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Sample records for large t-antigen atp-binding

  1. Validation of BKV Large T-antigen ATP-Binding Site as a Target for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Gang; Bueno, Marta; Camachos, Carlos J; Randhawa, Parmjeet

    2009-01-01

    Summary BK virus large T antigen (LTA) is a hexameric protein with a helicase activity that is powered by ATP hydrolysis. A mutant virus with Lys420Ala, Arg421Ala, and Asp504Ala mutations at the ATP binding sites showed marked reduction in viral fitness. This observation indicates that high throughput screening for ATPase inhibitors will be valid strategy to discover anti-BKV drugs. PMID:19084558

  2. Temperature-sensitive mutants identify crucial structural regions of simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Loeber, G; Tevethia, M J; Schwedes, J F; Tegtmeyer, P

    1989-01-01

    We have completed the cloning and sequencing of all known temperature-sensitive, amino acid substitution mutants of simian virus 40 large T antigen (tsA mutants). Surprisingly, many of the mutants isolated from distinct viral strains by different laboratories are identical. Thus, 17 independently isolated mutants represent only eight distinct genotypes. This remarkable clustering of tsA mutations in a few "hot spots" in the amino acid sequence of T antigen and the temperature-sensitive phenotypes of the mutations strongly suggest that these amino acids play crucial roles in organizing the structure of one or more functional domains. Most of the mutations are located in highly conserved regions of T antigen that correlate with DNA binding, protein-protein interactions, or ATP binding. With the exception of one mutant with a lesion in the putative ATP-binding region, all the mutants are temperature sensitive for DNA replication. PMID:2778883

  3. Mapping of phosphorylation sites in polyomavirus large T antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Hassauer, M.; Scheidtmann, K.H.; Walter, G.

    1986-06-01

    The phosphorylation sites of polyomavirus large T antigen from infected or transformed cells were investigated. Tryptic digestion of large T antigen from infected, /sup 32/P/sub i/-labeled cells revealed seven major phosphopeptides. Five of these were phosphorylated only at serine residues, and two were phosphorylated at serine and threonine residues. The overall ratio of phosphoserine to phosphothreonine was 6:1. The transformed cell line B4 expressed two polyomavirus-specific phosphoproteins: large T antigen, which was only weakly phosphorylated, and a truncated form of large T antigen of 34,000 molecular weight which was heavily phosphorylated. Both showed phosphorylation patterns similar to that of large T antigen from infected cells. Peptide analyses of large T antigens encoded by the deletion mutants dl8 and dl23 or of specific fragments of wild-type large T antigen indicated that the phosphorylation sites are located in an amino-terminal region upstream of residue 194. The amino acid composition of the phosphopeptides as revealed by differential labeling with various amino acids indicated that several phosphopeptides contain overlapping sequences and that all phosphorylation sites are located in four tryptic peptides derived from a region between Met71 and Arg191. Two of the potential phosphorylation sites were identified as Ser81 and Thr187. The possible role of this modification of large T antigen is discussed.

  4. Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen has growth-promoting and inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jingwei; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Paulson, Kelly G; Nghiem, Paul; DeCaprio, James A

    2013-06-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive form of skin cancer. In at least 80% of all MCC, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) DNA has undergone clonal integration into the host cell genome, and most tumors express the MCPyV large and small T antigens. In all cases of MCC reported to date, the integrated MCPyV genome has undergone mutations in the large T antigen. These mutations result in expression of a truncated large T antigen that retains the Rb binding or LXCXE motif but deletes the DNA binding and helicase domains. However, the transforming functions of full-length and truncated MCPyV large T antigen are unknown. We compared the transforming activities of full-length, truncated, and alternatively spliced 57kT forms of MCPyV large T antigen. MCPyV large T antigen could bind to Rb but was unable to bind to p53. Furthermore, MCPyV-truncated large T antigen was more effective than full-length and 57kT large T antigen in promoting the growth of human and mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, expression of the MCPyV large T antigen C-terminal 100 residues could inhibit the growth of several different cell types. These data imply that the deletion of the C terminus of MCPyV large T antigen found in MCC serves not only to disrupt viral replication but also results in the loss of a distinct growth-inhibitory function intrinsic to this region. PMID:23514892

  5. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Large T Antigen Has Growth-Promoting and Inhibitory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jingwei; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Paulson, Kelly G.; Nghiem, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive form of skin cancer. In at least 80% of all MCC, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) DNA has undergone clonal integration into the host cell genome, and most tumors express the MCPyV large and small T antigens. In all cases of MCC reported to date, the integrated MCPyV genome has undergone mutations in the large T antigen. These mutations result in expression of a truncated large T antigen that retains the Rb binding or LXCXE motif but deletes the DNA binding and helicase domains. However, the transforming functions of full-length and truncated MCPyV large T antigen are unknown. We compared the transforming activities of full-length, truncated, and alternatively spliced 57kT forms of MCPyV large T antigen. MCPyV large T antigen could bind to Rb but was unable to bind to p53. Furthermore, MCPyV-truncated large T antigen was more effective than full-length and 57kT large T antigen in promoting the growth of human and mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, expression of the MCPyV large T antigen C-terminal 100 residues could inhibit the growth of several different cell types. These data imply that the deletion of the C terminus of MCPyV large T antigen found in MCC serves not only to disrupt viral replication but also results in the loss of a distinct growth-inhibitory function intrinsic to this region. PMID:23514892

  6. Nuclear localization of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Sato, Yuko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ito, Hideki; Shimonohara, Nozomi; Tsuji, Takahiro; Nakajima, Noriko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Matsuo, Koma; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Katano, Harutaka

    2010-03-15

    To clarify whether mutations in the large T gene encoded by Merkel cell polyomavirus affect the expression and function of large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma cases, we investigated the expression of large T antigen in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal antibody revealed that large T antigen was expressed in the nuclei of Merkel cell carcinoma cells with Merkel cell polyomavirus infection. Deletion mutant analyses identified an Arg-Lys-Arg-Lys sequence (amino acids 277-280) as a nuclear localization signal in large T antigen. Sequence analyses revealed that there were no mutations in the nuclear localization signal in any of the eleven Merkel cell polyomavirus strains examined. Furthermore, stop codons were not observed in the upstream of the nuclear localization signal in any of the Merkel cell carcinoma cases examined. These data suggest that the nuclear localization signal is highly conserved and functional in Merkel cell carcinoma cases.

  7. Specific Antibodies Reacting with SV40 Large T Antigen Mimotopes in Serum Samples of Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tognon, Mauro; Corallini, Alfredo; Manfrini, Marco; Taronna, Angelo; Butel, Janet S.; Pietrobon, Silvia; Trevisiol, Lorenzo; Bononi, Ilaria; Vaccher, Emanuela; Barbanti-Brodano, Giuseppe; Martini, Fernanda; Mazzoni, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Simian Virus 40, experimentally assayed in vitro in different animal and human cells and in vivo in rodents, was classified as a small DNA tumor virus. In previous studies, many groups identified Simian Virus 40 sequences in healthy individuals and cancer patients using PCR techniques, whereas others failed to detect the viral sequences in human specimens. These conflicting results prompted us to develop a novel indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides, mimicking Simian Virus 40 capsid viral protein antigens, named mimotopes. This immunologic assay allowed us to investigate the presence of serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 and to verify whether Simian Virus 40 is circulating in humans. In this investigation two mimotopes from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen, the viral replication protein and oncoprotein, were employed to analyze for specific reactions to human sera antibodies. This indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen was used to assay a new collection of serum samples from healthy subjects. This novel assay revealed that serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 large T antigen mimotopes are detectable, at low titer, in healthy subjects aged from 18–65 years old. The overall prevalence of reactivity with the two Simian Virus 40 large T antigen peptides was 20%. This new ELISA with two mimotopes of the early viral regions is able to detect in a specific manner Simian Virus 40 large T antigen-antibody responses. PMID:26731525

  8. Specific Antibodies Reacting with SV40 Large T Antigen Mimotopes in Serum Samples of Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Tognon, Mauro; Corallini, Alfredo; Manfrini, Marco; Taronna, Angelo; Butel, Janet S; Pietrobon, Silvia; Trevisiol, Lorenzo; Bononi, Ilaria; Vaccher, Emanuela; Barbanti-Brodano, Giuseppe; Martini, Fernanda; Mazzoni, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Simian Virus 40, experimentally assayed in vitro in different animal and human cells and in vivo in rodents, was classified as a small DNA tumor virus. In previous studies, many groups identified Simian Virus 40 sequences in healthy individuals and cancer patients using PCR techniques, whereas others failed to detect the viral sequences in human specimens. These conflicting results prompted us to develop a novel indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides, mimicking Simian Virus 40 capsid viral protein antigens, named mimotopes. This immunologic assay allowed us to investigate the presence of serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 and to verify whether Simian Virus 40 is circulating in humans. In this investigation two mimotopes from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen, the viral replication protein and oncoprotein, were employed to analyze for specific reactions to human sera antibodies. This indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen was used to assay a new collection of serum samples from healthy subjects. This novel assay revealed that serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 large T antigen mimotopes are detectable, at low titer, in healthy subjects aged from 18-65 years old. The overall prevalence of reactivity with the two Simian Virus 40 large T antigen peptides was 20%. This new ELISA with two mimotopes of the early viral regions is able to detect in a specific manner Simian Virus 40 large T antigen-antibody responses. PMID:26731525

  9. Measurements of the molecular size of the simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, J D; Light, S; Livingston, D M

    1978-01-01

    A measure of the molecular weight of the large simian virus 40 T antigen was sought by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, random-coil chromatography, and sedimentation-velocity analysis in a density gradient. Large T antigen obtained from a simian virus 40-transformed human cell line either by immunoprecipitation or by standard preparatory methods migrated like a 94,000-molecular-weight (approximately 94K) polypeptide in SDS-gels but was found to have an approximate was observed with T antigen obtained from lytically infected monkey cells. In view of the strong theoretical basis for the guanidine method and the agreement with the sedimentation data, these findings suggest that the molecular weight of this protein is approximately 75 to 80K as opposed to 94 to 100K and, therefore, that considerably less than the entire early region of simian virus 40 is required to encode it. This size estimate is in keeping with earlier results which revealed a normal-size T antigen in cells infected with viable deletion mutants lacking as much as 10% of the early region. Images PMID:211251

  10. Replication and transformation functions of in vitro-generated simian virus 40 large T antigen mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Rutila, J E; Imperiale, M J; Brockman, W W

    1986-01-01

    We used sodium bisulfite mutagenesis to introduce point mutations within the early region of the simian virus 40 genome. Seventeen mutants which contained amino acid changes in the amino-terminal half of the large T antigen coding sequence were assayed for their ability to replicate viral DNA and to induce transformation in the established rodent cell line Rat-3. The mutants fell into four basic classes with respect to these two biological functions. Five mutants had wild-type replication and transformation activities, six were totally defective, three were replication deficient and transformation competent, and two were replication competent and transformation deficient. Within these classes were mutants which displayed intermediate phenotypes, such as four mutants which were not totally deficient in viral replication or cellular transformation but instead showed reduced large T antigen function relative to wild type. Three large T mutants displayed transforming activity that was greater than that of wild type and are called supertransforming mutants. Of the most interest are mutants differentially defective in replication and transformation activities. These results both support and extend previous findings that two important biological functions of large T antigen can be genetically separated. Images PMID:3009866

  11. p53 targets simian virus 40 large T antigen for acetylation by CBP.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Danielle L; Kung, Andrew L; DeCaprio, James A

    2004-08-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (T Ag) interacts with the tumor suppressor p53 and the transcriptional coactivators CBP and p300. Binding of these cellular proteins in a ternary complex has been implicated in T Ag-mediated transformation. It has been suggested that the ability of CBP/p300 to modulate p53 function underlies p53's regulation of cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. In this study, we provide further evidence that CBP activity may be mediated through its synergistic action with p53. We demonstrate that SV40 T Ag is acetylated in vivo in a p53-dependent manner and T Ag acetylation is largely mediated by CBP. The acetylation of T Ag is dependent on its interaction with p53 and on p53's interaction with CBP. We have mapped the site of acetylation on T Ag to the C-terminal lysine residue 697. This acetylation site is conserved between the T antigens of the human polyomaviruses JC and BK, which are also known to interact with p53. We show that both JC and BK T antigens are also acetylated at corresponding sites in vivo. While other proteins are known to be acetylated by CBP/p300, none are known to depend on p53 for acetylation. T Ag acetylation may provide a regulatory mechanism for T Ag binding to a cellular factor or play a role in another aspect of T Ag function. PMID:15254196

  12. Polyomavirus large T antigen is prevalent in urothelial carcinoma post-kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ling; Salama, Mohamed E; Lanciault, Christian; Matsumura, Linh; Troxell, Megan L

    2016-02-01

    Viral pathogens have been associated with both infectious disease and neoplasia in transplant recipients. Polyomavirus is emerging as a potential causative agent for genitourinary tract cancer in post-kidney transplant patients. Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a proven role in squamous cancers, but has not been studied in genitourinary malignancies in transplantation. Of 2345 kidney transplants performed at our center over the past 20 years, we identified 16 patients with 20 genitourinary cancers (0.7%), including 13 bladder/ureter carcinomas, 5 renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), and 2 prostate carcinomas. We performed immunohistochemical staining for polyomavirus large T antigen and p16, followed by in situ hybridization for HPV in p16+ cases. Four cases of high-grade invasive urothelial bladder carcinomas were positive for large T. Large T+ urothelial carcinomas developed at least 8 years posttransplant in young men, 3 with history of BK polyoma viremia, 2 of whom had native kidney failure due to reflux/obstruction. In situ hybridization for high-risk HPV was negative in all tested cases. Overall, 3 patients died of carcinoma. All 5 RCCs were negative for both large T and p16; 2 prostate cancers were p16 negative and p16+/HPV negative, respectively. Thus, our study shows a relatively high prevalence of large T antigen in urothelial carcinoma in kidney transplant patients (31%), but not in RCC. Although sample size is small, young patients with obstructive disease may be at particular risk for developing large T-positive urothelial carcinoma. Overall, our data further support the necessities of long-term cancer surveillance for renal transplant patients. PMID:26615524

  13. Association of p300 and CBP with simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Eckner, R; Ludlow, J W; Lill, N L; Oldread, E; Arany, Z; Modjtahedi, N; DeCaprio, J A; Livingston, D M; Morgan, J A

    1996-01-01

    p300 and the CREB-binding protein CBP are two large nuclear phosphoproteins that are structurally highly related. Both function, in part, as transcriptional adapters and are targeted by the adenovirus E1A oncoprotein. We show here that p300 and CBP interact with another transforming protein, the simian virus 40 large T antigen (T). This interaction depends on the integrity of a region of T which is critical for its transforming and mitogenic properties and includes its LXCXE Rb-binding motif. T interferes with normal p300 and CBP function on at least two different levels. The presence of T alters the phosphorylation states of both proteins and inhibits their transcriptional activities on certain promoters. Although E1A and T show little sequence similarity, they interact with the same domain of p300 and CBP, suggesting that this region exhibits considerable flexibility in accommodating diverse protein ligands. PMID:8668161

  14. Transcriptional activation by simian virus 40 large T antigen: interactions with multiple components of the transcription complex.

    PubMed Central

    Gruda, M C; Zabolotny, J M; Xiao, J H; Davidson, I; Alwine, J C

    1993-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen is a potent transcriptional activator of both viral and cellular promoters. Within the SV40 late promoter, a specific upstream element necessary for T-antigen transcriptional activation is the binding site for transcription-enhancing factor 1 (TEF-1). The promoter structure necessary for T-antigen-mediated transcriptional activation appears to be simple. For example, a promoter consisting of upstream TEF-1 binding sites (or other factor-binding sites) and a downstream TATA or initiator element is efficiently activated. It has been demonstrated that transcriptional activation by T antigen does not require direct binding to the DNA; thus, the most direct effect that T antigen could have on these simple promoters would be through protein-protein interactions with either upstream-bound transcription factors, the basal transcription complex, or both. To determine whether such interactions occur, full-length T antigen or segments of it was fused to the glutathione-binding site (GST fusions) or to the Gal4 DNA-binding domain (amino acids 1 to 147) (Gal4 fusions). With the GST fusions, it was found that TEF-1 and the TATA-binding protein (TBP) bound different regions of T antigen. A GST fusion containing amino acids 5 to 172 (region T1) efficiently bound TBP. TEF-1 bound neither region T1 nor a region between amino acids 168 and 373 (region T2); however, it bound efficiently to the combined region (T5) containing amino acids 5 to 383.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8423815

  15. A mouse model for chronic lymphocytic leukemia based on expression of the SV40 large T antigen.

    PubMed

    ter Brugge, Petra J; Ta, Van B T; de Bruijn, Marjolein J W; Keijzers, Guido; Maas, Alex; van Gent, Dik C; Hendriks, Rudi W

    2009-07-01

    The simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen is a potent oncogene able to transform many cell types and has been implicated in leukemia and lymphoma. In this report, we have achieved sporadic SV40 T-antigen expression in mature B cells in mice, by insertion of a SV40 T antigen gene in opposite transcriptional orientation in the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy (H) chain locus between the D and J(H) segments. SV40 T-antigen expression appeared to result from retention of the targeted germline allele and concomitant antisense transcription of SV40 large T in mature B cells, leading to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Although B-cell development was unperturbed in young mice, aging mice showed accumulation of a monoclonal B-cell population in which the targeted IgH allele was in germline configuration and the wild-type IgH allele had a productive V(D)J recombination. These leukemic B cells were IgD(low)CD5(+) and manifested nonrandom usage of V, D, and J segments. V(H) regions were either unmutated, with preferential usage of the VH11 family, or manifested extensive somatic hypermutation. Our findings provide an animal model for B-CLL and show that pathways activated by SV40 T antigen play important roles in the pathogenesis of B-CLL. PMID:19332766

  16. Four major sequence elements of simian virus 40 large T antigen coordinate its specific and nonspecific DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, D T; Loeber, G; Tegtmeyer, P

    1990-01-01

    By mutational analysis, we have identified a motif critical to the proper recognition and binding of simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (T antigen) to virus DNA sequences at the origin of DNA replication. This motif is tripartite and consists of two elements (termed A1 and B2) that are necessary for sequence-specific binding of the origin and a central element (B1) which is required for nonspecific DNA-binding activity. Certain amino acids in elements A1 (residues 152 to 155) and B2 (203 to 207) may make direct contact with the GAGGC pentanucleotide sequences in binding sites I and II on the DNA. Alternatively, these two elements could determine the proper structure of the DNA-binding domain, although for a number of reasons we favor the first possibility. In contrast, element B1 (183 to 187) is most likely important for recognizing a general structural feature of DNA. Elements A1 and B2 are nearly identical in all known papovavirus T antigens, whereas B1 is identical only in the closely related papovaviruses simian virus 40, BK virus, and JC virus. In addition to these three elements, a fourth (B3; residues 215 to 219) is necessary for the binding of T antigen to site II but not to site I. We propose that additional contact sites on T antigen are involved in the interaction with site II to initiate the replication of the viral DNA. PMID:2157865

  17. SV40 large T antigen-specific human T cell memory responses.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sharon; Gibbs, Allen; Butchart, Eric; Mason, Malcolm D; Jasani, Bharat; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2008-08-01

    The continued presence of simian virus 40 (SV40), a monkey polyomavirus, in man is confirmed by the regular detection of SV40-specific antibodies in 5-10% of children who are unlikely to have received contaminated polio-vaccines. The aim of our experiments was to find cellular immunological evidence of SV40 infection in humans by testing memory T cell responses to SV40 large T antigen (Tag). As there is some indication that the virus may be present in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cells, we analyzed T cell responses in MPM patients and in healthy donors. The frequencies of responding T cells to overlapping Tag peptides were tested by cytokine flow cytometry. CD8+ T cells from 4 of 32 MPM patients responded (above twofold of control) to SV40 Tag peptides, while no positive responses were detected in 12 healthy donors. Within SV40 Tag we identified three 15 amino acid-long immunogenic sequences and one 9 amino acid-long T cell epitope (p138) (138FPSELLSFL146), the latter including a HLA-B7-restriction motif. T cell responses to p138 were SV40-specific as T cells stimulated with p138 did not cross-react with the corresponding sequences of Tag of human polyomaviruses BKV and JCV. Similarly, the relevant BKV and JCV Tag peptides did not generate T cell responses against SV40 TAg p138. Peptide-stimulated T cells also killed SV40 Tag-transfected target cells. This article demonstrates the presence, and provides a detailed analysis, of SV40-specific T cell memory in man. PMID:18551603

  18. Properties of the DNA-binding domain of the simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    McVey, D; Strauss, M; Gluzman, Y

    1989-01-01

    T antigen (Tag) from simian virus 40 binds specifically to two distinct sites in the viral origin of replication and to single-stranded DNA. Analysis of the protein domain responsible for these activities revealed the following. (i) The C-terminal boundary of the origin-specific and single-strand-specific DNA-binding domain is at or near amino acid 246; furthermore, the maximum of these DNA-binding activities coincides with a narrow C-terminal boundary, spanning 4 amino acids (246 to 249) and declines sharply in proteins with C termini which differ by a few (4 to 10) amino acids; (ii) a polypeptide spanning residues 132 to 246 of Tag is an independent domain responsible for origin-specific DNA binding and presumably for single-stranded DNA binding; and (iii) a comparison of identical N-terminal fragments of Tag purified from mammalian and bacterial cells revealed differential specificity and levels of activity between the two sources of protein. A role for posttranslational modification (phosphorylation) in controlling the DNA-binding activity of Tag is discussed. Images PMID:2555700

  19. Formation of DNA triple helices inhibits DNA unwinding by the SV40 large T-antigen helicase.

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, M; Kopel, V; Borowiec, J A; Manor, H

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that d(TC)n.d(GA)n microsatellites may serve as arrest signals for mammalian DNA replication through the ability of such sequences to form DNA triple helices and thereby inhibit replication enzymes. To further test this hypothesis, we examined the ability of d(TC)i.d(GA)i.d(TC)i triplexes to inhibit DNA unwinding in vitro by a model eukaryotic DNA helicase, the SV40 large T-antigen. DNA substrates that were able to form triplexes, and non-triplex-forming control substrates, were tested. We found that the presence of DNA triplexes, as assayed by endonuclease S1 and osmium tetroxide footprinting, significantly inhibited DNA unwinding by T-antigen. Strong inhibition was observed not only at acidic pH values, in which the triplexes were most stable, but also at physiological pH values in the range 6.9-7.2. Little or no inhibition was detected at pH 8.7. Based on these results, and on previous studies of DNA polymerases, we suggest that DNA triplexes may form in vivo and cause replication arrest through a dual inhibition of duplex unwinding by DNA helicases and of nascent strand synthesis by DNA polymerases. DNA triplexes also have the potential to inhibit recombination and repair processes in which helicases and polymerases are involved. Images PMID:7753619

  20. Serine 220 phosphorylation of the Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen crucially supports growth of Merkel cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Schrama, David; Hesbacher, Sonja; Angermeyer, Sabrina; Schlosser, Andreas; Haferkamp, Sebastian; Aue, Annemarie; Adam, Christian; Weber, Alexandra; Schmidt, Marc; Houben, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is regarded as a major causal factor for Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Indeed, tumor cell growth of MCPyV-positive MCC cells is dependent on the expression of a truncated viral Large T antigen (LT) with an intact retinoblastoma protein (RB)-binding site. Here we determined the phosphorylation pattern of a truncated MCPyV-LT characteristically for MCC by mass spectrometry revealing MCPyV-LT as multi-phospho-protein phosphorylated at several serine and threonine residues. Remarkably, disruption of most of these phosphorylation sites did not affect its ability to rescue knockdown of endogenous T antigens in MCC cells indicating that phosphorylation of the respective amino acids is not essential for the growth promoting function of MCPyV-LT. However, alteration of serine 220 to alanine completely abolished the ability of MCPyV-LT to support proliferation of MCC cells. Conversely, mimicking the phosphorylated state by mutation of serine 220 to glutamic acid resulted in a fully functional LT. Moreover, MCPyV-LT(S220A) demonstrated reduced binding to RB in co-immunoprecipitation experiments as well as weaker induction of RB target genes in MCC cells. In conclusion, we provide evidence that phosphorylation of serine 220 is required for efficient RB inactivation in MCC and may therefore be a potential target for future therapeutic approaches. PMID:26383606

  1. Asymmetric Assembly of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Large T-Antigen Origin Binding Domains at the Viral Origin

    SciTech Connect

    C Harrison; G Meinke; H Kwun; H Rogalin; P Phelan; P Bullock; Y Chang; P Moore; A Bohm

    2011-12-31

    The double-stranded DNA polyomavirus Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes Merkel cell carcinoma, an aggressive but rare human skin cancer that most often affects immunosuppressed and elderly persons. As in other polyomaviruses, the large T-antigen of MCV recognizes the viral origin of replication by binding repeating G(A/G)GGC pentamers. The spacing, number, orientation, and necessity of repeats for viral replication differ, however, from other family members such as SV40 and murine polyomavirus. We report here the 2.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of the MCV large T-antigen origin binding domain (OBD) in complex with a DNA fragment from the MCV origin of replication. Consistent with replication data showing that three of the G(A/G)GGC-like binding sites near the center of the origin are required for replication, the crystal structure contains three copies of the OBD. This stoichiometry was verified using isothermal titration calorimetry. The affinity for G(A/G)GGC-containing double-stranded DNA was found to be {approx} 740 nM, approximately 8-fold weaker than the equivalent domain in SV40 for the analogous region of the SV40 origin. The difference in affinity is partially attributable to DNA-binding residue Lys331 (Arg154 in SV40). In contrast to SV40, a small protein-protein interface is observed between MCV OBDs when bound to the central region of the origin. This protein-protein interface is reminiscent of that seen in bovine papilloma virus E1 protein. Mutational analysis indicates, however, that this interface contributes little to DNA binding energy.

  2. Cul7/p185/p193 binding to simian virus 40 large T antigen has a role in cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed Hamid; Kasper, Jocelyn S; Arai, Takehiro; DeCaprio, James A

    2004-03-01

    Simian virus 40 large T antigen (TAg) is a viral oncoprotein that can promote cellular transformation. TAg's transforming activity results in part by binding and inactivating key tumor suppressors, including p53 and the retinoblastoma protein (pRb). We have identified a TAg-associated 185-kDa protein that has significant homology to the cullin family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. TAg binds to an SCF-like complex that contains p185/Cul7, Rbx1, and the F box protein Fbw6. This SCF-like complex binds to an N-terminal region of TAg. Several p185/Cul7-binding-deficient mutants of TAg were generated that retained binding to pRb and p53 and were capable of overcoming Rb-mediated repression of E2F transcription. Despite binding to pRb and p53, these p185/Cul7-binding-defective mutants of TAg were unable to transform primary mouse embryo fibroblasts. Cells expressing p185/Cul7-binding-defective mutants of TAg were unable to grow to high density or grow in an anchorage-independent manner as determined by growth in soft agar. Considering the significance of other TAg-interacting proteins in regulation of the cell cycle, p185/Cul7 may also regulate an important growth control pathway. PMID:14990695

  3. Simian virus 40 large T antigen's association with the CUL7 SCF complex contributes to cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Jocelyn S; Kuwabara, Hiroshi; Arai, Takehiro; Ali, Syed Hamid; DeCaprio, James A

    2005-09-01

    Simian virus 40 large T antigen (T Ag) is capable of immortalizing and transforming rodent cells. The transforming activity of T Ag is due in large part to perturbation of the tumor suppressor proteins p53 and the retinoblastoma (pRB) family members. Inactivation of these tumor suppressors may not be sufficient for T Ag-mediated cellular transformation. It has been shown that T Ag associates with an SCF-like complex that contains a member of the cullin family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, CUL7, as well as SKP1, RBX1, and an F-box protein, FBXW8. We identified T Ag residues 69 to 83 as required for T Ag binding to the CUL7 complex. We demonstrate that delta69-83 T Ag, while it lost its ability to associate with CUL7, retained binding to p53 and pRB family members. In the presence of CUL7, wild-type (WT) T Ag but not delta69-83 T Ag was able to induce proliferation of mouse embryo fibroblasts, an indication of cellular transformation. In contrast, WT and delta69-83 T Ag enabled mouse embryo fibroblasts to proliferate to similarly high densities in the absence of CUL7. Our data suggest that, in addition to p53 and the pRB family members, T Ag serves to bind to and inactivate the growth-suppressing properties of CUL7. In addition, these results imply that, at least in the presence of T Ag, CUL7 may function as a tumor suppressor. PMID:16140746

  4. Truncated N-terminal mutants of SV40 large T antigen as minimal immortalizing agents for CNS cells

    PubMed Central

    Freed, William J.; Zhang, Peisu; Sanchez, Joseph F.; Dillon-Carter, Ora; Coggiano, Mark; Errico, Stacie L.; Lewis, Brian D.; Truckenmiller, Mary Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Immortalized central nervous system (CNS) cell lines are useful as in vitro models for innumerable purposes such as elucidating biochemical pathways, studies of effects of drugs, and ultimately, such cells may also be useful for neural transplantation. The SV40 large T (LT) oncoprotein, commonly used for immortalization, interacts with several cell cycle regulatory factors, including binding and inactivating p53 and retinoblastoma family cell-cycle regulators. In an attempt to define the minimal requirements of SV40 T antigen for immortalizing cells of CNS origin, we constructed T155c, encoding the N-terminal 155 amino acids of LT. The p53 binding region is known to reside in the C-terminal region of LT. An additional series of mutants was produced to further narrow the molecular targets for immortalization, and plasmid vectors were constructed for each. In a p53 temperature sensitive cell line model, T64-7B, expression of T155c and all constructs having mutations outside of the first 82 amino acids were capable of overriding cell-cycle block at the non-permissive growth temperature. Several cell lines were produced from fetal rat mesencephalic and cerebral cortical cultures using the T155c construct. The E107K construct contained a mutation in the Rb binding region, but was nonetheless capable of overcoming cell cycle block in T64-7B cell and immortalizing primary cultured cells. Cells immortalized with T155c were often highly dependent on the presence of bFGF for growth. Telomerase activity, telomere length, growth rates, and integrity of the p53 gene in cells immortalized with T155c did not change over 100 population doublings in culture, indicating that cells immortalized with T155c were generally stable during long periods of continuous culture. PMID:15629761

  5. Loss of DNA-binding and new transcriptional trans-activation function in polyomavirus large T-antigen with mutation of zinc finger motif.

    PubMed Central

    Bergqvist, A; Nilsson, M; Bondeson, K; Magnusson, G

    1990-01-01

    A putative zinc finger in polyomavirus large T-antigen was investigated. We were unable to demonstrate unequivocally a requirement for zinc in specific DNA-binding using the chelating agent 1, 10-phenanthroline. An involvement of the putative zinc finger in specific DNA-binding was nevertheless suggested by the properties of a mutant protein with a cys----ser replacement in the finger motif. Probably as a result of the defective DNA-binding, the mutant protein had lost its activity in initiation of viral DNA-replication and in negative regulation of viral early transcription. However, the trans-activation of the viral late promoter was normal. The analysis also revealed a previously unrecognized activity of large T-antigen. The mutant protein trans-activated the viral early promoter. In the wild-type protein this activity is probably concealed by the separate, negative regulatory function. Images PMID:2160069

  6. Role of flanking sequences and phosphorylation in the recognition of the simian-virus-40 large T-antigen nuclear localization sequences by importin-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Marcos R M; Teh, Trazel; Toth, Gabor; John, Anna; Pavo, Imre; Jans, David A; Kobe, Bostjan

    2003-01-01

    The nuclear import of simian-virus-40 large T-antigen (tumour antigen) is enhanced via phosphorylation by the protein kinase CK2 at Ser112 in the vicinity of the NLS (nuclear localization sequence). To determine the structural basis of the effect of the sequences flanking the basic cluster KKKRK, and the effect of phosphorylation on the recognition of the NLS by the nuclear import factor importin-alpha (Impalpha), we co-crystallized non-autoinhibited Impalpha with peptides corresponding to the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of the NLS, and determined the crystal structures of the complexes. The structures show that the amino acids N-terminally flanking the basic cluster make specific contacts with the receptor that are distinct from the interactions between bipartite NLSs and Impalpha. We confirm the important role of flanking sequences using binding assays. Unexpectedly, the regions of the peptides containing the phosphorylation site do not make specific contacts with the receptor. Binding assays confirm that phosphorylation does not increase the affinity of the T-antigen NLS to Impalpha. We conclude that the sequences flanking the basic clusters in NLSs play a crucial role in nuclear import by modulating the recognition of the NLS by Impalpha, whereas phosphorylation of the T-antigen enhances nuclear import by a mechanism that does not involve a direct interaction of the phosphorylated residue with Impalpha. PMID:12852786

  7. Removal of a small C-terminal region of JCV and SV40 large T antigens has differential effects on transformation

    PubMed Central

    Seneca, Nicole TM; Robles, Maria Teresa Sáenz; Pipas, James M

    2014-01-01

    The large T antigen (LT) protein of JCV and SV40 polyomaviruses is required to induce tumors in rodents and transform cells in culture. When both LTs are compared side-by-side in cell culture assays, SV40 shows a more robust transformation phenotype even though the LT sequences are highly conserved. A complete understanding of SV40’s enhanced transforming capabilities relative to JCV is lacking. When the least conserved region of the LT proteins, the variable linker and host range region (VHR), was removed, changes in T antigen expression and cellular p53 post-translational modifications occurred, but interaction with the pRB pathway was unaffected. Transformation assessed by growth in low serum was reduced after VHR truncation of the SV40, but not the JCV, T antigen. Conversely, anchorage independent transformation was enhanced only by truncation of the JCV VHR. This is the first report to link the SV40 or JCV VHR region to transformation potential. PMID:25129438

  8. A Kinase Activity Associated with Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen Phosphorylates Upstream Binding Factor (UBF) and Promotes Formation of a Stable Initiation Complex between UBF and SL1

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Weiguo; Comai, Lucio

    1999-01-01

    Simian virus 40 large T antigen is a multifunctional protein which has been shown to modulate the expression of genes transcribed by RNA polymerase I (Pol I), II, and III. In all three transcription systems, a key step in the activation process is the recruitment of large T antigen to the promoter by direct protein-protein interaction with the TATA binding protein (TBP)-TAF complexes, namely, SL1, TFIID, and TFIIIB. However, our previous studies on large T antigen stimulation of Pol I transcription also revealed that the binding to the TBP-TAFI complex SL1 is not sufficient to activate transcription. To further define the molecular mechanism involved in large T antigen-mediated Pol I activation, we examined whether the high-mobility group box-containing upstream binding factor (UBF) plays any role in this process. Here, using cell labeling experiments, we showed that large T antigen expression induces an increase in UBF phosphorylation. Further biochemical analysis demonstrated that UBF is phosphorylated by a kinase activity that is strongly associated with large T antigen, and that the carboxy-terminal activation domain of UBF is required for the phosphorylation to occur. Using in vitro reconstituted transcription assays, we demonstrated that the inability of alkaline phosphatase treated UBF to efficiently activate transcription can be rescued by large T antigen. Moreover, we showed that large T antigen-induced UBF phosphorylation promotes the formation of a stable UBF-SL1 complex. Together, these results provide strong evidence for an important role for the large T antigen-associated kinase in mediating the stimulation of RNA Pol I transcription. PMID:10082545

  9. Structure-based design of a disulfide-linked oligomeric form of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen DNA-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2011-06-01

    With the aim of forming the ‘lock-washer’ conformation of the origin-binding domain of SV40 large T antigen in solution, using structure-based analysis an intermolecular disulfide bridge was engineered into the origin-binding domain to generate higher order oligomers in solution. The 1.7 Å resolution structure shows that the mutant forms a spiral in the crystal and has the de novo disulfide bond at the protein interface, although structural rearrangements at the interface are observed relative to the wild type. The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS–PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner.

  10. Glucagon gene 5'-flanking sequences direct expression of simian virus 40 large T antigen to the intestine, producing carcinoma of the large bowel in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y C; Asa, S L; Drucker, D J

    1992-05-25

    Glucagon and the glucagon-like peptides play important roles in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Previous studies have demonstrated that approximately 1300 base pairs of rat glucagon gene 5'-flanking sequences direct transgene expression to the pancreas and brain, but not to the intestine, of transgenic mice. These observations suggested that different tissue-specific enhancer elements mediate activation of glucagon gene transcription in the pancreas and intestine. We have now generated mice that express SV40 large T antigen under the control of approximately 2000 base pairs of glucagon gene 5'-flanking sequences. Transgene expression was observed in the brain and pancreas in association with the development of pancreatic endocrine tumors. In contrast to the mice described previously, we also detected transgene expression throughout the gastrointestinal tract in endocrine cells of the stomach and small and large intestine. Focal areas of enteroendocrine cell hyperplasia in the large bowel invariably progressed to invasive and metastasizing plurihormonal endocrine carcinoma, which was clinically and pathologically evident by 4 weeks of age. In contrast, transgene expression in the small bowel and stomach was not associated with progression to either hyperplasia or carcinoma. The results of these studies provide functional evidence for the existence of an upstream cis-acting regulatory domain that directs glucagon gene transcription to the endocrine cells of the intestine in transgenic mice. PMID:1587847

  11. Replication of simian virus 40 origin-containing DNA during infection with a recombinant Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus expressing large T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, D W; Weber, P C

    1997-01-01

    Autographica californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) has been shown to encode many of the enzymes involved in the replication of its own DNA. Although the AcMNPV genome contains multiple sets of reiterated sequences that are thought to function as origins of DNA replication, no initiator protein has yet been identified in the set of viral replication enzymes. In this study, the ability of a heterologous origin initiator system to promote DNA replication in AcMNPV-infected cells was examined. A recombinant AcMNPV that expressed the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen was surprisingly found to induce the efficient replication of a transfected plasmid containing an SV40 origin. This replication was subsequently found to involve three essential components: (i) T antigen, since replication of SV40 origin-containing plasmids was not induced by wild-type AcMNPV which did not express this protein; (ii) an intact SV40 core origin, since deletion of specific functional motifs within the origin resulted in a loss of replicative abilities; and (iii) one or more AcMNPV-encoded proteins, since viral superinfection was required for plasmid amplification. Characterization of the replicated DNA revealed that it existed as a high-molecular-weight concatemer and underwent significant levels of homologous recombination between inverted repeat sequences. These properties were consistent with an AcMNPV-directed mode of DNA synthesis rather than that of SV40 and suggested that T antigen-SV40 origin complexes may be capable of initiating DNA replication reactions that can be completed by AcMNPV-encoded enzymes. PMID:8985377

  12. Structure-based Design of a Disulfide-lined Oligomeric Form of the Simian Virus 40 (SV40) Large T Antigen DNA-Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    G Meinke; P Phelan; A Fradet-Turcotte; J Archambault; P Bullock

    2011-12-31

    The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS-PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner.

  13. pRB-Dependent, J Domain-Independent Function of Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen in Override of p53 Growth Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Gjoerup, Ole; Chao, Herta; DeCaprio, James A.; Roberts, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) can immortalize and transform many cell types. These activities are attributed in large part to the binding and functional inactivation by LT of two major tumor suppressors: p53 and the retinoblastoma protein, pRB. Most effects of LT on pRB have been shown to additionally require an intact J domain, which mediates binding to Hsc70. We show here that the J domain is not required for p53 override in full-length LT. Although LT binds p53, it was shown previously that overcoming a p53-induced cell cycle arrest requires binding to pRB family members (R. S. Quartin et al., J. Virol. 68:1334–1341). We demonstrate that an LT mutant defective for pRB family member binding (K1) can be complemented for efficient override of p53 arrest by a construct encoding the first 135 amino acids of LT with a J domain-inactivating mutation, H42Q. Hence, complementation does not require the J domain, and pRB binding by LT is important for more than dissociating pRB-E2F complexes, which is J dependent. In accordance with this notion, LT alleviates pRB small-pocket-mediated transcriptional repression independently of the J domain. The LT K1 mutant can also be complemented for p53 override by small t antigen (st) in a manner independent of its J domain. Our observations underscore the importance of multiple SV40 functions, two in LT and one in st, that act cooperatively to counteract p53 growth suppression. PMID:10623749

  14. Invited review: Architectures and mechanisms of ATP binding cassette proteins.

    PubMed

    Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2016-08-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) ATPases form chemo-mechanical engines and switches that function in a broad range of biological processes. Most prominently, a very large family of integral membrane NTPases-ABC transporters-catalyzes the import or export of a diverse molecules across membranes. ABC proteins are also important components of the chromosome segregation, recombination, and DNA repair machineries and regulate or catalyze critical steps of ribosomal protein synthesis. Recent structural and mechanistic studies draw interesting architectural and mechanistic parallels between diverse ABC proteins. Here, I review this state of our understanding how NTP-dependent conformational changes of ABC proteins drive diverse biological processes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 492-504, 2016. PMID:27037766

  15. Protein kinase activity associated with simian virus 40 T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, J D; Spangler, G; Livingston, D M

    1979-01-01

    Incubation of simian virus 40 (SV40) tumor (T) antigen-containing immunoprecipitates with [gamma-32P]ATP results in the incorporation of radioactive phosphate into large T antigen. Highly purified preparations of large T antigen from a SV40-transformed cell line, SV80, are able to catalyze the phosphorylation of a known phosphate acceptor, casein. The kinase activity migrates with large T antigen through multiple purification steps. Sedimentation analysis under non-T-antigen-aggregating conditions reveals that kinase activity and the immunoreactive protein comigrate as a 6S structure. The kinase activity of purified preparations of large T antigen can be specifically adsorbed to solid-phase anti-T IgG, and partially purified T antigen from a SV40 tsA transformation is thermolabile in its ability to phosphorylate casein when compared to comparably purified wild-type T antigen. These observations indicate that the SV40 large T antigen is closely associated with protein kinase (ATP:protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37) activity. Images PMID:223152

  16. trans activation of the simian virus 40 late promoter by large T antigen requires binding sites for the cellular transcription factor TEF-1.

    PubMed Central

    Casaz, P; Sundseth, R; Hansen, U

    1991-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen stimulates the level of transcription from several RNA polymerase II promoters, including the SV40 late promoter. The mechanism of trans activation appears to be indirect since binding of T antigen to specific DNA sequences is not required. However, specific promoter elements that respond to T antigen have not previously been defined. We identified DNA sequences from the SV40 late promoter whose ability to stimulate transcription is induced by the expression of T antigen. In particular, the Sph I + II motifs of the SV40 enhancer can confer T-antigen inducibility to the normally uninducible herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene promoter when multiple copies of the sequence are inserted 5' of the transcription initiation site and TATA sequence. Binding sites for the cellular transcription factor TEF-1 and octamer binding proteins are contained within the Sph I + II motifs, as well as at other positions in the SV40 promoter. To study the role of individual protein-binding sites in trans activation by T antigen, mutations were constructed in various TEF-1 and octamer protein-binding sites of the SV40 late promoter. These mutations did not significantly affect basal promoter activity. However, mutation of all three TEF-1 sites prevented detectable activation by T antigen. DNase I footprinting of the mutated promoters with purified proteins demonstrated that inducibility by T antigen correlated with binding affinity of TEF-1 for the DNA and not with binding affinity of an octamer binding protein. Images PMID:1658359

  17. Polyomavirus T Antigens Activate an Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbi, Nicholas S.; Gupta, Tushar; Coxon, Andrew; Pipas, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Simian Virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) increased levels of mRNAs encoding interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). The mechanism by which T antigen increases levels of ISGs in MEFs remains unclear. We present evidence that expression of T antigen from SV40, Human Polyomaviruses BK (BKV) or JC (JCV) upregulate production of ISGs in MEFs, and subsequently result in an antiviral state, as determined by inhibition of VSV or EMCV growth. The first 136 amino acids of LT are sufficient for these activities. Furthermore, increased ISG expression and induction of the antiviral state requires STAT1. Finally, the RB binding motif of LT is necessary for activation of STAT1. We conclude that the induction of the STAT1 mediated innate immune response in MEFs is a common feature shared by SV40, BKV and JCV. PMID:25589241

  18. The carboxyl-terminal domain of large T antigen rescues SV40 host range activity in trans independent of acetylation.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Danielle L; DeCaprio, James A

    2006-05-25

    The host range activity of SV40 has been described as the inability of mutant viruses with deletions in the C terminal region of large T Ag to replicate in certain types of African green monkey kidney cells. We constructed new mutant viruses expressing truncated T Ag proteins and found that these mutant viruses exhibited the host range phenotype. The host range phenotype was independent of acetylation of T Ag at lysine 697. Co-expression of the C terminal domain of T Ag (aa 627-708) in trans increased both T Ag and VP1 mRNA as well as protein levels for host range mutant viruses in the restrictive cell type. In addition, the T Ag 627-708 fragment promoted the productive lytic infection of host range mutant viruses in the nonpermissive cell type. The carboxyl-terminal region of T Ag contains a biological function essential for the SV40 viral life cycle. PMID:16510165

  19. Two ATP Binding Cassette G Transporters, Rice ATP Binding Cassette G26 and ATP Binding Cassette G15, Collaboratively Regulate Rice Male Reproduction1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guochao; Shi, Jianxin; Liang, Wanqi; Xue, Feiyang; Luo, Qian; Zhu, Lu; Qu, Guorun; Chen, Mingjiao; Schreiber, Lukas; Zhang, Dabing

    2015-01-01

    Male reproduction in higher plants requires the support of various metabolites, including lipid molecules produced in the innermost anther wall layer (the tapetum), but how the molecules are allocated among different anther tissues remains largely unknown. Previously, rice (Oryza sativa) ATP binding cassette G15 (ABCG15) and its Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ortholog were shown to be required for pollen exine formation. Here, we report the significant role of OsABCG26 in regulating the development of anther cuticle and pollen exine together with OsABCG15 in rice. Cytological and chemical analyses indicate that osabcg26 shows reduced transport of lipidic molecules from tapetal cells for anther cuticle development. Supportively, the localization of OsABCG26 is on the plasma membrane of the anther wall layers. By contrast, OsABCG15 is polarly localized in tapetal plasma membrane facing anther locules. osabcg26 osabcg15 double mutant displays an almost complete absence of anther cuticle and pollen exine, similar to that of osabcg15 single mutant. Taken together, we propose that OsABCG26 and OsABCG15 collaboratively regulate rice male reproduction: OsABCG26 is mainly responsible for the transport of lipidic molecules from tapetal cells to anther wall layers, whereas OsABCG15 mainly is responsible for the export of lipidic molecules from the tapetal cells to anther locules for pollen exine development. PMID:26392263

  20. Inhibition of Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase 7 by simian virus 40 large T antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Thomas; Xu, Xinsong; Kronast, Mira; Muehlich, Susanne; Meyer, Kathleen; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Hurwitz, Jerard; Pan, Zhen-Qiang; Engelhardt, Stefan; Sarikas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumor antigen (LT) triggers oncogenic transformation by inhibition of key tumor suppressor proteins, including p53 and members of the retinoblastoma family. In addition, SV40 transformation requires binding of LT to Cullin 7 (CUL7), a core component of Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase 7 (CRL7). However, the pathomechanistic effects of LT–CUL7 interaction are mostly unknown. Here we report both in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence that SV40 LT suppresses the ubiquitin ligase function of CRL7. We show that SV40 LT, but not a CUL7 binding-deficient mutant (LTΔ69–83), impaired 26S proteasome-dependent proteolysis of the CRL7 target protein insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), a component of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling pathway. SV40 LT expression resulted in the accumulation and prolonged half-life of IRS1. In vitro, purified SV40 LT reduced CRL7-dependent IRS1 ubiquitination in a concentration-dependent manner. Expression of SV40 LT, or depletion of CUL7 by RNA interference, resulted in the enhanced activation of IRS1 downstream signaling pathways phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/AKT and Erk mitogen-activated pathway kinase, as well as up-regulation of the downstream target gene c-fos. Finally, SV40 LT-positive carcinoma of carcinoembryonic antigen 424/SV40 LT transgenic mice displayed elevated IRS1 protein levels and activation of downstream signaling. Taken together, these data suggest that SV40 LT protects IRS1 from CRL7-mediated degradation, thereby sustaining high levels of promitogenic IRS1 downstream signaling pathways. PMID:24550499

  1. Protein encoded by HSV-1 stimulation-related gene 1 (HSRG1) interacts with and inhibits SV40 large T antigen.

    PubMed

    Guo, H X; Cun, W; Liu, L D; Dong, S Z; Wang, L C; Dong, C H; Li, Q H

    2006-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 stimulation-related gene 1 (HSRG1) protein expression is induced in HSV-1 infected cells. We found that HSRG1 interacts with SV40 large T antigen (LT) in yeast two-hybrid assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay. This interaction alters LT's regulation of the SV40 promoter and its ability to influence the cell cycle. Choramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) assays revealed that initiation of gene transcription by LT is changed by HSRG1 expression. HSRG1 inhibits the ability of LT to activate SV40 late gene transcription. Further data indicate that the ability of LT protein to stimulate S-phase entry is also inhibited by the expression of HSRG1. The results of a colony-forming assay suggested that expression of HSRG1 in cells transfected by LT gene decreased the rate of colony formation. Yeast two-hybrid beta-galactosidase assay revealed that amino acid residues 132-450 in LT bind HSRG1. PMID:17109635

  2. The N-terminal side of the origin-binding domain of simian virus 40 large T antigen is involved in A/T untwisting.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Joo, W S; Bullock, P A; Simmons, D T

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the role of the N-terminal side of simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen's origin-binding domain in the initiation of virus DNA replication by analyzing the biochemical activities of mutants containing single point substitutions or deletions in this region. Four mutants with substitutions at residues between 121 and 135 were partially defective in untwisting the A/T-rich track on the late side of the origin but were normal in melting the imperfect palindrome (IP) region on the early side. Deletion of the N-terminal 109 amino acids had no effect on either activity, whereas a longer deletion, up to residue 123, greatly reduced A/T untwisting but not IP melting. These results indicate that the region from residue 121 to 135 is important for A/T untwisting but not for IP melting and demonstrate that these activities are separable. Two point substitution mutants (126PS and 135PL) were characterized further by testing them for origin DNA binding, origin unwinding, oligomerization, and helicase activity. These two mutants were completely defective in origin (form U(R)) unwinding but normal in the other activities. Our results demonstrate that a failure to normally untwist the A/T track is correlated with a defect in origin unwinding. Further, they indicate that some mutants with substitutions in the region from residue 121 to 135 interact with origin DNA incorrectly, perhaps by failing to make appropriate contacts with the A/T-rich DNA. PMID:9343233

  3. Binding to retinoblastoma pocket domain does not alter the inter-domain flexibility of the J domain of SV40 large T antigen.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christina K; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Hammel, Michal; Pipas, James; Chazin, Walter J

    2012-02-15

    Simian Virus 40 uses the large T antigen (Tag) to bind and inactivate retinoblastoma tumor suppressor proteins (Rb), which can result in cellular transformation. Tag is a modular protein with four domains connected by flexible linkers. The N-terminal J domain of Tag is necessary for Rb inactivation. Binding of Rb is mediated by an LXCXE consensus motif immediately C-terminal to the J domain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) were used to study the structural dynamics and interaction of Rb with the LXCXE motif, the J domain and a construct (N(260)) extending from the J domain through the origin binding domain (OBD). NMR and SAXS data revealed substantial flexibility between the domains in N(260). Binding of pRb to a construct containing the LXCXE motif and the J domain revealed weak interactions between pRb and the J domain. Analysis of the complex of pRb and N(260) indicated that the OBD is not involved and retains its dynamic independence from the remainder of Tag. These results support a 'chaperone' model in which the J domain of Tag changes its orientation as it acts upon different protein complexes. PMID:22227098

  4. Nonviable mutants of simian virus 40 with deletions near the 3' end of gene A define a function for large T antigen required after onset of viral DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Tornow, J; Cole, C N

    1983-01-01

    Deletion mutants of simian virus 40 (SV40) with lesions at the three DdeI sites near the 3' end of the early region were constructed. Mutants with deletions at 0.203 and 0.219 map units (mu) which did not change the large T antigen reading frame were viable. This extends slightly the upstream boundary for the location of viable mutants with deletions in the 3' end of the A gene. Mutants with frameshift deletions at 0.193 and 0.219 mu were nonviable. These are the first nonviable mutants with deletions in this portion of the A gene. None of the three nonviable mutants with deletions at 0.219 mu produced progeny viral DNA. These three mutants all used the alternate reading frame located in this portion of the SV40 early region. The mutant with a deletion at 0.193 mu, dlA2459, was positive for viral DNA replication and was defective for adenovirus helper function. All of these mutations were located in the portion of the SV40 large T antigen which has no homology to the polyoma T antigens. These results indicate that this portion of large T antigen is required for some late step in the viral growth cycle and suggest that adenovirus helper function is required for productive infection by SV40. Images PMID:6312080

  5. The Polyomavirus BK Large T-Antigen-Derived Peptide Elicits an HLA-DR Promiscuous and Polyfunctional CD4+ T-Cell Response▿

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswami, Bala; Popescu, Iulia; Macedo, Camila; Luo, Chunqing; Shapiro, Ron; Metes, Diana; Chalasani, Geetha; Randhawa, Parmjeet S.

    2011-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis are increasingly recognized causes of disease in renal and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, respectively. Functional characterization of the immune response to BKV is important for clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and vaccine design. A peptide mix (PepMix) and overlapping (OPP) or random (RPP) peptide pools derived from BKV large T antigen (LTA) were used to restimulate 14-day-expanded peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 27 healthy control subjects in gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-specific enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. A T-cell response to LTA PepMix was detected in 15/27 subjects. A response was frequently observed with peptides derived from the helicase domain (9/15 subjects), while the DNA binding and host range domains were immunologically inert (0/15 subjects). For all nine subjects who responded to LTA peptide pools, the immune response could be explained largely by a 15-mer peptide designated P313. P313-specific CD4+ T-cell clones demonstrated (i) stringent LTA peptide specificity; (ii) promiscuous recognition in the context of HLA-DR alleles; (iii) cross recognition of homologous peptides from the polyomavirus simian virus 40 (SV40); (iv) an effector memory phenotype, CD107a expression, and intracellular production of IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α); (v) cytotoxic activity in a chromium release assay; and (vi) the ability to directly present cognate antigen to autologous T cells. In conclusion, T-cell-mediated immunity to BKV in healthy subjects is associated with a polyfunctional population of CD4+ T cells with dual T-helper and T-cytotoxic properties. HLA class II promiscuity in antigen presentation makes the targeted LTA peptide sequence a suitable candidate for inclusion in immunotherapy protocols. PMID:21367979

  6. Inactivation of pRB-related proteins p130 and p107 mediated by the J domain of simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Stubdal, H; Zalvide, J; Campbell, K S; Schweitzer, C; Roberts, T M; DeCaprio, J A

    1997-01-01

    Inactivation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRB) contributes to tumorigenesis in a wide variety of cancers. In contrast, the role of the two pRB-related proteins, p130 and p107, in oncogenic transformation is unclear. The LXCXE domain of simian virus 40 large T antigen (TAg) specifically binds to pRB, p107, and p130. We have previously shown that the N terminus and the LXCXE domain of TAg cooperate to alter the phosphorylation state of p130 and p107. Here, we demonstrate that TAg promotes the degradation of p130 and that the N terminus of TAg is required for this activity. The N terminus of TAg has homology to the J domain of the DnaJ family of molecular chaperone proteins. Mutants with mutations in the J-domain homology region of TAg are defective for altering p130 and p107 phosphorylation and for p130 degradation. A heterologous J-domain from a human DnaJ protein can functionally substitute for the N terminus of TAg in the effect on p107 and p130 phosphorylation and p130 stability. We further demonstrate that the J-domain homology region of TAg confers a growth advantage to wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) but is dispensable in the case of MEFs lacking both p130 and p107. This indicates that p107 and p130 have overlapping growth-suppressing activities whose inactivation is mediated by the J domain of TAg. PMID:9271376

  7. The SV40 large T antigen and adenovirus E1a oncoproteins interact with distinct isoforms of the transcriptional co-activator, p300.

    PubMed Central

    Avantaggiati, M L; Carbone, M; Graessmann, A; Nakatani, Y; Howard, B; Levine, A S

    1996-01-01

    p300 is a nuclear phosphoprotein likely to be involved in the control of cell growth. Here we show that SV40 large T antigen (Tag) forms a specific complex with p300. In various Tag-expressing cell lines, the affinity of Tag for p300 was restricted to a newly identified unphosphorylated but ubiquitinated form of the protein. Further, Tag did not associate with p300 in an SV40 Tag-producing cell line (REV2) in which the original transformed phenotype (SV52) is reverted. Biochemical studies demonstrate that both the phosphorylation and the ubiquitination profile of p300 are altered in REV2 with respect to the wild-type fully transformed SV52 parental cells, wherein Tag-p300 complexes are readily detected. In contrast to Tag, the adenovirus early expression product E1a interacts with both phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of p300. In addition, when REV2 cells were infected with adenovirus, E1a-p300 complexes were detected, suggesting that the p300 expressed in REV2 has lost the affinity for Tag, but not for E1a. We then compared the ability of Tag and E1a to affect the transcription levels of the cAMP-responsive promoter (CRE), which is modulated in vivo by p300, in REV2 cells. We found that Tag repressed the CRE promoter in all of the cell lines in which Tag-p300 complexes were detected, but not in REV2 cells. In contrast, E1a efficiently inhibited CRE-directed transcription in this cell line. The data thus indicate that the different specificities exhibited by Tag and E1a towards the various forms of p300 are reflected in vivo as a difference in the ability of these viral oncoproteins to modulate the expression of CRE-containing genes. Images PMID:8641289

  8. Computerized segmentation algorithm with personalized atlases of murine MRIs in a SV40 large T-antigen mouse mammary cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, Adam R.; Markiewicz, Erica; Mustafi, Devkumar; Fan, Xiaobing; Conzen, Suzanne; Karczmar, Greg; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2016-03-01

    Quantities of MRI data, much larger than can be objectively and efficiently analyzed manually, are routinely generated in preclinical research. We aim to develop an automated image segmentation and registration pipeline to aid in analysis of image data from our high-throughput 9.4 Tesla small animal MRI imaging center. T2-weighted, fat-suppressed MRIs were acquired over 4 life-cycle time-points [up to 12 to 18 weeks] of twelve C3(1) SV40 Large T-antigen mice for a total of 46 T2-weighted MRI volumes; each with a matrix size of 192 x 256, 62 slices, in plane resolution 0.1 mm, and slice thickness 0.5 mm. These image sets were acquired with the goal of tracking and quantifying progression of mammary intraepithelial neoplasia (MIN) to invasive cancer in mice, believed to be similar to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in humans. Our segmentation algorithm takes 2D seed-points drawn by the user at the center of the 4 co-registered volumes associated with each mouse. The level set then evolves in 3D from these 2D seeds. The contour evolution incorporates texture information, edge information, and a statistical shape model in a two-step process. Volumetric DICE coefficients comparing the automatic with manual segmentations were computed and ranged between 0.75 and 0.58 for averages over the 4 life-cycle time points of the mice. Incorporation of these personalized atlases with intra and inter mouse registration is expected to enable locally and globally tracking of the morphological and textural changes in the mammary tissue and associated lesions of these mice.

  9. Normal gating of CFTR requires ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains and hydrolysis at the second nucleotide-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Berger, Allan L; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-01-11

    ATP interacts with the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR to control gating. However, it is unclear whether gating involves ATP binding alone, or also involves hydrolysis at each NBD. We introduced phenylalanine residues into nonconserved positions of each NBD Walker A motif to sterically prevent ATP binding. These mutations blocked [alpha-(32)P]8-N(3)-ATP labeling of the mutated NBD and reduced channel opening rate without changing burst duration. Introducing cysteine residues at these positions and modifying with N-ethylmaleimide produced the same gating behavior. These results indicate that normal gating requires ATP binding to both NBDs, but ATP interaction with one NBD is sufficient to support some activity. We also studied mutations of the conserved Walker A lysine residues (K464A and K1250A) that prevent hydrolysis. By combining substitutions that block ATP binding with Walker A lysine mutations, we could differentiate the role of ATP binding vs. hydrolysis at each NBD. The K1250A mutation prolonged burst duration; however, blocking ATP binding prevented the long bursts. These data indicate that ATP binding to NBD2 allowed channel opening and that closing was delayed in the absence of hydrolysis. The corresponding NBD1 mutations showed relatively little effect of preventing ATP hydrolysis but a large inhibition of blocking ATP binding. These data suggest that ATP binding to NBD1 is required for normal activity but that hydrolysis has little effect. Our results suggest that both NBDs contribute to channel gating, NBD1 binds ATP but supports little hydrolysis, and ATP binding and hydrolysis at NBD2 are key for normal gating. PMID:15623556

  10. Normal gating of CFTR requires ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains and hydrolysis at the second nucleotide-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Allan L.; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    ATP interacts with the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR to control gating. However, it is unclear whether gating involves ATP binding alone, or also involves hydrolysis at each NBD. We introduced phenylalanine residues into nonconserved positions of each NBD Walker A motif to sterically prevent ATP binding. These mutations blocked [α-32P]8-N3-ATP labeling of the mutated NBD and reduced channel opening rate without changing burst duration. Introducing cysteine residues at these positions and modifying with N-ethylmaleimide produced the same gating behavior. These results indicate that normal gating requires ATP binding to both NBDs, but ATP interaction with one NBD is sufficient to support some activity. We also studied mutations of the conserved Walker A lysine residues (K464A and K1250A) that prevent hydrolysis. By combining substitutions that block ATP binding with Walker A lysine mutations, we could differentiate the role of ATP binding vs. hydrolysis at each NBD. The K1250A mutation prolonged burst duration; however, blocking ATP binding prevented the long bursts. These data indicate that ATP binding to NBD2 allowed channel opening and that closing was delayed in the absence of hydrolysis. The corresponding NBD1 mutations showed relatively little effect of preventing ATP hydrolysis but a large inhibition of blocking ATP binding. These data suggest that ATP binding to NBD1 is required for normal activity but that hydrolysis has little effect. Our results suggest that both NBDs contribute to channel gating, NBD1 binds ATP but supports little hydrolysis, and ATP binding and hydrolysis at NBD2 are key for normal gating. PMID:15623556

  11. Effects of large and small T antigens on DNA synthesis and cell division in simian virus 40-transformed BALB/c 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, J B; Brockman, W W

    1982-01-01

    The roles of the large T and small t antigens of simian virus 40 in cellular DNA synthesis and cell division were analyzed in BALB/c 3T3 mouse cells transformed by wild-type, temperature-sensitive A (tsA), or tsA-deletion (tsA/dl) double mutants. Assessment of DNA replication and cell cycle distribution by radioautography of [3H]thymidine-labeled nuclei and by flow microfluorimetry indicate that tsA transformants do not synthesize DNA or divide at the restrictive temperature to the same extent as they do at the permissive temperature or as wild-type transformants do at the restrictive temperature. This confirms earlier studies suggesting that large T induces DNA synthesis and mitosis in transformed cells. Inhibition of replication in tsA transformants at the restrictive temperature, however, is not complete. Some residual cell division does occur but is in large part offset by cell detachment and death. This failure to revert completely to the parental 3T3 phenotype, as indicated by residual cell cycling at the restrictive temperature, was also observed in cells transformed by tsA/dl double mutants which, in addition to producing a ts large T, make no small t protein. Small t, therefore, does not appear to be responsible for the residual cell cycling and plays no demonstrable role in the induction of DNA synthesis or cell division in stably transformed BALB/c 3T3 cells. Comparison of cell cycling in tsA and tsA/dl transformants, normal 3T3 cells, and a transformation revertant suggests that the failure of tsA transformants to revert completely may be due to leakiness of the tsA mutation as well as to a permanent cellular alteration induced during viral transformation. Finally, analysis of cells transformed by tsA/dl double mutants indicates that small t is not required for full expression of growth properties characteristic of transformed cells. Images PMID:6292518

  12. Human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    There exist four fundamentally different classes of membrane-bound transport proteins: ion channels; transporters; aquaporins; and ATP-powered pumps. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an example of ATP-dependent pumps. ABC transporters are ubiquitous membrane-bound proteins, present in all prokaryotes, as well as plants, fungi, yeast and animals. These pumps can move substrates in (influx) or out (efflux) of cells. In mammals, ABC transporters are expressed predominantly in the liver, intestine, blood-brain barrier, blood-testis barrier, placenta and kidney. ABC proteins transport a number of endogenous substrates, including inorganic anions, metal ions, peptides, amino acids, sugars and a large number of hydrophobic compounds and metabolites across the plasma membrane, and also across intracellular membranes. The human genome contains 49 ABC genes, arranged in eight subfamilies and named via divergent evolution. That ABC genes are important is underscored by the fact that mutations in at least I I of these genes are already known to cause severe inherited diseases (eg cystic fibrosis and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy [X-ALD]). ABC transporters also participate in the movement of most drugs and their metabolites across cell surface and cellular organelle membranes; thus, defects in these genes can be important in terms of cancer therapy, pharmacokinetics and innumerable pharmacogenetic disorders. PMID:19403462

  13. ATP-Binding Cassette Proteins: Towards a Computational View of Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jielou

    2004-03-01

    Many large machine proteins can generate mechanical force and undergo large-scale conformational changes (LSCC) to perform varying biological tasks in living cells by utilizing ATP. Important examples include ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. They are membrane proteins that couple ATP binding and hydrolysis to the translocation of substrates across membranes [1]. To interpret how the mechanical force generated by ATP binding and hydrolysis is propagated, a coarse-grained ATP-dependent harmonic network model (HNM) [2,3] is applied to the ABC protein, BtuCD. This protein machine transports vitamin B12 across membranes. The analysis shows that subunits of the protein move against each other in a concerted manner. The lowest-frequency modes of the BtuCD protein are found to link the functionally critical domains, and are suggested to be responsible for large-scale ATP-coupled conformational changes. [1] K. P. Locher, A. T. Lee and D. C. Rees. Science 296, 1091-1098 (2002). [2] Atilgan, A. R., S. R. Durell, R. L. Jernigan, M. C. Demirel, O. Keskin, and I. Bahar. Biophys. J. 80, 505-515(2002); M. M Tirion, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 1905-1908 (1996). [3] J. -L. Liao and D. N. Beratan, 2003, to be published.

  14. Intestinal Dysplasia Induced by Simian Virus 40 T Antigen Is Independent of p53

    PubMed Central

    Markovics, Jennifer A.; Carroll, Patrick A.; Robles, M. Teresa Sáenz; Pope, Hannah; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Pipas, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing simian virus 40 large T antigen in enterocytes develop intestinal hyperplasia that progresses to dysplasia with age. Hyperplasia is dependent on T antigen binding to the retinoblastoma (pRb) family of tumor suppressor proteins. Mice expressing a truncated T antigen that inactivates the pRb-family, but is defective for binding p53, exhibit hyperplasia but do not progress to dysplasia. We hypothesized that the inhibition of the pRb family leads to entry of enterocytes into the cell cycle, resulting in hyperplasia, while inactivation of p53 is required for progression to dysplasia. Therefore, we examined T antigen/p53 complexes from the intestines of transgenic mice. We found that T antigen did not induce p53 stabilization, and we could not detect T antigen/p53 complexes in villus enterocytes. In contrast, T antigen expression led to a large increase in the levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. Furthermore, mice in which pRb was inactivated by a truncated T antigen in a p53 null background exhibited intestinal hyperplasia but no progression to dysplasia. These data indicate that loss of p53 function does not play a role in T antigen-induced dysplasia in the intestine. Rather, some unknown function of T antigen is essential for progression beyond hyperplasia. PMID:15919904

  15. Cell-type specific regulation of gene expression by simian virus 40 T antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Cantalupo, Paul G.; Saenz-Robles, Maria Teresa; Rathi, Abhilasha V.; Beerman, Rebecca W.; Patterson, William H.; Whitehead, Robert H.; Pipas, James M.

    2009-03-30

    SV40 transforms cells through the action of two oncoproteins, large T antigen and small t antigen. Small t antigen targets phosphatase PP2A, while large T antigen stimulates cell proliferation and survival by action on multiple proteins, including the tumor suppressors Rb and p53. Large T antigen also binds components of the transcription initiation complex and several transcription factors. We examined global gene expression in SV40-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts, and in enterocytes obtained from transgenic mice. SV40 transformation alters the expression of approximately 800 cellular genes in both systems. Much of this regulation is observed in both MEFs and enterocytes and is consistent with T antigen action on the Rb-E2F pathway. However, the regulation of many genes is cell-type specific, suggesting that unique signaling pathways are activated in different cell types upon transformation, and that the consequences of SV40 transformation depends on the type of cell targeted.

  16. Role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in assembly of MacAB-TolC macrolide transporter.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuo; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2012-12-01

    MacB is a founding member of the Macrolide Exporter family of transporters belonging to the ATP-Binding Cassette superfamily. These proteins are broadly represented in genomes of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and are implicated in virulence and protection against antibiotics and peptide toxins. MacB transporter functions together with MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, which stimulates MacB ATPase. In Gram-negative bacteria, MacA is believed to couple ATP hydrolysis to transport of substrates across the outer membrane through a TolC-like channel. In this study, we report a real-time analysis of concurrent ATP hydrolysis and assembly of MacAB-TolC complex. MacB binds nucleotides with a low millimolar affinity and fast on- and off-rates. In contrast, MacA-MacB complex is formed with a nanomolar affinity, which further increases in the presence of ATP. Our results strongly suggest that association between MacA and MacB is stimulated by ATP binding to MacB but remains unchanged during ATP hydrolysis cycle. We also found that the large periplasmic loop of MacB plays the major role in coupling reactions separated in two different membranes. This loop is required for MacA-dependent stimulation of MacB ATPase and at the same time, contributes to recruitment of TolC into a trans-envelope complex. PMID:23057817

  17. Formation of a Chloride-conducting State in the Maltose ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Michael L; Bao, Huan; Duong, Franck

    2016-06-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters use an alternating access mechanism to move substrates across cellular membranes. This mode of transport ensures the selective passage of molecules while preserving membrane impermeability. The crystal structures of MalFGK2, inward- and outward-facing, show that the transporter is sealed against ions and small molecules. It has yet to be determined whether membrane impermeability is maintained when MalFGK2 cycles between these two conformations. Through the use of a mutant that resides in intermediate conformations close to the transition state, we demonstrate that not only is chloride conductance occurring, but also to a degree large enough to compromise cell viability. Introduction of mutations in the periplasmic gate lead to the formation of a channel that is quasi-permanently open. MalFGK2 must therefore stay away from these ion-conducting conformations to preserve the membrane barrier; otherwise, a few mutations that increase access to the ion-conducting states are enough to convert an ATP-binding cassette transporter into a channel. PMID:27059961

  18. Conserved mechanisms of microtubule-stimulated ADP release, ATP binding, and force generation in transport kinesins

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, Joseph; Farabella, Irene; Yu, I-Mei; Rosenfeld, Steven S; Houdusse, Anne; Topf, Maya; Moores, Carolyn A

    2014-01-01

    Kinesins are a superfamily of microtubule-based ATP-powered motors, important for multiple, essential cellular functions. How microtubule binding stimulates their ATPase and controls force generation is not understood. To address this fundamental question, we visualized microtubule-bound kinesin-1 and kinesin-3 motor domains at multiple steps in their ATPase cycles—including their nucleotide-free states—at ∼7 Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy. In both motors, microtubule binding promotes ordered conformations of conserved loops that stimulate ADP release, enhance microtubule affinity and prime the catalytic site for ATP binding. ATP binding causes only small shifts of these nucleotide-coordinating loops but induces large conformational changes elsewhere that allow force generation and neck linker docking towards the microtubule plus end. Family-specific differences across the kinesin–microtubule interface account for the distinctive properties of each motor. Our data thus provide evidence for a conserved ATP-driven mechanism for kinesins and reveal the critical mechanistic contribution of the microtubule interface. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03680.001 PMID:25209998

  19. ATP binding cassette G transporters and plant male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guochao; Shi, Jianxin; Liang, Wanqi; Zhang, Dabing

    2016-01-01

    The function of ATP Binding Cassette G (ABCG) transporters in the regulation of plant vegetative organs development has been well characterized in various plant species. In contrast, their function in reproductive development particularly male reproductive development received considerably less attention till some ABCG transporters was reported to be associated with anther and pollen wall development in Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa) during the past decade. This mini-review summarizes current knowledge of ABCG transporters regarding to their roles in male reproduction and underlying genetic and biochemical mechanisms, which makes it evident that ABCG transporters represent one of those conserved and divergent components closely related to male reproduction in plants. This mini-review also discusses the current challenges and future perspectives in this particular field. PMID:26906115

  20. ATP Binding Turns Plant Cryptochrome Into an Efficient Natural Photoswitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Pavel; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Hitomi, Kenichi; Balland, Véronique; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Ritz, Thorsten; Brettel, Klaus

    2014-06-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins that drive diverse developmental light-responses in plants and participate in the circadian clock in animals. Plant cryptochromes have found application as photoswitches in optogenetics. We have studied effects of pH and ATP on the functionally relevant photoreduction of the oxidized FAD cofactor to the semi-reduced FADH. radical in isolated Arabidopsis cryptochrome 1 by transient absorption spectroscopy on nanosecond to millisecond timescales. In the absence of ATP, the yield of light-induced radicals strongly decreased with increasing pH from 6.5 to 8.5. With ATP present, these yields were significantly higher and virtually pH-independent up to pH 9. Analysis of our data in light of the crystallographic structure suggests that ATP-binding shifts the pKa of aspartic acid D396, the putative proton donor to FAD.-, from ~7.4 to >9, and favours a reaction pathway yielding long-lived aspartate D396-. Its negative charge could trigger conformational changes necessary for signal transduction.

  1. ATP binding turns plant cryptochrome into an efficient natural photoswitch.

    PubMed

    Müller, Pavel; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Hitomi, Kenichi; Balland, Véronique; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Ritz, Thorsten; Brettel, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins that drive diverse developmental light-responses in plants and participate in the circadian clock in animals. Plant cryptochromes have found application as photoswitches in optogenetics. We have studied effects of pH and ATP on the functionally relevant photoreduction of the oxidized FAD cofactor to the semi-reduced FADH(·) radical in isolated Arabidopsis cryptochrome 1 by transient absorption spectroscopy on nanosecond to millisecond timescales. In the absence of ATP, the yield of light-induced radicals strongly decreased with increasing pH from 6.5 to 8.5. With ATP present, these yields were significantly higher and virtually pH-independent up to pH 9. Analysis of our data in light of the crystallographic structure suggests that ATP-binding shifts the pKa of aspartic acid D396, the putative proton donor to FAD·(-), from ~7.4 to >9, and favours a reaction pathway yielding long-lived aspartate D396(-). Its negative charge could trigger conformational changes necessary for signal transduction. PMID:24898692

  2. Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen-dependent amplification of an Epstein-Barr virus-SV40 hybrid shuttle vector integrated into the human HeLa cell genome.

    PubMed

    Stary, A; Sarasin, A

    1992-07-01

    We analysed the DNA rearrangements that occurred during the integration and amplification of an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-simian virus 40 (SV40) hybrid shuttle vector in human cells. The human HeLa cell line was episomally transformed with the EBV-SV40 p205-GTI plasmid. After a 2 month culture in a selective medium, a HeLa cell-derived population (H-G1 cells) was obtained in which the p205-GTI vector was integrated as a single intact copy deleted in the EBV latent origin of replication (OriP). Sequencing data showed that the endpoints of the plasmid sequences, at the plasmid-cell DNA junctions, are located within the two essential elements of EBV OriP, which may form several secondary structures. This result suggests that a specific DNA sequence (OriP) or palindromic structures could play a role in this integration process. This represents the first fully characterized site of integration of an EBV vector in human cells. The transient expression of the SV40 large T antigen in H-G1 cells leads to the appearance of episomal molecules with an extremely heterogeneous size pattern. Individual analysis of these episomes after rescue in bacteria indicated that they retained sequences of both the p205-GTI plasmid and cellular DNA. Comparison of the structure of these circular DNAs with those of the integrated p205-GTI copy indicated that large T antigen expression in human cells leads to the amplification of the integrated shuttle vector according to the 'onion skin' model developed for transformed rodent cells. Indeed, amplified sequences were colinear with the integrated p205-GTI copy and its surrounding cellular sequences, distributed almost equally around the SV40 replication origin, and circularized by illegitimate recombination which did not involve specific nucleotide sequences. This system is of interest in that it enables easy recovery of individual recombined molecules in host bacteria. Each isolated clone contains a unique recombination junction which is easily

  3. Human polyoma JC virus minor capsid proteins, VP2 and VP3, enhance large T antigen binding to the origin of viral DNA replication: Evidence for their involvement in regulation of the viral DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Saribas, A. Sami; Mun, Sarah; Johnson, Jaslyn; El-Hajmoussa, Mohammad; White, Martyn K.; Safak, Mahmut

    2014-01-01

    JC virus (JCV) lytically infects the oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system in a subset of immunocompromized patients and causes the demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. JCV replicates and assembles into infectious virions in the nucleus. However, understanding the molecular mechanisms of its virion biogenesis remains elusive. In this report, we have attempted to shed more light on this process by investigating molecular interactions between large T antigen (LT-Ag), Hsp70 and minor capsid proteins, VP2/VP3. We demonstrated that Hsp70 interacts with VP2/VP3 and LT-Ag; and accumulates heavily in the nucleus of the infected cells. We also showed that VP2/VP3 associates with LT-Ag through their DNA binding domains resulting in enhancement in LT-Ag DNA binding to Ori and induction in viral DNA replication. Altogether, our results suggest that VP2/VP3 and Hsp70 actively participate in JCV DNA replication and may play critical roles in coupling of viral DNA replication to virion encapsidation. PMID:24418532

  4. Simian virus Large T antigen interacts with the N-terminal domain of the 70 kD subunit of Replication Protein A in the same mode as multiple DNA damage response factors.

    PubMed

    Ning, Boting; Feldkamp, Michael D; Cortez, David; Chazin, Walter J; Friedman, Katherine L; Fanning, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) serves as an important model organism for studying eukaryotic DNA replication. Its helicase, Large T-antigen (Tag), is a multi-functional protein that interacts with multiple host proteins, including the ubiquitous ssDNA binding protein Replication Protein A (RPA). Tag recruits RPA, actively loads it onto the unwound DNA, and together they promote priming of the template. Although interactions of Tag with RPA have been mapped, no interaction between Tag and the N-terminal protein interaction domain of the RPA 70kDa subunit (RPA70N) has been reported. Here we provide evidence of direct physical interaction of Tag with RPA70N and map the binding sites using a series of pull-down and mutational experiments. In addition, a monoclonal anti-Tag antibody, the epitope of which overlaps with the binding site, blocks the binding of Tag to RPA70N. We use NMR chemical shift perturbation analysis to show that Tag uses the same basic cleft in RPA70N as multiple of DNA damage response proteins. Mutations in the binding sites of both RPA70N and Tag demonstrate that specific charge reversal substitutions in either binding partner strongly diminish the interaction. These results expand the known repertoire of contacts between Tag and RPA, which mediate the many critical roles of Tag in viral replication. PMID:25706313

  5. ATP-binding cassette transporters, atherosclerosis, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Westerterp, Marit; Bochem, Andrea E; Yvan-Charvet, Laurent; Murphy, Andrew J; Wang, Nan; Tall, Alan R

    2014-01-01

    Although recent genome-wide association studies have called into question the causal relationship between high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels and cardiovascular disease, ongoing research in animals and cells has produced increasing evidence that cholesterol efflux pathways mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and HDL suppress atherosclerosis. These differing perspectives may be reconciled by a modified HDL theory that emphasizes the antiatherogenic role of cholesterol flux pathways, initiated in cells by ABC transporters. ABCA1 and ABCG1 control the proliferation of hematopoietic stem and multipotential progenitor cells in the bone marrow and hematopoietic stem and multipotential progenitor cell mobilization and extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen. Thus, activation of cholesterol efflux pathways by HDL infusions or liver X receptor activation results in suppression of hematopoietic stem and multipotential progenitor cell mobilization and extramedullary hematopoiesis, leading to decreased production of monocytes and neutrophils and suppression of atherosclerosis. In addition, macrophage-specific knockout of transporters has confirmed their role in suppression of inflammatory responses in the arterial wall. Recent studies have also shown that ABCG4, a close relative of ABCG1, controls platelet production, atherosclerosis, and thrombosis. ABCG4 is highly expressed in megakaryocyte progenitors, where it promotes cholesterol efflux to HDL and controls the proliferative responses to thrombopoietin. Reconstituted HDL infusions act in an ABCG4-dependent fashion to limit hypercholesterolemia-driven excessive platelet production, thrombosis, and atherogenesis, as occurs in human myeloproliferative syndromes. Activation of ABC transporter-dependent cholesterol efflux pathways in macrophages, hematopoietic stem and multipotential progenitor cells, or platelet progenitors by reconstituted HDL infusion or liver X receptor activation remain

  6. T-antigen-DNA polymerase alpha complex implicated in simian virus 40 DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Smale, S T; Tjian, R

    1986-01-01

    We have combined in vitro DNA replication reactions and immunological techniques to analyze biochemical interactions between simian virus (SV40) large T antigen and components of the cellular replication apparatus. First, in vitro SV40 DNA replication was characterized with specific origin mutants. Next, monoclonal antibodies were used to demonstrate that a specific domain of T antigen formed a complex with cellular DNA polymerase alpha. Several antibodies were identified that coprecipitated T antigen and DNA polymerase alpha, while others were found to selectively prevent this interaction and concomitantly inhibit DNA replication. DNA polymerase alpha also bound efficiently to a T-antigen affinity column, confirming the immunoprecipitation results and providing a useful method for purification of the complete protein complex. Taken together, these results suggest that the T-antigen-polymerase association may be a key step in the initiation of SV40 DNA replication. Images PMID:3025630

  7. Tiny T antigen: an autonomous polyomavirus T antigen amino-terminal domain.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M I; Yoo, W; Mda, N Y; Folk, W R

    1997-01-01

    Three mRNAs from the murine polyomavirus early region encode the three well-characterized tumor antigens. We report the existence of a fourth alternatively spliced mRNA which encodes a fourth tumor antigen, tiny T antigen, which comprises the amino-terminal domain common to all of the T antigens but is extended by six unique amino acid residues. The amount of tiny T antigen in infected cells is small because of its short half-life. Tiny T antigen stimulates the ATPase activity of Hsc70, most likely because of its DnaJ-like motif. The common amino-terminal domain may interface with chaperone complexes to assist the T antigens in carrying out their diverse functions of replication, transcription, and transformation in the appropriate cellular compartments. PMID:9223500

  8. Evolutionary relationships of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) uptake porters

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) functional superfamily includes integral transmembrane exporters that have evolved three times independently, forming three families termed ABC1, ABC2 and ABC3, upon which monophyletic ATPases have been superimposed for energy-coupling purposes [e.g., J Membr Biol 231(1):1-10, 2009]. The goal of the work reported in this communication was to understand how the integral membrane constituents of ABC uptake transporters with different numbers of predicted or established transmembrane segments (TMSs) evolved. In a few cases, high resolution 3-dimensional structures were available, and in these cases, their structures plus primary sequence analyses allowed us to predict evolutionary pathways of origin. Results All of the 35 currently recognized families of ABC uptake proteins except for one (family 21) were shown to be homologous using quantitative statistical methods. These methods involved using established programs that compare native protein sequences with each other, after having compared each sequence with thousands of its own shuffled sequences, to gain evidence for homology. Topological analyses suggested that these porters contain numbers of TMSs ranging from four or five to twenty. Intragenic duplication events occurred multiple times during the evolution of these porters. They originated from a simple primordial protein containing 3 TMSs which duplicated to 6 TMSs, and then produced porters of the various topologies via insertions, deletions and further duplications. Except for family 21 which proved to be related to ABC1 exporters, they are all related to members of the previously identified ABC2 exporter family. Duplications that occurred in addition to the primordial 3 → 6 duplication included 5 → 10, 6 → 12 and 10 → 20 TMSs. In one case, protein topologies were uncertain as different programs gave discrepant predictions. It could not be concluded with certainty whether a 4 TMS ancestral

  9. Characterization of am404, an amber mutation in the simian virus 40 T antigen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlins, D R; Collis, P; Muzyczka, N

    1983-01-01

    We analyzed the biological activity of an amber mutation, am404, at map position 0.27 in the T antigen gene of simian virus 40. Immunoprecipitation of extracts from am404-infected cells demonstrated the presence of an amber protein fragment (am T antigen) of the expected molecular weight (67,000). Differential immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibody demonstrated that am T antigen was missing the carboxy-terminal antigenic determinants. The amber mutant was shown to be defective for most of the functions associated with wild-type T antigen. The mutant did not replicate autonomously, but this defect could be complemented by a helper virus (D. R. Rawlins and N. Muzyczka, J. Virol. 36:611-616, 1980). The mutant failed to transform nonpermissive rodent cells and did not relieve the host range restriction of adenovirus 2 in monkey cells. However, stimulation of host cell DNA, whose functional region domain has been mapped within that portion of the protein synthesized by the mutant, could be demonstrated in am404-infected cells. A number of unexpected observations were made. First, the am T antigen was produced in unusually large amounts in a simian virus 40-transformed monkey cell line (COS-1), but overproduction was not seen in nontransformed monkey cells regardless of whether or not a helper virus was present. This feature of the mutant was presumably the result of the inability of am T antigen to autoregulate, the level of wild-type T antigen in COS-1 cells, and the unusually short half-life of am T antigen in vivo. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that am T antigen had an intracellular half-life of approximately 10 min. In addition, although the am T antigen retained the major phosphorylation site found in simian virus 40 T antigen, it was not phosphorylated. Thus, phosphorylation of simian virus 40 T antigen is not required for the stimulation of host cell DNA synthesis. Finally, fusion of am404-infected monkey cells with Escherichia coli protoplasts

  10. Immortalization of Human Fetal Hepatocyte by Ectopic Expression of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, Human Papilloma Virus (E7) and Simian Virus 40 Large T (SV40 T) Antigen Towards Bioartificial Liver Support

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Shibashish; Bader, Augustinus

    2014-01-01

    Background Generation of genetically stable and non-tumoric immortalization cell line from primary cells would be enormously useful for research and therapeutic purposes, but progress towards this goal has so far been limited. It is now universal acceptance that immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes based on recent advances of telomerase biology and oncogene, lead to unlimited population doubling could be the possible source for bioartificial liver device. Methods Immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes cell line by ectopic expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), human papilloma virus gene (E7) and simian virus 40 large T (SV40 T) antigens is main goal of present study. We used an inducible system containing human telomerase and E7, both of which are cloned into responder constructs controlled by doxycycline transactivator. We characterized the immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells by analysis of green fluorescent cells (GFP) positive cells using flow cytometry (FACs) cell sorting and morphology, proliferative rate and antigen expression by immunohistochemical analysis. In addition to we analysized lactate formation, glucose consumption, albumin secretion and urea production of immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells. Results After 25 attempts for transfection of adult primary hepatocytes by human telomerase and E7 to immortalize them, none of the transfection systems resulted in the production of a stable, proliferating cell line. Although the transfection efficiency was more than 70% on the first day, the vast majority of the transfected hepatocytes lost their signal within the first 5–7 days. The remaining transfected hepatocytes persisted for 2–4 weeks and divided one or two times without forming a clone. After 10 attempts of transfection human fetal hepatocytes using the same transfection system, we obtained one stable human fetal hepatocytes cell line which was able albumin secretion urea production and glucose

  11. ATP binding to the pseudokinase domain of JAK2 is critical for pathogenic activation.

    PubMed

    Hammarén, Henrik M; Ungureanu, Daniela; Grisouard, Jean; Skoda, Radek C; Hubbard, Stevan R; Silvennoinen, Olli

    2015-04-14

    Pseudokinases lack conserved motifs typically required for kinase activity. Nearly half of pseudokinases bind ATP, but only few retain phosphotransfer activity, leaving the functional role of nucleotide binding in most cases unknown. Janus kinases (JAKs) are nonreceptor tyrosine kinases with a tandem pseudokinase-kinase domain configuration, where the pseudokinase domain (JAK homology 2, JH2) has important regulatory functions and harbors mutations underlying hematological and immunological diseases. JH2 of JAK1, JAK2, and TYK2 all bind ATP, but the significance of this is unclear. We characterize the role of nucleotide binding in normal and pathogenic JAK signaling using comprehensive structure-based mutagenesis. Disruption of JH2 ATP binding in wild-type JAK2 has only minor effects, and in the presence of type I cytokine receptors, the mutations do not affect JAK2 activation. However, JH2 mutants devoid of ATP binding ameliorate the hyperactivation of JAK2 V617F. Disrupting ATP binding in JH2 also inhibits the hyperactivity of other pathogenic JAK2 mutants, as well as of JAK1 V658F, and prevents induction of erythrocytosis in a JAK2 V617F myeloproliferative neoplasm mouse model. Molecular dynamic simulations and thermal-shift analysis indicate that ATP binding stabilizes JH2, with a pronounced effect on the C helix region, which plays a critical role in pathogenic activation of JAK2. Taken together, our results suggest that ATP binding to JH2 serves a structural role in JAKs, which is required for aberrant activity of pathogenic JAK mutants. The inhibitory effect of abrogating JH2 ATP binding in pathogenic JAK mutants may warrant novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25825724

  12. Influence of ATP-binding cassette transporters in root exudation of phytoalexins, signals, and disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The roots of plants secrete compounds as a way to exchange information with organ-isms living in the soil. Here, we report the involvement of seven root-expressed ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters corresponding to both full and half-size molecules (Atabcg36, Atabcg37, Atabcc5, Atabcf1, Atabcf3...

  13. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  14. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells.

    PubMed

    Lara, Flavio Alves; Pohl, Paula C; Gandara, Ana Caroline; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Sorgine, Marcos H F; Almeida, Igor C; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Oliveira, Pedro L

    2015-01-01

    In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA), a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may represent a new

  15. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Flavio Alves; Pohl, Paula C.; Gandara, Ana Caroline; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Sorgine, Marcos H. F.; Almeida, Igor C.; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Oliveira, Pedro L.

    2015-01-01

    In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA), a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may represent a new

  16. Probing the ATP-binding site of P1 ParA: partition and repression have different requirements for ATP binding and hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Emma; Bouet, Jean-Yves; Funnell, Barbara E.

    2001-01-01

    The ParA family of proteins is involved in partition of a variety of plasmid and bacterial chromosomes. P1 ParA plays two roles in partition: it acts as a repressor of the par operon and has an undefined yet indispensable role in P1 plasmid localization. We constructed seven mutations in three putative ATP-binding motifs of ParA. Three classes of phenotypes resulted, each represented by mutations in more than one motif. Three mutations created ‘super-repressors’, in which repressor activity was much stronger than in wild-type ParA, while the remainder damaged repressor activity. All mutations eliminated partition activities, but two showed a plasmid stability defect that was worse than that of a null mutation. Four mutant ParAs, two super-repressors and two weak repressors, were analyzed biochemically, and all exhibited damaged ATPase activity. The super-repressors bound site-specifically to the par operator sequence, and this activity was strongly stimulated by ATP and ADP. These results support the proposal that ATP binding is essential but hydrolysis is inhibitory for ParA’s repressor activity and suggest that ATP hydrolysis is essential for plasmid localization. PMID:11532954

  17. The ATP-binding site of Ca(2+)-ATPase revealed by electron image analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Yonekura, K; Stokes, D L; Sasabe, H; Toyoshima, C

    1997-01-01

    The location of the ATP-binding site of a P-type ion pump, Ca(2+)-ATPase from rabbit sarcoplasmic reticulum, was examined by cryoelectron microscopy. A nonhydrolyzable analog of ATP, beta, gamma-bidentate chromium (III) complex of ATP (CrATP), was used to stabilize the enzyme in the Ca(2+)-occluded state. Tubular crystals were then induced by vanadate in the presence of EGTA, keeping CrATP bound to the enzyme. The three-dimensional structures of the crystals were determined at 14 A resolution by cryoelectron microscopy and helical image analysis. Statistical comparison of the structures with and without CrATP showed clear and significant differences at the groove proposed previously as the ATP-binding pocket. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:9138598

  18. Inactivation of Multiple Bacterial Histidine Kinases by Targeting the ATP-Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial agents that exploit new targets will be required to combat the perpetual rise of bacterial resistance to current antibiotics. We are exploring the inhibition of histidine kinases, constituents of two-component systems. Two-component systems are the primary signaling pathways that bacteria utilize to respond to their environment. They are ubiquitous in bacteria and trigger various pathogenic mechanisms. To attenuate these signaling pathways, we sought to broadly target the histidine kinase family by focusing on their highly conserved ATP-binding domain. Development of a fluorescence polarization displacement assay facilitated high-throughput screening of ∼53 000 diverse small molecules for binding to the ATP-binding pocket. Of these compounds, nine inhibited the catalytic activity of two or more histidine kinases. These scaffolds could provide valuable starting points for the design of broadly effective HK inhibitors, global reduction of bacterial signaling, and ultimately, a class of antibiotics that function by a new mechanism of action. PMID:25531939

  19. Complexed Structures of Formylglycinamide Ribonucleotide Amidotransferase from Thermotoga maritima Describe a Novel ATP-binding Protein Superfamily†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Morar, Mariya; Anand, Ruchi; Hoskins, Aaron A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    Formylglycinamide ribonucleotide amidotransferase (FGAR-AT) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of formylglycinamidine ribonucleotide (FGAM) from formylglycinamide ribonucleotide (FGAR) and glutamine in the fourth step of the purine biosynthetic pathway. FGAR-AT is encoded by the purL gene. Two types of PurL have been detected. The first type, found in eukaryotes and Gram-negative bacteria, consists of a single 140 kDa polypeptide chain and is designated large PurL (lgPurL). The second type, small PurL (smPurL), is found in archaea and Gram-positive bacteria and consists of an 80 kDa polypeptide chain. Small PurL requires two additional gene products, PurQ and PurS, for activity. PurL is a member of a protein superfamily that contains a novel ATP-binding domain. Structures of several members of this superfamily are available in the apo form. We determined five different structures of FGAR-AT from Thermotoga maritima in the presence of substrates, a substrate analog, and a product. These complexes have allowed a detailed description of the novel ATP-binding motif. Availability of a ternary complex enabled mapping of the active site thus identifying potential residues involved in catalysis. The complexes show a conformational change in the active site compared to the unliganded structure. A surprising discovery, an ATP molecule in an auxiliary site of the protein and the conformational changes associated with its binding, provoke speculations about the regulatory role of the auxiliary site in PurLSQ complex formation as well as the evolutionary relationship of PurL's from different organisms. PMID:17154526

  20. The rad50 signature motif: essential to ATP binding and biological function.

    PubMed

    Moncalian, Gabriel; Lengsfeld, Bettina; Bhaskara, Venugopal; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Karcher, Annette; Alden, Erinn; Tainer, John A; Paull, Tanya T

    2004-01-23

    The repair of double-strand breaks in DNA is an essential process in all organisms, and requires the coordinated activities of evolutionarily conserved protein assemblies. One of the most critical of these is the Mre11/Rad50 (M/R) complex, which is present in all three biological kingdoms, but is not well-understood at the biochemical level. Previous structural analysis of a Rad50 homolog from archaebacteria illuminated the catalytic core of the enzyme, an ATP-binding domain related to the ABC transporter family of ATPases. Here, we present the crystallographic structure of the Rad50 mutant S793R. This missense signature motif mutation changes the key serine residue in the signature motif that is conserved among Rad50 homologs and ABC ATPases. The S793R mutation is analogous to the mutation S549R in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) that results in cystic fibrosis. We show here that the serine to arginine change in the Rad50 protein prevents ATP binding and disrupts the communication among the other ATP-binding loops. This structural change, in turn, alters the communication between Rad50 monomers and thus prevents Rad50 dimerization. The equivalent mutation was made in the human Rad50 gene, and the resulting mutant protein did form a complex with Mre11 and Nbs1, but was specifically deficient in all ATP-dependent enzymatic activities. This signature motif structure-function homology extends to yeast, because the same mutation introduced into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD50 gene generated an allele that failed to complement a rad50 deletion strain in DNA repair assays in vivo. These structural and biochemical results extend our understanding of the Rad50 catalytic domain and validate the use of the signature motif mutant to test the role of Rad50 ATP binding in diverse organisms. PMID:14698290

  1. Unique Functional and Structural Properties of the LRRK2 Protein ATP-binding Pocket*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiyong; Galemmo, Robert A.; Fraser, Kyle B.; Moehle, Mark S.; Sen, Saurabh; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Ross, Larry J.; Valiyaveettil, Jacob; Moukha-Chafiq, Omar; Pathak, Ashish K.; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Kezar, Hollis; White, E. Lucile; Gupta, Vandana; Maddry, Joseph A.; Suto, Mark J.; West, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in the LRRK2 gene can cause late-onset Parkinson disease. The most common mutation, G2019S, resides in the kinase domain and enhances activity. LRRK2 possesses the unique property of cis-autophosphorylation of its own GTPase domain. Because high-resolution structures of the human LRRK2 kinase domain are not available, we used novel high-throughput assays that measured both cis-autophosphorylation and trans-peptide phosphorylation to probe the ATP-binding pocket. We disclose hundreds of commercially available activity-selective LRRK2 kinase inhibitors. Some compounds inhibit cis-autophosphorylation more strongly than trans-peptide phosphorylation, and other compounds inhibit G2019S-LRRK2 more strongly than WT-LRRK2. Through exploitation of structure-activity relationships revealed through high-throughput analyses, we identified a useful probe inhibitor, SRI-29132 (11). SRI-29132 is exquisitely selective for LRRK2 kinase activity and is effective in attenuating proinflammatory responses in macrophages and rescuing neurite retraction phenotypes in neurons. Furthermore, the compound demonstrates excellent potency, is highly blood-brain barrier-permeant, but suffers from rapid first-pass metabolism. Despite the observed selectivity of SRI-29132, docking models highlighted critical interactions with residues conserved in many protein kinases, implying a unique structural configuration for the LRRK2 ATP-binding pocket. Although the human LRRK2 kinase domain is unstable and insoluble, we demonstrate that the LRRK2 homolog from ameba can be mutated to approximate some aspects of the human LRRK2 ATP-binding pocket. Our results provide a rich resource for LRRK2 small molecule inhibitor development. More broadly, our results provide a precedent for the functional interrogation of ATP-binding pockets when traditional approaches to ascertain structure prove difficult. PMID:25228699

  2. Regulation of CFTR Cl- channel gating by ATP binding and hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ikuma, M; Welsh, M J

    2000-07-18

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is regulated by the interaction of ATP with its two cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains (NBD). Although ATP hydrolysis by the NBDs is required for normal gating, the influence of ATP binding versus hydrolysis on specific steps in the gating cycle remains uncertain. Earlier work showed that the absence of Mg(2+) prevents hydrolysis. We found that even in the absence of Mg(2+), ATP could support channel activity, albeit at a reduced level compared with the presence of Mg(2+). Application of ATP with a divalent cation, including the poorly hydrolyzed CaATP complex, increased the rate of opening. Moreover, in CFTR variants with mutations that disrupt hydrolysis, ATP alone opened the channel and Mg(2+) further enhanced ATP-dependent opening. These data suggest that ATP alone can open the channel and that divalent cations increase ATP binding. Consistent with this conclusion, when we mutated an aspartate thought to bind Mg(2+), divalent cations failed to increase activity compared with ATP alone. Two observations suggested that divalent cations also stabilize the open state. In wild-type CFTR, CaATP generated a long duration open state, whereas ATP alone did not. With a CFTR variant in which hydrolysis was disrupted, MgATP, but not ATP alone, produced long openings. These results suggest a gating cycle for CFTR in which ATP binding opens the channel and either hydrolysis or dissociation leads to channel closure. In addition, the data suggest that ATP binding and hydrolysis by either NBD can gate the channel. PMID:10880569

  3. Regulation of CFTR Cl− channel gating by ATP binding and hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel is regulated by the interaction of ATP with its two cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains (NBD). Although ATP hydrolysis by the NBDs is required for normal gating, the influence of ATP binding versus hydrolysis on specific steps in the gating cycle remains uncertain. Earlier work showed that the absence of Mg2+ prevents hydrolysis. We found that even in the absence of Mg2+, ATP could support channel activity, albeit at a reduced level compared with the presence of Mg2+. Application of ATP with a divalent cation, including the poorly hydrolyzed CaATP complex, increased the rate of opening. Moreover, in CFTR variants with mutations that disrupt hydrolysis, ATP alone opened the channel and Mg2+ further enhanced ATP-dependent opening. These data suggest that ATP alone can open the channel and that divalent cations increase ATP binding. Consistent with this conclusion, when we mutated an aspartate thought to bind Mg2+, divalent cations failed to increase activity compared with ATP alone. Two observations suggested that divalent cations also stabilize the open state. In wild-type CFTR, CaATP generated a long duration open state, whereas ATP alone did not. With a CFTR variant in which hydrolysis was disrupted, MgATP, but not ATP alone, produced long openings. These results suggest a gating cycle for CFTR in which ATP binding opens the channel and either hydrolysis or dissociation leads to channel closure. In addition, the data suggest that ATP binding and hydrolysis by either NBD can gate the channel. PMID:10880569

  4. On the ATP binding site of the ε subunit from bacterial F-type ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Krah, Alexander; Takada, Shoji

    2016-04-01

    F-type ATP synthases are reversible machinery that not only synthesize adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using an electrochemical gradient across the membrane, but also can hydrolyze ATP to pump ions under certain conditions. To prevent wasteful ATP hydrolysis, subunit ε in bacterial ATP synthases changes its conformation from the non-inhibitory down- to the inhibitory up-state at a low cellular ATP concentration. Recently, a crystal structure of the ε subunit in complex with ATP was solved in a non-biologically relevant dimeric form. Here, to derive the functional ATP binding site motif, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. Our results suggest that the ATP binding site markedly differs from the experimental resolved one; we observe a reorientation of several residues, which bind to ATP in the crystal structure. In addition we find that an Mg(2+) ion is coordinated by ATP, replacing interactions of the second chain in the crystal structure. Thus we demonstrate more generally the influence of crystallization effects on ligand binding sites and their respective binding modes. Furthermore, we propose a role for two highly conserved residues to control the ATP binding/unbinding event, which have not been considered before. Additionally our results provide the basis for the rational development of new biosensors based on subunit ε, as shown previously for novel sensors measuring the ATP concentration in cells. PMID:26780667

  5. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Bacterial ATP-Binding Cassette Systems

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Amy L.; Dassa, Elie; Orelle, Cedric; Chen, Jue

    2008-01-01

    Summary: ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems are universally distributed among living organisms and function in many different aspects of bacterial physiology. ABC transporters are best known for their role in the import of essential nutrients and the export of toxic molecules, but they can also mediate the transport of many other physiological substrates. In a classical transport reaction, two highly conserved ATP-binding domains or subunits couple the binding/hydrolysis of ATP to the translocation of particular substrates across the membrane, through interactions with membrane-spanning domains of the transporter. Variations on this basic theme involve soluble ABC ATP-binding proteins that couple ATP hydrolysis to nontransport processes, such as DNA repair and gene expression regulation. Insights into the structure, function, and mechanism of action of bacterial ABC proteins are reported, based on phylogenetic comparisons as well as classic biochemical and genetic approaches. The availability of an increasing number of high-resolution structures has provided a valuable framework for interpretation of recent studies, and realistic models have been proposed to explain how these fascinating molecular machines use complex dynamic processes to fulfill their numerous biological functions. These advances are also important for elucidating the mechanism of action of eukaryotic ABC proteins, because functional defects in many of them are responsible for severe human inherited diseases. PMID:18535149

  6. Recombinant preparation and functional studies of EspI ATP binding domain from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanyu; Wang, Huilin; Sun, Tao; Tian, Shuangliang; Lin, Donghai; Guo, Chenyun

    2016-07-01

    The ESX-1 secretion system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is required for the virulence of tubercle bacillus. EspI, the ESX-1 secretion-associated protein in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtEspI), is involved in repressing the activity of ESX-1-mediated secretion when the cellular ATP level is low. The ATP binding domain of MtEspI plays a crucial role in this regulatory process. However, further structural and functional studies of MtEspI are hindered due to the bottleneck of obtaining stable and pure recombinant protein. In this study, we systematically analyzed the structure and function of MtEspI using bioinformatics tools and tried various expression constructs to recombinantly express full-length and truncated MtEspI ATP binding domain. Finally, we prepared pure and stable MtEspI ATP binding domain, MtEspI415-493, in Escherichia coli by fusion expression and purification with dual tag, Glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag and (His)6 tag. (31)P NMR titration assay indicated that MtEspI415-493 possessed a moderate affinity (∼μM) for ATP and the residue K425 was located at the binding site. The protocol described here may provide a train of thought for recombinant preparation of other ESX-1 secretion-associated proteins. PMID:27017992

  7. The power stroke driven by ATP binding in CFTR as studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Furukawa-Hagiya, Tomoka; Furuta, Tadaomi; Chiba, Shuntaro; Sohma, Yoshiro; Sakurai, Minoru

    2013-01-10

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel belonging to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily. Currently, it remains unclear how ATP binding causes the opening of the channel gate at the molecular level. To clarify this mechanism, we first constructed an atomic model of the inward-facing CFTR using the X-ray structures of other ABC proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were then performed to explore the structure and dynamics of the inward-facing CFTR in a membrane environment. In the MgATP-bound state, two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) formed a head-to-tail type of dimer, in which the ATP molecules were sandwiched between the Walker A and signature motifs. Alternatively, one of the final MD structures in the apo state was similar to that of a "closed-apo" conformation found in the X-ray analysis of ATP-free MsbA. Principal component analysis for the MD trajectory indicated that NBD dimerization causes significant structural and dynamical changes in the transmembrane domains (TMDs), which is likely indicative of the formation of a chloride ion access path. This study suggests that the free energy gain from ATP binding acts as a driving force not only for NBD dimerization but also for NBD-TMD concerted motions. PMID:23214920

  8. Expression patterns of the T antigen and the cryptic T antigen in rat fetuses: detection with the lectin amaranthin.

    PubMed

    Sata, T; Zuber, C; Rinderle, S J; Goldstein, I J; Roth, J

    1990-06-01

    The lectin amaranthin, purified from the seeds of Amaranthus caudatus, has been shown to react specifically with the Gal beta 1,3GalNAc-alpha and the NeuAc alpha 2,3Gal beta 1,3GalNAc-alpha sequence which represent the T antigen and the cryptic T antigen, respectively. We report here the development of labeling techniques that apply amaranthin to stain paraffin sections from rat fetuses. Amaranthin staining was inhibited by pre-incubation of lectin-gold complexes with 10 mM Gal beta 1,3GalNAc-alpha-O-benzyl (synthetic T antigen) or 10 mM Gal beta 1,3GalNAc-alpha-O-aminophenylethyl-human serum albumin (T antigen neoglycoprotein), asialoglycophorin, asialofetuin, and asialomucin. The beta-elimination reaction also abolished the lectin staining demonstrating specificity for O-glycosidically linked structures. A comparison with monoclonal anti-T antigen antibody immunostaining demonstrated that amaranthin detects the T antigen and its cryptic form in tissue sections. Application of the galactose oxidase-Schiff sequence abolished amaranthin (and anti-T antibody) binding to the T antigen but not to its cryptic form, and therefore permitted their differentiation in tissue sections. Histochemical evidence was obtained indicating that amaranthin is a more specific anti-T reagent than peanut lectin. Data are presented that show the differential expression of the T antigen and the cryptic T antigen in organs and cells of rat fetuses late in gestation. Therefore, amaranthin can be used for histochemical detection of the T antigen and the cryptic T antigen, and facilitates discrimination between them. PMID:2335739

  9. [Detection of T-antigen in colorectal adenocarcinoma and polyps].

    PubMed

    Xu, S; Lu, Y; Wang, Q

    1995-10-01

    Galactose oxidase method was employed to detect the beta-D-Gal (1-->3) -D-Gal NAc residue of T-antigen present in the large intestinal mucus of 156 subjects. The positive rates of the test were 84.4%, 29.1%, and 7.2% in the mucus samples obtained from 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, 55 with polyps and 69 controls respectively. Chi-square test demonstrated that there were significant differences between the group of carcinoma and control (P < 0.001) as well as between also polyp and control (P < 0.01). The test had a high sensitivity (84.4%) and specificity (92.8%) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and may be used as a practical mass screening test for colorectal neoplasms. PMID:8731834

  10. Stable ATP binding mediated by a partial NBD dimer of the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2010-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) superfamily, is an ATP-gated chloride channel. Like other ABC proteins, CFTR encompasses two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), NBD1 and NBD2, each accommodating an ATP binding site. It is generally accepted that CFTR's opening-closing cycles, each completed within 1 s, are driven by rapid ATP binding and hydrolysis events in NBD2. Here, by recording CFTR currents in real time with a ligand exchange protocol, we demonstrated that during many of these gating cycles, NBD1 is constantly occupied by a stably bound ATP or 8-N(3)-ATP molecule for tens of seconds. We provided evidence that this tightly bound ATP or 8-N(3)-ATP also interacts with residues in the signature sequence of NBD2, a telltale sign for an event occurring at the NBD1-NBD2 interface. The open state of CFTR has been shown to represent a two-ATP-bound NBD dimer. Our results indicate that upon ATP hydrolysis in NBD2, the channel closes into a "partial NBD dimer" state where the NBD interface remains partially closed, preventing ATP dissociation from NBD1 but allowing the release of hydrolytic products and binding of the next ATP to occur in NBD2. Opening and closing of CFTR can then be coupled to the formation and "partial" separation of the NBD dimer. The tightly bound ATP molecule in NBD1 can occasionally dissociate from the partial dimer state, resulting in a nucleotide-free monomeric state of NBDs. Our data, together with other structural/functional studies of CFTR's NBDs, suggest that this process is poorly reversible, implying that the channel in the partial dimer state or monomeric state enters the open state through different pathways. We therefore proposed a gating model for CFTR with two distinct cycles. The structural and functional significance of our results to other ABC proteins is discussed. PMID:20421370

  11. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: a chloride channel gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bompadre, Silvia G; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2007-08-25

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. Defective function of CFTR is responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in Caucasian populations. The disease is manifested in defective chloride transport across the epithelial cells in various tissues. To date, more than 1400 different mutations have been identified as CF-associated. CFTR is regulated by phosphorylation in its regulatory (R) domain, and gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis at its two nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies reveal that the NBDs of CFTR may dimerize as observed in other ABC proteins. Upon dimerization of CFTR's two NBDs, in a head-to-tail configuration, the two ATP-binding pockets (ABP1 and ABP2) are formed by the canonical Walker A and B motifs from one NBD and the signature sequence from the partner NBD. Mutations of the amino acids that interact with ATP reveal that the two ABPs play distinct roles in controlling ATP-dependent gating of CFTR. It was proposed that binding of ATP to the ABP2, which is formed by the Walker A and B in NBD2 and the signature sequence in NBD1, is critical for catalyzing channel opening. While binding of ATP to the ABP1 alone may not increase the opening rate, it does contribute to the stabilization of the open channel conformation. Several disease-associated mutations of the CFTR channel are characterized by gating defects. Understanding how CFTR's two NBDs work together to gate the channel could provide considerable mechanistic information for future pharmacological studies, which could pave the way for tailored drug design for therapeutical interventions in CF. PMID:17700963

  12. Phylogenetic and functional classification of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems.

    PubMed

    Bouige, Philippe; Laurent, David; Piloyan, Linda; Dassa, Elie

    2002-10-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) systems constitute one of the most abundant superfamilies of proteins. They are involved in the transport of a wide variety of substances, but also in many cellular processes and in their regulation. In this paper, we made a comparative analysis of the properties of ABC systems and we provide a phylogenetic and functional classification. This analysis will be helpful to accurately annotate ABC systems discovered during the sequencing of the genome of living organisms and to identify the partners of the ABC ATPases. PMID:12370001

  13. New ATP-binding cassette A3 mutation causing surfactant metabolism dysfunction pulmonary type 3.

    PubMed

    Piersigilli, Fiammetta; Peca, Donatella; Campi, Francesca; Corsello, Mirta; Landolfo, Francesca; Boldrini, Renata; Danhaive, Olivier; Dotta, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) may occur in term and near-term infants because of mutations in surfactant-related genes. ATP-binding cassette A3 (ABCA3), a phospholipid carrier specifically expressed in the alveolar epithelium, is the most frequently involved protein. We report the case of a couple of late-preterm fraternal twin infants of opposite sex carrying the same compound heterozygous ABCA3 mutations, one of which has never been previously reported, with different disease severity, suggesting variable penetrance or sex-related differences. ABCA3 deficiency should be considered in term or near-term babies who develop unexplained RDS. PMID:26508177

  14. Cowpox virus protein CPXV012 eludes CTLs by blocking ATP binding to TAP.

    PubMed

    Luteijn, Rutger D; Hoelen, Hanneke; Kruse, Elisabeth; van Leeuwen, Wouter F; Grootens, Jennine; Horst, Daniëlle; Koorengevel, Martijn; Drijfhout, Jan W; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Früh, Klaus; Neefjes, Jacques J; Killian, Antoinette; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Ressing, Maaike E; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J

    2014-08-15

    CD8(+) CTLs detect virus-infected cells through recognition of virus-derived peptides presented at the cell surface by MHC class I molecules. The cowpox virus protein CPXV012 deprives the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen of peptides for loading onto newly synthesized MHC class I molecules by inhibiting the transporter associated with Ag processing (TAP). This evasion strategy allows the virus to avoid detection by the immune system. In this article, we show that CPXV012, a 9-kDa type II transmembrane protein, prevents peptide transport by inhibiting ATP binding to TAP. We identified a segment within the ER-luminal domain of CPXV012 that imposes the block in peptide transport by TAP. Biophysical studies show that this domain has a strong affinity for phospholipids that are also abundant in the ER membrane. We discuss these findings in an evolutionary context and show that a frameshift deletion in the CPXV012 gene in an ancestral cowpox virus created the current form of CPXV012 that is capable of inhibiting TAP. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the ER-luminal domain of CPXV012 inserts into the ER membrane, where it interacts with TAP. CPXV012 presumably induces a conformational arrest that precludes ATP binding to TAP and, thus, activity of TAP, thereby preventing the presentation of viral peptides to CTLs. PMID:25024387

  15. Selenodiglutathione uptake by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuolar ATP-binding cassette transporter Ycf1p.

    PubMed

    Lazard, Myriam; Ha-Duong, Nguyet-Thanh; Mounié, Stéphanie; Perrin, Romary; Plateau, Pierre; Blanquet, Sylvain

    2011-11-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuolar ATP-binding cassette transporter Ycf1p is involved in heavy metal detoxification by mediating the ATP-dependent transport of glutathione-metal conjugates to the vacuole. In the case of selenite toxicity, deletion of YCF1 was shown to confer increased resistance, rather than sensitivity, to selenite exposure [Pinson B, Sagot I & Daignan-Fornier B (2000) Mol Microbiol36, 679-687]. Here, we show that when Ycf1p is expressed from a multicopy plasmid, the toxicity of selenite is exacerbated. Using secretory vesicles isolated from a sec6-4 mutant transformed either with the plasmid harbouring YCF1 or the control plasmid, we establish that the glutathione-conjugate selenodigluthatione is a high-affinity substrate of this ATP-binding cassette transporter and that oxidized glutathione is also efficiently transported. Finally, we show that the presence of Ycf1p impairs the glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio of cells subjected to a selenite stress. Possible mechanisms by which Ycf1p-mediated vacuolar uptake of selenodiglutathione and oxidized glutathione enhances selenite toxicity are discussed. PMID:21880115

  16. Structure, function, and evolution of bacterial ATP-binding cassette systems

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, A.L.; Dassa, E.; Orelle, C.; Chen, J.

    2010-07-27

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems constitute one of the largest superfamilies of paralogous sequences. All ABC systems share a highly conserved ATP-hydrolyzing domain or protein (the ABC; also referred to as a nucleotide-binding domain [NBD]) that is unequivocally characterized by three short sequence motifs (Fig. 1): these are the Walker A and Walker B motifs, indicative of the presence of a nucleotide-binding site, and the signature motif, unique to ABC proteins, located upstream of the Walker B motif (426). Other motifs diagnostic of ABC proteins are also indicated in Fig. 1. The biological significance of these motifs is discussed in Structure, Function, and Dynamics of the ABC. ABC systems are widespread among living organisms and have been detected in all genera of the three kingdoms of life, with remarkable conservation in the primary sequence of the cassette and in the organization of the constitutive domains or subunits (203, 420). ABC systems couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to an impressively large variety of essential biological phenomena, comprising not only transmembrane (TM) transport, for which they are best known, but also several non-transport-related processes, such as translation elongation (62) and DNA repair (174). Although ABC systems deserve much attention because they are involved in severe human inherited diseases (107), they were first discovered and characterized in detail in prokaryotes, as early as the 1970s (13, 148, 238, 468). The most extensively analyzed systems were the high-affinity histidine and maltose uptake systems of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli. Over 2 decades ago, after the completion of the nucleotide sequences encoding these transporters in the respective laboratories of Giovanna Ames and Maurice Hofnung, Hiroshi Nikaido and colleagues noticed that the two systems displayed a global similarity in the nature of their components and, moreover, that the primary sequences of MalK and

  17. Tumorigenic activity of Merkel cell polyomavirus T antigens expressed in the stratified epithelium of mice

    PubMed Central

    Spurgeon, Megan E.; Cheng, Jingwei; Bronson, Roderick T.; Lambert, Paul F.; DeCaprio, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is frequently associated with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a highly aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. Most MCC tumors contain integrated copies of the viral genome with persistent expression of the MCPyV large T (LT) and small T (ST) antigen. MCPyV isolated from MCC typically contain wild type ST but truncated forms of LT that retain the N-terminus but delete the C-terminus and render LT incapable of supporting virus replication. To determine the oncogenic activity of MCC tumor-derived T antigens in vivo, a conditional, tissue-specific mouse model was developed. Keratin 14-mediated Cre recombinase expression induced expression of MCPyV T antigens in stratified squamous epithelial cells and Merkel cells of the skin epidermis. Mice expressing MCPyV T antigens developed hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and acanthosis of the skin with additional abnormalities in whisker pads, footpads and eyes. Nearly half of the mice also developed cutaneous papillomas. Evidence for neoplastic progression within stratified epithelia included increased cellular proliferation, unscheduled DNA synthesis, increased E2F-responsive genes levels, disrupted differentiation, and presence of a DNA damage response. These results indicate that MCPyV T antigens are tumorigenic in vivo, consistent with their suspected etiological role in human cancer. PMID:25596282

  18. Tumorigenic activity of merkel cell polyomavirus T antigens expressed in the stratified epithelium of mice.

    PubMed

    Spurgeon, Megan E; Cheng, Jingwei; Bronson, Roderick T; Lambert, Paul F; DeCaprio, James A

    2015-03-15

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is frequently associated with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a highly aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. Most MCC tumors contain integrated copies of the viral genome with persistent expression of the MCPyV large T (LT) and small T (ST) antigen. MCPyV isolated from MCC typically contains wild-type ST but truncated forms of LT that retain the N-terminus but delete the C-terminus and render LT incapable of supporting virus replication. To determine the oncogenic activity of MCC tumor-derived T antigens in vivo, a conditional, tissue-specific mouse model was developed. Keratin 14-mediated Cre recombinase expression induced expression of MCPyV T antigens in stratified squamous epithelial cells and Merkel cells of the skin epidermis. Mice expressing MCPyV T antigens developed hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and acanthosis of the skin with additional abnormalities in whisker pads, footpads, and eyes. Nearly half of the mice also developed cutaneous papillomas. Evidence for neoplastic progression within stratified epithelia included increased cellular proliferation, unscheduled DNA synthesis, increased E2F-responsive genes levels, disrupted differentiation, and presence of a DNA damage response. These results indicate that MCPyV T antigens are tumorigenic in vivo, consistent with their suspected etiologic role in human cancer. PMID:25596282

  19. Whole-Genome Survey of the Putative ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Family Genes in Vitis vinifera

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily constitutes one of the largest protein families known in plants. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of ABC protein genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with ABC protein members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified 135 putative ABC proteins with 1 or 2 NBDs in V. vinifera. Of these, 120 encode intrinsic membrane proteins, and 15 encode proteins missing TMDs. V. vinifera ABC proteins can be divided into 13 subfamilies with 79 “full-size,” 41 “half-size,” and 15 “soluble” putative ABC proteins. The main feature of the Vitis ABC superfamily is the presence of 2 large subfamilies, ABCG (pleiotropic drug resistance and white-brown complex homolog) and ABCC (multidrug resistance-associated protein). We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative ABC transporters in different species. This work represents the first complete inventory of ABC transporters in V. vinifera. The identification of Vitis ABC transporters and their comparative analysis with the Arabidopsis counterparts revealed a strong conservation between the 2 species. This inventory could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these transporters in V. vinifera. PMID:24244377

  20. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2010-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  1. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  2. Stable ATP binding mediated by a partial NBD dimer of the CFTR chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Li, Min

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) superfamily, is an ATP-gated chloride channel. Like other ABC proteins, CFTR encompasses two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), NBD1 and NBD2, each accommodating an ATP binding site. It is generally accepted that CFTR’s opening–closing cycles, each completed within 1 s, are driven by rapid ATP binding and hydrolysis events in NBD2. Here, by recording CFTR currents in real time with a ligand exchange protocol, we demonstrated that during many of these gating cycles, NBD1 is constantly occupied by a stably bound ATP or 8-N3-ATP molecule for tens of seconds. We provided evidence that this tightly bound ATP or 8-N3-ATP also interacts with residues in the signature sequence of NBD2, a telltale sign for an event occurring at the NBD1–NBD2 interface. The open state of CFTR has been shown to represent a two-ATP–bound NBD dimer. Our results indicate that upon ATP hydrolysis in NBD2, the channel closes into a “partial NBD dimer” state where the NBD interface remains partially closed, preventing ATP dissociation from NBD1 but allowing the release of hydrolytic products and binding of the next ATP to occur in NBD2. Opening and closing of CFTR can then be coupled to the formation and “partial” separation of the NBD dimer. The tightly bound ATP molecule in NBD1 can occasionally dissociate from the partial dimer state, resulting in a nucleotide-free monomeric state of NBDs. Our data, together with other structural/functional studies of CFTR’s NBDs, suggest that this process is poorly reversible, implying that the channel in the partial dimer state or monomeric state enters the open state through different pathways. We therefore proposed a gating model for CFTR with two distinct cycles. The structural and functional significance of our results to other ABC proteins is discussed. PMID:20421370

  3. ATP-binding sites in brain p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein), a multifunctional AAA ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Zalk, Ran; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2003-01-01

    VCP (valosin-containing protein) or p97 is a member of the AAA family (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities family), a diverse group of proteins sharing a key conserved AAA module containing duplicate putative ATP-binding sites. Although the functions of the AAA family are related to their putative ATP-binding sites, the binding of ATP to these sites has not yet been demonstrated. In the present study, the ATP-binding site(s) of brain VCP was characterized using the photoreactive ATP analogue, BzATP [3'- O -(4-benzoylbenzoyl)ATP]. Photo-activation of Bz-[alpha-(32)P]ATP resulted in its covalent binding to a 97-kDa purified soluble or membrane-associated protein, identified by amino acid sequencing as VCP. Bz-[alpha-(32)P]ATP covalently bound to the purified homo-hexameric VCP with an apparent high affinity (74-111 nM). A molar stoichiometry of 2.23+/-0.14 BzATP bound per homo-hexameric VCP (n =6) was determined using different methods for analysis of radiolabelling and protein determination. Nucleotides inhibited the binding of Bz-[alpha-(32)P]ATP to VCP with the following efficiency: BzATP>ATP>ADP>>adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate>or=adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-methylene]triphosphate, whereas AMP, GTP and CTP were ineffective. VCP was observed to possess very low ATPase activity, with nucleotide specificity similar to that for BzATP binding. Conformational changes induced by an alternating site mechanism for ATP binding are suggested as a molecular mechanism for coupling ATP binding to the diverse activities of the AAA family. PMID:12747802

  4. The two ATP binding sites of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) play distinct roles in gating kinetics and energetics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Wang, Xiaohui; Liu, Hao-Yang; Zou, Xiaoqin; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2006-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporter family, is a chloride channel whose activity is controlled by protein kinase-dependent phosphorylation. Opening and closing (gating) of the phosphorylated CFTR is coupled to ATP binding and hydrolysis at CFTR's two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies present evidence that the open channel conformation reflects a head-to-tail dimerization of CFTR's two NBDs as seen in the NBDs of other ABC transporters (Vergani et al., 2005). Whether these two ATP binding sites play an equivalent role in the dynamics of NBD dimerization, and thus in gating CFTR channels, remains unsettled. Based on the crystal structures of NBDs, sequence alignment, and homology modeling, we have identified two critical aromatic amino acids (W401 in NBD1 and Y1219 in NBD2) that coordinate the adenine ring of the bound ATP. Conversion of the W401 residue to glycine (W401G) has little effect on the sensitivity of the opening rate to [ATP], but the same mutation at the Y1219 residue dramatically lowers the apparent affinity for ATP by >50-fold, suggesting distinct roles of these two ATP binding sites in channel opening. The W401G mutation, however, shortens the open time constant. Energetic analysis of our data suggests that the free energy of ATP binding at NBD1, but not at NBD2, contributes significantly to the energetics of the open state. This kinetic and energetic asymmetry of CFTR's two NBDs suggests an asymmetric motion of the NBDs during channel gating. Opening of the channel is initiated by ATP binding at the NBD2 site, whereas separation of the NBD dimer at the NBD1 site constitutes the rate-limiting step in channel closing. PMID:16966475

  5. The Two ATP Binding Sites of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Play Distinct Roles in Gating Kinetics and Energetics

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen; Wang, Xiaohui; Liu, Hao-Yang; Zou, Xiaoqin; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2006-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporter family, is a chloride channel whose activity is controlled by protein kinase–dependent phosphorylation. Opening and closing (gating) of the phosphorylated CFTR is coupled to ATP binding and hydrolysis at CFTR's two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies present evidence that the open channel conformation reflects a head-to-tail dimerization of CFTR's two NBDs as seen in the NBDs of other ABC transporters (Vergani et al., 2005). Whether these two ATP binding sites play an equivalent role in the dynamics of NBD dimerization, and thus in gating CFTR channels, remains unsettled. Based on the crystal structures of NBDs, sequence alignment, and homology modeling, we have identified two critical aromatic amino acids (W401 in NBD1 and Y1219 in NBD2) that coordinate the adenine ring of the bound ATP. Conversion of the W401 residue to glycine (W401G) has little effect on the sensitivity of the opening rate to [ATP], but the same mutation at the Y1219 residue dramatically lowers the apparent affinity for ATP by >50-fold, suggesting distinct roles of these two ATP binding sites in channel opening. The W401G mutation, however, shortens the open time constant. Energetic analysis of our data suggests that the free energy of ATP binding at NBD1, but not at NBD2, contributes significantly to the energetics of the open state. This kinetic and energetic asymmetry of CFTR's two NBDs suggests an asymmetric motion of the NBDs during channel gating. Opening of the channel is initiated by ATP binding at the NBD2 site, whereas separation of the NBD dimer at the NBD1 site constitutes the rate-limiting step in channel closing. PMID:16966475

  6. Microarray study of single nucleotide polymorphisms and expression of ATP-binding cassette genes in breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, M. M.; Ibragimova, M. K.; Karabut, I. V.; Freydin, M. B.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Litvyakov, N. V.

    2015-11-01

    Our previous research establishes that changes of expression of the ATP-binding cassette genes family is connected with the neoadjuvant chemotherapy effect. However, the mechanism of regulation of resistance gene expression remains unclear. As many researchers believe, single nucleotide polymorphisms can be involved in this process. Thereupon, microarray analysis is used to study polymorphisms in ATP-binding cassette genes. It is thus found that MDR gene expression is connected with 5 polymorphisms, i.e. rs241432, rs241429, rs241430, rs3784867, rs59409230, which participate in the regulation of expression of own genes.

  7. Protection against chemotherapy-induced alopecia: targeting ATP-binding cassette transporters in the hair follicle?

    PubMed

    Haslam, Iain S; Pitre, Aaron; Schuetz, John D; Paus, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    Currently, efficacious treatments for chemotherapy-induced alopecia (hair loss) are lacking, and incidences of permanent hair loss following high-dose chemotherapy are on the increase. In this article, we describe mechanisms by which the pharmacological defense status of the hair follicle might be enhanced, thereby reducing the accumulation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and preventing or reducing hair loss and damage. We believe this could be achieved via the selective increase in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression within the hair follicle epithelium, following application of topical agonists for regulatory nuclear receptors. Clinical application would require the development of hair follicle-targeted formulations, potentially utilizing nanoparticle technology. This novel approach has the potential to yield entirely new therapeutic options for the treatment and management of chemotherapy-induced alopecia, providing significant psychological and physical benefit to cancer patients. PMID:24100054

  8. Role of family D ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABCD) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hlaváč, Viktor; Souček, Pavel

    2015-10-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, belonging to the family D, are expressed in peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum or lysosomes. ABCD transporters play a role in transport of lipids, bile acids and vitamin B12 and associate with peroxisomal disorders. ABCD1 performs transport of coenzyme A esters of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) in peroxisomes and a number of mutations in ABCD1 gene were linked to an X-linked adrenoleucodystrophy (X-ALD). The role of ABCD transporters in tumour growth has not been studied in detail, but there is some evidence that ABCDs levels differ between undifferentiated stem or tumour cells and differentiated cells suggesting a possible link to tumorigenesis. In this mini-review, we discuss the available information about the role of ABCD transporters in cancer. PMID:26517907

  9. Transport in technicolor: Mapping ATP-binding cassette transporters in sea urchin embryos

    PubMed Central

    Gökirmak, Tufan; Shipp, Lauren E.; Campanale, Joseph P.; Nicklisch, Sascha C.T.; Hamdoun, Amro

    2014-01-01

    One quarter of eukaryotic genes encode membrane proteins. These include nearly 1000 transporters that translocate nutrients, signaling molecules, and xenobiotics across membranes. While it is well appreciated that membrane transport is critical for development, the specific roles of many transporters have remained cryptic, in part because of their abundance and the diversity of their substrates. Multi-drug resistance ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters are one example of cryptic membrane proteins. Although most organisms utilize these ABC transporters during embryonic development, many of these transporters have broad substrate specificity, and their developmental functions remain incompletely understood. Here, we review advances in our understanding of ABC transporters in sea urchin embryos, and methods developed to spatially and temporally map these proteins. These studies reveal that multifunctional transporters are required for signaling, homeostasis, and protection of the embryo, and shed light on how they are integrated into ancestral developmental pathways recapitulated in disease. PMID:25156004

  10. TSH increases synthesis of hepatic ATP-binding cassette subfamily A member 1 in hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tiantian; Zhou, Lingyan; Li, Cong Cong; Shi, Hong; Zhou, Xinli

    2016-07-22

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that thyrotropin (TSH) levels are closely correlated with the severity of hypercholesterolemia. Reverse cholesterol transfer (RCT) plays an important role in regulating bloodcholesterol. However, the molecular mechanism of hypercholesterolemia in subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) has not been fully clarified. The SCH mouse model, which is characterized by elevated serum TSH but not thyroid hormone levels, demonstrated a significant increase in plasma cholesterol compared with controls. Interestingly, Tshr KO mice, with normal thyroid hormone levels after thyroid hormone supplementation, showed lower plasma cholesterol levels compared with their wild-type littermates. ATP binding cassette subfamily A member 1(ABCA1) is a member of the ABC superfamily, which induces transfer of intracellular cholesterol to extracellular apolipoprotein. TSH upregulated hepatic ABCA1 to promote the efflux of intercellular cumulative cholesterol, resulting in increased plasma cholesterol. These data might partially explain the pathogenesis of hypercholesterolemia in SCH. PMID:27179782

  11. Study of the ATP-binding site of helicase IV from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dubaele, Sandy; Lourdel, Claude; Chène, Patrick

    2006-03-17

    Helicases contain conserved motifs involved in ATP/magnesium/nucleic acid binding and in the mechanisms coupling nucleotide hydrolysis to duplex unwinding. None of these motifs are located at the adenine-binding pocket of the protein. We show here that the superfamily I helicase, helicase IV from Escherichia coli, utilizes a conserved glutamine and conserved aromatic residue to interact with ATP. Other superfamily I helicases such as, UvrD/Rep/PcrA also possess these residues but in addition they interact with adenine via a conserved arginine, which is replaced by a serine in helicase IV. Mutation of this serine residue in helicase IV into histidine or methionine leads to proteins with unaffected ATPase and DNA-binding activities but with low helicase activity. This suggests that residues located at the adenine-binding pocket, in addition to be involved in ATP-binding, are important for efficient coupling between ATP hydrolysis and DNA unwinding. PMID:16442499

  12. Inhibitors of Ketohexokinase: Discovery of Pyrimidinopyrimidines with Specific Substitution that Complements the ATP-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Attenuation of fructose metabolism by the inhibition of ketohexokinase (KHK; fructokinase) should reduce body weight, free fatty acids, and triglycerides, thereby offering a novel approach to treat diabetes and obesity in response to modern diets. We have identified potent, selective inhibitors of human hepatic KHK within a series of pyrimidinopyrimidines (1). For example, 8, 38, and 47 exhibited KHK IC50 values of 12, 7, and 8 nM, respectively, and also showed potent cellular KHK inhibition (IC50 < 500 nM), which relates to their intrinsic potency vs KHK and their ability to penetrate cells. X-ray cocrystal structures of KHK complexes of 3, 8, and 47 revealed the important interactions within the enzyme's adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding pocket. PMID:24900346

  13. Critical roles of interdomain interactions for modulatory ATP binding to sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Johannes D; Holdensen, Anne Nyholm; Andersen, Jens Peter

    2014-10-17

    ATP has dual roles in the reaction cycle of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase. Upon binding to the Ca2E1 state, ATP phosphorylates the enzyme, and by binding to other conformational states in a non-phosphorylating modulatory mode ATP stimulates the dephosphorylation and other partial reaction steps of the cycle, thereby ensuring a high rate of Ca(2+) transport under physiological conditions. The present study elucidates the mechanism underlying the modulatory effect on dephosphorylation. In the intermediate states of dephosphorylation the A-domain residues Ser(186) and Asp(203) interact with Glu(439) (N-domain) and Arg(678) (P-domain), respectively. Single mutations to these residues abolish the stimulation of dephosphorylation by ATP. The double mutation swapping Asp(203) and Arg(678) rescues ATP stimulation, whereas this is not the case for the double mutation swapping Ser(186) and Glu(439). By taking advantage of the ability of wild type and mutant Ca(2+)-ATPases to form stable complexes with aluminum fluoride (E2·AlF) and beryllium fluoride (E2·BeF) as analogs of the E2·P phosphoryl transition state and E2P ground state, respectively, of the dephosphorylation reaction, the mutational effects on ATP binding to these intermediates are demonstrated. In the wild type Ca(2+)-ATPase, the ATP affinity of the E2·P phosphoryl transition state is higher than that of the E2P ground state, thus explaining the stimulation of dephosphorylation by nucleotide-induced transition state stabilization. We find that the Asp(203)-Arg(678) and Ser(186)-Glu(439) interdomain bonds are critical, because they tighten the interaction with ATP in the E2·P phosphoryl transition state. Moreover, ATP binding and the Ser(186)-Glu(439) bond are mutually exclusive in the E2P ground state. PMID:25193668

  14. Critical Roles of Interdomain Interactions for Modulatory ATP Binding to Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPase*

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Johannes D.; Holdensen, Anne Nyholm; Andersen, Jens Peter

    2014-01-01

    ATP has dual roles in the reaction cycle of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase. Upon binding to the Ca2E1 state, ATP phosphorylates the enzyme, and by binding to other conformational states in a non-phosphorylating modulatory mode ATP stimulates the dephosphorylation and other partial reaction steps of the cycle, thereby ensuring a high rate of Ca2+ transport under physiological conditions. The present study elucidates the mechanism underlying the modulatory effect on dephosphorylation. In the intermediate states of dephosphorylation the A-domain residues Ser186 and Asp203 interact with Glu439 (N-domain) and Arg678 (P-domain), respectively. Single mutations to these residues abolish the stimulation of dephosphorylation by ATP. The double mutation swapping Asp203 and Arg678 rescues ATP stimulation, whereas this is not the case for the double mutation swapping Ser186 and Glu439. By taking advantage of the ability of wild type and mutant Ca2+-ATPases to form stable complexes with aluminum fluoride (E2·AlF) and beryllium fluoride (E2·BeF) as analogs of the E2·P phosphoryl transition state and E2P ground state, respectively, of the dephosphorylation reaction, the mutational effects on ATP binding to these intermediates are demonstrated. In the wild type Ca2+-ATPase, the ATP affinity of the E2·P phosphoryl transition state is higher than that of the E2P ground state, thus explaining the stimulation of dephosphorylation by nucleotide-induced transition state stabilization. We find that the Asp203-Arg678 and Ser186-Glu439 interdomain bonds are critical, because they tighten the interaction with ATP in the E2·P phosphoryl transition state. Moreover, ATP binding and the Ser186-Glu439 bond are mutually exclusive in the E2P ground state. PMID:25193668

  15. Structure-Function Analysis of Peroxisomal ATP-binding Cassette Transporters Using Chimeric Dimers*

    PubMed Central

    Geillon, Flore; Gondcaille, Catherine; Charbonnier, Soëli; Van Roermund, Carlo W.; Lopez, Tatiana E.; Dias, Alexandre M. M.; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Arnould, Christine; Wanders, Ronald J.; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    ABCD1 and ABCD2 are two closely related ATP-binding cassette half-transporters predicted to homodimerize and form peroxisomal importers for fatty acyl-CoAs. Available evidence has shown that ABCD1 and ABCD2 display a distinct but overlapping substrate specificity, although much remains to be learned in this respect as well as in their capability to form functional heterodimers. Using a cell model expressing an ABCD2-EGFP fusion protein, we first demonstrated by proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay that ABCD1 interacts with ABCD2. Next, we tested in the pxa1/pxa2Δ yeast mutant the functionality of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers by expressing chimeric proteins mimicking homo- or heterodimers. For further structure-function analysis of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers, we expressed chimeric dimers fused to enhanced GFP in human skin fibroblasts of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patients. These cells are devoid of ABCD1 and accumulate very long-chain fatty acids (C26:0 and C26:1). We checked that the chimeric proteins were correctly expressed and targeted to the peroxisomes. Very long-chain fatty acid levels were partially restored in transfected X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy fibroblasts regardless of the chimeric construct used, thus demonstrating functionality of both homo- and heterodimers. Interestingly, the level of C24:6 n-3, the immediate precursor of docosahexaenoic acid, was decreased in cells expressing chimeric proteins containing at least one ABCD2 moiety. Our data demonstrate for the first time that both homo- and heterodimers of ABCD1 and ABCD2 are functionally active. Interestingly, the role of ABCD2 (in homo- and heterodimeric forms) in the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids is clearly evidenced, and the chimeric dimers provide a novel tool to study substrate specificity of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters. PMID:25043761

  16. A Chemical Proteomics Approach to Profiling the ATP-binding Proteome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis *

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Lisa M.; Veeraraghavan, Usha; Idicula-Thomas, Susan; Schürer, Stephan; Wennerberg, Krister; Reynolds, Robert; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Dobos, Karen M.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, remains one of the leading causes of death worldwide despite extensive research, directly observed therapy using multidrug regimens, and the widespread use of a vaccine. The majority of patients harbor the bacterium in a state of metabolic dormancy. New drugs with novel modes of action are needed to target essential metabolic pathways in M. tuberculosis; ATP-competitive enzyme inhibitors are one such class. Previous screening efforts for ATP-competitive enzyme inhibitors identified several classes of lead compounds that demonstrated potent anti-mycobacterial efficacy as well as tolerable levels of toxicity in cell culture. In this report, a probe-based chemoproteomic approach was used to selectively profile the M. tuberculosis ATP-binding proteome in normally growing and hypoxic M. tuberculosis. From these studies, 122 ATP-binding proteins were identified in either metabolic state, and roughly 60% of these are reported to be essential for survival in vitro. These data are available through ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000141. Protein families vital to the survival of the tubercle bacillus during hypoxia emerged from our studies. Specifically, along with members of the DosR regulon, several proteins involved in energy metabolism (Icl/Rv0468 and Mdh/Rv1240) and lipid biosynthesis (UmaA/Rv0469, DesA1/Rv0824c, and DesA2/Rv1094) were found to be differentially abundant in hypoxic versus normal growing cultures. These pathways represent a subset of proteins that may be relevant therapeutic targets for development of novel ATP-competitive antibiotics. PMID:23462205

  17. ATP binding and aspartate protonation enhance photoinduced electron transfer in plant cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Cailliez, Fabien; Müller, Pavel; Gallois, Michaël; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2014-09-17

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins encountered in most vegetal and animal species. They play a role of blue-light receptors in plants and in invertebrates. The putative resting state of the FAD cofactor in these proteins is its fully oxidized form, FADox. Upon blue-light excitation, the isoalloxazine ring (ISO) may undergo an ultrafast reduction by a nearby tryptophan residue W400. This primary reduction triggers a cascade of electron and proton transfers, ultimately leading to the formation of the FADH° radical. A recent experimental study has shown that the yield of FADH° formation in Arabidopsis cryptochrome can be strongly modulated by ATP binding and by pH, affecting the protonation state of D396 (proton donor to FAD°(-)). Here we provide a detailed molecular analysis of these effects by means of combined classical molecular dynamics simulations and time-dependent density functional theory calculations. When ATP is present and D396 protonated, FAD remains in close contact with W400, thereby enhancing electron transfer (ET) from W400 to ISO*. In contrast, deprotonation of D396 and absence of ATP introduce flexibility to the photoactive site prior to FAD excitation, with the consequence of increased ISO-W400 distance and diminished tunneling rate by almost two orders of magnitude. We show that under these conditions, ET from the adenine moiety of FAD becomes a competitive relaxation pathway. Overall, our data suggest that the observed effects of ATP and pH on the FAD photoreduction find their roots in the earliest stage of the photoreduction process; i.e., ATP binding and the protonation state of D396 determine the preferred pathway of ISO* relaxation. PMID:25157750

  18. Comparisons between Murine Polyomavirus and Simian Virus 40 Show Significant Differences in Small T Antigen Function ▿

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Shaida; Hwang, Justin H.; Choe, Jennifer Kean; Roberts, Thomas M.; Schaffhausen, Brian S.

    2011-01-01

    Although members of a virus family produce similar gene products, those products may have quite different functions. Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT), for example, targets p53 directly, but murine polyomavirus LT does not. SV40 small T antigen (SVST) has received considerable attention because of its ability to contribute to transformation of human cells. Here, we show that there are major differences between SVST and polyomavirus small T antigen (POLST) in their effects on differentiation, transformation, and cell survival. Both SVST and POLST induce cell cycle progression. However, POLST also inhibits differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and C2C12 myoblasts. Additionally, POLST induces apoptosis of mouse embryo fibroblasts. SVST reduces the proapoptotic transcriptional activity of FOXO1 through phosphorylation. On the other hand, SVST complements large T antigen and Ras for the transformation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs), but POLST does not. Mechanistically, the differences between SVST and POLST may lie in utilization of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). POLST binds both Aα and Aβ scaffolding subunits of PP2A while SVST binds only Aα. Knockdown of Aβ could mimic POLST-induced apoptosis. The two small T antigens can target different proteins for dephosphorylation. POLST binds and dephosphorylates substrates, such as lipins, that SVST does not. PMID:21835797

  19. ROLE OF ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUB-FAMILY MEMBER 2 (ABCG2) IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATP binding cassette sub-family member 2 (ABCG2), is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily and a principal xenobiotic transporter. ABCG2 is also highly expressed in certain stem cell populations where it is thought to be related to stem cell plasticity, although the role o...

  20. A Survey of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Gene Superfamily in the Salmon Louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis)

    PubMed Central

    Heumann, Jan; Taggart, John B.; Gharbi, Karim; Bron, James E.; Bekaert, Michaël; Sturm, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Salmon lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer, 1837), are fish ectoparasites causing significant economic damage in the mariculture of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar Linnaeus, 1758. The control of L. salmonis at fish farms relies to a large extent on treatment with anti-parasitic drugs. A problem related to chemical control is the potential for development of resistance, which in L. salmonis is documented for a number of drug classes including organophosphates, pyrethroids and avermectins. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene superfamily is found in all biota and includes a range of drug efflux transporters that can confer drug resistance to cancers and pathogens. Furthermore, some ABC transporters are recognised to be involved in conferral of insecticide resistance. While a number of studies have investigated ABC transporters in L. salmonis, no systematic analysis of the ABC gene family exists for this species. This study presents a genome-wide survey of ABC genes in L. salmonis for which, ABC superfamily members were identified through homology searching of the L. salmonis genome. In addition, ABC proteins were identified in a reference transcriptome of the parasite generated by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of a multi-stage RNA library. Searches of both genome and transcriptome allowed the identification of a total of 33 genes / transcripts coding for ABC proteins, of which 3 were represented only in the genome and 4 only in the transcriptome. Eighteen sequences were assigned to ABC subfamilies known to contain drug transporters, i.e. subfamilies B (4 sequences), C (11) and G (2). The results suggest that the ABC gene family of L. salmonis possesses fewer members than recorded for other arthropods. The present survey of the L. salmonis ABC gene superfamily will provide the basis for further research into potential roles of ABC transporters in the toxicity of salmon delousing agents and as potential mechanisms of drug resistance. PMID:26418738

  1. Alternating access to the transmembrane domain of the ATP-binding cassette protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ABCC7).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2012-03-23

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family, most members of which act as active transporters. Actively transporting ABC proteins are thought to alternate between "outwardly facing" and "inwardly facing" conformations of the transmembrane substrate pathway. In CFTR, it is assumed that the outwardly facing conformation corresponds to the channel open state, based on homology with other ABC proteins. We have used patch clamp recording to quantify the rate of access of cysteine-reactive probes to cysteines introduced into two different transmembrane regions of CFTR from both the intracellular and extracellular solutions. Two probes, the large [2-sulfonatoethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) molecule and permeant Au(CN)(2)(-) ions, were applied to either side of the membrane to modify cysteines substituted for Leu-102 (first transmembrane region) and Thr-338 (sixth transmembrane region). Channel opening and closing were altered by mutations in the nucleotide binding domains of the channel. We find that, for both MTSES and Au(CN)(2)(-), access to these two cysteines from the cytoplasmic side is faster in open channels, whereas access to these same sites from the extracellular side is faster in closed channels. These results are consistent with alternating access to the transmembrane regions, however with the open state facing inwardly and the closed state facing outwardly. Our findings therefore prompt revision of current CFTR structural and mechanistic models, as well as having broader implications for transport mechanisms in all ABC proteins. Our results also suggest possible locations of both functional and dysfunctional ("vestigial") gates within the CFTR permeation pathway. PMID:22303012

  2. Alternating Access to the Transmembrane Domain of the ATP-binding Cassette Protein Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (ABCC7)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family, most members of which act as active transporters. Actively transporting ABC proteins are thought to alternate between “outwardly facing” and “inwardly facing” conformations of the transmembrane substrate pathway. In CFTR, it is assumed that the outwardly facing conformation corresponds to the channel open state, based on homology with other ABC proteins. We have used patch clamp recording to quantify the rate of access of cysteine-reactive probes to cysteines introduced into two different transmembrane regions of CFTR from both the intracellular and extracellular solutions. Two probes, the large [2-sulfonatoethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) molecule and permeant Au(CN)2− ions, were applied to either side of the membrane to modify cysteines substituted for Leu-102 (first transmembrane region) and Thr-338 (sixth transmembrane region). Channel opening and closing were altered by mutations in the nucleotide binding domains of the channel. We find that, for both MTSES and Au(CN)2−, access to these two cysteines from the cytoplasmic side is faster in open channels, whereas access to these same sites from the extracellular side is faster in closed channels. These results are consistent with alternating access to the transmembrane regions, however with the open state facing inwardly and the closed state facing outwardly. Our findings therefore prompt revision of current CFTR structural and mechanistic models, as well as having broader implications for transport mechanisms in all ABC proteins. Our results also suggest possible locations of both functional and dysfunctional (“vestigial”) gates within the CFTR permeation pathway. PMID:22303012

  3. Small and middle T antigens contribute to lytic and abortive polyomavirus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Tuerler, H.; Salomon, C.

    1985-02-01

    Using three different polyomavirus hr-t mutants and two polyomavirus mlT mutants, the authors studied induction of S-phase by mutants and wild-type virus in quiescent mouse kidney cells, mouse 3T6 cells, and FR 3T3 cells. At different times after infection, they measured the proportion of T-antigen-positive cells, the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine, the proportion of DNA-synthesizing cells, and the increase in total DNA, RNA, and protein content of the cultures. In permissive mouse cells, they also determined the amount of viral DNA and the proportion of viral capsid-producing cells. In polyomavirus hr-t mutant-infected cultures, the onset of host DNA replication was delayed by several hours, and a smaller proportion of T-antigen-positive cells entered S-phase than in wild-type-infected cultures. Of the two polyomavirus mlT mutants studied, dl-23 behaved similarly to wild-type virus in many, but not all, parameters tested. The poorly replicating but well-transforming mutant dl-8 was able to induce S-phase, and (in permissive cells) progeny virus production, in only about one-third of the T-antigen-positive cells. From the experiments, the authors concluded that mutations affecting small and middle T-antigen cause a reduction in the proportion of cells responding to virus infection and a prolongation of the early phase, i.e., the period before cells center S-phase. In hr-t mutant-infected mouse 3T6 cells, production of viral DNA was <10% of that in wild-type-infected cultures; low hr-t progeny production in 3T6 cells was therefore largely due to poor viral DNA replication.

  4. Differential induction of structural changes in the simian virus 40 origin of replication by T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Borowiec, J A; Dean, F B; Hurwitz, J

    1991-01-01

    The ATP-dependent binding of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumor antigen (T antigen) to the SV40 origin of replication (ori) results in the structural distortion of two critical elements within flanking regions of ori and the untwisting of the DNA helix. We examined the effect of changes in temperature, ATP concentration, and other reaction parameters on the generation of these DNA structural changes. We found that induction of the two localized structural transitions were highly and differentially sensitive to reaction conditions. Significant distortion of the early palindrome element, shown previously to result from DNA melting, required low levels of ATP (10 to 30 microM) but temperatures above 25 degrees C. Distortion of the AT tract occurred at low temperatures (5 degrees C) but required relatively high concentrations of ATP (greater than 300 microM). Thus, T antigen can induce structural changes within one critical element of ori without generating significant structural distortion within the second element. The response of ori untwisting to reaction conditions generally increased in parallel with or fell intermediate between the inductions of localized structural transitions. We suggest that ori untwisting and localized structural distortions are interdependent consequences of T-antigen binding to ori. These results suggest a model for the structural events occurring during the initial steps of SV40 DNA replication. Images PMID:1847451

  5. A microsomal ATP-binding protein involved in efficient protein transport into the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Dierks, T; Volkmer, J; Schlenstedt, G; Jung, C; Sandholzer, U; Zachmann, K; Schlotterhose, P; Neifer, K; Schmidt, B; Zimmermann, R

    1996-01-01

    Protein transport into the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum depends on nucleoside triphosphates. Photoaffinity labelling of microsomes with azido-ATP prevents protein transport at the level of association of precursor proteins with the components of the transport machinery, Sec61alpha and TRAM proteins. The same phenotype of inactivation was observed after depleting a microsomal detergent extract of ATP-binding proteins by passage through ATP-agarose and subsequent reconstitution of the pass-through into proteoliposomes. Transport was restored by co-reconstitution of the ATP eluate. This eluate showed eight distinct bands in SDS gels. We identified five lumenal proteins (Grp170, Grp94, BiP/Grp78, calreticulin and protein disulfide isomerase), one membrane protein (ribophorin I) and two ribosomal proteins (L4 and L5). In addition to BiP (Grp78), Grp170 was most efficiently retained on ATP-agarose. Purified BiP did not stimulate transport activity. Sequence analysis revealed a striking similarity of Grp170 and the yeast microsomal protein Lhs1p which was recently shown to be involved in protein transport into yeast microsomes. We suggest that Grp170 mediates efficient insertion of polypeptides into the microsomal membrane at the expense of nucleoside triphosphates. Images PMID:9003769

  6. Three-Dimensional Structures Reveal Multiple ADP/ATP Binding Modes

    SciTech Connect

    C Simmons; C Magee; D Smith; L Lauman; J Chaput; J Allen

    2011-12-31

    The creation of synthetic enzymes with predefined functions represents a major challenge in future synthetic biology applications. Here, we describe six structures of de novo proteins that have been determined using protein crystallography to address how simple enzymes perform catalysis. Three structures are of a protein, DX, selected for its stability and ability to tightly bind ATP. Despite the addition of ATP to the crystallization conditions, the presence of a bound but distorted ATP was found only under excess ATP conditions, with ADP being present under equimolar conditions or when crystallized for a prolonged period of time. A bound ADP cofactor was evident when Asp was substituted for Val at residue 65, but ATP in a linear configuration is present when Phe was substituted for Tyr at residue 43. These new structures complement previously determined structures of DX and the protein with the Phe 43 to Tyr substitution [Simmons, C. R., et al. (2009) ACS Chem. Biol. 4, 649-658] and together demonstrate the multiple ADP/ATP binding modes from which a model emerges in which the DX protein binds ATP in a configuration that represents a transitional state for the catalysis of ATP to ADP through a slow, metal-free reaction capable of multiple turnovers. This unusual observation suggests that design-free methods can be used to generate novel protein scaffolds that are tailor-made for catalysis.

  7. Multidrug ATP-binding cassette transporters are essential for hepatic development of Plasmodium sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Rijpma, Sanna R; van der Velden, Maarten; González-Pons, Maria; Annoura, Takeshi; van Schaijk, Ben C L; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; Ramesar, Jai; Chevalley-Maurel, Severine; Ploemen, Ivo H; Khan, Shahid M; Franetich, Jean-Francois; Mazier, Dominique; de Wilt, Johannes H W; Serrano, Adelfa E; Russel, Frans G M; Janse, Chris J; Sauerwein, Robert W; Koenderink, Jan B; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M

    2016-03-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) belong to the C-family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins and are known to transport a variety of physiologically important compounds and to be involved in the extrusion of pharmaceuticals. Rodent malaria parasites encode a single ABC transporter subfamily C protein, whereas human parasites encode two: MRP1 and MRP2. Although associated with drug resistance, their biological function and substrates remain unknown. To elucidate the role of MRP throughout the parasite life cycle, Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium falciparum mutants lacking MRP expression were generated. P. berghei mutants lacking expression of the single MRP as well as P. falciparum mutants lacking MRP1, MRP2 or both proteins have similar blood stage growth kinetics and drug-sensitivity profiles as wild type parasites. We show that MRP1-deficient parasites readily invade primary human hepatocytes and develop into mature liver stages. In contrast, both P. falciparum MRP2-deficient parasites and P. berghei mutants lacking MRP protein expression abort in mid to late liver stage development, failing to produce mature liver stages. The combined P. berghei and P. falciparum data are the first demonstration of a critical role of an ABC transporter during Plasmodium liver stage development. PMID:26332724

  8. Discovery of a new ATP-binding motif involved in peptidic azoline biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Kyle L.; Chekan, Jonathan R.; Cox, Courtney L.; Burkhart, Brandon J.; Nair, Satish K.; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite intensive research, the cyclodehydratase responsible for azoline biogenesis in thiazole/oxazole-modified microcin (TOMM) natural products remains enigmatic. The collaboration of two proteins, C and D, is required for cyclodehydration. The C protein is homologous to E1 ubiquitin-activating enzymes, while the D protein is within the YcaO superfamily. Recent studies have demonstrated that TOMM YcaOs phosphorylate amide carbonyl oxygens to facilitate azoline formation. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of an uncharacterized YcaO from Escherichia coli (Ec-YcaO). Ec-YcaO harbors an unprecedented fold and ATP-binding motif. This motif is conserved among TOMM YcaOs and is required for cyclodehydration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the C protein regulates substrate binding and catalysis and that the proline-rich C-terminus of the D protein is involved in C protein recognition and catalysis. This study identifies the YcaO active site and paves the way for the characterization of the numerous YcaO domains not associated with TOMM biosynthesis. PMID:25129028

  9. Molecular Characterization of LjABCG1, an ATP-Binding Cassette Protein in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Fukuda, Shoju; Takanashi, Kojiro; Yoshioka, Miki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Narusaka, Yoshihiro; Narusaka, Mari; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Shitan, Nobukazu; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2015-01-01

    LjABCG1, a full-size ABCG subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins of a model legume, Lotus japonicus, was reported as a gene highly expressed during the early stages of nodulation, but have not been characterized in detail. In this study we showed that the induction of LjABCG1 expression was remarkable by methyl jasmonate treatment, and reporter gene experiments indicated that LjABCG1 was strongly expressed in the nodule parenchyma and cell layers adjacent to the root vascular tissue toward the nodule. LjABCG1 was suggested to be localized at the plasma membrane based on the fractionation of microsomal membranes as well as separation via aqueous two-phase partitioning. The physiological functions of LjABCG1 in symbiosis and pathogenesis were analyzed in homologous and heterologous systems. LjABCG1 knock-down L. japonicus plants did not show clear phenotypic differences in nodule formation, and not in defense against Pseudomonas syringae, either. In contrast, when LjABCG1 was expressed in the Arabidopsis pdr8-1 mutant, the penetration frequency of Phytophthora infestans, a potato late blight pathogen, was significantly reduced in LjABCG1/pdr8-1 than in pdr8-1 plants. This finding indicated that LjABCG1, at least partially, complemented the phenotype of pdr8 in Arabidopsis, suggesting the multiple roles of this protein in plant-microbe interactions. PMID:26418593

  10. Tracing the structural evolution of eukaryotic ATP binding cassette transporter superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Feng, Jinmei; Yuan, Dongxia; Zhou, Jun; Miao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters superfamily is one of the largest classes of membrane proteins. The core of the ABC transporter protein is composed of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Eukaryotes ABC transporters are classified into seven main families (ABCA to ABCG) based on sequence similarity and domain organizations. With different domain number and domain organizations, eukaryote ABC transporters show diverse structures: the single structure (NBD or TMD), the ABC2 structure (NBD-NBD), the half structure (TMD-NBD or NBD-TMD) and the full structure (TMD-NBD-TMD-NBD or NBD-TMD-NBD-TMD). However, studies on how various ABC transporter gene structures evolved is still absent. Therefore, in this study, we comprehensively investigated the structural evolution of eukaryotic ABC transporters. The seven eukaryote ABC transporter families (A to G) fell into three groups: A&G group, B,C&D group and E&F group. There were at least four times the number of NBD and TMD fusion events in the origin of the half structure transporter. Two fusion modes were found in the full and ABC2 structure origination. Based on these findings, we present a putative structural evolutionary path of eukaryote ABC transporters that will increase our understanding on their origin, divergence and function. PMID:26577702

  11. Trapping the ATP binding state leads to a detailed understanding of the F1-ATPase mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kwangho; Pu, Jingzhi; Karplus, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The rotary motor enzyme FoF1-ATP synthase uses the proton-motive force across a membrane to synthesize ATP from ADP and Pi (H2PO4−) under cellular conditions that favor the hydrolysis reaction by a factor of 2 × 105. This remarkable ability to drive a reaction away from equilibrium by harnessing an external force differentiates it from an ordinary enzyme, which increases the rate of reaction without shifting the equilibrium. Hydrolysis takes place in the neighborhood of one conformation of the catalytic moiety F1-ATPase, whose structure is known from crystallography. By use of molecular dynamics simulations we trap a second structure, which is rotated by 40° from the catalytic dwell conformation and represents the state associated with ATP binding, in accord with single-molecule experiments. Using the two structures, we show why Pi is not released immediately after ATP hydrolysis, but only after a subsequent 120° rotation, in agreement with experiment. A concerted conformational change of the α3β3 crown is shown to induce the 40° rotation of the γ-subunit only when the βE subunit is empty, whereas with Pi bound, βE serves as a latch to prevent the rotation of γ. The present results provide a rationalization of how F1-ATPase achieves the coupling between the small changes in the active site of βDP and the 40° rotation of γ. PMID:25453082

  12. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression and localization in sea urchin development

    PubMed Central

    Shipp, Lauren E.; Hamdoun, Amro

    2012-01-01

    Background ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are membrane proteins that regulate intracellular concentrations of myriad compounds and ions. There are >100 ABC transporter predictions in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome, including 40 annotated ABCB, ABCC, and ABCG “multidrug efflux” transporters. Despite the importance of multidrug transporters for protection and signaling, their expression patterns have not been characterized in deuterostome embryos. Results Sea urchin embryos expressed 20 ABCB, ABCC, and ABCG transporter genes in the first 58 hours of development, from unfertilized egg to early prism. We quantified transcripts of ABCB1a, ABCB4a, ABCC1, ABCC5a, ABCC9a, and ABCG2b, and found that ABCB1a mRNA was 10–100 times more abundant than other transporter mRNAs. In situ hybridization showed ABCB1a was expressed ubiquitously in embryos, while ABCC5a was restricted to secondary mesenchyme cells and their precursors. Fluorescent protein fusions showed localization of ABCB1a on apical cell surfaces, and ABCC5a on basolateral surfaces. Conclusions Embryos utilize many ABC transporters with predicted functions in cell signaling, lysosomal and mitochondrial homeostasis, potassium channel regulation, pigmentation, and xenobiotic efflux. Detailed characterization of ABCB1a and ABCC5a revealed that they have different temporal and spatial gene expression profiles and protein localization patterns that correlate to their predicted functions in protection and development, respectively. PMID:22473856

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family in three mosquito species.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Xu, Yongyu; Cui, Feng

    2016-09-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family functions in the ATP-dependent transportation of various substrates across biological membranes. ABC proteins participate in various biological processes and insecticide resistance in insects, and are divided into eight subfamilies (A-H). Mosquitoes are important vectors of human diseases, but the mechanism by which the ABC transporter family evolves in mosquitoes is unknown. In this study, we classified and compared the ABC transporter families of three mosquitoes, namely, Anopheles gambiae, Aedes aegypti, and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus. The three mosquitoes have 55, 69, and 70 ABC genes, respectively. The C. p. quinquefasciatus had approximately 40% and 65% expansion in the ABCG subfamily, mainly in ABCG1/G4, compared with the two other mosquito species. The ABCB, ABCD, ABCE, and ABCF subfamilies were conserved in the three mosquito species. The C. p. quinquefasciatus transcriptomes during development showed that the ABCG and ABCC genes were mainly highly expressed at the egg and pupal stages. The pigment-transport relative brown, white, and scarlet, as well as the ABCF subfamily, were highly expressed at the egg stage. The highly expressed genes in larvae included three ABCA3 genes. The majority of the highly expressed genes in adults were ABCG1/4 genes. These results provided insights into the evolution of the ABC transporter family in mosquitoes. PMID:27521922

  14. Masitinib antagonizes ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2-mediated multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    KATHAWALA, RISHIL J.; CHEN, JUN-JIANG; ZHANG, YUN-KAI; WANG, YI-JUN; PATEL, ATISH; WANG, DE-SHEN; TALELE, TANAJI T.; ASHBY, CHARLES R.; CHEN, ZHE-SHENG

    2014-01-01

    In this in vitro study, we determined whether masitinib could reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) in cells overexpressing the ATP binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) transporter. Masitinib (1.25 and 2.5 μM) significantly decreases the resistance to mitoxantrone (MX), SN38 and doxorubicin in HEK293 and H460 cells overexpressing the ABCG2 transporter. In addition, masitinib (2.5 μM) significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-MX, a substrate for ABCG2, by inhibiting the function of ABCG2 and significantly decreased the efflux of [3H]-MX. However, masitinib (2.5 μM) did not significantly alter the expression of the ABCG2 protein. In addition, a docking model suggested that masitinib binds within the transmembrane region of a homology-modeled human ABCG2 transporter. Overall, our in vitro findings suggest that masitinib reverses MDR to various anti-neoplastic drugs in HEK293 and H460 cells overexpressing ABCG2 by inhibiting their transport activity as opposed to altering their levels of expression. PMID:24626598

  15. ATP binding by NLRP7 is required for inflammasome activation in response to bacterial lipopeptides.

    PubMed

    Radian, Alexander D; Khare, Sonal; Chu, Lan H; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligimerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) are pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) involved in innate immune responses. NLRs encode a central nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) consisting of the NAIP, CIITA, HET-E and TP1 (NACHT) domain and the NACHT associated domain (NAD), which facilitates receptor oligomerization and downstream inflammasome signaling. The NBD contains highly conserved regions, known as Walker motifs, that are required for nucleotide binding and hydrolysis. The NLR containing a PYRIN domain (PYD) 7 (NLRP7) has been recently shown to assemble an ASC and caspase-1-containing high molecular weight inflammasome complex in response to microbial acylated lipopeptides and Staphylococcus aureus infection. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for NLRP7 inflammasome activation is still elusive. Here we demonstrate that the NBD of NLRP7 is an ATP binding domain and has ATPase activity. We further show that an intact nucleotide-binding Walker A motif is required for NBD-mediated nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, oligomerization, and NLRP7 inflammasome formation and activity. Accordingly, THP-1 cells expressing a mutated Walker A motif display defective NLRP7 inflammasome activation, interleukin (IL)-1β release and pyroptosis in response to acylated lipopeptides and S. aureus infection. Taken together, our results provide novel insights into the mechanism of NLRP7 inflammasome assembly. PMID:26143398

  16. ATP-binding cassette transporters as pitfalls in selection of transgenic cells.

    PubMed

    Theile, Dirk; Staffen, Bianca; Weiss, Johanna

    2010-04-15

    Puromycin, hygromycin, and geneticin (G418) are antibiotics frequently used to select genetically engineered eukaryotic cells after transfection or transduction. Because intrinsic or acquired high expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp/ABCB1) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP/ABCC1), can hamper efficient selection, it is important to know whether these antibiotics are substrates and/or inducers of efflux transporters. Therefore, we investigated the influence of these antibiotics on drug transporter expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in the induction model cell line LS180. Moreover, we assessed whether ABC transporters influence the growth inhibitory effects of these antibiotics by proliferation assays using Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCKII) cells overexpressing the particular transporter. The results obtained indicate that puromycin and G418 are substrates of several ABC transporters, mainly Pgp/ABCB1. In contrast, hygromycin seems to be no good substrate for any of the ABC transporters investigated. Puromycin induced ABCC1/MRP1, whereas G418 suppressed ABCB1/Pgp, at the messenger RNA (mRNA) level. In contrast, hygromycin had no effect on ABC transporter mRNA expressions. In conclusion, this study emphasizes the significance of ABC transporters for the efficacy of selection processes. Consciousness of the results is supposed to guide the molecular biologist to the right choice of adequate experimental conditions for successful selection of genetically engineered eukaryotic cells. PMID:20018165

  17. A novel ATP-binding cassette transporter, ABCG6 is involved in chemoresistance of Leishmania.

    PubMed

    BoseDasgupta, Somdeb; Ganguly, Agneyo; Roy, Amit; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2008-04-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters constitute the biggest family of membrane proteins involved in drug resistance and other biological activities. Resistance of leishmanial parasites to therapeutic drugs continues to escalate in developing countries and in many instances it is due to overexpressed ABC efflux pumps. Progressively adapted camptothecin (CPT)-resistant parasites show overexpression of a novel ABC transporter, which was classified as ABCG6. Transfection and overexpression of LdABCG6 in wild type parasites, shows its localization primarily in the plasma membrane and flagellar pocket region. Overexpressed LdABCG6 confers substantial CPT resistance to the parasites by rapid drug efflux. Various inhibitors have been tested for their ability to revert the CPT-resistant phenotype to specifically understand the inhibition of LdABCG6 transporter. Transport experiments using everted membrane vesicles were carried out to gain an insight into the kinetics of drug transport. This study provides further knowledge of specific membrane traffic ATPase and its involvement in the chemoresistance of Leishmania. PMID:18243364

  18. Akt isoform-dependent regulation of ATP-Binding cassette A1 expression by apolipoprotein E.

    PubMed

    Okoro, Emmanuel U; Guo, Zhongmao; Yang, Hong

    2016-08-12

    We previously reported that apolipoprotein E (apoE) upregulates ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) transcription through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Here we demonstrate that treatment of murine macrophages with human apoE3 enhanced Akt phosphorylation, and upregulated ABCA1 protein and mRNA expression. Inhibition of PI3K weakened apoE3-induced Akt phosphorylation, and ABCA1 protein and mRNA increase. In contrast, inhibition of Akt only diminished apoE-induced ABCA1 protein but not the mRNA level. Suppression of protein synthesis did not erase the ability of apoE3 to increase ABCA1 protein level. Further, apoE3 increased the resistance of ABCA1 protein to calpain-mediated degradation without affecting calpain activity. Treatment of macrophages with apoE3 selectively enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt1 and Akt2, but not Akt3. Knockdown of Akt1 or Akt2 increased and decreased ABCA1 protein level, respectively; while overexpression of these Akt isoenzymes caused changes in ABCA1 protein level opposite to those induced by knockdown of the corresponding Akt. These data imply that apoE3 guards against calpain-mediated ABCA1 degradation through Akt2. PMID:27297104

  19. Molecular Characterization of LjABCG1, an ATP-Binding Cassette Protein in Lotus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Fukuda, Shoju; Takanashi, Kojiro; Yoshioka, Miki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Narusaka, Yoshihiro; Narusaka, Mari; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Shitan, Nobukazu; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2015-01-01

    LjABCG1, a full-size ABCG subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins of a model legume, Lotus japonicus, was reported as a gene highly expressed during the early stages of nodulation, but have not been characterized in detail. In this study we showed that the induction of LjABCG1 expression was remarkable by methyl jasmonate treatment, and reporter gene experiments indicated that LjABCG1 was strongly expressed in the nodule parenchyma and cell layers adjacent to the root vascular tissue toward the nodule. LjABCG1 was suggested to be localized at the plasma membrane based on the fractionation of microsomal membranes as well as separation via aqueous two-phase partitioning. The physiological functions of LjABCG1 in symbiosis and pathogenesis were analyzed in homologous and heterologous systems. LjABCG1 knock-down L. japonicus plants did not show clear phenotypic differences in nodule formation, and not in defense against Pseudomonas syringae, either. In contrast, when LjABCG1 was expressed in the Arabidopsis pdr8-1 mutant, the penetration frequency of Phytophthora infestans, a potato late blight pathogen, was significantly reduced in LjABCG1/pdr8-1 than in pdr8-1 plants. This finding indicated that LjABCG1, at least partially, complemented the phenotype of pdr8 in Arabidopsis, suggesting the multiple roles of this protein in plant-microbe interactions. PMID:26418593

  20. Mapping of the viral mRNA encoding a super-T antigen of 115,000 daltons expressed in simian virus 40-transformed rat cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    May, E; Kress, M; Daya-Grosjean, L; Monier, R; May, P

    1981-01-01

    Simian virus 40-transformed V11 F1 clone 1 subclone 7 rat cells produced a considerable amount of an elongated form of large-T antigen with an Mr of 115,000 (115K super-T antigen), but these cells did not produce detectable traces of normal-sized large-T antigen (86,000 daltons) (P. May, M. Kress, M. Lange, and E. May, Cold Spring Harbor Symp. Quant. Biol. 44:189-200, 1980). First, a comparison of the tryptic peptide fingerprints of 115K super-T and large-T antigens suggested that 115K super-T antigen is simian virus 40 coded and contains a duplication of amino acid sequences of large-T antigen. Second, from S1 mapping analysis of 115K super-T mRNA, performed with various restriction fragments of simian virus 40 DNA, it was concluded that super-T mRNA is a form of large-T mRNA containing a tandem duplication of the sequence extending from approximately 0.46 to 0.35 map unit. The duplicated sequence corresponded to that region of the simian virus 40 genome in which 12 of 13 tsA mutation sites are clustered (C. J. Lai and D. Nathans, Virology 66:70-81, 1975). Images PMID:6260978

  1. Sequences flanking the pentanucleotide T-antigen binding sites in the polyomavirus core origin help determine selectivity of DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Li, B L; Hock, M; Wang, E; Folk, W R

    1995-01-01

    Replication of the genomes of the polyomaviruses requires two virus-specified elements, the cis-acting origin of DNA replication, with its auxiliary DNA elements, and the trans-acting viral large tumor antigen (T antigen). Appropriate interactions between them initiate the assembly of a replication complex which, together with cellular proteins, is responsible for primer synthesis and DNA chain elongation. The organization of cis-acting elements within the origins of the polyomaviruses which replicate in mammalian cells is conserved; however, these origins are sufficiently distinct that the T antigen of one virus may function inefficiently or not at all to initiate replication at the origin of another virus. We have studied the basis for such replication selectivity between the murine polyomavirus T antigen and the primate lymphotropic polyomavirus origin. The murine polyomavirus T antigen is capable of carrying out the early steps of the assembly of an initiation complex at the lymphotropic papovavirus origin, including binding to and deformation of origin sequences in vitro. However, the T antigen inefficiently unwinds the origin, and unwinding is influenced by sequences flanking the T antigen pentanucleotide binding sites on the late side of the viral core origin. These same sequences contribute to the replication selectivity observed in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that the inefficient unwinding is the cause of the replication defect. These observations suggest a mechanism by which origins of DNA replication can evolve replication selectivity and by which the function of diverse cellular origins might be temporally activated during the S phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. PMID:7494263

  2. Glycan bioengineering in immunogen design for tumor T antigen immunotargeting.

    PubMed

    Sendra, Victor G; Zlocowski, Natacha; Ditamo, Yanina; Copioli, Silvina; Tarp, Mads P; Bennett, Eric P; Clausen, Henrik; Roth, German A; Nores, Gustavo A; Irazoqui, Fernando J

    2009-10-01

    Bioengineering of Galbeta3GalNAcalpha, known as Thomsen-Friedenreich disaccharide (TFD), is studied to promote glycan immunogenicity and immunotargeting to tumor T antigen (Galbeta3GalNAcalpha-O-Ser/Thr). Theoretical studies on disaccharide conformations by energy minimization of structures using MM2 energy function showed that pentalysine (Lys5) linker and benzyl (Bzl) residue enhance TFD rigidity of the glycosidic bond. Antibodies raised against BzlalphaTFD-Lys5 immunogen recognize tumor T antigen. Competitive assays confirm that TFD-related structures are the main glycan epitope. Antibodies produced by glycan bioengineering recognize HT29, T47D, MCF7, and CT26 epithelial tumor cells. Epithelial tumor cell adhesion to T antigen-binding lectins and endothelial cells was lower in the presence of antibodies raised against the engineered immunogen. The immune response directed to the bioengineered glycoconjugate inhibited CT26 tumor cell proliferation and reduced tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model. These results show that TFD bioengineering is a useful immunogenic strategy with potential application in cancer therapy. The same approach can be extended to other glycan immunogens for immunotargeting purposes. PMID:19726087

  3. Function and expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters in cultured human Y79 retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yuka; Nagai, Junya; Okada, Yumi; Sato, Koya; Yumoto, Ryoko; Takano, Mikihisa

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the expression and function of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP), members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of drug transporters, in cultured human Y79 retinoblastoma cells. ABC transporter mRNA expression was evaluated by conventional reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR analyses. Cellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 (P-glycoprotein substrate), calcein (MRP substrate), and doxorubicin (P-glycoprotein/MRP substrate) was analyzed by fluorometry. Conventional RT-PCR analysis showed the expression of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1), MRP1, MRP2 and lung resistance-related protein (LRP) mRNAs. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that the expression levels of the MDR1 and MRP2 genes in Y79 cells were much lower than those in human intestinal cell line Caco-2, while the expression level of MRP1 was higher than that in Caco-2 cells. The accumulation of rhodamine 123 was not enhanced by verapamil or reversin 205, inhibitors of P-glycoprotein, indicating no function of P-glycoprotein in Y79 cells. The accumulation of calcein was significantly increased by various MRP inhibitors including probenecid, indicating that MRP functions in Y79 cells. The accumulation of doxorubicin was increased in the presence of metabolic inhibitors (10 mM 2-deoxyglucose and 5 mM sodium azide). However, most MRP inhibitors such as probenecid and indomethacin did not affect doxorubicin accumulation, while cyclosporin A and taclorimus significantly increased doxorubicin accumulation. These results suggest that MRP, but not P-glycoprotein, functions in Y79 cells, and that the efflux of doxorubicin from Y79 cells may be due to an ATP-dependent transporter, which has not been identified yet. PMID:20190417

  4. ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) loss of function alters Alzheimer amyloid processing.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kanayo; Abe-Dohmae, Sumiko; Yokoyama, Shinji; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Fraser, Paul E

    2015-10-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) has been identified as a susceptibility factor of late onset Alzheimer disease in genome-wide association studies. ABCA7 has been shown to mediate phagocytosis and affect membrane trafficking. The current study examined the impact of ABCA7 loss of function on amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and generation of amyloid-β (Aβ). Suppression of endogenous ABCA7 in several different cell lines resulted in increased β-secretase cleavage and elevated Aβ. ABCA7 knock-out mice displayed an increased production of endogenous murine amyloid Aβ42 species. Crossing ABCA7-deficient animals to an APP transgenic model resulted in significant increases in the soluble Aβ as compared with mice expressing normal levels of ABCA7. Only modest changes in the amount of insoluble Aβ and amyloid plaque densities were observed once the amyloid pathology was well developed, whereas Aβ deposition was enhanced in younger animals. In vitro studies indicated a more rapid endocytosis of APP in ABCA7 knock-out cells that is mechanistically consistent with the increased Aβ production. These in vitro and in vivo findings indicate a direct role of ABCA7 in amyloid processing that may be associated with its primary biological function to regulate endocytic pathways. Several potential loss-of-function ABCA7 mutations and deletions linked to Alzheimer disease that in some instances have a greater impact than apoE allelic variants have recently been identified. A reduction in ABCA7 expression or loss of function would be predicted to increase amyloid production and that may be a contributing factor in the associated Alzheimer disease susceptibility. PMID:26260791

  5. A Novel Flow Cytometric HTS Assay Reveals Functional Modulators of ATP Binding Cassette Transporter ABCB6

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Hemantkumar; Young, Susan; Ma, Xiaochao; Waller, Anna; Garcia, Matthew; Perez, Dominique; Chavez, Stephanie; Strouse, Jacob J.; Haynes, Mark K.; Bologa, Cristian G.; Oprea, Tudor I.; Tegos, George P.; Sklar, Larry A.; Krishnamurthy, Partha

    2012-01-01

    ABCB6 is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette family of transporter proteins that is increasingly recognized as a relevant physiological and therapeutic target. Evaluation of modulators of ABCB6 activity would pave the way toward a more complete understanding of the significance of this transport process in tumor cell growth, proliferation and therapy-related drug resistance. In addition, this effort would improve our understanding of the function of ABCB6 in normal physiology with respect to heme biosynthesis, and cellular adaptation to metabolic demand and stress responses. To search for modulators of ABCB6, we developed a novel cell-based approach that, in combination with flow cytometric high-throughput screening (HTS), can be used to identify functional modulators of ABCB6. Accumulation of protoporphyrin, a fluorescent molecule, in wild-type ABCB6 expressing K562 cells, forms the basis of the HTS assay. Screening the Prestwick Chemical Library employing the HTS assay identified four compounds, benzethonium chloride, verteporfin, tomatine hydrochloride and piperlongumine, that reduced ABCB6 mediated cellular porphyrin levels. Validation of the identified compounds employing the hemin-agarose affinity chromatography and mitochondrial transport assays demonstrated that three out of the four compounds were capable of inhibiting ABCB6 mediated hemin transport into isolated mitochondria. However, only verteporfin and tomatine hydrochloride inhibited ABCB6’s ability to compete with hemin as an ABCB6 substrate. This assay is therefore sensitive, robust, and suitable for automation in a high-throughput environment as demonstrated by our identification of selective functional modulators of ABCB6. Application of this assay to other libraries of synthetic compounds and natural products is expected to identify novel modulators of ABCB6 activity. PMID:22808084

  6. Inflammatory Regulation of ATP Binding Cassette Efflux Transporter Expression and Function in Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Christopher J.; Hossain, Muhammad M.; Richardson, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters, including multidrug resistance protein 1 (Mdr1), breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrps) extrude chemicals from the brain. Although ABC transporters are critical for blood-brain barrier integrity, less attention has been placed on the regulation of these proteins in brain parenchymal cells such as microglia. Prior studies demonstrate that inflammation after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment alters transporter expression in the livers of mice. Here, we sought to determine the effects of inflammation on the expression and function of transporters in microglia. To test this, the expression and function of ABC efflux transport proteins were quantified in mouse BV-2 microglial cells in response to activation with LPS. Intracellular retention of fluorescent rhodamine 123, Hoechst 33342, and calcein acetoxymethyl ester was increased in LPS-treated microglia, suggesting that the functions of Mdr1, Bcrp, and Mrps were decreased, respectively. LPS reduced Mdr1, Bcrp, and Mrp4 mRNA and protein expression between 40 and 70%. Conversely, LPS increased expression of Mrp1 and Mrp5 mRNA and protein. Immunofluorescent staining confirmed reduced Bcrp and Mrp4 and elevated Mrp1 and Mrp5 protein in activated microglia. Pharmacological inhibition of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transcriptional signaling attenuated down-regulation of Mdr1a mRNA and potentiated up-regulation of Mrp5 mRNA in LPS-treated cells. Together, these data suggest that LPS stimulates microglia and impairs efflux of prototypical ABC transporter substrates by altering mRNA and protein expression, in part through NF-κB signaling. Decreased transporter efflux function in microglia may lead to the retention of toxic chemicals and aberrant cell-cell communication during neuroinflammation. PMID:22942241

  7. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in normal and pathological lung

    PubMed Central

    van der Deen, Margaretha; de Vries, Elisabeth GE; Timens, Wim; Scheper, Rik J; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Postma, Dirkje S

    2005-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a family of transmembrane proteins that can transport a wide variety of substrates across biological membranes in an energy-dependent manner. Many ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are highly expressed in bronchial epithelium. This review aims to give new insights in the possible functions of ABC molecules in the lung in view of their expression in different cell types. Furthermore, their role in protection against noxious compounds, e.g. air pollutants and cigarette smoke components, will be discussed as well as the (mal)function in normal and pathological lung. Several pulmonary drugs are substrates for ABC transporters and therefore, the delivery of these drugs to the site of action may be highly dependent on the presence and activity of many ABC transporters in several cell types. Three ABC transporters are known to play an important role in lung functioning. Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene can cause cystic fibrosis, and mutations in ABCA1 and ABCA3 are responsible for respectively Tangier disease and fatal surfactant deficiency. The role of altered function of ABC transporters in highly prevalent pulmonary diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have hardly been investigated so far. We especially focused on polymorphisms, knock-out mice models and in vitro results of pulmonary research. Insight in the function of ABC transporters in the lung may open new ways to facilitate treatment of lung diseases. PMID:15967026

  8. Contributions of Aspergillus fumigatus ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Proteins to Drug Resistance and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sanjoy; Diekema, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In yeast cells such as those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins has been found to be increased and correlates with a concomitant elevation in azole drug resistance. In this study, we investigated the roles of two Aspergillus fumigatus proteins that share high sequence similarity with S. cerevisiae Pdr5, an ABC transporter protein that is commonly overproduced in azole-resistant isolates in this yeast. The two A. fumigatus genes encoding the ABC transporters sharing the highest sequence similarity to S. cerevisiae Pdr5 are called abcA and abcB here. We constructed deletion alleles of these two different ABC transporter-encoding genes in three different strains of A. fumigatus. Loss of abcB invariably elicited increased azole susceptibility, while abcA disruption alleles had variable phenotypes. Specific antibodies were raised to both AbcA and AbcB proteins. These antisera allowed detection of AbcB in wild-type cells, while AbcA could be visualized only when overproduced from the hspA promoter in A. fumigatus. Overproduction of AbcA also yielded increased azole resistance. Green fluorescent protein fusions were used to provide evidence that both AbcA and AbcB are localized to the plasma membrane in A. fumigatus. Promoter fusions to firefly luciferase suggested that expression of both ABC transporter-encoding genes is inducible by azole challenge. Virulence assays implicated AbcB as a possible factor required for normal pathogenesis. This work provides important new insights into the physiological roles of ABC transporters in this major fungal pathogen. PMID:24123268

  9. Endothelial ATP-binding cassette G1 in mouse endothelium protects against hemodynamic-induced atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shanshan; Wang, Jiaxing; Zhang, Xu; Shi, Ying; Li, Bochuan; Bao, Qiankun; Pang, Wei; Ai, Ding; Zhu, Yi; He, Jinlong

    2016-08-19

    Activated vascular endothelium inflammation under persistent hyperlipidemia is the initial step of atherogenesis. ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1) is a crucial factor maintaining sterol and lipid homeostasis by transporting cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of ABCG1 in endothelial inflammation activation during early-stage atherogenesis in mice and the underlying mechanisms. Endothelial cell (EC)-specific ABCG1 transgenic (EC-ABCG1-Tg) mice were generated and cross-bred with low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice. After a 4-week Western-type diet, the mice were sacrificed for assessing atherosclerosis. Human umbilical vein ECs were treated with different flows, and ABCG1 was adenovirally overexpressed to investigate the mechanism in vitro. Compared with Ldlr(-/-) mouse aortas, EC-ABCG1-Tg/Ldlr(-/-) aortas showed decreased early-stage lesions. Furthermore, the lesion area in the EC-ABCG1-Tg/Ldlr(-/-) mouse aortic arch but not thoracic aorta was significantly reduced, which suggests a protective role of ABCG1 under atheroprone flow. In vitro, overexpression of ABCG1 attenuated EC activation caused by oscillatory shear stress. Overexpression of ABCG1 blunted cholesterol-activated ECs in vitro. In exploring the mechanisms of ABCG1 attenuating endothelial inflammation, we found that ABCG1 inhibited oscillatory flow-activated nuclear factor kappa B and NLRP3 inflammasome in ECs. ABCG1 may play a protective role in early-stage atherosclerosis by reducing endothelial activation induced by oscillatory shear stress via suppressing the inflammatory response. PMID:27297110

  10. ATP binding cassette transporter gene expression in rat liver progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Ros, J E; Roskams, T A D; Geuken, M; Havinga, R; Splinter, P L; Petersen, B E; LaRusso, N F; van der Kolk, D M; Kuipers, F; Faber, K N; Müller, M; Jansen, P L M

    2003-01-01

    Background and aim: Liver regeneration after severe liver damage depends in part on proliferation and differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs). Under these conditions they must be able to withstand the toxic milieu of the damaged liver. ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters are cytoprotective efflux pumps that may contribute to the preservation of these cells. The aim of this study was to determine the ABC transporter phenotype of HPCs. Methods: HPC activation was studied in rats treated with 2- acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) followed by partial hepatectomy (PHx). ABC transporter gene expression was determined by real time detection reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in isolated HPCs, hepatocytes, cholangiocytes, and cultured progenitor cell-like RLF φ 13 cells and by immunohistochemistry of total liver samples. ABC transporter efflux activity was studied in RLF φ 13 cells by flow cytometry. Results: 2-AAF/PHx treated animals showed increased hepatic mRNA levels of the genes encoding multidrug resistance proteins Mdr1b, Mrp1, and Mrp3. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated expression of Mrp1 and Mrp3 proteins in periportal progenitor cells and of the Mdr1b protein in periportal hepatocytes. Freshly isolated Thy-1 positive cells and cultured RLF φ 13 progenitor cells highly expressed Mrp1 and Mrp3 mRNA while the hepatocyte specific transporters Mdr2, Bsep, Mrp2, and Mrp6 were only minimally expressed. Blocking Mrp activity by MK-571 resulted in accumulation of the Mrp specific substrate carboxyfluorescein in RLF φ 13 cells. Conclusion: HPCs express high levels of active Mrp1 and Mrp3. These may have a cytoprotective role in conditions of severe hepatotoxicity. PMID:12801967

  11. Parametrisation of the free energy of ATP binding to wild-type and mutant Kir6.2 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Moran, Oscar; Grottesi, Alessandro; Chadburn, Andrew J; Tammaro, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channels, comprised of pore-forming Kir6.x and regulatory SURx subunits, play important roles in many cellular functions; because of their sensitivity to inhibition by intracellular ATP, K(ATP) channels provide a link between cell metabolism and membrane electrical activity. We constructed structural homology models of Kir6.2 and a series of Kir6.2 channels carrying mutations within the putative ATP-binding site. Computational docking was carried out to determine the conformation of ATP in its binding site. The Linear Interaction Energy (LIE) method was used to estimate the free-energy of ATP binding to wild-type and mutant Kir6.2 channels. Comparisons of the theoretical binding free energies for ATP with those determined from mutational experiments enabled the identification of the most probable conformation of ATP bound to the Kir6.2 channel. A set of LIE parameters was defined that may enable prediction of the effects of additional Kir6.2 mutations within the ATP binding site on the affinity for ATP. PMID:23219002

  12. Lessons in Signaling and Tumorigenesis from Polyomavirus Middle T Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Fluck, Michele M.; Schaffhausen, Brian S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The small DNA tumor viruses have provided a very long-lived source of insights into many aspects of the life cycle of eukaryotic cells. In recent years, the emphasis has been on cancer-related signaling. Here we review murine polyomavirus middle T antigen, its mechanisms, and its downstream pathways of transformation. We concentrate on the MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse, one of the most studied models of breast cancer, which permits the examination of in situ tumor progression from hyperplasia to metastasis. PMID:19721090

  13. Cardiac myosin isoforms exhibit differential rates of MgADP release and MgATP binding detected by myocardial viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Tanner, Bertrand C W; Lombardo, Andrew T; Tremble, Sarah M; Maughan, David W; Vanburen, Peter; Lewinter, Martin M; Robbins, Jeffrey; Palmer, Bradley M

    2013-01-01

    We measured myosin crossbridge detachment rate and the rates of MgADP release and MgATP binding in mouse and rat myocardial strips bearing one of the two cardiac myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms. Mice and rats were fed an iodine-deficient, propylthiouracil diet resulting in ~100% expression of β-MyHC in the ventricles. Ventricles of control animals expressed ~100% α-MyHC. Chemically-skinned myocardial strips prepared from papillary muscle were subjected to sinusoidal length perturbation analysis at maximum calcium activation pCa 4.8 and 17°C. Frequency characteristics of myocardial viscoelasticity were used to calculate crossbridge detachment rate over 0.01 to 5mM [MgATP]. The rate of MgADP release, equivalent to the asymptotic value of crossbridge detachment rate at high MgATP, was highest in mouse α-MyHC (111.4±6.2s(-1)) followed by rat α-MyHC (65.0±7.3s(-1)), mouse β-MyHC (24.3±1.8s(-1)) and rat β-MyHC (15.5±0.8s(-1)). The rate of MgATP binding was highest in mouse α-MyHC (325±32 mM(-1) s(-1)) then mouse β-MyHC (152±23 mM(-1) s(-1)), rat α-MyHC (108±10 mM(-1) s(-1)) and rat β-MyHC (55±6 mM(-1) s(-1)). Because the events of MgADP release and MgATP binding occur in a post power-stroke state of the myosin crossbridge, we infer that MgATP release and MgATP binding must be regulated by isoform- and species-specific structural differences located outside the nucleotide binding pocket, which is identical in sequence for these four myosins. We postulate that differences in the stiffness profile of the entire myosin molecule, including the thick filament and the myosin-actin interface, are primarily responsible for determining the strain on the nucleotide binding pocket and the subsequent differences in the rates of nucleotide release and binding observed among the four myosins examined here. PMID:23123290

  14. Activation of ATP binding for the autophosphorylation of DosS, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis histidine kinase lacking an ATP lid motif.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ha Yeon; Lee, Young-Hoon; Bae, Young-Seuk; Kim, Eungbin; Kang, Beom Sik

    2013-05-01

    The sensor histidine kinases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, DosS and DosT, are responsible for sensing hypoxic conditions and consist of sensor and kinase cores responsible for accepting signals and phosphorylation activity, respectively. The kinase core contains a dimerization and histidine phosphate-accepting (DHp) domain and an ATP binding domain (ABD). The 13 histidine kinase genes of M. tuberculosis can be grouped based on the presence or absence of the ATP lid motif and F box (elements known to play roles in ATP binding) in their ABDs; DosS and DosT have ABDs lacking both these elements, and the crystal structures of their ABDs indicated that they were unsuitable for ATP binding, as a short loop covers the putative ATP binding site. Although the ABD alone cannot bind ATP, the kinase core is functional in autophosphorylation. Appropriate spatial arrangement of the ABD and DHp domain within the kinase core is required for both autophosphorylation and ATP binding. An ionic interaction between Arg(440) in the DHp domain and Glu(537) in the short loop of the ABD is available and may open the ATP binding site, by repositioning the short loop away from the site. Mutations at Arg(440) and Glu(537) reduce autophosphorylation activity. Unlike other histidine kinases containing an ATP lid, which protects bound ATP, DosS is unable to accept ATP until the ABD is properly positioned relative to the histidine; this may prevent unexpected ATP reactions. ATP binding can, therefore, function as a control mechanism for histidine kinase activity. PMID:23486471

  15. The Allosteric Regulatory Mechanism of the Escherichia coli MetNI Methionine ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Janet G.; Rees, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    The MetNI methionine importer of Escherichia coli, an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter, uses the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to catalyze the high affinity uptake of d- and l-methionine. Early in vivo studies showed that the uptake of external methionine is repressed by the level of the internal methionine pool, a phenomenon termed transinhibition. Our understanding of the MetNI mechanism has thus far been limited to a series of crystal structures in an inward-facing conformation. To understand the molecular mechanism of transinhibition, we studied the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis using detergent-solubilized MetNI. We find that transinhibition is due to noncompetitive inhibition by l-methionine, much like a negative feedback loop. Thermodynamic analyses revealed two allosteric methionine binding sites per transporter. This quantitative analysis of transinhibition, the first to our knowledge for a structurally defined transporter, builds upon the previously proposed structurally based model for regulation. This mechanism of regulation at the transporter activity level could be applicable to not only ABC transporters but other types of membrane transporters as well. PMID:25678706

  16. ATP-binding cassette-like transporters are involved in the transport of lignin precursors across plasma and vacuolar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Y.C.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-28

    Lignin is a complex biopolymer derived primarily from the condensation of three monomeric precursors, the monolignols. The synthesis of monolignols occurs in the cytoplasm. To reach the cell wall where they are oxidized and polymerized, they must be transported across the cell membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the transport process are unclear. There are conflicting views about whether the transport of these precursors occurs by passive diffusion or is an energized active process; further, we know little about what chemical forms are required. Using isolated plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles prepared from Arabidopsis, together with applying different transporter inhibitors in the assays, we examined the uptake of monolignols and their derivatives by these native membrane vesicles. We demonstrate that the transport of lignin precursors across plasmalemma and their sequestration into vacuoles are ATP-dependent primary-transport processes, involving ATP-binding cassette-like transporters. Moreover, we show that both plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles selectively transport different forms of lignin precursors. In the presence of ATP, the inverted plasma membrane vesicles preferentially take up monolignol aglycones, whereas the vacuolar vesicles are more specific for glucoconjugates, suggesting that the different ATP-binding cassette-like transporters recognize different chemical forms in conveying them to distinct sites, and that glucosylation of monolignols is necessary for their vacuolar storage but not required for direct transport into the cell wall in Arabidopsis.

  17. The Tomato R Gene Products I-2 and Mi-1 Are Functional ATP Binding Proteins with ATPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tameling, Wladimir I. L.; Elzinga, Sandra D. J.; Darmin, Patricia S.; Vossen, Jack H.; Takken, Frank L. W.; Haring, Michel A.; Cornelissen, Ben J. C.

    2002-01-01

    Most plant disease resistance (R) genes known today encode proteins with a central nucleotide binding site (NBS) and a C-terminal Leu-rich repeat (LRR) domain. The NBS contains three ATP/GTP binding motifs known as the kinase-1a or P-loop, kinase-2, and kinase-3a motifs. In this article, we show that the NBS of R proteins forms a functional nucleotide binding pocket. The N-terminal halves of two tomato R proteins, I-2 conferring resistance to Fusarium oxysporum and Mi-1 conferring resistance to root-knot nematodes and potato aphids, were produced as glutathione S-transferase fusions in Escherichia coli. In a filter binding assay, purified I-2 was found to bind ATP rather than other nucleoside triphosphates. ATP binding appeared to be fully dependent on the presence of a divalent cation. A mutant I-2 protein containing a mutation in the P-loop showed a strongly reduced ATP binding capacity. Thin layer chromatography revealed that both I-2 and Mi-1 exerted ATPase activity. Based on the strong conservation of NBS domains in R proteins of the NBS-LRR class, we propose that they all are capable of binding and hydrolyzing ATP. PMID:12417711

  18. ATP-Binding Pocket-Targeted Suppression of Src and Syk by Luteolin Contributes to Its Anti-Inflammatory Action

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Oog; Jeong, Deok; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-01-01

    Luteolin is a flavonoid identified as a major anti-inflammatory component of Artemisia asiatica. Numerous reports have demonstrated the ability of luteolin to suppress inflammation in a variety of inflammatory conditions. However, its exact anti-inflammatory mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory mode of action in activated macrophages of luteolin from Artemisia asiatica was examined by employing immunoblotting analysis, a luciferase reporter gene assay, enzyme assays, and an overexpression strategy. Luteolin dose-dependently inhibited the secretion of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and diminished the levels of mRNA transcripts of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) and pam3CSK-treated macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells without displaying cytotoxicity. Luteolin displayed potent NO-inhibitory activity and also suppressed the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65 and p50) via blockade of Src and Syk, but not other mitogen-activated kinases. Overexpression of wild type Src and point mutants thereof, and molecular modelling studies, suggest that the ATP-binding pocket may be the luteolin-binding site in Src. These results strongly suggest that luteolin may exert its anti-inflammatory action by suppressing the NF-κB signaling cascade via blockade of ATP binding in Src and Syk. PMID:26236111

  19. Induction of interferon-stimulated genes by Simian virus 40 T antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Rathi, Abhilasha V.; Cantalupo, Paul G.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.; Pipas, James M.

    2010-10-25

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (TAg) is a multifunctional oncoprotein essential for productive viral infection and for cellular transformation. We have used microarray analysis to examine the global changes in cellular gene expression induced by wild-type T antigen (TAg{sup wt}) and TAg-mutants in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). The expression profile of approximately 800 cellular genes was altered by TAg{sup wt} and a truncated TAg (TAg{sup N136}), including many genes that influence cell cycle, DNA-replication, transcription, chromatin structure and DNA repair. Unexpectedly, we found a significant number of immune response genes upregulated by TAg{sup wt} including many interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) such as ISG56, OAS, Rsad2, Ifi27 and Mx1. Additionally, we also observed activation of STAT1 by TAg{sup wt}. Our genetic studies using several TAg-mutants reveal an unexplored function of TAg and indicate that the LXCXE motif and p53 binding are required for the upregulation of ISGs.

  20. Structures of the CDK12/CycK complex with AMP-PNP reveal a flexible C-terminal kinase extension important for ATP binding

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Clarke, Sarah E.; Elkins, Jonathan M.; Cheng, S.-W. Grace; Morin, Gregg B.; Bullock, Alex N.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (CDK12) promotes transcriptional elongation by phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD). Structure-function studies show that this activity is dependent on a C-terminal kinase extension, as well as the binding of cyclin K (CycK). To better define these interactions we determined the crystal structure of the human CDK12/CycK complex with and without the kinase extension in the presence of AMP-PNP. The structures revealed novel features for a CDK, including a large β4-β5 loop insertion that contributes to the N-lobe interaction with the cyclin. We also observed two different conformations of the C-terminal kinase extension that effectively open and close the ATP pocket. Most notably, bound AMP-PNP was only observed when trapped in the closed state. Truncation of this C-terminal structure also diminished AMP-PNP binding, as well as the catalytic activity of the CDK12/CycK complex. Further kinetic measurements showed that the full length CDK12/CycK complex was significantly more active than the two crystallised constructs suggesting a critical role for additional domains. Overall, these results demonstrate the intrinsic flexibility of the C-terminal extension in CDK12 and highlight its importance for both ATP binding and kinase activity. PMID:26597175

  1. A 20(S)-protopanoxadiol derivative overcomes multi-drug resistance by antagonizing ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 transporter function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wantao; Xu, Qin; Xiao, Meng; Hu, Lihong; Mao, Li; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    In cancer cells, failure of chemotherapy is often caused by the ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1), and few drugs have been successfully developed to overcome ABCB1-mediated multi-drug resistance (MDR). To suppress ABCB1 activity, we previously designed and synthesized a new series of derivatives based on 20(S)-protopanoxadiol (PPD). In the present study, we investigated the role of PPD derivatives in the function of ABC transporters. Non-toxic concentrations of the PPD derivative PPD12 sensitized ABCB1-overexpressing cells to their anti-cancer substrates better than either the parental PPD or inactive PPD11. PPD12 increased intracellular accumulation of adriamycin and rhodamine123 in resistant cancer cells. Although PPD12 did not suppress the expression of ABCB1 mRNA or protein, it stimulated the activity of ABCB1 ATPase. Because PPD12 is a competitive inhibitor, it was predicted to bind to the large hydrophobic cavity of homology-modeled human ABCB1. PPD12 also enhanced the efficacy of adriamycin against ABCB1-overexpressing KB/VCR xenografts in nude mice. In conclusion, PPD12 enhances the efficacy of substrate drugs in ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells. These findings suggest that a combination therapy consisting of PPD12 with conventional chemotherapeutic agents may be an effective treatment for ABCB1-mediated MDR cancer patients. PMID:26824187

  2. Whole-Transcriptome Survey of the Putative ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Family Genes in the Latex-Producing Laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhiyi, Nie; Guijuan, Kang; Yu, Li; Longjun, Dai; Rizhong, Zeng

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins or transporters constitute a large protein family in plants and are involved in many different cellular functions and processes, including solute transportation, channel regulation and molecular switches, etc. Through transcriptome sequencing, a transcriptome-wide survey and expression analysis of the ABC protein genes were carried out using the laticiferous latex from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree). A total of 46 putative ABC family proteins were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex. These consisted of 12 ‘full-size’, 21 ‘half-size’ and 13 other putative ABC proteins, and all of them showed strong conservation with their Arabidopsis thaliana counterparts. This study indicated that all eight plant ABC protein paralog subfamilies were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex, of which ABCB, ABCG and ABCI were the most abundant. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrated that gene expression of several latex ABC proteins was regulated by ethylene, jasmonic acid or bark tapping (a wound stress) stimulation, and that HbABCB15, HbABCB19, HbABCD1 and HbABCG21 responded most significantly of all to the abiotic stresses. The identification and expression analysis of the latex ABC family proteins could facilitate further investigation into their physiological involvement in latex metabolism and rubber biosynthesis by H. brasiliensis. PMID:25615936

  3. Hernandezine, a Bisbenzylisoquinoline Alkaloid with Selective Inhibitory Activity against Multidrug-Resistance-Linked ATP-Binding Cassette Drug Transporter ABCB1.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sung-Han; Lu, Yu-Jen; Yang, Chun-Chiao; Tuo, Wei-Cherng; Li, Yan-Qing; Huang, Yang-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Hung, Tai-Ho; Wu, Chung-Pu

    2016-08-26

    The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein, MDR1) is the most studied mechanism of multidrug resistance (MDR), which remains a major obstacle in clinical cancer chemotherapy. Consequently, resensitizing MDR cancer cells by inhibiting the efflux function of ABCB1 has been considered as a potential strategy to overcome ABCB1-mediated MDR in cancer patients. However, the task of developing a suitable modulator of ABCB1 has been hindered mostly by the lack of selectivity and high intrinsic toxicity of candidate compounds. Considering the wide range of diversity and relatively nontoxic nature of natural products, developing a potential modulator of ABCB1 from natural sources is particularly valuable. Through screening of a large collection of purified bioactive natural products, hernandezine was identified as a potent and selective reversing agent for ABCB1-mediated MDR in cancer cells. Experimental data demonstrated that the bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid hernandezine is selective for ABCB1, effectively inhibits the transport function of ABCB1, and enhances drug-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. More importantly, hernandezine significantly resensitizes ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells to multiple chemotherapeutic drugs at nontoxic, nanomolar concentrations. Collectively, these findings reveal that hernandezine has great potential to be further developed into a novel reversal agent for combination therapy in MDR cancer patients. PMID:27504669

  4. Whole-transcriptome survey of the putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family genes in the latex-producing laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Zhiyi, Nie; Guijuan, Kang; Yu, Li; Longjun, Dai; Rizhong, Zeng

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins or transporters constitute a large protein family in plants and are involved in many different cellular functions and processes, including solute transportation, channel regulation and molecular switches, etc. Through transcriptome sequencing, a transcriptome-wide survey and expression analysis of the ABC protein genes were carried out using the laticiferous latex from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree). A total of 46 putative ABC family proteins were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex. These consisted of 12 'full-size', 21 'half-size' and 13 other putative ABC proteins, and all of them showed strong conservation with their Arabidopsis thaliana counterparts. This study indicated that all eight plant ABC protein paralog subfamilies were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex, of which ABCB, ABCG and ABCI were the most abundant. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrated that gene expression of several latex ABC proteins was regulated by ethylene, jasmonic acid or bark tapping (a wound stress) stimulation, and that HbABCB15, HbABCB19, HbABCD1 and HbABCG21 responded most significantly of all to the abiotic stresses. The identification and expression analysis of the latex ABC family proteins could facilitate further investigation into their physiological involvement in latex metabolism and rubber biosynthesis by H. brasiliensis. PMID:25615936

  5. Suppression of c-Myc is involved in multi-walled carbon nanotubes' down-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhaojing; Xu, Yonghong; Meng, Xiangning; Watari, Fumio; Liu, Hudan; Chen, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a large family of integral membrane proteins that decrease cellular drug uptake and accumulation by active extrusion, is one of the major causes of cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR) that frequently leads to failure of chemotherapy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based drug delivery devices hold great promise in enhancing the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. However, CNTs' effects on the ABC transporters remain under-investigated. In this study, we found that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reduced transport activity and expression of ABC transporters including ABCB1/Pgp and ABCC4/MRP4 in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Proto-oncogene c-Myc, which directly regulates ABC gene expression, was concurrently decreased in MWCNT-treated cells and forced over-expression of c-Myc reversed MWCNTs' inhibitory effects on ABCB1 and ABCC4 expression. MWCNT-cell membrane interaction and cell membrane oxidative damage were observed. However, antioxidants such as vitamin C, β-mecaptoethanol and dimethylthiourea failed to antagonize MWCNTs' down-regulation of ABC transporters. These data suggest that MWCNTs may act on c-Myc, but not through oxidative stress, to down-regulate ABC transporter expression. Our findings thus shed light on CNTs' novel cellular effects that may be utilized to develop CNTs-based drug delivery devices to overcome ABC transporter-mediated cancer chemoresistance.

  6. Naturally occurring germline and tumor-associated mutations within the ATP-binding motifs of PTEN lead to oxidative damage of DNA associated with decreased nuclear p53

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Ni, Ying; Wang, Yu; Romigh, Todd; Eng, Charis

    2011-01-01

    Somatic and germline mutations in PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) are found in sporadic cancers and Cowden syndrome patients, respectively. Recent identification of naturally occurring cancer and germline mutations within the ATP-binding motifs of PTEN (heretofore referred to as PTEN ATP-binding mutations) has revealed that these mutations disrupted the subcellular localization and tumor-suppressor activity of PTEN. However, very little is known about the underlying mechanisms of PTEN ATP-binding mutations in tumorigenesis. Here we show that these mutations impair PTEN's function both qualitatively and quantitatively. On the one hand, PTEN ATP-binding mutants lose their phosphatase activity and the effect of downregulation of cyclin D1. On the other, the mislocalized mutant PTEN results in a significantly decreased nuclear p53 protein level and transcriptional activity, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species, induction of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase as well as dramatically increased DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). When compared with wild-type PTEN, the ATP-binding mutant PTEN has reduced half-life in vitro and decreased protein expression levels in vivo. Our data, thus, reveal a novel mechanism of tumorigenesis in patients with germline or somatic mutations affecting PTEN ATP-binding motifs, i.e. qualitative and quantitative impairment of PTEN due to the loss of its phosphatase activity, and nuclear mislocalization, resulting in rapid PTEN protein degradation, suppression of p53-mediated transcriptional activity, loss of protection against oxidative stress as well as accumulation of spontaneous DNA DSBs. PMID:20926450

  7. ATP and AMP Mutually Influence Their Interaction with the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) at Separate Binding Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Dong, Qian; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Elcock, Adrian H.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein family. In the presence of ATP and physiologically relevant concentrations of AMP, CFTR exhibits adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). Previous studies suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for this activity. Two other ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome protein, also have adenylate kinase activity. All three ABC adenylate kinases bind and hydrolyze ATP in the absence of other nucleotides. However, little is known about how an ABC adenylate kinase interacts with ATP and AMP when both are present. Based on data from non-ABC adenylate kinases, we hypothesized that ATP and AMP mutually influence their interaction with CFTR at separate binding sites. We further hypothesized that only one of the two CFTR ATP-binding sites is involved in the adenylate kinase reaction. We found that 8-azidoadenosine 5′-triphosphate (8-N3-ATP) and 8-azidoadenosine 5′-monophosphate (8-N3-AMP) photolabeled separate sites in CFTR. Labeling of the AMP-binding site with 8-N3-AMP required the presence of ATP. Conversely, AMP enhanced photolabeling with 8-N3-ATP at ATP-binding site 2. The adenylate kinase active center probe P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate interacted simultaneously with an AMP-binding site and ATP-binding site 2. These results show that ATP and AMP interact with separate binding sites but mutually influence their interaction with the ABC adenylate kinase CFTR. They further indicate that the active center of the adenylate kinase comprises ATP-binding site 2. PMID:23921386

  8. ATP and AMP mutually influence their interaction with the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) adenylate kinase cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) at separate binding sites.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Dong, Qian; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Elcock, Adrian H; Welsh, Michael J

    2013-09-20

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein family. In the presence of ATP and physiologically relevant concentrations of AMP, CFTR exhibits adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP &lrarr2; 2 ADP). Previous studies suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for this activity. Two other ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome protein, also have adenylate kinase activity. All three ABC adenylate kinases bind and hydrolyze ATP in the absence of other nucleotides. However, little is known about how an ABC adenylate kinase interacts with ATP and AMP when both are present. Based on data from non-ABC adenylate kinases, we hypothesized that ATP and AMP mutually influence their interaction with CFTR at separate binding sites. We further hypothesized that only one of the two CFTR ATP-binding sites is involved in the adenylate kinase reaction. We found that 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8-N3-ATP) and 8-azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate (8-N3-AMP) photolabeled separate sites in CFTR. Labeling of the AMP-binding site with 8-N3-AMP required the presence of ATP. Conversely, AMP enhanced photolabeling with 8-N3-ATP at ATP-binding site 2. The adenylate kinase active center probe P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate interacted simultaneously with an AMP-binding site and ATP-binding site 2. These results show that ATP and AMP interact with separate binding sites but mutually influence their interaction with the ABC adenylate kinase CFTR. They further indicate that the active center of the adenylate kinase comprises ATP-binding site 2. PMID:23921386

  9. T antigen origin-binding domain of simian virus 40: determinants of specific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Sanford, David G; Luo, Xuelian; Sudmeier, James L; Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Bullock, Peter A; Bachovchin, William W

    2004-06-01

    To better understand origin recognition and initiation of DNA replication, we have examined by NMR complexes formed between the origin-binding domain of SV40 T antigen (T-ag-obd), the initiator protein of the SV40 virus, and cognate and noncognate DNA oligomers. The results reveal two structural effects associated with "origin-specific" binding that are absent in nonspecific DNA binding. The first is the formation of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) involving His 203, a residue that genetic studies have previously identified as crucial to both specific and nonspecific DNA binding in full-length T antigen. In free T-ag-obd, the side chain of His 203 has a pK(a) value of approximately 5, titrating to the N(epsilon)(1)H tautomer at neutral pH (Sudmeier, J. L., et al. (1996) J. Magn. Reson., Ser. B 113, 236-247). In complexes with origin DNA, His 203 N(delta)(1) becomes protonated and remains nontitrating as the imidazolium cation at all pH values from 4 to 8. The H-bonded N(delta1)H resonates at 15.9 ppm, an unusually large N-H proton chemical shift, of a magnitude previously observed only in the catalytic triad of serine proteases at low pH. The formation of this H-bond requires the middle G/C base pair of the recognition pentanucleotide, GAGGC. The second structural effect is a selective distortion of the A/T base pair characterized by a large (0.6 ppm) upfield chemical-shift change of its Watson-Crick proton, while nearby H-bonded protons remain relatively unaffected. The results indicate that T antigen, like many other DNA-binding proteins, may employ "catalytic" or "transition-state-like" interactions in binding its cognate DNA (Jen-Jacobson, L. (1997) Biopolymers 44, 153-180), which may be the solution to the well-known paradox between the relatively modest DNA-binding specificity exhibited by initiator proteins and the high specificity of initiation. PMID:15170330

  10. CpABC, a Cryptosporidium parvum ATP-binding cassette protein at the host–parasite boundary in intracellular stages

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Margaret E.; Riojas, Ynolde A.; Wu, Teresa W.; Le Blancq, Sylvie M.

    1999-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Cryptosporidium parvum develops inside a vacuole at the apex of its epithelial host cell. The developing parasite is separated from the host cell cytoplasm by a zone of attachment that consists of an extensively folded membranous structure known as the feeder organelle. It has been proposed that the feeder organelle is the site of regulation of transport of nutrients and drugs into the parasite. In this report, we localize an ≈200-kDa integral membrane protein, CpABC, from Cryptosporidium parvum to the host–parasite boundary, possibly the feeder organelle. The predicted amino acid sequence of CpABC has significant structural similarity with the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator and the multidrug resistance protein subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins. This is an example of a parasite-encoded transport protein localized at the parasite–host interface of an intracellular protozoan. PMID:10318953

  11. In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter-Mediated Efflux at the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Wei, Bih-Rong; Hall, Matthew D; Simpson, R Mark; Gottesman, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    We provide a detailed protocol for imaging ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) function at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of transgenic mice. D-Luciferin is specifically transported by ABCG2 found on the apical side of endothelial cells at the BBB. The luciferase-luciferin enzymatic reaction produces bioluminescence, which allows a direct measurement of ABCG2 function at the BBB. Therefore bioluminescence imaging (BLI) correlates with ABCG2 function at the BBB and this can be measured by administering luciferin in a mouse model that expresses luciferase in the brain parenchyma. BLI allows for a relatively low-cost alternative for studying transporter function in vivo compared to other strategies such as positron emission tomography. This method for imaging ABCG2 function at the BBB can be used to investigate pharmacokinetic inhibition of the transporter. PMID:27424909

  12. Repositioning of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors as Antagonists of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Anticancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR) has attenuated the efficacy of anticancer drugs and the possibility of successful cancer chemotherapy. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play an essential role in mediating MDR in cancer cells by increasing efflux of drugs from cancer cells, hence reducing the intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs. Interestingly, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as AST1306, lapatinib, linsitinib, masitinib, motesanib, nilotinib, telatinib and WHI-P154, have been found to have the capability to overcome anticancer drug resistance by inhibiting ABC transporters in recent years. This review will focus on some of the latest and clinical developments with ABC transporters, TKIs and anticancer drug resistance. PMID:25268163

  13. Polyoma small T antigen triggers cell death via mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Pores Fernando, A T; Andrabi, S; Cizmecioglu, O; Zhu, C; Livingston, D M; Higgins, J M G; Schaffhausen, B S; Roberts, T M

    2015-05-01

    Polyoma small T antigen (PyST), an early gene product of the polyoma virus, has been shown to cause cell death in a number of mammalian cells in a protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-dependent manner. In the current study, using a cell line featuring regulated expression of PyST, we found that PyST arrests cells in mitosis. Live-cell and immunofluorescence studies showed that the majority of the PyST expressing cells were arrested in prometaphase with almost no cells progressing beyond metaphase. These cells exhibited defects in chromosomal congression, sister chromatid cohesion and spindle positioning, thereby resulting in the activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint. Prolonged mitotic arrest then led to cell death via mitotic catastrophe. Cell cycle inhibitors that block cells in G1/S prevented PyST-induced death. PyST-induced cell death that occurs during M is not dependent on p53 status. These data suggested, and our results confirmed, that PP2A inhibition could be used to preferentially kill cancer cells with p53 mutations that proliferate normally in the presence of cell cycle inhibitors. PMID:24998850

  14. In Vitro Reassembly of the Ribose ATP-binding Cassette Transporter Reveals a Distinct Set of Transport Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Matthew C.; Simon, Michael J.; Erramilli, Satchal K.; Zhang, Huide; Zaitseva, Jelena; Hermodson, Mark A.; Stauffacher, Cynthia V.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importers are primary active transporters that are critical for nutrient uptake. Based on structural and functional studies, ABC importers can be divided into two distinct classes, type I and type II. Type I importers follow a strict alternating access mechanism that is driven by the presence of the substrate. Type II importers accept substrates in a nucleotide-free state, with hydrolysis driving an inward facing conformation. The ribose transporter in Escherichia coli is a tripartite complex consisting of a cytoplasmic ATP-binding cassette protein, RbsA, with fused nucleotide binding domains; a transmembrane domain homodimer, RbsC2; and a periplasmic substrate binding protein, RbsB. To investigate the transport mechanism of the complex RbsABC2, we probed intersubunit interactions by varying the presence of the substrate ribose and the hydrolysis cofactors, ATP/ADP and Mg2+. We were able to purify a full complex, RbsABC2, in the presence of stable, transition state mimics (ATP, Mg2+, and VO4); a RbsAC complex in the presence of ADP and Mg2+; and a heretofore unobserved RbsBC complex in the absence of cofactors. The presence of excess ribose also destabilized complex formation between RbsB and RbsC. These observations suggest that RbsABC2 shares functional traits with both type I and type II importers, as well as possessing unique features, and employs a distinct mechanism relative to other ABC transporters. PMID:25533465

  15. The Q Motif Is Involved in DNA Binding but Not ATP Binding in ChlR1 Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hao; Guo, Manhong; Vidhyasagar, Venkatasubramanian; Talwar, Tanu; Wu, Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    Helicases are molecular motors that couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to the unwinding of structured DNA or RNA and chromatin remodeling. The conversion of energy derived from ATP hydrolysis into unwinding and remodeling is coordinated by seven sequence motifs (I, Ia, II, III, IV, V, and VI). The Q motif, consisting of nine amino acids (GFXXPXPIQ) with an invariant glutamine (Q) residue, has been identified in some, but not all helicases. Compared to the seven well-recognized conserved helicase motifs, the role of the Q motif is less acknowledged. Mutations in the human ChlR1 (DDX11) gene are associated with a unique genetic disorder known as Warsaw Breakage Syndrome, which is characterized by cellular defects in genome maintenance. To examine the roles of the Q motif in ChlR1 helicase, we performed site directed mutagenesis of glutamine to alanine at residue 23 in the Q motif of ChlR1. ChlR1 recombinant protein was overexpressed and purified from HEK293T cells. ChlR1-Q23A mutant abolished the helicase activity of ChlR1 and displayed reduced DNA binding ability. The mutant showed impaired ATPase activity but normal ATP binding. A thermal shift assay revealed that ChlR1-Q23A has a melting point value similar to ChlR1-WT. Partial proteolysis mapping demonstrated that ChlR1-WT and Q23A have a similar globular structure, although some subtle conformational differences in these two proteins are evident. Finally, we found ChlR1 exists and functions as a monomer in solution, which is different from FANCJ, in which the Q motif is involved in protein dimerization. Taken together, our results suggest that the Q motif is involved in DNA binding but not ATP binding in ChlR1 helicase. PMID:26474416

  16. Identification and expression analysis of ABC protein-encoding genes in Toxoplasma gondii. Toxoplasma gondii ATP-binding cassette superfamily.

    PubMed

    Sauvage, Virginie; Millot, Jean-Marc; Aubert, Dominique; Visneux, Vincent; Marle-Plistat, Maggy; Pinon, Jean-Michel; Villena, Isabelle

    2006-06-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are one of the largest evolutionarily conserved families of proteins. They are characterized by the presence of nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), which are highly conserved among organisms. In the present study, we used human and protozoan ABC sequences, and ATP-binding consensus motifs to screen the Toxoplasma gondii TwinScan2 predicted proteins database. We identified 24 ABC open reading frames (ORFs), whose deduced amino acid sequences exhibited all the typical biochemical features of the ABC family members. Fifteen of them clustered into five of the seven families of human ABC proteins: six ABCBs (drug, peptides and lipid export), two ABCCs (organic anion conjugates and drug export), one ABCE (Rnase L inhibitor, RLI, antibiotic resistance and translation regulation), one ABCF (drug resistance and regulation of gene expression) and five ABCGs (drug export and resistance). The nine other ORFs were represented by four ABCHs (energy-generating subunits), four SMCs (structural maintenance of chromosomes) and one member of unclear origin, whose closest homologue was the yeast Elf1 protein (mRNA export factor). A notable feature of the Toxoplasma ABC superfamily seems to be the absence of genes encoding ABCA and ABCD members. Expression analysis of ABC genes in tachyzoite and bradyzoite stages revealed the presence of ABC transcripts for all genes studied. Further research on the implication of these ABC proteins will increase our knowledge of the basic biology of Toxoplasma and provide the opportunity to identify novel therapeutic targets. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ABC transporters in T. gondii. PMID:16600400

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Universal Stress Protein Rv2623 Regulates Bacillary Growth by ATP-Binding: Requirement for Establishing Chronic Persistent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bilder, Patrick; Sun, Meihao; Lim, Jihyeon; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Basaraba, Randall; So, Melvin; Zhu, Guofeng; Tufariello, JoAnn M.; Izzo, Angelo A.; Orme, Ian M.; Almo, Steve C.; Leyh, Thomas S.; Chan, John

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculous latency and reactivation play a significant role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, yet the mechanisms that regulate these processes remain unclear. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis universal stress protein (USP) homolog, rv2623, is among the most highly induced genes when the tubercle bacillus is subjected to hypoxia and nitrosative stress, conditions thought to promote latency. Induction of rv2623 also occurs when M. tuberculosis encounters conditions associated with growth arrest, such as the intracellular milieu of macrophages and in the lungs of mice with chronic tuberculosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Rv2623 regulates tuberculosis latency. We observed that an Rv2623-deficient mutant fails to establish chronic tuberculous infection in guinea pigs and mice, exhibiting a hypervirulence phenotype associated with increased bacterial burden and mortality. Consistent with this in vivo growth-regulatory role, constitutive overexpression of rv2623 attenuates mycobacterial growth in vitro. Biochemical analysis of purified Rv2623 suggested that this mycobacterial USP binds ATP, and the 2.9-Å-resolution crystal structure revealed that Rv2623 engages ATP in a novel nucleotide-binding pocket. Structure-guided mutagenesis yielded Rv2623 mutants with reduced ATP-binding capacity. Analysis of mycobacteria overexpressing these mutants revealed that the in vitro growth-inhibitory property of Rv2623 correlates with its ability to bind ATP. Together, the results indicate that i) M. tuberculosis Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth in vitro and in vivo, and ii) Rv2623 is required for the entry of the tubercle bacillus into the chronic phase of infection in the host; in addition, iii) Rv2623 binds ATP; and iv) the growth-regulatory attribute of this USP is dependent on its ATP-binding activity. We propose that Rv2623 may function as an ATP-dependent signaling intermediate in a pathway that promotes persistent infection. PMID:19478878

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Universal Stress Protein Rv2623 Regulates Bacillary Growth by ATP Binding: Requirement for Establishing Chronic Persistent Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, J.; Mi, K; Bilder, P; Sun, M; Lim, J; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H; Basaraba, R; So, M; Zhu, G; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculous latency and reactivation play a significant role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, yet the mechanisms that regulate these processes remain unclear. The Mycobacterium tuberculosisuniversal stress protein (USP) homolog, rv2623, is among the most highly induced genes when the tubercle bacillus is subjected to hypoxia and nitrosative stress, conditions thought to promote latency. Induction of rv2623 also occurs when M. tuberculosis encounters conditions associated with growth arrest, such as the intracellular milieu of macrophages and in the lungs of mice with chronic tuberculosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Rv2623 regulates tuberculosis latency. We observed that an Rv2623-deficient mutant fails to establish chronic tuberculous infection in guinea pigs and mice, exhibiting a hypervirulence phenotype associated with increased bacterial burden and mortality. Consistent with this in vivo growth-regulatory role, constitutive overexpression of rv2623 attenuates mycobacterial growth in vitro. Biochemical analysis of purified Rv2623 suggested that this mycobacterial USP binds ATP, and the 2.9-A-resolution crystal structure revealed that Rv2623 engages ATP in a novel nucleotide-binding pocket. Structure-guided mutagenesis yielded Rv2623 mutants with reduced ATP-binding capacity. Analysis of mycobacteria overexpressing these mutants revealed that the in vitro growth-inhibitory property of Rv2623 correlates with its ability to bind ATP. Together, the results indicate that i M. tuberculosis Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth in vitro and in vivo, and ii Rv2623 is required for the entry of the tubercle bacillus into the chronic phase of infection in the host; in addition, iii Rv2623 binds ATP; and iv the growth-regulatory attribute of this USP is dependent on its ATP-binding activity. We propose that Rv2623 may function as an ATP-dependent signaling intermediate in a pathway that promotes persistent infection.

  19. Mutant cycles at CFTR's non-canonical ATP-binding site support little interface separation during gating.

    PubMed

    Szollosi, Andras; Muallem, Daniella R; Csanády, László; Vergani, Paola

    2011-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel belonging to the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. ABC proteins share a common molecular mechanism that couples ATP binding and hydrolysis at two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) to diverse functions. This involves formation of NBD dimers, with ATP bound at two composite interfacial sites. In CFTR, intramolecular NBD dimerization is coupled to channel opening. Channel closing is triggered by hydrolysis of the ATP molecule bound at composite site 2. Site 1, which is non-canonical, binds nucleotide tightly but is not hydrolytic. Recently, based on kinetic arguments, it was suggested that this site remains closed for several gating cycles. To investigate movements at site 1 by an independent technique, we studied changes in thermodynamic coupling between pairs of residues on opposite sides of this site. The chosen targets are likely to interact based on both phylogenetic analysis and closeness on structural models. First, we mutated T460 in NBD1 and L1353 in NBD2 (the corresponding site-2 residues become energetically coupled as channels open). Mutation T460S accelerated closure in hydrolytic conditions and in the nonhydrolytic K1250R background; mutation L1353M did not affect these rates. Analysis of the double mutant showed additive effects of mutations, suggesting that energetic coupling between the two residues remains unchanged during the gating cycle. We next investigated pairs 460-1348 and 460-1375. Although both mutations H1348A and H1375A produced dramatic changes in hydrolytic and nonhydrolytic channel closing rates, in the corresponding double mutants these changes proved mostly additive with those caused by mutation T460S, suggesting little change in energetic coupling between either positions 460-1348 or positions 460-1375 during gating. These results provide independent support for a gating model in which ATP-bound composite site 1 remains

  20. Solution structure of the origin DNA-binding domain of SV40 T-antigen.

    PubMed

    Luo, X; Sanford, D G; Bullock, P A; Bachovchin, W W

    1996-12-01

    The structure of the domain from simian virus 40 (SV40) large T-antigen that binds to the SV40 origin of DNA replication (T-ag-OBD131-260) has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The overall fold, consisting of a central five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet flanked by two alpha-helices on one side and one alpha-helix and one 3(10)-helix on the other, is a new one. Previous mutational analyses have identified two elements, termed A (approximately 152-155) and B2 (203-207), as essential for origin-specific recognition. These elements form two closely juxtaposed loops that define a continuous surface on the protein. The addition of a duplex oligonucleotide containing the origin recognition pentanucleotide GAGGC induces chemical shift changes and slows amide proton exchange in resonances from this region, indicating that this surface directly contacts the DNA. PMID:8946857

  1. [GnRH analogues containing SV-40 virus T-antigen nuclear localization sequence].

    PubMed

    Burov, S V; Iablokova, T V; Dorosh, M Iu; Kriviziuk, E V; Efremov, A M; Orlov, S V

    2010-01-01

    To improve the efficiency of anticancer drugs due to their delivery to intracellular targets a set of GnRH analogues containing nuclear localization signal (NLS) of SV-40 virus large T-antigen have been synthesized. NLS was attached to the parent molecule via ε-amino group of D-Lysine in position 1 or 6 of peptide sequence using orthogonal protection strategy. The biological activity studies revealed that incorporation of NLS moiety significantly increases cytotoxic activity of palmitoyl-containing GnRH analogues in vitro. The influence of tested peptides on tumor cells does not accompanied by the destruction of cell membrane, as confirmed in experiments with normal fibroblasts, used as a control. PMID:21063449

  2. LrABCF1, a GCN-type ATP-binding cassette transporter from Lilium regale, is involved in defense responses against viral and fungal pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are essential for membrane translocation in diverse biological processes, such as plant development and defense response. Here, a general control non-derepressible (GCN)-type ABC transporter gene, designated LrABCF1, was identified from Cucumber mosaic virus (...

  3. Regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters and cholesterol efflux by glucose in primary human monocytes and murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing atherosclerosis. This may be partially attributable to suppression of macrophage ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated cholesterol efflux by sustained elevated blood glucose concentrations. Two models were used...

  4. ATP-binding motifs play key roles in Krp1p, kinesin-related protein 1, function for bi-polar growth control in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Dong Keun; Cho, Bon A; Kim, Hyong Bai . E-mail: hbkim5212@hotmail.com

    2005-06-03

    Kinesin is a microtubule-based motor protein with various functions related to the cell growth and division. It has been reported that Krp1p, kinesin-related protein 1, which belongs to the kinesin heavy chain superfamily, localizes on microtubules and may play an important role in cytokinesis. However, the function of Krp1p has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we overexpressed an intact form and three different mutant forms of Krp1p in fission yeast constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in two ATP-binding motifs or by truncation of the leucine zipper-like motif (LZiP). We observed hyper-extended microtubules and the aberrant nuclear shape in Krp1p-overexpressed fission yeast. As a functional consequence, a point mutation of ATP-binding domain 1 (G89E) in Krp1p reversed the effect of Krp1p overexpression in fission yeast, whereas the specific mutation in ATP-binding domain 2 (G238E) resulted in the altered cell polarity. Additionally, truncation of the leucine zipper-like domain (LZiP) at the C-terminal of Krp1p showed a normal nuclear division. Taken together, we suggest that krp1p is involved in regulation of cell-polarized growth through ATP-binding motifs in fission yeast.

  5. Insulin receptor substrate 1 translocation to the nucleus by the human JC virus T-antigen.

    PubMed

    Lassak, Adam; Del Valle, Luis; Peruzzi, Francesca; Wang, Jin Ying; Enam, Sahnila; Croul, Sidney; Khalili, Kamel; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2002-05-10

    Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) is the major signaling molecule for the insulin and insulin-like growth factor I receptors, which transduces both metabolic and growth-promoting signals, and has transforming properties when overexpressed in the cells. Here we show that IRS-1 is translocated to the nucleus in the presence of the early viral protein-T-antigen of the human polyomavirus JC. Nuclear IRS-1 was detected in T-antigen-positive cell lines and in T-antigen-positive biopsies from patients diagnosed with medulloblastoma. The IRS-1 domain responsible for a direct JC virus T-antigen binding was localized within the N-terminal portion of IRS-1 molecule, and the binding was independent from IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and was strongly inhibited by IRS-1 serine phosphorylation. In addition, competition for the IRS-1-T-antigen binding by a dominant negative mutant of IRS-1 inhibited growth and survival of JC virus T-antigen-transformed cells in anchorage-independent culture conditions. Based on these findings, we propose a novel role for the IRS-1-T-antigen complex in controlling cellular equilibrium during viral infection. It may involve uncoupling of IRS-1 from its surface receptor and translocation of its function to the nucleus. PMID:11877394

  6. Novel ATP-binding heat-inducible protein of Mr = 37,000 that is sensitive to transformation in BALB/3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, A.; Hirayama, C.; Ohtsuka, K.; Hirayoshi, K.; Nagata, K. )

    1990-06-01

    Using affinity chromatography on ATP-agarose, we have identified a major ATP-binding protein in Nonidet P-40 extracts of avian and mammalian cells labeled with (35S)methionine. After washing ATP-agarose beads with high-ionic-strength buffer (0.4 M NaCl), the 37-kD protein was shown to be one of the major ATP-binding proteins while p72 and grp78, which are members of the hsp70 family, also bound to ATP-agarose. This protein consisted of several spots on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric point of the most basic spot was approximately 9.2 in chick embryo fibroblasts, whereas it was about 8.8 in mouse 3T3 cells. The identities of these proteins in mouse and chick cells were confirmed by peptide mapping. After heat-shock treatment of BALB/3T3 cells, the major heat-shock protein, hsp70, was shown to be induced very rapidly after heat shock and was recovered in the ATP-binding fraction. Besides hsp70, a 37-kD protein was also found to be induced by heat shock. This protein was drastically induced by treating the cells with alpha,alpha'-dipyridyl, an iron chelating reagent, but not with sodium arsenite, calcium ionophore, or tunicamycin. The synthesis and the total amount of this ATP-binding protein increased in mouse 3T3 cells transformed by simian virus 40, methylcholanthrene, or activated c-Ha-ras oncogene compared to their normal counterparts. The incorporation of (32P)orthophosphate was not detected in either normal or transformed cells. These studies established that a major ATP-binding protein of Mr = 37,000 is a heat-inducible protein and that the synthesis of this protein is regulated by malignant transformation.

  7. Blockade of ATP binding site of P2 purinoceptors in rat parotid acinar cells by isothiocyanate compounds.

    PubMed

    Soltoff, S P; McMillian, M K; Talamo, B R; Cantley, L C

    1993-05-01

    Extracellular ATP activates a P2Z-type purinergic receptor (purinoceptor) in rat parotid acinar cells that increases the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration via the entry of extracellular Ca2+ through an ATP-sensitive cation channel (Soltoff et al., Am J Physiol 262: C934-C940, 1992). To learn more about the ATP binding site of the purinoceptor, we examined the effects of several stilbene isothiocyanate analogs of DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid), which block the binding of [32P]ATP to intact parotid cells (McMillian et al., Biochem J 255:291-300, 1988) and blocked the activation of the P2Z purinoceptor. The ATP-stimulated 45Ca2+ uptake was blocked by DIDS, H2DIDS (dihydro-DIDS; 4,4'-diisothiocyanatodihydrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid), and SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid), but not by DNDS (4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid), a stilbene disulfonate compound lacking isothiocyanate (SCN-) groups, or by KSCN. The potency of the stilbene disulfonates was related to the number of isothiocyanate groups on each compound. Under the experimental conditions, the IC50 value of DIDS (approximately 35 microM), which has two SCN-groups, was much lower than that of SITS (approximately 125 microM), which has only one SCN-group. The inhibitory effects of DIDS appeared to be much more potent than those of SITS due to the kinetics of their binding to the purinoceptors. Eosin-5-isothiocyanate (EITC) and fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC), non-stilbene isothiocyanate compounds with single SCN-groups, also blocked the response to ATP and were less potent than DIDS. Trinitrophenyl-ATP (TNP-ATP), an ATP derivative that is not an effective agonist of the parotid P2Z receptor, blocked the covalent binding of DIDS to the plasma membrane, suggesting that ATP and DIDS bind to the same site. Reactive Blue 2 (Cibacron Blue 3GA), an anthraquinone-sulfonic acid derivative that is a noncovalent purinergic antagonist, also blocked

  8. Hydrogen Sulfide Up-Regulates the Expression of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 via Promoting Nuclear Translocation of PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Xiong, Qinghui; Peng, Jin; Hu, Bin; Li, Wanzhen; Zhu, Yizhun; Shen, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) plays a key role in atherogenesis. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gasotransmitter, has been reported to play an anti-atherosclerotic role. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study we examined whether and how H2S regulates ABCA1 expression. The effect of H2S on ABCA1 expression and lipid metabolism were assessed in vitro by cultured human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and in vivo by ApoE−/− mice with a high-cholesterol diet. NaHS (an exogenous H2S donor) treatment significantly increased the expression of ABCA1, ApoA1, and ApoA2 and ameliorated intracellular lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells. Depletion of the endogenous H2S generator cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) by small RNA interference (siRNA) significantly decreased the expression of ABCA1 and resulted in the accumulation of lipids in HepG2 cells. In vivo NaHS treatment significantly reduced the serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and low-density lipoproteins (LDL), diminished atherosclerotic plaque size, and increased hepatic ABCA1 expression in fat-fed ApoE−/− mice. Further study revealed that NaHS upregulated ABCA1 expression by promoting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) nuclear translocation. H2S up-regulates the expression of ABCA1 by promoting the nuclear translocation of PPARα, providing a fundamental mechanism for the anti-atherogenic activity of H2S. H2S may be a promising potential drug candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27136542

  9. Hydrogen Sulfide Up-Regulates the Expression of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 via Promoting Nuclear Translocation of PPARα.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Xiong, Qinghui; Peng, Jin; Hu, Bin; Li, Wanzhen; Zhu, Yizhun; Shen, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) plays a key role in atherogenesis. Hydrogen sulfide (H₂S), a gasotransmitter, has been reported to play an anti-atherosclerotic role. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study we examined whether and how H₂S regulates ABCA1 expression. The effect of H₂S on ABCA1 expression and lipid metabolism were assessed in vitro by cultured human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and in vivo by ApoE(-/-) mice with a high-cholesterol diet. NaHS (an exogenous H₂S donor) treatment significantly increased the expression of ABCA1, ApoA1, and ApoA2 and ameliorated intracellular lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells. Depletion of the endogenous H₂S generator cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) by small RNA interference (siRNA) significantly decreased the expression of ABCA1 and resulted in the accumulation of lipids in HepG2 cells. In vivo NaHS treatment significantly reduced the serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and low-density lipoproteins (LDL), diminished atherosclerotic plaque size, and increased hepatic ABCA1 expression in fat-fed ApoE(-/-) mice. Further study revealed that NaHS upregulated ABCA1 expression by promoting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) nuclear translocation. H₂S up-regulates the expression of ABCA1 by promoting the nuclear translocation of PPARα, providing a fundamental mechanism for the anti-atherogenic activity of H₂S. H₂S may be a promising potential drug candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27136542

  10. Fasting Induces Nuclear Factor E2-Related Factor 2 and ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters via Protein Kinase A and Sirtuin-1 in Mouse and Human

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Donepudi, Ajay C.; Xu, Jialin; Wei, Wei; Cheng, Qiuqiong C.; Driscoll, Maureen V.; Johnson, Delinda A.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Li, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine whether 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) and Sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) dependent mechanisms modulate ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) transport protein expression. ABC transport proteins (ABCC2–4) are essential for chemical elimination from hepatocytes and biliary excretion. Nuclear factor-E2 related-factor 2 (NRF2) is a transcription factor that mediates ABCC induction in response to chemical inducers and liver injury. However, a role for NRF2 in the regulation of transporter expression in nonchemical models of liver perturbation is largely undescribed. Results: Here we show that fasting increased NRF2 target gene expression through NRF2- and SIRT1–dependent mechanisms. In intact mouse liver, fasting induces NRF2 target gene expression by at least 1.5 to 5-fold. In mouse and human hepatocytes, treatment with 8-Bromoadenosine-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased NRF2 target gene expression and antioxidant response element activity, which was decreased by the PKA inhibitor, H-89. Moreover, fasting induced NRF2 target gene expression was decreased in liver and hepatocytes of SIRT1 liver-specific null mice and NRF2-null mice. Lastly, NRF2 and SIRT1 were recruited to MAREs and Antioxidant Response Elements (AREs) in the human ABCC2 promoter. Innovation: Oxidative stress mediated NRF2 activation is well described, yet the influence of basic metabolic processes on NRF2 activation is just emerging. Conclusion: The current data point toward a novel role of nutrient status in regulation of NRF2 activity and the antioxidant response, and indicates that cAMP/PKA and SIRT1 are upstream regulators for fasting-induced activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 15–30. PMID:23725046

  11. AtMRP2, an Arabidopsis ATP binding cassette transporter able to transport glutathione S-conjugates and chlorophyll catabolites: functional comparisons with Atmrp1.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y P; Li, Z S; Drozdowicz, Y M; Hortensteiner, S; Martinoia, E; Rea, P A

    1998-01-01

    Three ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter-like activities directed toward large amphipathic organic anions have recently been identified on the vacuolar membrane of plant cells. These are the Mg-ATP-energized, vanadate-inhibitable vacuolar accumulation of glutathione S-conjugates (GS conjugates), chlorophyll catabolites, and bile acids, respectively. Although each of these activities previously had been assigned to distinct pumps in native plant membranes, we describe here the molecular cloning, physical mapping, and heterologous expression of a gene, AtMRP2, from Arabidopsis thaliana that encodes a multispecific ABC transporter competent in the transport of both GS conjugates and chlorophyll catabolites. Unlike its isoform, AtMRP1, which transports the model Brassica napus chlorophyll catabolite transporter substrate Bn-NCC-1 at low efficiency, heterologously expressed AtMRP2 has the facility for simultaneous high-efficiency parallel transport of GS conjugates and Bn-NCC-1. The properties of AtMRP2 therefore establish a basis for the manipulation of two previously identified plant ABC transporter activities and provide an explanation for how the comparable transporter in native plant membranes would be systematically mistaken for two distinct transporters. These findings are discussed with respect to the functional organization of AtMRP2, the inability of AtMRP2 and AtMRP1 to transport the model bile acid transporter substrate taurocholate (despite the pronounced sensitivity of both to direct inhibition by this agent), the differential patterns of expression of their genes in the intact plant, and the high capacity of AtMRP2 for the transport of glutathionated herbicides and anthocyanins. PMID:9490749

  12. Characterization of the ATP-binding cassette transporter gene expression profile in Y79: a retinoblastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Hendig, Doris; Langmann, Thomas; Zarbock, Ralf; Schmitz, Gerd; Kleesiek, Knut; Götting, Christian

    2009-08-01

    Chemotherapy failure was reported in treatment of retinoblastoma suggesting a role for ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins. Little is known about the expression pattern of ABC proteins in this cancer type. We investigated the gene expression profile of 47 ABC proteins in the human retinoblastoma cell line Y79 by TaqMan low-density array. Analysis revealed 31 ABC transporter genes expressed in this tumor cell line. Y79 cells demonstrate high gene expression of ABCA7, ABCA12, ABCB7, ABCB10, ABCC1, ABCC4, ABCD3, ABCE1, ABCF1, ABCF2, and ABCF3 (more than twofold compared to pooled RNA from different tissues). Moreover, we show that Y79 cells exhibit an active calcein efflux pointing to multidrug resistance protein (MRP)-like transporter activity. In summary, we present for the first time an ABC transporter gene expression profile in cells derived from retinoblastoma. Most of the highly expressed ABC transporter genes are typical markers of cancer cells and might exhibit potential targets for medical treatment of retinoblastoma. PMID:19266166

  13. Stickleback embryos use ATP-binding cassette transporters as a buffer against exposure to maternally derived cortisol.

    PubMed

    Paitz, Ryan T; Bukhari, Syed Abbas; Bell, Alison M

    2016-03-16

    Offspring from females that experience stressful conditions during reproduction often exhibit altered phenotypes and many of these effects are thought to arise owing to increased exposure to maternal glucocorticoids. While embryos of placental vertebrates are known to regulate exposure to maternal glucocorticoids via placental steroid metabolism, much less is known about how and whether egg-laying vertebrates can control their steroid environment during embryonic development. We tested the hypothesis that threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) embryos can regulate exposure to maternal steroids via active efflux of maternal steroids from the egg. Embryos rapidly (within 72 h) cleared intact steroids, but blocking ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters inhibited cortisol clearance. Remarkably, this efflux of cortisol was sufficient to prevent a transcriptional response of embryos to exogenous cortisol. Taken together, these findings suggest that, much like their placental counterparts, developing fish embryos can actively regulate their exposure to maternal cortisol. These findings highlight the fact that even in egg-laying vertebrates, the realized exposure to maternal steroids is mediated by both maternal and embryonic processes and this has important implications for understanding how maternal stress influences offspring development. PMID:26984623

  14. Functional coupling of ATP-binding cassette transporter Abcb6 to cytochrome P450 expression and activity in liver.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Hemantkumar; Li, Feng; Tessman, Robert; Mickey, Kristen; Dorko, Kenneth; Schmitt, Timothy; Kumer, Sean; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Gaikwad, Nilesh; Krishnamurthy, Partha

    2015-03-20

    Although endogenous mechanisms that negatively regulate cytochrome P450 (P450) monooxygenases in response to physiological and pathophysiological signals are not well understood, they are thought to result from alterations in the level of endogenous metabolites, involved in maintaining homeostasis. Here we show that homeostatic changes in hepatic metabolite profile in Abcb6 (mitochondrial ATP-binding cassette transporter B6) deficiency results in suppression of a specific subset of hepatic P450 activity. Abcb6 null mice are more susceptible to pentobarbital-induced sleep and zoxazolamine-induced paralysis, secondary to decreased expression and activity of Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10. The knock-out mice also show decrease in both basal and xeno-inducible expression and activity of a subset of hepatic P450s that appear to be related to changes in hepatic metabolite profile. These data, together with the observation that liver extracts from Abcb6-deficient mice suppress P450 expression in human primary hepatocytes, suggest that this mouse model may provide an opportunity to understand the physiological signals and the mechanisms involved in negative regulation of P450s. PMID:25623066

  15. Rice Stomatal Closure Requires Guard Cell Plasma Membrane ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter RCN1/OsABCG5.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shuichi; Takano, Sho; Sato, Moeko; Furukawa, Kaoru; Nagasawa, Hidetaka; Yoshikawa, Shoko; Kasuga, Jun; Tokuji, Yoshihiko; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Nakazono, Mikio; Takamure, Itsuro; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2016-03-01

    Water stress is one of the major environmental stresses that affect agricultural production worldwide. Water loss from plants occurs primarily through stomatal pores. Here, we report that an Oryza sativa half-size ATP-binding cassette (ABC) subfamily G protein, RCN1/OsABCG5, is involved in stomatal closure mediated by phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation in guard cells. We found that the GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5-fusion protein was localized at the plasma membrane in guard cells. The percentage of guard cell pairs containing both ABA and GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5 increased after exogenous ABA treatment, whereas they were co-localized in guard cell pairs regardless of whether exogenous ABA was applied. ABA application resulted in a smaller increase in the percentage of guard cell pairs containing ABA in rcn1 mutant (A684P) and RCN1-RNAi than in wild-type plants. Furthermore, polyethylene glycol (drought stress)-inducible ABA accumulation in guard cells did not occur in rcn1 mutants. Stomata closure mediated by exogenous ABA application was strongly reduced in rcn1 mutants. Finally, rcn1 mutant plants had more rapid water loss from detached leaves than the wild-type plants. These results indicate that in response to drought stress, RCN1/OsABCG5 is involved in accumulation of ABA in guard cells, which is indispensable for stomatal closure. PMID:26708605

  16. Getting in or out: early segregation between importers and exporters in the evolution of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters.

    PubMed

    Saurin, W; Hofnung, M; Dassa, E

    1999-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems, also called traffic ATPases, are found in eukaryotes and prokaryotes and almost all participate in the transport of a wide variety of molecules. ABC systems are characterized by a highly conserved ATPase module called here the ABC module, involved in coupling transport to ATP hydrolysis. We have used the sequence of one of the first representatives of bacterial ABC transporters, the MalK protein, to collect 250 closely related sequences from a nonredundant protein sequence database. The sequences collected by this objective method are all known or putative ABC transporters. After having eliminated short protein sequences and duplicates, the 197 remaining sequences were subjected to a phylogenetic analysis based on a mutational similarity matrix. An unrooted tree for these modules was found to display two major branches, one grouping all collected uptake systems and the other all collected export systems. This remarkable disposition strongly suggests that the divergence between these two functionally different types of ABC systems occurred once in the history of these systems and probably before the differentiation of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We discuss the implications of this finding and we propose a model accounting for the generation and the diversification of ABC systems. PMID:9873074

  17. HG-829 is a potent noncompetitive inhibitor of the ATP-binding cassette multidrug resistance transporter ABCB1.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Gisela; Robey, Robert W; Sokol, Lubomir; McGraw, Kathy L; Clark, Justine; Lawrence, Nicholas J; Sebti, Said M; Wiese, Michael; List, Alan F

    2012-08-15

    Transmembrane drug export mediated by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein contributes to clinical resistance to antineoplastics. In this study, we identified the substituted quinoline HG-829 as a novel, noncompetitive, and potent P-glycoprotein inhibitor that overcomes in vitro and in vivo drug resistance. We found that nontoxic concentrations of HG-829 restored sensitivity to P-glycoprotein oncolytic substrates. In ABCB1-overexpressing cell lines, HG-829 significantly enhanced cytotoxicity to daunorubicin, paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, and etoposide. Coadministration of HG-829 fully restored in vivo antitumor activity of daunorubicin in mice without added toxicity. Functional assays showed that HG-829 is not a Pgp substrate or competitive inhibitor of Pgp-mediated drug efflux but rather acts as a noncompetitive modulator of P-glycoprotein transport function. Taken together, our findings indicate that HG-829 is a potent, long-acting, and noncompetitive modulator of P-glycoprotein export function that may offer therapeutic promise for multidrug-resistant malignancies. PMID:22761337

  18. Genome-wide analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene family in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaodong; Cheng, Tingcai; Wang, Genhong; Duan, Jun; Niu, Weihuan; Xia, Qingyou

    2012-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily is a larger protein family with diverse physiological functions in all kingdoms of life. We identified 53 ABC transporters in the silkworm genome, and classified them into eight subfamilies (A-H). Comparative genome analysis revealed that the silkworm has an expanded ABCC subfamily with more members than Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, or Homo sapiens. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the ABCE and ABCF genes were highly conserved in the silkworm, indicating possible involvement in fundamental biological processes. Five multidrug resistance-related genes in the ABCB subfamily and two multidrug resistance-associated-related genes in the ABCC subfamily indicated involvement in biochemical defense. Genetic variation analysis revealed four ABC genes that might be evolving under positive selection. Moreover, the silkworm ABCC4 gene might be important for silkworm domestication. Microarray analysis showed that the silkworm ABC genes had distinct expression patterns in different tissues on day 3 of the fifth instar. These results might provide new insights for further functional studies on the ABC genes in the silkworm genome. PMID:22311044

  19. Association of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 Gene Polymorphisms in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus among Malaysians

    PubMed Central

    Haghvirdizadeh, Polin; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Etemad, Ali; Heidari, Farzad; Ghodsian, Nooshin; Bin Ismail, Norzian; Ismail, Patimah

    2015-01-01

    Background. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex polygenic disorder characterized by impaired insulin resistance, insulin secretion, and dysregulation of lipid and protein metabolism with environmental and genetic factors. ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) gene polymorphisms are reported as the one of the genetic risk factors for T2DM in various populations with conflicting results. This study was conducted based on PCR-HRM to determine the frequency of ABCA1 gene by rs2230806 (R219K), rs1800977 (C69T), and rs9282541 (R230C) polymorphisms Malaysian subjects. Methods. A total of 164 T2DM and 165 controls were recruited and their genotypes for ABCA1 gene polymorphisms were determined based on the real time high resolution melting analysis. Results. There was a significant difference between the subjects in terms of age, BMI, FPG, HbA1c, HDL, LDL, and TG (P < 0.05). There was a significant association between HOM of R219K (P = 0.005), among Malaysian subjects; moreover, allele frequency revealed the significant difference in A allele of R219K (P = 0.003). But, there was no significant difference in genotypic and allelic frequencies of C69T and R230C polymorphism. Conclusion. R219K polymorphism of ABCA1 gene can be considered as a genetic risk factor for T2DM subjects among Malaysians. PMID:26451383

  20. Phosphorylation of the TOR ATP binding domain by AGC kinase constitutes a novel mode of TOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hálová, Lenka; Du, Wei; Kirkham, Sara; Smith, Duncan L; Petersen, Janni

    2013-11-25

    TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling coordinates cell growth, metabolism, and cell division through tight control of signaling via two complexes, TORC1 and TORC2. Here, we show that fission yeast TOR kinases and mTOR are phosphorylated on an evolutionarily conserved residue of their ATP-binding domain. The Gad8 kinase (AKT homologue) phosphorylates fission yeast Tor1 at this threonine (T1972) to reduce activity. A T1972A mutation that blocked phosphorylation increased Tor1 activity and stress resistance. Nitrogen starvation of fission yeast inhibited TOR signaling to arrest cell cycle progression in G1 phase and promoted sexual differentiation. Starvation and a Gad8/T1972-dependent decrease in Tor1 (TORC2) activity was essential for efficient cell cycle arrest and differentiation. Experiments in human cell lines recapitulated these yeast observations, as mTOR was phosphorylated on T2173 in an AKT-dependent manner. In addition, a T2173A mutation increased mTOR activity. Thus, TOR kinase activity can be reduced through AGC kinase-controlled phosphorylation to generate physiologically significant changes in TOR signaling. PMID:24247430

  1. Functional Coupling of ATP-binding Cassette Transporter Abcb6 to Cytochrome P450 Expression and Activity in Liver*

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Hemantkumar; Li, Feng; Tessman, Robert; Mickey, Kristen; Dorko, Kenneth; Schmitt, Timothy; Kumer, Sean; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Gaikwad, Nilesh; Krishnamurthy, Partha

    2015-01-01

    Although endogenous mechanisms that negatively regulate cytochrome P450 (P450) monooxygenases in response to physiological and pathophysiological signals are not well understood, they are thought to result from alterations in the level of endogenous metabolites, involved in maintaining homeostasis. Here we show that homeostatic changes in hepatic metabolite profile in Abcb6 (mitochondrial ATP-binding cassette transporter B6) deficiency results in suppression of a specific subset of hepatic P450 activity. Abcb6 null mice are more susceptible to pentobarbital-induced sleep and zoxazolamine-induced paralysis, secondary to decreased expression and activity of Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10. The knock-out mice also show decrease in both basal and xeno-inducible expression and activity of a subset of hepatic P450s that appear to be related to changes in hepatic metabolite profile. These data, together with the observation that liver extracts from Abcb6-deficient mice suppress P450 expression in human primary hepatocytes, suggest that this mouse model may provide an opportunity to understand the physiological signals and the mechanisms involved in negative regulation of P450s. PMID:25623066

  2. The ATP-binding cassette transporter OsABCG15 is required for anther development and pollen fertility in rice.

    PubMed

    Niu, Bai-Xiao; He, Fu-Rong; He, Ming; Ren, Ding; Chen, Le-Tian; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2013-08-01

    Plant male reproductive development is a complex biological process, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here, we characterized a rice (Oryza sativa L.) male sterile mutant. Based on map-based cloning and sequence analysis, we identified a 1,459-bp deletion in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene, OsABCG15, causing abnormal anthers and male sterility. Therefore, we named this mutant osabcg15. Expression analysis showed that OsABCG15 is expressed specifically in developmental anthers from stage 8 (meiosis II stage) to stage 10 (late microspore stage). Two genes CYP704B2 and WDA1, involved in the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids for the establishment of the anther cuticle and pollen exine, were downregulated in osabcg15 mutant, suggesting that OsABCG15 may play a key function in the processes related to sporopollenin biosynthesis or sporopollenin transfer from tapetal cells to anther locules. Consistently, histological analysis showed that osabcg15 mutants developed obvious abnormality in postmeiotic tapetum degeneration, leading to rapid degredation of young microspores. The results suggest that OsABCG15 plays a critical role in exine formation and pollen development, similar to the homologous gene of AtABCG26 in Arabidopsis. This work is helpful to understand the regulatory network in rice anther development. PMID:23570336

  3. ABCC1, an ATP Binding Cassette Protein from Grape Berry, Transports Anthocyanidin 3-O-Glucosides[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Rita Maria; Regalado, Ana; Ageorges, Agnès; Burla, Bo J.; Bassin, Barbara; Eisenach, Cornelia; Zarrouk, Olfa; Vialet, Sandrine; Marlin, Thérèse; Chaves, Maria Manuela; Martinoia, Enrico; Nagy, Réka

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of anthocyanins in the exocarp of red grapevine (Vitis vinifera) cultivars is one of several events that characterize the onset of grape berry ripening (véraison). Despite our thorough understanding of anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulation, little is known about the molecular aspects of their transport. The participation of ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins in vacuolar anthocyanin transport has long been a matter of debate. Here, we present biochemical evidence that an ABC protein, ABCC1, localizes to the tonoplast and is involved in the transport of glucosylated anthocyanidins. ABCC1 is expressed in the exocarp throughout berry development and ripening, with a significant increase at véraison (i.e., the onset of ripening). Transport experiments using microsomes isolated from ABCC1-expressing yeast cells showed that ABCC1 transports malvidin 3-O-glucoside. The transport strictly depends on the presence of GSH, which is cotransported with the anthocyanins and is sensitive to inhibitors of ABC proteins. By exposing anthocyanin-producing grapevine root cultures to buthionine sulphoximine, which reduced GSH levels, a decrease in anthocyanin concentration is observed. In conclusion, we provide evidence that ABCC1 acts as an anthocyanin transporter that depends on GSH without the formation of an anthocyanin-GSH conjugate. PMID:23723325

  4. Inventory and general analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene superfamily in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Pang, Kaiyuan; Li, Yanjiao; Liu, Menghan; Meng, Zhaodong; Yu, Yanli

    2013-09-10

    The metabolic functions of ATP-binding cassette (or ABC) proteins, one of the largest families of proteins presented in all organisms, have been investigated in many protozoan, animal and plant species. To facilitate more systematic and complicated studies on maize ABC proteins in the future, we present the first complete inventory of these proteins, including 130 open reading frames (ORFs), and provide general descriptions of their classifications, basic structures, typical functions, evolution track analysis and expression profiles. The 130 ORFs were assigned to eight subfamilies based on their structures and homological features. Five of these subfamilies consist of 109 proteins, containing transmembrane domains (TM) performing as transporters. The rest three subfamilies contain 21 soluble proteins involved in various functions other than molecular transport. A comparison of ABC proteins among nine selected species revealed either convergence or divergence in each of the ABC subfamilies. Generally, plant genomes contain far more ABC genes than animal genomes. The expression profiles and evolution track of each maize ABC gene were further investigated, the results of which could provide clues for analyzing their functions. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction experiments (PCR) were conducted to detect induced expression in select ABC genes under several common stresses. This investigation provides valuable information for future research on stress tolerance in plants and potential strategies for enhancing maize production under stressful conditions. PMID:23747399

  5. Citrulline increases cholesterol efflux from macrophages in vitro and ex vivo via ATP-binding cassette transporters

    PubMed Central

    Uto-Kondo, Harumi; Ayaori, Makoto; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Takiguchi, Shunichi; Yakushiji, Emi; Ogura, Masatsune; Terao, Yoshio; Ozasa, Hideki; Sasaki, Makoto; Komatsu, Tomohiro; Sotherden, Grace Megumi; Hosoai, Tamaki; Sakurada, Masami; Ikewaki, Katsunori

    2014-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is a mechanism critical to the anti-atherogenic property of HDL. Although citrulline contributes to the amelioration of atherosclerosis via endothelial nitric oxide production, it remains unclear whether it affects RCT. This study was undertaken to clarify the effects of citrulline on expressions of specific transporters such as ATP binding cassette transporters (ABC)A1 and ABCG1, and the cholesterol efflux from macrophages to apolipoprotein (apo) A-I or HDL in vitro and ex vivo. Citrulline increased ABCA1 and ABCG1 mRNA and protein levels in THP-1 macrophages, translating into enhanced apoA-I- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux. In the human crossover study, 8 healthy male volunteers (age 30–49 years) consumed either 3.2 g/day citrulline or placebo for 1 week. Citrulline consumption brought about significant increases in plasma levels of citrulline and arginine. Supporting the in vitro data, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) differentiated under autologous post-citrulline sera demonstrated enhancement of both apoA-I- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux through increased ABCA1 and ABCG1 expressions, compared to MDM differentiated under pre-citrulline sera. However, the placebo did not modulate these parameters. Therefore, in addition to improving endothelium function, citrulline might have an anti-atherogenic property by increasing RCT of HDL. PMID:25120277

  6. Identification of mutations in regions corresponding to the two putative nucleotide (ATP)-binding folds of the cystic fibrosis gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kerem, B.; Zielenski, J.; Markiewicz, D.; Bozon, D.; Kennedy, D.; Rommens, J.M. ); Gazit, E. ); Yahav, J. ); Riordan, J.R. ); Collins, F.S. ); Tsui, Lapchee Univ. of Toronto, Ontario )

    1990-11-01

    Additional mutations in the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene were identified in the regions corresponding to the two putative nucleotide (ATP)-binding folds (NBFs) of the predicted polypeptide. The patient cohort included 46 Canadian CF families with well-characterized DNA marker haplotypes spanning the disease locus and several other families from Israel. Eleven mutations were found in the first NBF, 2 were found in the second NBF, but none was found in the R-domain. Seven of the mutations were of the missense type affecting some of the highly conserved amino acid residues in the first NBF; 3 were nonsense mutations; 2 would probably affect mRNA splicing; 2 corresponded to small deletions, including another 3-base-pair deletion different from the major mutation ({delta}F508), which could account for 70% of the CF chromosomes in the population. Nine of these mutations accounted for 12 of the 31 non-{delta}F508 CF chromosomes in the Canadian families. The highly heterogeneous nature of the remaining CF mutations provides important insights into the structure and function of the protein, but it also suggests that DNA-based genetic screening for CF carrier status will not be straightforward.

  7. Afatinib reverses multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer via dually inhibiting ATP binding cassette subfamily B member 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng-qi; Liu, Shi-ting; Zhao, Bo-xin; Yang, Fu-heng; Wang, Ya-tian; Liang, Qian-ying; Sun, Ya-bin; Liu, Yuan; Song, Zhi-hua; Cai, Yun; Li, Guo-feng

    2015-01-01

    ABCB1-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. Herein, afatinib at nontoxic concentrations significantly reversed ABCB1-mediated MDR in ovarian cancer cells in vitro (p < 0.05). Combining paclitaxel and afatinib caused tumor regressions and tumor necrosis in A2780T xenografts in vivo. More interestingly, unlike reversible TKIs, afatinib had a distinctive dual-mode action. Afatinib not only inhibited the efflux function of ABCB1, but also attenuated its expression transcriptionally via down-regulation of PI3K/AKT and MAPK/p38-dependent activation of NF-κB. Furthermore, apart from a substrate binding domain, afatinib could also bind to an ATP binding domain of ABCB1 through forming hydrogen bonds with Gly533, Gly534, Lys536 and Ala560 sites. Importantly, mutations in these four binding sites of ABCB1 and the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR were not correlated with the reversal activity of afatinib on MDR. Given that afatinib is a clinically approved drug, our results suggest combining afatinib with chemotherapeutic drugs in ovarian cancer. This study can facilitate the rediscovery of superior MDR reversal agents from molecular targeted drugs to provide a more effective and safer way of resensitizing MDR. PMID:26317651

  8. Heavy metal tolerance in the fission yeast requires an ATP-binding cassette-type vacuolar membrane transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, D F; Kreppel, L; Speiser, D M; Scheel, G; McDonald, G; Ow, D W

    1992-01-01

    In response to heavy metal stress, plants and certain fungi, such as the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, synthesize small metal-binding peptides known as phytochelatins. We have identified a cadmium sensitive S. pombe mutant deficient in the accumulation of a sulfide-containing phytochelatin-cadmium complex, and have isolated the gene, designated hmt1, that complements this mutant. The deduced protein sequence of the hmt1 gene product shares sequence identity with the family of ABC (ATP-binding cassette)-type transport proteins which includes the mammalian P-glycoproteins and CFTR, suggesting that the encoded product is an integral membrane protein. Analysis of fractionated fission yeast cell components indicates that the HMT1 polypeptide is associated with the vacuolar membrane. Additionally, fission yeast strains harboring an hmt1-expressing multicopy plasmid exhibit enhanced metal tolerance along with a higher intracellular level of cadmium, implying a relationship between HMT1 mediated transport and compartmentalization of heavy metals. This suggests that tissue-specific overproduction of a functional hmt1 product in transgenic plants might be a means to alter the tissue localization of these elements, such as for sequestering heavy metals away from consumable parts of crop plants. Images PMID:1396551

  9. Identification of mutations in regions corresponding to the two putative nucleotide (ATP)-binding folds of the cystic fibrosis gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kerem, B S; Zielenski, J; Markiewicz, D; Bozon, D; Gazit, E; Yahav, J; Kennedy, D; Riordan, J R; Collins, F S; Rommens, J M

    1990-01-01

    Additional mutations in the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene were identified in the regions corresponding to the two putative nucleotide (ATP)-binding folds (NBFs) of the predicted polypeptide. The patient cohort included 46 Canadian CF families with well-characterized DNA marker haplotypes spanning the disease locus and several other families from Israel. Eleven mutations were found in the first NBF, 2 were found in the second NBF, but none was found in the R-domain. Seven of the mutations were of the missense type affecting some of the highly conserved amino acid residues in the first NBF; 3 were nonsense mutations; 2 would probably affect mRNA splicing; 2 corresponded to small deletions, including another 3-base-pair deletion different from the major mutation (delta F508), which could account for 70% of the CF chromosomes in the population. Nine of these mutations accounted for 12 of the 31 non-delta F508 CF chromosomes in the Canadian families. The highly heterogeneous nature of the remaining CF mutations provides important insights into the structure and function of the protein, but it also suggests that DNA-based genetic screening for CF carrier status will not be straightforward. Images PMID:2236053

  10. ATP-binding Cassette Subfamily C Member 5 (ABCC5) Functions as an Efflux Transporter of Glutamate Conjugates and Analogs.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Robert S; Mahakena, Sunny; de Haas, Marcel; Borst, Piet; van de Wetering, Koen

    2015-12-18

    The ubiquitous efflux transporter ABCC5 (ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 5) is present at high levels in the blood-brain barrier, neurons, and glia, but its in vivo substrates and function are not known. Using untargeted metabolomic screens, we show that Abcc5(-/-) mice accumulate endogenous glutamate conjugates in several tissues, but brain in particular. The abundant neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate was 2.4-fold higher in Abcc5(-/-) brain. The metabolites that accumulated in Abcc5(-/-) tissues were depleted in cultured cells that overexpressed human ABCC5. In a vesicular membrane transport assay, ABCC5 also transported exogenous glutamate analogs, like the classic excitotoxic neurotoxins kainic acid, domoic acid, and NMDA; the therapeutic glutamate analog ZJ43; and, as previously shown, the anti-cancer drug methotrexate. Glutamate conjugates and analogs are of physiological relevance because they can affect the function of glutamate, the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. After CO2 asphyxiation, several immediate early genes were expressed at lower levels in Abcc5(-/-) brains than in wild type brains, suggesting altered glutamate signaling. Our results show that ABCC5 is a general glutamate conjugate and analog transporter that affects the disposition of endogenous metabolites, toxins, and drugs. PMID:26515061

  11. Gestational and pregnane X receptor-mediated regulation of placental ATP-binding cassette drug transporters in mice.

    PubMed

    Gahir, Sarabjit S; Piquette-Miller, Micheline

    2011-03-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters in the placenta are involved in controlling the exchange of endogenous and exogenous moieties. Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the hepatic expression of several key ABC transporters, but it is unclear whether PXR is involved in the regulation of these transporters in the placenta. This study explores the role of PXR in the regulation of placental drug transporters. The placental mRNA expression of Mdr1a, Bcrp, and Mrp1, 2, and 3 was examined in PXR knockout (-/-), heterozygote (+/-), and wild-type (+/+) mice by quantitative PCR. The impact of PXR activation was examined in pregnant pregnane-16α-carbonitrile (PCN)-treated mice. Compared with that in controls, the basal expression of Mdr1a, Bcrp, Mrp1, and Mrp2 was significantly higher in (+/-) and (-/-) mice. Alterations in the expression of mdr1a, bcrp, and mrp1, 2, and 3 between gestational day (GD) 10 and GD 17 was dissimilar between (+/+) and (-/-) mice. Although PCN treatment induced maternal and fetal hepatic expression of Cyp3a11; placental expression of transporters were not significantly changed. Overall, our results suggest a repressive role of PXR in the basal expression of several placental transporters and a tissue-specific induction of these target genes after PXR activation. PMID:21127142

  12. Marine medaka ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily and new insight into teleost Abch nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Kim, Bo-Mi; Kang, Hye-Min; Choi, Ik-Young; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The ABC gene family is recognized as one of the largest gene families in all kingdoms of life. Although many genes involved in the ABC superfamily have been annotated from several fish species, information on large sets of the ABC superfamily and their evolutionary characterization are still unclear. In the marine medaka Oryzias melastigma, 50 ABC transporters were identified with bioinformatics-aided in silico analyses, and their full-length cDNA sequences were characterized. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they could be classified into the eight subfamilies (A–H) that include all members of all ABC subfamilies. Interestingly, several teleosts’ Abcg members were closely clustered with Abch members in a distinctive clade. The abch gene was also observed in the coelacanth and the spotted gar, suggesting that this gene was retained from a bilaterian ancestor and that a gene loss event recently occurred in the tetrapod lineage. In teleosts, the nomenclature of previously annotated abcg genes should be considered carefully, as they form a distinctive clade with the marine medaka abch subfamily and other teleost abch genes, but not with the members of the Abcg subfamily. PMID:26472499

  13. Multidrug efflux pumps: the structures of prokaryotic ATP-binding cassette transporter efflux pumps and implications for our understanding of eukaryotic P-glycoproteins and homologues.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Ian D; Jones, Peter M; George, Anthony M

    2010-02-01

    One of the Holy Grails of ATP-binding cassette transporter research is a structural understanding of drug binding and transport in a eukaryotic multidrug resistance pump. These transporters are front-line mediators of drug resistance in cancers and represent an important therapeutic target in future chemotherapy. Although there has been intensive biochemical research into the human multidrug pumps, their 3D structure at atomic resolution remains unknown. The recent determination of the structure of a mouse P-glycoprotein at subatomic resolution is complemented by structures for a number of prokaryotic homologues. These structures have provided advances into our knowledge of the ATP-binding cassette exporter structure and mechanism, and have provided the template data for a number of homology modelling studies designed to reconcile biochemical data on these clinically important proteins. PMID:19961540

  14. Biophysical changes of ATP binding pocket may explain loss of kinase activity in mutant DAPK3 in cancer: A molecular dynamic simulation analysis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Tarun; Annamalai, Nithyanan; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Arsad, Hasni

    2016-04-10

    DAPK3 belongs to family of DAPK (death-associated protein kinases) and is involved in the regulation of progression of the cell cycle, cell proliferation, apoptosis and autophagy. It is considered as a tumor suppressor kinase, suggesting the loss of its function in case of certain specific mutations. The T112M, D161N and P216S mutations in DAPK3 have been observed in cancer patients. These DAPK3 mutants have been associated with very low kinase activity, which results in the cellular progression towards cancer. However, a clear understanding of the structural and biophysical variations that occur in DAPK3 with these mutations, resulting in the decreased kinase activity has yet not been deciphered. We performed a molecular dynamic simulation study to investigate such structural variations. Our results revealed that mutations caused a significant structural variation in DAPK3, majorly concentrated in the flexible loops that form part of the ATP binding pocket. Interestingly, D161N and P216S mutations collapsed the ATP binding pocket through flexible loops invasion, hindering ATP binding which resulted in very low kinase activity. On the contrary, T112M mutant DAPK3 reduces ATP binding potential through outward distortion of flexible loops. In addition, the mutant lacked characteristic features of the active protein kinase including proper interaction between HR/FD and DFG motifs, well structured hydrophobic spine and Lys42-Glu64 salt bridge interaction. These observations could possibly explain the underlying mechanism associated with the loss of kinase activity with T112M, D161N and P216S mutation in DAPK3. PMID:26748242

  15. Optimization of the degenerated interfacial ATP binding site improves the function of disease-related mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Jih, Kang-Yang; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2010-11-26

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, an ATP binding cassette (ABC) protein whose defects cause the deadly genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF), encompasses two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies indicate that in the presence of ATP, the two NBDs coalesce into a dimer, trapping an ATP molecule in each of the two interfacial composite ATP binding sites (site 1 and site 2). Experimental evidence also suggests that CFTR gating is mainly controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis in site 2, whereas site 1, which harbors several non-canonical substitutions in ATP-interacting motifs, is considered degenerated. The CF-associated mutation G551D, by introducing a bulky and negatively charged side chain into site 2, completely abolishes ATP-induced openings of CFTR. Here, we report a strategy to optimize site 1 for ATP binding by converting two amino acid residues to ABC consensus (i.e. H1348G) or more commonly seen residues in other ABC proteins (i.e. W401Y,W401F). Introducing either one or both of these mutations into G551D-CFTR confers ATP responsiveness for this disease-associated mutant channel. We further showed that the same maneuver also improved the function of WT-CFTR and the most common CF-associated ΔF508 channels, both of which rely on site 2 for gating control. Thus, our results demonstrated that the degenerated site 1 can be rebuilt to complement or support site 2 for CFTR function. Possible approaches for developing CFTR potentiators targeting site 1 will be discussed. PMID:20861014

  16. Optimization of the Degenerated Interfacial ATP Binding Site Improves the Function of Disease-related Mutant Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Channels*♦

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Jih, Kang-Yang; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2010-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, an ATP binding cassette (ABC) protein whose defects cause the deadly genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF), encompasses two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies indicate that in the presence of ATP, the two NBDs coalesce into a dimer, trapping an ATP molecule in each of the two interfacial composite ATP binding sites (site 1 and site 2). Experimental evidence also suggests that CFTR gating is mainly controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis in site 2, whereas site 1, which harbors several non-canonical substitutions in ATP-interacting motifs, is considered degenerated. The CF-associated mutation G551D, by introducing a bulky and negatively charged side chain into site 2, completely abolishes ATP-induced openings of CFTR. Here, we report a strategy to optimize site 1 for ATP binding by converting two amino acid residues to ABC consensus (i.e. H1348G) or more commonly seen residues in other ABC proteins (i.e. W401Y,W401F). Introducing either one or both of these mutations into G551D-CFTR confers ATP responsiveness for this disease-associated mutant channel. We further showed that the same maneuver also improved the function of WT-CFTR and the most common CF-associated ΔF508 channels, both of which rely on site 2 for gating control. Thus, our results demonstrated that the degenerated site 1 can be rebuilt to complement or support site 2 for CFTR function. Possible approaches for developing CFTR potentiators targeting site 1 will be discussed. PMID:20861014

  17. ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporters of the Human Respiratory Tract Pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis: Role in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy F; Brauer, Aimee L.; Johnson, Antoinette; Kirkham, Charmaine

    2016-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory tract pathogen that causes otitis media (middle ear infections) in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In view of the huge global burden of disease caused by M. catarrhalis, the development of vaccines to prevent these infections and better approaches to treatment have become priorities. In previous work, we used a genome mining approach that identified three substrate binding proteins (SBPs) of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as promising candidate vaccine antigens. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive assessment of 19 SBPs of 15 ABC transporter systems in the M. catarrhalis genome by engineering knockout mutants and studying their role in assays that assess mechanisms of infection. The capacity of M. catarrhalis to survive and grow in the nutrient-limited and hostile environment of the human respiratory tract, including intracellular growth, account in part for its virulence. The results show that ABC transporters that mediate uptake of peptides, amino acids, cations and anions play important roles in pathogenesis by enabling M. catarrhalis to 1) grow in nutrient-limited conditions, 2) invade and survive in human respiratory epithelial cells and 3) persist in the lungs in a murine pulmonary clearance model. The knockout mutants of SBPs and ABC transporters showed different patterns of activity in the assay systems, supporting the conclusion that different SBPs and ABC transporters function at different stages in the pathogenesis of infection. These results indicate that ABC transporters are nutritional virulence factors, functioning to enable the survival of M catarrhalis in the diverse microenvironments of the respiratory tract. Based on the role of ABC transporters as virulence factors of M. catarrhalis, these molecules represent potential drug targets to eradicate the organism from the human respiratory tract. PMID:27391026

  18. ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporters of the Human Respiratory Tract Pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis: Role in Virulence.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F; Brauer, Aimee L; Johnson, Antoinette; Kirkham, Charmaine

    2016-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory tract pathogen that causes otitis media (middle ear infections) in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In view of the huge global burden of disease caused by M. catarrhalis, the development of vaccines to prevent these infections and better approaches to treatment have become priorities. In previous work, we used a genome mining approach that identified three substrate binding proteins (SBPs) of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as promising candidate vaccine antigens. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive assessment of 19 SBPs of 15 ABC transporter systems in the M. catarrhalis genome by engineering knockout mutants and studying their role in assays that assess mechanisms of infection. The capacity of M. catarrhalis to survive and grow in the nutrient-limited and hostile environment of the human respiratory tract, including intracellular growth, account in part for its virulence. The results show that ABC transporters that mediate uptake of peptides, amino acids, cations and anions play important roles in pathogenesis by enabling M. catarrhalis to 1) grow in nutrient-limited conditions, 2) invade and survive in human respiratory epithelial cells and 3) persist in the lungs in a murine pulmonary clearance model. The knockout mutants of SBPs and ABC transporters showed different patterns of activity in the assay systems, supporting the conclusion that different SBPs and ABC transporters function at different stages in the pathogenesis of infection. These results indicate that ABC transporters are nutritional virulence factors, functioning to enable the survival of M catarrhalis in the diverse microenvironments of the respiratory tract. Based on the role of ABC transporters as virulence factors of M. catarrhalis, these molecules represent potential drug targets to eradicate the organism from the human respiratory tract. PMID:27391026

  19. ATP-Binding Membrane Cassette Transporter A1 (ABCA1): A Possible Link between Inflammation and Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kai; Liao, Duan-fang; Tang, Chao-ke

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by a chronic inflammatory condition that involves numerous cellular and molecular inflammatory components. A wide array of inflammatory mediators, such as cytokines and proteins produced by macrophages and other cells, play a critical role in the development and progression of the disease. ATP-binding membrane cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is crucial for cellular cholesterol efflux and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and is also identified as an important target in antiatherosclerosis treatment. Evidence from several recent studies indicates that inflammation, along with other atherogenic-related mediators, plays distinct regulating roles in ABCA1 expression. Proatherogenic cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-1β have been shown to inhibit the expression of ABCA1, while antiatherogenic cytokines, including IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, have been shown to promote the expression of ABCA1. Moreover, some cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α seem to regulate ABCA1 expression in species-specific and dose-dependent manners. Inflammatory proteins such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 are likely to inhibit ABCA1 expression during inflammation, and inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was also found to block the expression of ABCA1. Interestingly, recent experiments revealed ABCA1 can function as an antiinflammatory receptor to suppress the expression of inflammatory factors, suggesting that ABCA1 may be the molecular basis for the interaction between inflammation and RCT. This review aims to summarize recent findings on the role of inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory proteins, inflammatory lipids, and the endotoxin-mediated inflammatory process in expression of ABCA1. Also covered is the current understanding of the function of ABCA1 in modulating the immune response and inflammation through its direct and indirect antiinflammatory mechanisms

  20. Role of the glycine triad in the ATP-binding site of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Hemmer, W; McGlone, M; Tsigelny, I; Taylor, S S

    1997-07-01

    A glycine-rich loop in the ATP-binding site is one of the most highly conserved sequence motifs in protein kinases. Each conserved glycine (Gly-50, Gly-52, and Gly-55) in the catalytic (C) subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAPK) was replaced with Ser and/or Ala. Active mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified to apparent homogeneity, separated into phosphoisoforms, and characterized. Replacing Gly-55 had minimal effects on steady-state kinetic parameters, whereas replacement of either Gly-50 or Gly-52 had major effects on both Km and kcat values consistent with the prediction of the importance of the tip of the glycine-rich loop for catalysis. Substitution of Gly-50 caused a 5-8-fold reduction in Km (ATP), an 8-12-fold increase in Km (peptide), and a 3-5-fold drop in kcat. The Km (ATP) and Km (peptide) values of C(G52S) were increased 8- and 18-fold, respectively, and the kcat was decreased 6-fold. In contrast to catalytic efficiency, the ATPase rates of C(G50S) and C(G52S) were increased by more than an order of magnitude. The thermostability of each mutant was slightly increased. Unphosphorylated C(G52S) was characterized as well as several isoforms phosphorylated at a single site, Ser-338. All of these phosphorylation-defective mutants displayed a substantial decrease in both enzymatic activity and thermal stability that correlated with the missing phosphate at Thr-197. These results are correlated with the crystal structure, models of the respective mutant proteins, and conservation of the Glys within the protein kinase family. PMID:9202006

  1. ATP-binding cassette transporter G26 is required for male fertility and pollen exine formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Quilichini, Teagen D; Friedmann, Michael C; Samuels, A Lacey; Douglas, Carl J

    2010-10-01

    The highly resistant biopolymer, sporopollenin, gives the outer wall (exine) of spores and pollen grains their unparalleled strength, shielding these structures from terrestrial stresses. Despite a limited understanding of the composition of sporopollenin, it appears that the synthesis of sporopollenin occurs in the tapetum and requires the transport of one or more sporopollenin constituents to the surface of developing microspores. Here, we describe ABCG26, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily, which is required for pollen exine formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). abcg26 mutants are severely reduced in fertility, with most siliques failing to produce seeds by self-fertilization and mature anthers failing to release pollen. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed an absence of an exine wall on abcg26-1 mutant microspores. Phenotypic abnormalities in pollen wall formation were first apparent in early uninucleate microspores as a lack of exine formation and sporopollenin deposition. Additionally, the highest levels of ABCG26 mRNA were in the tapetum, during early pollen wall formation, sporopollenin biosynthesis, and sporopollenin deposition. Accumulations resembling the trilamellar lipidic coils in the abcg11 and abcg12 mutants defective in cuticular wax export were observed in the anther locules of abcg26 mutants. A yellow fluorescent protein-ABCG26 protein was localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane. Our results show that ABCG26 plays a critical role in exine formation and pollen development and are consistent with a model by which ABCG26 transports sporopollenin precursors across the tapetum plasma membrane into the locule for polymerization on developing microspore walls. PMID:20732973

  2. The COMATOSE ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Is Required for Full Fertility in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Footitt, Steven; Dietrich, Daniela; Fait, Aaron; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Holdsworth, Michael J.; Baker, Alison; Theodoulou, Frederica L.

    2007-01-01

    COMATOSE (CTS) encodes a peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporter required not only for β-oxidation of storage lipids during germination and establishment, but also for biosynthesis of jasmonic acid and conversion of indole butyric acid to indole acetic acid. cts mutants exhibited reduced fertilization, which was rescued by genetic complementation, but not by exogenous application of jasmonic acid or indole acetic acid. Reduced fertilization was also observed in thiolase (kat2-1) and peroxisomal acyl-Coenzyme A synthetase mutants (lacs6-1,lacs7-1), indicating a general role for β-oxidation in fertility. Genetic analysis revealed reduced male transmission of cts alleles and both cts pollen germination and tube growth in vitro were impaired in the absence of an exogenous carbon source. Aniline blue staining of pollinated pistils demonstrated that pollen tube growth was affected only when both parents bore the cts mutation, indicating that expression of CTS in either male or female tissues was sufficient to support pollen tube growth in vivo. Accordingly, abundant peroxisomes were detected in a range of maternal tissues. Although γ-aminobutyric acid levels were reduced in flowers of cts mutants, they were unchanged in kat2-1, suggesting that alterations in γ-aminobutyric acid catabolism do not contribute to the reduced fertility phenotype through altered pollen tube targeting. Taken together, our data support an important role for β-oxidation in fertility in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and suggest that this pathway could play a role in the mobilization of lipids in both pollen and female tissues. PMID:17468211

  3. HIV-1 Protein Nef Inhibits Activity of ATP-binding Cassette Transporter A1 by Targeting Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Calnexin*

    PubMed Central

    Jennelle, Lucas; Hunegnaw, Ruth; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Fitzgerald, Michael L.; Sviridov, Dmitri; Popratiloff, Anastas; Brichacek, Beda; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    HIV-infected patients are at increased risk of developing atherosclerosis, in part due to an altered high density lipoprotein profile exacerbated by down-modulation and impairment of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) activity by the HIV-1 protein Nef. However, the mechanisms of this Nef effect remain unknown. Here, we show that Nef interacts with an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone calnexin, which regulates folding and maturation of glycosylated proteins. Nef disrupted interaction between calnexin and ABCA1 but increased affinity and enhanced interaction of calnexin with HIV-1 gp160. The Nef mutant that did not bind to calnexin did not affect the calnexin-ABCA1 interaction. Interaction with calnexin was essential for functionality of ABCA1, as knockdown of calnexin blocked the ABCA1 exit from the endoplasmic reticulum, reduced ABCA1 abundance, and inhibited cholesterol efflux; the same effects were observed after Nef overexpression. However, the effects of calnexin knockdown and Nef on cholesterol efflux were not additive; in fact, the combined effect of these two factors together did not differ significantly from the effect of calnexin knockdown alone. Interestingly, gp160 and ABCA1 interacted with calnexin differently; although gp160 binding to calnexin was dependent on glycosylation, glycosylation was of little importance for the interaction between ABCA1 and calnexin. Thus, Nef regulates the activity of calnexin to stimulate its interaction with gp160 at the expense of ABCA1. This study identifies a mechanism for Nef-dependent inactivation of ABCA1 and dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25170080

  4. Astaxanthin enhances ATP-binding cassette transporter A1/G1 expressions and cholesterol efflux from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Maki; Ayaori, Makoto; Uto-Kondo, Harumi; Yakushiji, Emi; Takiguchi, Shunichi; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Hisada, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Makoto; Komatsu, Tomohiro; Yogo, Makiko; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Kondo, Kazuo; Ikewaki, Katsunori

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC) A1 and G1 are key molecules in cholesterol efflux from macrophages, which is an initial step of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), a major anti-atherogenic property of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Astaxanthin is one of the naturally occurring carotenoids responsible for the pink-red pigmentation in a variety of living organisms. Although astaxanthin is known to be a strong antioxidant, it remains unclear through what mechanism of action it affects cholesterol homeostasis in macrophages. We therefore investigated the effects of astaxanthin on cholesterol efflux and ABCA1/G1 expressions in macrophages. Astaxanthin enhanced both apolipoprotein (apo) A-I- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from RAW264.7 cells. In supporting these enhanced cholesterol efflux mechanisms, astaxanthin promoted ABCA1/G1 expression in various macrophages. In contrast, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, liver X receptor (LXR) α and LXRβ levels remained unchanged by astaxanthin. An experiment using actinomycin D demonstrated that astaxanthin transcriptionally induced ABCA1/G1 expression, and oxysterol depletion caused by overexpression of cholesterol sulfotransferase further revealed that these inductions in ABCA1/G1 were independent of LXR-mediated pathways. Finally, we performed luciferase assays using human ABCA1/G1 promoter-reporter constructs to reveal that astaxanthin activated both promoters irrespective of the presence or absence of LXR-responsive elements, indicating LXR-independence of these activations. In conclusion, astaxanthin increased ABCA1/G1 expression, thereby enhancing apoA-I/HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from the macrophages in an LXR-independent manner. In addition to the anti-oxidative properties, the potential cardioprotective properties of astaxanthin might therefore be associated with an enhanced anti-atherogenic function of HDL. PMID:22790567

  5. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of an ATP-binding cassette transporter OtrC from Streptomyces rimosus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The otrC gene of Streptomyces rimosus was previously annotated as an oxytetracycline (OTC) resistance protein. However, the amino acid sequence analysis of OtrC shows that it is a putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter with multidrug resistance function. To our knowledge, none of the ABC transporters in S. rimosus have yet been characterized. In this study, we aimed to characterize the multidrug exporter function of OtrC and evaluate its relevancy to OTC production. Results In order to investigate OtrC’s function, otrC is cloned and expressed in E. coli The exporter function of OtrC was identified by ATPase activity determination and ethidium bromide efflux assays. Also, the susceptibilities of OtrC-overexpressing cells to several structurally unrelated drugs were compared with those of OtrC-non-expressing cells by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays, indicating that OtrC functions as a drug exporter with a broad range of drug specificities. The OTC production was enhanced by 1.6-fold in M4018 (P = 0.000877) and 1.4-fold in SR16 (P = 0.00973) duplication mutants, while it decreased to 80% in disruption mutants (P = 0.0182 and 0.0124 in M4018 and SR16, respectively). Conclusions The results suggest that OtrC is an ABC transporter with multidrug resistance function, and plays an important role in self-protection by drug efflux mechanisms. This is the first report of such a protein in S. rimosus, and otrC could be a valuable target for genetic manipulation to improve the production of industrial antibiotics. PMID:22906146

  6. Ablation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter, Abca2 modifies response to estrogen-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Mack, Jody T; Brown, Carol B; Garrett, Tracy E; Uys, Joachim D; Townsend, Danyelle M; Tew, Kenneth D

    2012-09-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter 2 (ABCA2) is an endolysosomal protein expressed in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells, prostate, ovary and macrophages. In cell cultures, ABCA2 over-expression has been linked with resistance to the anticancer agent, estramustine phosphate (EMP; a nor-nitrogen mustard conjugate of estradiol). The present study shows that Abca2 knockout (KO) mice have greater sensitivity to a variety of side effects induced by EMP treatment. Chronic EMP (12×100 mg/kg body weight) produced mortality in 36% of KO mice, but only 7% of age-matched wild type (WT). Side effects of the drug were also more prevalent in the KO mouse. For example, during the first week of EMP treatments, 67% of KO males (compared to 6% of WT males) responded with episodic erectile events. In WT mice, ABCA2 protein localized within pene corpuscles, (which rely on modified Schwann cells for amplification of tactile signals) suggesting that the transporter may function in the erectile process. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS; a source of nitric oxide during erectile response) levels were similar in WT and KO male penile tissue. Treatment with 100 mg/kg EMP (once daily for four days) elevated serum estradiol and estrone in both WT and KO. However, the circulating levels of these estrogens were higher in KO mice implying a reduced plasma clearance of estrogens as a consequence of ABCA2 ablation. Consistent with the pro-convulsant effects of estrogens, KO mice also displayed an increased incidence of seizures following EMP (14% vs. 0%). Taken together, these data indicate that ABCA2 deficiency renders mice more sensitive to EMP treatment-induced effects implying that the transporter has a role in regulating EMP transport and/or metabolism. PMID:22898081

  7. Ablation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter, Abca2 modifies response to estrogen-based therapies

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Jody T.; Brown, Carol B.; Garrett, Tracy E.; Uys, Joachim D.; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Tew, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter 2 (ABCA2) is an endolysosomal protein expressed in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells, prostate, ovary and macrophages. In cell cultures, ABCA2 over-expression has been linked with resistance to the anticancer agent, estramustine phosphate (EMP; a nor-nitrogen mustard conjugate of estradiol). The present study shows that Abca2 knockout (KO) mice have greater sensitivity to a variety of side effects induced by EMP treatment. Chronic EMP (12 × 100 mg/kg body weight) produced mortality in 36% of KO mice, but only 7% of age-matched wild type (WT). Side effects of the drug were also more prevalent in the KO mouse. For example, during the first week of EMP treatments, 67% of KO males (compared to 6% of WT males) responded with episodic erectile events. In WT mice, ABCA2 protein localized within pene corpuscles, (which rely on modified Schwann cells for amplification of tactile signals) suggesting that the transporter may function in the erectile process. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS; a source of nitric oxide during erectile response) levels were similar in WT and KO male penile tissue. Treatment with 100 mg/kg EMP (once daily for four days) elevated serum estradiol and estrone in both WT and KO. However, the circulating levels of these estrogens were higher in KO mice implying a reduced plasma clearance of estrogens as a consequence of ABCA2 ablation. Consistent with the pro-convulsant effects of estrogens, KO mice also displayed an increased incidence of seizures following EMP (14% vs. 0%). Taken together, these data indicate that ABCA2 deficiency renders mice more sensitive to EMP treatment-induced effects implying that the transporter has a role in regulating EMP transport and/or metabolism. PMID:22898081

  8. Osimertinib (AZD9291) Attenuates the Function of Multidrug Resistance-Linked ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter ABCB1 in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sung-Han; Lu, Yu-Jen; Li, Yan-Qing; Huang, Yang-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Wu, Chung-Pu

    2016-06-01

    The effectiveness of cancer chemotherapy is often circumvented by multidrug resistance (MDR) caused by the overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter ABCB1 (MDR1, P-glycoprotein). Several epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been shown previously capable of modulating the function of ABCB1 and reversing ABCB1-mediated MDR in human cancer cells. Furthermore, some TKIs are transported by ABCB1, which results in low oral bioavailability, reduced distribution, and the development of acquired resistance to these TKIs. In this study, we investigated the interaction between ABCB1 and osimertinib, a novel selective, irreversible third-generation EGFR TKI that has recently been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. We also evaluated the potential impact of ABCB1 on the efficacy of osimertinib in cancer cells, which can present a therapeutic challenge to clinicians in the future. We revealed that although osimertinib stimulates the ATPase activity of ABCB1, overexpression of ABCB1 does not confer resistance to osimertinib. Our results suggest that it is unlikely that the overexpression of ABCB1 can be a major contributor to the development of osimertinib resistance in cancer patients. More significantly, we revealed an additional action of osimertinib that directly inhibits the function of ABCB1 without affecting the expression level of ABCB1, enhances drug-induced apoptosis, and reverses the MDR phenotype in ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells. Considering that osimertinib is a clinically approved third-generation EGFR TKI, our findings suggest that a combination therapy with osimertinib and conventional anticancer drugs may be beneficial to patients with MDR tumors. PMID:27169328

  9. Evolutionary and functional divergence between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and related ATP-binding cassette transporters

    PubMed Central

    King Jordan, I.; Kota, Karthik C.; Cui, Guiying; Thompson, Christopher H.; McCarty, Nael A.

    2008-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily, an ancient family of proteins found in all phyla. In nearly all cases, ABC proteins are transporters that couple the hydrolysis of ATP to the transmembrane movement of substrate via an alternating access mechanism. In contrast, CFTR is best known for its activity as an ATP-dependent chloride channel. We asked why CFTR, which shares the domain architecture of ABC proteins that function as transporters, exhibits functional divergence. We compared CFTR protein sequences to those of other ABC transporters, which identified the ABCC4 proteins as the closest mammalian paralogs, and used statistical analysis of the CFTR-ABCC4 multiple sequence alignment to identify the specific domains and residues most likely to be involved in the evolutionary transition from transporter to channel activity. Among the residues identified as being involved in CFTR functional divergence, by virtue of being both CFTR-specific and conserved among all CFTR orthologs, was R352 in the sixth transmembrane helix (TM6). Patch-clamp experiments show that R352 interacts with D993 in TM9 to stabilize the open-channel state; D993 is absolutely conserved between CFTRs and ABCC4s. These data suggest that CFTR channel activity evolved, at least in part, by converting the conformational changes associated with binding and hydrolysis of ATP, as are found in true ABC Transporters, into an open permeation pathway by means of intraprotein interactions that stabilize the open state. This analysis sets the stage for understanding the evolutionary and functional relationships that make CFTR a unique ABC transporter protein. PMID:19020075

  10. Evolutionary and functional divergence between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and related ATP-binding cassette transporters.

    PubMed

    Jordan, I King; Kota, Karthik C; Cui, Guiying; Thompson, Christopher H; McCarty, Nael A

    2008-12-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily, an ancient family of proteins found in all phyla. In nearly all cases, ABC proteins are transporters that couple the hydrolysis of ATP to the transmembrane movement of substrate via an alternating access mechanism. In contrast, CFTR is best known for its activity as an ATP-dependent chloride channel. We asked why CFTR, which shares the domain architecture of ABC proteins that function as transporters, exhibits functional divergence. We compared CFTR protein sequences to those of other ABC transporters, which identified the ABCC4 proteins as the closest mammalian paralogs, and used statistical analysis of the CFTR-ABCC4 multiple sequence alignment to identify the specific domains and residues most likely to be involved in the evolutionary transition from transporter to channel activity. Among the residues identified as being involved in CFTR functional divergence, by virtue of being both CFTR-specific and conserved among all CFTR orthologs, was R352 in the sixth transmembrane helix (TM6). Patch-clamp experiments show that R352 interacts with D993 in TM9 to stabilize the open-channel state; D993 is absolutely conserved between CFTRs and ABCC4s. These data suggest that CFTR channel activity evolved, at least in part, by converting the conformational changes associated with binding and hydrolysis of ATP, as are found in true ABC Transporters, into an open permeation pathway by means of intraprotein interactions that stabilize the open state. This analysis sets the stage for understanding the evolutionary and functional relationships that make CFTR a unique ABC transporter protein. PMID:19020075

  11. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Icyuz, Mert; Chauvet, Sylvain; Tao, Binli; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2016-03-01

    The ABCC transporter subfamily includes pumps, the long and short multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs), and an ATP-gated anion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We show that despite their thermodynamic differences, these ABCC transporter subtypes use broadly similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to the ATP occupancies of their cytosolic nucleotide binding domains. A conserved extracellular phenylalanine at this gate was a prime location for producing gain of function (GOF) mutants of a long MRP in yeast (Ycf1p cadmium transporter), a short yeast MRP (Yor1p oligomycin exporter), and human CFTR channels. Extracellular gate mutations rescued ATP binding mutants of the yeast MRPs and CFTR by increasing ATP sensitivity. Control ATPase-defective MRP mutants could not be rescued by this mechanism. A CFTR double mutant with an extracellular gate mutation plus a cytosolic GOF mutation was highly active (single-channel open probability >0.3) in the absence of ATP and protein kinase A, each normally required for CFTR activity. We conclude that all 3 ABCC transporter subtypes use similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to ATP occupancy, and highly active CFTR channels that bypass defects in ATP binding or phosphorylation can be produced.-Wei, S., Roessler, B. C., Icyuz, M., Chauvet, S., Tao, B., Hartman IV, J. L., Kirk, K. L. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels. PMID:26606940

  12. Discovery of a novel allosteric inhibitor-binding site in ERK5: comparison with the canonical kinase hinge ATP-binding site.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongming; Tucker, Julie; Wang, Xiaotao; Gavine, Paul R; Phillips, Chris; Augustin, Martin A; Schreiner, Patrick; Steinbacher, Stefan; Preston, Marian; Ogg, Derek

    2016-05-01

    MAP kinases act as an integration point for multiple biochemical signals and are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, regulation of transcription and development. As a member of the MAP kinase family, ERK5 (MAPK7) is involved in the downstream signalling pathways of various cell-surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. In the current study, five structures of the ERK5 kinase domain co-crystallized with ERK5 inhibitors are reported. Interestingly, three of the compounds bind at a novel allosteric binding site in ERK5, while the other two bind at the typical ATP-binding site. Binding of inhibitors at the allosteric site is accompanied by displacement of the P-loop into the ATP-binding site and is shown to be ATP-competitive in an enzymatic assay of ERK5 kinase activity. Kinase selectivity data show that the most potent allosteric inhibitor exhibits superior kinase selectivity compared with the two inhibitors that bind at the canonical ATP-binding site. An analysis of these structures and comparison with both a previously published ERK5-inhibitor complex structure (PDB entry 4b99) and the structures of three other kinases (CDK2, ITK and MEK) in complex with allosteric inhibitors are presented. PMID:27139631

  13. Discovery of a novel allosteric inhibitor-binding site in ERK5: comparison with the canonical kinase hinge ATP-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongming; Tucker, Julie; Wang, Xiaotao; Gavine, Paul R.; Phillips, Chris; Augustin, Martin A.; Schreiner, Patrick; Steinbacher, Stefan; Preston, Marian; Ogg, Derek

    2016-01-01

    MAP kinases act as an integration point for multiple biochemical signals and are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, regulation of transcription and development. As a member of the MAP kinase family, ERK5 (MAPK7) is involved in the downstream signalling pathways of various cell-surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. In the current study, five structures of the ERK5 kinase domain co-crystallized with ERK5 inhibitors are reported. Interestingly, three of the compounds bind at a novel allosteric binding site in ERK5, while the other two bind at the typical ATP-binding site. Binding of inhibitors at the allosteric site is accompanied by displacement of the P-loop into the ATP-binding site and is shown to be ATP-competitive in an enzymatic assay of ERK5 kinase activity. Kinase selectivity data show that the most potent allosteric inhibitor exhibits superior kinase selectivity compared with the two inhibitors that bind at the canonical ATP-binding site. An analysis of these structures and comparison with both a previously published ERK5–inhibitor complex structure (PDB entry 4b99) and the structures of three other kinases (CDK2, ITK and MEK) in complex with allosteric inhibitors are presented. PMID:27139631

  14. Association of ATP binding cassette transporter G8 rs4148217 SNP and serum lipid levels in Mulao and Han nationalities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The association of ATP binding cassette transporter G8 gene (ABCG8) rs4148217 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and serum lipid profiles is still controversial in diverse racial/ethnic groups. Mulao nationality is an isolated minority in China. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP and several environmental factors with serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Mulao and Han populations. Methods A total of 634 subjects of Mulao nationality and 717 participants of Han nationality were randomly selected from our previous samples. Genotyping of the ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The genotypic and allelic frequencies of ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP were different between the two nationalities (P < 0.01 for each), the frequency of A allele was higher in Mulao than in Han. The A allele carriers in Han had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 levels than the A allele noncarriers (P < 0.05 for each), whereas the A allele carriers in Mulao had lower ApoA1 levels than the A allele noncarriers (P < 0.05). Subgroup analyses showed that the A allele carriers in Han had lower HDL-C and higher triglyceride (TG) levels in females but not in males than the A allele noncarriers (P < 0.05 for each), and the A allele carriers in Mulao had lower ApoA1 levels in females but not in males than the A allele noncarriers (P < 0.05). The levels of TG and HDL-C in Han, and ApoA1 in Mulao were associated with genotypes in females but not in males (P < 0.05-0.01). Serum lipid parameters were also correlated with several environmental factors (P < 0.05-0.001). Conclusions The ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP is associated with serum TG, HDL-C and ApoA1 levels in our study populations, but this association is different between the Mulao and Han

  15. Simian virus 40 T antigen can regulate p53-mediated transcription independent of binding p53.

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, J J; Jiang, D; Srinivasan, A; Pipas, J M; Robbins, P D

    1997-01-01

    A simian virus 40 (SV40) T-antigen mutant containing only the N-terminal 136 amino acids, able to bind to Rb and p300 but not p53, partially inhibited p53-mediated transcription without affecting the ability of p53 to bind DNA. These results suggest that SV40 T antigen can regulate p53-mediated transcription either directly through protein-protein association or indirectly through interaction with factors which may function to confer p53-mediated transcription. PMID:9188637

  16. cdc2 phosphorylation of threonine 124 activates the origin-unwinding functions of simian virus 40 T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    McVey, D; Ray, S; Gluzman, Y; Berger, L; Wildeman, A G; Marshak, D R; Tegtmeyer, P

    1993-01-01

    Phosphorylation of simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen on threonine 124 activates viral DNA replication in vivo and in vitro. We have manipulated the modification of T-antigen residue 124 both genetically and biochemically and have investigated individual replication functions of T antigen under conditions suitable for in vitro DNA replication. We find that the hexamer assembly, helicase, DNA polymerase alpha-binding, and transcriptional-autoregulation functions are independent of phosphorylation of threonine 124. In contrast, neither T antigen with an alanine mutation of threonine 124 made in human cells nor unphosphorylated T antigen made in Escherichia coli binds the SV40 replication origin as stably as phosphorylated wild-type T antigen does. Furthermore, modification of threonine 124 is essential for complete unwinding of the SV40 replication origin. We conclude that phosphorylation of threonine 124 enhances specific interactions of T antigen with SV40 origin DNA. Our findings do not exclude the possibility that phosphorylation of threonine 124 may affect additional undefined steps in DNA replication. We also show that DNase footprinting and KMnO4 modification assays are not as stringent as immunoprecipitation and origin-dependent strand displacement assays for detecting defects in the origin-binding and -unwinding functions of T antigen. Differences in the assays may explain discrepancies in previous reports on the role of T-antigen phosphorylation in DNA binding. Images PMID:8394445

  17. Structural models of zebrafish (Danio rerio) NOD1 and NOD2 NACHT domains suggest differential ATP binding orientations: insights from computational modeling, docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Maharana, Jitendra; Sahoo, Bikash Ranjan; Bej, Aritra; Jena, Itishree; Parida, Arunima; Sahoo, Jyoti Ranjan; Dehury, Budheswar; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Martha, Sushma Rani; Balabantray, Sucharita; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; Behera, Bijay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1) and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors playing pivotal roles in innate immune signaling. NOD1 and NOD2 recognize bacterial peptidoglycan derivatives iE-DAP and MDP, respectively and undergoes conformational alternation and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT domain followed by downstream signaling. Lack of structural adequacy of NACHT domain confines our understanding about the NOD-mediated signaling mechanism. Here, we predicted the structure of NACHT domain of both NOD1 and NOD2 from model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio) using computational methods. Our study highlighted the differential ATP binding modes in NOD1 and NOD2. In NOD1, γ-phosphate of ATP faced toward the central nucleotide binding cavity like NLRC4, whereas in NOD2 the cavity was occupied by adenine moiety. The conserved 'Lysine' at Walker A formed hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) and Aspartic acid (Walker B) formed electrostatic interaction with ATP. At Sensor 1, Arg328 of NOD1 exhibited an H-bond with ATP, whereas corresponding Arg404 of NOD2 did not. 'Proline' of GxP motif (Pro386 of NOD1 and Pro464 of NOD2) interacted with adenine moiety and His511 at Sensor 2 of NOD1 interacted with γ-phosphate group of ATP. In contrast, His579 of NOD2 interacted with the adenine moiety having a relatively inverted orientation. Our findings are well supplemented with the molecular interaction of ATP with NLRC4, and consistent with mutagenesis data reported for human, which indicates evolutionary shared NOD signaling mechanism. Together, this study provides novel insights into ATP binding mechanism, and highlights the differential ATP binding modes in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2. PMID:25811192

  18. Structural Models of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) NOD1 and NOD2 NACHT Domains Suggest Differential ATP Binding Orientations: Insights from Computational Modeling, Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Maharana, Jitendra; Sahoo, Bikash Ranjan; Bej, Aritra; Sahoo, Jyoti Ranjan; Dehury, Budheswar; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Martha, Sushma Rani; Balabantray, Sucharita; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; Behera, Bijay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1) and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors playing pivotal roles in innate immune signaling. NOD1 and NOD2 recognize bacterial peptidoglycan derivatives iE-DAP and MDP, respectively and undergoes conformational alternation and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT domain followed by downstream signaling. Lack of structural adequacy of NACHT domain confines our understanding about the NOD-mediated signaling mechanism. Here, we predicted the structure of NACHT domain of both NOD1 and NOD2 from model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio) using computational methods. Our study highlighted the differential ATP binding modes in NOD1 and NOD2. In NOD1, γ-phosphate of ATP faced toward the central nucleotide binding cavity like NLRC4, whereas in NOD2 the cavity was occupied by adenine moiety. The conserved ‘Lysine’ at Walker A formed hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) and Aspartic acid (Walker B) formed electrostatic interaction with ATP. At Sensor 1, Arg328 of NOD1 exhibited an H-bond with ATP, whereas corresponding Arg404 of NOD2 did not. ‘Proline’ of GxP motif (Pro386 of NOD1 and Pro464 of NOD2) interacted with adenine moiety and His511 at Sensor 2 of NOD1 interacted with γ-phosphate group of ATP. In contrast, His579 of NOD2 interacted with the adenine moiety having a relatively inverted orientation. Our findings are well supplemented with the molecular interaction of ATP with NLRC4, and consistent with mutagenesis data reported for human, which indicates evolutionary shared NOD signaling mechanism. Together, this study provides novel insights into ATP binding mechanism, and highlights the differential ATP binding modes in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2. PMID:25811192

  19. Di-tert-butylsilylene-directed alpha-selective synthesis of 4-methylumbelliferyl T-antigen.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Akihiro; Ando, Hiromune; Ishida, Hideharu; Kiso, Makoto

    2005-09-29

    [reaction: see text] We have succeeded in the facile synthesis of 4-methylumbelliferyl T-antigen as a substrate for endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase by exploiting the combination of the di-tert-butylsilylene effect and the Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:16178547

  20. Evaluation of the role of ATP-binding cassette transporters as a defence mechanism against temephos in populations of Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Lima, Estelita Pereira; Goulart, Marília Oliveira Fonseca; Rolim Neto, Modesto Leite

    2014-11-01

    The role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the efflux of the insecticide, temephos, was assessed in the larvae of Aedes aegypti. Bioassays were conducted using mosquito populations that were either susceptible or resistant to temephos by exposure to insecticide alone or in combination with sublethal doses of the ABC transporter inhibitor, verapamil (30, 35 and 40 μM). The best result in the series was obtained with the addition of verapamil (40 μM), which led to a 2x increase in the toxicity of temephos, suggesting that ABC transporters may be partially involved in conferring resistance to the populations evaluated. PMID:25411004

  1. Evaluation of the role of ATP-binding cassette transporters as a defence mechanism against temephos in populations of Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Estelita Pereira; Goulart, Marília Oliveira Fonseca; Rolim, Modesto Leite

    2014-01-01

    The role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the efflux of the insecticide, temephos, was assessed in the larvae of Aedes aegypti. Bioassays were conducted using mosquito populations that were either susceptible or resistant to temephos by exposure to insecticide alone or in combination with sublethal doses of the ABC transporter inhibitor, verapamil (30, 35 and 40 μM). The best result in the series was obtained with the addition of verapamil (40 μM), which led to a 2x increase in the toxicity of temephos, suggesting that ABC transporters may be partially involved in conferring resistance to the populations evaluated.

  2. ATP-Binding Cassette Transport System Involved in Regulation of Morphological Differentiation in Response to Glucose in Streptomyces griseus

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jeong-Woo; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Hirata, Aiko; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2002-01-01

    Streptomyces griseus NP4, which was derived by UV mutagenesis from strain IFO13350, showed a bald and wrinkled colony morphology in response to glucose. Mutant NP4 formed ectopic septa at intervals along substrate hyphae, and each of the compartments developed into a spore which was indistinguishable from an aerial spore in size, shape, and thickness of the spore wall and in susceptibility to lysozyme and heat. The ectopic spores of NP4 formed in liquid medium differed from “submerged spores” in lysozyme sensitivity. Shotgun cloning experiments with a library of the chromosomal DNA of the parental strain and mutant NP4 as the host gave rise to DNA fragments giving two different phenotypes; one complementing the bald phenotype of the host, and the other causing much severe wrinkled morphology in the host. Subcloning identified a gene (dasR) encoding a transcriptional repressor belonging to the GntR family that was responsible for the reversal of the bald phenotype and a gene (dasA) encoding a lipoprotein probably serving as a substrate-binding protein in an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport system that was responsible for the severe wrinkled morphology. These genes were adjacent but divergently encoded. Two genes, named dasB and dasC, encoding a membrane-spanning protein were present downstream of dasA, which suggested that dasRABC comprises a gene cluster for an ABC transporter, probably for sugar import. dasR was transcribed actively during vegetative growth, and dasA was transcribed just after commencement of aerial hypha formation and during sporulation, indicating that both were developmentally regulated. Transcriptional analysis and direct sequencing of dasRA in mutant NP4 suggested a defect of this mutant in the regulatory system to control the expression of these genes. Introduction of multicopies of dasA into the wild-type strain caused ectopic septation in very young substrate hyphae after only 1 day of growth and subsequent sporulation in response

  3. The structural basis for T-antigen hydrolysis by Streptococcus pneumoniae: a target for structure-based vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Caines, Matthew E C; Zhu, Haizhong; Vuckovic, Marija; Willis, Lisa M; Withers, Stephen G; Wakarchuk, Warren W; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2008-11-14

    Streptococcus pneumoniae endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase is a cell surface-anchored glycoside hydrolase from family GH101 involved in the breakdown of mucin type O-linked glycans. The 189-kDa mature enzyme specifically hydrolyzes the T-antigen disaccharide from extracellular host glycoproteins and is representative of a broadly important class of virulence factors that have remained structurally uncharacterized due to their large size and highly modular nature. Here we report a 2.9 angstroms resolution crystal structure that remarkably captures the multidomain architecture and characterizes a catalytic center unexpectedly resembling that of alpha-amylases. Our analysis presents a complete model of glycoprotein recognition and provides a basis for the structure-based design of novel Streptococcus vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:18784084

  4. PDE5 inhibitors, sildenafil and vardenafil, reverse multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux function of multidrug resistance protein 7 (ATP-binding Cassette C10) transporter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Jiang; Sun, Yue-Li; Tiwari, Amit K; Xiao, Zhi-Jie; Sodani, Kamlesh; Yang, Dong-Hua; Vispute, Saraubh G; Jiang, Wen-Qi; Chen, Si-Dong; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-08-01

    Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors are widely used in the treatment of male erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. Recently, several groups have evaluated the ability of PDE5 inhibitors for their anticancer activities. Previously, we had shown that sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil could reverse P-glycoprotein (ATP-binding cassette B1)-mediated MDR. In the present study, we determined whether these PDE5 inhibitors have the potential to reverse multidrug resistance protein 7 (MRP7; ATP-binding cassette C10)-mediated MDR. We found that sildenafil and vardenafil dose-dependently enhanced the sensitivity of MRP7-transfected HEK293 cells to paclitaxel, docetaxel and vinblastine, while tadalafil had only a minimal effect. Accumulation and efflux experiments demonstrated that sildenafil and vardenafil increased the intracellular accumulation of [(3)H]-paclitaxel by inhibiting the efflux of [(3 H]-paclitaxel in HEK/MRP7 cells. In addition, immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses indicated that no significant alterations of MRP7 protein expression and localization in plasma membranes were found after treatment with sildenafil, vardenafil or tadalafil. These results demonstrate that sildenafil and vardenafil reverse MRP7-mediated a MDR through inhibition of the drug efflux function of MRP7. Our findings indicate a potentially novel use of PDE5 inhibitors as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent in clinical practice. PMID:22578167

  5. The histone H4 tail regulates the conformation of the ATP-binding pocket in the SNF2h chromatin remodeling enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Racki, Lisa R.; Naber, Nariman; Pate, Ed; Leonard, John; Cooke, Roger; Narlikar, Geeta J.

    2014-01-01

    The chromatin remodeling complex ACF helps establish the appropriate nucleosome spacing for generating repressed chromatin states. ACF activity is stimulated by two defining features of the nucleosomal substrate: a basic patch on the histone H4 N-terminal tail and the specific length of flanking DNA. Yet the mechanisms by which these two substrate cues function in the ACF remodeling reaction is not well understood. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with spin-labeled ATP analogs to probe the structure of the ATP active site under physiological solution conditions, we identify a closed state of the ATP-binding pocket that correlates with ATPase activity. We find that the H4 tail promotes pocket closure. We further show that ATPase stimulation by the H4 tail does not require a specific structure connecting the H4 tail and the globular domain. In the case of many DNA helicases, closure of the ATP- binding pocket is regulated by specific DNA substrates. Pocket closure by the H4 tail may analogously provide a mechanism to directly couple substrate recognition to activity. Surprisingly, the flanking DNA, which also stimulates ATP hydrolysis, does not promote pocket closure, suggesting that the H4 tail and flanking DNA may be recognized in different reaction steps. PMID:24607692

  6. The histone H4 tail regulates the conformation of the ATP-binding pocket in the SNF2h chromatin remodeling enzyme.

    PubMed

    Racki, Lisa R; Naber, Nariman; Pate, Ed; Leonard, John D; Cooke, Roger; Narlikar, Geeta J

    2014-05-15

    The chromatin remodeling complex ACF helps establish the appropriate nucleosome spacing for generating repressed chromatin states. ACF activity is stimulated by two defining features of the nucleosomal substrate: a basic patch on the histone H4 N-terminal tail and the specific length of flanking DNA. However, the mechanisms by which these two substrate cues function in the ACF remodeling reaction is not well understood. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with spin-labeled ATP analogs to probe the structure of the ATP active site under physiological solution conditions, we identify a closed state of the ATP-binding pocket that correlates with ATPase activity. We find that the H4 tail promotes pocket closure. We further show that ATPase stimulation by the H4 tail does not require a specific structure connecting the H4 tail and the globular domain. In the case of many DNA helicases, closure of the ATP-binding pocket is regulated by specific DNA substrates. Pocket closure by the H4 tail may analogously provide a mechanism to directly couple substrate recognition to activity. Surprisingly, the flanking DNA, which also stimulates ATP hydrolysis, does not promote pocket closure, suggesting that the H4 tail and flanking DNA may be recognized in different reaction steps. PMID:24607692

  7. Optimizing expression and purification of an ATP-binding gene gsiA from Escherichia coli k-12 by using GFP fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongshan; Xiang, Quanju; Wang, Guangjun; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng

    2011-01-01

    The cloning, expression and purification of the glutathione (sulfur) import system ATP-binding protein (gsiA) was carried out. The coding sequence of Escherichia coli gsiA, which encodes the ATP-binding protein of a glutathione importer, was amplified by PCR, and then inserted into a prokaryotic expression vector pWaldo-GFPe harboring green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene. The resulting recombinant plasmid pWaldo-GFP-GsiA was transformed into various E. coli strains, and expression conditions were optimized. The effect of five E. coli expression strains on the production of the recombinant gsiA protein was evaluated. E. coli BL21 (DE3) was found to be the most productive strain for GsiA-GFP fusion-protein expression, most of which was insoluble fraction. However, results from in-gel and Western blot analysis suggested that expression of recombinant GsiA in Rosetta (DE3) provides an efficient source in soluble form. By using GFP as reporter, the most suitable host strain was conveniently obtained, whereby optimizing conditions for overexpression and purification of the proteins for further functional and structural studies, became, not only less laborious, but also time-saving. PMID:22215971

  8. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among recA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K.L.; Hess, R.M.; McEntee, K.

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N/sub 3/ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T/sub 31/ of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N/sub 3/ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10/sup 7/ years.

  9. Cystic fibrosis-type mutational analysis in the ATP-binding cassette transporter signature of human P-glycoprotein MDR1.

    PubMed

    Hoof, T; Demmer, A; Hadam, M R; Riordan, J R; Tümmler, B

    1994-08-12

    Members of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily such as the P-glycoproteins (MDR) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) share conserved sequence motifs in their nucleotide binding fold that are the major targets for CFTR mutations in patients with cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis-type mutations were introduced at analogous positions into the human MDR1 gene. Heterologous expression of wild-type or mutated MDR1 revealed similar mRNA transcript levels in Chinese hamster ovary K1 recipients, but the subsequent processing was defective for all mutations that give rise to severe cystic fibrosis in the case of CFTR. Functional multidrug transporter MDR1, however, was obtained when amino acid substitutions were introduced into a less conserved position of the ATP-binding cassette transporter signature (codon 536 in MDR1). The profile of cross-resistance and chemosensitization was modulated in these codon 536 variants, which suggests that this region is involved in the drug transport function of P-glycoprotein. PMID:7914197

  10. Endogenous mutagenesis by an insertion sequence element identifies Aeromonas salmonicida AbcA as an ATP-binding cassette transport protein required for biogenesis of smooth lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, S; Noonan, B; Cavaignac, S; Trust, T J

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of an Aeromonas salmonicida A layer-deficient/O polysaccharide-deficient mutant carrying a Tn5 insertion in the structural gene for A protein (vapA) showed that the abcA gene immediately downstream of vapA had been interrupted by the endogenous insertion sequence element ISAS1. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that O polysaccharides did not accumulate at the inner membrane-cytoplasm interface of this mutant. abcA encodes an unusual protein; it carries both an amino-terminal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) domain showing high sequence similarity to ABC proteins implicated in the transport of certain capsular and O polysaccharides and a carboxyl-terminal potential DNA-binding domain, which distinguishes AbcA from other polysaccharide transport proteins in structural and evolutionary terms. The smooth lipopolysaccharide phenotype was restored by complementation with abcA but not by abcA carrying site-directed mutations in the sequence encoding the ATP-binding site of the protein. The genetic organization of the A. salmonicida ABC polysaccharide system differs from other bacteria. abcA also differs in apparently being required for both O-polysaccharide synthesis and in energizing the transport of O polysaccharides to the cell surface. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777581