We find that there are two competing mechanisms which bring momentum to the turbines, i.e. a sideways flux, and a top-down flux of momentum (sideways fluxes themselves are fed by a top-down flux in regions outside the turbine wake area). For large spanwise turbine spacings, sideways momentum fluxes are dominating; for small spanwise spacings, the top-down mechanism is dominant. Inspired by these observations, we propose a new integral model for wind-farm performance, in which competing fluxes of momentum are represented by closed analytical expressions obtained by integrating momentum equations over different regions in the ABL. The research of CM is supported by NSF AGS 1045189.

  4. Coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian transport of large debris by tsunamis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, Daniel A. S.; Ferreira, Rui M. L.; Sousa Oliveira, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Tsunamis are notorious for the large disruption they can cause on coastal environments, not only due to the imparted momentum of the incoming wave but also due to its capacity to transport large quantities of solid debris, either from natural or human-made sources, over great distances. A 2DH numerical model under development at CERIS-IST (Ferreira et al., 2009; Conde, 2013) - STAV2D - capable of simulating solid transport in both Eulerian and Lagrangian paradigms will be used to assess the relevance of Lagrangian-Eulerian coupling when modelling the transport of solid debris by tsunamis. The model has been previously validated and applied to tsunami scenarios (Conde, 2013), being well-suited for overland tsunami propagation and capable of handling morphodynamic changes in estuaries and seashores. The discretization scheme is an explicit Finite Volume technique employing flux-vector splitting and a reviewed Roe-Riemann solver. Source term formulations are employed in a semi-implicit way, including the two-way coupling of the Lagrangian and Eulerian solvers by means of conservative mass and momentum transfers between fluid and solid phases. The model was applied to Sines Port, a major commercial port in Portugal, where two tsunamigenic scenarios are considered: an 8.5 Mw scenario, consistent with the Great Lisbon Earthquake and Tsunami of the 1st November 1755 (Baptista, 2009), and an hypothetical 9.5 Mw worst-case scenario based on the same historical event. Open-ocean propagation of these scenarios were simulated with GeoClaw model from ClawPack (Leveque, 2011). Following previous efforts on the modelling of debris transport by tsunamis in seaports (Conde, 2015), this work discusses the sensitivity of the obtained results with respect to the phenomenological detail of the employed Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation and the resolution of the mesh used in the Eulerian solver. The results have shown that the fluid to debris mass ratio is the key parameter regarding the

  5. Locating inefficient links in a large-scale transportation network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Liu, Like; Xu, Zhongzhi; Jie, Yang; Wei, Dong; Wang, Pu

    2015-02-01

    Based on data from geographical information system (GIS) and daily commuting origin destination (OD) matrices, we estimated the distribution of traffic flow in the San Francisco road network and studied Braess's paradox in a large-scale transportation network with realistic travel demand. We measured the variation of total travel time Δ T when a road segment is closed, and found that | Δ T | follows a power-law distribution if Δ T < 0 or Δ T > 0. This implies that most roads have a negligible effect on the efficiency of the road network, while the failure of a few crucial links would result in severe travel delays, and closure of a few inefficient links would counter-intuitively reduce travel costs considerably. Generating three theoretical networks, we discovered that the heterogeneously distributed travel demand may be the origin of the observed power-law distributions of | Δ T | . Finally, a genetic algorithm was used to pinpoint inefficient link clusters in the road network. We found that closing specific road clusters would further improve the transportation efficiency.

  6. Large wood budget and transport dynamics on a large river using radio telemetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Edward R.; Moulin, Bertrand; Hupp, Cliff R.; Richte, Jean M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the abundance of large wood (LW) river studies there is still a lack of understanding of LW transport dynamics on large low gradient rivers. This study used 290 radio frequency identification tagged (RFID) LW and 54 metal (aluminum) tagged LW, to quantify the percent of in-channel LW that moves per year and what variables play a role in LW transport dynamics. Aluminum tags were installed and monitored on LW in-transit during the rising limb of a flood, the mean distance traveled by those pieces during the week was 13.3 river kilometers (km) with a maximum distance of 72 km. RFID tagged LW moved a mean of 11.9 km/yr with a maximum observed at 101.1 km/yr. Approximately 41% of LW low on the bank moves per year. The high rate of transport and distance traveled is likely due to the lack of interaction between LW floating in the channel and the channel boundaries, caused primarily by the width of the channel relative to length of the LW. Approximately 80% of the RFID tags moved past a fixed reader during the highest 20% of river stage per year. LW transport and logjam dynamics are complicated at high flows as pieces form temporary jams that continually expand and contract. Unlike most other studies, key members that create a logjam were defined more by stability than jam size or channel/hydrologic conditions. Finally, using an existing geomorphic database for the river, and data from this study, we were able to develop a comprehensive LW budget showing that 5% of the in-channel LW population turns over each year (input from mass wasting and fluvial erosion equals burial, decomposition, and export out of system) and another 16% of the population moving within the system.

  7. Mass transport and element mobilisation during large-scale metasomatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnis, C. V.; Austrheim, H.; Jamtveit, B.; Engvik, A. K.; Putnis, A.

    2009-04-01

    Replacement textures commonly occur in relation to fluid-driven large scale metasomatism and metamorphism and these processes are often related to mineralisation. For example, the albitisation of gabbroic rocks in the Bamble District, southern Norway is associated with ore deposits. Similar albitised rocks are also characteristic of the Curnamona Province, Australia, which includes large areas of mineralisation such as the Pb, Zn, Ag of the Broken Hill deposits as well as Cu, Au and U deposits. The main question addressed here is the mechanism of mass transport and hence element mobilisation. An indication of the former presence of fluids within a rock can be seen in mineral textures, such as porosity, replacement rims, replacement induced fracturing and crystallographic continuity across sharp compositional boundaries. Such textural observations from natural rocks as well as experimental products show that during mineral-fluid interaction, the crystallographic relations between parent and product phases control the nucleation of the product, and hence a coupling between dissolution and reprecipitation. If the rate of nucleation and growth of the product equals the dissolution rate, a pseudomorphic replacement takes place. The degree of epitaxy (or lattice misfit) at the interface, the relative solubility of parent and product phases and the molar volume changes control the microstructure of the product phase. The key observation is that these factors control the generation of porosity as well as reaction induced fracturing ahead of the main reaction interface. Porosity is generated whenever the amount of parent dissolved is greater than the amount of product reprecipitated, irrespective of the molar volume changes of the solid reactants and products. This porosity is occupied by the fluid phase during the reaction, and provides a mechanism of mass transport and fluid movement between reaction interface and the surrounding phases. The reaction-induced fracturing

  8. 14 CFR 135.367 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes....367 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off...

  9. 14 CFR 135.365 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.365 Large transport... reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane from an airport located at an elevation...

  10. 14 CFR 135.365 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.365 Large transport... reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane from an airport located at an elevation...

  11. 14 CFR 135.365 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.365 Large transport... reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane from an airport located at an elevation...

  12. 14 CFR 135.367 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes....367 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off...

  13. 14 CFR 135.385 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....385 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane may take...

  14. 14 CFR 135.385 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....385 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane may take...

  15. 14 CFR 135.385 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....385 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane may take...

  16. 14 CFR 135.385 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....385 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane may take...

  17. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acoustical change: Transport category large... § 36.7 Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes. (a) Applicability. This section applies to all transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes for which an acoustical...

  18. 14 CFR 135.365 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.365 Large transport... reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane from an airport located at an elevation...

  19. 14 CFR 135.367 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes....367 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off...

  20. 14 CFR 135.387 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....387 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... alternate airport for a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane unless (based on...

  1. 14 CFR 135.387 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....387 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... alternate airport for a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane unless (based on...

  2. 14 CFR 135.387 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....387 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... alternate airport for a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane unless (based on...

  3. 14 CFR 135.387 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....387 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... alternate airport for a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane unless (based on...

  4. Unsteady Aerodynamics - Subsonic Compressible Inviscid Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a new analytical treatment of Unsteady Aerodynamics - the linear theory covering the subsonic compressible (inviscid) case - drawing on some recent work in Operator Theory and Functional Analysis. The specific new results are: (a) An existence and uniqueness proof for the Laplace transform version of the Possio integral equation as well as a new closed form solution approximation thereof. (b) A new representation for the time-domain solution of the subsonic compressible aerodynamic equations emphasizing in particular the role of the initial conditions.

  5. Transport of large particles in flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imdakm, A. O.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    1987-12-01

    There is considerable evidence indicating that significant reduction in the efficiency of many processes in porous media, such as enhancing oil recovery, heterogeneous chemical reactions, deep-bed filtration, gel permeation, and liquid chromatography, is due to the reduction in the permeability of the pore space. This reduction is due to the transport of particles, whose sizes are comparable with those of the pores, and the subsequent blocking of the pores by various mechanisms. In this paper we develop a novel Monte Carlo method for theoretical modeling of this phenomenon. Particles of various sizes are injected into the medium, and their migration in the flow field is modeled by a random walk whose transition porbability is proportional to the local pore fluxes. Pores are blocked and their flow capacity is reduced (or vanished) when large particles pass through them (and reduce their flow) or totally block them. The permeability of the medium can ultimately vanish and, therefore, this phenomenon is a percolation process. Various quantities of interest such as the variations of the permeability with process time and the distribution of pore-plugging times are computed. The critical exponent characterizing the vanishing of the permeability near the percolation threshold appears to be different from that of percolation conductivity. The agreement between our results and the available experimental data is excellent.

  6. Modeling of highly brines transport in large water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, T. P.; Lepikhin, A. P.; Parshakova, Y. N.; Tiunov, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    The paper deals with the numerical modeling of a dilution and transport of highly brines in large water bodies taking into account the density stratification effects. This problem has an exceptional importance for the guarantee of ecological security of the Kama Reservoir in the conditions of extending exploitation of Verhnekamsk deposit of potassium and magnesium salts - one of the largest in the world. The output of million of tones of the potassium fertilizer is accompanied by the producing of the same quantity of highly brines demanding utilization. With the existing technologies the desalination of such quantity of brines is extremely energy-capacious and almost inapplicable. That is why main way for the brine utilization is the release into the surface water bodies or underground water-bearing horizons. Since the uncertainty level in the parameter setting for underground water-bearing horizons is higher than that for the surface water bodies, under the same or close conditions the release into the surface water bodies is considerably less dangerous. The main water body able to assimilate such huge amount of the removed brines is the upper part of the Kama Reservoir located within the Solikamsk-Berezniki industrial centre. The wastewater arriving from this centre make a decisive contribution to the formation of hydrochemical regime of Kama river. We suggested two-dimensional imitational hydrodynamical model allowing to determine the possible pollution zones depending on the flow rate and concentration of pollutant, flow rate and water level in the Kama river and wind characteristics in the zone of pollutant discharge. This model allows not only to calculate the distribution of pollution zones for various pollutant sources but also to estimate the consequences of emergencies. The Kama river near the Solikamsk-Berezniki industrial centre has complex morphometry. For the complete and efficient accounting for the morphometry peculiarities the non-linear orthogonal

  7. 14 CFR 91.805 - Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. 91... § 91.805 Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in §§ 91.809 and 91.811, on and after January 1, 1985, no person may operate to or from an airport in the United States any subsonic...

  8. 14 CFR 91.805 - Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. 91... § 91.805 Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in §§ 91.809 and 91.811, on and after January 1, 1985, no person may operate to or from an airport in the United States any subsonic...

  9. 14 CFR 91.805 - Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. 91... § 91.805 Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in §§ 91.809 and 91.811, on and after January 1, 1985, no person may operate to or from an airport in the United States any subsonic...

  10. 14 CFR 91.805 - Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. 91... § 91.805 Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in §§ 91.809 and 91.811, on and after January 1, 1985, no person may operate to or from an airport in the United States any subsonic...

  11. 14 CFR 91.805 - Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. 91... § 91.805 Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in §§ 91.809 and 91.811, on and after January 1, 1985, no person may operate to or from an airport in the United States any subsonic...

  12. Investigation of the Physical Processes Governing Large-Scale Tracer Transport in the Stratosphere and Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selkirk, Henry B.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes work conducted from January 1996 through April 1999 on a program of research to investigate the physical mechanisms that underlie the transport of trace constituents in the stratosphere-troposphere system. The primary scientific goal of the research has been to identify the processes which transport air masses within the lower stratosphere, particularly between the tropics and middle latitudes. This research was conducted in collaboration with the Subsonic Assessment (SASS) of the NASA Atmospheric Effects of Radiation Program (AEAP) and the Upper Atmospheric Research Program (UARP). The SASS program sought to understand the impact of the present and future fleets of conventional jet traffic on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, while complementary airborne observations under UARP seek to understand the complex interactions of dynamical and chemical processes that affect the ozone layer. The present investigation contributed to the goals of each of these by diagnosing the history of air parcels intercepted by NASA research aircraft in UARP and AEAP campaigns. This was done by means of a blend of trajectory analyses and tracer correlation techniques.

  13. Tunnel Correction for Compressible Subsonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranoff, A. V.

    1947-01-01

    This report presents a treatment of the effects of the tunnel walls on the flow velocity and direction in a compressible medium at subsonic speed by an approximate method. Calculations are given for the rotationally symmetric and two- dimensionl problems of the flow past bodies, as well for the downwash effect in the tunnel with circular cross section.

  14. Airfoil shape for flight at subsonic speeds

    DOEpatents

    Whitcomb, Richard T.

    1976-01-01

    An airfoil having an upper surface shaped to control flow accelerations and pressure distribution over the upper surface and to prevent separation of the boundary layer due to shock wave formulation at high subsonic speeds well above the critical Mach number. A highly cambered trailing edge section improves overall airfoil lifting efficiency.

  15. Statistical theories of Langmuir turbulence. II - Subsonic to sonic transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, D. F.; Rose, H. A.; Nicholson, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The subsonic limit of the quadratic direct interaction approximation (DIA) applied to the Zakharov equations is compared with the cubic DIA applied to the nonlinear Schroedinger equation, which is the subsonic limit of the Zakharov equations. Comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations of a truncated system show that the first theory more accurately describes the regime of stationary turbulence, while the second theory more accurately describes the subsonic evolution of the modulational instability. The weak turbulence limits of the two theories describe the sonic and subsonic regimes, respectively. The addition of vertex corrections to the DIA leads to a hybrid weak turbulence theory that smoothly interpolates between the sonic and subsonic regimes.

  16. Subsonic and Supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Kuranz, C. C.; Visco, A.; Ditmar, J. R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Bono, M. J.; Plewa, T.

    2009-05-01

    Shear flows arise in many high-energy-density (HED) and astrophysical systems, yet few laboratory experiments have been carried out to study their evolution in these extreme environments. Fundamentally, shear flows can initiate mixing via the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability and may eventually drive a transition to turbulence. We present two dedicated shear flow experiments that created subsonic and supersonic shear layers in HED plasmas. In the subsonic case the Omega laser was used to drive a shock wave along a rippled plastic interface, which subsequently rolled-upped into large KH vortices. In the supersonic shear experiment the Nike laser was used to drive Al plasma across a low-density foam surface also seeded with a ripple. Unlike the subsonic case, detached shocks developed around the ripples in response to the supersonic Al flow.

  17. 14 CFR 91.1037 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....1037 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and alternate airports. (a) No program manager or any other person may permit a turbine engine powered large...

  18. 14 CFR 91.1037 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....1037 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and alternate airports. (a) No program manager or any other person may permit a turbine engine powered large...

  19. 14 CFR 91.1037 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....1037 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and alternate airports. (a) No program manager or any other person may permit a turbine engine powered large...

  20. 14 CFR 91.1037 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....1037 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and alternate airports. (a) No program manager or any other person may permit a turbine engine powered large...

  1. 14 CFR 91.1037 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....1037 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and alternate airports. (a) No program manager or any other person may permit a turbine engine powered large...

  2. Parameterization of Fire Injection Height in Large Scale Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paugam, R.; Wooster, M.; Atherton, J.; Val Martin, M.; Freitas, S.; Kaiser, J. W.; Schultz, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    The parameterization of fire injection height in global chemistry transport model is currently a subject of debate in the atmospheric community. The approach usually proposed in the literature is based on relationships linking injection height and remote sensing products like the Fire Radiative Power (FRP) which can measure active fire properties. In this work we present an approach based on the Plume Rise Model (PRM) developed by Freitas et al (2007, 2010). This plume model is already used in different host models (e.g. WRF, BRAMS). In its original version, the fire is modeled by: a convective heat flux (CHF; pre-defined by the land cover and evaluated as a fixed part of the total heat released) and a plume radius (derived from the GOES Wildfire-ABBA product) which defines the fire extension where the CHF is homogeneously distributed. Here in our approach the Freitas model is modified, in particular we added (i) an equation for mass conservation, (ii) a scheme to parameterize horizontal entrainment/detrainment, and (iii) a new initialization module which estimates the sensible heat released by the fire on the basis of measured FRP rather than fuel cover type. FRP and Active Fire (AF) area necessary for the initialization of the model are directly derived from a modified version of the Dozier algorithm applied to the MOD14 product. An optimization (using the simulating annealing method) of this new version of the PRM is then proposed based on fire plume characteristics derived from the official MISR plume height project and atmospheric profiles extracted from the ECMWF analysis. The data set covers the main fire region (Africa, Siberia, Indonesia, and North and South America) and is set up to (i) retain fires where plume height and FRP can be easily linked (i.e. avoid large fire cluster where individual plume might interact), (ii) keep fire which show decrease of FRP and AF area after MISR overpass (i.e. to minimize effect of the time period needed for the plume to

  3. Parameterization of Fire Injection Height in Large Scale Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paugam, r.; Wooster, m.; Freitas, s.; Gonzi, s.; Palmer, p.

    2012-04-01

    The parameterization of fire injection height in global chemistry transport model is currently a subject of debate in the atmospheric community. The approach usually proposed in the literature is based on relationships linking injection height and remote sensing products like the Fire Radiative Power (FRP) which can measure active fire properties. In this work we present an approach based on the Plume Rise Model (PRM) developed by Freitas et al (2007, 2010). This plume model is already used in different host models (e.g. WRF, BRAMS). In its original version, the fire is modelled by: a convective heat flux (CHF; pre-defined by the land cover and evaluated as a fixed part of the total heat released) and a plume radius (derived from the GOES Wildfire-ABBA product) which defines the fire extension where the CHF is homogeneously distributed. Here in our approach the Freitas model is modified. Major modifications are implemented in its initialisation module: (i) CHF and the Active Fire area are directly force from FRP data derived from a modified version of the Dozier algorithm applied to the MOD12 product, (ii) and a new module of the buoyancy flux calculation is implemented instead of the original module based on the Morton Taylor and Turner equation. Furthermore the dynamical core of the plume model is also modified with a new entrainment scheme inspired from latest results from shallow convection parameterization. Optimization and validation of this new version of the Freitas PRM is based on fire plume characteristics derived from the official MISR plume height project and atmospheric profile extracted from the ECMWF analysis. The data set is (i) build up to only keep fires where plume height and FRP can be easily linked (i.e. avoid large fire cluster where individual plume might interact) and (ii) split per fire land cover type to optimize the constant of the buoyancy flux module and the entrainment scheme to different fire regime. Result shows that the new PRM is

  4. Subsonic Round and Rectangular Twin Jet Flow Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Rick; Wernet, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Subsonic and supersonic aircraft concepts proposed by NASAs Fundamental Aeronautics Program have integrated propulsion systems with asymmetric nozzles. The asymmetry in the exhaust of these propulsion systems creates asymmetric flow and acoustic fields. The flow asymmetries investigated in the current study are from two parallel round, 2:1, and 8:1 aspect ratio rectangular jets at the same nozzle conditions. The flow field was measured with streamwise and cross-stream particle image velocimetry (PIV). A large dataset of single and twin jet flow field measurements was acquired at subsonic jet conditions. The effects of twin jet spacing and forward flight were investigated. For round, 2:1, and 8:1 rectangular twin jets at their closest spacings, turbulence levels between the two jets decreased due to enhanced jet mixing at near static conditions. When the flight Mach number was increased to 0.25, the flow around the twin jet model created a velocity deficit between the two nozzles. This velocity deficit diminished the effect of forward flight causing an increase in turbulent kinetic energy relative to a single jet. Both of these twin jet flow field effects decreased with increasing twin jet spacing relative to a single jet. These variations in turbulent kinetic energy correlate with changes in far-field sound pressure level.

  5. Aeropropulsion 1987. Session 5: Subsonic Propulsion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    NASA is conducting aeropropulsion research over a broad range of Mach numbers. In addition to the high-speed propulsion research described, major progress was recorded in research aimed at the subsonic flight regimes of interest to many commercial and military users. Recent progress and future directions in such areas as small engine technology, rotorcraft transmissions, icing, Hot Section Technology (HOST) and the Advanced Turboprop Program (ATP) are covered.

  6. Flow quality measurements in compressible subsonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, P. Calvin; Johnson, Charles B.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose is to re-examine the heat transfer from a hot-wire probe in the compressible subsonic flow regime; describe the three-wire hot-wire probe calibration and data reduction techniques used to measure the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuation; and present flow quality results obtained in the Langley 0.3 meter Transonic Cryogenic Wind Tunnel and in flight with the NASA JetStar from the same three-wire hot-wire probe.

  7. Review of Propulsion Technologies for N+3 Subsonic Vehicle Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashcraft, Scott W.; Padron, Andres S.; Pascioni, Kyle A.; Stout, Gary W., Jr.; Huff, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    NASA has set aggressive fuel burn, noise, and emission reduction goals for a new generation (N+3) of aircraft targeting concepts that could be viable in the 2035 timeframe. Several N+3 concepts have been formulated, where the term "N+3" indicate aircraft three generations later than current state-of-the-art aircraft, "N". Dramatic improvements need to be made in the airframe, propulsion systems, mission design, and the air transportation system in order to meet these N+3 goals. The propulsion system is a key element to achieving these goals due to its major role with reducing emissions, fuel burn, and noise. This report provides an in-depth description and assessment of propulsion systems and technologies considered in the N+3 subsonic vehicle concepts. Recommendations for technologies that merit further research and development are presented based upon their impact on the N+3 goals and likelihood of being operational by 2035.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation and PIV Visualization of a Vertical Hydrogen Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, G.; Peneau, F.; Wu, T. C.; Oshkai, P.; Djilali, N.

    2006-11-01

    Increasing concerns about green house gas emissions and deteriorating local air quality will necessitate substantial emission reductions, particularly from road vehicles. Canada has made important contributions in paving the way for the use of hydrogen in the transportation sector, which could lead to a substantial reduction of urban pollution and CO2 emissions. However production and storage issues, as well as the absence of specific standards for hydrogen are regarded as obstacles to the introduction of hydrogen in the energy market. A hydrogen jet exiting into quiescent air in both the supersonic and subsonic regimes is simulated using large eddy simulation with a Smagorinski subgrid model. The subsonic results are compared with experimental results obtained by Panchapakesan et al. and So et al. Using a high speed PIV system, a subsonic air-in-air jet is studied and the time averaged flow-field is compared to the one obtained in the simulation.

  9. Large-scale multi-agent transportation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, Nurhan; Nagel, Kai; Raney, Bryan; Voellmy, Andreas

    2002-08-01

    It is now possible to microsimulate the traffic of whole metropolitan areas with 10 million travelers or more, "micro" meaning that each traveler is resolved individually as a particle. In contrast to physics or chemistry, these particles have internal intelligence; for example, they know where they are going. This means that a transportation simulation project will have, besides the traffic microsimulation, modules which model this intelligent behavior. The most important modules are for route generation and for demand generation. Demand is generated by each individual in the simulation making a plan of activities such as sleeping, eating, working, shopping, etc. If activities are planned at different locations, they obviously generate demand for transportation. This however is not enough since those plans are influenced by congestion which initially is not known. This is solved via a relaxation method, which means iterating back and forth between the activities/routes generation and the traffic simulation.

  10. 14 CFR 135.367 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... person operating a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off that... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations §...

  11. 14 CFR 135.365 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Weight limitations. (a) No person may take off a... may take off a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane for an airport of... may take off a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane at a weight more...

  12. 14 CFR 135.371 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: One...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off that airplane at a weight, allowing... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance...

  13. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine... existing at take- off. (b) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  14. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine... existing at take- off. (b) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  15. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine... existing at take- off. (b) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  16. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine... existing at take- off. (b) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  17. 14 CFR 135.377 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.377 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing...

  18. 14 CFR 135.375 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing limitations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.375 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing...

  19. 14 CFR 135.371 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: One...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.371 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route...

  20. 14 CFR 135.387 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.387 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations:...

  1. 14 CFR 135.369 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: All...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.369 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route...

  2. Evaluation of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program Noise Reduction Benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Robert A.; Rawls, John W., Jr.; Russell, James W.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a detailed evaluation of the aircraft noise reduction technology concepts developed during the course of the NASA/FAA Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program. In 1992, NASA and the FAA initiated a cosponsored, multi-year program with the U.S. aircraft industry focused on achieving significant advances in aircraft noise reduction. The program achieved success through a systematic development and validation of noise reduction technology. Using the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program, the noise reduction benefit of the technologies that reached a NASA technology readiness level of 5 or 6 were applied to each of four classes of aircraft which included a large four engine aircraft, a large twin engine aircraft, a small twin engine aircraft and a business jet. Total aircraft noise reductions resulting from the implementation of the appropriate technologies for each class of aircraft are presented and compared to the AST program goals.

  3. Wind tunnel investigation of a large scale 35 deg swept wing jet transport model with an external blowing triple slotted flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoyagi, K.; Hall, L. P.; Falarski, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale subsonic jet transport model with an externally jet-augmented flap system that would augment lift and provide direct-lift control. The model had a 35 deg swept wing of aspect ratio 7.82 and two side-by-side engines mounted on a single pylon under each wing close to the fuselage. The lift of the flap system was augmented by jet engine exhaust impingement on the triple-slotted flap surfaces. The rearmost flap provided direct lift control. Results were obtained for several combinations of flap deflections at gross thrust coefficients from 0 to 2.0. Three-component longitudinal data are presented with four engines operating. Limited longitudinal and lateral data are presented for asymmetric and symmetric thrust conditions with three engines operating. For the same overall flap deflection, lift coefficient and maximum lift coefficient were improved 13 and 7 percent compared to coefficients obtained with a double-slotted flap configuration. A maximum lift coefficient of 6.3 was obtained at a gross thrust coefficient of 2.0. At the same flap deflection lateral and directional trim moment requirements with an engine inoperative were reduced 55 and 33 percent, respectively, compared to those with the engines located farther outboard on the wing. Trim moment requirements in pitch were also reduced significantly. However, pitching-moment instability occurred and increased with gross thrust coefficient.

  4. Electron Trapping and Charge Transport by Large Amplitude Whistlers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, P. J.; Cattell, C. A.; Goetz, K.; Monson, S. J.; Wilson, L. B., III

    2010-01-01

    Trapping of electrons by magnetospheric whistlers is investigated using data from the Waves experiment on Wind and the S/WAVES experiment on STEREO. Waveforms often show a characteristic distortion which is shown to be due to electrons trapped in the potential of the electrostatic part of oblique whistlers. The density of trapped electrons is significant, comparable to that of the unperturbed whistler. Transport of these trapped electrons to new regions can generate potentials of several kilovolts, Trapping and the associated potentials may play an important role in the acceleration of Earth's radiation belt electrons.

  5. Far-Field Turbulent Vortex-Wake/Exhaust Plume Interaction for Subsonic and HSCT Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Adam, Ihab; Wong, Tin-Chee

    1996-01-01

    Computational study of the far-field turbulent vortex-wake/exhaust plume interaction for subsonic and high speed civil transport (HSCT) airplanes is carried out. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are solved using the implicit, upwind, Roe-flux-differencing, finite-volume scheme. The two-equation shear stress transport model of Menter is implemented with the NS solver for turbulent-flow calculation. For the far-field study, the computations of vortex-wake interaction with the exhaust plume of a single engine of a Boeing 727 wing in a holding condition and two engines of an HSCT in a cruise condition are carried out using overlapping zonal method for several miles downstream. These results are obtained using the computer code FTNS3D. The results of the subsonic flow of this code are compared with those of a parabolized NS solver known as the UNIWAKE code.

  6. Atmospheric Effects of Subsonic Aircraft: Interim Assessment Report of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedl, Randall R. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This first interim assessment of the subsonic assessment (SASS) project attempts to summarize concisely the status of our knowledge concerning the impacts of present and future subsonic aircraft fleets. It also highlights the major areas of scientific uncertainty, through review of existing data bases and model-based sensitivity studies. In view of the need for substantial improvements in both model formulations and experimental databases, this interim assessment cannot provide confident numerical predictions of aviation impacts. However, a number of quantitative estimates are presented, which provide some guidance to policy makers.

  7. Experimental investigation of subsonic combustion driven MHD generator performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClaine, A. W.; Swallom, D. W.; Kessler, R.

    1984-01-01

    Future mature combined cycle MHD/steam electrical power plants may use subsonic flow trains. To provide a data base of subsonic generator design and operating experience an experimental program was begun in 1977 at the Avco Everett Research Laboratory. During this program an MHD generator was operated with a subsonic flow train under both Faraday and diagonal loads. This paper reviews the work performed under this program and the results obtained.

  8. Analysis of supersonic combustion flow fields with embedded subsonic regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S.; Delguidice, P.

    1972-01-01

    The viscous characteristic analysis for supersonic chemically reacting flows was extended to include provisions for analyzing embedded subsonic regions. The numerical method developed to analyze this mixed subsonic-supersonic flow fields is described. The boundary conditions are discussed related to the supersonic-subsonic and subsonic-supersonic transition, as well as a heuristic description of several other numerical schemes for analyzing this problem. An analysis of shock waves generated either by pressure mismatch between the injected fluid and surrounding flow or by chemical heat release is also described.

  9. Large scale Wyoming transportation data: a resource planning tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, Michael S.; Fancher, Tammy S.; Freeman, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Abra E.; Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Fort Collins Science Center created statewide roads data for the Bureau of Land Management Wyoming State Office using 2009 aerial photography from the National Agriculture Imagery Program. The updated roads data resolves known concerns of omission, commission, and inconsistent representation of map scale, attribution, and ground reference dates which were present in the original source data. To ensure a systematic and repeatable approach of capturing roads on the landscape using on-screen digitizing from true color National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery, we developed a photogrammetry key and quality assurance/quality control protocols. Therefore, the updated statewide roads data will support the Bureau of Land Management’s resource management requirements with a standardized map product representing 2009 ground conditions. The updated Geographic Information System roads data set product, represented at 1:4,000 and +/- 10 meters spatial accuracy, contains 425,275 kilometers within eight attribute classes. The quality control of these products indicated a 97.7 percent accuracy of aspatial information and 98.0 percent accuracy of spatial locations. Approximately 48 percent of the updated roads data was corrected for spatial errors of greater than 1 meter relative to the pre-existing road data. Twenty-six percent of the updated roads involved correcting spatial errors of greater than 5 meters and 17 percent of the updated roads involved correcting spatial errors of greater than 9 meters. The Bureau of Land Management, other land managers, and researchers can use these new statewide roads data set products to support important studies and management decisions regarding land use changes, transportation and planning needs, transportation safety, wildlife applications, and other studies.

  10. Light-fuelled transport of large dendrimers and proteins.

    PubMed

    Koskela, Jenni E; Liljeström, Ville; Lim, Jongdoo; Simanek, Eric E; Ras, Robin H A; Priimagi, Arri; Kostiainen, Mauri A

    2014-05-14

    This work presents a facile water-based supramolecular approach for light-induced surface patterning. The method is based upon azobenzene-functionalized high-molecular weight triazine dendrimers up to generation 9, demonstrating that even very large globular supramolecular complexes can be made to move in response to light. We also demonstrate light-fuelled macroscopic movements in native biomolecules, showing that complexes of apoferritin protein and azobenzene can effectively form light-induced surface patterns. Fundamentally, the results establish that thin films comprising both flexible and rigid globular particles of large diameter can be moved with light, whereas the presented material concepts offer new possibilities for the yet marginally explored biological applications of azobenzene surface patterning. PMID:24785836

  11. Space transportation booster engine thrust chamber technology, large scale injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the Large Scale Injector (LSI) program was to deliver a 21 inch diameter, 600,000 lbf thrust class injector to NASA/MSFC for hot fire testing. The hot fire test program would demonstrate the feasibility and integrity of the full scale injector, including combustion stability, chamber wall compatibility (thermal management), and injector performance. The 21 inch diameter injector was delivered in September of 1991.

  12. Two Dimensional Subsonic Euler Flows Past a Wall or a Symmetric Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Du, Lili; Xie, Chunjing; Xin, Zhouping

    2016-08-01

    The existence and uniqueness of two dimensional steady compressible Euler flows past a wall or a symmetric body are established. More precisely, given positive convex horizontal velocity in the upstream, there exists a critical value {ρ_cr} such that if the incoming density in the upstream is larger than {ρ_cr}, then there exists a subsonic flow past a wall. Furthermore, {ρ_cr} is critical in the sense that there is no such subsonic flow if the density of the incoming flow is less than {ρ_cr}. The subsonic flows possess large vorticity and positive horizontal velocity above the wall except at the corner points on the boundary. Moreover, the existence and uniqueness of a two dimensional subsonic Euler flow past a symmetric body are also obtained when the incoming velocity field is a general small perturbation of a constant velocity field and the density of the incoming flow is larger than a critical value. The asymptotic behavior of the flows is obtained with the aid of some integral estimates for the difference between the velocity field and its far field states.

  13. Monitoring Large-Scale Sediment Transport Dynamics with Multibeam Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, D. R.; Simmons, S. M.; Best, J. L.; Keevil, G. M.; Oberg, K.; Czuba, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Multibeam Echo-Sounder systems have developed rapidly over recent decades and are routinely deployed to provide high-resolution bathymetric information in and range of environments. Modern data handling and storage technologies now facilitate the logging of the raw acoustic back-scatter information that was previously discarded by these systems. This paper describes methodologies that exploit this logging capability to quantify both the concentration and dynamics of suspended sediment within the water column. This development provides a multi-purpose tool for the holistic surveying of sediment transport dynamics by imaging suspended sediment concentration, the associated flows and providing concurrent high-resolution bathymetry. Results obtained a RESON 7125 MBES are presented from both well constrained dock-side testing and full field deployment over dune bedforms in the Mississippi. The capacity of the system to image suspended sediment structures is demonstrated and a novel methodology for estimating 2D flow velocities, based on frame cross-correlation methods, is introduced. The results demonstrate the capability of MBES systems to successfully map spatial and temporal variations in suspended sediment concentration throughout a 2D swath and application of the velocity estimation algorithms allow real-time holistic monitoring of turbulent flow processes and suspended sediment fluxes at a scale previously unrealisable. Turbulent flow over a natural dune bedform on the Mississippi is used to highlight the process information provided and the insights that can be gleaned for this technical development.

  14. Subsonic Performance of Ejector Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, Samuel

    Combined cycle engines combining scramjets with turbo jets or rockets can provide efficient hypersonic flight. Ejectors have the potential to increase the thrust and efficiency of combined cycle engines near static conditions. A computer code was developed to support the design of a small-scale, turbine-based combined cycle demonstrator with an ejector, built around a commercially available turbojet engine. This code was used to analyze the performance of an ejector system built around a micro-turbojet. With the use of a simple ejector, net thrust increases as large as 20% over the base engine were predicted. Additionally the specific fuel consumption was lowered by 10%. Increasing the secondary to primary area ratio of the ejector lead to significant improvements in static thrust, specific fuel consumption (SFC), and propulsive efficiency. Further ejector performance improvements can be achieved by using a diffuser. Ejector performance drops off rapidly with increasing Mach number. The ejector has lower thrust and higher SFC than the turbojet core at Mach numbers above 0.2. When the nozzle chokes a significant drop in ejector performance is seen. When a diffuser is used, higher Mach numbers lead to choking in the mixer and a shock in the nozzle causing a significant decrease in ejector performance. Evaluation of different turbo jets shows that ejector performance depends significantly on the properties of the turbojet. Static thrust and SFC improvements can be achieved with increasing ejector area for all engines, but size of increase and change in performance at higher Mach numbers depend heavily on the turbojet. The use of an ejector in a turbine based combined cycle configuration also increases performance at static conditions with a thrust increase of 5% and SFC decrease of 5% for the tested configuration.

  15. Full scale subsonic wind tunnel requirements and design studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. W.; Mort, K. W.; Hickey, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The justification and requirements are summarized for a large subsonic wind tunnel capable of testing full-scale aircraft, rotor systems, and advanced V/STOL aircraft propulsion systems. The design considerations and constraints for such a facility are reviewed, and the trades between facility test capability and costs are discussed. The design studies showed that the structural cost of this facility is the most important cost factor. For this reason (and other considerations such as requirements for engine exhaust gas purging) an open-return wind tunnel having two test sections was selected. The major technical problem in the design of an open-return wind tunnel is maintaining good test section flow quality in the presence of external winds. This problem has been studied extensively, and inlet and exhaust systems which provide satisfactory attenuation of the effects of external winds on test section flow quality were developed.

  16. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Flow field measurements of three subsonic rectangular cold air jets are presented. The three cases had aspect ratios of 1x2, 1x4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1x2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. The data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data are presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made.

  17. FPGA development for high altitude subsonic parachute testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, James E.; Gromov, Konstantin G.; Konefat, Edward H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid, top down requirements-driven design of a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) used in an Earth qualification test program for a new Mars subsonic parachute. The FPGA is used to process and control storage of telemetry data from multiple sensors throughout launch, ascent, deployment and descent phases of the subsonic parachute test.

  18. FPGA development for high altitude subsonic parachute testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, James E.; Konefat, Edward H.; Gromovt, Konstantin

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid, top down requirements-driven design of an FPGA used in an Earth qualification test program for a new Mars subsonic parachute. The FPGA is used to process and store data from multiple sensors at multiple rates during launch, ascent, deployment and descent phases of the subsonic parachute test.

  19. High altitude subsonic parachute field programmable gate array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, James E.; Gromov, Konstantin; Konefat, Edward H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid, top down requirements-driven design of an FPGA used in an Earth qualification test program for a new Mars subsonic parachute. The FPGA is used to process and control storage of telemetry data from multiple sensors throughout; launch, ascent, deployment and descent phases of the subsonic parachute test.

  20. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage...

  1. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage...

  2. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage...

  3. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage...

  4. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage...

  5. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. 135.379 Section 135.379 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS...

  6. 14 CFR 135.385 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. 135.385 Section 135.385 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION...

  7. Large internal waves in Massachusetts Bay transport sediments offshore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, B.; Alexander, P.S.; Scotti, A.; Beardsley, R.C.; Anderson, S.P.

    2006-01-01

    A field experiment was carried out in Massachusetts Bay in August 1998 to assess the role of large-amplitude internal waves (LIWs) in resuspending bottom sediments. The field experiment consisted of a four-element moored array extending from just west of Stellwagen Bank (90-m water depth) across Stellwagen Basin (85- and 50-m water depth) to the coast (24-m water depth). The LIWs were observed in packets of 5–10 waves, had periods of 5–10 min and wavelengths of 200–400 m, and caused downward excursions of the thermocline of as much as 30 m. At the 85-m site, the current measured 1 m above bottom (mab) typically increased from near 0 to 0.2 m/s offshore in a few minutes upon arrival of the LIWs. At the 50-m site, the near-bottom offshore flow measured 6 mab increased from about 0.1 to 0.4–0.6 m/s upon arrival of the LIWs and remained offshore in the bottom layer for 1–2 h. The near-bottom currents associated with the LIWs, in concert with the tidal currents, were directed offshore and sufficient to resuspend the bottom sediments at both the 50- and 85-m sites. When LIWs are present, they may resuspend sediments for as long as 5 hours each tidal cycle as they travel westward across Stellwagen Basin. At 85-m water depth, resuspension associated with LIWs is estimated to occur for about 0.4 days each summer, about the same amount of time as caused by surface waves.

  8. On the Importance of Very Light Internally Subsonic AGN Jets in Radio-mode AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai

    2016-07-01

    Radio-mode active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in the evolution of galaxy groups and clusters. Its physical origin lies in the kiloparsec-scale interaction of AGN jets with the intracluster medium. Large-scale jet simulations often initiate light internally supersonic jets with density contrast 0.01 < η < 1. Here we argue for the first time for the importance of very light (η < 0.01) internally subsonic jets. We investigated the shapes of young X-ray cavities produced in a suite of hydrodynamic simulations, and found that bottom-wide cavities are always produced by internally subsonic jets, while internally supersonic jets inflate cylindrical, center-wide, or top-wide cavities. We found examples of real cavities with shapes analogous to those inflated in our simulations by internally subsonic and internally supersonic jets, suggesting a dichotomy of AGN jets according to their internal Mach numbers. We further studied the long-term cavity evolution, and found that old cavities resulted from light jets spread along the jet direction, while those produced by very light jets are significantly elongated along the perpendicular direction. The northwestern ghost cavity in Perseus is pancake shaped, providing tentative evidence for the existence of very light jets. Our simulations show that very light internally subsonic jets decelerate faster and rise much slower in the intracluster medium than light internally supersonic jets, possibly depositing a larger fraction of jet energy to cluster cores and alleviating the problem of low coupling efficiencies found previously. The internal Mach number points to the jet’s energy content, and internally subsonic jets are energetically dominated by non-kinetic energy, such as thermal energy, cosmic rays, or magnetic fields.

  9. An Analytical Assessment of NASA's N+1 Subsonic Fixed Wing Project Noise Goal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Envia, Edmane; Burley, Casey L.

    2009-01-01

    The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program has adopted a noise reduction goal for new, subsonic, single-aisle, civil aircraft expected to replace current 737 and A320 airplanes. These so-called 'N+1' aircraft - designated in NASA vernacular as such since they will follow the current, in-service, 'N' airplanes - are hoped to achieve certification noise goal levels of 32 cumulative EPNdB under current Stage 4 noise regulations. A notional, N+1, single-aisle, twinjet transport with ultrahigh bypass ratio turbofan engines is analyzed in this study using NASA software and methods. Several advanced noise-reduction technologies are analytically applied to the propulsion system and airframe. Certification noise levels are predicted and compared with the NASA goal.

  10. An Analytical Assessment of NASA's N(+)1 Subsonic Fixed Wing Project Noise Goal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Envia, Edmane; Burley, Casey L.

    2010-01-01

    The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project of NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program has adopted a noise reduction goal for new, subsonic, single-aisle, civil aircraft expected to replace current 737 and A320 airplanes. These so-called "N+1" aircraft--designated in NASA vernacular as such since they will follow the current, in-service, "N" airplanes--are hoped to achieve certification noise goal levels of 32 cumulative EPNdB under current Stage 4 noise regulations. A notional, N+1, single-aisle, twinjet transport with ultrahigh bypass ratio turbofan engines is analyzed in this study using NASA software and methods. Several advanced noise-reduction technologies are empirically applied to the propulsion system and airframe. Certification noise levels are predicted and compared with the NASA goal.

  11. Transverse charge transport through DNA oligomers in large-area molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsouras, Ilias; Piliego, Claudia; Blom, Paul W. M.; de Leeuw, Dago M.

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the nature of charge transport in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) using self-assembled layers of DNA in large-area molecular junctions. A protocol was developed that yields dense monolayers where the DNA molecules are not standing upright, but are lying flat on the substrate. As a result the charge transport is measured not along the DNA molecules but in the transverse direction, across their diameter. The electrical transport data are consistent with the derived morphology. We demonstrate that the charge transport mechanism through DNA is identical to non-resonant tunneling through alkanethiols with identical length, classifying DNA as a dielectric.

  12. Simulator study of flight characteristics of several large, dissimilar, cargo transport airplanes during approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. D.; Smith, P. M.; Deal, P. L.; Neely, W. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom, ground based simulator study is conducted to evaluate the low-speed flight characteristics of four dissimilar cargo transport airplanes. These characteristics are compared with those of a large, present-day (reference) transport configuration similar to the Lockheed C-5A airplane. The four very large transport concepts evaluated consist of single-fuselage, twin-fuselage, triple-fuselage, and span-loader configurations. The primary piloting task is the approach and landing operation. The results of his study indicate that all four concepts evaluated have unsatisfactory longitudinal and lateral directional low speed flight characteristics and that considerable stability and control augmentation would be required to improve these characteristics (handling qualities) to a satisfactory level. Through the use of rate command/attitude hold augmentation in the pitch and roll axes, and the use of several turn-coordination features, the handling qualities of all four large transports simulated are improved appreciably.

  13. Langley 14- by 22-foot subsonic tunnel test engineer's data acquisition and reduction manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinto, P. Frank; Orie, Nettie M.

    1994-01-01

    The Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel is used to test a large variety of aircraft and nonaircraft models. To support these investigations, a data acquisition system has been developed that has both static and dynamic capabilities. The static data acquisition and reduction system is described; the hardware and software of this system are explained. The theory and equations used to reduce the data obtained in the wind tunnel are presented; the computer code is not included.

  14. Are windshear training aid recommendations appropriate for other than large jet transports? Pilot procedures: Shear models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Information is given in vugraph form on pilot procedures in windshear, typical winds in a downburst, a downburst encounter at takeoff by a large jet transport and a light turboprop twin, and a comparison of pitch algorithms in an approach encounter with downburst shear. It is observed that the light turboprop appears no less tolerant of a downburst encounter than the large jet.

  15. Effect of winglets on a first-generation jet transport wing. 1: Longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a semispan model at subsonic speeds. [in the Langley 8 ft transonic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. F.; Flechner, S. G.; Montoya, L. C.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of winglets and a simple wing-tip extension on the aerodynamic forces and moments and the flow-field cross flow velocity vectors behind the wing tip of a first generation jet transport wing were investigated in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel using a semi-span model. The test was conducted at Mach numbers of 0.30, 0.70, 0.75, 0.78, and 0.80. At a Mach number of 0.30, the configurations were tested with combinations of leading- and trailing-edge flaps.

  16. 14 CFR 135.381 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.381 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  17. 14 CFR 135.381 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.381 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  18. 14 CFR 135.381 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.381 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  19. 14 CFR 135.381 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.381 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  20. 14 CFR 135.383 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.383 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane along an...

  1. 14 CFR 135.383 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.383 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane along an...

  2. 14 CFR 135.383 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.383 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane along an...

  3. 14 CFR 135.383 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.383 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane along an...

  4. Investigating Aeroacoustic Sources in a Subsonic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachtor, Adam J.; Jordan, Peter; George, William K.

    2007-11-01

    George, W"anstr"om, and Jordan (2007) suggested an alternative approach to identifying aeroacoustic sources. Through this method, contributions to the pressure field are effectively separated into three separate terms. One term is unique in that it present only in compressible flows. This compressible term has been argued to be the only term that can radiate acoustically. An investigation into this approach is presented in the specific case of a subsonic jet. Particular attention is paid to the compressible term and its interaction with the mechanism that is responsible for the hydrodynamic pressure in an incompressible flow. We extend our thanks to Jonathan B. Freund for access to data from his DNS jet simulation.

  5. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1989-01-01

    Flow field measurements are presented of 3 subsonic rectangular cold air jets. The 3 cases presented had aspect ratios of 1 x 2, 1 x 4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1 x 2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemoneter system. The presented data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data is presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made. All tabular data are available in ASCII format on MS-DOS compatible disks.

  6. Subsonic Glideback Rocket Demonstrator Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeTurris, Dianne J.; Foster, Trevor J.; Barthel, Paul E.; Macy, Daniel J.; Droney, Christopher K.; Talay, Theodore A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the past two years, Cal Poly's rocket program has been aggressively exploring the concept of remotely controlled, fixed wing, flyable rocket boosters. This program, embodied by a group of student engineers known as Cal Poly Space Systems, has successfully demonstrated the idea of a rocket design that incorporates a vertical launch pattern followed by a horizontal return flight and landing. Though the design is meant for supersonic flight, CPSS demonstrators are deployed at a subsonic speed. Many steps have been taken by the club that allowed the evolution of the StarBooster prototype to reach its current size: a ten-foot tall, one-foot diameter, composite material rocket. Progress is currently being made that involves multiple boosters along with a second stage, third rocket.

  7. On the stability of subsonic thermal fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez S, Miguel H.; Shchekinov, Yuri; Bessega L, Maria C.

    2005-08-15

    The stability of subsonic thermal fronts against corrugation is analyzed and an exact dispersion relation is obtained taking into account the compressibility of the gas. For heat fronts, this dispersion equation has an unstable root ({omega}{sub ex}) corresponding to the Landau-Darrieus unstable mode ({omega}{sub 0}) modified by the compressional effects. In particular, the exact solution shows a conspicuous maximum very close to the value of the intake Mach number M{sub 1} at which a Chapman-Jouguet deflagration wave behind the heat front is formed. Cooling fronts are stable for corrugation-like disturbances. A maximum damping as well as a maximum in the frequency occur at a value of M{sub 1} depending on the value of the normalized cooling q.

  8. Power spectral density of subsonic jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Yu, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The power-spectrum density (PSD) of the far-field noise of a subsonic unheated axisymmetric jet is investigated by analysis of about 80 sets of published noise spectra and of spectra obtained using 12.7 and 25.4-mm-diameter compressed-air jets at exit velocities 66 and 104 m/s and 67 and 91 m/s, respectively, in the NASA Langley anechoic flow facility. The results are presented in tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Findings reported include Strouhal-number scaling of the PSD at theta = 30 deg or more, scaling with the product of the Helmholtz number and the Doppler factor at theta less than 30 deg, best collapse at source convection Mach number 0.5, variation of PSD amplitude as U to the 6.5th at theta = 90 deg, and no sharp PSD-amplitude variation at any critical Reynolds number.

  9. Packaging, Transportation, and Disposal Logistics for Large Radioactively Contaminated Reactor Decommissioning Components

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Mark S.

    2008-01-15

    The packaging, transportation and disposal of large, retired reactor components from operating or decommissioning nuclear plants pose unique challenges from a technical as well as regulatory compliance standpoint. In addition to the routine considerations associated with any radioactive waste disposition activity, such as characterization, ALARA, and manifesting, the technical challenges for large radioactively contaminated components, such as access, segmentation, removal, packaging, rigging, lifting, mode of transportation, conveyance compatibility, and load securing require significant planning and execution. In addition, the current regulatory framework, domestically in Titles 49 and 10 and internationally in TS-R-1, does not lend itself to the transport of these large radioactively contaminated components, such as reactor vessels, steam generators, reactor pressure vessel heads, and pressurizers, without application for a special permit or arrangement. This paper addresses the methods of overcoming the technical and regulatory challenges. The challenges and disposition decisions do differ during decommissioning versus component replacement during an outage at an operating plant. During decommissioning, there is less concern about critical path for restart and more concern about volume reduction and waste minimization. Segmentation on-site is an available option during decommissioning, since labor and equipment will be readily available and decontamination activities are routine. The reactor building removal path is also of less concern and there are more rigging/lifting options available. Radionuclide assessment is necessary for transportation and disposal characterization. Characterization will dictate the packaging methodology, transportation mode, need for intermediate processing, and the disposal location or availability. Characterization will also assist in determining if the large component can be transported in full compliance with the transportation

  10. Subsonic flight test evaluation of a performance seeking control algorithm on an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn B.; Orme, John S.

    1992-01-01

    The subsonic flight test evaluation phase of the NASA F-15 (powered by F 100 engines) performance seeking control program was completed for single-engine operation at part- and military-power settings. The subsonic performance seeking control algorithm optimizes the quasi-steady-state performance of the propulsion system for three modes of operation. The minimum fuel flow mode minimizes fuel consumption. The minimum thrust mode maximizes thrust at military power. Decreases in thrust-specific fuel consumption of 1 to 2 percent were measured in the minimum fuel flow mode; these fuel savings are significant, especially for supersonic cruise aircraft. Decreases of up to approximately 100 degree R in fan turbine inlet temperature were measured in the minimum temperature mode. Temperature reductions of this magnitude would more than double turbine life if inlet temperature was the only life factor. Measured thrust increases of up to approximately 15 percent in the maximum thrust mode cause substantial increases in aircraft acceleration. The system dynamics of the closed-loop algorithm operation were good. The subsonic flight phase has validated the performance seeking control technology, which can significantly benefit the next generation of fighter and transport aircraft.

  11. Large-Scale Transportation Network Congestion Evolution Prediction Using Deep Learning Theory

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Yunpeng; Wang, Yinhai

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how congestion at one location can cause ripples throughout large-scale transportation network is vital for transportation researchers and practitioners to pinpoint traffic bottlenecks for congestion mitigation. Traditional studies rely on either mathematical equations or simulation techniques to model traffic congestion dynamics. However, most of the approaches have limitations, largely due to unrealistic assumptions and cumbersome parameter calibration process. With the development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and Internet of Things (IoT), transportation data become more and more ubiquitous. This triggers a series of data-driven research to investigate transportation phenomena. Among them, deep learning theory is considered one of the most promising techniques to tackle tremendous high-dimensional data. This study attempts to extend deep learning theory into large-scale transportation network analysis. A deep Restricted Boltzmann Machine and Recurrent Neural Network architecture is utilized to model and predict traffic congestion evolution based on Global Positioning System (GPS) data from taxi. A numerical study in Ningbo, China is conducted to validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. Results show that the prediction accuracy can achieve as high as 88% within less than 6 minutes when the model is implemented in a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU)-based parallel computing environment. The predicted congestion evolution patterns can be visualized temporally and spatially through a map-based platform to identify the vulnerable links for proactive congestion mitigation. PMID:25780910

  12. Large-scale transportation network congestion evolution prediction using deep learning theory.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Yunpeng; Wang, Yinhai

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how congestion at one location can cause ripples throughout large-scale transportation network is vital for transportation researchers and practitioners to pinpoint traffic bottlenecks for congestion mitigation. Traditional studies rely on either mathematical equations or simulation techniques to model traffic congestion dynamics. However, most of the approaches have limitations, largely due to unrealistic assumptions and cumbersome parameter calibration process. With the development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and Internet of Things (IoT), transportation data become more and more ubiquitous. This triggers a series of data-driven research to investigate transportation phenomena. Among them, deep learning theory is considered one of the most promising techniques to tackle tremendous high-dimensional data. This study attempts to extend deep learning theory into large-scale transportation network analysis. A deep Restricted Boltzmann Machine and Recurrent Neural Network architecture is utilized to model and predict traffic congestion evolution based on Global Positioning System (GPS) data from taxi. A numerical study in Ningbo, China is conducted to validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. Results show that the prediction accuracy can achieve as high as 88% within less than 6 minutes when the model is implemented in a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU)-based parallel computing environment. The predicted congestion evolution patterns can be visualized temporally and spatially through a map-based platform to identify the vulnerable links for proactive congestion mitigation. PMID:25780910

  13. Variation in material transport and water chemistry along a large ephemeral river in the Namib Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, P.J.; Jacobson, K.M.; Angermeier, P.L.; Cherry, D.S.

    2000-01-01

    1. The chemical characteristics of floodwaters in ephemeral rivers are little known, particularly with regard to their organic loads. These rivers typically exhibit a pronounced downstream hydrological decay but few studies have documented its effect on chemical characteristics and material transport. To develop a better understanding of the dynamics of floods and associated material transport in large ephemeral rivers, floods of the ephemeral Kuiseb River in south-western Africa were tracked and repeatedly sampled at multiple points along the river's lower 220 km. 2. We quantified the composition and transport of solute and sediment loads in relation to longitudinal hydrological patterns associated with downstream hydrological decay. Source and sink areas for transported materials were identified, and the composition and transport dynamics of the organic matter load were compared to those described from more mesic systems. 3. Concentrations of sediments and solutes transported by floods in the Kuiseb River tended to increase downstream in association with pronounced hydrological decay. The contribution of particulate organic matter to total organic load is among the highest recorded, despite our observation of unusually high levels of dissolved organic matter. Hydrological decay resulted in deposition of all transported material within the lower Kuiseb River, with no discharge of water or materials to the Atlantic Ocean. 4. Our results suggest that longitudinal variation in surface flow and associated patterns of material transport renders the lower Kuiseb River a sink for materials transported from upstream. The downstream transport and deposition of large amounts of labile organic matter provides an important carbon supplement to heterotrophic communities within the river's lower reaches.

  14. Supersonic Jet Exhaust Noise at High Subsonic Flight Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norum, Thomas D.; Garber, Donald P.; Golub, Robert A.; Santa Maria, Odilyn L.; Orme, John S.

    2004-01-01

    An empirical model to predict the effects of flight on the noise from a supersonic transport is developed. This model is based on an analysis of the exhaust jet noise from high subsonic flights of the F-15 ACTIVE Aircraft. Acoustic comparisons previously attainable only in a wind tunnel were accomplished through the control of both flight operations and exhaust nozzle exit diameter. Independent parametric variations of both flight and exhaust jet Mach numbers at given supersonic nozzle pressure ratios enabled excellent correlations to be made for both jet broadband shock noise and jet mixing noise at flight speeds up to Mach 0.8. Shock noise correlated with flight speed and emission angle through a Doppler factor exponent of about 2.6. Mixing noise at all downstream angles was found to correlate well with a jet relative velocity exponent of about 7.3, with deviations from this behavior only at supersonic eddy convection speeds and at very high flight Mach numbers. The acoustic database from the flight test is also provided.

  15. An Overview of NASA's Subsonic Research Aircraft Testbed (SCRAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, Ethan; Hernandez, Joe; Ruhf, John C.

    2013-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center acquired a Gulfstream III (GIII) aircraft to serve as a testbed for aeronautics flight research experiments. The aircraft is referred to as SCRAT, which stands for SubsoniC Research Aircraft Testbed. The aircraft's mission is to perform aeronautics research; more specifically raising the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of advanced technologies through flight demonstrations and gathering high-quality research data suitable for verifying the technologies, and validating design and analysis tools. The SCRAT has the ability to conduct a range of flight research experiments throughout a transport class aircraft's flight envelope. Experiments ranging from flight-testing of a new aircraft system or sensor to those requiring structural and aerodynamic modifications to the aircraft can be accomplished. The aircraft has been modified to include an instrumentation system and sensors necessary to conduct flight research experiments along with a telemetry capability. An instrumentation power distribution system was installed to accommodate the instrumentation system and future experiments. An engineering simulation of the SCRAT has been developed to aid in integrating research experiments. A series of baseline aircraft characterization flights has been flown that gathered flight data to aid in developing and integrating future research experiments. This paper describes the SCRAT's research systems and capabilities.

  16. Unique Systems Analysis Task 7, Advanced Subsonic Technologies Evaluation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, Joseph D. (Technical Monitor); Bettner, J. L.; Stratton, S.

    2004-01-01

    To retain a preeminent U.S. position in the aircraft industry, aircraft passenger mile costs must be reduced while at the same time, meeting anticipated more stringent environmental regulations. A significant portion of these improvements will come from the propulsion system. A technology evaluation and system analysis was accomplished under this task, including areas such as aerodynamics and materials and improved methods for obtaining low noise and emissions. Previous subsonic evaluation analyses have identified key technologies in selected components for propulsion systems for year 2015 and beyond. Based on the current economic and competitive environment, it is clear that studies with nearer turn focus that have a direct impact on the propulsion industry s next generation product are required. This study will emphasize the year 2005 entry into service time period. The objective of this study was to determine which technologies and materials offer the greatest opportunities for improving propulsion systems. The goals are twofold. The first goal is to determine an acceptable compromise between the thermodynamic operating conditions for A) best performance, and B) acceptable noise and chemical emissions. The second goal is the evaluation of performance, weight and cost of advanced materials and concepts on the direct operating cost of an advanced regional transport of comparable technology level.

  17. 1. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING AND TRANSONIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING AND TRANSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  18. 7. VIEW NORTHWEST OF SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING TO TRANSONIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW NORTHWEST OF SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING TO TRANSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  19. 5. VIEW NORTHWEST OF SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING TO TRANSONIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW NORTHWEST OF SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING TO TRANSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  20. 3. VIEW SOUTHEAST OF TRANSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING TO SUBSONIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW SOUTHEAST OF TRANSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING TO SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  1. The role of freestream turbulence scale in subsonic flow separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. L.; Seebaugh, W. R.; Barnett, R. J.; Gokhale, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The ojective of this work is the clarification of the role of freestream turbulence scale in determining the location of boundary layer separation. An airfoil in subsonic wind tunnel flow is the specific case studied. Hot-film and hot-wire anemometry, liquid-film visualization and pressure measurements are the principal diagnostic techniques in use. The Vanderbilt University subsonic wind tunnel is the flow facility being used.

  2. Computation of subsonic flow around airfoil systems with multiple separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, K.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical method for computing the subsonic flow around multi-element airfoil systems was developed, allowing for flow separation at one or more elements. Besides multiple rear separation also sort bubbles on the upper surface and cove bubbles can approximately be taken into account. Also, compressibility effects for pure subsonic flow are approximately accounted for. After presentation the method is applied to several examples and improved in some details. Finally, the present limitations and desirable extensions are discussed.

  3. SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS SOFTWARE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, W. T.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed as an aid in the design and analysis of subsonic wind tunnels. It brings together and refines previously scattered and over-simplified techniques used for the design and loss prediction of the components of subsonic wind tunnels. It implements a system of equations for determining the total pressure losses and provides general guidelines for the design of diffusers, contractions, corners and the inlets and exits of non-return tunnels. The algorithms used in the program are applicable to compressible flow through most closed- or open-throated, single-, double- or non-return wind tunnels or ducts. A comparison between calculated performance and that actually achieved by several existing facilities produced generally good agreement. Any system through which air is flowing which involves turns, fans, contractions etc. (e.g., an HVAC system) may benefit from analysis using this software. This program is an update of ARC-11138 which includes PC compatibility and an improved user interface. The method of loss analysis used by the program is a synthesis of theoretical and empirical techniques. Generally, the algorithms used are those which have been substantiated by experimental test. The basic flow-state parameters used by the program are determined from input information about the reference control section and the test section. These parameters were derived from standard relationships for compressible flow. The local flow conditions, including Mach number, Reynolds number and friction coefficient are determined for each end of each component or section. The loss in total pressure caused by each section is calculated in a form non-dimensionalized by local dynamic pressure. The individual losses are based on the nature of the section, local flow conditions and input geometry and parameter information. The loss forms for typical wind tunnel sections considered by the program include: constant area ducts, open throat ducts, contractions, constant

  4. Quasispherical subsonic accretion in X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakura, Nikolai I.; Postnov, Konstantin A.; Kochetkova, A. Yu; Hjalmarsdotter, L.

    2013-04-01

    A theoretical model is considered for quasispherical subsonic accretion onto slowly rotating magnetized neutron stars. In this regime, the accreting matter settles down subsonically onto the rotating magnetosphere, forming an extended quasistatic shell. Angular momentum transfer in the shell occurs via large-scale convective motions resulting, for observed pulsars, in an almost iso-angular-momentum \\omega \\sim 1/R^2 rotation law inside the shell. The accretion rate through the shell is determined by the ability of the plasma to enter the magnetosphere due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, with allowance for cooling. A settling accretion regime is possible for moderate accretion rates \\dot M \\lesssim \\dot M_* \\simeq 4\\times 10^{16} g s ^{-1}. At higher accretion rates, a free-fall gap above the neutron star magnetosphere appears due to rapid Compton cooling, and the accretion becomes highly nonstationary. Observations of spin-up/spin-down rates of quasispherically wind accreting equilibrium X-ray pulsars with known orbital periods (e.g., GX 301-2 and Vela X-1) enable us to determine the main dimensionless parameters of the model, as well as to estimate surface magnetic field of the neutron star. For equilibrium pulsars, the independent measurements of the neutron star magnetic field allow for an estimate of the stellar wind velocity of the optical companion without using complicated spectroscopic measurements. For nonequilibrium pulsars, a maximum value is shown to exist for the spin-down rate of the accreting neutron star. From observations of the spin-down rate and the X-ray luminosity in such pulsars (e.g., GX 1+4, SXP 1062, and 4U 2206+54), a lower limit can be put on the neutron star magnetic field, which in all cases turns out to be close to the standard value and which agrees with cyclotron line measurements. Furthermore, both explains the spin-up/spin-down of the pulsar frequency on large time-scales and also accounts for the irregular short

  5. Planar Microdevices Enhance Transport of Large Molecular Weight Molecules Across Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Jennifer S.; Desai, Tejal A.

    2014-01-01

    Large molecular weight drug delivery to the posterior eye is challenging due to cellular barriers that hinder drug transport. Understanding how to enhance transport across the retinal barrier is important for the design of new drug delivery systems. A novel mechanism to enhance drug transport is the use of geometric properties, which has not been extensively explored in the retina. Planar SU-8/ Poly(ethyleneglycol)dimethacrylate microdevices were constructed using photolithography to deliver FITC dextran across an in vitro retinal model. The model consists of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown to confluence on transwell inserts, which provides an environment to investigate the influence of geometry on paracellular and transcellular delivery of encapsulated large molecules. Planar microdevices enhanced transport of large molecular weight dextrans across different models of RPE in a size dependent fashion. Increased drug permeation across the RPE was observed with the addition of microdevices as compared to a traditional bolus of FITC dextran. This phenomena was initiated by a non-toxic interaction between the microdevices and the retinal tight junction proteins. Suggesting that increased drug transport occurs via a paracellular pathway. These experiments provide evidence to support the future use of planar unidirectional microdevices for delivery of biologics in ocular applications. PMID:24789225

  6. Large-voltage behavior of charge transport characteristics in nanosystems with weak electron-vibration coupling.

    PubMed

    Novotný, Tomáš; Belzig, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    We study analytically the Full Counting Statistics of the charge transport through a nanosystem consisting of a few electronic levels weakly coupled to a discrete vibrational mode. In the limit of large transport voltage bias the cumulant generating function can be evaluated explicitly based solely on the intuitive physical arguments and classical master equation description of the vibration mode. We find that for the undamped vibrational modes mutual dynamical interplay between electronic and vibronic degrees of freedom leads to strongly nonlinear (in voltage) transport characteristics of the nanosystem. In particular, we find that for large voltages the k-th cumulant of the current grows as V (2k) to be contrasted with the linear dependence in case of more strongly externally damped and thus thermalized vibrational modes. PMID:26425436

  7. Large-voltage behavior of charge transport characteristics in nanosystems with weak electron–vibration coupling

    PubMed Central

    Belzig, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Summary We study analytically the Full Counting Statistics of the charge transport through a nanosystem consisting of a few electronic levels weakly coupled to a discrete vibrational mode. In the limit of large transport voltage bias the cumulant generating function can be evaluated explicitly based solely on the intuitive physical arguments and classical master equation description of the vibration mode. We find that for the undamped vibrational modes mutual dynamical interplay between electronic and vibronic degrees of freedom leads to strongly nonlinear (in voltage) transport characteristics of the nanosystem. In particular, we find that for large voltages the k-th cumulant of the current grows as V 2k to be contrasted with the linear dependence in case of more strongly externally damped and thus thermalized vibrational modes. PMID:26425436

  8. The Effect of Yaw Coupling in Turning Maneuvers of Large Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeill, Walter E.; Innis, Robert C.

    1965-01-01

    A study has been made, using a piloted moving simulator, of the effects of the yaw-coupling parameters N(sub p) and N(sub delta(sub a) on the lateral-directional handling qualities of a large transport airplane at landing-approach airspeed. It is shown that the desirable combinations of these parameters tend to be more proverse when compared with values typical of current aircraft. Results of flight tests in a large variable-stability jet transport showed trends which were similar to those of the simulator data. Areas of minor disagreement, which were traced to differences in airplane geometry, indicate that pilot consciousness of side acceleration forces can be an important factor in handling qualities of future long-nosed transport aircraft.

  9. Advanced air transport concepts. [review of design methods for very large aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molloy, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    The concepts of laminar flow control, very large all-wing aircraft, an aerial relay transportation system and alternative fuels, which would enable large improvements in fuel conservation in air transportation in the 1990's are discussed. Laminar boundary layer control through suction would greatly reduce skin friction and has been reported to reduce fuel consumption by up to 29%. Distributed load aircraft, in which all fuel and payload are carried in the wing and the fuselage is absent, permit the use of lighter construction materials and the elimination of fuselage and tail drag. Spanloader aircraft with laminar flow control could be used in an aerial relay transportation system which would employ a network of continuously flying liners supplied with fuel, cargo and crews by smaller feeder aircraft. Liquid hydrogen and methane fuels derived from coal are shown to be more weight efficient and less costly than coal-derived synthetic jet fuels.

  10. 14 CFR 135.369 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: All...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airplane may take off that airplane at a weight, allowing for normal consumption of fuel and oil, that does... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance...

  11. 14 CFR 135.375 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing limitations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off that airplane, unless its weight on... tailwind component. (b) An airplane that would be prohibited from being taken off because it could not meet paragraph (a)(2) of this section may be taken off if an alternate airport is selected that meets all of...

  12. Asymptotic theory of propeller noise. I - Subsonic single-rotation propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, A. B.; Crighton, D. G.

    1989-09-01

    Asymptotic expressions for the harmonic amplitudes and phases of the far-field acoustic pressure generated by a single-rotation propeller operating at subsonic tip relative Mach number are presented. These expressions are found from asymptotic approximations to integrals of the steady-loading distribution and of the blade thickness distribution over the surface of one blade, under the assumption that the number of blades B is large (but the harmonic number m is arbitrary). The asymptotics demonstrate rigorously that in this limit the noise of subsonic propellers is entirely tip generated, and described by very simple formulas giving explicit dependence on harmonic number, Mach number, and radiation angle. Excellent agreements is found between the asymptotic prediction and full numerical evaluation of the acoustic field (and between the latter and experimental data taken by Rolls-Royce in flyovers of a Gannet aircraft). Numerous trends and observations noted in the literature are explained by the asymptotic formulas, which are also extended to predict the acoustic benefit of sweep at subsonic conditions.

  13. Operation of the ISL transonic shock tube in a high subsonic flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, F.; Havermann, M.; Boller, F.; Mangold, P.; Takayama, K.

    The transonic flow regime plays an important role in experimental aerodynamic research. Modern civil aircraft fly up to a Mach number of M ≈ 0.9 in the high subsonic speed regime, as, for example, the Boeing or Airbus passenger aircraft. Nearly sonic Mach numbers are foreseen for innovative airplane concepts like the sonic cruiser by Boeing. In the military domain, guided missiles like the cruise missile also fly in the high subsonic flow regime. For testing purposes, transonic wind tunnels are mainly used for sub- as well as supersonic design applications. These wind tunnels have normally very large dimensions, which makes their operation quite expensive. If only small scale tests are required, a cheap working facility turns out to be more beneficial. For this purpose, a conventional shock tube operated at transonic flow conditions has been put into operation at the ISL. In the transonic flow regime, however, the reduction of the tube cross section by the model can produce severe distortions followed by a choking of the shock tube flow in the test section. Extensive experimental investigations were performed to determine the subsonic choking Mach number as a function of the model size. These results are compared with theoretical estimations and, more in detail, with CFD calculations.

  14. Is Long-Term Coastline Evolution Independent of Large-Scale Cross-Shore Transport?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worman, S.; Murray, A.; Limber, P. W.

    2012-12-01

    Long-term coastal evolution is independent of small-scale cross-shore sediment transport: Winds and currents associated with storms and seasons temporarily divert sand off-shore but waves quickly swept it back [List and Farris, 1999]. Large-scale (kms and greater) chronic shoreline change is, instead, driven by gradients in along-shore sediment transport [Lazarus and Murray 2007, Lazarus et al. 2011]. However large-scale planform features, whether emergent or geologically determined, channel large volumes of sand across shore. On sandy coastlines, for instance, capes produce a hydrodynamic confluence and build shoals whereas on rocky coastlines, near-shore canyons intercept and flush sediment into the abyss. The impressive size of offshore shoals and submarine deltas suggests that these spatially discrete locations are large sediment sinks, functioning as dramatic one-way cross-shore transport conduits. Using a numerical model of large-scale shoreline change, we explore the connection between these features and retreat rates in both sandy and rocky coastlines. By locally disrupting gradients in along-shore sediment transport set up by wave characteristics and shoreline orientation, our preliminary results suggest that these large-scale sinks exert a currently unexplored first-order control on coastal planform morphology and evolution. References List, J.H., and A.S. Farris: Large-Scale Shoreline Response to Storms and Fair Weather. 1999. Coastal Sediments, 1-3:1324-1338. Lazarus, E.D and A.B. Murray. 2007. Process Signatures in Regional Patterns of Shoreline Change on Annual to Decadal Time Scales. Geophysical Research Letters, 34, 19. Lazarus, E.D., A. Ashton, A.B. Murray, S. Tebbens, and S. Burroughs. 2011. Cumulative Versus Transient Shoreline Change: Dependencies on Temporal and Spatial Scale. Journal of Geophysical Research - Earth Surface, 116.

  15. The Cylinder and Semicylinder in Subsonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, Harry J.; Weimer, David K..; Griffith, Wayland

    1952-01-01

    In studying the diffraction of shock waves around various two-dimensional obstacles we have observed that flow separation and the formation of vortices contributes in an important way to transient loading of the obstacle. The cases of a cylinder and semicylinder are especially interesting because the breakaway point is not clearly defined as it is for objects having sharp corners. Accordingly a number of experiments have been made in the shock tube to observe the influence of Reynolds number and Mach number on the transient flow patterns about a cylinder and about a semicylinder mounted on a smooth plane. Some differences might be anticipated since the plane would impose a symmetry on the flow and produce a viscous boundary layer for which there is no counterpart with the cylinder. In the course of these experiments it was noted that a condition of steady subsonic flow about both the cylinder and semicylinder was approached. Thus a comparison with von Karrnan's theoretical calculation of the drag on a cylinder, from certain characteristics of its wake or "vortex street", was undertaken.

  16. Subsonic-transonic stall flutter study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stardter, H.

    1979-01-01

    The objective of the Subsonic/Transonic Stall Flutter Program was to obtain detailed measurements of both the steady and unsteady flow field surrounding a rotor and the mechanical state of the rotor while it was operating in both steady and flutter modes to provide a basis for future analysis and for development of theories describing the flutter phenomenon. The program revealed that while all blades flutter at the same frequency, they do not flutter at the same amplitude, and their interblade phase angles are not equal. Such a pattern represents the superposition of a number of rotating nodal diameter patterns, each characterized by a different amplitude and different phase indexing, but each rotating at a speed that results in the same flutter frequency as seen in the rotor system. Review of the steady pressure contours indicated that flutter may alter the blade passage pressure distribution. The unsteady pressure amplitude contour maps reveal regions of high unsteady pressure amplitudes near the leading edge, lower amplitudes near the trailing.

  17. Advanced Subsonic Airplane Design and Economic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebeck, Robert H.; Andrastek, Donald A.; Chau, Johnny; Girvin, Raquel; Lyon, Roger; Rawdon, Blaine K.; Scott, Paul W.; Wright, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    A study was made to examine the effect of advanced technology engines on the performance of subsonic airplanes and provide a vision of the potential which these advanced engines offered. The year 2005 was selected as the entry-into-service (EIS) date for engine/airframe combination. A set of four airplane classes (passenger and design range combinations) that were envisioned to span the needs for the 2005 EIS period were defined. The airframes for all classes were designed and sized using 2005 EIS advanced technology. Two airplanes were designed and sized for each class: one using current technology (1995) engines to provide a baseline, and one using advanced technology (2005) engines. The resulting engine/airframe combinations were compared and evaluated on the basis on sensitivity to basic engine performance parameters (e.g. SFC and engine weight) as well as DOC+I. The advanced technology engines provided significant reductions in fuel burn, weight, and wing area. Average values were as follows: reduction in fuel burn = 18%, reduction in wing area = 7%, and reduction in TOGW = 9%. Average DOC+I reduction was 3.5% using the pricing model based on payload-range index and 5% using the pricing model based on airframe weight. Noise and emissions were not considered.

  18. SHARP: Subsonic High Altitude Research Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beals, Todd; Burton, Craig; Cabatan, Aileen; Hermano, Christine; Jones, Tom; Lee, Susan; Radloff, Brian

    1991-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association is sponsoring an undergraduate program which is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to satisfy four mission profiles. Mission one is a polar mission that ranges from Chile to the South Pole and back to Chile, a total range of 6000 n.mi. at 100,000 ft with a 2500 lb payload. The second mission is also a polar mission, with an altitude of 70,000 ft and an increased payload of 4000 lbs. For the third mission, the aircraft will takeoff at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft carrying a 2500 lb payload, and land at Puerto Montt, Chile. The final mission requires the aircraft to take off at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft with a 1000 lb payload, make an excursion to 120,000 ft, and land at Howard AFB, Panama. Three missions require that a subsonic Mach number be maintained due to constraints imposed by the air sampling equipment. The aircraft need not be manned for all four missions. Three aircraft configurations have been determined to be the most suitable for meeting the above requirements. In the event that a requirement cannot be obtained within the given constraints, recommendations for proposal modifications are given.

  19. Subsonic Aircraft With Regression and Neural-Network Approximators Designed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    2004-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, NASA Langley Research Center's Flight Optimization System (FLOPS) and the design optimization testbed COMETBOARDS with regression and neural-network-analysis approximators have been coupled to obtain a preliminary aircraft design methodology. For a subsonic aircraft, the optimal design, that is the airframe-engine combination, is obtained by the simulation. The aircraft is powered by two high-bypass-ratio engines with a nominal thrust of about 35,000 lbf. It is to carry 150 passengers at a cruise speed of Mach 0.8 over a range of 3000 n mi and to operate on a 6000-ft runway. The aircraft design utilized a neural network and a regression-approximations-based analysis tool, along with a multioptimizer cascade algorithm that uses sequential linear programming, sequential quadratic programming, the method of feasible directions, and then sequential quadratic programming again. Optimal aircraft weight versus the number of design iterations is shown. The central processing unit (CPU) time to solution is given. It is shown that the regression-method-based analyzer exhibited a smoother convergence pattern than the FLOPS code. The optimum weight obtained by the approximation technique and the FLOPS code differed by 1.3 percent. Prediction by the approximation technique exhibited no error for the aircraft wing area and turbine entry temperature, whereas it was within 2 percent for most other parameters. Cascade strategy was required by FLOPS as well as the approximators. The regression method had a tendency to hug the data points, whereas the neural network exhibited a propensity to follow a mean path. The performance of the neural network and regression methods was considered adequate. It was at about the same level for small, standard, and large models with redundancy ratios (defined as the number of input-output pairs to the number of unknown coefficients) of 14, 28, and 57, respectively. In an SGI octane workstation (Silicon Graphics

  20. Large anisotropic thermal transport properties observed in bulk single crystal black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Xu, Guizhou; Hou, Zhipeng; Yang, Bingchao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Liu, Enke; Xi, Xuekui; Liu, Zhongyuan; Zeng, Zhongming; Wang, Wenhong; Wu, Guangheng

    2016-02-01

    The anisotropy of thermal transport properties for bulk black phosphorus (BP) single crystal, which might be of particular interest in the fabrication of thermoelectric/optoelectronic devices, was investigated by using angular dependent thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements at various temperatures. We found that the maximum thermal conductivities in x (zigzag), y (armchair), and z (perpendicular to the puckered layers) directions are 34, 17, and 5 W m-1 K-1, respectively, exhibiting large anisotropy. At temperature around 200 K, a large Seebeck coefficient up to +487 ± 10 μV/K has been obtained in x direction, which is 1.5 times higher than that in z direction. The large anisotropy of thermal transport properties can be understood from the crystal structure and bonding characters of BP. In addition, the energy gap has been obtained from nuclear spin lattice relaxation measurements, which is consistent with the value derived from temperature-dependent Seebeck coefficient measurements.

  1. A finite element method for transient analysis of concurrent large deformation and mass transport in gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiaping; Zhao, Xuanhe; Suo, Zhigang; Jiang, Hanqing

    2009-05-01

    A gel is an aggregate of polymers and solvent molecules. The polymers crosslink into a three-dimensional network by strong chemical bonds and enable the gel to retain its shape after a large deformation. The solvent molecules, however, interact among themselves and with the network by weak physical bonds and enable the gel to be a conduit of mass transport. The time-dependent concurrent process of large deformation and mass transport is studied by developing a finite element method. We combine the kinematics of large deformation, the conservation of the solvent molecules, the conditions of local equilibrium, and the kinetics of migration to evolve simultaneously two fields: the displacement of the network and the chemical potential of the solvent. The finite element method is demonstrated by analyzing several phenomena, such as swelling, draining and buckling. This work builds a platform to study diverse phenomena in gels with spatial and temporal complexity.

  2. Cavity Unsteady-Pressure Measurements at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tracy, Maureen B.; Plentovich, E. B.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel to determine the flow characteristics of rectangular cavities with varying relative dimensions at subsonic and transonic speeds. Cavities were tested with width-to-depth ratios of 1, 4, 8, and 16 for length-to-depth ratios l/h of 1 through 17.5. The maximum cavity depth was 2.4 in., and the turbulent boundary layer approaching the cavity was approximately 0.5 in. thick. Unsteady- and mean static-pressure measurements were made at free-stream Mach numbers from 0.20 to 0.95 at a unit Reynolds number per foot of approximately 3 x 10(exp 6); however, only unsteady-pressure results are presented in this paper. Results indicate that as l/h increases, cavity flows changed from resonant to nonresonant with resonant amplitudes decreasing gradually. Resonant spectra are obtained largely in cavities with mean static-pressure distributions characteristic of open and transitional flows. Resonance sometimes occurred for closed flow. Increasing cavity width or decreasing cavity depth while holding l/h fixed had the effect of increasing resonant amplitudes and sometimes induced resonance. The effects due to changes in width are more pronounced. Decreasing Mach number has the effect of broadening the resonances.

  3. Response of High Subsonic Jet to Nonaxisymmetric Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.

    1997-01-01

    A model of sound generated in a high subsonic (Mach 0.9) circular jet is solved numerically in cylindrical coordinates for nonaxisymmetric disturbances. The jet is excited by transient mass injection by a finite duration pulse via a modulated ring source. The nonaxisymmetric solution is computed for long times after the initial disturbance has exited the computational domain. The long time behavior of the jet is dominated by vorticity and pressure disturbances generated at the nozzle lip and growing as they convect down-stream in the jet. These disturbances generate sound as they propagate. The primary non-axisymmetric effect that we simulate is that of a flapping mode where regions of high and low pressure alternate on opposite sides of the jet. The predominant feature of this mode is the appearance of relatively large deviations of the pressure from the ambient pressure on opposite sides of the jet and the convection of these regions downstream. We illustrate flow field, near field and far field data. Important nonaxisymmetric characteristics of the near and flow field disturbances include roughly periodic pressure elevations and depressions at opposite values of the azimuthal angle psi. These correspond to pressure disturbances propagating in the axial direction. The azimuthal velocity exhibits a sinusoidal dependence on psi with similar roughly periodic disturbances. For every azimuthal angle psi, the jet radiation peaks about 30 deg. from the jet axis, however there is now a pronounced dependence of the far field radiation pattern on psi.

  4. Cryogenic foam insulation for LH2 fueled subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, E. L.; Helenbrook, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    Shortages of petroleum-based aircraft fuels are foreseen before the end of the century. To cope with such shortages, NASA is developing a commercial aircraft which can operate on liquid hydrogen. Various foam insulators for LH2 storage are considered in terms of thermal performance and service life. Of the cryogenic foams considered (plain foam, foam with flame retardants and fiberglass reinforcement, and foam with vapor barriers), polyurethane foams were found to be the best. Tests consisted of heating a 5 cm layer of insulation around an aluminum tank containing LH2 to 316 K, and then cooling it to 266 K, while the inner surface was maintained at LH2 temperature (20 K).

  5. Dentate transport discs can be used to reconstruct large segmental mandibular defects

    PubMed Central

    Elsalanty, Mohammed E.; Malavia, Veera; Zakhary, Ibrahim; Mulone, Timothy; Kontogiorgos, Elias D.; Dechow, Paul C.; Opperman, Lynne A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study tests the use of a dentate transport segment for the reconstruction of a large U-shaped defect in the anterior segment of the canine mandible, using a novel curved reconstruction plate. The quality and quantity of bone regenerate formed by dentate versus edentulous transport segments was compared. Methods In five adult foxhound dogs, a defect of 70–75 mm was created in the canine mandible by excising the mandible anterior to the right and left 4th premolars. Reconstruction was done by trifocal distraction osteogenesis using a bone transport reconstruction plate (BTRP-02™), with two transport units being activated simultaneously, one on either side of the defect, one dentate and one edentulous. Bilateral distraction proceeded at a rate of 1mm/day until the segments docked against each other in midline. After 39–44 days consolidation, the animals were euthanized. The quantity and quality of bone regeneration on both sides were compared using micro-computed tomography. Results The defect reconstruction was successful. The amount and quality of bone formed by the transport segments was similar on both sides. There were no significant differences in the bone volume fraction and density of the regenerate bone formed by the two transport segments. The bone volume fraction and density of the regenerate was significantly lower than that of the host bone in the distal segments, likely due to the short consolidation period. Conclusions Bone transport remains a viable option in reconstructing anterior segmental defects in the mandible. The use of either dentate or edentulous transport segments for reconstruction provides options for the surgeon in often highly compromised patients requiring these surgeries. PMID:25661502

  6. Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form

    SciTech Connect

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2007-01-01

    Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunker silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.

  7. Aeroelasticity Benchmark Assessment: Subsonic Fixed Wing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florance, Jennifer P.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2010-01-01

    Aeroelasticity Branch will examine other experimental efforts within the Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) program (such as testing of the NASA Common Research Model (CRM)) and other NASA programs and assess aeroelasticity issues and research topics.

  8. Study on utilization of advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Thomson, L. W.; Wilson, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The potential for utilizing advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports was assessed. Six fuselage design concepts were selected and evaluated in terms of structural performance, weight, and manufacturing development and costs. Two concepts were selected that merit further consideration for composite fuselage application. These concepts are: (1) a full depth honeycomb design with no stringers, and (2) an I section stringer stiffened laminate skin design. Weight reductions due to applying composites to the fuselages of commercial and military transports were calculated. The benefits of applying composites to a fleet of military transports were determined. Significant technology issues pertinent to composite fuselage structures were identified and evaluated. Program plans for resolving the technology issues were developed.

  9. Pangolin v1.0, a conservative 2-D transport model for large scale parallel calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praga, A.; Cariolle, D.; Giraud, L.

    2014-07-01

    To exploit the possibilities of parallel computers, we designed a large-scale bidimensional atmospheric transport model named Pangolin. As the basis for a future chemistry-transport model, a finite-volume approach was chosen both for mass preservation and to ease parallelization. To overcome the pole restriction on time-steps for a regular latitude-longitude grid, Pangolin uses a quasi-area-preserving reduced latitude-longitude grid. The features of the regular grid are exploited to improve parallel performances and a custom domain decomposition algorithm is presented. To assess the validity of the transport scheme, its results are compared with state-of-the-art models on analytical test cases. Finally, parallel performances are shown in terms of strong scaling and confirm the efficient scalability up to a few hundred of cores.

  10. Aerodynamic characteristics of a large aircraft to transport space shuttle orbiter or other external payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, J. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a large transport aircraft designed to carry the space shuttle orbiter or orbiter booster tank. Results indicate that the transport, with or without payloads, is statically stable, the longitudinal static margins being rather excessive. Elevator power is sufficient to trim the transport up to stall except when the orbiter is mounted close to the wing. Maximum lift-drag ratios at wind tunnel Reynolds numbers vary from 12 to 14 depending on model configuration. Tests were conducted at Reynolds numbers from 1.21 x 1 million to 1.49 x 1 million with angle of attack from -2 deg to 20 deg and angle of sideslip from -5 deg to 5 deg.

  11. NUHOWS - Storage and Transportation of Irradiated Reactor Components in Large Packages - 13439

    SciTech Connect

    Rae, Glen A.

    2013-07-01

    Most irradiated reactor components (hardware such as Control Rod Blades, Fuel Channels, Poison Curtains, etc.) generated at reactors previously required significant processing for size reduction due to the available transportation casks not being physically capable of containing unprocessed material. As of July 1, 2008, disposal for this typical waste class (B and C) became inaccessible (for the major part of the nation) due to the Barnwell, SC disposal facility being closed to all but its three compact states (CT, NJ and SC). Currently in the United States, most facilities are storing their irradiated hardware on-site in the spent fuel pools. Until recently with the opening of the Waste Control Specialists' Texas disposal facility, utilities faced the challenges of spent fuel pool space and capacity management. However, even with WCS's disposal availability, the site currently has annual Curie limitations for disposal, which will continue to promote interim on-site storage until such time as disposal is available. In response, Transnuclear Inc., (TN) an AREVA company, proceeded with designing a new large Radioactive Waste Container (RWC) that can be used to package irradiated hardware without the need for significant processing. The design features of the RWC allows for intermittent loadings of the hardware for better packaging efficiency, higher packaging density, space savings and reduced cost. This RWC is also compatible with TN's on-site modular vault storage system. Once completely loaded, the RWC can be transported to an on-site storage facility, an off-site storage facility and/or an available disposal facility. To accommodate the transportation, TN has designed a large transportation cask, the MP197HB. As the original design was for transporting fuel, it contains the necessary shielding to allow for the transport of unprocessed irradiated reactor components, while significantly reducing the amount of irradiated hardware shipments required with the use of

  12. A Lagrangian Simulation of Subsonic Aircraft Exhaust Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Morris, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    To estimate the effect of subsonic and supersonic aircraft exhaust on the stratospheric concentration of NO(y), we employ a trajectory model initialized with air parcels based on the standard release scenarios. The supersonic exhaust simulations are in good agreement with 2D and 3D model results and show a perturbation of about 1-2 ppbv of NO(y) in the stratosphere. The subsonic simulations show that subsonic emissions are almost entirely trapped below the 380 K potential temperature surface. Our subsonic results contradict results from most other models, which show exhaust products penetrating above 380 K, as summarized. The disagreement can likely be attributed to an excessive vertical diffusion in most models of the strong vertical gradient in NO(y) that forms at the boundary between the emission zone and the stratosphere above 380 K. Our results suggest that previous assessments of the impact of subsonic exhaust emission on the stratospheric region above 380 K should be considered to be an upper bound.

  13. Continuous subsonic-sonic flows in a general nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunpeng

    2015-10-01

    This paper concerns continuous subsonic-sonic potential flows in a two dimensional finite nozzle with a general upper wall and a straight lower wall. We give a class of nozzles where continuous subsonic-sonic flows may exist. Consider a continuous subsonic-sonic flow in such a nozzle after rescaling the upper wall in a small scale. It is shown that for a given inlet and a fixed point at the upper wall, there exists uniquely a continuous subsonic-sonic flow whose velocity vector is along the normal direction at the inlet and the sonic curve, which satisfies the slip conditions on the nozzle walls and whose sonic curve intersects the upper wall at the fixed point. Furthermore, the sonic curve of this flow is a free boundary, where the flow is singular in the sense that the speed is only C 1 / 2 Hölder continuous and the acceleration blows up at the sonic state. As the scale tends to zero, the precise convergent rate of the continuous subsonic-sonic flow converging to the sonic state is also determined.

  14. Networking for large-scale science: infrastructure, provisioning, transport and application mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Nageswara S.; Carter, Steven M.; Wu, Qishi; Wing, William R.; Zhu, Mengxia; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Veeraraghavan, Malathi; Blondin, John M.

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale science computations and experiments require unprecedented network capabilities in the form of large bandwidth and dynamically stable connections to support data transfers, interactive visualizations, and monitoring and steering operations. A number of component technologies dealing with the infrastructure, provisioning, transport and application mappings must be developed and/or optimized to achieve these capabilities. We present a brief account of the following technologies that contribute toward achieving these network capabilities: (a) DOE UltraScienceNet and NSF CHEETAH network testbeds that provide on-demand and scheduled dedicated network connections; (b) experimental results on transport protocols that achieve close to 100% utilization on dedicated 1Gbps wide-area channels; (c) a scheme for optimally mapping a visualization pipeline onto a network to minimize the end-to-end delays; and (d) interconnect configuration and protocols that provides multiple Gbps flows from Cray X1 to external hosts.

  15. Sediment transport dynamics in the swash zone under large-scale laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruju, Andrea; Conley, Daniel; Masselink, Gerd; Puleo, Jack

    2016-06-01

    A laboratory experiment was carried out to study sediment transport dynamics occurring in the swash zone of a coarse-sandy beach built in a large-scale wave flume. Hydro- and morpho-dynamic as well as sediment transport data were collected using sensors mounted on a scaffold rig deployed in the lower swash zone close to the moving bed. The high resolution of near-bed data permitted quantitative evaluation of suspended and sheet flow contributions to the total sediment transport. Although sheet flow sediment fluxes were higher than suspended fluxes, the vertically integrated suspended sediment load overcame the sheet flow load during uprush and it was on the same order of magnitude during backwash. The observed cumulative sediment transport was generally larger than the morphological changes occurring shoreward of the rig location implying either an underestimation of the offshore sediment transport or an overestimation of the onshore fluxes obtained from concentration and velocity profile data. Low correlations were found between net swash profile changes and runup parameters suggesting that local hydrodynamic parameters provide little or no predictability of accretion and erosion of an upper beach which is near equilibrium. The balance between erosion and deposition induced by individual swash events brought a dynamic equilibrium with small differences between the profiles measured at the start and at the end of the run.

  16. Large Eddy Simulations of Suspended Sediment Transport over Bedforms with a New Boundary Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayamatullah, M. M.; Liu, X.

    2013-12-01

    In many geophysical flows the motion of a turbulent fluid over bedforms (i.e., ripples, dunes etc.) considerably affects some important features, such as the coherent structures of flow, momentum flux, mixing, and transport of sediment. This paper presents details of hydrodynamics, turbulence characteristic, and suspended sediment transport over ripples in an open channel. A well-resolved large-eddy simulations (LES) has been employed to investigate the implication of hydrodynamics to sediment transport in fully developed turbulent flow. The model solves the Navier-Sotkes equations for fluid and an advection-diffusion equation for the sediment considering appropriate boundary conditions. The transport of suspended sediment is a highly nonlinear process that is profoundly affected by complex near-bed boundary condition. For relaxing the near-bed complexities, a novel approach of near-wall treatment for suspended sediment boundary-layer has been introduced which eliminates the need of use two different meshes for fluid and sediment, thus a dynamic exchange of sediment mass across the bottom can be evaluated correctly in the model, yields reduction of accuracy loss. The simulated sediment concentrations are compared to available measurements from literature covering the situations of two dimensional, three dimensional ripples with different Reynolds numbers, which demonstrate the model's capability to simulate the flow interactions as well as associated sediment transport processes with reasonably good accuracy. Velocity component after fully developed turbulent flow Vortex contour plotted as Lambda2

  17. Modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, B.S.

    2000-02-01

    This paper describes the modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program. This effort represents a complete 'white sheet of paper' rewrite of the code. In this paper, the motivation driving this project, the design objectives for the new version of the program, and the design choices and their consequences will be discussed. The design itself will also be described, including the important subsystems as well as the key classes within those subsystems.

  18. Influences of clouds and rain on the large-scale transport and deposition of sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Luecken, D.J.; Berkowitz, C.M.; Easter, R.C.

    1991-07-01

    This paper describes the application of a three-dimensional, global-scale Eulerian model with an explicit description of cloud and chemical processes. Simulation results describing the transport of sulfur from North America and Europe across the north Atlantic Ocean during a climatological July are presented. Wet deposition was found to contribute slightly more to total sulfur deposition than dry deposition, a feature explained by the large amounts of precipitation during this month. The wet deposition patterns did not always correspond to the emissions patterns. The precipitation rate and spatial distribution had a large effect on the calculated concentrations of soluble sulfur species. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Development of pressure containment and damage tolerance technology for composite fuselage structures in large transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. J.; Thomson, L. W.; Wilson, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    NASA sponsored composites research and development programs were set in place to develop the critical engineering technologies in large transport aircraft structures. This NASA-Boeing program focused on the critical issues of damage tolerance and pressure containment generic to the fuselage structure of large pressurized aircraft. Skin-stringer and honeycomb sandwich composite fuselage shell designs were evaluated to resolve these issues. Analyses were developed to model the structural response of the fuselage shell designs, and a development test program evaluated the selected design configurations to appropriate load conditions.

  20. Along-stream transport and transformation of dissolved organic matter in a large tropical river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Thibault; Teodoru, Cristian R.; Nyoni, Frank C.; Bouillon, Steven; Darchambeau, François; Massicotte, Philippe; Borges, Alberto V.

    2016-05-01

    Large rivers transport considerable amounts of terrestrial dissolved organic matter (DOM) to the ocean. However, downstream gradients and temporal variability in DOM fluxes and characteristics are poorly studied at the scale of large river basins, especially in tropical areas. Here, we report longitudinal patterns in DOM content and composition based on absorbance and fluorescence measurements along the Zambezi River and its main tributary, the Kafue River, during two hydrological seasons. During high-flow periods, a greater proportion of aromatic and humic DOM was mobilized along rivers due to the hydrological connectivity with wetlands, while low-flow periods were characterized by lower DOM content of less aromaticity resulting from loss of connectivity with wetlands, more efficient degradation of terrestrial DOM and enhanced autochthonous productivity. Changes in water residence time due to contrasting water discharge were found to modulate the fate of DOM along the river continuum. Thus, high water discharge promotes the transport of terrestrial DOM downstream relative to its degradation, while low water discharge enhances the degradation of DOM during its transport. The longitudinal evolution of DOM was also strongly impacted by a hydrological buffering effect in large reservoirs in which the seasonal variability of DOM fluxes and composition was strongly reduced.<

  1. Transport of iron oxide nanoparticles in saturated porous media: a large-scale 3D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velimirovic, Milica; Schmid, Doris; Micić, Vesna; Miyajima, Kumiko; Klaas, Norbert; Braun, Jürgen; Bosch, Julian; Meckenstock, Rainer; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (FeOxNp) have a high potential as electron acceptor for in situ microbial oxidation of a wide range of recalcitrant groundwater contaminants (Bosch et al., 2010). Tosco et al. (2012) reported on high colloidal stability of FeOxNp dispersed in water, their low deposition behavior, and consequently improved transport in column experiments compared to extensively studied zerovalent iron nanoparticles. However, determination of FeOxNp transport behavior at the field-relevant conditions has not been done before. The present work is aimed to evaluate different complementary methods for detection, quantification and transport characterization of FeOxNp in a large-scale three-dimensional (3D) model aquifer. Prior to that, batch-scale experiments were performed in order to elucidate the potential of the selected methods for direct and indirect characterization and detection of FeOxNp. Direct methods included measurements of particle size distribution, particle concentration, Fetot content and turbidity of the FeOxNp suspension. Indirect methods included measurements of particle zeta potential, as well as TOC content and pH of the FeOxNp suspension. The results of the batch experiments indicated that the most suitable approach for detecting and quantifying FeOxNp was measuring Fetot content and suspension turbidity, as well as particle size determined using dynamic light scattering principle. These complementary methods were further applied in a large-scale 3D study containing medium and coarse sand in order to 1) assess the transport of FeOxNp in saturated porous medium during injection (VFeOx = 6 m3, cparticle = 20 g/L, Qinj = 0.7 m3/h), and 2) illustrate their spatial distribution after injection. The outcomes of the large-scale 3D study confirmed that FeOxNp transport can be successfully investigated applying complementary methods. Monitoring data including Fetot content, turbidity and particle size showed the transport of particles towards the

  2. Extension of the Blasius force theorem to subsonic speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsony-Nagy, A.

    1985-11-01

    The theorem considered by Blasius (1910) represents a well-known method for calculating the force on a body situated in an incompressible, inviscid two-dimensional flow. The efficiency of the Blasius theorem is due to its quality of expressing the forces with the aid of contour integrals of analytic functions of complex variables. The present note has the objective to deduce an analog of Blasius theorem for the aerodynamic forces in subsonic flow. It is assumed that an approximate velocity potential of the subsonic flow has been calculated by using the Imai-Lamla method. It is pointed out that this method is a variant specially suited for the two-dimensionally flows of the Janzen-Rayleigh expansion method. The derived formula expresses the aerodynamic forces with the aid of contour integrals of analytic complex functions. It can be regarded as the Blasius theorem with first-order compressibility correction for the subsonic speed regime.

  3. Acoustic mode in numerical calculations of subsonic combustion

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    A review is given of the methods for treating the acoustic mode in numerical calculations of subsonic combustion. In numerical calculations of subsonic combustion, treatment of the acoustic mode has been a problem for many researchers. It is widely believed that Mach number and acoustic wave effects are negligible in many subsonic combustion problems. Yet, the equations that are often solved contain the acoustic mode, and many numerical techniques for solving these equations are inefficient when the Mach number is much smaller than one. This paper reviews two general approaches to ameliorating this problem. In the first approach, equations are solved that ignore acoustic waves and Mach number effects. Section II of this paper gives two such formulations which are called the Elliptic Primitive and the Stream and Potential Function formulations. We tell how these formulations are obtained and give some advantages and disadvantages of solving them numerically. In the second approach to the problem of calculating subsonic combustion, the fully compressible equations are solved by numerical methods that are efficient, but treat the acoustic mode inaccurately, in low Mach number calculations. Section III of this paper introduces two of these numerical methods in the context of an analysis of their stability properties when applied to the acoustic wave equations. These are called the ICE and acoustic subcycling methods. It is shown that even though these methods are more efficient than traditional methods for solving subsonic combustion problems, they still can be inefficient when the Mach number is very small. Finally, a method called Pressure Gradient Scaling is described that, when used in conjunction with either the ICE or acoustic subcycling methods, allows for very efficient numerical solution of subsonic combustion problems. 11 refs.

  4. HYDRODYNAMICS AND SEDIMENT TRANSPORT IN LOWER MISSISSIPPI RIVER MEANDER BENDS (LOUISIANA): IMPLICATIONS FOR LARGE SEDIMENT DIVERSIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, M. A.; McCorquodale, A.; Meselhe, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Field data collection and numerical modeling is being conducted in the lower Mississippi River in the region of a meander bend at Myrtle Grove, LA (river km 96 above Head of Passes) in support of a proposed large water and sediment diversion (1,130-2,830 cms) for coastal wetland restoration. Field studies in October 2008, April and May 2009, at discharges ranging from 11,000-21,000 cms, examined the role of bend dynamics on sediment transport through this reach relative to control sites further downriver and USGS monitoring stations upriver. Suspended loads and grain size character measured by ADCP (velocities and backscatter), isokinetic point sampler (P-63), and optical sensors (LISST, OBS, transmissometer) indicate that during the rising-to-high discharge phase, sand lifting off from the downstream edge of the lateral bar upriver of the bend augments that carried from further upriver, and is entrained in the upper 10-25m of the water column. This excess suspended sand is advected around the bend before concentrations are reduced to background levels over the lateral bar downstream of the bend. Bedload transport rates measured by repeat swath bathymetric mapping of migrating dunes are comparable upstream of the bend, downstream, and in the control sites. However, no bedforms are observed in the bend thalweg (up to 60 m deep) supporting the dominance of suspended sand transport in the bend. Both 1D (HEC-RAS and HEC6-T) and 3D (Flow3D) numerical hydrodynamic and sediment transport modeling is underway to simulate this process and the large-scale eddy present in the bend that generates upriver transport along the inside of the meander bend at all observed discharges. Our preliminary results suggest that the outside of meander bends might be an appropriate site for sediment diversions that draw near-surface water from this sediment-rich layer.

  5. Up-scaling Dune Morphodynamic Models for the Study of Bedload Transport in Large Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclair, S. F.

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents preliminary results from a first attempt to give a channel-scale perspective to models of sediment transport over dunes, thereafter integrating effects at all bedform scales. Recent morphodynamic models have demonstrated the relationships between composition and rate of sediment transport, and the probability distribution of bed elevation relative to mean bed level (Ps) over a train of dunes. These models are yet essentially theoretical and there exists only limited data to implement them. Lately, the analysis of Ps curves for new data from the Mississippi River revealed the potential interest of this approach for assessing, although mostly qualitatively for the moment, the sediment transport stage and the erosion-deposition pattern. Just as bed elevations vary over dune backs, crests, and troughs, bed elevations over a meander planform vary in the alongstream direction from bend scours to point-bar tops. The range and shape of channel-scale Ps curves, and their time variation, thus can provide information on bedload-transport conditions, especially in large rivers where it is difficult to obtain. The survey line in this study is located just upstream of Baton Rouge in Louisiana and is nearly 50-km long, hence comprising several meander bends and low-sinuosity reaches of the Mississippi River. Two surveys were conducted during different high-stage events. The bathymetry was measured with a high-precision echo sounder and a 1MHz transducer. Data on flow conditions are those reported by the USACE. The Ps curves compare well with those from experimental data sets at smaller scale. This study shows that depth-continuous models for sediment continuity are promising for scale-integrated analysis of sediment transport in large rivers.

  6. Large-scale quantification of suspended sediment transport and deposition in the Mekong Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manh, N. V.; Dung, N. V.; Hung, N. N.; Merz, B.; Apel, H.

    2014-04-01

    Sediment dynamics play a major role for the agricultural and fishery productivity of the Mekong Delta. However, the understanding of sediment dynamics in the Mekong Delta, one of the most complex river deltas in the world, is very limited. This is a consequence of its large extent, the intricate system of rivers, channels and floodplains and the scarcity of observations. This study quantifies, for the first time, the suspended sediment transport and sediment-nutrient deposition in the whole Mekong Delta. To this end, a quasi-2-D hydrodynamic model is combined with a cohesive sediment transport model. The combined model is calibrated automatically using six objective functions to represent the different aspects of the hydraulic and sediment transport components. The model is calibrated for the extreme flood season in 2011 and shows good performance for the two validation years with very different flood characteristics. It is shown how sediment transport and sediment deposition vary from Kratie at the entrance of the Delta to the coast. The main factors influencing the spatial sediment dynamics are the setup of rivers, channels and dike-rings, the sluice gate operations, the magnitude of the floods and tidal influences. The superposition of these factors leads to high spatial variability of sediment transport, in particular in the Vietnamese floodplains. Depending on the flood magnitude, the annual sedimentation rate averaged over the Vietnamese floodplains varies from 0.3 to 2.1 kg m-2 yr-1, and the ring dike floodplains trap between 1 and 6% of the total sediment load at Kratie. This is equivalent to 29 × 103-440 × 103 t of nutrients (N, P, K, TOC) deposited in the Vietnamese floodplains. This large-scale quantification provides a basis for estimating the benefits of the annual Mekong floods for agriculture and fishery, and is important information for assessing the effects of deltaic subsidence and climate change related sea level rise.

  7. 14 CFR 135.383 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.383 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations:...

  8. Effects of woody vegetation on overbank sand transport during a large flood, Rio Puerco, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Eleanor R.; Perignon, Mariela C.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Tucker, Gregory E.

    2014-02-01

    Distributions of woody vegetation on floodplain surfaces affect flood-flow erosion and deposition processes. A large flood along the lower Rio Puerco, New Mexico, in August 2006 caused extensive erosion in a reach that had been sprayed with herbicide in September 2003 for the purpose of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) control. Large volumes of sediment, including a substantial fraction of sand, were delivered to the reach downstream, which had not been treated with herbicide. We applied physically based, one-dimensional models of flow and suspended-sediment transport to compute volume concentrations of sand in suspension in floodplain flow at a site within the sprayed reach and at a site downstream from the sprayed reach. We computed the effects of drag on woody stems in reducing the skin friction shear stress, velocity of flow, and suspended-sand transport from open paths into patches of dense stems. Total flow and suspended-sand fluxes were computed for each site using well-constrained flood-flow depths, water-surface slopes, and measured shrub characteristics. Results show that flow in open paths carried high concentrations of sand in suspension with nearly uniform vertical distributions. Drag on woody floodplain stems reduced skin friction shear stresses by two orders of magnitude, yet sufficient velocities were maintained to transport sand more than 50 m into fields of dense, free-surface-penetrating stems. An increase in shrub canopy extent from 31% in the sprayed reach site to 49% in the downstream site was found to account for 69% of the computed decrease in discharge between the two sites. The results demonstrate the need to compute the spatial distribution of skin friction shear stress in order to effectively compute suspended-sand transport and to predict the fate of sediment and contaminants carried in suspension during large floods.

  9. Moditored unsaturated soil transport processes as a support for large scale soil and water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanclooster, Marnik

    2010-05-01

    The current societal demand for sustainable soil and water management is very large. The drivers of global and climate change exert many pressures on the soil and water ecosystems, endangering appropriate ecosystem functioning. The unsaturated soil transport processes play a key role in soil-water system functioning as it controls the fluxes of water and nutrients from the soil to plants (the pedo-biosphere link), the infiltration flux of precipitated water to groundwater and the evaporative flux, and hence the feed back from the soil to the climate system. Yet, unsaturated soil transport processes are difficult to quantify since they are affected by huge variability of the governing properties at different space-time scales and the intrinsic non-linearity of the transport processes. The incompatibility of the scales between the scale at which processes reasonably can be characterized, the scale at which the theoretical process correctly can be described and the scale at which the soil and water system need to be managed, calls for further development of scaling procedures in unsaturated zone science. It also calls for a better integration of theoretical and modelling approaches to elucidate transport processes at the appropriate scales, compatible with the sustainable soil and water management objective. Moditoring science, i.e the interdisciplinary research domain where modelling and monitoring science are linked, is currently evolving significantly in the unsaturated zone hydrology area. In this presentation, a review of current moditoring strategies/techniques will be given and illustrated for solving large scale soil and water management problems. This will also allow identifying research needs in the interdisciplinary domain of modelling and monitoring and to improve the integration of unsaturated zone science in solving soil and water management issues. A focus will be given on examples of large scale soil and water management problems in Europe.

  10. Effects of woody vegetation on overbank sand transport during a large flood, Rio Puerco, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Eleanor R.; Perignon, Mariela C.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Tucker, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Distributions of woody vegetation on floodplain surfaces affect flood-flow erosion and deposition processes. A large flood along the lower Rio Puerco, New Mexico, in August 2006 caused extensive erosion in a reach that had been sprayed with herbicide in September 2003 for the purpose of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) control. Large volumes of sediment, including a substantial fraction of sand, were delivered to the reach downstream, which had not been treated with herbicide. We applied physically based, one-dimensional models of flow and suspended-sediment transport to compute volume concentrations of sand in suspension in floodplain flow at a site within the sprayed reach and at a site downstream from the sprayed reach. We computed the effects of drag on woody stems in reducing the skin friction shear stress, velocity of flow, and suspended-sand transport from open paths into patches of dense stems. Total flow and suspended-sand fluxes were computed for each site using well-constrained flood-flow depths, water-surface slopes, and measured shrub characteristics. Results show that flow in open paths carried high concentrations of sand in suspension with nearly uniform vertical distributions. Drag on woody floodplain stems reduced skin friction shear stresses by two orders of magnitude, yet sufficient velocities were maintained to transport sand more than 50 m into fields of dense, free-surface-penetrating stems. An increase in shrub canopy extent from 31% in the sprayed reach site to 49% in the downstream site was found to account for 69% of the computed decrease in discharge between the two sites. The results demonstrate the need to compute the spatial distribution of skin friction shear stress in order to effectively compute suspended-sand transport and to predict the fate of sediment and contaminants carried in suspension during large floods.

  11. Second-order subsonic airfoil theory including edge effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Milton D

    1956-01-01

    Several recent advances in plane subsonic flow theory are combined into a unified second-order theory for airfoil sections of arbitrary shape. The solution is reached in three steps: the incompressible result is found by integration, it is converted into the corresponding subsonic compressible result by means of the second-order compressibility rule, and it is rendered uniformly valid near stagnation points by further rules. Solutions for a number of airfoils are given and are compared with the results of other theories and of experiment. A straight-forward computing scheme is outlined for calculating the surface velocities and pressures on any airfoil at any angle of attack

  12. Subsonic flow over thin oblique airfoils at zero lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    The pressure distribution over thin oblique airfoils at subsonic speeds is studied. It is found that the flows again can be obtained by the superposition of elementary conical flow fields. In the case of the sweptback wing the pressure distributions remain qualitatively similar at subsonic and supersonic speeds. Thus a distribution similar to the Ackeret type of distribution appears on the root sections of the sweptback wing at M = 0. The resulting positive pressure drag on the root section is balanced by negative drags on outboard sections.

  13. Overview of the Langley subsonic research effort on SCR configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr.; Thomas, J. D.; Huffman, J. K.; Weston, R. P.; Schoonover, W. E., Jr.; Gentry, C. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Recent advances achieved in the subsonic aerodynamics of low aspect ratio, highly swept wing designs are summarized. The most significant of these advances was the development of leading edge deflection concepts which effectively reduce leading edge flow separation. The improved flow attachment results in substantial improvements in low speed performance, significant delay of longitudinal pitch up, increased trailing edge flap effectiveness, and increased lateral control capability. Various additional theoretical and/or experimental studies are considered which, in conjunction with the leading edge deflection studies, form the basis for future subsonic research effort.

  14. Inverse transport modeling of volcanic sulfur dioxide emissions using large-scale ensemble simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Y.; Hoffmann, L.; Griessbach, S.; Rößler, T.; Stein, O.

    2015-10-01

    An inverse transport modeling approach based on the concepts of sequential importance resampling and parallel computing is presented to reconstruct altitude-resolved time series of volcanic emissions, which often can not be obtained directly with current measurement techniques. A new inverse modeling and simulation system, which implements the inversion approach with the Lagrangian transport model Massive-Parallel Trajectory Calculations (MPTRAC) is developed to provide reliable transport simulations of volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2). In the inverse modeling system MPTRAC is used to perform two types of simulations, i. e., large-scale ensemble simulations for the reconstruction of volcanic emissions and final transport simulations. The transport simulations are based on wind fields of the ERA-Interim meteorological reanalysis of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts. The reconstruction of altitude-dependent SO2 emission time series is also based on Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) satellite observations. A case study for the eruption of the Nabro volcano, Eritrea, in June 2011, with complex emission patterns, is considered for method validation. Meteosat Visible and InfraRed Imager (MVIRI) near-real-time imagery data are used to validate the temporal development of the reconstructed emissions. Furthermore, the altitude distributions of the emission time series are compared with top and bottom altitude measurements of aerosol layers obtained by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) satellite instruments. The final transport simulations provide detailed spatial and temporal information on the SO2 distributions of the Nabro eruption. The SO2 column densities from the simulations are in good qualitative agreement with the AIRS observations. Our new inverse modeling and simulation system is expected to become a useful tool to also study other volcanic

  15. Suspended sediment transport trough a large fluvial-tidal channel network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Scott A.; Morgan, Tara

    2015-01-01

    The confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, CA, forms a large network of interconnected channels, referred to as the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the Delta). The Delta comprises the transition zone from the fluvial influences of the upstream rivers and tidal influences of San Francisco Bay downstream. Formerly an extensive tidal marsh, the hydrodynamics and geomorphology of Delta have been substantially modified by humans to support agriculture, navigation, and water supply. These modifications, including construction of new channels, diking and draining of tidal wetlands, dredging of navigation channels, and the operation of large pumping facilities for distribution of freshwater from the Delta to other parts of the state, have had a dramatic impact on the physical and ecological processes within the Delta. To better understand the current physical processes, and their linkages to ecological processes, the USGS maintains an extensive network of flow, sediment, and water quality gages in the Delta. Flow gaging is accomplished through use of the index-velocity method, and sediment monitoring uses turbidity as a surrogate for suspended-sediment concentration. Herein, we present analyses of the transport and dispersal of suspended sediment through the complex network of channels in the Delta. The primary source of sediment to the Delta is the Sacramento River, which delivers pulses of sediment primarily during winter and spring runoff events. Upon reaching the Delta, the sediment pulses move through the fluvial-tidal transition while also encountering numerous channel junctions as the Sacramento River branches into several distributary channels. The monitoring network allows us to track these pulses through the network and document the dominant transport pathways for suspended sediment. Further, the flow gaging allows for an assessment of the relative effects of advection (the fluvial signal) and dispersion (from the tides) on the sediment pulses as they

  16. The large volume radiometric calorimeter system: A transportable device to measure scrap category plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M.F.; Wetzel, J.R.; Breakall, K.L.; Lemming, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    An innovative design concept has been used to design a large volume calorimeter system. The new design permits two measuring cells to fit in a compact, nonevaporative environmental bath. The system is mounted on a cart for transportability. Samples in the power range of 0.50 to 12.0 W can be measured. The calorimeters will receive samples as large as 22.0 cm in diameter by 43.2 cm high, and smaller samples can be measured without lengthening measurement time or increasing measurement error by using specially designed sleeve adapters. This paper describes the design considerations, construction, theory, applications, and performance of the large volume calorimeter system. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Large eddy simulation of turbulence and solute transport in a forested headwater stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosronejad, A.; Hansen, A. T.; Kozarek, J. L.; Guentzel, K.; Hondzo, M.; Guala, M.; Wilcock, P.; Finlay, J. C.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2016-01-01

    The large eddy simulation (LES) module of the Virtual StreamLab (VSL3D) model is applied to simulate the flow and transport of a conservative tracer in a headwater stream in Minnesota, located in the south Twin Cities metropolitan area. The detailed geometry of the stream reach, which is ˜135 m long, ˜2.5 m wide, and ˜0.15 m deep, was surveyed and used as input to the computational model. The detailed geometry and location of large woody debris and bed roughness elements up to ˜0.1 m in size were also surveyed and incorporated in the numerical simulation using the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary approach employed in VSL3D. The resolution of the simulation, which employs up to a total of 25 million grid nodes to discretize the flow domain, is sufficiently fine to directly account for the effect of large woody debris and small cobbles (on the streambed) on the flow patterns and transport processes of conservative solutes. Two tracer injection conditions, a pulse and a plateau release, and two cross sections of measured velocity were used to validate the LES results. The computed results are shown to be in good agreement with the field measurements and tracer concentration time series. To our knowledge, the present study is the first attempt to simulate via high-resolution LES solute transport in a natural stream environment taking into account a range of roughness length scales spanning an order of magnitude: from small cobbles on the streambed (˜0.1 m in diameter) to large woody debris up to ˜3 m long.

  18. Defective nuclear import of Tpr in Progeria reflects the Ran sensitivity of large cargo transport.

    PubMed

    Snow, Chelsi J; Dar, Ashraf; Dutta, Anindya; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Paschal, Bryce M

    2013-05-13

    The RanGTPase acts as a master regulator of nucleocytoplasmic transport by controlling assembly and disassembly of nuclear transport complexes. RanGTP is required in the nucleus to release nuclear localization signal (NLS)-containing cargo from import receptors, and, under steady-state conditions, Ran is highly concentrated in the nucleus. We previously showed the nuclear/cytoplasmic Ran distribution is disrupted in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) fibroblasts that express the Progerin form of lamin A, causing a major defect in nuclear import of the protein, translocated promoter region (Tpr). In this paper, we show that Tpr import was mediated by the most abundant import receptor, KPNA2, which binds the bipartite NLS in Tpr with nanomolar affinity. Analyses including NLS swapping revealed Progerin did not cause global inhibition of nuclear import. Rather, Progerin inhibited Tpr import because transport of large protein cargoes was sensitive to changes in the Ran nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution that occurred in HGPS. We propose that defective import of large protein complexes with important roles in nuclear function may contribute to disease-associated phenotypes in Progeria. PMID:23649804

  19. Space transportation alternatives for large space programs: The International Space University Summer Session, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1993-01-01

    In 1992, the International Space University (ISU) held its Summer Session in Kitakyushu, Japan. This paper summarizes and expands upon some aspects of space solar power and space transportation that were considered during that session. The issues discussed in this paper are the result of a 10-week study by the Space Solar Power Program design project members and the Space Transportation Group to investigate new paradigms in space propulsion and how those paradigms might reduce the costs for large space programs. The program plan was to place a series of power satellites in Earth orbit. Several designs were studied where many kW, MW, or GW of power would be transmitted to Earth or to other spacecraft in orbit. During the summer session, a space solar power system was also detailed and analyzed. A high-cost space transportation program is potentially the most crippling barrier to such a space power program. At ISU, the focus of the study was to foster and develop some of the new paradigms that may eliminate the barriers to low cost for space exploration and exploitation. Many international and technical aspects of a large multinational program were studied. Environmental safety, space construction and maintenance, legal and policy issues of frequency allocation, technology transfer and control and many other areas were addressed. Over 120 students from 29 countries participated in this summer session. The results discussed in this paper, therefore, represent the efforts of many nations.

  20. Large-scale plasma transport in the magnetotail during different solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myllys, Minna; Kilpua, Emilia; Pulkkinen, Tuija

    2015-04-01

    We present results from a study on how solar wind conditions affect the energy and plasma transport in the geomagnetic tail and how they modify the large-scale magnetotail configuration. We study the large-scale plasma transport in the magnetotail using tail observations from the five THEMIS spacecrafts during 2008-2011. During this period the THEMIS spacecraft spent a considerable time in the geomagnetic tail allowing us to compile statistical maps of plasma flow and energy transport properties. Furthermore, this time period corresponds to the extended and prolonged solar activity minimum between solar cycle 23 and 24 and relatively quiet rising phase of cycle 24. This allowed us to investigate magnetospheric processes and solar wind-magnetospheric coupling during relatively quiet state of the magnetosphere. In order to separate the role of different solar wind parameters and their activity level on the average sunward and tailward plasma flows and the occurrence rate of fast plasma bursts, the magnetospheric data was binned according to solar wind speed, dynamic pressure and IMF measurements. Our results show that the tailward flow bursts are not dependent on the solar wind conditions, but that the sign of the IMF z-component (GSM coordinates) causes the most visible effect to the occurence rate and pattern of sunward flows.

  1. Studies of dust transport in long pulse plasma discharges in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, M.; Kasahara, H.; Tokitani, M.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kamio, S.; Seki, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Pigarov, A.; Smirnov, R.; Kawamura, G.; Tanaka, H.; Masuzaki, S.; Uesugi, Y.; Mutoh, T.; The LHD Experiment Group

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional trajectories of incandescent dust particles in plasmas were observed with stereoscopic fast framing cameras in a large helical device. It proved that the dust is located in the peripheral plasma and most of the dust moves along the magnetic field lines with acceleration in the direction that corresponds to the plasma flow. ICRF heated long pulse plasma discharges were terminated with the release of large amounts of dust from a closed divertor region. After the experimental campaign, the traces of exfoliation of carbon rich mixed-material deposition layers were found in the divertor region. Transport of carbon dust is investigated using a modified dust transport simulation code, which can explain the observed dust trajectories. It also shows that controlling the radius of the dust particles to less than 1 mm is necessary to prevent the plasma termination by penetration of dust for the long pulse discharges. Dust transport simulation including heavy metal dust particles demonstrates that high heating power operation is effective for shielding the main plasma from dust penetration by an enhanced plasma flow effect and a high heat load onto the dust particles in the peripheral plasma. It shows a more powerful penetration characteristic of tungsten dust particles compared to that of carbon and iron dust particles.

  2. Space-charge limited transport in large-area monolayer hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Mahvash, Farzaneh; Paradis, Etienne; Drouin, Dominique; Szkopek, Thomas; Siaj, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a wide-gap material that has attracted significant attention as an ideal dielectric substrate for 2D crystal heterostructures. We report here the first observation of in-plane charge transport in large-area monolayer hBN, grown by chemical vapor deposition. The quadratic scaling of current with voltage at high bias corresponds to a space-charge limited conduction mechanism, with a room-temperature mobility reaching up to 0.01 cm(2)/(V s) at electric fields up to 100 kV/cm in the absence of dielectric breakdown. The observation of in-plane charge transport highlights the semiconducting nature of monolayer hBN, and identifies hBN as a wide-gap 2D crystal capable of supporting charge transport at high field. Future exploration of charge transport in hBN is motivated by the fundamental study of UV optoelectronics and the massive Dirac fermion spectrum of hBN. PMID:25730309

  3. A Two-Stage Approach for Medical Supplies Intermodal Transportation in Large-Scale Disaster Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Junhu; Wang, Xuping; Shi, Yan

    2014-01-01

    We present a two-stage approach for the “helicopters and vehicles” intermodal transportation of medical supplies in large-scale disaster responses. In the first stage, a fuzzy-based method and its heuristic algorithm are developed to select the locations of temporary distribution centers (TDCs) and assign medial aid points (MAPs) to each TDC. In the second stage, an integer-programming model is developed to determine the delivery routes. Numerical experiments verified the effectiveness of the approach, and observed several findings: (i) More TDCs often increase the efficiency and utility of medical supplies; (ii) It is not definitely true that vehicles should load more and more medical supplies in emergency responses; (iii) The more contrasting the traveling speeds of helicopters and vehicles are, the more advantageous the intermodal transportation is. PMID:25350005

  4. A two-stage approach for medical supplies intermodal transportation in large-scale disaster responses.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Junhu; Wang, Xuping; Shi, Yan

    2014-11-01

    We present a two-stage approach for the "helicopters and vehicles" intermodal transportation of medical supplies in large-scale disaster responses. In the first stage, a fuzzy-based method and its heuristic algorithm are developed to select the locations of temporary distribution centers (TDCs) and assign medial aid points (MAPs) to each TDC. In the second stage, an integer-programming model is developed to determine the delivery routes. Numerical experiments verified the effectiveness of the approach, and observed several findings: (i) More TDCs often increase the efficiency and utility of medical supplies; (ii) It is not definitely true that vehicles should load more and more medical supplies in emergency responses; (iii) The more contrasting the traveling speeds of helicopters and vehicles are, the more advantageous the intermodal transportation is. PMID:25350005

  5. Mixing of Multiple Jets With a Confined Subsonic Crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Results from a recently completed enhanced mixing program are summarized in the two technical papers. These studies were parts of a High Speed Research (HSR)-supported joint Government/industry/university program that involved, in addition to the NASA Lewis Research Center, researchers at United Technologies Research Center, Allison Engine Company, CFD Research Corporation, and the University of California, Irvine. The studies investigated the mixing of jets injected normal to a confined subsonic mainsteam in both rectangular and cylindrical ducts. Experimental and computational studies were performed in both nonreacting and reacting flows. The orifice geometries and flow conditions were selected as typical of the complex three-dimensional flows in the combustion chambers in low-emission gas turbine engines. The principal conclusion from both the experiments and modeling was that the momentum-flux ratio J and orifice spacing S/H were the most significant flow and geometry variables, respectively. Conserved scalar distributions were similar-independent of reaction, orifice diameter H/d, and shape-when the orifice spacing and the square root of the momentum-flux ratio were inversely proportional. Jet penetration was critical, and penetration decreased as either momentum-flux ratio or orifice spacing decreased. We found that planar averages must be considered in context with the distributions. The mass-flow ratios and the orifices investigated were often very large. The jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio was varied from significantly less than 1 to greater than 1. The orifice-area to mainstream-cross-sectional-area was varied from approx. 0 to 0.5, and the axial planes of interest were often just downstream of the orifice trailing edge. Three-dimensional flow was a key part of efficient mixing and was observed for all configurations. As an example of the results, the accompanying figure shows the effects of different rates of mass addition on the opposite walls of a

  6. Computational Investigations of Noise Suppression in Subsonic Round Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. David

    1997-01-01

    NASA Grant NAG1-1802, originally submitted in June 1996 as a two-year proposal, was awarded one-year's funding by NASA LaRC for the period 5 Oct., 1996, through 4 Oct., 1997. Because of the inavailability (from IT at NASA ARC) of sufficient supercomputer time in fiscal 1998 to complete the computational goals of the second year of the original proposal (estimated to be at least 400 Cray C-90 CPU hours), those goals have been appropriately amended, and a new proposal has been submitted to LaRC as a follow-on to NAG1-1802. The current report documents the activities and accomplishments on NAG1-1802 during the one-year period from 5 Oct., 1996, through 4 Oct., 1997. NASA Grant NAG1-1802, and its predecessor, NAG1-1772, have been directed toward adapting the numerical tool of Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) to aeroacoustic applications, with particular focus on noise suppression in subsonic round jets. In LES, the filtered Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically on a relatively coarse computational grid. Residual stresses, generated by scales of motion too small to be resolved on the coarse grid, are modeled. Although most LES incorporate spatial filtering, time-domain filtering affords certain conceptual and computational advantages, particularly for aeroacoustic applications. Consequently, this work has focused on the development of SubGrid-Scale (SGS) models that incorporate time- domain filters. The author is unaware of any previous attempt at purely time-filtered LES; however, Aldama and Dakhoul and Bedford have considered approaches that combine both spatial and temporal filtering. In our view, filtering in both space and time is redundant, because removal of high frequencies effects the removal of small spatial scales and vice versa.

  7. Large scale atomistic approaches to thermal transport and phonon scattering in nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savic, Ivana

    2012-02-01

    Decreasing the thermal conductivity of bulk materials by nanostructuring and dimensionality reduction, or by introducing some amount of disorder represents a promising strategy in the search for efficient thermoelectric materials [1]. For example, considerable improvements of the thermoelectric efficiency in nanowires with surface roughness [2], superlattices [3] and nanocomposites [4] have been attributed to a significantly reduced thermal conductivity. In order to accurately describe thermal transport processes in complex nanostructured materials and directly compare with experiments, the development of theoretical and computational approaches that can account for both anharmonic and disorder effects in large samples is highly desirable. We will first summarize the strengths and weaknesses of the standard atomistic approaches to thermal transport (molecular dynamics [5], Boltzmann transport equation [6] and Green's function approach [7]) . We will then focus on the methods based on the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation, that are computationally too demanding, at present, to treat large scale systems and thus to investigate realistic materials. We will present a Monte Carlo method [8] to solve the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation [9], that enables computation of the thermal conductivity of ordered and disordered systems with a number of atoms up to an order of magnitude larger than feasible with straightforward integration. We will present a comparison between exact and Monte Carlo Boltzmann transport results for small SiGe nanostructures and then use the Monte Carlo method to analyze the thermal properties of realistic SiGe nanostructured materials. This work is done in collaboration with Davide Donadio, Francois Gygi, and Giulia Galli from UC Davis.[4pt] [1] See e.g. A. J. Minnich, M. S. Dresselhaus, Z. F. Ren, and G. Chen, Energy Environ. Sci. 2, 466 (2009).[0pt] [2] A. I. Hochbaum et al, Nature 451, 163 (2008).[0pt

  8. Large-scale laboratory measurements of sheet flow sediment transport in the swash zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanckriet, T. M.; Puleo, J. A.; Foster, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Existing sediment transport models show poor predictive quality when applied to the swash zone, indicating that the underlying processes of swash zone sediment transport are not yet fully understood. The recognition that more detailed measurements are needed to improve understanding of swash-zone processes has led to several recent innovations in swash-zone measurement techniques. One of these innovative measurement techniques, the Conductivity Concentration Profiler (CCP), was developed to address the issue of near-bed (sheet flow) sediment transport, which is believed to be an important part of the overall swash-zone sediment transport. Measurements of sheet flow processes in the swash zone from the Barrier Dynamics Experiment (Bardex-II) are presented. The aim of this study was to investigate the dynamics of a coastal barrier system and develop an increased understanding of cross-shore sediment transport processes in the nearshore zone of sandy beaches. A 70-m long, near-prototype scale sandy barrier was constructed in a large wave flume facility and equipped with over 200 sensors to measure hydrodynamics and sediment processes ranging from the shoaling-wave zone to the back barrier. CCP sensors were deployed at three locations in the swash zone as part of the ';swash and berm dynamics' work package. Onshore-directed pressure gradients, observed during the initial stages of uprush, enhanced sediment mobilization. The combination of near-bed sediment mobilization due to pressure gradients (known as plug flow) and shear stress (sheet flow) is examined. Sediment load in the sheet flow layer is also compared to suspended load and total load measured using an array of optical backscatter sensors. The sheet flow layer thickness is compared to hydrodynamic forcing such as bed shear stress and the effect of groundwater exchange.

  9. Modeling scalar dissipation and scalar variance in large eddy simulation: Algebraic and transport equation closures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, E.; Richardson, E. S.; Doran, E. M.; Pitsch, H.; Chen, J. H.

    2012-05-01

    Scalar dissipation rates and subfilter scalar variances are important modeling parameters in large eddy simulations (LES) of reacting flows. Currently available models capture the general behavior of these parameters, but these models do not always perform with the degree of accuracy that is needed for predictive LES. Here, two direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to analyze LES dissipation rate and variance models, and to propose a new model for the dissipation rate that is based on a transport equation. The first DNS that is considered is a non-premixed auto-igniting C2H4 jet flame simulation originally performed by Yoo et al. [Proc. Combust. Inst. 33, 1619-1627 (2011)], 10.1016/j.proci.2010.06.147. A LES of this case is run using algebraic models for the dissipation rate and subfilter variance. It is shown that the algebraic models fail to adequately reproduce the DNS results. This motivates the introduction of a transport equation model for the LES dissipation rate. Closure of the equation is addressed by formulating a new adapted dynamic approach. This approach borrows dynamically computed information from LES quantities that, unlike the dissipation rate, do not reside on the smallest flow length scales. The adapted dynamic approach is analyzed by considering a second DNS of scalar mixing in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Data from this second DNS are used to confirm that the adapted dynamic approach successfully closes the dissipation rate equation over a wide range of LES filter widths. The first reacting jet case is then returned to and used to test the LES transport equation models. The transport equation model for the dissipation rate is shown to be more accurate than its algebraic counterpoint, and the dissipation rate is eliminated as a source of error in the transported variance model.

  10. Advanced Low Emissions Subsonic Combustor Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Reid

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in commercial and military aircraft gas turbines have yielded significant improvements in fuel efficiency and thrust-to-weight ratio, due in large part to increased combustor operating pressures and temperatures. However, the higher operating conditions have increased the emission of oxides of nitrogen (NOx), which is a pollutant with adverse impact on the atmosphere and environment. Since commercial and military aircraft are the only important direct source of NOx emissions at high altitudes, there is a growing consensus that considerably more stringent limits on NOx emissions will be required in the future for all aircraft. In fact, the regulatory communities have recently agreed to reduce NOx limits by 20 percent from current requirements effective in 1996. Further reductions at low altitude, together with introduction of limits on NOx at altitude, are virtual certainties. In addition, the U.S. Government recently conducted hearings on the introduction of federal fees on the local emission of pollutants from all sources, including aircraft. While no action was taken regarding aircraft in this instance, the threat of future action clearly remains. In these times of intense and growing international competition, the U.S. le-ad in aerospace can only be maintained through a clear technological dominance that leads to a product line of maximum value to the global airline customer. Development of a very low NOx combustor will be essential to meet the future needs of both the commercial and military transport markets, if additional economic burdens and/or operational restrictions are to be avoided. In this report, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) presents the study results with the following specific objectives: Development of low-emissions combustor technologies for advances engines that will enter into service circa 2005, while producing a goal of 70 percent lower NOx emissions, compared to 1996 regulatory levels. Identification of solution approaches to

  11. Large wood transport and jam formation in a series of flume experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, S. L.; MacKenzie, L. G.; Eaton, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    Large wood has historically been removed from streams, resulting in the depletion of in-stream wood in waterways worldwide. As wood increases morphological and hydraulic complexity, the addition of large wood is commonly employed as a means to rehabilitate in-stream habitat. At present, however, the scientific understanding of wood mobilization and transport is incomplete. This paper presents results from a series of four flume experiments in which wood was added to a reach to investigate the piece and reach characteristics that determine wood stability and transport, as well as the time scale required for newly recruited wood to self-organize into stable jams. Our results show that wood transitions from a randomly distributed newly recruited state to a self-organized, or jam-stabilized state, over the course of a single bankfull flow event. Statistical analyses of piece mobility during this transitional period indicate that piece irregularities, especially rootwads, dictate the stability of individual wood pieces; rootwad presence or absence accounts for up to 80% of the variance explained by linear regression models for transport distance. Furthermore, small pieces containing rootwads are especially stable. Large ramped pieces provide nuclei for the formation of persistent wood jams, and the frequency of these pieces in the reach impacts the travel distance of mobile wood. This research shows that the simulation of realistic wood dynamics is possible using a simplified physical model, and also has management implications, as it suggests that randomly added wood may organize into persistent, stable jams, and characterizes the time scale for this transition.

  12. Leading-edge transition and relaminarization phenomena on a subsonic high-lift system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dam, C. P.; Vijgen, P. M. H. W.; Yip, L. P.; Potter, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    Boundary-layer transition and relaminarization may have a critical effect on the flow development about multielement high-lift systems of subsonic transport aircraft with swept wings. The purpose of this paper is a study of transition phenomena in the leading-edge region of the various elements of a high-lift system. The flow phenomena studied include transition of the attachment-line flow, relaminarization, and crossflow instability. The calculations are based on pressure distributions measured in flight on the NASA Transport Systems Research Vehicle (Boeing 737-100) at a wing station where the flow approximated infinite swept wing conditions. The results indicate that significant regions of laminar flow can exist on all flap elements in flight. In future flight experiments the extent of these regions will be measured, and the transition mechanisms and the effect of laminar flow on the high-lift characteristics of the multi-element system will be further explored.

  13. Subsonic annular wing theory with application to flow about nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A method has recently been developed for calculating the flow over a subsonic nacelle at zero angle of attack. The method makes use of annular wing theory and boundary-layer theory and has shown good agreement with both experimental data and more complex theoretical solutions. The method permits variation of the mass flow by changing the size of a center body.

  14. Near-Field Noise Computation for a Subsonic Coannular Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Hultgren, Lennart S.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2008-01-01

    A high-Reynolds-number, subsonic coannular jet is simulated, using a three-dimensional finite-volume LES method, with emphasis on the near field noise. The nozzle geometry used is the NASA Glenn 3BB baseline model. The numerical results are generally in good agreement with existing experimental findings.

  15. 27. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH LABORATORY, BUILDING 25C, WHICH REPLACED THE 10-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  16. 26. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH LABORATORY, BUILDING 25C, WHICH REPLACED THE 10-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  17. 28. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH LABORATORY, BUILDING 25C, WHICH REPLACED THE 10-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  18. Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemical Energy Storage: From Transportation to Electrical Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Lemmon, John P.; Imhoff, Carl H.; Graff, Gordon L.; Li, Liyu; Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Chong M.; Xiao, Jie; Xia, Guanguang; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Baskaran, Suresh; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Li, Xiaolin; Shao, Yuyan; Schwenzer, Birgit

    2013-02-15

    Large-scale electrical energy storage has become more important than ever for reducing fossil energy consumption in transportation and for the widespread deployment of intermittent renewable energy in electric grid. However, significant challenges exist for its applications. Here, the status and challenges are reviewed from the perspective of materials science and materials chemistry in electrochemical energy storage technologies, such as Li-ion batteries, sodium (sulfur and metal halide) batteries, Pb-acid battery, redox flow batteries, and supercapacitors. Perspectives and approaches are introduced for emerging battery designs and new chemistry combinations to reduce the cost of energy storage devices.

  19. Clarke Stations and mercurian mass-drivers: energy for large-scale transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    Three-week voyages across 1 AU could be made in large sailing craft propelled by microwaves generated at power stations operating at 0.1 AU from the sun. The power stations could be built of mercurian materials launched by mass driver to building sites in solar orbit. A Clarke Station 28 km in radius could generate 64 TW of microwaves and support the operation of a 1000-tonne, 1000-passenger vessel. The ability to build near-sun power stations of mercurian materials would not only support high-speed transport but solar system development in general.

  20. Development of an integrated sediment transport model and application at a large gravel bed river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritthart, M.; Schober, B.; Liedermann, M.; Habersack, H.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the development, validation and application of iSed, an integrated numerical sediment transport and morphology model. The model was specifically designed to suit the needs of large gravel bed rivers, such as the Danube East of Vienna. It is coupled with external 2-D or 3-D hydrodynamic codes to obtain the flow field and bed shear stress patterns driving sediment transport processes. This approach is of particular advantage for an investigation into sediment dynamics based on hydrodynamics of different dimensionality. The model is capable of calculating both suspended and bed load transport. It solves a convection-diffusion equation to account for suspended load; in addition, four different transport formulae - the relations of Meyer-Peter/Müller, Hunziker, van Rijn and Egiazaroff - are implemented for the computation of bed load. The well-known Exner equation is solved for deriving resulting bed level differences for every node of the computation mesh based on the sediment balance. All equations are evaluated for an unlimited number of sediment size fractions, allowing for the investigation of sorting processes. The river bed is organized into an active layer, where sorting takes place, and an unlimited number of bed layers below the active layer. The sediment transport model was validated using results from three different laboratory experiments: (i) morphodynamics of a 180 degree channel bend, based on hydraulics of a 3-D numerical model; (ii) erosion and deposition patterns due to a channel contraction, using a 2-D model to provide the flow field; (iii) incipient motion and erosion processes due to different sediment materials in a straight laboratory channel, coupled with a 3-D numerical model. The results of the numerical code were in satisfactory agreement with the experimental measurements, demonstrating the general validity of the sediment transport model. After successful validation, the model was applied to a 4 kilometre reach of the

  1. 3D CFD modeling of subsonic and transonic flowing-gas DPALs with different pumping geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yacoby, Eyal; Sadot, Oren; Barmashenko, Boris D.; Rosenwaks, Salman

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) modeling of subsonic (Mach number M ~ 0.2) and transonic (M ~ 0.9) diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), taking into account fluid dynamics and kinetic processes in the lasing medium is reported. The performance of these lasers is compared with that of supersonic (M ~ 2.7 for Cs and M ~ 2.4 for K) DPALs. The motivation for this study stems from the fact that subsonic and transonic DPALs require much simpler hardware than supersonic ones where supersonic nozzle, diffuser and high power mechanical pump (due to a drop in the gas total pressure in the nozzle) are required for continuous closed cycle operation. For Cs DPALs with 5 x 5 cm2 flow cross section pumped by large cross section (5 x 2 cm2) beam the maximum achievable power of supersonic devices is higher than that of the transonic and subsonic devices by only ~ 3% and ~ 10%, respectively. Thus in this case the supersonic operation mode has no substantial advantage over the transonic one. The main processes limiting the power of Cs supersonic DPALs are saturation of the D2 transition and large ~ 60% losses of alkali atoms due to ionization, whereas the influence of gas heating is negligible. For K transonic DPALs both the gas heating and ionization effects are shown to be unimportant. The maximum values of the power are higher than those in Cs transonic laser by ~ 11%. The power achieved in the supersonic and transonic K DPAL is higher than for the subsonic version, with the same resonator and K density at the inlet, by ~ 84% and ~ 27%, respectively, showing a considerable advantaged of the supersonic device over the transonic one. For pumping by rectangular beams of the same (5 x 2 cm2) cross section, comparison between end-pumping - where the laser beam and pump beam both propagate at along the same axis, and transverse-pumping - where they propagate perpendicularly to each other, shows that the output power and optical-to-optical efficiency are not

  2. ABCG2 Transports and Transfers Heme to Albumin through Its Large Extracellular Loop*

    PubMed Central

    Desuzinges-Mandon, Elodie; Arnaud, Ophélie; Martinez, Lorena; Huché, Frédéric; Di Pietro, Attilio; Falson, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    ABCG2 is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter preferentially expressed by immature human hematopoietic progenitors. Due to its role in drug resistance, its expression has been correlated with a protection role against protoporhyrin IX (PPIX) accumulation in stem cells under hypoxic conditions. We show here that zinc mesoporphyrin, a validated fluorescent heme analog, is transported by ABCG2. We also show that the ABCG2 large extracellular loop ECL3 constitutes a porphyrin-binding domain, which strongly interacts with heme, hemin, PPIX, ZnPPIX, CoPPIX, and much less efficiently with pheophorbide a, but not with vitamin B12. Kd values are in the range 0.5–3.5 μm, with heme displaying the highest affinity. Nonporphyrin substrates of ABCG2, such as mitoxantrone, doxo/daunorubicin, and riboflavin, do not bind to ECL3. Single-point mutations H583A and C603A inside ECL3 prevent the binding of hemin but hardly affect that of iron-free PPIX. The extracellular location of ECL3 downstream from the transport sites suggests that, after membrane translocation, hemin is transferred to ECL3, which is strategically positioned to release the bound porphyrin to extracellular partners. We show here that human serum albumin could be one of these possible partners as it removes hemin bound to ECL3 and interacts with ABCG2, with a Kd of about 3 μm. PMID:20705604

  3. Large Eddy Simulation of Transient Flow, Solidification, and Particle Transport Processes in Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2014-07-01

    The current study developed a coupled computational model to simulate the transient fluid flow, solidification, and particle transport processes in a slab continuous-casting mold. Transient flow of molten steel in the mold is calculated using the large eddy simulation. An enthalpy-porosity approach is used for the analysis of solidification processes. The transport of bubble and non-metallic inclusion inside the liquid pool is calculated using the Lagrangian approach based on the transient flow field. A criterion of particle entrapment in the solidified shell is developed using the user-defined functions of FLUENT software (ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, PA). The predicted results of this model are compared with the measurements of the ultrasonic testing of the rolled steel plates and the water model experiments. The transient asymmetrical flow pattern inside the liquid pool exhibits quite satisfactory agreement with the corresponding measurements. The predicted complex instantaneous velocity field is composed of various small recirculation zones and multiple vortices. The transport of particles inside the liquid pool and the entrapment of particles in the solidified shell are not symmetric. The Magnus force can reduce the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell, especially for smaller particles, but the effect is not obvious. The Marangoni force can play an important role in controlling the motion of particles, which increases the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell obviously.

  4. Large-scale simulation of flow and transport in reconstructed HPLC-microchip packings.

    PubMed

    Khirevich, Siarhei; Höltzel, Alexandra; Ehlert, Steffen; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2009-06-15

    Flow and transport in a particle-packed microchip separation channel were investigated with quantitative numerical analysis methods, comprising the generation of confined, polydisperse sphere packings by a modified Jodrey-Tory algorithm, 3D velocity field calculations by the lattice-Boltzmann method, and modeling of convective-diffusive mass transport with a random-walk particle-tracking approach. For the simulations, the exact conduit cross section, the particle-size distribution of the packing material, and the respective average interparticle porosity (packing density) of the HPLC-microchip packings was reconstructed. Large-scale simulation of flow and transport at Peclet numbers of up to Pe = 140 in the reconstructed microchip packings (containing more than 3 x 10(5) spheres) was facilitated by the efficient use of supercomputer power. Porosity distributions and fluid flow velocity profiles for the reconstructed microchip packings are presented and analyzed. Aberrations from regular geometrical conduit shape are shown to influence packing structure and, thus, porosity and velocity distributions. Simulated axial dispersion coefficients are discussed with respect to their dependence on flow velocity and bed porosity. It is shown by comparison to experimental separation efficiencies that the simulated data genuinely reflect the general dispersion behavior of the real-life HPLC-microchip packings. Differences between experiment and simulation are explained by differing morphologies of real and simulated packings (intraparticle porosity, packing structure in the corner regions). PMID:19459621

  5. Multi-Mission Earth Vehicle Subsonic Dynamic Stability Testing and Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Fremaux, C. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEVs) are blunt-body vehicles designed with the purpose of transporting payloads from outer space to the surface of the Earth. To achieve high-reliability and minimum weight, MMEEVs avoid use of limited-reliability systems, such as parachutes, retro-rockets, and reaction control systems and rely on the natural aerodynamic stability of the vehicle throughout the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase of flight. The Multi-Mission Systems Analysis for Planetary Entry (M-SAPE) parametric design tool is used to facilitate the design of MMEEVs for an array of missions and develop and visualize the trade space. Testing in NASA Langley?s Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST) was conducted to significantly improve M-SAPE?s subsonic aerodynamic models. Vehicle size and shape can be driven by entry flight path angle and speed, thermal protection system performance, terminal velocity limitations, payload mass and density, among other design parameters. The objectives of the VST testing were to define usable subsonic center of gravity limits, and aerodynamic parameters for 6-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) simulations, for a range of MMEEV designs. The range of MMEEVs tested was from 1.8m down to 1.2m diameter. A backshell extender provided the ability to test a design with a much larger payload for the 1.2m MMEEV.

  6. High performance reversed shear plasmas with a large radius transport barrier in JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T.; Hatae, T.; Oikawa, T.; Takeji, S.; Shirai, H.; Koide, Y.; Ishida, S.; Ide, S.; Ishii, Y.; Ozeki, T.; Higashijima, S.; Yoshino, R.; Kamada, Y.; Neyatani, Y.

    1998-02-01

    The operation of reversed shear plasmas in JT-60U has been extended to the low-q, high-Ip region keeping a large radius transport barrier, and a high fusion performance has been achieved. Record values of deuterium-tritium (DT)-equivalent power gain in JT-60U have been obtained: QDTeq = 1.05, τE = 0.97 s, nD(0) = 4.9 × 1019 m-3 and Ti(0) = 16.5 keV. A large improvement in confinement resulted from the formation of an internal transport barrier (ITB) with a large radius, which was characterized by steep gradients in electron density, electron temperature and ion temperature just inside the position of qmin. Large negative shear regions, up to 80% of the plasma minor radius in the low-qmin regime (qmin~2), were obtained by plasma current ramp-up after the formation of the ITB with the pressure and current profiles being controlled by adjustment of plasma volume and beam power. The ITB was established by on-axis beam heating into a low density target plasma with reversed shear that was formed by current ramp-up without beam heating. The confinement time increased with the radius of the ITB and the decrease of qmin at a fixed toroidal field. High H factors, up to 3.3, were achieved with an L mode edge. The effective one fluid thermal diffusivity χeff had its minimum in the ITB. The values of H/q95 and βt increased with the decrease of q95, and the highest performance was achieved at q95 ~3.1 (2.8 MA). The performance was limited by disruptive beta collapses with βN~2 at qmin~2.

  7. Observations of subsonic and supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.

    2009-11-01

    Shear layers containing strong velocity gradients appear in many high-energy-density (HED) systems and play important roles in mixing and the transition to turbulence. Yet few laboratory experiments have been carried out to study their detailed evolution in this extreme environment where plasmas are compressible, actively ionizing, often involve strong shock waves and have complex material properties. Many shear flows produce the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, which initiates the mixing at a fluid interface. We present results from two dedicated shear flow experiments that produced overall subsonic and supersonic flows using novel target designs. In the subsonic case, the Omega laser was used to drive a blast wave along a rippled interface between plastic and foam, shocking both the materials to produce two fluids separated by a sharp shear layer. The interface subsequently rolled-upped into large KH vortices that were accompanied by bubble-like structures of unknown origin. This was the first time the evolution of a well-resolved KH instability was observed in a HED plasma in the laboratory. We have analyzed the properties and dynamics of the plasma based on the data and fundamental models, without resorting to simulated values. In the second, supersonic experiment the Nike laser was used to drive a supersonic flow of Al plasma along a rippled, low-density foam surface. Here again the flowing plasma drove a shock into the second material, so that two fluids were separated by a shear layer. In contrast to the subsonic case, the flow developed shocks around the ripples in response to the supersonic flow of Al. Collaborators: R.P. Drake, O.A. Hurricane, J.F. Hansen, Y. Aglitskiy, T. Plewa, B.A. Remington, H.F. Robey, J.L. Weaver, A.L. Velikovich, R.S. Gillespie, M.J. Bono, M.J. Grosskopf, C.C. Kuranz, A. Visco.

  8. Sugar alcohols enhance calcium transport from rat small and large intestine epithelium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Hitoshi; Hara, Hiroshi; Tomita, Fusao

    2002-06-01

    We compared the effect of a variety of sugar alcohols on calcium absorption from the rat small and large intestine in vitro. An Ussing chamber technique was used to determine the net transport of Ca across the epithelium isolated from the jejunum, ileum, cecum, and colon of rats. The concentration of Ca in the serosal and mucosal Tris buffer solution was 1.25 mM and 10 mM, respectively. The Ca concentration in the serosal medium was determined after incubation for 30 min and the net Ca absorption was evaluated. The addition of 0.1-200 mM erythritol, xylitol, sorbitol, maltitol, palatinit, or lactitol to the mucosal medium affected net Ca absorption in the intestinal preparations. Differences in Ca transport were observed between portions of the intestine, but not between sugar alcohols tested. We concluded that sugar alcohols directly affect the epithelial tissue and promote Ca absorption from the small and large intestine in vitro. PMID:12064809

  9. Probing Energy Levels of Large Array Quantum Dot Superlattice by Electronic Transport Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisri, S. Z.; Degoli, E.; Spallanzani, N.; Krishnan, G.; Kooi, B.; Ghica, C.; Yarema, M.; Protesescu, L.; Heiss, W.; Kovalenko, M.; Pulci, O.; Ossicini, S.; Iwasa, Y.; Loi, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    Colloidal quantum dot superlattice (CQDS) emerges as new type of hybrid solids allowing easy fabrication of devices that exploits the quantum confinement properties of individual QD. This materials displays peculiar characters, making investigation of their transport properties nontrivial. Besides the bandgap variations, 0D nature of QD lead to the formation of discrete energy subbands. These subbands are crucial for multiple exciton generation (for efficient solar cell), thermoelectric material and multistate transistor. Full understanding of the CQDS energy level structure is vital to use them in complex devices. Here we show a powerful method to determine the CQDS electronic energy levels from their intrinsic charge transport characteristics. Via the use of ambipolar transistors with CQDS as active materials and gated using highly capacitive ionic liquid gating, Fermi energy can be largely tuned. It can access energy levels beyond QD's HOMO & LUMO. Ability to probe not only the bandgap, but also the discrete energy level from large assembly of QD at room temperature suggests the formation of energy minibands in this system.

  10. Large Conductance Switching in a Single-Molecule Device through Room Temperature Spin-Dependent Transport.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Albert C; Aravena, Daniel; Cerdá, Jorge I; Acís-Castillo, Zulema; Li, Haipeng; Real, José Antonio; Sanz, Fausto; Hihath, Josh; Ruiz, Eliseo; Díez-Pérez, Ismael

    2016-01-13

    Controlling the spin of electrons in nanoscale electronic devices is one of the most promising topics aiming at developing devices with rapid and high density information storage capabilities. The interface magnetism or spinterface resulting from the interaction between a magnetic molecule and a metal surface, or vice versa, has become a key ingredient in creating nanoscale molecular devices with novel functionalities. Here, we present a single-molecule wire that displays large (>10000%) conductance switching by controlling the spin-dependent transport under ambient conditions (room temperature in a liquid cell). The molecular wire is built by trapping individual spin crossover Fe(II) complexes between one Au electrode and one ferromagnetic Ni electrode in an organic liquid medium. Large changes in the single-molecule conductance (>100-fold) are measured when the electrons flow from the Au electrode to either an α-up or a β-down spin-polarized Ni electrode. Our calculations show that the current flowing through such an interface appears to be strongly spin-polarized, thus resulting in the observed switching of the single-molecule wire conductance. The observation of such a high spin-dependent conductance switching in a single-molecule wire opens up a new door for the design and control of spin-polarized transport in nanoscale molecular devices at room temperature. PMID:26675052

  11. Biomass Energy for Transport and Electricity: Large scale utilization under low CO2 concentration scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

    2010-01-25

    This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. The costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are also incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the dominant source. A key finding of this paper is the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies coupled with commercial biomass energy can play in meeting stringent emissions targets. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, the resulting negative emissions used in combination with biomass are a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels and shows that both technologies are important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics. Through application of the GCAM integrated assessment model, it becomes clear that, given CCS availability, bioenergy will be used both in electricity and transportation.

  12. CFD-Based Design Optimization Tool Developed for Subsonic Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The traditional approach to the design of engine inlets for commercial transport aircraft is a tedious process that ends with a less-than-optimum design. With the advent of high-speed computers and the availability of more accurate and reliable computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers, numerical optimization processes can effectively be used to design an aerodynamic inlet lip that enhances engine performance. The designers' experience at Boeing Corporation showed that for a peak Mach number on the inlet surface beyond some upper limit, the performance of the engine degrades excessively. Thus, our objective was to optimize efficiency (minimize the peak Mach number) at maximum cruise without compromising performance at other operating conditions. Using a CFD code NPARC, the NASA Lewis Research Center, in collaboration with Boeing, developed an integrated procedure at Lewis to find the optimum shape of a subsonic inlet lip and a numerical optimization code, ADS. We used a GRAPE-based three-dimensional grid generator to help automate the optimization procedure. The inlet lip shape at the crown and the keel was described as a superellipse, and the superellipse exponents and radii ratios were considered as design variables. Three operating conditions: cruise, takeoff, and rolling takeoff, were considered in this study. Three-dimensional Euler computations were carried out to obtain the flow field. At the initial design, the peak Mach numbers for maximum cruise, takeoff, and rolling takeoff conditions were 0.88, 1.772, and 1.61, respectively. The acceptable upper limits on the takeoff and rolling takeoff Mach numbers were 1.55 and 1.45. Since the initial design provided by Boeing was found to be optimum with respect to the maximum cruise condition, the sum of the peak Mach numbers at takeoff and rolling takeoff were minimized in the current study while the maximum cruise Mach number was constrained to be close to that at the existing design. With this objective, the

  13. 14 CFR 135.381 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. 135.381 Section 135.381 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE:...

  14. Transport equations for multicomponent anisotropic space plasmas - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barakat, A. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to present a unified approach to the study of transport phenomena in multicomponent anisotropic space plasmas. In particular, a system of generalized transport equations is presented that can be applied to widely different plasma flow conditions. The generalized transport equations can describe subsonic and supersonic flows, collision-dominated and collisionless flows, plasma flows in rapidly changing magnetic field configurations, multicomponent plasma flows with large temperature differences between the interacting species, and plasma flows that contain anisotropic temperature distributions. In addition, if Maxwell's equations of electricity and magnetism are added to the system of transport equations, they can be used to model electrostatic shocks, double layers, and magnetic merging processes. These transport equations also contain terms which act to regulate both the heat flow and temperature anisotropy, processes which appear to be operating in the solar wind.

  15. Large-scale suspended sediment transport and sediment deposition in the Mekong Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manh, N. V.; Dung, N. V.; Hung, N. N.; Merz, B.; Apel, H.

    2014-08-01

    Sediment dynamics play a major role in the agricultural and fishery productivity of the Mekong Delta. However, the understanding of sediment dynamics in the delta, one of the most complex river deltas in the world, is very limited. This is a consequence of its large extent, the intricate system of rivers, channels and floodplains, and the scarcity of observations. This study quantifies, for the first time, the suspended sediment transport and sediment deposition in the whole Mekong Delta. To this end, a quasi-2D hydrodynamic model is combined with a cohesive sediment transport model. The combined model is calibrated using six objective functions to represent the different aspects of the hydraulic and sediment transport components. The model is calibrated for the extreme flood season in 2011 and shows good performance for 2 validation years with very different flood characteristics. It is shown how sediment transport and sediment deposition is differentiated from Kratie at the entrance of the delta on its way to the coast. The main factors influencing the spatial sediment dynamics are the river and channel system, dike rings, sluice gate operations, the magnitude of the floods, and tidal influences. The superposition of these factors leads to high spatial variability of sediment transport, in particular in the Vietnamese floodplains. Depending on the flood magnitude, annual sediment loads reaching the coast vary from 48 to 60% of the sediment load at Kratie. Deposited sediment varies from 19 to 23% of the annual load at Kratie in Cambodian floodplains, and from 1 to 6% in the compartmented and diked floodplains in Vietnam. Annual deposited nutrients (N, P, K), which are associated with the sediment deposition, provide on average more than 50% of mineral fertilizers typically applied for rice crops in non-flooded ring dike floodplains in Vietnam. Through the quantification of sediment and related nutrient input, the presented study provides a quantitative basis for

  16. Two-group interfacial area transport equation in large diameter pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Todd Ryan

    2002-01-01

    The closure relations for the two-group interfacial area transport equation (LATE) by which the changes of interfacial area concentration can be dynamically modeled are set forth in this thesis for the case of large diameter pipes. In the two-group formulation, the sources and sink terms are established by mechanistic modeling of the intra-group and inter-group transport of the bubbles based on five major bubble interaction mechanisms. These mechanisms are bubble coalescence as a result of random collision, RC, wake entrainment, WE, bubble break-up due to turbulent impact, TI, small bubble shearing-off of large bubbles, SO, and bubble break-up due to surface instability for large bubbles, SI. The models developed are supported by experiments using a four-sensor conductivity probe in large diameter test sections, 10.16 cm and 15.24 cm in diameter. A total of 31 different flow conditions under atmospheric pressure are examined in the bubbly to churn-turbulent flow regimes. The local flow parameters measured by the multi-sensor conductivity probe include the local time-averaged void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble Sauter mean diameter, interfacial velocity, and interface frequency for the two groups of bubbles. The model is evaluated against the extensive database and good agreement is obtained between the model predictions and the experimental data. The average error based on the total interfacial area concentration is around 7.0% for interfacial area concentration in both test sections. Recirculation in the large pipes is given special treatment in the measurement analysis. Using upwards and downwards facing probes, information on the missing bubble signals is obtained which is used to correct the local data by either the Effective Bubble Number or Intrusiveness Factor Method. The correction to void fraction is found to be about a 12% increase in the local area averaged value, while interfacial area concentration may increase upwards of 60% in the

  17. Measurement of Large-Scale Sediment Transport Dynamics Using Multibeam Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, S. M.; Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.; Malzone, C.; Keevil, G.

    2007-12-01

    Multibeam Echo-Sounder (MBES) sonar systems have developed rapidly over recent decades and are now routinely deployed to provide high-resolution object detection and bathymetric surveying in a range of aquatic environments, from the deep-sea to lakes and rivers. MBES systems were developed for bottom-detection and measurement of bed morphology, and have previously discarded the received acoustic back-scatter from the water column after the bottom-detection algorithms have been performed. However, modern data handling and storage technologies have facilitated the logging of this large quantity of acoustic intensity and phase information, and commercial MBES systems are now available that provide this capability. This paper develops a novel methodology to exploit this logging capability to quantify the concentration and dynamics of suspended sediment within the water column. This development provides a multi-purpose tool for the holistic surveying of sediment transport by imaging suspended sediment concentration, associated coherent flow structures and providing concurrent high-resolution bathymetry. This paper presents methods of data analysis and results obtained from deployment of the RESON SeaBat 8125 and 7125 MBES systems in the field and during testing in a controlled environment. The field results were obtained from sites on the Paraná river, Argentina, with the aim of examining the dynamics of suspended sediment transport over dune bedforms and in the region of flow mixing between large rivers of significantly different suspended sediment concentration. Controlled testing was performed in a former ship dry-dock by creating flows density currents of known suspended sediment concentration with different types and mixes of sediment. The results demonstrate the capability of the RESON MBES systems to successfully resolve the contrast in suspended sediment concentration, and hence the spatio-temporal monitoring of the associated coherent flow structures. The

  18. Switch-Loop Flexibility Affects Transport of Large Drugs by the Promiscuous AcrB Multidrug Efflux Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hi-jea; Müller, Reinke T.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug efflux transporters recognize a variety of structurally unrelated compounds for which the molecular basis is poorly understood. For the resistance nodulation and cell division (RND) inner membrane component AcrB of the AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux system from Escherichia coli, drug binding occurs at the access and deep binding pockets. These two binding areas are separated by an 11-amino-acid-residue-containing switch loop whose conformational flexibility is speculated to be essential for drug binding and transport. A G616N substitution in the switch loop has a distinct and local effect on the orientation of the loop and on the ability to transport larger drugs. Here, we report a distinct phenotypical pattern of drug recognition and transport for the G616N variant, indicating that drug substrates with minimal projection areas of >70 Å2 are less well transported than other substrates. PMID:24914123

  19. Physically based modelling of sediment generation and transport under a large rainfall simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Russell; Elliott, Sandy

    2006-07-01

    A series of large rainfall simulator experiments was conducted in 2002 and 2003 on a small plot located in an experimental catchment in the North Island of New Zealand. These experiments measured both runoff and sediment transport under carefully controlled conditions. A physically based hydrological modelling system (SHETRAN) was then applied to reproduce the observed hydrographs and sedigraphs. SHETRAN uses physically based equations to represent flow and sediment transport, and two erodibility coefficients to model detachment of soil particles by raindrop erosion and overland flow erosion. The rate of raindrop erosion also depended on the amount of bare ground under the simulator; this was estimated before each experiment. These erodibility coefficients were calibrated systematically for summer and winter experiments separately, and lower values were obtained for the summer experiments. Earlier studies using small rainfall simulators in the vicinity of the plot also found the soil to be less erodible in summer and autumn. Limited validation of model parameters was carried out using results from a series of autumn experiments. The modelled suspended sediment load was also sensitive to parameters controlling the generation of runoff from the rainfall simulator plot; therefore, we found that accurate runoff predictions were important for the sediment predictions, especially from the experiments where the pasture cover was good and overland flow erosion was the dominant mechanism. The rainfall simulator experiments showed that the mass of suspended sediment increased post-grazing, and according to the model this was due to raindrop detachment. The results indicated that grazing cattle or sheep on steeply sloping hill-country paddocks should be carefully managed, especially in winter, to limit the transport of suspended sediment into watercourses.

  20. Simulation of Large Parallel Plasma Flows in the Tokamak SOL Driven by Cross-Field Transport Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A Y; Krasheninnikov, S I; LaBombard, B; Rognlien, T D

    2006-06-06

    Large-Mach-number parallel plasma flows in the single-null SOL of different tokamaks are simulated with multi-fluid transport code UEDGE. The key role of poloidal asymmetry of cross-field plasma transport as the driving mechanism for such flows is discussed. The impact of ballooning-like diffusive and convective transport and plasma flows on divertor detachment, material migration, impurity flows, and erosion/deposition profiles is studied. The results on well-balanced double null plasma modeling that are indicative of strong asymmetry of cross-field transport are presented.

  1. Ghost transmission: How large basis sets can make electron transport calculations worse

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Carmen; Solomon, Gemma C.; Subotnik, Joseph E.; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    The Landauer approach has proven to be an invaluable tool for calculating the electron transport properties of single molecules, especially when combined with a nonequilibrium Green’s function approach and Kohn–Sham density functional theory. However, when using large nonorthogonal atom-centered basis sets, such as those common in quantum chemistry, one can find erroneous results if the Landauer approach is applied blindly. In fact, basis sets of triple-zeta quality or higher sometimes result in an artificially high transmission and possibly even qualitatively wrong conclusions regarding chemical trends. In these cases, transport persists when molecular atoms are replaced by basis functions alone (“ghost atoms”). The occurrence of such ghost transmission is correlated with low-energy virtual molecular orbitals of the central subsystem and may be interpreted as a biased and thus inaccurate description of vacuum transmission. An approximate practical correction scheme is to calculate the ghost transmission and subtract it from the full transmission. As a further consequence of this study, it is recommended that sensitive molecules be used for parameter studies, in particular those whose transmission functions show antiresonance features such as benzene-based systems connected to the electrodes in meta positions and other low-conducting systems such as alkanes and silanes.

  2. Seasonal characteristics of the large-scale moisture flux transport over the Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athar, H.; Ammar, K.

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between the lower tropospheric (1000 to 850 hPa) large-scale moisture flux transport and the precipitation over the Arabian Peninsula (AP), on a seasonal basis, using the NCEP-NCAR gridded dataset for the 53-year period (1958-2010), is investigated. The lower tropospheric moisture flux divergence occurs due to the Hadley cell-based descending air over the AP, as well as due to the presence of Somali jet in dry season (June to September) for the southern (≤22° N) AP domain, leading to significantly reduced precipitation in the AP. The AP thus acts more as a net transporter of moisture flux from adjacent Sea areas to nearby regions. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the Artic Oscillation (AO) climatic indices are found to modulate significantly the net seasonal moisture flux into the AP region animating from the Mediterranean Sea, and the Arabian Sea, both for the northern (≥22° N) and southern AP domains.

  3. A COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF CHLORINE TRANSPORT AND FATE FOLLOWING A LARGE ENVIRONMENTAL RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R.; Hunter, C.; Werth, D.; Chen, K.; Whiteside, M.; Mazzola, C.

    2011-05-10

    A train derailment occurred in Graniteville, South Carolina during the early morning of January 6, 2005, and resulted in the release of a large amount of cryogenic pressurized liquid chlorine to the environment in a short time period. A comprehensive evaluation of the transport and fate of the released chlorine was performed, accounting for dilution, diffusion, transport and deposition into the local environment. This involved the characterization of a three-phased chlorine release, a detailed determination of local atmospheric mechanisms acting on the released chlorine, the establishment of atmospheric-hydrological physical exchange mechanisms, and aquatic dilution and mixing. This presentation will provide an overview of the models used in determining the total air-to-water mass transfer estimated to have occurred as a result of the roughly 60 tons of chlorine released into the atmosphere from the train derailment. The assumptions used in the modeling effort will be addressed, along with a comparison with available observational data to validate the model results. Overall, model-estimated chlorine concentrations in the airborne plume compare well with human and animal exposure data collected in the days after the derailment.

  4. Structure-based ligand discovery for the Large-neutral Amino Acid Transporter 1, LAT-1.

    PubMed

    Geier, Ethan G; Schlessinger, Avner; Fan, Hao; Gable, Jonathan E; Irwin, John J; Sali, Andrej; Giacomini, Kathleen M

    2013-04-01

    The Large-neutral Amino Acid Transporter 1 (LAT-1)--a sodium-independent exchanger of amino acids, thyroid hormones, and prescription drugs--is highly expressed in the blood-brain barrier and various types of cancer. LAT-1 plays an important role in cancer development as well as in mediating drug and nutrient delivery across the blood-brain barrier, making it a key drug target. Here, we identify four LAT-1 ligands, including one chemically novel substrate, by comparative modeling, virtual screening, and experimental validation. These results may rationalize the enhanced brain permeability of two drugs, including the anticancer agent acivicin. Finally, two of our hits inhibited proliferation of a cancer cell line by distinct mechanisms, providing useful chemical tools to characterize the role of LAT-1 in cancer metabolism. PMID:23509259

  5. Oil droplets transport due to irregular waves: Development of large-scale spreading coefficients.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C; Ozgokmen, Tamay; King, Thomas; Lee, Kenneth; Lu, Youyu; Zhao, Lin

    2016-03-15

    The movement of oil droplets due to waves and buoyancy was investigated by assuming an irregular sea state following a JONSWAP spectrum and four buoyancy values. A technique known as Wheeler stretching was used to model the movement of particles under the moving water surface. In each simulation, 500 particles were released and were tracked for a real time of 4.0 h. A Monte Carlo approach was used to obtain ensemble properties. It was found that small eddy diffusivities that decrease rapidly with depth generated the largest horizontal spreading of the plume. It was also found that large eddy diffusivities that decrease slowly with depth generated the smallest horizontal spreading coefficient of the plume. The increase in buoyancy resulted in a decrease in the horizontal spreading coefficient, which suggests that two-dimensional (horizontal) models that predict the transport of surface oil could be overestimating the spreading of oil. PMID:26795121

  6. Graphene oxide hole transport layers for large area, high efficiency organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Chris T. G.; Rhodes, Rhys W.; Beliatis, Michail J.; Imalka Jayawardena, K. D. G.; Rozanski, Lynn J.; Mills, Christopher A.; Silva, S. Ravi P.

    2014-08-18

    Graphene oxide (GO) is becoming increasingly popular for organic electronic applications. We present large active area (0.64 cm{sup 2}), solution processable, poly[[9-(1-octylnonyl)-9H-carbazole-2,7-diyl]-2,5-thiophenediyl-2,1, 3-benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyl-2,5-thiophenediyl]:[6,6]-Phenyl C{sub 71} butyric acid methyl ester (PCDTBT:PC{sub 70}BM) organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells, incorporating GO hole transport layers (HTL). The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of ∼5% is the highest reported for OPV using this architecture. A comparative study of solution-processable devices has been undertaken to benchmark GO OPV performance with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) HTL devices, confirming the viability of GO devices, with comparable PCEs, suitable as high chemical and thermal stability replacements for PEDOT:PSS in OPV.

  7. Electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulation of turbulent transport in high ion temperature discharge of Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Tomo-Hiko; Sugama, Hideo; Maeyama, Shinya; Nunami, Masanori; Nakajima, Noriyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Turbulent transport in a high ion temperature discharge of Large Helical Device (LHD) is investigated by means of electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations including kinetic electrons. A new electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulation code GKV+enables us to examine electron heat and particle fluxes as well as ion heat flux in finite beta heliotron/stellarator plasmas. This problem has not been previously explored because of numerical difficulties associated with complex three-dimensional magnetic structures as well as multiple spatio-temporal scales related to electromagnetic ion and electron dynamics. The turbulent fluxes, which are evaluated through a nonlinear simulation carried out in the K-super computer system, will be reported. This research uses computational resources of K at RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science through the HPCI System Research project (Project ID: hp140044).

  8. Structure-based ligand discovery for the Large-neutral Amino Acid Transporter 1, LAT-1

    PubMed Central

    Geier, Ethan G.; Schlessinger, Avner; Fan, Hao; Gable, Jonathan E.; Irwin, John J.; Sali, Andrej; Giacomini, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    The Large-neutral Amino Acid Transporter 1 (LAT-1)—a sodium-independent exchanger of amino acids, thyroid hormones, and prescription drugs—is highly expressed in the blood–brain barrier and various types of cancer. LAT-1 plays an important role in cancer development as well as in mediating drug and nutrient delivery across the blood–brain barrier, making it a key drug target. Here, we identify four LAT-1 ligands, including one chemically novel substrate, by comparative modeling, virtual screening, and experimental validation. These results may rationalize the enhanced brain permeability of two drugs, including the anticancer agent acivicin. Finally, two of our hits inhibited proliferation of a cancer cell line by distinct mechanisms, providing useful chemical tools to characterize the role of LAT-1 in cancer metabolism. PMID:23509259

  9. Electron transporting organic materials with an exceptional large scale homeotropic molecular orientation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huan; He, Zhiqun; Xu, Min; Liang, Chunjun; Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-03-28

    An electron transporting anthraquinone derivative demonstrated a stable large-scale homeotropic alignment on an open substrate surface, which substantially improved its charge carrier mobility. The electron mobility (μ(E)) increased by two orders of magnitude from 3.2 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for the film without alignment to 1.2 × 10(-2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for the homeotropically aligned film. A distinct enhancement in the UV absorption spectra of the films around the short wavelength range was observed to be associated with the molecular alignments. These alignments are less sensitive to the substrate under test. The anchoring force of the columnar stacks appears to be related to the nature of the material associated with the strong interaction between the molecules and substrate interface. PMID:26949167

  10. Dynamics Modeling and Simulation of Large Transport Airplanes in Upset Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John V.; Cunningham, Kevin; Fremaux, Charles M.; Shah, Gautam H.; Stewart, Eric C.; Rivers, Robert A.; Wilborn, James E.; Gato, William

    2005-01-01

    As part of NASA's Aviation Safety and Security Program, research has been in progress to develop aerodynamic modeling methods for simulations that accurately predict the flight dynamics characteristics of large transport airplanes in upset conditions. The motivation for this research stems from the recognition that simulation is a vital tool for addressing loss-of-control accidents, including applications to pilot training, accident reconstruction, and advanced control system analysis. The ultimate goal of this effort is to contribute to the reduction of the fatal accident rate due to loss-of-control. Research activities have involved accident analyses, wind tunnel testing, and piloted simulation. Results have shown that significant improvements in simulation fidelity for upset conditions, compared to current training simulations, can be achieved using state-of-the-art wind tunnel testing and aerodynamic modeling methods. This paper provides a summary of research completed to date and includes discussion on key technical results, lessons learned, and future research needs.

  11. Large-scale charge transport and collective streamer dynamics within a developing sprite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, A.; Ebert, U.; Gordillo-Vázquez, F.

    2013-12-01

    Sprite discharges, ocurring above active electrical thunderstorms, often appear as huge trees containing hundreds of propagating streamer filaments. Some features in these "carrot sprites", such as the reconnection of neighbouring streamers and the emergence of upward-propagating tendrils, reveal the complex collective dynamics of the propagating branches and the large-scale charge transport within the developing sprite. We here present a model of growing streamer trees that takes into account the finite channel conductivity and treats the electric field self-consistently [1]. Our simulations show the structure of an overall ``streamer of streamers'' that we name collective streamer front. We discuss the charge distribution inside the discharge tree, which provides a natural explanation for the observed reconnections of streamers in sprites and for the emergence from existing channels of upward-propagating, negative streamers. [1] arXiv:1307.2378 [physics.plasm-ph

  12. Electronic transport in large systems through a QUAMBO-NEGF approach: Application to atomic carbon chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X. W.; Zhang, G. P.; Yao, Y. X.; Wang, C. Z.; Ding, Z. J.; Ho, K. M.

    2011-10-01

    The conductance of single-atom carbon chain (SACC) between two zigzag graphene nanoribbons (GNR) is studied by an efficient scheme utilizing tight-binding (TB) parameters generated via quasi-atomic minimal basis set orbitals (QUAMBOs) and non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF). Large systems (SACC contains more than 50 atoms) are investigated and the electronic transport properties are found to correlate with SACC's parity. The SACCs provide a stable off or on state in broad energy region (0.1-1 eV) around Fermi energy. The off state is not sensitive to the length of SACC while the corresponding energy region decreases with the increase of the width of GNR.

  13. Quantifying jet transport properties via large p_T hadron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-Quan; Zhang, Hanzhong; Zhang, Ben-Wei; Wang, Enke

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear modification factor R_{AA} for large p_T single hadron is studied in a next-to-leading order perturbative QCD parton model with medium-modified fragmentation functions (mFFs) due to jet quenching in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The energy loss of the hard partons in the quark-gluon plasma is incorporated in the mFFs which utilize two most important parameters to characterize the transport properties of the hard parton jets: the jet transport parameter hat{q}0 and the mean free path λ 0, both at the initial time τ _0. A phenomenological study of the experimental data for R_{AA}(pT) is performed to constrain the two parameters with simultaneous χ ^2/d.o.f. fits to Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider as well as Large Hadron Collider data. We obtain for energetic quarks hat{q}0≈ 1.1 ± 0.2 GeV^2/fm and λ 0≈ 0.4 ± 0.03 fm in central Au+Au collisions at √{s_{NN}}=200 GeV, while hat{q}0≈ 1.7 ± 0.3 GeV^2/fm, and λ 0≈ 0.5 ± 0.05 fm in central Pb+Pb collisions at √{s_{NN}}=2.76 TeV. Numerical analysis shows that the best fit favors a multiple scattering picture for the energetic jets propagating through the bulk medium, with a moderate averaged number of gluon emissions. Based on the best constraints for λ 0 and τ _0, the estimated value for the mean-squared transverse momentum broadening is moderate which implies that the hard jets go through the medium with small reflection.

  14. Electron collection theory for a D-region subsonic blunt electrostatic probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wai-Kwong Lai, T.

    1974-01-01

    Blunt probe theory for subsonic flow in a weakly ionized and collisional gas is reviewed, and an electron collection theory for the relatively unexplored case, Deybye length approximately 1, which occurs in the lower ionosphere (D-region), is developed. It is found that the dimensionless Debye length is no longer an electric field screening parameter, and the space charge field effect can be negelected. For ion collection, Hoult-Sonin theory is recognized as a correct description of the thin, ion density-perturbed layer adjacent the blunt probe surface. The large volume with electron density perturbed by a positively biased probe renders the usual thin boundary layer analysis inapplicable. Theories relating free stream conditions to the electron collection rate for both stationary and moving blunt probes are obtained. A model based on experimental nonlinear electron drift velocity data is proposed. For a subsonically moving probe, it is found that the perturbed region can be divided into four regions with distinct collection mechanisms.

  15. Aeroacoustic Data for a High Reynolds Number Axisymmetric Subsonic Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Ukeiley, Lawrence S.; Lee, Sang W.

    1999-01-01

    The near field fluctuating pressure and aerodynamic mean flow characteristics of a cold subsonic jet issuing from a contoured convergent nozzle are presented. The data are presented for nozzle exit Mach numbers of 0.30, 0.60, and 0.85 at a constant jet stagnation temperature of 104 F. The fluctuating pressure measurements were acquired via linear and semi-circular microphone arrays and the presented results include plots of narrowband spectra, contour maps, streamwise/azimuthal spatial correlations for zero time delay, and cross-spectra of the azimuthal correlations. A pitot probe was used to characterize the mean flow velocity by assuming the subsonic flow to be pressure-balanced with the ambient field into which it exhausts. Presented are mean flow profiles and the momentum thickness of the free shear layer as a function of streamwise position.

  16. A study of sound generation in subsonic rotors, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalupnik, J. D.; Clark, L. T.

    1975-01-01

    Computer programs were developed for use in the analysis of sound generation by subsonic rotors. Program AIRFOIL computes the spectrum of radiated sound from a single airfoil immersed in a laminar flow field. Program ROTOR extends this to a rotating frame, and provides a model for sound generation in subsonic rotors. The program also computes tone sound generation due to steady state forces on the blades. Program TONE uses a moving source analysis to generate a time series for an array of forces moving in a circular path. The resultant time series are than Fourier transformed to render the results in spectral form. Program SDATA is a standard time series analysis package. It reads in two discrete time series and forms auto and cross covariances and normalizes these to form correlations. The program then transforms the covariances to yield auto and cross power spectra by means of a Fourier transformation.

  17. User's manual: Subsonic/supersonic advanced panel pilot code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, J.; Tinoco, E. N.; Johnson, F. T.

    1978-01-01

    Sufficient instructions for running the subsonic/supersonic advanced panel pilot code were developed. This software was developed as a vehicle for numerical experimentation and it should not be construed to represent a finished production program. The pilot code is based on a higher order panel method using linearly varying source and quadratically varying doublet distributions for computing both linearized supersonic and subsonic flow over arbitrary wings and bodies. This user's manual contains complete input and output descriptions. A brief description of the method is given as well as practical instructions for proper configurations modeling. Computed results are also included to demonstrate some of the capabilities of the pilot code. The computer program is written in FORTRAN IV for the SCOPE 3.4.4 operations system of the Ames CDC 7600 computer. The program uses overlay structure and thirteen disk files, and it requires approximately 132000 (Octal) central memory words.

  18. 78 FR 48540 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Requests for Comments; Clearance of Renewed Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Airplanes and Subsonic Transport Category Large Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... Certification Standards for Subsonic Jet Airplanes and Subsonic Transport Category Large Airplanes. Form Numbers... in making a finding that the airplane is in compliance with regulations. Respondents:...

  19. Water and sediment transport modeling of a large temporary river basin in Greece.

    PubMed

    Gamvroudis, C; Nikolaidis, N P; Tzoraki, O; Papadoulakis, V; Karalemas, N

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this research was to study the spatial distribution of runoff and sediment transport in a large Mediterranean watershed (Evrotas River Basin) consisting of temporary flow tributaries and high mountain areas and springs by focusing on the collection and use of a variety of data to constrain the model parameters and characterize hydrologic and geophysical processes at various scales. Both monthly and daily discharge data (2004-2011) and monthly sediment concentration data (2010-2011) from an extended monitoring network of 8 sites were used to calibrate and validate the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. In addition flow desiccation maps showing wet and dry aquatic states obtained during a dry year were used to calibrate the simulation of low flows. Annual measurements of sediment accumulation in two reaches were used to further calibrate the sediment simulation. Model simulation of hydrology and sediment transport was in good agreement with field observations as indicated by a variety of statistical measures used to evaluate the goodness of fit. A water balance was constructed using a 12 year long (2000-2011) simulation. The average precipitation of the basin for this period was estimated to be 903 mm yr(-1). The actual evapotranspiration was 46.9% (424 mm yr(-1)), and the total water yield was 13.4% (121 mm yr(-1)). The remaining 33.4% (302 mm yr(-1)) was the amount of water that was lost through the deep groundwater of Taygetos and Parnonas Mountains to areas outside the watershed and for drinking water demands (6.3%). The results suggest that the catchment has on average significant water surplus to cover drinking water and irrigation demands. However, the situation is different during the dry years, where the majority of the reaches (85% of the river network are perennial and temporary) completely dry up as a result of the limited rainfall and the substantial water abstraction for irrigation purposes. There is a large variability in the

  20. Transport of creosote compounds in a large, intact, macroporous clayey till column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broholm, Kim; Jørgensen, Peter R.; Hansen, Asger B.; Arvin, Erik; Hansen, Martin

    1999-10-01

    The transport in macroporous clayey till of bromide and 25 organic compounds typical of creosote was studied using a large intact soil column. The organic compounds represented the following groups: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phenolic compounds, monoaromatic hydrocarbons (BTEXs), and heterocyclic compounds containing oxygen, nitrogen or sulphur in the aromatic ring structure (NSO-compounds). The clayey till column (0.5 m in height and 0.5 m in diameter) was obtained from a depth of 1-1.5 m at an experimental site located on the island of Funen, Denmark. Sodium azide was added to the influent water of the column to prevent biodegradation of the studied organic compounds. For the first 24 days of the experiment, the flow rate was 219 ml day -1 corresponding to an infiltration rate of 0.0011 m day -1. At this flow rate, the effluent concentrations of bromide and the organic compounds increased very slowly. The transport of bromide and the organic compounds were successfully increased by increasing the flow rate to 1353 ml day -1 corresponding to 0.0069 m day -1. The experiment showed that the transport of low-molecular-weight organic compounds was not retarded relative to bromide. The high-molecular-weight organic compounds were retarded significantly. The influence of sorption on the transport of the organic compounds through the column was evaluated based on the observed breakthrough curves. The observed order in the column experiment was, with increasing retardation, the following: benzene=pyrrole=toluene= o-xylene= p-xylene=ethylbenzene=phenol=benzothiophene=benzofuran

  1. Transport and biodegradation of creosote compounds in a large, intact, fractured clayey till column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broholm, Kim; Hansen, Asger B.; Jørgensen, Peter R.; Arvin, Erik; Hansen, Martin

    1999-10-01

    An experiment was conducted using a large, intact column of fractured clayey till to study the transport and biodegradation of 25 organic compounds typical of creosote. The column (0.5 m in height and 0.5 m in diameter) was collected from a depth of 2.5-3 m at an experimental site on the island of Funen, Denmark. For the first 82 days of the experiment, the column was infiltrated with water containing nitrate, but no organic compounds. During this period, significant nitrate removal and nitrite production were observed indicating that denitrification occurred in the clayey till. After 82 days, a mixture of 25 organic compounds with a total concentration of approximately 70 mg l -1 was added to the influent water together with a conservative tracer (92 mg bromide l -1). Most of the organic compounds were transported as rapidly as bromide, and only carbazole, dibenzofuran, fluorene, dibenzothiophene, and phenanthrene were significantly retarded. No extensive loss of organic compounds was observed during this period, which was attributed to the high concentration of applicated organic compounds. After 40 days, the influent concentration of organic compounds was lowered by a factor of 5; subsequently, significant biodegradation of phenol, ethylbenzene, toluene, quinoline, indole, p-xylene, and o-cresol was observed. Additionally, o-xylene, naphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene, phenanthrene, fluorene, 2-methylquinoline, carbazole, acridine, benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, benzofuran, dibenzofuran, pyrrole, 1-methylpyrrole, and benzene were biodegraded to some degree when oxygen was added concomitantly with nitrate (92 days after the addition of organic compounds). Pyrrole, 1-methylpyrrole, and benzene were only slightly biodegraded. The biodegradation of benzene was likely inhibited by the presence of pyrrole and/or 1-methylpyrrole. The study has shown that the transport of low-molecular-weight organic compounds through fractured clayey till may occur as rapid as the

  2. Design of a subsonic airfoil with upstream blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'Inskii, N. B.; Mardanov, R. F.

    2007-10-01

    The problem is solved of designing a symmetric airfoil with upstream blowing opposite to subsonic irrotational steady flow of an inviscid incompressible fluid. The solution relies on Sedov’s idea of a stagnation region developing in the neighborhood of the stagnation point. An iterative solution process is developed, and examples of airfoils are constructed. The numerical results are analyzed, and conclusions are drawn about the effect of blowing parameters on the airfoil geometry and the resultant force acting on the airfoil.

  3. Advanced surface paneling method for subsonic and supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, L. L.; Johnson, F. T.; Ehlers, F. E.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical results illustrating the capabilities of an advanced aerodynamic surface paneling method are presented. The method is applicable to both subsonic and supersonic flow, as represented by linearized potential flow theory. The method is based on linearly varying sources and quadratically varying doublets which are distributed over flat or curved panels. These panels are applied to the true surface geometry of arbitrarily shaped three dimensional aerodynamic configurations.

  4. Development of panel methods for subsonic analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Two computer programs, developed for subsonic inviscid analysis and design are described. The first solves arbitrary mixed analysis design problems for multielement airfoils in two dimensional flow. The second calculates the pressure distribution for arbitrary lifting or nonlifting three dimensional configurations. In each program, inviscid flow is modelled by using distributed source doublet singularities on configuration surface panels. Numerical formulations and representative solutions are presented for the programs.

  5. Three dimensional supersonic flows with subsonic axial Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marconi, F.; Moretti, G.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical approach is presented for the computation of flows in which the component of velocity in the selected marching direction is subsonic although the total velocity is supersonic. A local coordinate rotation procedure is employed together with an implicit differencing scheme. Complex coordinate transformations and time-consuming iterations are avoided. The implementation of the described approach is illustrated with the aid of a two-dimensional problem. An application in the case of three-dimensional flows is also discussed.

  6. Sediment transport dynamics in response to large-scale human intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eelkema, Menno; Wang, Zheng Bing

    2010-05-01

    SEDIMENT TRANSPORT DYNAMICS IN RESPONSE TO LARGE-SCALE HUMAN INTERVENTION M. Eelkema and Z.B. Wang The Eastern Scheldt basin in the southwestern part of the Netherlands is an elongated tidal basin of approximately 50 km in length with an average tidal range of roughly 3 meters at the inlet. Before 1969 A.D., this basin was also connected to two more tidal basins to the north through several narrow, yet deep channels. These connections were closed off with dams in the nineteen sixties in response to the catastrophic flooding in 1953. In the inlet of the Eastern Scheldt a storm-surge barrier was built in order to safeguard against flooding during storms while retaining a part of the tidal influence inside the basin during normal conditions. This barrier was finalized in 1986. The construction of the back-barrier dams in 1965 and 1969 had a significant impact on the tidal hydrodynamics and sediment transport (Van den Berg, 1986). The effects of these interventions were still ongoing when the hydrodynamic regime was altered again by the construction of the storm-surge barrier between 1983 and 1986. This research aims to describe the hydrodynamic and morphodynamic evolution of the Eastern Scheldt between 1953 and 1983, before construction of the storm-surge barrier had started. An analysis is made of the manner in which the back-barrier dams changed the tidal flow through the basin, and how these altered hydrodynamics influenced the sediment transport and morphology. This analysis consists first of all of a description of the observed hydrodynamical and bathymetrical changes. Second, these observations are used as input for a process-based hydrodynamic model (Delft3D), which is applied in order to gain more insight into the changes in sediment transport patterns. The model is used to simulate the situations before and after the closures of the connections between the Eastern Scheldt and the basins north of it In the decades before 1965, the Eastern Scheldt exported

  7. Subsonic Flow for the Multidimensional Euler-Poisson System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Myoungjean; Duan, Ben; Xie, Chunjing

    2016-04-01

    We establish the existence and stability of subsonic potential flow for the steady Euler-Poisson system in a multidimensional nozzle of a finite length when prescribing the electric potential difference on a non-insulated boundary from a fixed point at the exit, and prescribing the pressure at the exit of the nozzle. The Euler-Poisson system for subsonic potential flow can be reduced to a nonlinear elliptic system of second order. In this paper, we develop a technique to achieve a priori {C^{1,α}} estimates of solutions to a quasi-linear second order elliptic system with mixed boundary conditions in a multidimensional domain enclosed by a Lipschitz continuous boundary. In particular, we discovered a special structure of the Euler-Poisson system which enables us to obtain {C^{1,α}} estimates of the velocity potential and the electric potential functions, and this leads us to establish structural stability of subsonic flows for the Euler-Poisson system under perturbations of various data.

  8. Demonstration of a Probabilistic Technique for the Determination of Economic Viability of Very Large Transport Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavris, Dimitri N.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, modem aircraft design has experienced a paradigm shift from designing for performance to designing for affordability. This report contains a probabilistic approach that will allow traditional deterministic design methods to be extended to account for disciplinary, economic, and technological uncertainty. The probabilistic approach was facilitated by the Fast Probability Integration (FPI) technique; a technique which allows the designer to gather valuable information about the vehicle's behavior in the design space. This technique is efficient for assessing multi-attribute, multi-constraint problems in a more realistic fashion. For implementation purposes, this technique is applied to illustrate how both economic and technological uncertainty associated with a Very Large Transport aircraft concept may be assessed. The assessment is evaluated with the FPI technique to determine the cumulative probability distributions of the design space, as bound by economic objectives and performance constraints. These distributions were compared to established targets for a comparable large capacity aircraft, similar in size to the Boeing 747-400. The conventional baseline configuration design space was determined to be unfeasible and marginally viable, motivating the infusion of advanced technologies, including reductions in drag, specific fuel consumption, wing weight, and Research, Development, Testing, and Evaluation costs. The resulting system design space was qualitatively assessed with technology metric "k" factors. The infusion of technologies shifted the VLT design into regions of feasibility and greater viability. The study also demonstrated a method and relationship by which the impact of new technologies may be assessed in a more system focused approach.

  9. Space transportation alternatives for large space programs - The International Space University summer session - 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    1993-01-01

    The issues discussed in this paper are the result of a 10-week study by the Space Solar Power Program design project members and the Space Transportation Group at the International Space University (ISU) summer session of 1992 to investigate new paradigms in space propulsion and how those paradigms might reduce the costs for large space programs. The program plan was to place a series of power satellites in Earth orbit. Several designs were studied where many kW, MW or GW of power would be transmitted to Earth or to other spacecraft in orbit. During the summer session, a space solar power system was also detailed and analyzed. At ISU, the focus of the study was to foster and develop some of the new paradigms that may eliminate the barriers to low cost for space exploration and exploitation. Many international and technical aspects of a large multinational program were studied. Environmental safety, space construction and maintenance, legal and policy issues of frequency allocation, technology transfer and control and many other areas were addressed.

  10. Tests and analyses applicable to passenger ride quality of large transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, R. B.; Brumaghin, S. H.

    1972-01-01

    A test program was undertaken to determine airline passenger reaction to vibration environments that might be encountered in a supersonic transport or other large commercial jet aircraft. The principal problem addressed was to determine accelerations of vertical and lateral vibration that people find objectionable. Further questions experimentally posed were: (1) what is the relationship between human reactions to vertical and lateral vibration, (2) to single- and combined-frequency vibration, and (3) to single- and combined-axis vibration? Interest was confined to reactions to vibration in the frequency range of 0.20 to 7.0 Hz, a range typical of the vibration environment of a large airplane. Results indicated an increasing sensitivity to vertical vibration as frequency was increased from 1.0 to 7.0 Hz. Subjects were found most sensitive to lateral vibration in the 1.0 to 3.0 Hz range. There was a nearly linear decrease in sensitivity as frequency of lateral vibration was increased from 3.0 to 7.0 Hz.

  11. Plasma transport at the dayside magnetopause: observations and large-scale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berchem, Jean; Richard, Robert; Escoubet, C. Philippe; Pitout, Frederic; Taylor, Matthew G.; Laasko, Harri; Masson, Arnaud; Dandouras, Iannis; Reme, Henri

    2013-04-01

    Multipoint observations made by the Cluster spacecraft as they cross the polar cusps can provide significant insight into the plasma transport that occurs at the magnetospheric boundary. In particular, the formation of discrete structures in the energy-latitude dispersion of ions observed in the cusp reflects fundamental properties of the entry and acceleration of solar wind ions at the dayside magnetopause. We present the results of a study that uses large-scale numerical simulations to determine the relationship between the structures observed in ion dispersions in the cusp and the injection process at the magnetopause. This study uses the time-dependent electric and magnetic fields predicted by three-dimensional global MHD simulations to compute the trajectories of large samples of ions launched upstream of the bow shock for different solar wind conditions. Particle information collected in the simulations is then used to reconstruct ion dispersions that are compared with Cluster observations in the cusp. Individual particle trajectories are subsequently analyzed to determine the relationship between the structures observed in the cusp and the entry and acceleration process at the dayside magnetopause.

  12. Test-to-Test Repeatability of Results From a Subsonic Wing-Body Configuration in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Results from three wind tunnel tests in the National Transonic Facility of a model of an advanced-technology, subsonic-transport wing-body configuration have been analyzed to assess the test-to-test repeatability of several aerodynamic parameters. The scatter, as measured by the prediction interval, in the longitudinal force and moment coefficients increases as the Mach number increases. Residual errors with and without the ESP tubes installed suggest a bias leading to lower drag with the tubes installed. Residual errors as well as average values of the longitudinal force and moment coefficients show that there are small bias errors between the different tests.

  13. Treatment of large bone defects with a novel biological transport disc in non-vascular transport distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, J J; Guo, P; Zhou, N; Xie, Q T; Liao, F C

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a potential novel biological transport disc that avoids secondary injury to the body and facilitates bone healing. Twenty-seven dogs were divided randomly into three groups: group A were treated with human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) modified bone mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) sheets combined with freeze-dried bone allograft as biological transport disc; group B were treated with BMSC sheets combined with freeze-dried bone allograft as transport disc (control); and group C were treated with direct extension only (blank). There were nine dogs in each group. Non-vascular transport distraction osteogenesis was performed in groups A and B to repair the mandibular bone defects, and in group C only mandibular truncation surgery was performed. The regeneration of bone was evaluated through X-ray, haematoxylin and eosin assay, and immunohistochemistry. After 2, 4, and 8 weeks of distraction, new bone density values in group A were 49.00±1.16, 66.63±2.62, and 72.78±2.67, respectively, and these were significantly different to values in groups B (P=0.0005, P=0.0004, P=0.0012) and C (P<0.0005, P=0.0001, P=0.0003). The average grey value for BMP-2 expression in group A after 4 weeks of distraction was 195.63±4.45, which was significantly different when compared to groups B (P=0.0022) and C (P=0.0006). This novel biological transport disc represents an effective non-secondary injury method to enhance new bone formation in non-vascular transport distraction osteogenesis. PMID:26792145

  14. A large-scale methane model by incorporating the surface water transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaoliang; Zhuang, Qianlai; Liu, Yaling; Zhou, Yuyu; Aghakouchak, Amir

    2016-06-01

    The effect of surface water movement on methane emissions is not explicitly considered in most of the current methane models. In this study, a surface water routing was coupled into our previously developed large-scale methane model. The revised methane model was then used to simulate global methane emissions during 2006-2010. From our simulations, the global mean annual maximum inundation extent is 10.6 ± 1.9 km2 and the methane emission is 297 ± 11 Tg C/yr in the study period. In comparison to the currently used TOPMODEL-based approach, we found that the incorporation of surface water routing leads to 24.7% increase in the annual maximum inundation extent and 30.8% increase in the methane emissions at the global scale for the study period, respectively. The effect of surface water transport on methane emissions varies in different regions: (1) the largest difference occurs in flat and moist regions, such as Eastern China; (2) high-latitude regions, hot spots in methane emissions, show a small increase in both inundation extent and methane emissions with the consideration of surface water movement; and (3) in arid regions, the new model yields significantly larger maximum flooded areas and a relatively small increase in the methane emissions. Although surface water is a small component in the terrestrial water balance, it plays an important role in determining inundation extent and methane emissions, especially in flat regions. This study indicates that future quantification of methane emissions shall consider the effects of surface water transport.

  15. Porous medium convection at large Rayleigh number: Studies of coherent structure, transport, and reduced dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Baole

    Buoyancy-driven convection in fluid-saturated porous media is a key environmental and technological process, with applications ranging from carbon dioxide storage in terrestrial aquifers to the design of compact heat exchangers. Porous medium convection is also a paradigm for forced-dissipative infinite-dimensional dynamical systems, exhibiting spatiotemporally chaotic dynamics if not "true" turbulence. The objective of this dissertation research is to quantitatively characterize the dynamics and heat transport in two-dimensional horizontal and inclined porous medium convection between isothermal plane parallel boundaries at asymptotically large values of the Rayleigh number Ra by investigating the emergent, quasi-coherent flow. This investigation employs a complement of direct numerical simulations (DNS), secondary stability and dynamical systems theory, and variational analysis. The DNS confirm the remarkable tendency for the interior flow to self-organize into closely-spaced columnar plumes at sufficiently large Ra (up to Ra ≃ 105), with more complex spatiotemporal features being confined to boundary layers near the heated and cooled walls. The relatively simple form of the interior flow motivates investigation of unstable steady and time-periodic convective states at large Ra as a function of the domain aspect ratio L. To gain insight into the development of spatiotemporally chaotic convection, the (secondary) stability of these fully nonlinear states to small-amplitude disturbances is investigated using a spatial Floquet analysis. The results indicate that there exist two distinct modes of instability at large Ra: a bulk instability mode and a wall instability mode. The former usually is excited by long-wavelength disturbances and is generally much weaker than the latter. DNS, strategically initialized to investigate the fully nonlinear evolution of the most dangerous secondary instability modes, suggest that the (long time) mean inter-plume spacing in

  16. Large-Scale Transport Model Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis: Distributed Sources in Complex, Hydrogeologic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfsberg, A.; Kang, Q.; Li, C.; Ruskauff, G.; Bhark, E.; Freeman, E.; Prothro, L.; Drellack, S.

    2007-12-01

    The Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is in the process of assessing and developing regulatory decision options based on modeling predictions of contaminant transport from underground testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The UGTA Project is attempting to develop an effective modeling strategy that addresses and quantifies multiple components of uncertainty including natural variability, parameter uncertainty, conceptual/model uncertainty, and decision uncertainty in translating model results into regulatory requirements. The modeling task presents multiple unique challenges to the hydrological sciences as a result of the complex fractured and faulted hydrostratigraphy, the distributed locations of sources, the suite of reactive and non-reactive radionuclides, and uncertainty in conceptual models. Characterization of the hydrogeologic system is difficult and expensive because of deep groundwater in the arid desert setting and the large spatial setting of the NTS. Therefore, conceptual model uncertainty is partially addressed through the development of multiple alternative conceptual models of the hydrostratigraphic framework and multiple alternative models of recharge and discharge. Uncertainty in boundary conditions is assessed through development of alternative groundwater fluxes through multiple simulations using the regional groundwater flow model. Calibration of alternative models to heads and measured or inferred fluxes has not proven to provide clear measures of model quality. Therefore, model screening by comparison to independently-derived natural geochemical mixing targets through cluster analysis has also been invoked to evaluate differences between alternative conceptual models. Advancing multiple alternative flow models, sensitivity of transport predictions to parameter uncertainty is assessed through Monte Carlo simulations. The

  17. Large-Scale Transport Model Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis: Distributed Sources in Complex Hydrogeologic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sig Drellack, Lance Prothro

    2007-12-01

    The Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is in the process of assessing and developing regulatory decision options based on modeling predictions of contaminant transport from underground testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The UGTA Project is attempting to develop an effective modeling strategy that addresses and quantifies multiple components of uncertainty including natural variability, parameter uncertainty, conceptual/model uncertainty, and decision uncertainty in translating model results into regulatory requirements. The modeling task presents multiple unique challenges to the hydrological sciences as a result of the complex fractured and faulted hydrostratigraphy, the distributed locations of sources, the suite of reactive and non-reactive radionuclides, and uncertainty in conceptual models. Characterization of the hydrogeologic system is difficult and expensive because of deep groundwater in the arid desert setting and the large spatial setting of the NTS. Therefore, conceptual model uncertainty is partially addressed through the development of multiple alternative conceptual models of the hydrostratigraphic framework and multiple alternative models of recharge and discharge. Uncertainty in boundary conditions is assessed through development of alternative groundwater fluxes through multiple simulations using the regional groundwater flow model. Calibration of alternative models to heads and measured or inferred fluxes has not proven to provide clear measures of model quality. Therefore, model screening by comparison to independently-derived natural geochemical mixing targets through cluster analysis has also been invoked to evaluate differences between alternative conceptual models. Advancing multiple alternative flow models, sensitivity of transport predictions to parameter uncertainty is assessed through Monte Carlo simulations. The

  18. Investigating convective transport processes and large scale stratospheric dynamics with ICON-ART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassen, Christian; Ruhnke, Roland; Schröter, Jennifer; Daniel, Rieger; Bischoff-Gauss, Ingeborg; Vogel, Heike; Vogel, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    We have extended the global ICON (ICOsahedral Nonhydrostatic) modelling framework. ICON is a joint development by the German Weather Service (DWD) and the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M). We added modules for gas-phase chemistry and aerosol dynamics (ART, Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases) [1]. ICON allows a regional grid refinement with two-way interactions between the different horizontal grids. It is used by DWD for numerical weather predictions and will be used by MPI-M for climate projections [2]. The extended modelling framework ICON-ART is developed in an analogous way to its predecessors COSMO-ART [3], so that aerosol and chemical composition feedbacks can be considered in a comprehensive way. Up to now, ICON-ART accounts for volcanic ash tracers, radioactive tracers, sea salt and mineral dust aerosols. Additionally, several gaseous tracers have been introduced. For the dynamics (transport and diffusion) of aerosol and gaseous tracers, the original ICON tracer framework is used. For the model physics, numerical time integration follows a process splitting approach separating physical processes. Each process is called independently via an interface module. Currently, the processes of emission, dry and wet deposition, sedimentation, and first order chemical reactions are included. We will present a simulation of the transport of ozone depleting short-lived trace gases from the surface into the stratosphere as well as of long-lived tracers. The simulated tracer distributions are used to investigate the ability of ICON-ART to simulate convective vertical transport in the troposphere as well as of large-scale stratospheric dynamics. [1] Rieger, D., et al. (2014), ICON-ART - A new online-coupled model system from the global to regional scale, submitted to Geosci. Model Dev. [2] Zängl, G., et al. (2014), The ICON (ICOsahedral Non-hydrostatic) modelling framework of DWD MPI-M: Description of the non-hydrostatic dynamical core. Q.J.R. Meteorol. Soc

  19. Transport, retention, and ecological significance of woody debris within a large ephemeral river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, P.J.; Jacobson, K.M.; Angermeier, P.L.; Cherry, D.S.

    1999-01-01

    The spatiotemporal patterns and ecological significance of the retention of coarse particulate organic matter and large woody debris have been intensively studied in perennial rivers and streams but are virtually unknown in ephemeral systems. We examined the influence of 2 features characteristic of ephemeral systems, downstream hydrologic decay and in-channel tree growth, on the distribution, transport, and retention of woody debris following a flood having a ~2.6-y recurrence interval in the ephemeral Kuiseb River in southwestern Africa. A total of 2105 pieces of wood were painted at 8 sites along the river channel to measure retention patterns. The flood had a peak discharge of 159 m3/s at the upper end of the study area, decaying to <1 m3/s by 200 km downstream. Downstream export of wood from marking sites totaled 59.5% (n = 1253). Transport distances ranged from 1 to 124 km, and 34.8% (n = 436) of the exported wood was recovered. Marked wood retained within marking sites was significantly longer than exported wood (p < 0.001, t-test). Once in transport, there was little correlation between wood length and distance traveled (r = 0.11, correlation analysis, n = 369). Length influenced the site of retention; material retained on debris piles was significantly longer than that stranded on channel sediments (p < 0.001, t-test). In-channel growth of Faidherbia trees significantly influenced wood retention; 83.7% of marked wood not moved by the flood was associated with debris piles on Faidherbia trees. Similarly, 65% of the exported wood retained within downstream debris piles was associated with Faidherbia trees. In contrast to many perennial systems, we observed a general increase in wood retention downstream, peaking in the river's lower reaches in response to hydrologic decay. Debris piles induced sediment deposition and the formation of in-channel islands. Following flood recession, debris piles and their associated sediments provided moist, organic

  20. Variability of effective discharge for suspended sediment transport in a large semi-arid river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuanxu; Huang, He Qing; Xu, Jiongxin; Brierley, Gary J.; Yao, Zhijun

    2010-07-01

    SummaryThe variability of effective discharge is analysed for three geomorphological zones (gullied hilly loess, valley-hill loess and eolian sand) in the Wuding River basin, China, based on mean daily flow discharge and mean daily suspended sediment discharge from 1959 to 1969, a period when human disturbance in this catchment was less intensive. A modified approach to the determination of discharge class intervals is developed, framed in terms of equal arithmetic intervals of the standard deviation S for all the discharges, such as S, 0.75 S, 0.5 S, and 0.25 S. The average flow duration of effective discharge in the river basin ranges primarily from 0.026% to 3.16% in the two loess regions (corresponding to large flood events), and from 18.75% to 91.51% in the eolian sand region (corresponding to low or moderate flows). The average flow duration of effective discharge is significantly influenced by the size of class intervals and by characteristics of the flow and sediment regime. Using the most appropriate class interval of 0.25 S, the average flow duration of effective discharge is about 0.026% in the two loess regions (other than 0.104% at Hengshan), but in the eolian sand region it reaches 24.50% at Yulin and 52.66% at Hanjiamao, respectively. Histograms of suspended sediment transport indicate that there is a bimodal dominant discharge for suspended sediment transport, with one peak in the range of low flows and the other in the range of large floods. Drainage density and specific sediment yields are lower in the eolian sand region, where effective discharge events occur more frequently and suspended sediment concentration is much lower than that carried by events of the same discharge in the loess region. In contrast, drainage density is higher in the two loess regions, where infrequent hyperconcentrated flows generate high specific sediment yields. Effective discharge differs significantly from bankfull discharge across the whole Wuding River basin.

  1. Large Eddy Simulation and Field Experiments of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamecki, M.; Meneveau, C.; Parlange, M. B.; van Hout, R.

    2006-12-01

    Dispersion of airborne pollen by the wind has been a subject of interest for botanists and allergists for a long time. More recently, the development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and subsequent contamination of natural plant populations has brought even more interest to this field. A critical question is how far from the source field pollen grains will be advected. Clearly the answer depends on the aerodynamic properties of the pollen, geometrical properties of the field, topography, local vegetation, wind conditions, atmospheric stability, etc. As a consequence, field experiments are well suited to provide some information on pollen transport mechanisms but are limited to specific field and weather conditions. Numerical simulations do not have this drawback and can be a useful tool to study pollen dispersal in a variety of configurations. It is well known that the dispersion of particles in turbulent fields is strongly affected by the large scale coherent structures. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is a technique that allows us to study the typical distances reached by pollen grains and, at the same time, resolve the larger coherent structures present in the atmospheric boundary layer. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using LES. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of extreme importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. In both cases we make use of the theoretical profile for suspended particles derived by Kind (1992). Field experiments were performed to study the applicability of the theoretical profile to pollen grains and the results are encouraging. Airborne concentrations as well as ground deposition from the simulations are compared to experimental data to validate the

  2. Technology for future air transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klineberg, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The requirements and opportunities for technological development in transport aircraft of the next generation are reviewed, focusing primarily on conventional, subsonic aircraft. Advances in computational aerodynamics and computer-aided design and manufacturing (in numerically controlled processes) are noted as well as improved wind tunnel testing and drag reduction techniques. Advances in aeroelasticity prediction have made it possible to use flexible, high-aspect-ratio wings without large weight penalties. Weight reduction may be achieved by the use of composite aircraft structures and superplastic forming combined with diffusion bonding, however composites require improvement in manufacturing techniques and mechanical properties in order to gain general acceptance. Propulsion systems can be improved in engine fuel efficiency, control, durability, environmental compatibility (exhaust and noise emissions), and fuel specifications. In avionics, due to the growth of low-cost, miniaturized packages, opportunities exist in the fields of digital controls, navigation, guidance and communication. Applications of new technologies to various aspects of flight safety are also outlined.

  3. Study of Flow, Turbulence and Transport on the Large Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffner, David Andrew

    The relationships amongst azimuthal flow, radial particle transport and turbulence on the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) are explored through the use of biasable limiters which continuously modify the rotation of the plasma column. Four quarter annulus plates serve as an iris-like boundary between the cathode source and the main plasma chamber. Application of a voltage to the plates using a capacitor bank drives cross-field current which rotates the plasma azimuthally in the electron diamagnetic direction (EDD). With the limiters inserted, a spontaneous rotation in the ion diamagnetic direction is observed; thus, increasing biasing tends to first slow rotation, null it out, then reverse it. This experiment builds on previous LAPD biasing experiments which used the chamber wall as the biasing electrode rather than inserted limiter plates. The use of inserted limiter biasing rather than chamber wall biasing allows for better cross-field current penetration between the plasma source and the electrodes which in turn allow for a finer variation of applied torque on the plasma. The modification of plasma parameter profiles, turbulent characteristics, and radial transport are tracked through these varying flow states. Azimuthal flow radial profiles are peaked at the limiter edge. Consequently, the variation in flow states also results in variation of sheared flow. Improved radial particle confinement is observed in states with sheared flow regardless of the direction of rotation. This improvement is indicated by both steepened density profiles and decreased radial particle flux. Conversely, a confinement degradation is seen in the minimum sheared flow state. Comparison of density fluctuation power and crossphase between density and radial velocity fluctuations show that both quantities are suppressed by sheared flow, but that the density fluctuation suppression is dominant and contributes most to the decrease in radial particle flux. Also, some observed changes to density and

  4. A case study of chlorine transport and fate following a large accidental release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Robert L.; Hunter, Charles H.; Werth, David W.; Whiteside, Morgana T.; Chen, Kuo-Fu; Mazzola, Carl A.

    2012-12-01

    A train derailment that occurred in Graniteville, South Carolina during the early morning hours of 06 January, 2005 resulted in the prompt release of approximately 60 tons of chlorine to the environment. Comprehensive modeling of the transport and fate of this release was performed including the characterization of the initial three-phased chlorine release, a detailed determination of the local atmospheric conditions acting to generate, disperse, and deplete the chlorine vapor cloud, the establishment of physical exchange mechanisms between the airborne vapor and local surface waters, and local aquatic dilution and mixing.Previous studies of large chlorine releases have concluded that depletion of the resulting vapor cloud through physical and chemical reactions with sunlight, atmospheric constituents, and local surfaces can significantly reduce the areal extent over which the vapor poses a toxicological hazard. For Graniteville, modeling results were the most consistent with available data on human health effects, animal and fish mortality, and vegetation damage when an effective deposition velocity in the lower end of a range of values commonly cited in other studies (1 cm s-1) was applied. This relatively small deposition is attributed to a lack of sunlight, a limited uptake in vegetation due to rapid stomatal damage, and the limited presence of nearby man-made structures. Explicit simulations of chlorine deposition into adjacent surface waters were based on a modified Henry's Law approach and resulted in the transfer of an estimated 21 kg of chlorine into these waters.

  5. Turbulence and transport suppression scaling with flow shear on the Large Plasma Device

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffner, D. A.; Carter, T. A.; Rossi, G. D.; Guice, D. S.; Maggs, J. E.; Vincena, S.; Friedman, B.

    2013-05-15

    Continuous control over azimuthal flow and shear in the edge of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instr. 62, 2875 (1991)] has been achieved using a biasable limiter. This flow control has allowed a careful study of the effect of flow shear on pressure-gradient-driven turbulence and particle transport in LAPD. The combination of externally controllable shear in a turbulent plasma along with the detailed spatial diagnostic capabilities on LAPD makes the experiment a useful testbed for validation of shear suppression models. Motivated by these models, power-law fits are made to the density and radial velocity fluctuation amplitudes, particle flux, density-potential crossphase, and radial correlation length. The data show a break in the trend of these quantities when the shearing rate (γ{sub s}=∂V{sub θ}/∂r) is comparable to the turbulent decorrelation rate (1/τ{sub ac}). No one model captures the trends in the all turbulent quantities for all values of the shearing rate, but some models successfully match the trend in either the weak (γ{sub s}τ{sub ac}<1) or strong (γ{sub s}τ{sub ac}>1) shear limits.

  6. Non-isothermal infiltration and tracer transport experiments on large soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotkova, Martina; Snehota, Michal; Cejkova, Eva; Tesar, Miroslav

    2016-04-01

    Isothermal and non-isothermal infiltration experiments were carried out in the laboratory on large undisturbed soil columns (19 cm in diameter, 25 cm high) taken at the experimental catchments Roklan (Sumava Mountains, Czech Republic) and Uhlirska (Jizera Mountains, Czech republic). The aim of the study was twofold. The first goal was to obtain water flow and heat transport data for indirect parameter estimation of thermal and hydraulic properties of soils from two sites by inverse modelling. The second aim was to investigate the extent of impact of the temperature on saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) and dispersity of solute transport. The temperature of infiltrating water in isothermal experiment (20 °C) was equal to the initial temperature of the sample. For non-isothermal experiment water temperature was 5°C, while the initial temperature of the sample was 20°C as in previous case. The experiment was started by flooding the sample surface. Then water level was maintained at constant level throughout the infiltration run using the optical sensor and peristaltic pump. Concentration pulse of deuterium was applied at the top of the soil sample, during the steady state flow. Initial pressure head in the sample was close to field capacity. Two tensiometers and two temperature sensors were inserted in the soil sample in two depths (9 and 15 cm below the top of the sample). Two additional temperature sensors monitored the temperature entering and leaving the samples. Water drained freely through the perforated plate at the bottom of sample by gravity. Inflow and outflow water flux densities, water pressure heads and soil temperatures were monitored continuously during experiments. Effluent was sampled in regular time intervals and samples were analysed for deuterium concentrations by laser spectroscopy to develop breakthrough curves. The outcome of experiments are the series of measured water fluxes, pressure heads and temperatures ready for inverse modelling

  7. On an acoustic field generated by subsonic jet at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Arndt, R. E. A.

    1978-01-01

    An acoustic field generated by subsonic jets at low Reynolds numbers was investigated. This work is motivated by the need to increase the fundamental understanding of the jet noise generation mechanism which is essential to the development of further advanced techniques of noise suppression. The scope of this study consists of two major investigation. One is a study of large scale coherent structure in the jet turbulence, and the other is a study of the Reynolds number dependence of jet noise. With this in mind, extensive flow and acoustic measurements in low Reynolds number turbulent jets (8,930 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 220,000) were undertaken using miniature nozzles of the same configuration but different diameters at various exist Mach numbers (0.2 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 0.9).

  8. Flow field and near and far sound field of a subsonic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1986-04-01

    Flow and sound field data are presented for a 2°54 cm diameter air jet at a Mach number of 0·50 and a Reynolds number of 3×10 5. Distributions of mean velocity, turbulence intensities, Reynolds stress, spectral components of turbulence as well as of the near field pressure, together with essential characteristics of the far field sound are reported. This detailed set of data for one particular flow, erstwhile unavailable in the literature, is expected to help promote and calibrate subsonic jet noise theories. "Source locations" in terms of the turbulence maxima, coupling between the entrainment dynamics and the near pressure field, the sound radiation paths, and the balance in mass, momentum and sound energy fluxes are discussed. The results suggest that the large scale coherent structures of the jet govern the "source locations" by controlling the turbulence and also strongly influence the near field pressure fluctuations.

  9. Progress on a generalized coordinates tensor product finite element 3DPNS algorithm for subsonic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Orzechowski, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A generalized coordinates form of the penalty finite element algorithm for the 3-dimensional parabolic Navier-Stokes equations for turbulent subsonic flows was derived. This algorithm formulation requires only three distinct hypermatrices and is applicable using any boundary fitted coordinate transformation procedure. The tensor matrix product approximation to the Jacobian of the Newton linear algebra matrix statement was also derived. Tne Newton algorithm was restructured to replace large sparse matrix solution procedures with grid sweeping using alpha-block tridiagonal matrices, where alpha equals the number of dependent variables. Numerical experiments were conducted and the resultant data gives guidance on potentially preferred tensor product constructions for the penalty finite element 3DPNS algorithm.

  10. Influence of configuration details on the subsonic characteristics of a space shuttle orbiter design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, J. P.; Phillips, W. P.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley low-turbulence pressure tunnel of a model of a space shuttle orbiter design in order to determine the influence of minor configuration geometric details on the aerodynamic characteristics at subsonic speeds. A plane wing was tested with a small planform fillet; a twisted wing was tested with both a small and a large planform fillet. Tailored attitude-control propulsion-system wing-tip and body pods, trisegmented elevons, and canopy effects were also investigated. The tests were conducted at angles of attack from -3 deg to 24 deg for sideslip angles of 0 deg and 6 deg and at a Mach number of 0.25.

  11. Drug Transporters and Na+/H+ Exchange Regulatory Factor PSD-95/Drosophila Discs Large/ZO-1 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Dustin R.; Nolin, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Drug transporters govern the absorption, distribution, and elimination of pharmacologically active compounds. Members of the solute carrier and ATP binding-cassette drug transporter family mediate cellular drug uptake and efflux processes, thereby coordinating the vectorial movement of drugs across epithelial barriers. To exert their physiologic and pharmacological function in polarized epithelia, drug transporters must be targeted and stabilized to appropriate regions of the cell membrane (i.e., apical versus basolateral). Despite the critical importance of drug transporter membrane targeting, the mechanisms that underlie these processes are largely unknown. Several clinically significant drug transporters possess a recognition sequence that binds to PSD-95/Drosophila discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ) proteins. PDZ proteins, such as the Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF) family, act to stabilize and organize membrane targeting of multiple transmembrane proteins, including many clinically relevant drug transporters. These PDZ proteins are normally abundant at apical membranes, where they tether membrane-delimited transporters. NHERF expression is particularly high at the apical membrane in polarized tissue such as intestinal, hepatic, and renal epithelia, tissues important to drug disposition. Several recent studies have highlighted NHERF proteins as determinants of drug transporter function secondary to their role in controlling membrane abundance and localization. Mounting evidence strongly suggests that NHERF proteins may have clinically significant roles in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of several pharmacologically active compounds and may affect drug action in cancer and chronic kidney disease. For these reasons, NHERF proteins represent a novel class of post-translational mediators of drug transport and novel targets for new drug development. PMID:26092975

  12. IAEA regulatory initiatives for the air transport of large quantities of radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, Robert E.; Wangler, Michael W.; Selling, Hendrik A.

    1992-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been laboring since 1988 over a far reaching change to its model regulations (IAEA, 1990) for the transport of radioactive materials (RAM). This change could impact the manner in which certain classes of radioactive materials are shipped by air and change some of the basic tenets of radioactive material transport regulations around the world. This report discusses issues associated with air transport regulations.

  13. Minimizing life cycle cost for subsonic commercial aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, V.S. )

    1990-02-01

    A methodology is presented which facilitates the identification of that aircraft design concept which will incur the lowest life-cycle costs (LCCs) while meeting mission requirements. The methodology consists of an LCC module whose constituent elements calculate the costs associated with R D, testing, evaluation, and production, as well as direct and indirect operating costs, in conjunction with the Flight Optimization System conceptual design/analysis code. Provision is made in the methodology for sensitivities to advanced technologies for the subsonic commercial aircraft in question, which are optimized with respect to minimum gross weight, fuel consumption, acquisition cost, and direct operating cost. 12 refs.

  14. Minimizing life cycle cost for subsonic commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Vicki S.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology is presented which facilitates the identification of that aircraft design concept which will incur the lowest life-cycle costs (LCCs) while meeting mission requirements. The methodology consists of an LCC module whose constituent elements calculate the costs associated with R&D, testing, evaluation, and production, as well as direct and indirect operating costs, in conjunction with the 'Flight Optimization System' conceptual design/analysis code. Provision is made in the methodology for sensitivities to advanced technologies for the subsonic commercial aircraft in question, which are optimized with respect to minimum gross weight, fuel consumption, acquisition cost, and direct operating cost.

  15. Finite element analysis of inviscid subsonic boattail flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Gerhart, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element code for analysis of inviscid subsonic flows over arbitrary nonlifting planar or axisymmetric bodies is described. The code solves a novel primitive variable formulation of the coupled irrotationality and compressible continuity equations. Results for flow over a cylinder, a sphere, and a NACA 0012 airfoil verify the code. Computed subcritical flows over an axisymmetric boattailed afterbody compare well with finite difference results and experimental data. Interative coupling with an integral turbulent boundary layer code shows strong viscous effects on the inviscid flow. Improvements in code efficiency and extensions to transonic flows are discussed.

  16. Simulation of Atmospheric-Entry Capsules in the Subsonic Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Childs, Robert E.; Garcia, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of Computational Fluid Dynamics predictions of subsonic capsule aerodynamics is examined by comparison against recent NASA wind-tunnel data at high-Reynolds-number flight conditions. Several aspects of numerical and physical modeling are considered, including inviscid numerical scheme, mesh adaptation, rough-wall modeling, rotation and curvature corrections for eddy-viscosity models, and Detached-Eddy Simulations of the unsteady wake. All of these are considered in isolation against relevant data where possible. The results indicate that an improved predictive capability is developed by considering physics-based approaches and validating the results against flight-relevant experimental data.

  17. Acoustic measurement study 40 by 80 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An acoustical study conducted during the period from September 1, 1973 to April 30, 1974 measured sound pressure levels and vibration amplitudes inside and outside of the subsonic tunnel and on the tunnel structure. A discussion of the technical aspects of the study, the field measurement and data reduction procedures, and results are presentd, and conclusions resulting from the study which bear upon near field and far field tunnel noise, upon the tunnel as an acoustical enclosure, and upon the sources of noise within the tunnel drive system are given.

  18. NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Project - Structures and Materials Discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Johnson, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    The Structures & Materials Discipline within the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Project is focused on developing rotorcraft technologies. The technologies being developed are within the task areas of: 5.1.1 Life Prediction Methods for Engine Structures & Components 5.1.2 Erosion Resistant Coatings for Improved Turbine Blade Life 5.2.1 Crashworthiness 5.2.2 Methods for Prediction of Fatigue Damage & Self Healing 5.3.1 Propulsion High Temperature Materials 5.3.2 Lightweight Structures and Noise Integration The presentation will discuss rotorcraft specific technical challenges and needs as well as details of the work being conducted in the six task areas.

  19. Subsonic/transonic stall flutter investigation of a rotating rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutras, R. R.; Fost, R. B.; Chi, R. M.; Beacher, B. F.

    1981-01-01

    Stall flutter is investigated by obtaining detailed quantitative steady and aerodynamic and aeromechanical measurements in a typical fan rotor. The experimental investigation is made with a 31.3 percent scale model of the Quiet Engine Program Fan C rotor system. Both subsonic/transonic (torsional mode) flutter and supersonic (flexural) flutter are investigated. Extensive steady and unsteady data on the blade deformations and aerodynamic properties surrounding the rotor are acquired while operating in both the steady and flutter modes. Analysis of this data shows that while there may be more than one traveling wave present during flutter, they are all forward traveling waves.

  20. Sound radiation from a subsonic rotor subjected to turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevik, M.

    1974-01-01

    The broadband sound radiated by a subsonic rotor subjected to turbulence in the approach stream has been analyzed. The power spectral density of the sound intensity has been found to depend on a characteristic time scale-namely, the integral scale of the turbulence divided by the axial flow velocity-as well as several length-scale ratios. These consist of the ratio of the integral scale to the acoustic wavelength, rotor radius, and blade chord. Due to the simplified model chosen, only a limited number of cascade parameters appear. Limited comparisons with experimental data indicate good agreement with predicted values.

  1. Subsonic flow in the channel of a diagonal MHD generator

    SciTech Connect

    Isakova, N.P.; Medin, S.A.

    1981-05-01

    A numerical study has been made of the local and integral characteristics of the planar subsonic flow in the channel of an MHD generator with diagonal electrode connection. It is shown that the inhomogeneity in the parameter distribution is dependent on the electrical loading, and the largest deviations from homogeneous flow occur on open circuit and short circuit. A comparison is made with a channel of Faraday type as regards the main integral characteristics. The data from two-dimensional analysis are compared with those from a one-dimensional flow model.

  2. Reconstruction of large tibial bone defects following osteosarcoma resection using bone transport distraction: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhengming; Jin, Libin; Tao, Huimin; Yang, Disheng

    2016-01-01

    The clinical efficiency of bone transport distraction osteogenesis in the reconstruction of large tibial defects following resection of osteosarcoma remains unclear. The current study presents two cases of large tibial defects treated with bone transport distraction using an Orthofix external fixator. Case 1 was a 29-year-old man with a tibial defect 11 cm in length, while case 2 was a 16-year-old girl with a 15-cm-long defect. Bone transport distraction osteogenesis was initiated for the both cases on day 14 following resection of the tibial osteosarcoma. Bone transport distraction in case 1 and 2 was continued for 16 and 28 months, respectively, and the patients were followed up for 51 and 56 months, respectively. The two patients did not exhibit any signs of tumor recurrence or tumor metastasis during the follow-up period. The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society functional scores at final follow-up visits were 22 and 18 for case 1 and 2, respectively. Based on the experience gained in these 2 cases, a bone transport is a viable option for the reconstruction of large tibial defects following osteosarcoma resection.

  3. Extremely Large Magnetoresistance at Low Magnetic Field by Coupling the Nonlinear Transport Effect and the Anomalous Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhaochu; Xiong, Chengyue; Zhang, Xu; Guo, Zhen-Gang; Cai, Jianwang; Zhang, Xiaozhong

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect of a magnetic material is coupled to the nonlinear transport effect of a semiconductor material in a simple structure to achieve a large geometric magnetoresistance (MR) based on a diode-assisted mechanism. An extremely large MR (>10(4) %) at low magnetic fields (1 mT) is observed at room temperature. This MR device shows potential for use as a logic gate for the four basic Boolean logic operations. PMID:26857904

  4. Hydrogen transport diagnostics by atomic and molecular emission line profiles simultaneously measured for large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.

    2013-01-15

    We observe the Balmer-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} lines of hydrogen atoms and Q branches of the Fulcher-{alpha} band of hydrogen molecules simultaneously with their polarization resolved for large helical device. From the fit including the line splits and the polarization dependences by the Zeeman effect, the emission locations, intensities, and the temperatures of the atoms and molecules are determined. The emission locations of the hydrogen atoms are determined outside but close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS). The results are consistent with a previous work (Phys. Plasmas 12, 042501 (2005)). On the other hand, the emission locations of the molecules are determined to be in the divertor legs, which is farer from those of the atoms. The kinetic energy of the atoms is 1 {approx} 20 eV, while the rotational temperature of molecules is {approx}0.04 eV. Additionally, substantial wings, which originate from high velocity atoms and are not reproduced by the conventional spectral analysis, are observed in the Balmer line profiles. We develop a one-dimensional model to simulate the transport of the atoms and molecules. The model reproduces the differences of the emission locations of the atoms and molecules when their initial temperatures are assumed to be 3 eV and 0.04 eV, respectively. From the model, the wings of the Balmer-{alpha} line is attributed to the high velocity atoms exist deep inside the LCFS, which are generated by the charge exchange collisions with hot protons there.

  5. 14 CFR 135.371 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: One...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND... the rate of climb for transport category airplanes certificated under part 4a of the Civil Air... under part 4a of the Civil Air Regulations. (2) The all-engines-operating altitude shall be...

  6. 14 CFR 135.371 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: One...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND... the rate of climb for transport category airplanes certificated under part 4a of the Civil Air... under part 4a of the Civil Air Regulations. (2) The all-engines-operating altitude shall be...

  7. 14 CFR 135.371 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: One...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND... the rate of climb for transport category airplanes certificated under part 4a of the Civil Air... under part 4a of the Civil Air Regulations. (2) The all-engines-operating altitude shall be...

  8. Stochastic dynamics from the fractional Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equation: Large-scale behavior of the turbulent transport coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanov, Alexander V.

    2001-04-01

    The formulation of the fractional Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK) equation [Physica D 76, 110 (1994)] has led to important advances in the description of the stochastic dynamics of Hamiltonian systems. Here, the long-time behavior of the basic transport processes obeying the fractional FPK equation is analyzed. A derivation of the large-scale turbulent transport coefficient for a Hamiltonian system with 112 degrees of freedom is proposed in connection with the fractal structure of the particle chaotic trajectories. The principal transport regimes (i.e., a diffusion-type process, ballistic motion, subdiffusion in the limit of the frozen Hamiltonian, and behavior associated with self-organized criticality) are obtained as partial cases of the generalized transport law. A comparison with recent numerical and experimental studies is given.

  9. Stochastic dynamics from the fractional Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equation: large-scale behavior of the turbulent transport coefficient.

    PubMed

    Milovanov, A V

    2001-04-01

    The formulation of the fractional Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK) equation [Physica D 76, 110 (1994)] has led to important advances in the description of the stochastic dynamics of Hamiltonian systems. Here, the long-time behavior of the basic transport processes obeying the fractional FPK equation is analyzed. A derivation of the large-scale turbulent transport coefficient for a Hamiltonian system with 11 / 2 degrees of freedom is proposed in connection with the fractal structure of the particle chaotic trajectories. The principal transport regimes (i.e., a diffusion-type process, ballistic motion, subdiffusion in the limit of the frozen Hamiltonian, and behavior associated with self-organized criticality) are obtained as partial cases of the generalized transport law. A comparison with recent numerical and experimental studies is given. PMID:11308983

  10. Sediment Transport and bedform dynamics during a major, typhoon-driven, flood on a large tropical river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unsworth, Christopher; Parsons, Daniel; Keevil, Claire; Darby, Stephen; Hackney, Chris; Leyland, Julian; Best, Jim; Nicholas, Andy; Aalto, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Fluvial sediment transport in tropical-monsoonal rivers are characterised by some of the highest sediment yields on Earth, yet the unsteady dynamics and partitioning of sediment transport as bedload and suspended load during floods has received little attention. Herein, results from multiple field surveys of a section of the Mekong River (in Cambodia) reveal the variability in sediment transport during a large flood in 2013. High-resolution MultiBeam EchoSounder (MBES) surveys produced river bed bathymetric maps to record the movement of sedimentary bedforms though time. Suspended sediment transport rates and flow velocities were concurrently measured using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). These surveys found major changes in the type and size of bedforms present through time. Barchan dunes that were present before, during and after the peak flood are denudated massively at the peak of the flood by large numbers of secondary superimposed bedforms. However, during the falling limb of the flood these secondary dunes merged with the Barchans to produce the largest bedforms measured in the surveys. The difference in bedload sediment transport rates between the peak and waning leg of a major flood event was also quantified. Data from the ADCP reveals a match between local flow velocities, bed shear stress and Rouse number that can be related to the changes in suspended sediment concentration across the river channel. This impacted the shape of bedforms though alteration of the dominant mode of sediment transport, which varied considerably across the channel. These factors contributed to a spatial disparity in local storing and erosion of sediment within the river channel. This paper will highlight the above findings and discuss the implications for modelling the response of large river morphodynamics to large flood events.

  11. Large wood recruitment and transport during a severe flash flood in North-western Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucía, Ana; Comiti, Francesco; Borga, Marco; Cavalli, Marco; Marchi, Lorenzo

    2013-04-01

    Understanding and modelling the dynamics of large wood (LW) in rivers during flood events has spurred a great deal of research in recent years. Whereas most of the research on LW has focused on its spatial distribution and geomorphologic role at longer time scales, only few studies have documented the effect of high-magnitude flash floods on LW recruitment, transport and deposition. On October 25th2011, the Magra river basin (North-western Italy) was hit by an extreme meteorological event, with hourly rainrates up to 130 mm h-1 and event rain accumulations up to 540 mm. Such large rainfall intensities originated flash floods in the main river channels and in some of the tributaries, with unit peak discharges up to around 20 m3s-1km-2 in catchments of 10-20 km2, causing severe damages and loss of lives. Numerous landslides were triggered and the morphology of the tributaries was highly affected in response to intense lateral and vertical channel dynamics. Besides, many bridges were partly or fully clogged by LW jams. A post-floodsurvey was carried out in November 2011 and February 2012 along four of the tributaries most severely affected by this event. The total length of surveyed channels is 9.5 km. These channels were divided into reaches of similar morphological characteristics (slope, width, vegetation cover), and in every reach the volume of LW deposited was estimated by a combination of field surveys and interpretation of aerial photos. In addition, LW recruited from hillslopes and floodplains was estimated by comparing pre and post-event orthophotos. Preliminary results show very high rates of LW recruitment (1127 m3km-1 on average ranging from 569-2001 m3km-1) along the analysed channels, the majority (about 80%) stemming from floodplain erosion and the rest from the colluvial processes (predominantly landslides). Channels width has increased on average 10 times (ranging from 4 to 23 times). Despite the large variability among the channels, LW dynamics seems

  12. Numerical Model of Turbulence, Sediment Transport, and Sediment Cover in a Large Canyon-Bound River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, L. V.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2013-12-01

    The Colorado River in Grand Canyon is confined by bedrock and coarse-grained sediments. Finer grain sizes are supply limited, and sandbars primarily occur in lateral separation eddies downstream of coarse-grained tributary debris fans. These sandbars are important resources for native fish, recreational boaters, and as a source of aeolian transport preventing the erosion of archaeological resources by gully extension. Relatively accurate prediction of deposition and, especially, erosion of these sandbar beaches has proven difficult using two- and three-dimensional, time-averaged morphodynamic models. We present a parallelized, three-dimensional, turbulence-resolving model using the Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) technique. DES is a hybrid large eddy simulation (LES) and Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS). RANS is applied to the near-bed grid cells, where grid resolution is not sufficient to fully resolve wall turbulence. LES is applied further from the bed and banks. We utilize the Spalart-Allmaras one equation turbulence closure with a rough wall extension. The model resolves large-scale turbulence using DES and simultaneously integrates the suspended sediment advection-diffusion equation. The Smith and McLean suspended sediment boundary condition is used to calculate the upward and downward settling of sediment fluxes in the grid cells attached to the bed. The model calculates the entrainment of five grain sizes at every time step using a mixing layer model. Where the mixing layer depth becomes zero, the net entrainment is zero or negative. As such, the model is able to predict the exposure and burial of bedrock and coarse-grained surfaces by fine-grained sediments. A separate program was written to automatically construct the computational domain between the water surface and a triangulated surface of a digital elevation model of the given river reach. Model results compare favorably with ADCP measurements of flow taken on the Colorado River in Grand Canyon

  13. Fourier time spectral method for subsonic and transonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Lei; Liu, Feng; Papamoschou, Dimitri

    2016-06-01

    The time accuracy of the exponentially accurate Fourier time spectral method (TSM) is examined and compared with a conventional 2nd-order backward difference formula (BDF) method for periodic unsteady flows. In particular, detailed error analysis based on numerical computations is performed on the accuracy of resolving the local pressure coefficient and global integrated force coefficients for smooth subsonic and non-smooth transonic flows with moving shock waves on a pitching airfoil. For smooth subsonic flows, the Fourier TSM method offers a significant accuracy advantage over the BDF method for the prediction of both the local pressure coefficient and integrated force coefficients. For transonic flows where the motion of the discontinuous shock wave contributes significant higher-order harmonic contents to the local pressure fluctuations, a sufficient number of modes must be included before the Fourier TSM provides an advantage over the BDF method. The Fourier TSM, however, still offers better accuracy than the BDF method for integrated force coefficients even for transonic flows. A problem of non-symmetric solutions for symmetric periodic flows due to the use of odd numbers of intervals is uncovered and analyzed. A frequency-searching method is proposed for problems where the frequency is not known a priori. The method is tested on the vortex shedding problem of the flow over a circular cylinder.

  14. Subsonic and Supersonic Effects in Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2003-01-01

    A paper presents a theoretical investigation of subsonic and supersonic effects in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The BEC is represented by a time-dependent, nonlinear Schroedinger equation that includes terms for an external confining potential term and a weak interatomic repulsive potential proportional to the number density of atoms. From this model are derived Madelung equations, which relate the quantum phase with the number density, and which are used to represent excitations propagating through the BEC. These equations are shown to be analogous to the classical equations of flow of an inviscid, compressible fluid characterized by a speed of sound (g/Po)1/2, where g is the coefficient of the repulsive potential and Po is the unperturbed mass density of the BEC. The equations are used to study the effects of a region of perturbation moving through the BEC. The excitations created by a perturbation moving at subsonic speed are found to be described by a Laplace equation and to propagate at infinite speed. For a supersonically moving perturbation, the excitations are found to be described by a wave equation and to propagate at finite speed inside a Mach cone.

  15. Mitigation of wind tunnel wall interactions in subsonic cavity flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-03-06

    In this study, the flow over an open aircraft bay is often represented in a wind tunnel with a cavity. In flight, this flow is unconfined, though in experiments, the cavity is surrounded by wind tunnel walls. If untreated, wind tunnel wall effects can lead to significant distortions of cavity acoustics in subsonic flows. To understand and mitigate these cavity–tunnel interactions, a parametric approach was taken for flow over an L/D = 7 cavity at Mach numbers 0.6–0.8. With solid tunnel walls, a dominant cavity tone was observed, likely due to an interaction with a tunnel duct mode. Furthermore, anmore » acoustic liner opposite the cavity decreased the amplitude of the dominant mode and its harmonics, a result observed by previous researchers. Acoustic dampeners were also placed in the tunnel sidewalls, which further decreased the dominant mode amplitudes and peak amplitudes associated with nonlinear interactions between cavity modes. This then indicates that cavity resonance can be altered by tunnel sidewalls and that spanwise coupling should be addressed when conducting subsonic cavity experiments. Though mechanisms for dominant modes and nonlinear interactions likely exist in unconfined cavity flows, these effects can be amplified by the wind tunnel walls.« less

  16. A model of unsteady subsonic flow with acoustics excluded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorchenko, A. T.

    1997-03-01

    Diverse subsonic initial-boundary-value problems (flows in a closed volume initiated by blowing or suction through permeable walls, flows with continuously distributed sources, viscous flows with substantial heat fluxes, etc.) are considered, to show that they cannot be solved by using the classical theory of incompressible fluid motion which involves the equation div u = 0. Application of the most general theory of compressible fluid flow may not be best in such cases, because then we encounter difficulties in accurately resolving the complex acoustic phenomena as well as in assigning the proper boundary conditions. With this in mind a new non-local mathematical model, where div u [not equal] 0 in the general case, is proposed for the simulation of unsteady subsonic flows in a bounded domain with continuously distributed sources of mass, momentum and entropy, also taking into account the effects of viscosity and heat conductivity when necessary. The exclusion of sound waves is one of the most important features of this model which represents a fundamental extension of the conventional model of incompressible fluid flow. The model has been built up by modifying both the general system of equations for the motion of compressible fluid (viscous or inviscid as required) and the appropriate set of boundary conditions. Some particular cases of this model are discussed. A series of exact time-dependent solutions, one- and two-dimensional, is presented to illustrate the model.

  17. Fourier time spectral method for subsonic and transonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Lei; Liu, Feng; Papamoschou, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    The time accuracy of the exponentially accurate Fourier time spectral method (TSM) is examined and compared with a conventional 2nd-order backward difference formula (BDF) method for periodic unsteady flows. In particular, detailed error analysis based on numerical computations is performed on the accuracy of resolving the local pressure coefficient and global integrated force coefficients for smooth subsonic and non-smooth transonic flows with moving shock waves on a pitching airfoil. For smooth subsonic flows, the Fourier TSM method offers a significant accuracy advantage over the BDF method for the prediction of both the local pressure coefficient and integrated force coefficients. For transonic flows where the motion of the discontinuous shock wave contributes significant higher-order harmonic contents to the local pressure fluctuations, a sufficient number of modes must be included before the Fourier TSM provides an advantage over the BDF method. The Fourier TSM, however, still offers better accuracy than the BDF method for integrated force coefficients even for transonic flows. A problem of non-symmetric solutions for symmetric periodic flows due to the use of odd numbers of intervals is uncovered and analyzed. A frequency-searching method is proposed for problems where the frequency is not known a priori. The method is tested on the vortex shedding problem of the flow over a circular cylinder.

  18. Mitigation of wind tunnel wall interactions in subsonic cavity flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-03-06

    In this study, the flow over an open aircraft bay is often represented in a wind tunnel with a cavity. In flight, this flow is unconfined, though in experiments, the cavity is surrounded by wind tunnel walls. If untreated, wind tunnel wall effects can lead to significant distortions of cavity acoustics in subsonic flows. To understand and mitigate these cavity–tunnel interactions, a parametric approach was taken for flow over an L/D = 7 cavity at Mach numbers 0.6–0.8. With solid tunnel walls, a dominant cavity tone was observed, likely due to an interaction with a tunnel duct mode. Furthermore, an acoustic liner opposite the cavity decreased the amplitude of the dominant mode and its harmonics, a result observed by previous researchers. Acoustic dampeners were also placed in the tunnel sidewalls, which further decreased the dominant mode amplitudes and peak amplitudes associated with nonlinear interactions between cavity modes. This then indicates that cavity resonance can be altered by tunnel sidewalls and that spanwise coupling should be addressed when conducting subsonic cavity experiments. Though mechanisms for dominant modes and nonlinear interactions likely exist in unconfined cavity flows, these effects can be amplified by the wind tunnel walls.

  19. Assessment of suspended matter transport in a large agricultural catchment using the MOHID water modelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Bailly; David, Brito; Chantha, Oeurng; Ramiro, Neves; Sabine, Sauvage; Sánchez-Pérez, José-Miguel

    2010-05-01

    Suspended sediment transport from agricultural catchments to stream networks is responsible for impaired water quality, reservoir sedimentation and the transport of sediment-bound pollutants (pesticides, particulate nutrients, metals and other adsorbed toxic substances). The dynamic of pollutants adsorbed on sediment and associated with particulate organic carbon, from land areas into stream network arises mainly from erosion and sedimentation processes. It is known that up to 90% of suspended sediment is transported during flood event and therefore quick flood events have a major impact on pollutant transport. This study - part of the EU AguaFlash (http://www.aguaflash-sudoe.eu/) project - examined and quantified suspended sediment dynamics from catchment to river (erosion, transport, deposition on hillside and in the river). Semi-distributed, physics-based watershed or reservoir models are generally used to simulate sediment dynamics. One of the limitations of this kind of modelling is that transport along agricultural field and the possibility of deposition of suspended sediments in hillslopes are not considered. Consequently, all sediments eroded are assumed to be accumulated in the river and the sediment and associated pollutant dynamics are over- or under-estimated. In our approach, the mechanistic physics-based water modelling system MOHID (http://www.mohid.com) was used to quantify soil erosion and sediment transport processes at the local and macroscopic scale. This paper present the erosion and transport mathematical model and modelling strategy used and compares our initial results with filed data obtained on an 1100 km² intensive agricultural catchment (Save catchment, South-west France) during 2007-2009 and with simulation data produced using SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool, 2005 version). The contribution of the MOHID model compared with that of the semi-distributed SWAT model is discussed. Keywords: Erosion, suspended sediment, transport

  20. Large neutral amino acids levels in primate cerebrospinal fluid do not confirm competitive transport under baseline conditions.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, Rodolfo; Mchaourab, Ali S; McClellan, Frances; Elsworth, John; Double, Manda; Jaskiw, George E

    2016-10-01

    In rodents, transport of large neutral amino acids (LNAAs) across the blood brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier is mediated by high affinity carriers. Net brain LNAA levels are thought to be determined mainly by this competitive transport from plasma. Since the affinity for LNAA transport at the BBB in primates is considerably higher than in rodents, brain influx and by extension LNAA brain levels, should be even more dependent on competitive transport. Given that LNAA levels in CSF and brain interstitial fluid are usually similar, we analyzed serum and CSF of fasted subjects (n=24) undergoing spinal anesthesia and calculated brain influx and transporter occupancy using a conventional model of transport. Despite predicted near-full transporter saturation (99.7%), correlations between CSF levels and brain influx were modest, limited to tyrosine (r=0.60, p<0.002) and tryptophan (r=0.50, p<0.01) and comparable to correlations between CSF and serum levels. We also analyzed serum and CSF in (n=5) fasted vervet monkeys. Tyrosine and phenylalanine levels in CSF were positively correlated with those in serum, but correlations with calculated brain influx, which takes competition into account, were weaker or absent. We conclude that in primates i) baseline CSF LNAA levels do not confirm competitive transport, ii) brain LNAA levels should not be estimated on the basis of serum indices alone. This has implications for amino acid challenge studies and for neuropsychiatric disorders associated with dysregulated LNAA transport in which quantitative information about brain LNAA levels is needed. PMID:27521685

  1. 14 CFR 135.369 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: All...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND... part 4a of the Civil Air Regulations. ... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance...

  2. 14 CFR 135.369 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: All...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND... part 4a of the Civil Air Regulations. ... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance...

  3. 14 CFR 135.369 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: All...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND... part 4a of the Civil Air Regulations. ... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance...

  4. Distribution of transport injury and related risk behaviours in a large national cohort of Thai adults

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Karen; Kelly, Matthew; Mcclure, Rod; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara; Bain, Christopher; Sleigh, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Background A major barrier to addressing the problem of transport injury in low to middle-income countries is the lack of information regarding the incidence of traffic crashes and the demographic, behavioural and socio-economic determinants of crash-related injury. This study aimed to determine the baseline frequency and distribution of transport injury and the prevalence of various road safety behaviours in a newly recruited cohort of Thai adults. Methods The Thai Health-Risk Transition Study includes an ongoing population-based cohort study of 87,134 adult students residing across Thailand. Baseline survey data from 2005 includes data on self-reported transport injury within the previous 12 months and demographic, behavioural and transportation factors that could be linked to Thailand's transport risks. Results Overall, 7279 (8.4% or 8354 per 100,000) of respondents reported that their most serious injury in the 12 months prior to recruitment in the cohort was transport-related, with risk being higher for males and those aged 15–19 years. Most transport injuries occurred while using motorcycles. A much higher proportion of males reported driving after three or more glasses of alcohol at least once in the previous year compared to females. The prevalence of motorcycle helmet and seat belt wearing in this sample were higher than previously reported for Thailand. Conclusions The reported data provide the basis for monitoring changes in traffic crash risks and risk behaviours in a cohort of adults in the context of ongoing implementation of policy and programs that are currently being introduced to address the problem of transport-related injury in Thailand. PMID:21376902

  5. Backward-in-time methods to simulate large-scale transport and mixing in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.

    2015-06-01

    In oceanography and meteorology, it is important to know not only where water or air masses are headed for, but also where they came from as well. For example, it is important to find unknown sources of oil spills in the ocean and of dangerous substance plumes in the atmosphere. It is impossible with the help of conventional ocean and atmospheric numerical circulation models to extrapolate backward from the observed plumes to find the source because those models cannot be reversed in time. We review here recently elaborated backward-in-time numerical methods to identify and study mesoscale eddies in the ocean and to compute where those waters came from to a given area. The area under study is populated with a large number of artificial tracers that are advected backward in time in a given velocity field that is supposed to be known analytically or numerically, or from satellite and radar measurements. After integrating advection equations, one gets positions of each tracer on a fixed day in the past and can identify from known destinations a particle positions at earlier times. The results provided show that the method is efficient, for example, in estimating probabilities to find increased concentrations of radionuclides and other pollutants in oceanic mesoscale eddies. The backward-in-time methods are illustrated in this paper with a few examples. Backward-in-time Lagrangian maps are applied to identify eddies in satellite-derived and numerically generated velocity fields and to document the pathways by which they exchange water with their surroundings. Backward-in-time trapping maps are used to identify mesoscale eddies in the altimetric velocity field with a risk to be contaminated by Fukushima-derived radionuclides. The results of simulations are compared with in situ mesurement of caesium concentration in sea water samples collected in a recent research vessel cruise in the area to the east of Japan. Backward-in-time latitudinal maps and the corresponding

  6. Investigation of ion and electron heat transport of high-Te ECH heated discharges in the large helical device

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pablant, N. A.; Satake, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Gates, D. A.; Bitter, M.; Bertelli, N.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Dinklage, A.; Goto, M.; Hill, K. W.; et al

    2016-01-28

    An analysis of the radial electric field and heat transport, both for ions and electrons, is presented for a high-more » $${{T}_{\\text{e}}}$$ electron cyclotron heated (ECH) discharge on the large helical device (LHD). Transport analysis is done using the task3d transport suite utilizing experimentally measured profiles for both ions and electrons. Ion temperature and perpendicular flow profiles are measured using the recently installed x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer diagnostic (XICS), while electron temperature and density profiles are measured using Thomson scattering. The analysis also includes calculated ECH power deposition profiles as determined through the travis ray-tracing code. This is the first time on LHD that this type of integrated transport analysis with measured ion temperature profiles has been performed without NBI, allowing the heat transport properties of plasmas with only ECH heating to be more clearly examined. For this study, a plasma discharge is chosen which develops a high central electron temperature ($${{T}_{\\text{eo}}}=9$$ keV) at moderately low densities ($${{n}_{\\text{eo}}}=1.5\\times {{10}^{19}}$$ m-3). The experimentally determined transport properties from task3d are compared to neoclassical predictions as calculated by the gsrake and fortec-3d codes. The predicted electron fluxes are seen to be an order of magnitude less than the measured fluxes, indicating that electron transport is largely anomalous, while the neoclassical and measured ion heat fluxes are of the same magnitude. Neoclassical predictions of a strong positive ambipolar electric field ($${{E}_{\\text{r}}}$$ ) in the plasma core are validated through comparisons to perpendicular flow measurements from the XICS diagnostic. Furthermore, this provides confidence that the predictions are producing physically meaningful results for the particle fluxes and radial electric field, which are a key component in correctly predicting plasma confinement.« less

  7. Investigation of ion and electron heat transport of high-T e ECH heated discharges in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablant, N. A.; Satake, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Gates, D. A.; Bitter, M.; Bertelli, N.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Dinklage, A.; Goto, M.; Hill, K. W.; Igamai, S.; Kubo, S.; Lazerson, S.; Matsuoka, S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Morita, S.; Oishi, T.; Seki, R.; Shimozuma, T.; Suzuki, C.; Suzuki, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Yamada, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; the LHD Experiment Group

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of the radial electric field and heat transport, both for ions and electrons, is presented for a high-{{T}\\text{e}} electron cyclotron heated (ECH) discharge on the large helical device (LHD). Transport analysis is done using the task3d transport suite utilizing experimentally measured profiles for both ions and electrons. Ion temperature and perpendicular flow profiles are measured using the recently installed x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer diagnostic (XICS), while electron temperature and density profiles are measured using Thomson scattering. The analysis also includes calculated ECH power deposition profiles as determined through the travis ray-tracing code. This is the first time on LHD that this type of integrated transport analysis with measured ion temperature profiles has been performed without NBI, allowing the heat transport properties of plasmas with only ECH heating to be more clearly examined. For this study, a plasma discharge is chosen which develops a high central electron temperature ({{T}\\text{eo}}=9 keV) at moderately low densities ({{n}\\text{eo}}=1.5× {{10}19} m-3). The experimentally determined transport properties from task3d are compared to neoclassical predictions as calculated by the gsrake and fortec-3d codes. The predicted electron fluxes are seen to be an order of magnitude less than the measured fluxes, indicating that electron transport is largely anomalous, while the neoclassical and measured ion heat fluxes are of the same magnitude. Neoclassical predictions of a strong positive ambipolar electric field ({{E}\\text{r}} ) in the plasma core are validated through comparisons to perpendicular flow measurements from the XICS diagnostic. This provides confidence that the predictions are producing physically meaningful results for the particle fluxes and radial electric field, which are a key component in correctly predicting plasma confinement.

  8. Investigation of ion and electron heat transport of high- T e ECH heated discharges in the large helical device

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pablant, N. A.; Satake, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Gates, D. A.; Bitter, M.; Bertelli, N.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Dinklage, A.; Goto, M.; Hill, K. W.; et al

    2016-01-28

    An analysis of the radial electric field and heat transport, both for ions and electrons, is presented for a high-more » $${{T}_{\\text{e}}}$$ electron cyclotron heated (ECH) discharge on the large helical device (LHD). Transport analysis is done using the task3d transport suite utilizing experimentally measured profiles for both ions and electrons. Ion temperature and perpendicular flow profiles are measured using the recently installed x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer diagnostic (XICS), while electron temperature and density profiles are measured using Thomson scattering. The analysis also includes calculated ECH power deposition profiles as determined through the travis ray-tracing code. This is the first time on LHD that this type of integrated transport analysis with measured ion temperature profiles has been performed without NBI, allowing the heat transport properties of plasmas with only ECH heating to be more clearly examined. For this study, a plasma discharge is chosen which develops a high central electron temperature ($${{T}_{\\text{eo}}}=9$$ keV) at moderately low densities ($${{n}_{\\text{eo}}}=1.5\\times {{10}^{19}}$$ m-3). The experimentally determined transport properties from task3d are compared to neoclassical predictions as calculated by the gsrake and fortec-3d codes. The predicted electron fluxes are seen to be an order of magnitude less than the measured fluxes, indicating that electron transport is largely anomalous, while the neoclassical and measured ion heat fluxes are of the same magnitude. Neoclassical predictions of a strong positive ambipolar electric field ($${{E}_{\\text{r}}}$$ ) in the plasma core are validated through comparisons to perpendicular flow measurements from the XICS diagnostic. This provides confidence that the predictions are producing physically meaningful results for the particle fluxes and radial electric field, which are a key component in correctly predicting plasma confinement.« less

  9. Effects of tropical cyclones on large-scale circulation and ocean heat transport in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xidong; Wang, Chunzai; Han, Guijun; Li, Wei; Wu, Xinrong

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the influence of tropical cyclones (TCs) on large-scale circulation and ocean heat transport in the South China Sea (SCS) by using an ocean general circulation model at a 1/8° resolution during 2000-2008. The model uses a data assimilation system to assimilate observations in order to improve the representation of SCS circulation. The results reveal an unexpected deep SCS circulation anomaly induced by TCs, which suggests that effects of TC can penetrate deeper into the ocean. This deep effect may result from the near inertial oscillations excited by TCs. The inertial oscillations can propagate downward to the oceanic interior. The analyses confirm that TCs have two effects on ocean heat transport of the SCS. Firstly, the wind stress curl induced by TCs affects the structure of SCS circulation, and then changes heat transport. Secondly, TCs pump surface heat downward to the thermocline, increasing the heat injection from the atmosphere to the ocean. Two effects together amplify the outflow of the surface heat southward away the SCS through the Mindoro and Karimata Straits. The TC-induced heat transports through the Mindoro, Balabac and Karimata Straits account for 20 % of the total heat transport through three straits. An implication of this study is that ocean models need to simulate the TC effect on heat transport in order to correctly evaluate the role of the SCS through flow in regulating upper ocean circulation and climate in the Indonesian maritime continent and its adjacent regions.

  10. A Multi-Transducer Near Field Acoustic Levitation System for Noncontact Transportation of Large-Sized Planar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Takafumi; Koike, Yoshikazu; Nakamura, Kentaro; Ueha, Sadayuki; Hashimoto, Yoshiki

    2000-05-01

    A new noncontact transportation system, which consists of multiple ultrasonic transducers and operates based on near-field acoustic levitation, is proposed to transport a large-sized planar object such as a glass substrate for liquid crystal devices. Using the proposed systems consisting of two and three transducers, the suspension characteristics of the levitated objects are studied as functions of both size difference and angles between the vibration systems and the levitated object. As a result, the holding force is proved to increase as the angle increases and is maximum when the horizontal dimensions of the system and the object coincide.

  11. NO(y) from sub-sonic aircraft emissions - A global three-dimensional model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasibhatla, Prasad S.

    1993-08-01

    The 11-level Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory global chemical transport model (GCTM), which explicitly treats NO(x), HNO3, and PAN as transported species, has been used to assess the impact of sub-sonic aircraft emissions on the distribution of reactive nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) in the atmosphere. A 3D aircraft source inventory compiled by Boeing and McDonnell Douglas has been used, in conjunction with previously compiled surface-based fossil-fuel combustion and stratospheric source inventories. Consistent with previous 2D model calculations, we find that aircraft emissions have a significant impact on upper tropospheric NO(x) and HNO3 budgets in the mid- and high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. The relative impact of the aircraft source on upper tropospheric NO(x) levels at mid- and high northern latitudes varies longitudinally, and that in certain regions the aircraft source dominates the total NO(x) budget. Aircraft emissions appear to only minimally impact the NO(y) budget in the Northern Hemisphere lower troposphere, and in much of the Southern Hemisphere. Comparisons of model results with NO(y) measurements at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, and over western Alaska suggest that sources other than surface-based fossil-fuel combustion, stratospheric NO(x) production, and aircraft emissions, are significant in determining the free tropospheric NO(y) budget in these regions.

  12. Economic optimization of the energy transport component of a large distributed solar power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    A solar thermal power plant with a field of collectors, each locally heating some transport fluid, requires a pipe network system for eventual delivery of energy power generation equipment. For a given collector distribution and pipe network geometry, a technique is herein developed which manipulates basic cost information and physical data in order to design an energy transport system consistent with minimized cost constrained by a calculated technical performance. For a given transport fluid and collector conditions, the method determines the network pipe diameter and pipe thickness distribution and also insulation thickness distribution associated with minimum system cost; these relative distributions are unique. Transport losses, including pump work and heat leak, are calculated operating expenses and impact the total system cost. The minimum cost system is readily selected. The technique is demonstrated on six candidate transport fluids to emphasize which parameters dominate the system cost and to provide basic decision data. Three different power plant output sizes are evaluated in each case to determine severity of diseconomy of scale.

  13. Modelling radionuclide transport in large fractured-media systems: the example of Forsmark, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Michael O.

    2012-06-01

    The planned high-level nuclear waste repository at Forsmark, Sweden, will accommodate 6,824 containers with a total of 13,920 tonnes of uranium in burnt fuel at approximately 400 m depth in a fractured-granite aquifer. The transport of radionuclides, which may be released from the disposed waste, is simulated with the TOUGHREACT code for a three-dimensional model with 305,571 elements. The model performs coupled flow-transport simulations. It aims to achieve more realistic simulations of contaminant transport than the commonly used decoupled procedure consisting of three-dimensional flow and one-dimensional transport simulations. The model has a relatively small problem size because it is designed as a double-porosity model (one matrix continuum) that is the parameterised equivalent of a much larger multiple-interacting continua (MINC) model, i.e. a model with a finely discretised matrix (several matrix continua). The parameterisation is performed with two-dimensional models. Only one or two variables among three variables (diffusive transport distance between fracture and matrix, retardation factor and effective diffusivity) have to be parameterised. The results obtained with the parameterised three-dimensional model are very close to those that can be obtained with a much larger MINC model but may be quite different from those that can be obtained with the conventional decoupled procedure.

  14. A fast low-pressure transport route to large black phosphorus single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nilges, Tom Kersting, Marcel; Pfeifer, Thorben

    2008-08-15

    Black phosphorus, a promising candidate for lithium battery electrodes, can be prepared by a low-pressure transport reaction route representing the first effective and scalable access to this element modification. Crystal sizes larger than 1 cm were obtained at low-pressure conditions in silica ampoules. X-ray phase analyses, EDX, ICP-MS and optical microscopy were applied to characterize the resulting black phosphorus. The present method drastically improves the traditional preparation ways like mercury catalysis, bismuth-flux or high-pressure techniques and represents an easy, non-toxic, fast and highly efficient method to achieve black phosphorus. In contrast to a previously reported low-pressure route the present transport reaction allows an up-scaling to higher masses of starting materials, a larger black phosphorus yield and faster reaction time under retention of the high product crystallinity. - Graphical abstract: A low-pressure transport reaction route representing the first effective and scalable access to black phosphorus.

  15. Mass transport through vertically aligned large diameter MWCNTs embedded in parylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnakumar, P.; Tiwari, P. B.; Staples, S.; Luo, T.; Darici, Y.; He, J.; Lindsay, S. M.

    2012-11-01

    We have fabricated porous membranes using a parylene encapsulated vertically aligned forest of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, about 7 nm inner diameter). The transport of charged particles in electrolyte through these membranes was studied by applying electric field and pressure. Under an electric field in the range of 4.4 × 104 V m-1, electrophoresis instead of electroomosis is found to be the main mechanism for ion transport. Small molecules and 5 nm gold nanoparticles can be driven through the membranes by an electric field. However, small biomolecules, like DNA oligomers, cannot. Due to the weak electric driving force, the interactions between charged particles and the hydrophobic CNT inner surface play important roles in the transport, leading to enhanced selectivity for small molecules. Simple chemical modification on the CNT ends also induces an obvious effect on the translocation of single strand DNA oligomers and gold nanoparticles under a modest pressure (<294 Pa).

  16. Mass transport through vertically aligned large diameter MWCNT embedded in parylene

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, P; Tiwari, P B; Staples, S; Luo, T; Darici, Y; He, J; Lindsay, SM

    2013-01-01

    We have fabricated porous membranes using a parylene encapsulated vertically aligned forest of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT, about 7nm inner diameter). The transport of charged particles in electrolyte through these membranes was studied by applying electric field and pressure. Under an electric field in the range of 4.4×104 V/m, electrophoresis instead of electroomosis is found to be the main mechanism for ion transport. Small molecules and 5 nm gold nanoparticles can be driven through the membranes by an electric field. However, small biomolecules, like DNA oligomers, cannot. Due to the weak electric driving force, the interactions between charged particles and the hydrophobic CNT inner surface play important roles in the transport, leading to enhanced selectivity for small molecules. Simple chemical modification on the CNT ends also induces an obvious effect on the translocation of single strand DNA oligomer and gold nanoparticle under a modest pressure (<294 Pa). PMID:23064678

  17. Comparison of alternative models for simulating anomalous solute transport in a large heterogeneous soil column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guangyao; Zhan, Hongbin; Feng, Shaoyuan; Huang, Guanhua; Mao, Xiaomin

    2009-10-01

    SummaryThis study compared five different models for evaluating solute transport in a 1250-cm long, saturated and highly heterogeneous soil column. The five models were: the convection-dispersion equation (CDE), the mobile-immobile model (MIM), the convective lognormal transfer function model (CLT), the spatial fractional advection-dispersion equation (FADE) and the continuous time random walk model (CTRW). Each of these models was used to fit the breakthrough curve (BTC) at each distance individually and was also used to fit the BTCs at different distances simultaneously. Dependence of estimated parameters on distance was investigated. The estimated parameters at 200 cm were used to make predictions at subsequent distances. Highly anomalous transport behavior was observed in the column as the BTCs demonstrated significantly irregular shape and long tailing. This study indicated that CDE, CLT and FADE were unable to describe the anomalous BTCs adequately and their parameters changed with transport distance significantly. Compared to CDE, CLT and FADE, MIM better captured the evolution of anomalous BTCs. However, MIM did not explain the distinct BTC tailing satisfactorily. In contrast to MIM, CTRW better simulated the long tails of BTCs. The spreading parameter ( β) of CTRW was close to one and remained approximately constant at different travel distances. To make the comparison of these five models more general beyond the specific transport condition in the soil column, a generic evaluation of the advantages and disadvantages of these five models was presented in terms of their theory framework and a priori knowledge of the model behaviors.

  18. Neoclassical transport theory in a tokamak plasma with large spatial gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.S.

    1996-12-31

    Usual neoclassical theories assumed that the spatical inhomogeneity of the plasma was weak. Specifically, this included the following two strong assumptions: banana width was negligible compared to the radial gradient scale length and variation of any physical quantity along the field line was small. This led to the simplification that the spatial inhomogeneity itself did not affect the fundamental transport processes. However, there have been many experimental suggestions that the spatial inhomogeneity may not be small. Firstly, both H-mode and ERS mode experiments have indicated that the finite banana width effect may be important to understand the plasma transport processes. Secondly, the RF and auxiliary heating processes may be sufficiently localized in space so that we may need to consider a strongly inhomogeneous heating effect along the field lines. In the present work we develop a modified neoclassical theory, in parallel with the old theories, which can include the finite banana width effect and the inhomogeneous heating effect. Several new and significant transport terms have been identified, which can play important roles in the understanding of the fundamental transport processes in a tokamak plasma.

  19. Study of Subsonic Flow Over a TOW 2B Missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Koorosh; Jamali, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to study the subsonic flow over a missile. In this paper, a model of TOW 2B missile is studied. Two computational approaches are being explored, namely solutions based on the Reynolds-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations and solutions based on the inviscid flow (small disturbance theory). The simulations are performed at the Mach number of 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 and 1.0 at four angles of attack of 2, 4, 6 and 8 degree. Results obtained from analytical simulation are compared with numerical data. It is found that lift and drag coefficients would go up by increasing of the angle of attack and the Mach number. Trend of changes of the results that obtained from the small disturbance theory is roughly as same as the numeric solution.

  20. Subsonic Static and Dynamic Aerodynamics of Blunt Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Fremaux, Charles M.; Yates, Leslie A.

    1999-01-01

    The incompressible subsonic aerodynamics of four entry-vehicle shapes with variable c.g. locations are examined in the Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel. The shapes examined are spherically-blunted cones with half-cone angles of 30, 45, and 60 deg. The nose bluntness varies between 0.25 and 0.5 times the base diameter. The Reynolds number based on model diameter for these tests is near 500,000. Quantitative data on attitude and location are collected using a video-based data acquisition system and reduced with a six deg-of-freedom inverse method. All of the shapes examined suffered from strong dynamic instabilities which could produced limit cycles with sufficient amplitudes to overcome static stability of the configuration. Increasing cone half-angle or nose bluntness increases drag but decreases static and dynamic stability.

  1. Inviscid and Viscous Interactions in Subsonic Corner Flows

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kung-Ming; Chang, Po-Hsiung; Chang, Keh-Chin

    2013-01-01

    A flap can be used as a high-lift device, in which a downward deflection results in a gain in lift at a given geometric angle of attack. To characterize the aerodynamic performance of a deflected surface in compressible flows, the present study examines a naturally developed turbulent boundary layer past the convex and concave corners. This investigation involves the analysis of mean and fluctuating pressure distributions. The results obtained indicate strong inviscid-viscous interactions. There are upstream expansion and downstream compression for the convex-corner flows, while the opposite trend is observed for the concave-corner flows. A combined flow similarity parameter, based on the small perturbation theory, is proposed to scale the flow characteristics in both subsonic convex- and concave-corner flows. PMID:23935440

  2. Subsonic Dynamic Stability Tests of a Sample Return Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, C. Michael; Johnson, R. Keith

    2006-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the NASA Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST) to determine the subsonic dynamic stability characteristics of a proposed atmospheric entry vehicle for sample return missions. In particular, the effects of changes in aft-body geometry on stability were examined. Freeflying tests of a dynamically scaled model with various geometric features were conducted, including cases in which the model was perturbed to measure dynamic response. Both perturbed and non-perturbed runs were recorded as motion time histories using the VST optical data acquisition system and reduced for post-test analysis. In addition, preliminary results from a static force and moment test of a similar model in the Langley 12-Foot Low Speed Tunnel are presented. Results indicate that the configuration is dynamically stable for the baseline geometry, but exhibits degraded dynamic behavior for the geometry modifications tested.

  3. Subsonic drag reduction of the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammad Javed; Ahmed, Anwar; Varela-Rodriguez, Edmundo

    1995-01-01

    Various near-wake flow-modifying devices were experimentally evaluated for their effectiveness in increasing base pressure of the Space Shuttle Orbiter at low subsonic speed. The results confirmed the strong three-dimensional character of the orbiter near wake. A base cavity was found to be the most effective mechanism for increasing base pressure. However, for this mechanism to be effective, the cavity had to be longer than the main engine nozzles. Surface characteristics of the base cavity exposed to freestream had a strong influence on the base pressure. The trapped-vortex mechanism due to a back step was found to be effective in increasing the base pressure only in the region of the orbital-maneuvering-system pods. A combination of base-cavity and trapped-vortex mechanisms increased the base pressure by 25%, and the reduction in total drag was approximately 6%.

  4. Zero-length inlets for subsonic V/STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, E. R.; Beck, W. E.; Woollett, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Zero-length inlet performance and associated fan blade stresses were determined during model tests in the NASA-LeRC 9-by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel. The inlet models, which were installed on a 20-inch diameter fan unit, had different inlet lip contraction ratios as well as unslotted, slotted, and double slotted inlet lips. The inlet angle-of-attack boundaries for onset of flow separation were identified and compared to the operating requirements of several generically different subsonic V/STOL aircraft. The zero-length inlets, especially those with slotted lips, were able to satisfy these requirements without compromising the maximum cowl forebody radius. As an aid to the inlet design process, a unique relationship was established between the maximum surface Mach number associated with the separation boundary and the maximum-to-throat surface velocity ratio.

  5. Subsonic Wing Optimization for Handling Qualities Using ACSYNT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soban, Danielle Suzanne

    1996-01-01

    The capability to accurately and rapidly predict aircraft stability derivatives using one comprehensive analysis tool has been created. The PREDAVOR tool has the following capabilities: rapid estimation of stability derivatives using a vortex lattice method, calculation of a longitudinal handling qualities metric, and inherent methodology to optimize a given aircraft configuration for longitudinal handling qualities, including an intuitive graphical interface. The PREDAVOR tool may be applied to both subsonic and supersonic designs, as well as conventional and unconventional, symmetric and asymmetric configurations. The workstation-based tool uses as its model a three-dimensional model of the configuration generated using a computer aided design (CAD) package. The PREDAVOR tool was applied to a Lear Jet Model 23 and the North American XB-70 Valkyrie.

  6. Analysis of an advanced technology subsonic turbofan incorporating revolutionary materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knip, Gerald, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Successful implementation of revolutionary composite materials in an advanced turbofan offers the possibility of further improvements in engine performance and thrust-to-weight ratio relative to current metallic materials. The present analysis determines the approximate engine cycle and configuration for an early 21st century subsonic turbofan incorporating all composite materials. The advanced engine is evaluated relative to a current technology baseline engine in terms of its potential fuel savings for an intercontinental quadjet having a design range of 5500 nmi and a payload of 500 passengers. The resultant near optimum, uncooled, two-spool, advanced engine has an overall pressure ratio of 87, a bypass ratio of 18, a geared fan, and a turbine rotor inlet temperature of 3085 R. Improvements result in a 33-percent fuel saving for the specified misssion. Various advanced composite materials are used throughout the engine. For example, advanced polymer composite materials are used for the fan and the low pressure compressor (LPC).

  7. Sub-sonic thermal explosions investigated by radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Smilowitz, Laura B; Henson, Bryan F; Romero, Jerry J; Asay, Blaine W

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the past 5 years of experiments utilizing radiographic techniques to study defiagration in thermal explosions in HMX based formulations. Details of triggering and timing synchronization are given. Radiographic images collected using both protons and x-rays are presented. Comparisons of experiments with varying size, case confinement, binder, and synchronization are presented. Techniques for quantifying the data in the images are presented and a mechanism for post-ignition burn propagation in a thermal explosion is discussed. From these experiments, we have observed a mechanism for sub-sonic defiagration with both gas phase convective and solid phase conductive burning. The convective front velocity is directly measured from the radiographic images and consumes only a small fraction of the HE. It lights the HE as it passes beginning the slower solid state conductive burn process. This mechanism is used to create a model to simulate the radiographic results and a comparison will be shown.

  8. An Impact-Location Estimation Algorithm for Subsonic Uninhabited Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.; Teets, Edward

    1997-01-01

    An impact-location estimation algorithm is being used at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center to support range safety for uninhabited aerial vehicle flight tests. The algorithm computes an impact location based on the descent rate, mass, and altitude of the vehicle and current wind information. The predicted impact location is continuously displayed on the range safety officer's moving map display so that the flightpath of the vehicle can be routed to avoid ground assets if the flight must be terminated. The algorithm easily adapts to different vehicle termination techniques and has been shown to be accurate to the extent required to support range safety for subsonic uninhabited aerial vehicles. This paper describes how the algorithm functions, how the algorithm is used at NASA Dryden, and how various termination techniques are handled by the algorithm. Other approaches to predicting the impact location and the reasons why they were not selected for real-time implementation are also discussed.

  9. Prediction of subsonic vortex shedding from forebodies with chines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, Michael R.; Lesieutre, Daniel J.

    1990-01-01

    An engineering prediction method and associated computer code VTXCHN to predict nose vortex shedding from circular and noncircular forebodies with sharp chine edges in subsonic flow at angles of attack and roll are presented. Axisymmetric bodies are represented by point sources and doublets, and noncircular cross sections are transformed to a circle by either analytical or numerical conformal transformations. The lee side vortex wake is modeled by discrete vortices in crossflow planes along the body; thus the three-dimensional steady flow problem is reduced to a two-dimensional, unsteady, separated flow problem for solution. Comparison of measured and predicted surface pressure distributions, flow field surveys, and aerodynamic characteristics are presented for noncircular bodies alone and forebodies with sharp chines.

  10. Anode effect elimination by subsonic and sonic vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahan, Tuba; Duman, Ismail; Marsoglu, Muzeyyen

    2009-11-01

    The only method so far used industrially to produce primary aluminum is the combination of the Bayer process with the Hall-Héroult process. The production process of aluminum which was patented by Charles Martin Hall and Paul Louis Toussaint Héroult in 1886, has long been important in our daily lives and that importance is likely to increase year by year. In this study, different subsonic and sonic vibrations, which were obtained from a 0.30 kW, 1,400 rpm three-phase motor, also a 0.55 kW, 2,800 rpm three-phase motor and 0.75 kW frequency converter, were applied to a laboratory-type aluminum electrolysis cell and the possibility of eliminating the anode effect was investigated.

  11. Estimation of Rotary Stability Derivatives at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, Murray; Lessing, Henry C.

    1961-01-01

    The first part of this paper pertains to the estimation of subsonic rotary stability derivatives of wings. The unsteady potential flow problem is solved by a superposition of steady flow solutions. Numerical results for the damping coefficients of triangular wings are presented as functions of aspect ratio and Mach number, and are compared with experimental results over the Mach number range 0 to 1. In the second part, experimental results are used. to point out a close correlation between the nonlinear variations with angle of attack of the static pitching-moment curve slope and the damping-in-pitch coefficient. The underlying basis for the correlation is found as a result of an analysis in which the indicial function concept and. the principle of super-position are adapted to apply to the nonlinear problem. The form of the result suggests a method of estimating nonlinear damping coefficients from results of static wind-tunnel measurements.

  12. Estimating and understanding contemporary large-scale CO2 fluxes using 4D-Var for inverse transport modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Chris; Chipperfield, Martyn; Gloor, Emanuel

    2010-05-01

    Knowledge of fluxes from terrestrial carbon reservoirs is currently uncertain. While the atmospheric burden and oceanic uptake of carbon are well understood, evidence points to a large land sink, equivalent in size to the atmospheric sink. However, neither the nature nor the location of this land reservoir is well known. Atmospheric transport models, such as the CTM TOMCAT, predict the forward transport of carbon in the atmosphere by numerically solving tracer transport equations with respect to conditions based upon observed data. However, if an 'adjoint' to the CTM is created, it can be used to solve the inverse problem of investigating the nature of carbon sources and sinks using information about atmospheric carbon patterns i.e. inverse transport modelling. Due to recent and imminent improvements in remote sensing of atmospheric CO2, there will soon be thorough high-resolution data available which can be used in order to constrain the results from inverse transport modelling. In this work we describe the creation of the adjoint of the TOMCAT CTM and its application to the inverse modeling of carbon fluxes. The inverse model is created through methods involving matrix inversion and iterative minimisation of a cost function involving surface carbon fluxes.

  13. Dominant-Negative Myosin Va Impairs Retrograde but Not Anterograde Axonal Transport of Large Dense Core Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Bittins, Claudia Margarethe; Eichler, Tilo Wolf; Hammer, John A.; Gerdes, Hans-Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Axonal transport of peptide and hormone-containing large dense core vesicles (LDCVs) is known to be a microtubule-dependent process. Here, we suggest a role for the actin-based motor protein myosin Va specifically in retrograde axonal transport of LDCVs. Using live-cell imaging of transfected hippocampal neurons grown in culture, we measured the speed, transport direction, and the number of LDCVs that were labeled with ectopically expressed neuropeptide Y fused to EGFP. Upon expression of a dominant-negative tail construct of myosin Va, a general reduction of movement in both dendrites and axons was observed. In axons, it was particularly interesting that the retrograde speed of LDCVs was significantly impaired, although anterograde transport remained unchanged. Moreover, particles labeled with the dominant-negative construct often moved in the retrograde direction but rarely in the anterograde direction. We suggest a model where myosin Va acts as an actin-dependent vesicle motor that facilitates retrograde axonal transport. PMID:19787448

  14. Real-space method for first-principles electron transport calculations: Self-energy terms of electrodes for large systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Tomoya; Tsukamoto, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    We present a fast and stable numerical technique to obtain the self-energy terms of electrodes for first-principles electron transport calculations. Although first-principles calculations based on the real-space finite-difference method are advantageous for execution on massively parallel computers, large-scale transport calculations are hampered by the computational cost and numerical instability of the computation of the self-energy terms. Using the orthogonal complement vectors of the space spanned by the generalized Bloch waves that actually contribute to transport phenomena, the computational accuracy of transport properties is significantly improved with a moderate computational cost. To demonstrate the efficiency of the present technique, the electron transport properties of a Stone-Wales (SW) defect in graphene and silicene are examined. The resonance scattering of the SW defect is observed in the conductance spectrum of silicene since the σ* state of silicene lies near the Fermi energy. In addition, we found that one conduction channel is sensitive to a defect near the Fermi energy, while the other channel is hardly affected. This characteristic behavior of the conduction channels is interpreted in terms of the bonding network between the bilattices of the honeycomb structure in the formation of the SW defect. The present technique enables us to distinguish the different behaviors of the two conduction channels in graphene and silicene owing to its excellent accuracy.

  15. Subsonic jet pressure fluctuation characterization by tomographic laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martarelli, Milena; Castellini, Paolo; Tomasini, Enrico Primo

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the application of a nonconventional experimental technique based on optical interferometry for the characterization of aeroacoustic sources. The specific test case studied is a turbulent subsonic jet. Traditional experimental methods exploited for the measurement of aerodynamic velocity fields are laser Doppler anemometer and particle image velocimetry which have an important drawback due to the fact that they can measure only if the flow is seeded with tracer particles. The technique proposed, by exploiting a laser Doppler interferometer and a tomographic algorithm for 3D field reconstruction, overcomes the problem of the flow seeding since it allows directly measuring the flow pressure fluctuation due to the flow turbulence. A laser Doppler interferometer indeed is sensitive to the density oscillation within the medium traversed by the laser beam even though it integrates the density oscillation along the entire path traveled by the laser. Consequently, the 3D distribution of the flow density fluctuation can be recovered only by exploiting a tomographic reconstruction algorithm applied to several projections. Finally, the flow pressure fluctuation can be inferred from the flow density measured, which comprehends both the aerodynamic pressure related to the turbulence and the sound pressure due to the propagation of the acoustic waves into the far field. In relation to the test case studied in this paper, e.g., the turbulent subsonic jet, the method allows a complete aeroacoustic characterization of the flow field since it measures both the aerodynamic "cause" of the noise, such as the vortex shedding, and the acoustic "effect" of it, i.e., the sound propagation in the 3D space. The performances and the uncertainty have been evaluated and discussed, and the technique has been experimentally validated.

  16. Transport of suspended sediment and organic carbon during storm events in a large agricultural catchment, southwest France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantha, Oeurng; Sabine, Sauvage; David, Baqué; Alexandra, Coynel; Eric, Maneux; Henri, Etcheber; José-Miguel, Sánchez-Pérez

    2010-05-01

    Intensive agriculture has led to environmental degradation through soil erosion and carbon loss transferred from agricultural land to the stream networks. Suspended sediment transport from the agricultural catchment to the watercourses is responsible for aquatic habitat degradation, reservoir sedimentation, and for transporting sediment associated pollutants (pesticides, nutrient, heavy metals and other toxic substances). Consequently, the temporal transport of suspended sediment (SS), dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC and POC) was investigated during 18 months from January 2008 to June 2009 within a large agricultural catchment in southwest France. This study is based on an extensive dataset with high temporal resolution using manual and automatic sampling, especially during 15 flood events. Two main objectives aim at: (i) studying temporal transport in suspended sediment (SS), DOC and POC with factors explaining their dynamics and (ii) analysing the relationships between discharge, SSC, DOC and POC during flood events. The study demonstrates there is a strong variability of SS, POC and DOC during flood events. The SS transport during different seasonal floods varied by event from 513 to 41 750 t; POC transport varied from 12 to 748 t and DOC transport varied from 9 to 218 t. The specific yield of the catchment represents 76 t km-2 y-1 of sediment, 1.8 t km-2 y-1 of POC and 0.7 t km-2 y-1 of DOC, respectively. The POC associated with sediment transport from the catchment accounted for ~2.5% of the total sediment load. Flood duration and flood magnitude are key factors in determining the sediment and organic carbon transport. Statistical analyses revealed strong correlations between total precipitation, flood discharge, total water yield with suspended sediment and organic transport. The relationships of SSC, POC and DOC versus discharge over temporal flood events resulted in different hysteresis patterns which were used to suggest those dissolved and

  17. Comparison of two methods of phosphorus transport modelling in large areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jáchymová, Barbora; Krása, Josef; Borovec, Jakub

    2015-04-01

    Water erosion is a natural process of soil surface disturbance by rainfall and surface runoff. Phosphorus transported by surface runoff is followed by eutrophication of water bodies and water quality issues. The problem rises with climate change and increasing climate extremity. Agriculture soil, infrastructure and water quality protection have to be ensured by suitable legislative measures. The efficiency of these measures can be proved by suitable mathematical modeling of the soil erosion and nutrient transport to watercourses and water bodies. Research provided by the Department of Irrigation Drainage and Landscape Engineering FCE CTU is focused on the water erosion modeling, including nutrients transport. This research comprises either experimental rainfall-runoff and erosion events measuring or using mathematical models for calculation of runoff and erosion intensity in small and larger basins. The long-term erosion intensity on the area of 32 thousand square kilometers has been calculated using the empiric model WATEM/SEDEM. Within the project (QI102A265) the methodology for the dissolved phosphorus transport direct determination has been derived (Borovec et al., 2012; Jan et al., 2013). Only total soluble P affects actual water eutrophication. Phosphorus can be released, temporarily retained or permanently locked up, depending on the particles composition and the water body and sediment conditions. According the new methodology phosphorus desorption from the sediment particles is defined by actual dissolved P concentration within the stream and the available P (defined by Mehlich III test) in the source agricultural fields. This article presents the comparison between the indirect determination of the transported dissolved phosphorus using the equation of Sharpley (1995), based on usually used enrichment ratio and assumed share of the dissolved phosphorus in the total transported phosphorus during erosion event, and the direct determination of the

  18. Aeroelastic characteristics of a cascade of mistuned blades in subsonic and supersonic flows. [turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielb, R. E.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of mistuning on flutter and forced response of a cascade in subsonic in subsonic and supersonic flow were investigated. The aerodynamic and structural coupling between the bending and torsional motions and the aerodynamic coupling between the blades were studied. It is shown that frequency mistuning always has a beneficial effect on flutter. For the cascade considered, the potential for raising flutter speed is greater in subsonic than in supersonic flow. Preliminary results for structural damping mistuning show that there are no additional benefits over adding damping mistuning may have either a beneficial or an adverse effect on forced response, depending on the engine order of the excitation and Mach number.

  19. Investigation of the Physical Processes Governing Large-scale Tracer Transport in the Stratosphere and Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selkirk, Henry B.

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews the second year of a three-year research program to investigate the physical mechanisms which underlie the transport of trace constituents in the stratosphere- troposphere system. The primary scientific goal of the research is to identify the processes which transport air masses within the lower stratosphere, particularly between the tropics and middle latitudes. The SASS program seeks to understand the impact of the present and future fleets of conventional jet traffic on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, while complementary airborne observations under UARP seek to understand the complex interactions of dynamical and chemical processes that affect the ozone layer. The present investigation contributes to the goals of each of these by diagnosing the history of air parcels intercepted by NASA research aircraft in UARP and AEAP campaigns.

  20. Beyond isolated cells: microfluidic transport of large tissue for pancreatic cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ronnie; Murphy, Rachel G.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-03-01

    For cancer diagnoses, core biopsies (CBs) obtained from patients using coring needles (CNs) are traditionally visualized and assessed on microscope slides by pathologists after samples are processed and sectioned. A fundamental gain in optical information (i.e., diagnosis/staging) may be achieved when whole, unsectioned CBs (L = 5-20, D = 0.5-2.0 mm) are analyzed in 3D. This approach preserves CBs for traditional pathology and maximizes the diagnostic potential of patient samples. To bridge CNs/CBs with imaging, our group developed a microfluidic device that performs biospecimen preparation on unsectioned CBs for pathology. The ultimate goal is an automated and rapid point-of-care system that aids pathologists by processing tissue for advanced 3D imaging platforms. An inherent, but essential device feature is the microfluidic transport of CBs, which has not been previously investigated. Early experiments demonstrated proof-of-concept: pancreas CBs (D = 0.3-2.0 mm) of set lengths were transported in straight/curved microchannels, but dimensional tolerance and flow rates were variable, and preservation of CB integrity was uncontrolled. A second study used metal cylinder substitutes (L = 10, D = 1 mm) in microchannels to understand the transport mechanism. However, CBs are imperfectly shaped, rough, porous and viscoelastic. In this study, fresh/formalin-fixed porcine and human pancreas CBs were deposited into our device through a custom interface using clinical CNs. CB integrity (i.e., sample viability) may be assessed at every stage using an optomechanical metric: physical breaks were determined when specimen intensity profile data deviated beyond xavg + 2σ. Flow rates for human CBs were determined for several CNs, and microfluidic transport of fresh and formalin-fixed CBs was analyzed.

  1. Beyond isolated cells: microfluidic transport of large tissue for pancreatic cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Ronnie; Murphy, Rachel G.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    For cancer diagnoses, core biopsies (CBs) obtained from patients using coring needles (CNs) are traditionally visualized and assessed on microscope slides by pathologists after samples are processed and sectioned. A fundamental gain in optical information (i.e., diagnosis/staging) may be achieved when whole, unsectioned CBs (L = 5–20, D = 0.5–2.0 mm) are analyzed in 3D. This approach preserves CBs for traditional pathology and maximizes the diagnostic potential of patient samples. To bridge CNs/CBs with imaging, our group developed a microfluidic device that performs biospecimen preparation on unsectioned CBs for pathology. The ultimate goal is an automated and rapid point-of-care system that aids pathologists by processing tissue for advanced 3D imaging platforms. An inherent, but essential device feature is the microfluidic transport of CBs, which has not been previously investigated. Early experiments demonstrated proof-of-concept: pancreas CBs (D = 0.3–2.0 mm) of set lengths were transported in straight/curved microchannels, but dimensional tolerance and flow rates were variable, and preservation of CB integrity was uncontrolled. A second study used metal cylinder substitutes (L = 10, D = 1 mm) in microchannels to understand the transport mechanism. However, CBs are imperfectly shaped, rough, porous and viscoelastic. In this study, fresh/formalin-fixed porcine and human pancreas CBs were deposited into our device through a custom interface using clinical CNs. CB integrity (i.e., sample viability) may be assessed at every stage using an optomechanical metric: physical breaks were determined when specimen intensity profile data deviated beyond xavg + 2σ. Flow rates for human CBs were determined for several CNs, and microfluidic transport of fresh and formalin-fixed CBs was analyzed. PMID:25914501

  2. Characterization of butyrate transport across the luminal membranes of equine large intestine.

    PubMed

    Nedjadi, Taoufik; Moran, Andrew W; Al-Rammahi, Miran A; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2014-10-01

    The diet of the horse, pasture forage (grass), is fermented by the equine colonic microbiota to short-chain fatty acids, notably acetate, propionate and butyrate. Short-chain fatty acids provide a major source of energy for the horse and contribute to many vital physiological processes. We aimed to determine both the mechanism of butyrate uptake across the luminal membrane of equine colon and the nature of the protein involved. To this end, we isolated equine colonic luminal membrane vesicles. The abundance and activity of cysteine-sensitive alkaline phosphatase and villin, intestinal luminal membrane markers, were significantly enriched in membrane vesicles compared with the original homogenates. In contrast, the abundance of GLUT2 protein and the activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, known markers of the intestinal basolateral membrane, were hardly detectable. We demonstrated, by immunohistochemistry, that monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) protein is expressed on the luminal membrane of equine colonocytes. We showed that butyrate transport into luminal membrane vesicles is energized by a pH gradient (out < in) and is not Na(+) dependent. Moreover, butyrate uptake is time and concentration dependent, with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 5.6 ± 0.45 mm and maximal velocity of 614 ± 55 pmol s(-1) (mg protein)(-1). Butyrate transport is significantly inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, phloretin and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, all potent inhibitors of MCT1. Moreover, acetate and propionate, as well as the monocarboxylates pyruvate and lactate, also inhibit butyrate uptake. Data presented here support the conclusion that transport of butyrate across the equine colonic luminal membrane is predominantly accomplished by MCT1. PMID:25172888

  3. Characterizing, for packaging and transport, large objects contaminated by radioactive material having a limited A{sub 2} value

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, R.B.; Shappert, L.B.; Michelhaugh, R.D.; Cash, J.M.; Best, R.E.

    1998-02-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Regulations for the safe packaging and transportation of radioactive materials follow a graded approach to the requirements for both packaging and controls during transport. The concept is that, the lower the risk posed to the people and the environment by the contents, (1) the less demanding are the packaging requirements and (2) the smaller in number are the controls imposed on the transport of the material. There are likely to be a great number of situations arising in coming years when large objects, contaminated with radioactive material having unlimited A{sub 2} values will result from various decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities and will then require shipment from the D and D site to a disposal site. Such situations may arise relatively frequently during the cleanup of operations involving mining, milling, feedstock, and uranium enrichment processing facilities. Because these objects are contaminated with materials having an unlimited A{sub 2} value they present a low radiological risk to worker and public safety and to the environment during transport. However, when these radioactive materials reside on the surfaces of equipment and other large objects, where the equipment and objects themselves are not radioactive, the radioactive materials appear as surface contamination and, if the contaminated object is categorized as a surface contaminated object, it would need to be packaged for shipment according to the requirements of the Regulations for SCO. Despite this categorization, alternatives may be available which will allow these contaminants, when considered by themselves for packaging and transport, to be categorized as either (1) a limited quantity of radioactive material to be shipped in an excepted package or (2) low specific activity (LSA) materials to be shipped in an IP-1 package or possibly even shipped unpackaged. These options are discussed in this paper.

  4. A Ground-Based Research Vehicle for Base Drag Studies at Subsonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diebler, Corey; Smith, Mark

    2002-01-01

    A ground research vehicle (GRV) has been developed to study the base drag on large-scale vehicles at subsonic speeds. Existing models suggest that base drag is dependent upon vehicle forebody drag, and for certain configurations, the total drag of a vehicle can be reduced by increasing its forebody drag. Although these models work well for small projectile shapes, studies have shown that they do not provide accurate predictions when applied to large-scale vehicles. Experiments are underway at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center to collect data at Reynolds numbers to a maximum of 3 x 10(exp 7), and to formulate a new model for predicting the base drag of trucks, buses, motor homes, reentry vehicles, and other large-scale vehicles. Preliminary tests have shown errors as great as 70 percent compared to Hoerner's two-dimensional base drag prediction. This report describes the GRV and its capabilities, details the studies currently underway at NASA Dryden, and presents preliminary results of both the effort to formulate a new base drag model and the investigation into a method of reducing total drag by manipulating forebody drag.

  5. Structural Composition and Turbulent Mixing Mechanisms of a Subsonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechlars, Patrick; Sandberg, Richard; Aerodynamics; Flight Mechanics Group-Southampton Team

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent mixing is a key mechanism for redistributing energy in a wide range of flows. The effect of this mixing on the flow is similar to that of viscous diffusion and the process is therefore often described as turbulent diffusion. Turbulence models based on the Boussinesq approximation rely on the accuracy of the model's description of the mixing to capture the correct energy redistribution. In this presentation the basic mechanism is illustrated using a subsonic turbulent boundary layer (TBL) as a case study, and the direct influence of turbulence on the mean flow is quantified. Through a characteristic analysis the structures involved in the mixing mechanism are identified and further analyzed. The key structures for the mixing in a TBL are large clusters of smaller turbulent structures that are known as large scale motions (LSMs). While the smaller structures are located in the near-wall region they mainly align in the stream-wise direction and pack densely, which affects production and dissipation. Within the LSMs the single vortices reach towards the outer regions and develop an arbitrary alignment as soon as their distance to the wall is sufficiently large. The discussed mechanisms are not limited to TBLs and a comparison to a jet flow is provided in the talk. The authors acknowledge EPSRC for supporting this project under the grand number EP/I003754/1.

  6. Preliminary results from a subsonic high-angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system - Design, calibration, algorithm development, and flight test evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.; Larson, Terry J.

    1990-01-01

    A nonintrusive high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system was installed and flight-tested on the F-18 high alpha research vehicle. This paper discusses the airdata algorithm development and composite results expressed as airdata parameter estimates and describes the HI-FADS system hardware, calibration techniques, and algorithm development. An independent empirical verification was performed over a large portion of the subsonic flight envelope. Test points were obtained for Mach numbers from 0.15 to 0.94 and angles of attack from -8.0 to 55.0 deg. Angles of sideslip ranged from -15.0 to 15.0 deg, and test altitudes ranged from 18,000 to 40,000 ft. The HI-FADS system gave excellent results over the entire subsonic Mach number range up to 55 deg angle of attack. The internal pneumatic frequency response of the system is accurate to beyond 10 Hz.

  7. An isogeometric variational multiscale method for large-eddy simulation of coupled multi-ion transport in turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Georg; Gamnitzer, Peter; Gravemeier, Volker; Emmy Noether Research Group “Computational Multiscale Methods for Turbulent Combustion”, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85747 Garching ; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •We present a computational method for coupled multi-ion transport in turbulent flow. •The underlying formulation is a variational multiscale finite element method. •It is combined with the isogeometric concept for electrochemical systems. •Coupled multi-ion transport in fully turbulent Taylor–Couette flow is simulated. •This example is an important model problem for rotating cylinder electrodes. -- Abstract: Electrochemical processes, such as electroplating of large items in galvanic baths, are often coupled to turbulent flow. In this study, we propose an isogeometric residual-based variational multiscale finite element method for multi-ion transport in dilute electrolyte solutions under turbulent flow conditions. In other words, this means that the concepts of isogeometric discretization and variational multiscale methods are successfully combined for developing a method capable of simulating the challenging problem of coupled multi-ion transport in turbulent flow. We present a comprehensive three-dimensional computational method taking into account, among others, coupled convection–diffusion-migration equations subject to an electroneutrality constraint in combination with phenomenological electrode-kinetics modeling. The electrochemical subproblem is one-way coupled to turbulent incompressible flow via convection. Ionic mass transfer in turbulent Taylor–Couette flow is investigated, representing an important model problem for rotating-cylinder-electrode configurations. Multi-ion transport as considered here is an example for mass transport at high Schmidt number (Sc=1389). An isogeometric discretization is especially advantageous for the present problem, since (i) curved boundaries can be represented exactly, and (ii) it has been proven to provide very accurate solutions for flow quantities when being applied in combination with residual-based variational multiscale modeling. We demonstrate that the method is robust and provides

  8. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  9. Effect of Internal Aperture Variability on Tracer Transport in Large Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, N.; Painter, S. L.; Hyman, J.; Karra, S.; Gable, C. W.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Aperture variability within individual fractures is usually neglected in modeling flow and transport through fractured media. Typically, individual fractures are assumed to be homogeneous. However, in reality, individual fractures are heterogeneous, which may affect flow and transport in fractured media. The relative importance of including in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling has been under debate for a long time. Previous studies have shown flow channeling on an individual fracture with internal variability, where the fracture is considered isolated from the rest of the fracture network. Although these studies yield some clear insights into the process, the boundary conditions are impractical for field-scale networks, where the realistic boundary conditions are determined by fracture connections in the network. Therefore, flow in a single fracture is controlled not only by in-fracture variability but also by boundary conditions. In order to address the question of the importance of in-fracture variability, the internal heterogeneity of every individual fracture is incorporated into a three-dimensional fracture network, represented by a composition of intersecting fractures. The new DFN simulation capability, dfnWorks, is used to generate a kilometer scale DFNs similar to the Forsmark, Sweden site. In our DFN model, the in-fracture aperture variability is scattered over each cell of the computational mesh along the fracture, representing by a stationary Gaussian random field with various correlation lengths. The Lagrangian particle tracking is conducted in multiple DFN realizations and the flow-dependent Lagrangian parameters, non-reacting travel time, τ, and cumulative reactivity parameter, β, are obtained along particles streamlines. It is shown that early particle travel times are more sensitive to in-fracture aperture variability than tails of travel time distributions, where no significant effect of the aperture variations and spatial

  10. Inverse transport modeling of volcanic sulfur dioxide emissions using large-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Yi; Hoffmann, Lars; Griessbach, Sabine; Rößler, Thomas; Stein, Olaf

    2016-05-01

    An inverse transport modeling approach based on the concepts of sequential importance resampling and parallel computing is presented to reconstruct altitude-resolved time series of volcanic emissions, which often cannot be obtained directly with current measurement techniques. A new inverse modeling and simulation system, which implements the inversion approach with the Lagrangian transport model Massive-Parallel Trajectory Calculations (MPTRAC) is developed to provide reliable transport simulations of volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2). In the inverse modeling system MPTRAC is used to perform two types of simulations, i.e., unit simulations for the reconstruction of volcanic emissions and final forward simulations. Both types of transport simulations are based on wind fields of the ERA-Interim meteorological reanalysis of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts. The reconstruction of altitude-dependent SO2 emission time series is also based on Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) satellite observations. A case study for the eruption of the Nabro volcano, Eritrea, in June 2011, with complex emission patterns, is considered for method validation. Meteosat Visible and InfraRed Imager (MVIRI) near-real-time imagery data are used to validate the temporal development of the reconstructed emissions. Furthermore, the altitude distributions of the emission time series are compared with top and bottom altitude measurements of aerosol layers obtained by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) satellite instruments. The final forward simulations provide detailed spatial and temporal information on the SO2 distributions of the Nabro eruption. By using the critical success index (CSI), the simulation results are evaluated with the AIRS observations. Compared to the results with an assumption of a constant flux of SO2 emissions, our inversion approach leads to an improvement

  11. Effects of molecular adsorption on carrier transport properties of large-size graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shiu-Ming; Kumar, Pushpendra

    2015-01-14

    The temperature dependent resistance and thermoelectric power of macroscopic graphenes are studied in various gas environments. The temperature dependent slope of resistance is weaker in gas environments with heavier molecules. Following the temperature dependent slopes of normalized resistance, one can identify the molecular mass of the environmental gas. This is relative to the atomically sharp potential modification due to adsorbed gas molecules on the graphene. The temperature dependent thermopower increases as the mass of the gas molecules increases. A universal relationship between resistance and thermoelectric power in various gas environments further confirms that the transport mechanism is dominated by the adsorbed gas molecules on the graphene surface.

  12. Boeing 747 aircraft with large external pod for transporting outsize cargo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, J. E.; Quartero, C. B.; Smith, P. M.; Washburn, G. F.

    1979-01-01

    The effect on structural arrangement, system weight, and range performance of the cargo pod payload carrying capability was determined to include either the bridge launcher or a spacelab module on a Boeing 747 aircraft. Modifications to the carrier aircraft and the installation time required to attach the external pod to the 747 were minimized. Results indicate that the increase in pod size was minimal, and that the basic 747 structure was adequate to safely absorb the load induced by ground or air operation while transporting either payload.

  13. Response to comments on "Large volcanic aerosol load in the stratosphere linked to Asian monsoon transport".

    PubMed

    Bourassa, Adam E; Robock, Alan; Randel, William J; Deshler, Terry; Rieger, Landon A; Lloyd, Nicholas D; Llewellyn, E J; Degenstein, Douglas A

    2013-02-01

    Fromm et al. and Vernier et al. suggest that their analyses of satellite measurements indicate that the main part of the Nabro volcanic plume from the eruption on 13 June 2011 was directly injected into the stratosphere. We address these analyses and, in addition, show that both wind trajectories and height-resolved profiles of sulfur dioxide indicate that although the eruption column may have extended higher than the Smithsonian report we highlighted, it was overwhelmingly tropospheric. Additionally, the height-resolved sulfur dioxide profiles provide further convincing evidence for convective transport of volcanic gas to the stratosphere from deep convection associated with the Asian monsoon. PMID:23393248

  14. A CASE STUDY OF CHLORINE TRANSPORT AND FATE FOLLOWING A LARGE ACCIDENTAL RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R.; Hunter, C.; Werth, D.; Whiteside, M.; Chen, K.; Mazzola, C.

    2012-08-01

    A train derailment that occurred in Graniteville, South Carolina during the early morning hours of 06 January, 2005 resulted in the prompt release of approximately 60 tons of chlorine to the environment. Comprehensive modeling of the transport and fate of this release was performed including the characterization of the initial three-phased chlorine release, a detailed determination of the local atmospheric conditions acting to generate, disperse, and deplete the chlorine vapor cloud, the establishment of physical exchange mechanisms between the airborne vapor and local surface waters, and local aquatic dilution and mixing.

  15. Interacting Effects of Discharge and Channel Morphology on Transport of Semibuoyant Fish Eggs in Large, Altered River Systems

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Thomas A.; Brewer, Shannon K.; Farless, Nicole; Grabowski, Timothy B.; Gregory, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and flow regulation are significant factors related to the decline and extinction of freshwater biota. Pelagic-broadcast spawning cyprinids require moving water and some length of unfragmented stream to complete their life cycle. However, it is unknown how discharge and habitat features interact at multiple spatial scales to alter the transport of semi-buoyant fish eggs. Our objective was to assess the relationship between downstream drift of semi-buoyant egg surrogates (gellan beads) and discharge and habitat complexity. We quantified transport time of a known quantity of beads using 2–3 sampling devices at each of seven locations on the North Canadian and Canadian rivers. Transport time was assessed based on median capture time (time at which 50% of beads were captured) and sampling period (time period when 2.5% and 97.5% of beads were captured). Habitat complexity was assessed by calculating width∶depth ratios at each site, and several habitat metrics determined using analyses of aerial photographs. Median time of egg capture was negatively correlated to site discharge. The temporal extent of the sampling period at each site was negatively correlated to both site discharge and habitat-patch dispersion. Our results highlight the role of discharge in driving transport times, but also indicate that higher dispersion of habitat patches relates to increased retention of beads within the river. These results could be used to target restoration activities or prioritize water use to create and maintain habitat complexity within large, fragmented river systems. PMID:24802361

  16. Overview of transport and MHD stability study: focusing on the impact of magnetic field topology in the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Inagaki, S.; Kasahara, H.; Evans, T.; Yoshinuma, M.; Kamiya, K.; Ohdach, S.; Osakabe, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Sudo, S.; Itoh, K.; Akiyama, T.; Emoto, M.; Dinklage, A.; Du, X.; Fujii, K.; Goto, M.; Goto, T.; Hasuo, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Ichiguchi, K.; Ishizawa, A.; Jakubowski, M.; Kawamura, G.; Kato, D.; Morita, S.; Mukai, K.; Murakami, I.; Murakami, S.; Narushima, Y.; Nunami, M.; Ohno, N.; Pablant, N.; Sakakibara, S.; Seki, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Shoji, M.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Todo, Y.; Wang, H.; Yokoyama, M.; Yamada, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Mutoh, T.; Imagawa, S.; Mito, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Ashikawa, N.; Chikaraishi, H.; Ejiri, A.; Furukawa, M.; Fujita, T.; Hamaguchi, S.; Igami, H.; Isobe, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Morisaki, T.; Motojima, G.; Nagasaki, K.; Nakano, H.; Oya, Y.; Suzuki, C.; Suzuki, Y.; Sakamoto, R.; Sakamoto, M.; Sanpei, A.; Takahashi, H.; Tsuchiya, H.; Tokitani, M.; Ueda, Y.; Yoshimura, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Nishimura, K.; Sugama, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Idei, H.; Isayama, A.; Kitajima, S.; Masamune, S.; Shinohara, K.; Bawankar, P. S.; Bernard, E.; von Berkel, M.; Funaba, H.; Huang, X. L.; T., Ii; Ido, T.; Ikeda, K.; Kamio, S.; Kumazawa, R.; Kobayashi, T.; Moon, C.; Muto, S.; Miyazawa, J.; Ming, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishimura, S.; Ogawa, K.; Ozaki, T.; Oishi, T.; Ohno, M.; Pandya, S.; Shimizu, A.; Seki, R.; Sano, R.; Saito, K.; Sakaue, H.; Takemura, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, H.; Toi, K.; Wieland, B.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Zhang, H.; Kaneko, O.; Komori, A.; Collaborators

    2015-10-01

    The progress in the understanding of the physics and the concurrent parameter extension in the large helical device since the last IAEA-FEC, in 2012 (Kaneko O et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 095024), is reviewed. Plasma with high ion and electron temperatures (Ti(0) ˜ Te(0) ˜ 6 keV) with simultaneous ion and electron internal transport barriers is obtained by controlling recycling and heating deposition. A sign flip of the nondiffusive term of impurity/momentum transport (residual stress and convection flow) is observed, which is associated with the formation of a transport barrier. The impact of the topology of three-dimensional magnetic fields (stochastic magnetic fields and magnetic islands) on heat momentum, particle/impurity transport and magnetohydrodynamic stability is also discussed. In the steady state operation, a 48 min discharge with a line-averaged electron density of 1 × 1019 m-3 and with high electron and ion temperatures (Ti(0) ˜ Te(0) ˜ 2 keV), resulting in 3.36 GJ of input energy, is achieved.

  17. Interacting effects of discharge and channel morphology on transport of semibuoyant fish eggs in large, altered river systems.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Thomas A; Brewer, Shannon K; Farless, Nicole; Grabowski, Timothy B; Gregory, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and flow regulation are significant factors related to the decline and extinction of freshwater biota. Pelagic-broadcast spawning cyprinids require moving water and some length of unfragmented stream to complete their life cycle. However, it is unknown how discharge and habitat features interact at multiple spatial scales to alter the transport of semi-buoyant fish eggs. Our objective was to assess the relationship between downstream drift of semi-buoyant egg surrogates (gellan beads) and discharge and habitat complexity. We quantified transport time of a known quantity of beads using 2-3 sampling devices at each of seven locations on the North Canadian and Canadian rivers. Transport time was assessed based on median capture time (time at which 50% of beads were captured) and sampling period (time period when 2.5% and 97.5% of beads were captured). Habitat complexity was assessed by calculating width∶depth ratios at each site, and several habitat metrics determined using analyses of aerial photographs. Median time of egg capture was negatively correlated to site discharge. The temporal extent of the sampling period at each site was negatively correlated to both site discharge and habitat-patch dispersion. Our results highlight the role of discharge in driving transport times, but also indicate that higher dispersion of habitat patches relates to increased retention of beads within the river. These results could be used to target restoration activities or prioritize water use to create and maintain habitat complexity within large, fragmented river systems. PMID:24802361

  18. Investigation of a Technique for Measuring Dynamic Ground Effect in a Subsonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Sharon S.

    1999-01-01

    To better understand the ground effect encountered by slender wing supersonic transport aircraft, a test was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center's 14 x 22 foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel in October, 1997. Emphasis was placed on improving the accuracy of the ground effect data by using a "dynamic" technique in which the model's vertical motion was varied automatically during wind-on testing. This report describes and evaluates different aspects of the dynamic method utilized for obtaining ground effect data in this test. The method for acquiring and processing time data from a dynamic ground effect wind tunnel test is outlined with details of the overall data acquisition system and software used for the data analysis. The removal of inertial loads due to sting motion and the support dynamics in the balance force and moment data measurements of the aerodynamic forces on the model is described. An evaluation of the results identifies problem areas providing recommendations for future experiments. Test results are validated by comparing test data for an elliptical wing planform with an Elliptical wing planform section with a NACA 0012 airfoil to results found in current literature. Major aerodynamic forces acting on the model in terms of lift curves for determining ground effect are presented. Comparisons of flight and wind tunnel data for the TU-144 are presented.

  19. Aftbody Closure Effects on the Reference H Configuration at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahls, Richard A.; Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Londenberg, W. Kelly

    1999-01-01

    Experience with afterbody closure effects and accompanying test techniques issues on a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT)-class configuration is described. An experimental data base has been developed which includes force, moment, and surface pressure data for the High Speed Research (HSR) Reference H configuration with a closed afterbody at subsonic and transonic speeds, and with a cylindrical afterbody at transonic and supersonic speeds. A supporting computational study has been performed using the USM3D unstructured Euler solver for the purposes of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method assessment and model support system interference assessment with a focus on lower blade mount effects on longitudinal data at transonic speeds. Test technique issues related to a lower blade sting mount strategy are described based on experience in the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The assessment and application of the USM3D code to the afterbody/sting interference problem is discussed. Finally, status and plans to address critical test technique issues and for continuation of the computational study are presented.

  20. An Overview of NASA's SubsoniC Research Aircraft Testbed (SCRAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, Ethan; Hernandez, Joe; Ruhf, John

    2013-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center acquired a Gulfstream III (GIII) aircraft to serve as a testbed for aeronautics flight research experiments. The aircraft is referred to as SCRAT, which stands for SubsoniC Research Aircraft Testbed. The aircraft’s mission is to perform aeronautics research; more specifically raising the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of advanced technologies through flight demonstrations and gathering high-quality research data suitable for verifying the technologies, and validating design and analysis tools. The SCRAT has the ability to conduct a range of flight research experiments throughout a transport class aircraft’s flight envelope. Experiments ranging from flight-testing of a new aircraft system or sensor to those requiring structural and aerodynamic modifications to the aircraft can be accomplished. The aircraft has been modified to include an instrumentation system and sensors necessary to conduct flight research experiments along with a telemetry capability. An instrumentation power distribution system was installed to accommodate the instrumentation system and future experiments. An engineering simulation of the SCRAT has been developed to aid in integrating research experiments. A series of baseline aircraft characterization flights has been flown that gathered flight data to aid in developing and integrating future research experiments. This paper describes the SCRAT’s research systems and capabilities