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Sample records for large target volumes

  1. Dosimetric Comparison of Split Field and Fixed Jaw Techniques for Large IMRT Target Volumes in the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Shiv P.; Das, Indra J.; Kumar, Arvind; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2011-04-01

    Some treatment planning systems (TPSs), when used for large-field (>14 cm) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), create split fields that produce excessive multiple-leaf collimator segments, match-line dose inhomogeneity, and higher treatment times than nonsplit fields. A new method using a fixed-jaw technique (FJT) forces the jaw to stay at a fixed position during optimization and is proposed to reduce problems associated with split fields. Dosimetric comparisons between split-field technique (SFT) and FJT used for IMRT treatment is presented. Five patients with head and neck malignancies and regional target volumes were studied and compared with both techniques. Treatment planning was performed on an Eclipse TPS using beam data generated for Varian 2100C linear accelerator. A standard beam arrangement consisting of nine coplanar fields, equally spaced, was used in both techniques. Institutional dose-volume constraints used in head and neck cancer were kept the same for both techniques. The dosimetric coverage for the target volumes between SFT and FJT for head and neck IMRT plan is identical within {+-}1% up to 90% dose. Similarly, the organs at risk (OARs) have dose-volume coverage nearly identical for all patients. When the total monitor unit (MU) and segments were analyzed, SFT produces statistically significant higher segments (17.3 {+-} 6.3%) and higher MU (13.7 {+-} 4.4%) than the FJT. There is no match line in FJT and hence dose uniformity in the target volume is superior to the SFT. Dosimetrically, SFT and FJT are similar for dose-volume coverage; however, the FJT method provides better logistics, lower MU, shorter treatment time, and better dose uniformity. The number of segments and MU also has been correlated with the whole body radiation dose with long-term complications. Thus, FJT should be the preferred option over SFT for large target volumes.

  2. Suspect screening and target quantification of multi-class pharmaceuticals in surface water based on large-volume injection liquid chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, Leendert; Van Langenhove, Herman; Joos, Pieter; Demeestere, Kristof

    2014-04-01

    The ever-growing number of emerging micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals requests rapid and sensitive full-spectrum analytical techniques. Time-of-flight high-resolution mass spectrometry (TOF-HRMS) is a promising alternative for the state-of-the-art tandem mass spectrometry instruments because of its ability to simultaneously screen for a virtually unlimited number of suspect analytes and to perform target quantification. The challenge for such suspect screening is to develop a strategy, which minimizes the false-negative rate without restraining numerous false-positives. At the same time, omitting laborious sample enrichment through large-volume injection ultra-performance liquid chromatography (LVI-UPLC) avoids selective preconcentration. A suspect screening strategy was developed using LVI-UPLC-TOF-MS aiming the detection of 69 multi-class pharmaceuticals in surface water without the a priori availability of analytical standards. As a novel approach, the screening takes into account the signal-intensity-dependent accurate mass error of TOF-MS, hereby restraining 95 % of the measured suspect pharmaceuticals present in surface water. Application on five Belgian river water samples showed the potential of the suspect screening approach, as exemplified by a false-positive rate not higher than 15 % and given that 30 out of 37 restrained suspect compounds were confirmed by the retention time of analytical standards. Subsequently, this paper discusses the validation and applicability of the LVI-UPLC full-spectrum HRMS method for target quantification of the 69 pharmaceuticals in surface water. Analysis of five Belgian river water samples revealed the occurrence of 17 pharmaceuticals in a concentration range of 17 ng L(-1) up to 3.1 μg L(-1). PMID:24633561

  3. Sci—Fri PM: Dosimetry — 03: Delta4 diode absolute dose response for large and small target volume IMRT QA

    SciTech Connect

    Simard, D; Thakur, V

    2014-08-15

    The goal of this project was to quantify the over-response/under-response of the Delta4 diodes for Helical Tomotherapy plans on extreme target volume sizes. A custom Delta4 phantom quarter with a hole to insert an ionisation chamber (IC) close to the center of the phantom have been used to acquire simultaneous IC and diodes absolute dose measurements. Eight plans for different target volumes were created from 20cm to 1cm diameter. Diodes dose measurements in the target were compared with IC measurement, to quantify absolute dose accuracy. IC measurements show a good agreement with planned dose (±2%). Diode measurements demonstrate a good agreement with IC for regular target size of 5 and 10cm (0 to 1%). For larger targets, an over-response is observed for FW 25mm and 10mm (2 to 3%). for small target of 1cm diameter, a major under-response is observed for FW 25mm and 10mm (−8 and −36%). The over-response could to be due to the extra amount of scattered radiation and the opposite for under-response. Although this scatter hypothesis still has to be proven, early testing demonstrates an over-response of 40%/20% of the central diodes compare to IC when an open helical rotational beam is delivered 75mm/25mm away from the center of the phantom. These results are in agreement with the real patient Delta4 DQA results at our center.

  4. Range resolved mode mixing in a large volume for the mitigation of speckle and strategic target orientation requirements in active millimeter-wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Mark A; Holt, Jennifer A; Joye, Colin D; De Lucia, Frank C

    2015-04-01

    In spite of many reports of active millimeter-wave imaging in the literature, speckle and requirements for cooperative target orientation significantly reduce its practical usefulness. Here we report a new technique, range resolved mode mixing (RRMM), which significantly mitigates both of these issues. It also provides a three-dimensional (3D) image. RRMM accomplishes this by combining multimode illumination (which eliminates the requirement for cooperative target orientation) with range resolution (which provides statistical independence of speckle patterns for averaging and the 3D image). The use of a 5W extended interaction klystron amplifier results in large signal margins in the 50 m scale atrium of the Physics Department at Ohio State University. It appears that there are a number of scenarios out to a range of 1 km for which this approach is useful to provide 3D images, with minimal speckle, and no requirement for cooperative target orientation. PMID:26366774

  5. Large volume manufacture of dymalloy

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-22

    The purpose of this research was to test the commercial viability and feasibility of Dymalloy, a composite material to measure thermal conductivity. Dymalloy was developed as part of a CRADA with Sun Microsystems. Sun Microsystems was a potential end user of Dymalloy as a substrate for MCMS. Sun had no desire to be involved in the manufacture of this material. The goal of this small business CRADA with Spectra Mat was to establish the high volume commercial manufacturing industry source for Dymalloy required by an end-user such as Sun Microsystems. The difference between the fabrication technique developed during the CRADA and this proposed work related to the mechanical technique of coating the diamond powder. Mechanical parts for the high-volume diamond powder coating process existed; however, they needed to be installed in an existing coating system for evaluation. Sputtering systems similar to the one required for this project were available at LLNL. Once the diamond powder was coated, both LLNL and Spectra Mat could make and test the Dymalloy composites. Spectra Mat manufactured Dymalloy composites in order to evaluate and establish a reasonable cost estimate on their existing processing capabilities. This information was used by Spectra Mat to define the market and cost-competitive products that could be commercialized from this new substrate material.

  6. Variation in the Gross Tumor Volume and Clinical Target Volume for Preoperative Radiotherapy of Primary Large High-Grade Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Extremity Among RTOG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dian; Bosch, Walter; Kirsch, David G.; Al Lozi, Rawan; El Naqa, Issam; Roberge, David; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Petersen, Ivy; Haddock, Michael; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Saito, Naoyuki G.; Hitchcock, Ying J.; Wolfson, Aaron H.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate variability in the definition of preoperative radiotherapy gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) delineated by sarcoma radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Extremity sarcoma planning CT images along with the corresponding diagnostic MRI from two patients were distributed to 10 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group sarcoma radiation oncologists with instructions to define GTV and CTV using standardized guidelines. The CT data with contours were then returned for central analysis. Contours representing statistically corrected 95% (V95) and 100% (V100) agreement were computed for each structure. Results: For the GTV, the minimum, maximum, mean (SD) volumes (mL) were 674, 798, 752 {+-} 35 for the lower extremity case and 383, 543, 447 {+-} 46 for the upper extremity case. The volume (cc) of the union, V95 and V100 were 882, 761, and 752 for the lower, and 587, 461, and 455 for the upper extremity, respectively. The overall GTV agreement was judged to be almost perfect in both lower and upper extremity cases (kappa = 0.9 [p < 0.0001] and kappa = 0.86 [p < 0.0001]). For the CTV, the minimum, maximum, mean (SD) volumes (mL) were 1145, 1911, 1605 {+-} 211 for the lower extremity case and 637, 1246, 1006 {+-} 180 for the upper extremity case. The volume (cc) of the union, V95, and V100 were 2094, 1609, and 1593 for the lower, and 1533, 1020, and 965 for the upper extremity cases, respectively. The overall CTV agreement was judged to be almost perfect in the lower extremity case (kappa = 0.85 [p < 0.0001]) but only substantial in the upper extremity case (kappa = 0.77 [p < 0.0001]). Conclusions: Almost perfect agreement existed in the GTV of these two representative cases. Tshere was no significant disagreement in the CTV of the lower extremity, but variation in the CTV of upper extremity was seen, perhaps related to the positional differences between the planning CT and the diagnostic MRI.

  7. Distributed shared memory for roaming large volumes.

    PubMed

    Castanié, Laurent; Mion, Christophe; Cavin, Xavier; Lévy, Bruno

    2006-01-01

    We present a cluster-based volume rendering system for roaming very large volumes. This system allows to move a gigabyte-sized probe inside a total volume of several tens or hundreds of gigabytes in real-time. While the size of the probe is limited by the total amount of texture memory on the cluster, the size of the total data set has no theoretical limit. The cluster is used as a distributed graphics processing unit that both aggregates graphics power and graphics memory. A hardware-accelerated volume renderer runs in parallel on the cluster nodes and the final image compositing is implemented using a pipelined sort-last rendering algorithm. Meanwhile, volume bricking and volume paging allow efficient data caching. On each rendering node, a distributed hierarchical cache system implements a global software-based distributed shared memory on the cluster. In case of a cache miss, this system first checks page residency on the other cluster nodes instead of directly accessing local disks. Using two Gigabit Ethernet network interfaces per node, we accelerate data fetching by a factor of 4 compared to directly accessing local disks. The system also implements asynchronous disk access and texture loading, which makes it possible to overlap data loading, volume slicing and rendering for optimal volume roaming. PMID:17080865

  8. Interobserver Variation of Clinical Target Volume Delineation in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Edwin; Verheij, Marcel

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate interobserver variability in clinical target volume (CTV) delineation in gastric cancer performed with the help of a delineation guide. Patients and Methods: Ten radiotherapy centers that participate in the CRITICS Phase III trial were provided with a delineation atlas, preoperative CT scans, a postoperative planning CT scan, and clinical information for a gastric cancer case and were asked to construct a CTV and create a dosimetric plan according to departmental policy. Results: The volumes of the CTVs and planning target volumes (PTVs) differed greatly, with a mean (SD) CTV volume of 392 (176) cm{sup 3} (range, 240-821cm{sup 3}) and PTV volume of 915 (312) cm{sup 3} (range, 634-1677cm{sup 3}). The overlapping volume was 376cm{sup 3} for the CTV and 890cm{sup 3} for the PTV. The greatest differences in the CTV were seen at the cranial and caudal parts. After planning, dose coverage of the overlapping PTV volume showed less variability than the CTV. Conclusion: In this series of 10 plans, variability of the CTV in postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer is large. Strict and clear delineation guidelines should be provided, especially in Phase III multicenter studies. Adaptations of these guidelines should be evaluated in clinical studies.

  9. Large volume axionic Swiss cheese inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Aalok; Shukla, Pramod

    2008-09-01

    Continuing with the ideas of (Section 4 of) [A. Misra, P. Shukla, Moduli stabilization, large-volume dS minimum without anti-D3-branes, (non-)supersymmetric black hole attractors and two-parameter Swiss cheese Calabi Yau's, arXiv: 0707.0105 [hep-th], Nucl. Phys. B, in press], after inclusion of perturbative and non-perturbative α corrections to the Kähler potential and (D1- and D3-) instanton generated superpotential, we show the possibility of slow roll axionic inflation in the large volume limit of Swiss cheese Calabi Yau orientifold compactifications of type IIB string theory. We also include one- and two-loop corrections to the Kähler potential but find the same to be subdominant to the (perturbative and non-perturbative) α corrections. The NS NS axions provide a flat direction for slow roll inflation to proceed from a saddle point to the nearest dS minimum.

  10. Large volume flow-through scintillating detector

    DOEpatents

    Gritzo, Russ E.; Fowler, Malcolm M.

    1995-01-01

    A large volume flow through radiation detector for use in large air flow situations such as incinerator stacks or building air systems comprises a plurality of flat plates made of a scintillating material arranged parallel to the air flow. Each scintillating plate has a light guide attached which transfers light generated inside the scintillating plate to an associated photomultiplier tube. The output of the photomultiplier tubes are connected to electronics which can record any radiation and provide an alarm if appropriate for the application.

  11. Combined Recipe for Clinical Target Volume and Planning Target Volume Margins

    SciTech Connect

    Stroom, Joep; Gilhuijs, Kenneth; Vieira, Sandra; Chen, Wei; Salguero, Javier; Moser, Elizabeth; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a combined recipe for clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) margins. Methods and Materials: A widely accepted PTV margin recipe is M{sub geo} = aΣ{sub geo} + bσ{sub geo}, with Σ{sub geo} and σ{sub geo} standard deviations (SDs) representing systematic and random geometric uncertainties, respectively. On the basis of histopathology data of breast and lung tumors, we suggest describing the distribution of microscopic islets around the gross tumor volume (GTV) by a half-Gaussian with SD Σ{sub micro}, yielding as possible CTV margin recipe: M{sub micro} = ƒ(N{sub i}) × Σ{sub micro}, with N{sub i} the average number of microscopic islets per patient. To determine ƒ(N{sub i}), a computer model was developed that simulated radiation therapy of a spherical GTV with isotropic distribution of microscopic disease in a large group of virtual patients. The minimal margin that yielded D{sub min} <95% in maximally 10% of patients was calculated for various Σ{sub micro} and N{sub i}. Because Σ{sub micro} is independent of Σ{sub geo}, we propose they should be added quadratically, yielding for a combined GTV-to-PTV margin recipe: M{sub GTV-PTV} = √([aΣ{sub geo}]{sup 2} + [ƒ(N{sub i})Σ{sub micro}]{sup 2}) + bσ{sub geo}. This was validated by the computer model through numerous simultaneous simulations of microscopic and geometric uncertainties. Results: The margin factor ƒ(N{sub i}) in a relevant range of Σ{sub micro} and N{sub i} can be given by: ƒ(N{sub i}) = 1.4 + 0.8log(N{sub i}). Filling in the other factors found in our simulations (a = 2.1 and b = 0.8) yields for the combined recipe: M{sub GTV-PTV} = √((2.1Σ{sub geo}){sup 2} + ([1.4 + 0.8log(N{sub i})] × Σ{sub micro}){sup 2}) + 0.8σ{sub geo}. The average margin difference between the simultaneous simulations and the above recipe was 0.2 ± 0.8 mm (1 SD). Calculating M{sub geo} and M{sub micro} separately and adding them linearly overestimated PTVs by on

  12. LARGE volume string compactifications at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguelova, Lilia; Calò, Vincenzo; Cicoli, Michele

    2009-10-01

    We present a detailed study of the finite-temperature behaviour of the LARGE Volume type IIB flux compactifications. We show that certain moduli can thermalise at high temperatures. Despite that, their contribution to the finite-temperature effective potential is always negligible and the latter has a runaway behaviour. We compute the maximal temperature Tmax, above which the internal space decompactifies, as well as the temperature T*, that is reached after the decay of the heaviest moduli. The natural constraint T* < Tmax implies a lower bound on the allowed values of the internal volume Script V. We find that this restriction rules out a significant range of values corresponding to smaller volumes of the order Script V ~ 104ls6, which lead to standard GUT theories. Instead, the bound favours values of the order Script V ~ 1015ls6, which lead to TeV scale SUSY desirable for solving the hierarchy problem. Moreover, our result favours low-energy inflationary scenarios with density perturbations generated by a field, which is not the inflaton. In such a scenario, one could achieve both inflation and TeV-scale SUSY, although gravity waves would not be observable. Finally, we pose a two-fold challenge for the solution of the cosmological moduli problem. First, we show that the heavy moduli decay before they can begin to dominate the energy density of the Universe. Hence they are not able to dilute any unwanted relics. And second, we argue that, in order to obtain thermal inflation in the closed string moduli sector, one needs to go beyond the present EFT description.

  13. SUSY's Ladder: reframing sequestering at Large Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, Matthew; Xue, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Theories with approximate no-scale structure, such as the Large Volume Scenario, have a distinctive hierarchy of multiple mass scales in between TeV gaugino masses and the Planck scale, which we call SUSY's Ladder. This is a particular realization of Split Supersymmetry in which the same small parameter suppresses gaugino masses relative to scalar soft masses, scalar soft masses relative to the gravitino mass, and the UV cutoff or string scale relative to the Planck scale. This scenario has many phenomenologically interesting properties, and can avoid dangers including the gravitino problem, flavor problems, and the moduli-induced LSP problem that plague other supersymmetric theories. We study SUSY's Ladder using a superspace formalism that makes the mysterious cancelations in previous computations manifest. This opens the possibility of a consistent effective field theory understanding of the phenomenology of these scenarios, based on power-counting in the small ratio of string to Planck scales. We also show that four-dimensional theories with approximate no-scale structure enforced by a single volume modulus arise only from two special higher-dimensional theories: five-dimensional supergravity and ten-dimensional type IIB supergravity. This gives a phenomenological argument in favor of ten dimensional ultraviolet physics which is different from standard arguments based on the consistency of superstring theory.

  14. Comments on large-N volume independence

    SciTech Connect

    Poppitz, Erich; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-06-02

    We study aspects of the large-N volume independence on R{sup 3} X L{sup {Gamma}}, where L{sup {Gamma}} is a {Gamma}site lattice for Yang-Mills theory with adjoint Wilson-fermions. We find the critical number of lattice sites above which the center-symmetry analysis on L{sup {Gamma}} agrees with the one on the continuum S{sup 1}. For Wilson parameter set to one and {Gamma}{>=}2, the two analyses agree. One-loop radiative corrections to Wilson-line masses are finite, reminiscent of the UV-insensitivity of the Higgs mass in deconstruction/Little-Higgs theories. Even for theories with {Gamma}=1, volume independence in QCD(adj) may be guaranteed to work by tuning one low-energy effective field theory parameter. Within the parameter space of the theory, at most three operators of the 3d effective field theory exhibit one-loop UV-sensitivity. This opens the analytical prospect to study 4d non-perturbative physics by using lower dimensional field theories (d=3, in our example).

  15. A new large-volume multianvil system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, D. J.; Poe, B. T.; Trønnes, R. G.; Liebske, C.; Duba, A.; Rubie, D. C.

    2004-06-01

    A scaled-up version of the 6-8 Kwai-type multianvil apparatus has been developed at the Bayerisches Geoinstitut for operation over ranges of pressure and temperature attainable in conventional systems but with much larger sample volumes. This split-cylinder multianvil system is used with a hydraulic press that can generate loads of up to 5000 t (50 MN). The six tool-steel outer-anvils define a cubic cavity of 100 mm edge-length in which eight 54 mm tungsten carbide cubic inner-anvils are compressed. Experiments are performed using Cr 2O 3-doped MgO octahedra and pyrophyllite gaskets. Pressure calibrations at room temperature and high temperature have been performed with 14/8, 18/8, 18/11, 25/17 and 25/15 OEL/TEL (octahedral edge-length/anvil truncation edge-length, in millimetre) configurations. All configurations tested reach a limiting plateau where the sample-pressure no longer increases with applied load. Calibrations with different configurations show that greater sample-pressure efficiency can be achieved by increasing the OEL/TEL ratio. With the 18/8 configuration the GaP transition is reached at a load of 2500 t whereas using the 14/8 assembly this pressure cannot be reached even at substantially higher loads. With an applied load of 2000 t the 18/8 can produce MgSiO 3 perovskite at 1900 °C with a sample volume of ˜20 mm 3, compared with <3 mm 3 in conventional multianvil systems at the same conditions. The large octahedron size and use of a stepped LaCrO 3 heater also results in significantly lower thermal gradients over the sample.

  16. Large volumes and spectroscopy of walking theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Debbio, L.; Lucini, B.; Patella, A.; Pica, C.; Rago, A.

    2016-03-01

    A detailed investigation of finite-size effects is performed for SU(2) gauge theory with two fermions in the adjoint representation, which previous lattice studies have shown to be inside the conformal window. The system is investigated with different spatial and temporal boundary conditions on lattices of various spatial and temporal extensions, for two values of the bare fermion mass representing a heavy and light fermion regime. Our study shows that the infinite-volume limit of masses and decay constants in the mesonic sector is reached only when the mass of the pseudoscalar particle MPS and the spatial lattice size L satisfy the relation L MPS≥15 . This bound, which is at least a factor of three higher than what is observed in QCD, is a likely consequence of the different spectral signatures of the two theories, with the scalar isosinglet (0++ glueball) being the lightest particle in our model. In addition to stressing the importance of simulating large lattice sizes, our analysis emphasizes the need to understand quantitatively the full spectrum of the theory rather than just the spectrum in the mesonic isotriplet sector. While for the lightest fermion measuring masses from gluonic operators proves to be still challenging, reliable results for glueball states are obtained at the largest fermion mass and, in the mesonic sector, for both fermion masses. As a byproduct of our investigation, we perform a finite-size scaling of the pseudoscalar mass and decay constant. The data presented in this work support the conformal behavior of this theory with an anomalous dimension γ*≃0.37 .

  17. Large-volume sampling and preconcentration for trace explosives detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin Lane

    2004-05-01

    A trace explosives detection system typically contains three subsystems: sample collection, preconcentration, and detection. Sample collection of trace explosives (vapor and particulate) through large volumes of airflow helps reduce sampling time while increasing the amount of dilute sample collected. Preconcentration of the collected sample before introduction into the detector improves the sensitivity of the detector because of the increase in sample concentration. By combining large-volume sample collection and preconcentration, an improvement in the detection of explosives is possible. Large-volume sampling and preconcentration is presented using a systems level approach. In addition, the engineering of large-volume sampling and preconcentration for the trace detection of explosives is explained.

  18. Large space systems technology, 1980, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriver, F., III (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    The technological and developmental efforts in support of the large space systems technology are described. Three major areas of interests are emphasized: (1) technology pertient to large antenna systems; (2) technology related to large space systems; and (3) activities that support both antenna and platform systems.

  19. Liposome technology. Volume III: Targeted drug delivery and biological interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoriadis, G.

    1984-01-01

    These three volumes cover liposome technology in pharmacology and medicine. Contributors emphasize methodology used in their own laboratories, and include a brief introduction, coverage of relevant literature, applications and critical evaluations for the methods they describe. In Volume III, the growing variety of techniques yielding targeted liposomes and approaches of studying liposomal behavior both in vitro and in vivo are discussed.

  20. Large mode-volume, large beta, photonic crystal laser resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Dezfouli, Mohsen Kamandar; Dignam, Marc M.

    2014-12-15

    We propose an optical resonator formed from the coupling of 13, L2 defects in a triangular-lattice photonic crystal slab. Using a tight-binding formalism, we optimized the coupled-defect cavity design to obtain a resonator with predicted single-mode operation, a mode volume five times that of an L2-cavity mode and a beta factor of 0.39. The results are confirmed using finite-difference time domain simulations. This resonator is very promising for use as a single mode photonic crystal vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with high saturation output power compared to a laser consisting of one of the single-defect cavities.

  1. Technologies for imaging neural activity in large volumes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Na; Freeman, Jeremy; Smith, Spencer L

    2016-08-26

    Neural circuitry has evolved to form distributed networks that act dynamically across large volumes. Conventional microscopy collects data from individual planes and cannot sample circuitry across large volumes at the temporal resolution relevant to neural circuit function and behaviors. Here we review emerging technologies for rapid volume imaging of neural circuitry. We focus on two critical challenges: the inertia of optical systems, which limits image speed, and aberrations, which restrict the image volume. Optical sampling time must be long enough to ensure high-fidelity measurements, but optimized sampling strategies and point-spread function engineering can facilitate rapid volume imaging of neural activity within this constraint. We also discuss new computational strategies for processing and analyzing volume imaging data of increasing size and complexity. Together, optical and computational advances are providing a broader view of neural circuit dynamics and helping elucidate how brain regions work in concert to support behavior. PMID:27571194

  2. Large Volume Injection Techniques in Capillary Gas Chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large volume injection (LVI) is a prerequisite of modern gas chromatographic (GC) analysis, especially when trace sample components have to be determined at very low concentration levels. Injection of larger than usual sample volumes increases sensitivity and/or reduces (or even eliminates) the need...

  3. Large volume continuous counterflow dialyzer has high efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandeles, S.; Woods, E. C.

    1967-01-01

    Dialyzer separates macromolecules from small molecules in large volumes of solution. It takes advantage of the high area/volume ratio in commercially available 1/4-inch dialysis tubing and maintains a high concentration gradient at the dialyzing surface by counterflow.

  4. The Newly Upgraded Large COMPASS Polarized Target

    SciTech Connect

    Gautheron, F.

    2007-06-13

    During the CERN SPS 2005 shutdown the COMPASS target system received a major hardware upgrade for the new period of data taking starting in 2006. A new superconducting magnet with a larger acceptance combined with a new microwave cavity and a three cell target setup have been installed and already showed excellent performances that we present for the first time.

  5. Large-Volume Gravid Traps Enhance Collection of Culex Vectors.

    PubMed

    Popko, David A; Walton, William E

    2016-06-01

    Gravid mosquito collections were compared among several large-volume (infusion volume ≥35 liters) gravid trap designs and the small-volume (infusion volume  =  6 liters) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) gravid trap used routinely by vector control districts for vector and pathogen surveillance. The numbers of gravid Culex quinquefasciatus, Cx. tarsalis, and Cx. stigmatosoma collected by large gravid traps were greater than by the CDC gravid trap during nearly all overnight trials. Large-volume gravid traps collected on average 6.6-fold more adult female Culex mosquitoes compared to small-volume CDC gravid traps across 3 seasons during the 3 years of the studies. The differences in gravid mosquito collections between large-versus small-volume gravid traps were greatest during spring, when 8- to 56-fold more Culex individuals were collected using large-volume gravid traps. The proportion of gravid females in collections did not differ appreciably among the more effective trap designs tested. Important determinants of gravid trap performance were infusion container size and type as well as infusion volume, which determined the distance between the suction trap and the infusion surface. Of lesser importance for gravid trap performance were the number of suction traps, method of suction trap mounting, and infusion concentration. Fermentation of infusions between 1 and 4 wk weakly affected total mosquito collections, with Cx. stigmatosoma collections moderately enhanced by comparatively young and organically enriched infusions. A suction trap mounted above 100 liters of organic infusion housed in a 121-liter black plastic container collected the most gravid mosquitoes over the greatest range of experimental conditions, and a 35-liter infusion with side-mounted suction traps was a promising lesser-volume alternative design. PMID:27280347

  6. Is internal target volume accurate for dose evaluation in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jiayuan; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Jiazhou; Xie, Jiang; Hu, Weigang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose 4DCT delineated internal target volume (ITV) was applied to determine the tumor motion and used as planning target in treatment planning in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). This work is to study the accuracy of using ITV to predict the real target dose in lung cancer SBRT. Materials and methods Both for phantom and patient cases, the ITV and gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on the maximum intensity projection (MIP) CT and ten CT phases, respectively. A SBRT plan was designed using ITV as the planning target on average projection (AVG) CT. This plan was copied to each CT phase and the dose distribution was recalculated. The GTV_4D dose was acquired through accumulating the GTV doses over all ten phases and regarded as the real target dose. To analyze the ITV dose error, the ITV dose was compared to the real target dose by endpoints of D99, D95, D1 (doses received by the 99%, 95% and 1% of the target volume), and dose coverage endpoint of V100(relative volume receiving at least the prescription dose). Results The phantom study shows that the ITV underestimates the real target dose by 9.47%∼19.8% in D99, 4.43%∼15.99% in D95, and underestimates the dose coverage by 5% in V100. The patient cases show that the ITV underestimates the real target dose and dose coverage by 3.8%∼10.7% in D99, 4.7%∼7.2% in D95, and 3.96%∼6.59% in V100 in motion target cases. Conclusions Cautions should be taken that ITV is not accurate enough to predict the real target dose in lung cancer SBRT with large tumor motions. Restricting the target motion or reducing the target dose heterogeneity could reduce the ITV dose underestimation effect in lung SBRT. PMID:26968812

  7. Cosmological moduli problem in large volume scenario and thermal inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kiwoon; Park, Wan-Il; Shin, Chang Sub E-mail: wipark@kias.re.kr

    2013-03-01

    We show that in a large volume scenario of type IIB string or F-theory compactifications, single thermal inflation provides only a partial solution to the cosmological problem of the light volume modulus. We then clarify the conditions for double thermal inflation, being a simple extension of the usual single thermal inflation scenario, to solve the cosmological moduli problem in the case of relatively light moduli masses. Using a specific example, we demonstrate that double thermal inflation can be realized in large volume scenario in a natural manner, and the problem of the light volume modulus can be solved for the whole relevant mass range. We also find that right amount of baryon asymmetry and dark matter can be obtained via a late-time Affleck-Dine mechanism and the decays of the visible sector NLSP to flatino LSP.

  8. Performance of large electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Kaw, P. K.; Singh, R.

    2014-03-15

    This paper describes an in-house designed large Electron Energy Filter (EEF) utilized in the Large Volume Plasma Device (LVPD) [S. K. Mattoo, V. P. Anita, L. M. Awasthi, and G. Ravi, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 3864 (2001)] to secure objectives of (a) removing the presence of remnant primary ionizing energetic electrons and the non-thermal electrons, (b) introducing a radial gradient in plasma electron temperature without greatly affecting the radial profile of plasma density, and (c) providing a control on the scale length of gradient in electron temperature. A set of 19 independent coils of EEF make a variable aspect ratio, rectangular solenoid producing a magnetic field (B{sub x}) of 100 G along its axis and transverse to the ambient axial field (B{sub z} ∼ 6.2 G) of LVPD, when all its coils are used. Outside the EEF, magnetic field reduces rapidly to 1 G at a distance of 20 cm from the center of the solenoid on either side of target and source plasma. The EEF divides LVPD plasma into three distinct regions of source, EEF and target plasma. We report that the target plasma (n{sub e} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} and T{sub e} ∼ 2 eV) has no detectable energetic electrons and the radial gradients in its electron temperature can be established with scale length between 50 and 600 cm by controlling EEF magnetic field. Our observations reveal that the role of the EEF magnetic field is manifested by the energy dependence of transverse electron transport and enhanced transport caused by the plasma turbulence in the EEF plasma.

  9. Monte Carlo Simulations for Dosimetry in Prostate Radiotherapy with Different Intravesical Volumes and Planning Target Volume Margins

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei; Yu, Dong; He, Hengda; Liu, Qian

    2016-01-01

    In prostate radiotherapy, the influence of bladder volume variation on the dose absorbed by the target volume and organs at risk is significant and difficult to predict. In addition, the resolution of a typical medical image is insufficient for visualizing the bladder wall, which makes it more difficult to precisely evaluate the dose to the bladder wall. This simulation study aimed to quantitatively investigate the relationship between the dose received by organs at risk and the intravesical volume in prostate radiotherapy. The high-resolution Visible Chinese Human phantom and the finite element method were used to construct 10 pelvic models with specific intravesical volumes ranging from 100 ml to 700 ml to represent bladders of patients with different bladder filling capacities during radiotherapy. This series of models was utilized in six-field coplanar 3D conformal radiotherapy simulations with different planning target volume (PTV) margins. Each organ’s absorbed dose was calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The obtained bladder wall displacements during bladder filling were consistent with reported clinical measurements. The radiotherapy simulation revealed a linear relationship between the dose to non-targeted organs and the intravesical volume and indicated that a 10-mm PTV margin for a large bladder and a 5-mm PTV margin for a small bladder reduce the effective dose to the bladder wall to similar degrees. However, larger bladders were associated with evident protection of the intestines. Detailed dosimetry results can be used by radiation oncologists to create more accurate, individual water preload protocols according to the patient’s anatomy and bladder capacity. PMID:27441944

  10. Large-Volume High-Pressure Mineral Physics in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebermann, Robert C.; Prewitt, Charles T.; Weidner, Donald J.

    American high-pressure research with large sample volumes developed rapidly in the 1950s during the race to produce synthetic diamonds. At that time the piston cylinder, girdle (or belt), and tetrahedral anvil devices were invented. However, this development essentially stopped in the late 1950s, and while the diamond anvil cell has been used extensively in the United States with spectacular success for high-pressure experiments in small sample volumes, most of the significant technological advances in large-volume devices have taken place in Japan. Over the past 25 years, these technical advances have enabled a fourfold increase in pressure, with many important investigations of the chemical and physical properties of materials synthesized at high temperatures and pressures that cannot be duplicated with any apparatus currently available in the United States.

  11. A Warm Magnetoactive Plasma in a Large Volume of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiles, C.

    1984-01-01

    A diffuse ionized warm gas fills a large volume of space in the general direction of Radio Loop II. There are three types of observational evidence: Faraday rotation measures (RM's) of extragalactic sources; emission measures (EM's) derived from the H alpha emission line in the diffuse interstellar medium; and magnetic field strengths in HI clouds derived from Zeeman splitting observations.

  12. Large-volume en-bloc staining for electron microscopy-based connectomics

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yunfeng; Laserstein, Philip; Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale connectomics requires dense staining of neuronal tissue blocks for electron microscopy (EM). Here we report a large-volume dense en-bloc EM staining protocol that overcomes the staining gradients, which so far substantially limited the reconstructable volumes in three-dimensional (3D) EM. Our protocol provides densely reconstructable tissue blocks from mouse neocortex sized at least 1 mm in diameter. By relaxing the constraints on precise topographic sample targeting, it makes the correlated functional and structural analysis of neuronal circuits realistic. PMID:26235643

  13. Large discharge-volume, silent discharge spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Michael

    1995-01-01

    A large discharge-volume spark plug for providing self-limiting microdischarges. The apparatus includes a generally spark plug-shaped arrangement of a pair of electrodes, where either of the two coaxial electrodes is substantially shielded by a dielectric barrier from a direct discharge from the other electrode, the unshielded electrode and the dielectric barrier forming an annular volume in which self-terminating microdischarges occur when alternating high voltage is applied to the center electrode. The large area over which the discharges occur, and the large number of possible discharges within the period of an engine cycle, make the present silent discharge plasma spark plug suitable for use as an ignition source for engines. In the situation, where a single discharge is effective in causing ignition of the combustible gases, a conventional single-polarity, single-pulse, spark plug voltage supply may be used.

  14. Masked target transform volume clutter metric applied to vehicle search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Richard K.; Camp, H. A.; Moyer, Steve; Halford, Carl E.

    2010-04-01

    The Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate's current time-limited search model, which makes use of the targeting task performance (TTP) metric to describe imager quality, does not explicitly account for the effects of clutter on observer performance. The masked target transform volume (MTTV) clutter metric has been presented previously, but is first applied to the results of a vehicle search perception experiment with simulated thermal imagery here. NVESD's Electro-Optical Simulator program was used to generate hundreds of synthetic images of tracked vehicles hidden in a rural environment. 12 observers searched for the tracked vehicles and their performance is compared to the MTTV clutter level, signal-to-clutter ratios using several clutter metrics from open literature, and to the product of target size and contrast. The investigated clutter metrics included the Schmeider-Weathersby statistical variance, Silk's statistical variance, Aviram's probability of edge detection metric, and Chang's target structural similarity metric. The MTTV was shown to better model observer performance as measured by the perception experiment than any of the other compared metrics, including the product of target size and contrast.

  15. Functional magnetic resonance imaging for defining the biological target volume

    PubMed Central

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Zechmann, Christian; Stieltjes, Bram; Weber, Marc-Andre

    2006-01-01

    Morphology as demonstrated by CT is the basis for radiotherapy planning. Intensity-modulated and adaptive radiotherapy techniques would greatly benefit from additional functional information allowing for definition of the biological target volume. MRI techniques include several which can characterize and quantify different tissue properties and their tumour-related changes. Results of perfusion MRI represent microvascular density and permeability; MR spectroscopy depicts particular metabolites; diffusion weighted imaging shows tissue at risk and tumour cellularity; while dynamic 3D acquisition (4D MRI) shows organ motion and the mobility of tumours within them. PMID:16766269

  16. Spatial considerations during cryopreservation of a large volume sample.

    PubMed

    Kilbride, Peter; Lamb, Stephen; Milne, Stuart; Gibbons, Stephanie; Erro, Eloy; Bundy, James; Selden, Clare; Fuller, Barry; Morris, John

    2016-08-01

    There have been relatively few studies on the implications of the physical conditions experienced by cells during large volume (litres) cryopreservation - most studies have focused on the problem of cryopreservation of smaller volumes, typically up to 2 ml. This study explores the effects of ice growth by progressive solidification, generally seen during larger scale cryopreservation, on encapsulated liver hepatocyte spheroids, and it develops a method to reliably sample different regions across the frozen cores of samples experiencing progressive solidification. These issues are examined in the context of a Bioartificial Liver Device which requires cryopreservation of a 2 L volume in a strict cylindrical geometry for optimal clinical delivery. Progressive solidification cannot be avoided in this arrangement. In such a system optimal cryoprotectant concentrations and cooling rates are known. However, applying these parameters to a large volume is challenging due to the thermal mass and subsequent thermal lag. The specific impact of this to the cryopreservation outcome is required. Under conditions of progressive solidification, the spatial location of Encapsulated Liver Spheroids had a strong impact on post-thaw recovery. Cells in areas first and last to solidify demonstrated significantly impaired post-thaw function, whereas areas solidifying through the majority of the process exhibited higher post-thaw outcome. It was also found that samples where the ice thawed more rapidly had greater post-thaw viability 24 h post-thaw (75.7 ± 3.9% and 62.0 ± 7.2% respectively). These findings have implications for the cryopreservation of large volumes with a rigid shape and for the cryopreservation of a Bioartificial Liver Device. PMID:27256662

  17. Ray Casting of Large Multi-Resolution Volume Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lux, C.; Fröhlich, B.

    2009-04-01

    High quality volume visualization through ray casting on graphics processing units (GPU) has become an important approach for many application domains. We present a GPU-based, multi-resolution ray casting technique for the interactive visualization of massive volume data sets commonly found in the oil and gas industry. Large volume data sets are represented as a multi-resolution hierarchy based on an octree data structure. The original volume data is decomposed into small bricks of a fixed size acting as the leaf nodes of the octree. These nodes are the highest resolution of the volume. Coarser resolutions are represented through inner nodes of the hierarchy which are generated by down sampling eight neighboring nodes on a finer level. Due to limited memory resources of current desktop workstations and graphics hardware only a limited working set of bricks can be locally maintained for a frame to be displayed. This working set is chosen to represent the whole volume at different local resolution levels depending on the current viewer position, transfer function and distinct areas of interest. During runtime the working set of bricks is maintained in CPU- and GPU memory and is adaptively updated by asynchronously fetching data from external sources like hard drives or a network. The CPU memory hereby acts as a secondary level cache for these sources from which the GPU representation is updated. Our volume ray casting algorithm is based on a 3D texture-atlas in GPU memory. This texture-atlas contains the complete working set of bricks of the current multi-resolution representation of the volume. This enables the volume ray casting algorithm to access the whole working set of bricks through only a single 3D texture. For traversing rays through the volume, information about the locations and resolution levels of visited bricks are required for correct compositing computations. We encode this information into a small 3D index texture which represents the current octree

  18. AdS/CFT and Large-N Volume Independence

    SciTech Connect

    Poppitz, Erich; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-08-26

    We study the Eguchi-Kawai reduction in the strong-coupling domain of gauge theories via the gravity dual of N=4 super-Yang-Mills on R{sup 3} x S{sup 1}. We show that D-branes geometrize volume independence in the center-symmetric vacuum and give supergravity predictions for the range of validity of reduced large-N models at strong coupling.

  19. Large volume multiple-path nuclear pumped laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hohl, F.; Deyoung, R.J.

    1981-11-01

    Large volumes of gas are excited by using internal high reflectance mirrors that are arranged so that the optical path crosses back and forth through the excited gaseous medium. By adjusting the external dielectric mirrors of the laser, the number of paths through the laser cavity can be varied. Output powers were obtained that are substantially higher than the output powers of previous nuclear laser systems. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  20. Staged-volume radiosurgery for large arteriovenous malformations: a review.

    PubMed

    AlKhalili, Kenan; Chalouhi, Nohra; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula; Rosenwasser, Robert; Jabbour, Pascal

    2014-09-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective management strategy for properly selected patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, the risk of postradiosurgical radiation-related injury is higher in patients with large AVMs. Multistaged volumetric management of large AVMs was undertaken to limit the radiation exposure to the surrounding normal brain. This strategy offers a promising method for obtaining high AVM obliteration rates with minimal normal tissue damage. The use of embolization as an adjunctive method in the treatment of large AVMs remains controversial. Unfortunately, staged-volume radiosurgery (SVR) has a number of potential pitfalls that affect the outcome. The aim of this article is to highlight the role of SVR in the treatment of large AVMs, to discuss the outcome comparing it to other treatment modalities, and to discuss the potential improvement that could be introduced to this method of treatment. PMID:25175440

  1. Parallel Rendering of Large Time-Varying Volume Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbutt, Alexander E.

    2005-01-01

    Interactive visualization of large time-varying 3D volume datasets has been and still is a great challenge to the modem computational world. It stretches the limits of the memory capacity, the disk space, the network bandwidth and the CPU speed of a conventional computer. In this SURF project, we propose to develop a parallel volume rendering program on SGI's Prism, a cluster computer equipped with state-of-the-art graphic hardware. The proposed program combines both parallel computing and hardware rendering in order to achieve an interactive rendering rate. We use 3D texture mapping and a hardware shader to implement 3D volume rendering on each workstation. We use SGI's VisServer to enable remote rendering using Prism's graphic hardware. And last, we will integrate this new program with ParVox, a parallel distributed visualization system developed at JPL. At the end of the project, we Will demonstrate remote interactive visualization using this new hardware volume renderer on JPL's Prism System using a time-varying dataset from selected JPL applications.

  2. Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Sokolov, D A; Huxley, A D; Kamenev, K V

    2011-07-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements typically require two orders of magnitude longer data collection times and larger sample sizes than neutron diffraction studies. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on pressurised samples are particularly challenging since standard high-pressure apparatus restricts sample volume, attenuates the incident and scattered beams, and contributes background scattering. Here, we present the design of a large volume two-layered piston-cylinder pressure cell with optimised transmission for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The design and the materials selected for the construction of the cell enable its safe use to a pressure of 1.8 GPa with a sample volume in excess of 400 mm(3). The design of the piston seal eliminates the need for a sample container, thus providing a larger sample volume and reduced absorption. The integrated electrical plug with a manganin pressure gauge offers an accurate measurement of pressure over the whole range of operational temperatures. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by an inelastic neutron scattering study of UGe(2). PMID:21806195

  3. Optimized Planning Target Volume for Intact Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Alvin; Jensen, Lindsay G.; Sun Shuai; Song, William Y.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Zhang Fuquan; Jiang, Steve B.; Mell, Loren K.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To model interfraction clinical target volume (CTV) variation in patients with intact cervical cancer and design a planning target volume (PTV) that minimizes normal tissue dose while maximizing CTV coverage. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 50 patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy for intact cervical cancer using daily online cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The CBCTs (n = 972) for each patient were rigidly registered to the planning CT. The CTV was delineated on the planning CT (CTV{sub 0}) and the set of CBCTs ({l_brace}CTV{sub 1}-CTV{sub 25}{r_brace}). Manual (n = 98) and automated (n = 668) landmarks were placed over the surface of CTV{sub 0} with reference to defined anatomic structures. Normal vectors were extended from each landmark, and the minimum length required for a given probability of encompassing CTV{sub 1}-CTV{sub 25} was computed. The resulting expansions were used to generate an optimized PTV. Results: The mean (SD; range) normal vector length to ensure 95% coverage was 4.3 mm (2.7 mm; 1-16 mm). The uniform expansion required to ensure 95% probability of CTV coverage was 13 mm. An anisotropic margin of 20 mm anteriorly and posteriorly and 10 mm superiorly, inferiorly, and laterally also would have ensured a 95% probability of CTV coverage. The volume of the 95% optimized PTV (1470 cm{sup 3}) was significantly lower than both the anisotropic PTV (2220 cm{sup 3}) and the uniformly expanded PTV (2110 cm{sup 3}) (p < 0.001). For a 95% probability of CTV coverage, normal lengths of 1-3 mm were found along the superior and lateral regions of CTV{sub 0}, 5-10 mm along the interfaces of CTV{sub 0} with the bladder and rectum, and 10-14 mm along the anterior surface of CTV{sub 0} at the level of the uterus. Conclusion: Optimizing PTV definition according to surface landmarking resulted in a high probability of CTV coverage with reduced PTV volumes. Our results provide data justifying planning margins to use in practice and

  4. [Gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) in radiotherapy of benign skull base tumors].

    PubMed

    Maire, J P; Liguoro, D; San Galli, F

    2001-10-01

    Skull base tumours represent about 35 to 40% of all intracranial tumours. There are now many reports in the literature confirming the fact that about 80 to 90% of such tumours are controlled with fractionated radiotherapy. Stereotactic and 3-dimensional treatment planning techniques increase local control and central nervous system tolerance. Definition of the gross tumor volume (GTV) is generally easy with currently available medical imaging systems and computers for 3-dimensional dosimetry. The definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) is more difficult to appreciate; it is defined from the CTV plus a margin, which depends on the histology and anterior therapeutic history of the tumour. It is important to take into account the visible tumour and its possible extension pathways (adjacent bone, holes at the base of skull) and/or an anatomic region (sella turcica + adjacent cavernous sinus). It is necessary to evaluate these volumes with CT Scan and MRI to appreciate tumor extension in a 3-dimentional approach, in order to reduce the risk of marginal recurrences. The aim of this paper is to discuss volume definition as a function of tumour site and tumour type to be irradiated. PMID:11715310

  5. Construction of an unyielding target for large horizontal impacts.

    SciTech Connect

    Ammerman, Douglas James; Davie, Neil Thomas; Kalan, Robert J.

    2010-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has constructed an unyielding target at the end of its 2000-foot rocket sled track. This target is made up of approximately 5 million pounds of concrete, an embedded steel load spreading structure, and a steel armor plate face that varies from 10 inches thick at the center to 4 inches thick at the left and right edges. The target/track combination will allow horizontal impacts at regulatory speeds of very large objects, such as a full-scale rail cask, or high-speed impacts of smaller packages. The load-spreading mechanism in the target is based upon the proven design that has been in use for over 20 years at Sandia's aerial cable facility. That target, with a weight of 2 million pounds, has successfully withstood impact forces of up to 25 million pounds. It is expected that the new target will be capable of withstanding impact forces of more than 70 million pounds. During construction various instrumentation was placed in the target so that the response of the target during severe impacts can be monitored. This paper will discuss the construction of the target and provide insights on the testing capabilities at the sled track with this new target.

  6. Geometric Measures of Large Biomolecules: Surface, Volume and Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Mach, Paul; Koehl, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Geometry plays a major role in our attempt to understand the activity of large molecules. For example, surface area and volume are used to quantify the interactions between these molecules and the water surrounding them in implicit solvent models. In addition, the detection of pockets serves as a starting point for predictive studies of biomolecule-ligand interactions. The alpha shape theory provides an exact and robust method for computing these geometric measures. Several implementations of this theory are currently available. We show however that these implementations fail on very large macromolecular systems. We show that these difficulties are not theoretical; rather, they are related to the architecture of current computers that rely on the use of cache memory to speed up calculation. By rewriting the algorithms that implement the different steps of the alpha shape theory such that we enforce locality, we show that we can remediate these cache problems; the corresponding code, UnionBall has an apparent (n) behavior over a large range of values of n (up to tens of millions), where n is the number of atoms. As an example, it takes 136 seconds with UnionBall to compute the contribution of each atom to the surface area and volume of a viral capsid with more than five million atoms on a commodity PC. UnionBall includes functions for computing the surface area and volume of the intersection of two, three and four spheres that are fully detailed in an appendix. UnionBall is available as an OpenSource software. PMID:21823134

  7. Effect of large volume paracentesis on plasma volume--a cause of hypovolemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, H.W.; Rakov, N.E.; Savage, E.; Reynolds, T.B.

    1985-05-01

    Large volume paracentesis, while effectively relieving symptoms in patients with tense ascites, has been generally avoided due to reports of complications attributed to an acute reduction in intravascular volume. Measurements of plasma volume in these subjects have been by indirect methods and have not uniformly confirmed hypovolemia. We have prospectively evaluated 18 patients (20 paracenteses) with tense ascites and peripheral edema due to chronic liver disease undergoing 5 liter paracentesis for relief of symptoms. Plasma volume pre- and postparacentesis was assessed by a /sup 125/I-labeled human serum albumin dilution technique as well as by the change in hematocrit and postural blood pressure difference. No significant change in serum sodium, urea nitrogen, hematocrit or postural systolic blood pressure difference was noted at 24 or 48 hr after paracentesis. Serum creatinine at 24 hr after paracentesis was unchanged but a small but statistically significant increase in serum creatinine was noted at 48 hr postparacentesis. Plasma volume changed -2.7% (n = 6, not statistically significant) during the first 24 hr and -2.8% (n = 12, not statistically significant) during the 0- to 48-hr period. No complications from paracentesis were noted. These results suggest that 5 liter paracentesis for relief of symptoms is safe in patients with tense ascites and peripheral edema from chronic liver disease.

  8. Large volume loss during cleavage formation, Hamburg sequence, Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutner, Edward C.; Charles, Emmanuel G.

    1985-11-01

    Green reduction spots in red slate of the Hamburg sequence exposed near Shartlesville, Pennsylvania, have axial ratios of 1.42:1.0:0.28 on the limbs of near-isoclinal folds and 1.0:0.79:0.41 in fold hinge zones. Conodont cusps and denticles within the reduction spots have been brittlely pulled apart and give independent measures of extension in various directions. Comparison of conodont extensions with reduction spot shapes on limbs and hinges indicates that sedimentary compaction of 44% preceded the tectonic strain associated with cleavage formation. This strain, having identical maximum extensions but greater shortening in fold hinges as compared to limbs, was characterized by 41% extension in X, no change in Y, 50% to 59% shortening in Z, and 29% to 42% tectonic volume loss. The general lack of directed overgrowths on grains reflects the large volume loss and contrasts with other slates, where deformation was an almost constant volume process and extension in X compensated for shortening in Z. *Present address: Department of Geology, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056

  9. Efficient Large Volume Lentiviral Vector Production Using Flow Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Witting, Scott R.; Li, Lin-Hong; Jasti, Aparna; Allen, Cornell; Cornetta, Kenneth; Brady, James; Shivakumar, Rama

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Lentiviral vectors are beginning to emerge as a viable choice for human gene therapy. Here, we describe a method that combines the convenience of a suspension cell line with a scalable, nonchemically based, and GMP-compliant transfection technique known as flow electroporation (EP). Flow EP parameters for serum-free adapted HEK293FT cells were optimized to limit toxicity and maximize titers. Using a third generation, HIV-based, lentiviral vector system pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis glycoprotein envelope, both small- and large-volume transfections produced titers over 1×108 infectious units/mL. Therefore, an excellent option for implementing large-scale, clinical lentiviral productions is flow EP of suspension cell lines. PMID:21933028

  10. Analysis of volume holographic storage allowing large-angle illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamir, Joseph

    2005-05-01

    Advanced technological developments have stimulated renewed interest in volume holography for applications such as information storage and wavelength multiplexing for communications and laser beam shaping. In these and many other applications, the information-carrying wave fronts usually possess narrow spatial-frequency bands, although they may propagate at large angles with respect to each other or a preferred optical axis. Conventional analytic methods are not capable of properly analyzing the optical architectures involved. For mitigation of the analytic difficulties, a novel approximation is introduced to treat narrow spatial-frequency band wave fronts propagating at large angles. This approximation is incorporated into the analysis of volume holography based on a plane-wave decomposition and Fourier analysis. As a result of the analysis, the recently introduced generalized Bragg selectivity is rederived for this more general case and is shown to provide enhanced performance for the above indicated applications. The power of the new theoretical description is demonstrated with the help of specific examples and computer simulations. The simulations reveal some interesting effects, such as coherent motion blur, that were predicted in an earlier publication.

  11. Small-x parton distributions of large hadronic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebecker, A.; Weigert, H.

    1998-07-01

    A simple and intuitive calculation, based on the semiclassical approximation, demonstrates how the large size of a hadronic target introduces a new perturbative scale into the process of small-x deep inelastic scattering. The above calculation, which is performed in the target rest frame, is compared to the McLerran-Venugopalan model for scattering off large nuclei, which has first highlighted this effect in the infinite momentum frame. It is shown that the two approaches, i.e., the rest frame based semiclassical calculation and the infinite momentum frame based McLerran-Venugopalan approach are quantitatively consistent.

  12. Toward large-area targets for “TRAKULA”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vascon, A.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Runke, J.

    2011-11-01

    TRAKULA ( Transmutationsrelevante kernphysikalische Untersuchungen langlebiger Aktinide, i.e., nuclear physical investigations of long-lived actinides with relevance to transmutation) is a joint research project of the German Federal Ministry of Science and Education (BMBF) on nuclear physics investigations with modern scientific, technological and numerical methods. Experiments concerning the transmutation of radioactive waste are a central topic of the project. For this, large-area samples (≥40 cm 2) of 235,238U and 239,242Pu compounds are required for the calibration of fission chambers and for fission yield measurements. Another topic within the project requires large-area targets for precise measurements of the half-life, t1/2, of very long-lived α-particle emitters like 144Nd ( t1/2≈2×10 15 y). Here, we report on electrodeposition tests with Gd and Nd (used as chemical homologs of the actinides), which were performed to find optimal deposition conditions for small-area targets that should be applicable to future large-area targets. The layers were produced by molecular plating. A new stirring technique, ultrasonic stirring, was adopted and found to be suitable for producing large-area targets. Moreover, two different current densities (namely 0.7 and 1.4 mA/cm 2) were studied and found appropriate for target preparation. Characterization of the layers with different analytical techniques played a major role in these studies to gain a deeper understanding of the deposition process itself: neutron activation analysis and γ-spectroscopy were used for yield measurements, radiographic imaging for homogeneity studies, scanning electron microscopy for morphology studies, and atomic force microscopy for roughness studies. According to the obtained results, a new electrochemical cell for the production of large-area targets was designed.

  13. Large-scale optimal sensor array management for target tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tharmarasa, Ratnasingham; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam; Hernandez, Marcel L.

    2004-01-01

    Large-scale sensor array management has applications in a number of target tracking problems. For example, in ground target tracking, hundreds or even thousands of unattended ground sensors (UGS) may be dropped over a large surveillance area. At any one time it may then only be possible to utilize a very small number of the available sensors at the fusion center because of bandwidth limitations. A similar situation may arise in tracking sea surface or underwater targets using a large number of sonobuoys. The general problem is then to select a subset of the available sensors in order to optimize tracking performance. The Posterior Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (PCRLB), which quantifies the obtainable accuracy of target state estimation, is used as the basis for network management. In a practical scenario with even hundreds of sensors, the number of possible sensor combinations would make it impossible to enumerate all possibilities in real-time. Efficient local (or greedy) search techniques must then be used to make the computational load manageable. In this paper we introduce an efficient search strategy for selecting a subset of the sensor array for use during each sensor change interval in multi-target tracking. Simulation results illustrating the performance of the sensor array manager are also presented.

  14. Large-scale optimal sensor array management for target tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tharmarasa, Ratnasingham; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam; Hernandez, Marcel L.

    2003-12-01

    Large-scale sensor array management has applications in a number of target tracking problems. For example, in ground target tracking, hundreds or even thousands of unattended ground sensors (UGS) may be dropped over a large surveillance area. At any one time it may then only be possible to utilize a very small number of the available sensors at the fusion center because of bandwidth limitations. A similar situation may arise in tracking sea surface or underwater targets using a large number of sonobuoys. The general problem is then to select a subset of the available sensors in order to optimize tracking performance. The Posterior Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (PCRLB), which quantifies the obtainable accuracy of target state estimation, is used as the basis for network management. In a practical scenario with even hundreds of sensors, the number of possible sensor combinations would make it impossible to enumerate all possibilities in real-time. Efficient local (or greedy) search techniques must then be used to make the computational load manageable. In this paper we introduce an efficient search strategy for selecting a subset of the sensor array for use during each sensor change interval in multi-target tracking. Simulation results illustrating the performance of the sensor array manager are also presented.

  15. Cryogenic control system of the large COMPASS polarized target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautheron, F.; Ball, J.; Baum, G.; Berglund, P.; Doshita, N.; Goertz, St.; Gustafsson, K.; Horikawa, N.; Kisselev, Y.; Koivuniemi, J.; Kondo, K.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G.

    2004-06-01

    The dilution refrigerator used to cool the large COMPASS polarized target is monitored through a PC running LabVIEW TM 6.1 under Windows 2000 TM. About 60 parameters of the target (temperatures, pressures, flow rates) are continuously plotted and checked. They are periodically recorded in an Oracle TM database and in a data file. An alarm for every parameter can be individually activated and optionally connected to a GSM (Global System for Mobile Communication) delivery message system. A web server receives and publishes the online status of the target with online tables and graphics on a dedicated COMPASS polarized target information web site. A Siemens programmable logic controller (PLC) powered by an uninterruptable source keeps the cryogenic system safe and stable during the long beam periods by controlling valves and interlocks. This safety feature protects the dilution refrigerator against potential damages in case of power failure.

  16. A precision translation stage for reproducing measured target volume motions.

    PubMed

    Litzenberg, Dale W; Hadley, Scott W; Lam, Kwok L; Balter, James M

    2007-01-01

    The development of 4D imaging, treatment planning and treatment delivery methods for radiation therapy require the use of a high-precision translation stage for testing and validation. These technologies may require spatial resolutions of 1 mm, and temporal resolutions of 2-30 Hz for CT imaging, electromagnetic tracking, and fluoroscopic imaging. A 1D programmable translation stage capable of reproducing idealized and measured anatomic motions common to the thorax has been design and built to meet these spatial and temporal resolution requirement with phantoms weighing up to 27 kg. The stage consists of a polycarbonate base and table, driven by an AC servo motor with encoder feedback by means of a belt-coupled precision screw. Complex motions are possible through a programmable motion controller that is capable of running multiple independent control and monitoring programs concurrently. Programmable input and output ports allow motion to be synchronized with beam delivery and other imaging and treatment delivery devices to within 2.0 ms. Average deviations from the programmed positions are typically 0.2 mm or less, while the average typical maximum positional errors are typically 0.5 mm for an indefinite number of idealized breathing motion cycles and while reproducing measured target volume motions for several minutes. PMID:17712294

  17. SUSY’s Ladder: Reframing sequestering at Large Volume

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reece, Matthew; Xue, Wei

    2016-04-07

    Theories with approximate no-scale structure, such as the Large Volume Scenario, have a distinctive hierarchy of multiple mass scales in between TeV gaugino masses and the Planck scale, which we call SUSY's Ladder. This is a particular realization of Split Supersymmetry in which the same small parameter suppresses gaugino masses relative to scalar soft masses, scalar soft masses relative to the gravitino mass, and the UV cutoff or string scale relative to the Planck scale. This scenario has many phenomenologically interesting properties, and can avoid dangers including the gravitino problem, flavor problems, and the moduli-induced LSP problem that plague othermore » supersymmetric theories. We study SUSY's Ladder using a superspace formalism that makes the mysterious cancelations in previous computations manifest. This opens the possibility of a consistent effective field theory understanding of the phenomenology of these scenarios, based on power-counting in the small ratio of string to Planck scales. We also show that four-dimensional theories with approximate no-scale structure enforced by a single volume modulus arise only from two special higher-dimensional theories: five-dimensional supergravity and ten-dimensional type IIB supergravity. As a result, this gives a phenomenological argument in favor of ten dimensional ultraviolet physics which is different from standard arguments based on the consistency of superstring theory.« less

  18. Large volume water sprays for dispersing warm fogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.; Anderson, B. J.; Burns, R. A.; Lala, G. G.; Meyer, M. B.

    1986-01-01

    A new method for dispersing of warm fogs which impede visibility and alter schedules is described. The method uses large volume recycled water sprays to create curtains of falling drops through which the fog is processed by the ambient wind and spray-induced air flow; the fog droplets are removed by coalescence/rainout. The efficiency of this fog droplet removal process depends on the size spectra of the spray drops and optimum spray drop size is calculated as between 0.3-1.0 mm in diameter. Water spray tests were conducted in order to determine the drop size spectra and temperature response of sprays produced by commercially available fire-fighting nozzles, and nozzle array tests were utilized to study air flow patterns and the thermal properties of the overall system. The initial test data reveal that the fog-dispersal procedure is effective.

  19. Large volume water sprays for dispersing warm fogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, V. W.; Anderson, B. J.; Burns, R. A.; Lala, G. G.; Meyer, M. B.

    A new method for dispersing of warm fogs which impede visibility and alter schedules is described. The method uses large volume recycled water sprays to create curtains of falling drops through which the fog is processed by the ambient wind and spray-induced air flow; the fog droplets are removed by coalescence/rainout. The efficiency of this fog droplet removal process depends on the size spectra of the spray drops and optimum spray drop size is calculated as between 0.3-1.0 mm in diameter. Water spray tests were conducted in order to determine the drop size spectra and temperature response of sprays produced by commercially available fire-fighting nozzles, and nozzle array tests were utilized to study air flow patterns and the thermal properties of the overall system. The initial test data reveal that the fog-dispersal procedure is effective.

  20. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Phase A study of the Large Space Telescope (LST) is reported. The study defines an LST concept based on the broad mission guidelines provided by the Office of Space Science (OSS), the scientific requirements developed by OSS with the scientific community, and an understanding of long range NASA planning current at the time the study was performed. The LST is an unmanned astronomical observatory facility, consisting of an optical telescope assembly (OTA), scientific instrument package (SIP), and a support systems module (SSM). The report consists of five volumes. The report describes the constraints and trade off analyses that were performed to arrive at a reference design for each system and for the overall LST configuration. A low cost design approach was followed in the Phase A study. This resulted in the use of standard spacecraft hardware, the provision for maintenance at the black box level, growth potential in systems designs, and the sharing of shuttle maintenance flights with other payloads.

  1. Striped Bass, morone saxatilis, egg incubation in large volume jars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, C.J.; Wrege, B.M.; Jeffery, Isely J.

    2010-01-01

    The standard McDonald jar was compared with a large volume jar for striped bass, Morone saxatilis, egg incubation. The McDonald jar measured 16 cm in diameter by 45 cm in height and had a volume of 6 L. The experimental jar measured 0.4 m in diameter by 1.3 m in height and had a volume of 200 L. The hypothesis is that there is no difference in percent survival of fry hatched in experimental jars compared with McDonald jars. Striped bass brood fish were collected from the Coosa River and spawned using the dry spawn method of fertilization. Four McDonald jars were stocked with approximately 150 g of eggs each. Post-hatch survival was estimated at 48, 96, and 144 h. Stocking rates resulted in an average egg loading rate (??1 SE) in McDonald jars of 21.9 ?? 0.03 eggs/mL and in experimental jars of 10.9 ?? 0.57 eggs/mL. The major finding of this study was that average fry survival was 37.3 ?? 4.49% for McDonald jars and 34.2 ?? 3.80% for experimental jars. Although survival in experimental jars was slightly less than in McDonald jars, the effect of container volume on survival to 48 h (F = 6.57; df = 1,5; P > 0.05), 96 h (F = 0.02; df = 1, 4; P > 0.89), and 144 h (F = 3.50; df = 1, 4; P > 0.13) was not statistically significant. Mean survival between replicates ranged from 14.7 to 60.1% in McDonald jars and from 10.1 to 54.4% in experimental jars. No effect of initial stocking rate on survival (t = 0.06; df = 10; P > 0.95) was detected. Experimental jars allowed for incubation of a greater number of eggs in less than half the floor space of McDonald jars. As hatchery production is often limited by space or water supply, experimental jars offer an alternative to extending spawning activities, thereby reducing labor and operations cost. As survival was similar to McDonald jars, the experimental jar is suitable for striped bass egg incubation. ?? Copyright by the World Aquaculture Society 2010.

  2. [Gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) in adult gliomas].

    PubMed

    Kantor, G; Loiseau, H; Vital, A; Mazeron, J J

    2001-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiform and astrocytoma are the most frequent primary cancer of the central nervous system of adult. Definitions of gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) are based on the confrontation of clinical presentation (age, performance status, neurologic symptoms...), histological type and imaging aspects. For glioblastoma multiform, the GTV can be defined by the area of contrast enhancement observed on the CT scan or MRI. Definition of the CTV can be more difficult and have to take into account the risk of presence of isolated malignant cells in the oedema surrounding the tumor or in the adjacent brain structures. The classical concept of GTV plus a safety margin of 2 cm around is discussed with a CTV containing at least all the oedematous area and eventually adjacent brain structures (nuclei, corpus callosum or other long associative fibers...). For low grade astrocytoma, the definition of GTV can be difficult if the tumoral infiltration is diffuse without nodular visible tumor. CTV corresponds to at least T2 MRI hypersignal area when visible. For postoperative tumor, technical considerations are important for the detection of residual tumor. A safety margin around the resected area is designed according to the risk of presence of isolated cells or involvement of adjacent brain structures. PMID:11715309

  3. Volume visualization of multiple alignment of large genomicDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Nameeta; Dillard, Scott E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Hamann, Bernd

    2005-07-25

    Genomes of hundreds of species have been sequenced to date, and many more are being sequenced. As more and more sequence data sets become available, and as the challenge of comparing these massive ''billion basepair DNA sequences'' becomes substantial, so does the need for more powerful tools supporting the exploration of these data sets. Similarity score data used to compare aligned DNA sequences is inherently one-dimensional. One-dimensional (1D) representations of these data sets do not effectively utilize screen real estate. As a result, tools using 1D representations are incapable of providing informatory overview for extremely large data sets. We present a technique to arrange 1D data in 3D space to allow us to apply state-of-the-art interactive volume visualization techniques for data exploration. We demonstrate our technique using multi-millions-basepair-long aligned DNA sequence data and compare it with traditional 1D line plots. The results show that our technique is superior in providing an overview of entire data sets. Our technique, coupled with 1D line plots, results in effective multi-resolution visualization of very large aligned sequence data sets.

  4. Successful pregnancies with directional freezing of large volume buck semen.

    PubMed

    Gacitua, H; Arav, A

    2005-02-01

    Artificial insemination with frozen-thawed buck semen shows variable results which depend on many factors related to semen quality and the cryopreservation processing. We conducted experiments based on a new freezing method, directional freezing, of large volumes (8 ml). In the first experiment semen from three Saanen bucks, ages 1-2-years-old and genetically selected for milk improvement, was frozen individually. Two to three-years-old Saanen females (n = 164) were synchronized with controlled internal drug release (CIDR), pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin (PMSG) and prostaglandin. Double cervical inseminations were performed with frozen-thawed semen and fresh semen as control. In the second experiment we used pooled, washed frozen semen to examine the effect of washed seminal plasma. The motility after washing was 80-90% and after thawing was 55-65% for all bucks. The sperm concentration increased with the collections and the advance into the breeding season from 1.9 x 10(9) to 4.4 x 10(9) cell/ml average. Two inseminations were carried out at 8h intervals. The first insemination was performed at 32 h after CIDR withdrawal with fresh and frozen-thawed semen. Pregnancy rates were assessed by ultrasonography conducted 40 and 90 days post-insemination (from three bucks). Results were 58, 67, 50% with fresh semen, and for frozen semen were 33, 37 and 53%; these results were significantly different in one of the three bucks (P < 0.005). In the second experiment with pooled, washed semen the pregnancy rate was 41.6%, which compared with the average results of the frozen semen in the first experiment 38.9% no significant difference was found. We conclude that freezing buck semen in large volumes (8 ml) is possible. Cryobanking of buck semen will facilitate a genetic breeding program in goats and preservation of biodiversity. Washed semen did not improve the fertility of the semen when Andromed bull extender is used. PMID:15629809

  5. A large volume flat coil probe for oriented membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Gor'kov, Peter L; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Fu, Riqiang; Hu, Jun; Cross, Timothy A; Cotten, Myriam; Brey, William W

    2006-07-01

    15N detection of mechanically aligned membrane proteins benefits from large sample volumes that compensate for the low sensitivity of the observe nuclei, dilute sample preparation, and for the poor filling factor arising from the presence of alignment plates. Use of larger multi-tuned solenoids, however, is limited by wavelength effects that lead to inhomogeneous RF fields across the sample, complicating cross-polarization experiments. We describe a 600 MHz 15N-1H solid-state NMR probe with large (580 mm3) RF solenoid for high-power, multi-pulse sequence experiments, such as polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA). In order to provide efficient detection for 15N, a 4-turn solenoidal sample coil is used that exceeds 0.27 lambda at the 600 MHz 1H resonance. A balanced tuning-matching circuit is employed to preserve RF homogeneity across the sample for adequate magnetization transfer from 1H to 15N. We describe a procedure for optimization of the shorted 1/4 lambda coaxial trap that allows for the sufficiently strong RF fields in both 1H and 15N channels to be achieved within the power limits of 300 W 1H and 1 kW 15N amplifiers. The 8 x 6 x 12 mm solenoid sustains simultaneous B1 irradiation of 100 kHz at 1H frequency and 51 kHz at 15N frequency for at least 5 ms with 265 and 700 W of input power in the respective channels. The probe functionality is demonstrated by 2D 15N-1H PISEMA spectroscopy for two applications at 600 MHz. PMID:16580852

  6. New Large Volume Press Beamlines at the Canadian Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, H. J.; Hormes, J.; Lauterjung, J.; Secco, R.; Hallin, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Canadian Light Source, the German Research Centre for Geosciences and the Western University recently agreed to establish two new large volume press beamlines at the Canadian Lightsource. As the first step a 250 tons DIA-LVP will be installed at the IDEAS beamline in 2014. The further development is associated with the construction of a superconducting wiggler beamline at the Brockhouse sector. A 1750 tons DIA LVP will be installed there about 2 years later. Up to the completion of this wiggler beamline the big press will be used for offline high pressure high temperature experiments under simulated Earth's mantle conditions. In addition to X-ray diffraction, all up-to-date high pressure techniques as ultrasonic interferometry, deformation analyses by X-radiography, X-ray densitometry, falling sphere viscosimetry, multi-staging etc. will be available at both beamlines. After the required commissioning the beamlines will be open to the worldwide user community from Geosciences, general material sciences, physics, chemistry, biology etc. based on the evaluation and ranking of the submitted user proposals by an international review panel.

  7. Novel multi-slit large-volume air sampler.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, L M; Decker, H M; Frisque, D E; Phillips, C R; Dahlgren, C M

    1968-08-01

    Scientific investigators who are interested in the various facets of airborne transmission of disease in research laboratories and hospitals need a simple, continuous, high-volume sampling device that will recover a high percentage of viable microorganisms from the atmosphere. Such a device must sample a large quantity of air. It should effect direct transfer of the air into an all-purpose liquid medium in order to collect bacteria, viruses, rickettsia, and fungi, and it should be easy to use. A simple multi-slit impinger sampler that fulfills these requirements has been developed. It operates at an air-sampling rate of 500 liters/min, has a high collection efficiency, functions at a low pressure drop, and, in contrast to some earlier instruments, does not depend upon electrostatic precipitation at high voltages. When compared to the all-glass impinger, the multi-slit impinger sampler collected microbial aerosols of Serratia marcescens at 82% efficiency, and aerosols of Bacillus subtilis var. niger at 78% efficiency. PMID:4970892

  8. OPS MCC level B/C formulation requirements: Area targets and space volumes processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, M. J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The level B/C mathematical specifications for the area targets and space volumes processor (ATSVP) are described. The processor is designed to compute the acquisition-of-signal (AOS) and loss-of-signal (LOS) times for area targets and space volumes. The characteristics of the area targets and space volumes are given. The mathematical equations necessary to determine whether the spacecraft lies within the area target or space volume are given. These equations provide a detailed model of the target geometry. A semianalytical technique for predicting the AOS and LOS time periods is disucssed. This technique was designed to bound the actual visibility period using a simplified target geometry model and unperturbed orbital motion. Functional overview of the ATSVP is presented and it's detailed logic flow is described.

  9. Technology transfer from NASA to targeted industries, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccain, Wayne; Schroer, Bernard J.; Souder, William E.; Spann, Mary S.; Watters, Harry; Ziemke, M. Carl

    1993-01-01

    This volume contains the following materials to support Volume 1: (1) Survey of Metal Fabrication Industry in Alabama; (2) Survey of Electronics Manufacturing/Assembly Industry in Alabama; (3) Apparel Modular Manufacturing Simulators; (4) Synopsis of a Stereolithography Project; (5) Transferring Modular Manufacturing Technology to an Apparel Firm; (6) Letters of Support; (7) Fact Sheets; (8) Publications; and (9) One Stop Access to NASA Technology Brochure.

  10. High volume fabrication of laser targets using MEMS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spindloe, C.; Arthur, G.; Hall, F.; Tomlinson, S.; Potter, R.; Kar, S.; Green, J.; Higginbotham, A.; Booth, N.; Tolley, M. K.

    2016-04-01

    The latest techniques for the fabrication of high power laser targets, using processes developed for the manufacture of Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) devices are discussed. These laser targets are designed to meet the needs of the increased shot numbers that are available in the latest design of laser facilities. Traditionally laser targets have been fabricated using conventional machining or coarse etching processes and have been produced in quantities of 10s to low 100s. Such targets can be used for high complexity experiments such as Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) studies and can have many complex components that need assembling and characterisation with high precision. Using the techniques that are common to MEMS devices and integrating these with an existing target fabrication capability we are able to manufacture and deliver targets to these systems. It also enables us to manufacture novel targets that have not been possible using other techniques. In addition, developments in the positioning systems that are required to deliver these targets to the laser focus are also required and a system to deliver the target to a focus of an F2 beam at 0.1Hz is discussed.

  11. Delineation of Supraclavicular Target Volumes in Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Lindsay C.; Diehn, Felix E.; Boughey, Judy C.; Childs, Stephanie K.; Park, Sean S.; Yan, Elizabeth S.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Mutter, Robert W.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: To map the location of gross supraclavicular metastases in patients with breast cancer, in order to determine areas at highest risk of harboring subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with axial imaging of gross supraclavicular disease were identified from an institutional breast cancer registry. Locations of the metastatic lymph nodes were transferred onto representative axial computed tomography images of the supraclavicular region and compared with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) breast cancer atlas for radiation therapy planning. Results: Sixty-two patients with 161 supraclavicular nodal metastases were eligible for study inclusion. At the time of diagnosis, 117 nodal metastases were present in 44 patients. Forty-four nodal metastases in 18 patients were detected at disease recurrence, 4 of whom had received prior radiation to the supraclavicular fossa. Of the 161 nodal metastases, 95 (59%) were within the RTOG consensus volume, 4 nodal metastases (2%) in 3 patients were marginally within the volume, and 62 nodal metastases (39%) in 30 patients were outside the volume. Supraclavicular disease outside the RTOG consensus volume was located in 3 regions: at the level of the cricoid and thyroid cartilage (superior to the RTOG volume), in the posterolateral supraclavicular fossa (posterolateral to the RTOG volume), and in the lateral low supraclavicular fossa (lateral to the RTOG volume). Only women with multiple supraclavicular metastases had nodal disease that extended superiorly to the level of the thyroid cartilage. Conclusions: For women with risk of harboring subclinical supraclavicular disease warranting the addition of supraclavicular radiation, coverage of the posterior triangle and the lateral low supraclavicular region should be considered. For women with known supraclavicular disease, extension of neck coverage superior to the cricoid cartilage may be warranted.

  12. Re-accretion Efficiencies in Small Impactor - Large Target Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowski, Tim; Wurm, G.; Jens, T.

    2013-10-01

    During the formation process of planets, small dust particles grow to km-sized planetesimals via collisions. While the collision partners are equally sized in early phases, fragmentation, catastrophic destruction and other recycling processes can lead to collisions between partners with various size ranges. The gas in protoplanetary disks exerts size- and mass-dependent drag forces on the dust particles and bodies present which is why the relative velocities between the small particles and larger bodies increase. A field of investigation are the small-impactor large-target collisions where (partial) erosion can occur and small ejected dust particles can be produced. These ejecta can couple to the gas quite rapidly and can then be recaptured by the target and stick to it in secondary collisions. We use a Monte-Carlo code to calculate re-accretion efficiencies under certain conditions i.e. in free molecular flow regime (stream lines end on target body; impactors are completely coupled to the gas). Using experimental data we developed a model for the amount, masses, directions, and velocities of the ejecta depending on the impactor mass and velocity and the position of impact. The amount of re-accreted ejecta as well as the total re-accreted mass can be determined by using the solution of the equation of motion for particles in gaseous environments. Both - the amount dependent efficiency as well as the mass dependent efficiency - are highly dependent on the seven free parameters (impact velocity, impactor size and density, target size and density, gas pressure and temperature) but generally benefit from high gas velocities and a large size difference between target and impactor. Our final intention is to provide an analytical expression for the re-accretion efficiencies in respect to the free parameters and to use this in different disk models for sweeping the free parameters dependent on the distance to the central star. One major advantage of our code is the

  13. A method of calculating a lung clinical target volume DVH for IMRT with intrafractional motion.

    PubMed

    Kung, J H; Zygmanski, P; Choi, N; Chen, G T Y

    2003-06-01

    The motion of lung tumors from respiration has been reported in the literature to be as large as 1-2 cm. This motion requires an additional margin between the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) and the Planning Target Volume (PTV). In Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), while such a margin is necessary, the margin may not be sufficient to avoid unintended high and low dose regions to the interior on moving CTV. Gated treatment has been proposed to improve normal tissues sparing as well as to ensure accurate dose coverage of the tumor volume. The following questions have not been addressed in the literature: (a) what is the dose error to a target volume without a gated IMRT treatment? (b) What is an acceptable gating window for such a treatment. In this study, we address these questions by proposing a novel technique for calculating the three-dimensional (3-D) dose error that would result if a lung IMRT plan were delivered without a gated linac beam. The method is also generalized for gated treatment with an arbitrary triggering window. IMRT plans for three patients with lung tumors were studied. The treatment plans were generated with HELIOS for delivery with 6 MV on a CL2100 Varian linear accelerator with a 26 pair MLC. A CTV to PTV margin of 1 cm was used. An IMRT planning system searches for an optimized fluence map phi(x,y) for each port, which is then converted into a dynamic MLC file (DMLC). The DMLC file contains information about MLC subfield shapes and the fractional Monitor Units (MUs) to be delivered for each subfield. With a lung tumor, a CTV that executes a quasiperiodic motion z(t) does not receive phi(x,y), but rather an Effective Incident Fluence EIF(x,y). We numerically evaluate the EIF(x,y) from a given DMLC file by a coordinate transformation to the Target's Eye View (TEV). In the TEV coordinate system, the CTV itself is stationary, and the MLC is seen to execute a motion -z(t) that is superimposed on the DMLC motion. The resulting EIF(x,y) is

  14. Data fusion for planning target volume and isodose prediction in prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouranian, Saman; Ramezani, Mahdi; Mahdavi, S. Sara; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2015-03-01

    In low-dose prostate brachytherapy treatment, a large number of radioactive seeds is implanted in and adjacent to the prostate gland. Planning of this treatment involves the determination of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), followed by defining the optimal number of seeds, needles and their coordinates for implantation. The two major planning tasks, i.e. PTV determination and seed definition, are associated with inter- and intra-expert variability. Moreover, since these two steps are performed in sequence, the variability is accumulated in the overall treatment plan. In this paper, we introduce a model based on a data fusion technique that enables joint determination of PTV and the minimum Prescribed Isodose (mPD) map. The model captures the correlation between different information modalities consisting of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) volumes, PTV and isodose contours. We take advantage of joint Independent Component Analysis (jICA) as a linear decomposition technique to obtain a set of joint components that optimally describe such correlation. We perform a component stability analysis to generate a model with stable parameters that predicts the PTV and isodose contours solely based on a new patient TRUS volume. We propose a framework for both modeling and prediction processes and evaluate it on a dataset of 60 brachytherapy treatment records. We show PTV prediction error of 10:02+/-4:5% and the V100 isodose overlap of 97+/-3:55% with respect to the clinical gold standard.

  15. Resonant RF network antennas for large-area and large-volume inductively coupled plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenstein, Ch; Guittienne, Ph; Howling, A. A.

    2013-10-01

    Large-area and large-volume radio frequency (RF) plasmas are produced by different arrangements of an elementary electrical mesh consisting of two conductors interconnected by a capacitor at each end. The obtained cylindrical and planar RF networks are resonant and generate very high RF currents. The input impedance of such RF networks shows the behaviour of an RLC parallel resonance equivalent circuit. The real impedance at the resonance frequency is of great advantage for power matching compared with conventional inductive devices. Changes in the RLC equivalent circuit during the observed E-H transition will allow future interpretation of the plasma-antenna coupling. Furthermore, high power transfer efficiencies are found during inductively coupled plasma (ICP) operation. For the planar RF antenna network it is shown that the E-H transition occurs simultaneously over the entire antenna. The underlying physics of these discharges induced by the resonant RF network antenna is found to be identical to that of the conventional ICP devices described in the literature. The resonant RF network antenna is a new versatile plasma source, which can be adapted to applications in industry and research.

  16. The 1980 Large space systems technology. Volume 2: Base technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriver, F., III (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    Technology pertinent to large antenna systems, technology related to large space platform systems, and base technology applicable to both antenna and platform systems are discussed. Design studies, structural testing results, and theoretical applications are presented with accompanying validation data. A total systems approach including controls, platforms, and antennas is presented as a cohesive, programmatic plan for large space systems.

  17. Atlas-Based Semiautomatic Target Volume Definition (CTV) for Head-and-Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Strassmann, Gerd; Abdellaoui, Soulimane; Richter, Detlef; Bekkaoui, Fayzal; Haderlein, Marlene; Fokas, Emmanouil; Timmesfeld, Nina; Vogel, Birgitt M.D.; Henzel, Martin; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a new semiautomatic method to improve target delineation in head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: We implemented an atlas-based software program using fourteen anatomic landmarks as well as the most superior and inferior computerd tomography slices for automatic target delineation, using an advanced laryngeal carcinoma as an example. Registration was made by an affine transformation. Evaluation was performed with manually drawn contours for comparison. Three physicians sampled and further applied a target volume atlas to ten other computer tomography data sets. In addition, a rapid three-dimensional (3D) correction program was developed. Results: The mean time to the first semiautomatic target delineation proposal was 2.7 minutes. Manual contouring required 20.2 minutes per target, whereas semiautomatic target volume definition with the rapid 3D correction was completed in only 9.7 minutes. The net calculation time for image registration of the target volume atlas was negligible (approximately 0.6 seconds). Our method depicted a sufficient adaptation of the target volume atlas on the new data sets, with a mean similarity index of 77.2%. The similarity index increased up to 85% after 3D correction performed by the physicians. Conclusions: We have developed a new, feasible method for semiautomatic contouring that saves a significant amount (51.8%) of target delineation time for head-and-neck cancer patients. This approach uses a target volume atlas and a landmark model. The software was evaluated by means of laryngeal cancer but has important implications for various tumor types whereby target volumes remain constant in form and do not move with respiration.

  18. Target volume definition for three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J G

    1998-06-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) is a mode of high precision radiotherapy which has the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio of radiation therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The preliminary clinical experience with 3DCRT has been promising and justifies further endeavour to refine its clinical application and ultimately test its role in randomized trials. There are several steps to be taken before 3DCRT evolves into an effective single modality for the treatment of lung cancer and before it is effectively integrated with chemotherapy. This article addresses core issues in the process of target volume definition for the application of 3DCRT technology to lung cancer. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report no. 50 definitions of target volumes are used to identify the factors influencing target volumes in lung cancer. The rationale for applying 3DCRT to lung cancer is based on the frequency of failure to eradicate gross tumour with conventional approaches. It may therefore be appropriate to ignore subclinical or microscopic extensions when designing a clinical target volume, thereby restricting target volume size and allowing dose escalation. When the clinical target volume is expanded to a planning target volume, an optimized margin would result in homogeneous irradiation to the highest dose feasible within normal tissue constraints. To arrive at such optimized margins, multiple factors, including data acquisition, data transfer, patient movement, treatment reproducibility, and internal organ and target volume motion, must be considered. These factors may vary significantly depending on technology and techniques, and published quantitative analyses are no substitute for meticulous attention to detail and audit of performance. PMID:9849380

  19. Technology transfer from NASA to targeted industries, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccain, Wayne; Schroer, Bernard J.; Souder, William E.; Spann, Mary S.; Watters, Harry; Ziemke, M. Carl

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) technology transfer to three target industries with focus on the apparel manufacturing industry in Alabama. Also included in this report are an analysis of the 1992 problem statements submitted by Alabama firms, the results of the survey of 1987-88 NASA Tech Brief requests, the results of the followup to Alabama submitted problem statements, and the development of the model describing the MSFC technology transfer process.

  20. International Spine Radiosurgery Consortium Consensus Guidelines for Target Volume Definition in Spinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Brett W.; Spratt, Daniel E.; Lovelock, Michael; Bilsky, Mark H.; Lis, Eric; Ryu, Samuel; Sheehan, Jason; Gerszten, Peter C.; Chang, Eric; Gibbs, Iris; Soltys, Scott; Sahgal, Arjun; Deasy, Joe; Flickinger, John; Quader, Mubina; Mindea, Stefan; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is increasingly used to manage spinal metastases. However, target volume definition varies considerably and no consensus target volume guidelines exist. This study proposes consensus target volume definitions using common scenarios in metastatic spine radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Seven radiation oncologists and 3 neurological surgeons with spinal radiosurgery expertise independently contoured target and critical normal structures for 10 cases representing common scenarios in metastatic spine radiosurgery. Each set of volumes was imported into the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research. Quantitative analysis was performed using an expectation maximization algorithm for Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) with kappa statistics calculating agreement between physicians. Optimized confidence level consensus contours were identified using histogram agreement analysis and characterized to create target volume definition guidelines. Results: Mean STAPLE agreement sensitivity and specificity was 0.76 (range, 0.67-0.84) and 0.97 (range, 0.94-0.99), respectively, for gross tumor volume (GTV) and 0.79 (range, 0.66-0.91) and 0.96 (range, 0.92-0.98), respectively, for clinical target volume (CTV). Mean kappa agreement was 0.65 (range, 0.54-0.79) for GTV and 0.64 (range, 0.54-0.82) for CTV (P<.01 for GTV and CTV in all cases). STAPLE histogram agreement analysis identified optimal consensus contours (80% confidence limit). Consensus recommendations include that the CTV should include abnormal marrow signal suspicious for microscopic invasion and an adjacent normal bony expansion to account for subclinical tumor spread in the marrow space. No epidural CTV expansion is recommended without epidural disease, and circumferential CTVs encircling the cord should be used only when the vertebral body, bilateral pedicles/lamina, and spinous process are all involved or there is extensive metastatic

  1. Large volume flow electroporation of mRNA: clinical scale process.

    PubMed

    Li, Linhong; Allen, Cornell; Shivakumar, Rama; Peshwa, Madhusudan V

    2013-01-01

    Genetic modification for enhancing cellular function has been continuously pursued for fighting diseases. Messenger RNA (mRNA) transfection is found to be a promising solution in modifying hematopoietic and immune cells for therapeutic purpose. We have developed a flow electroporation-based system for large volume electroporation of cells with various molecules, including mRNA. This allows robust and scalable mRNA transfection of primary cells of different origin. Here we describe transfection of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) mRNA into NK cells to modulate the ability of NK cells to target tumor cells. High levels of CAR expression in NK cells can be maintained for 3-7 days post transfection. CD19-specific CAR mRNA transfected NK cells demonstrate targeted lysis of CD19-expressing tumor cells OP-1, primary B-CLL tumor cells, and autologous CD19+ B cells in in vitro assays with enhanced potency: >80% lysis at effector-target ratio of 1:1. This allows current good manufacturing practices (cGMP) and regulatory compliant manufacture of CAR mRNA transfected NK cells for clinical delivery. PMID:23296932

  2. Defining Radiotherapy Target Volumes Using {sup 18}F-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography: Still a Pandora's Box?

    SciTech Connect

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Faria, Sergio; Menard, Sonia; Lisbona, Robert; Lehnert, Shirley

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: We discuss the effect of {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) data on target volume definition for radiotherapy planning. We compared the effect of various thresholding methods on the PET-based target volume vs. the standard CT-based tumor volume. Methods and Materials: Different thresholding methods were reviewed and compared to our PET-based gross tumor volume data obtained from a cohort of 31 non-small-cell lung carcinoma patients who had undergone preoperative PET/CT scans for staging. The feasibility and limitations of FDG-based PET/CT data on target volume delineation in radiotherapy planning have been demonstrated with frequently used approaches for target outlining such as the qualitative visual method and the fixed 15% or 40% of the maximal iso-uptake value threshold methods. Results: The relationship between PET-based and CT-based volumes generally suffers from poor correlation between the two image data sets, expressed in terms of a large statistical variation in gross tumor volume ratios, irrespective of the threshold method used. However, we found that the maximal signal/background ratios in non-small-cell lung carcinoma patients correlated well with the pathologic results, with an average ratio for adenocarcinoma, large cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma of 10.5 {+-} 3.5, 12.6 {+-} 2.8, and 14.1 {+-} 5.9, respectively. Conclusion: The fluctuations in tumor volume using different quantitative PET thresholding approaches did not depend on the thresholding method used. They originated from the nature of functional imaging in general and PET imaging in particular. Functional imaging will eventually be used for biologically tailored target radiotherapy volume definition not as a replacement of CT- or magnetic resonance imaging-based anatomic gross tumor volumes but with the methods complementing each other in a complex mosaic of distinct biologic target volumes.

  3. Assessing the Effect of a Contouring Protocol on Postprostatectomy Radiotherapy Clinical Target Volumes and Interphysician Variation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darren M.; Perry, Lesley; Smith, Steve; Elliott, Tony; Wylie, James P.; Cowan, Richard A.; Livsey, Jacqueline E.; Logue, John P.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To compare postprostatectomy clinical target volume (CTV) delineation before and after the introduction of a contouring protocol and to investigate its effect on interphysician variability Methods and Materials: Six site-specialized radiation oncologists independently delineated a CTV on the computed tomography (CT) scans of 3 patients who had received postprostatectomy radiotherapy. At least 3 weeks later this was repeated, but with the physicians adhering to the contouring protocol from the Medical Research Council's Radiotherapy and Androgen Deprivation In Combination After Local Surgery (RADICALS) trial. The volumes obtained before and after the protocol were compared and the effect of the protocol on interphysician variability assessed. Results: An increase in mean CTV for all patients of 40.7 to 53.9cm{sup 3} was noted as a result of observing the protocol, with individual increases in the mean CTV of 65%, 15%, and 24% for Patients 1, 2, and 3 respectively. A reduction in interphysician variability was noted when the protocol was used. Conclusions: Substantial interphysician variation in target volume delineation for postprostatectomy radiotherapy exists, which can be reduced by the use of a contouring protocol. The RADICALS contouring protocol increases the target volumes when compared with those volumes typically applied at our center. The effect of treating larger volumes on the therapeutic ratio and resultant toxicity should be carefully monitored, particularly if the same dose-response as documented in radical prostate radiotherapy applies to the adjuvant and salvage setting. Prostate cancer, Postprostatectomy, Radiotherapy, Target volume.

  4. Formation of large target residues in intermediate energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Loveland, W.; Aleklett, K.; Sihver, L.; Xu, Z.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1987-04-01

    We have used radiochemical techniques to measure the yields, angular distributions and velocity spectra of the large (A/sub frag/ greater than or equal to 2/3 A/sub tgt/) target residues from the fragmentation of /sup 197/Au by intermediate energy /sup 12/C, /sup 20/Ne, /sup 32/S, /sup 40/Ar, /sup 84/Kr, and /sup 139/La projectiles. The fragment moving frame angular distributions are asymmetric for the lighter projectiles (C-Ar). The fragment velocity spectra are Maxwellian for the Kr induced reactions and non-Maxwellian for the reactions induced by the lighter ions. We interpret these results in terms of a change in the dominant fragment production mechanism(s) from one(s) involving a fast non-equilibrium process for the lighter ions to a slow, equilibrium process for Kr. Comparison of the measured yields and angular distributions with calculations made using a Boltzmann transport equation with appropriate modifications for Pauli blocking, etc., show excellent agreement between data and theory. 12 refs., 12 figs.

  5. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 3: Optical telescope assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the optical telescope assembly for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The systems considerations are based on mission-related parameters and optical equipment requirements. Information is included on: (1) structural design and analysis, (2) thermal design, (3) stabilization and control, (4) alignment, focus, and figure control, (5) electronic subsystem, and (6) scientific instrument design.

  6. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 5: Support systems module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the support systems module for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The following systems and described: (1) thermal control, (2) electrical, (3) communication and data landing, (4) attitude control system, and (5) structural features. Analyses of maintainability and reliability considerations are included.

  7. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 4: Scientific instrument package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design and characteristics of the scientific instrument package for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The subjects include: (1) general scientific objectives, (2) package system analysis, (3) scientific instrumentation, (4) imaging photoelectric sensors, (5) environmental considerations, and (6) reliability and maintainability.

  8. RADON DIAGNOSTIC MEASUREMENT GUIDANCE FOR LARGE BUILDINGS - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development of radon diagnostic procedures and mitigation strategies applicable to a variety of large non-residential buildings commonly found in Florida. The investigations document and evaluate the nature of radon occurrence and entry mechanisms for rad...

  9. Evaluation of Peritumoral Edema in the Delineation of Radiotherapy Clinical Target Volumes for Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Eric L. . E-mail: echang@mdanderson.org; Akyurek, Serap; Avalos, Tedde C; Rebueno, Neal C; Spicer, Chris C; Garcia, John C; Famiglietti, Robin; Allen, Pamela K.; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.; Maor, Moshe H.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the spatial relationship between peritumoral edema and recurrence pattern in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Forty-eight primary GBM patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy that did not intentionally include peritumoral edema within the clinical target volume between July 2000 and June 2001. All 48 patients have subsequently recurred, and their original treatment planning parameters were used for this study. New theoretical radiation treatment plans were created for the same 48 patients, based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) target delineation guidelines that specify inclusion of peritumoral edema. Target volume and recurrent tumor coverage, as well as percent volume of normal brain irradiated, were assessed for both methods of target delineation using dose-volume histograms. Results: A comparison between the location of recurrent tumor and peritumoral edema volumes from all 48 cases failed to show correlation by linear regression modeling (r {sup 2} 0.0007; p = 0.3). For patients with edema >75 cm{sup 3}, the percent volume of brain irradiated to 46 Gy was significantly greater in treatment plans that intentionally included peritumoral edema compared with those that did not (38% vs. 31%; p = 0.003). The pattern of failure was identical between the two sets of plans (40 central, 3 in-field, 3 marginal, and 2 distant recurrence). Conclusion: Clinical target volume delineation based on a 2-cm margin rather than on peritumoral edema did not seem to alter the central pattern of failure for patients with GBM. For patients with peritumoral edema >75 cm{sup 3}, using a constant 2-cm margin resulted in a smaller median percent volume of brain being irradiated to 30 Gy, 46 Gy, and 50 Gy compared with corresponding theoretical RTOG plans that deliberately included peritumoral edema.

  10. Large-Volume Resonant Microwave Discharge for Plasma Cleaning of a CEBAF 5-Cell SRF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    J. Mammosser, S. Ahmed, K. Macha, J. Upadhyay, M. Nikoli, S. Popovi, L. Vuakovi

    2012-07-01

    We report the preliminary results on plasma generation in a 5-cell CEBAF superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity for the application of cavity interior surface cleaning. CEBAF currently has {approx}300 of these five cell cavities installed in the Jefferson Lab accelerator which are mostly limited by cavity surface contamination. The development of an in-situ cavity surface cleaning method utilizing a resonant microwave discharge could lead to significant CEBAF accelerator performance improvement. This microwave discharge is currently being used for the development of a set of plasma cleaning procedures targeted to the removal of various organic, metal and metal oxide impurities. These contaminants are responsible for the increase of surface resistance and the reduction of RF performance in installed cavities. The CEBAF five cell cavity volume is {approx} 0.5 m2, which places the discharge in the category of large-volume plasmas. CEBAF cavity has a cylindrical symmetry, but its elliptical shape and transversal power coupling makes it an unusual plasma application, which requires special consideration of microwave breakdown. Our preliminary study includes microwave breakdown and optical spectroscopy, which was used to define the operating pressure range and the rate of removal of organic impurities.

  11. Real-time visualization of large volume datasets on standard PC hardware.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kai; Yang, Jie; Zhu, Y M

    2008-05-01

    In medical area, interactive three-dimensional volume visualization of large volume datasets is a challenging task. One of the major challenges in graphics processing unit (GPU)-based volume rendering algorithms is the limited size of texture memory imposed by current GPU architecture. We attempt to overcome this limitation by rendering only visible parts of large CT datasets. In this paper, we present an efficient, high-quality volume rendering algorithm using GPUs for rendering large CT datasets at interactive frame rates on standard PC hardware. We subdivide the volume dataset into uniform sized blocks and take advantage of combinations of early ray termination, empty-space skipping and visibility culling to accelerate the whole rendering process and render visible parts of volume data. We have implemented our volume rendering algorithm for a large volume data of 512 x 304 x 1878 dimensions (visible female), and achieved real-time performance (i.e., 3-4 frames per second) on a Pentium 4 2.4GHz PC equipped with NVIDIA Geforce 6600 graphics card ( 256 MB video memory). This method can be used as a 3D visualization tool of large CT datasets for doctors or radiologists. PMID:18243401

  12. Special Properties of Coherence Scanning Interferometers for large Measurement Volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, W.

    2011-08-01

    In contrast to many other optical methods the uncertainty of Coherence Scanning Interferometer (CSI) in vertical direction is independent from the field of view. Therefore CSIs are ideal instruments for measuring 3D-profiles of larger areas (36×28mm2, e.g.) with high precision. This is of advantage for the determination of form parameters like flatness, parallelism and steps heights within a short time. In addition, using a telecentric beam path allows measurements of deep lying surfaces (<70mm) and the determination of form parameters with large step-heights. The lateral and spatial resolution, however, are reduced. In this presentation different metrological characteristics together with their potential errors are analyzed for large-scale measuring CSIs. Therefore these instruments are ideal tools in quality control for good/bad selections, e.g. The consequences for the practical use in industry and for standardization are discussed by examples of workpieces of automotive suppliers or from the steel industry.

  13. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Ng, Joseph D; Baird, James K; Coates, Leighton; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M; Hodge, Teresa A; Huang, Sijay

    2015-04-01

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for the growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. These include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations. PMID:25849493

  14. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Joseph D.; Baird, James K.; Coates, Leighton; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M.; Hodge, Teresa A.; Huang, Sijay

    2015-03-30

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for the growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. We report that these include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations.

  15. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ng, Joseph D.; Baird, James K.; Coates, Leighton; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M.; Hodge, Teresa A.; Huang, Sijay

    2015-03-30

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for themore » growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. We report that these include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations.« less

  16. Clinicopathologic Analysis of Microscopic Extension in Lung Adenocarcinoma: Defining Clinical Target Volume for Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, Inga S.; Fitch, Dwight L.; Goldstein, Neal S.; Yan Di; Chmielewski, Gary W.; Welsh, Robert J.; Kestin, Larry L.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the gross tumor volume (GTV) to clinical target volume margin for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment planning. Methods: A total of 35 patients with Stage T1N0 adenocarcinoma underwent wedge resection plus immediate lobectomy. The gross tumor size and microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor were measured. The nuclear grade and percentage of bronchoalveolar features were analyzed for association with microscopic extension. The gross tumor dimensions were measured on a computed tomography (CT) scan (lung and mediastinal windows) and compared with the pathologic dimensions. The potential coverage of microscopic extension for two different lung stereotactic radiotherapy regimens was evaluated. Results: The mean microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor was 7.2 mm and varied according to grade (10.1, 7.0, and 3.5 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively, p < 0.01). The 90th percentile for microscopic extension was 12.0 mm (13.0, 9.7, and 4.4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The CT lung windows correlated better with the pathologic size than did the mediastinal windows (gross pathologic size overestimated by a mean of 5.8 mm; composite size [gross plus microscopic extension] underestimated by a mean of 1.2 mm). For a GTV contoured on the CT lung windows, the margin required to cover microscopic extension for 90% of the cases would be 9 mm (9, 7, and 4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The potential microscopic extension dosimetric coverage (55 Gy) varied substantially between the stereotactic radiotherapy schedules. Conclusion: For lung adenocarcinomas, the GTV should be contoured using CT lung windows. Although a GTV based on the CT lung windows would underestimate the gross tumor size plus microscopic extension by only 1.2 mm for the average case, the clinical target volume expansion required to cover the microscopic extension in 90% of cases could be as large as 9 mm, although considerably smaller for high-grade tumors

  17. Characterization of Target Volume Changes During Breast Radiotherapy Using Implanted Fiducial Markers and Portal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Emma J. Donovan, Ellen M.; Yarnold, John R.; Coles, Charlotte E.; Evans, Philip M.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To determine target volume changes by using volume and shape analysis for patients receiving radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery and to compare different methods of automatically identifying changes in target volume, position, size, and shape during radiotherapy for use in adaptive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients undergoing whole breast radiotherapy had fiducial markers sutured into the excision cavity at the time of surgery. Patients underwent imaging using computed tomography (for planning and at the end of treatment) and during treatment by using portal imaging. A marker volume (MV) was defined by using the measured marker positions. Changes in both individual marker positions and MVs were identified manually and using six automated similarity indices. Comparison of the two types of analysis (manual and automated) was undertaken to establish whether similarity indices can be used to automatically detect changes in target volumes. Results: Manual analysis showed that 3 patients had significant MV reduction. This analysis also showed significant changes between planning computed tomography and the start of treatment for 9 patients, including single and multiple marker movement, deformation (shape change), and rotation. Four of the six similarity indices were shown to be sensitive to the observed changes. Conclusions: Significant changes in size, shape, and position occur to the fiducial marker-defined volume. Four similarity indices can be used to identify these changes, and a protocol for their use in adaptive radiotherapy is suggested.

  18. Image Guidance-Based Target Volume Margin Expansion in IMRT of Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shiv P; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J

    2016-02-01

    This study quantifies the setup uncertainties to optimize the planning target volume (PTV) margin based on daily image guidance, its dosimetric impact, and radiobiological implication for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in head and neck cancer. Ten patients were retrospectively chosen who had been treated with IMRT and with daily image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). The daily setup errors of the 10 patients from on-board imaging for the entire treatment were analyzed. Planning target volumes were generated by expanding the clinical target volumes (CTVs) with 0 to 10 mm margins. The IMRT plans with the same dose-volume constraints were created in an Eclipse treatment planning system. The effect of volume expansion was analyzed with biological indices such as tumor control probability, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and equivalent uniform dose. Analysis of 906 daily setup corrections using daily IGRT showed that 98% of the daily setups are within ± 5 mm. The relative increase in PTV-CTV volume from 0 to 10 mm margins provides nearly 4-fold volume increase and is linearly related to monitor unit (MU). The increase in MU is about 5%/mm margin increase. The relative increase in NTCP of parotids from 5 to 10 mm margins is 3.2 ± 1.15. Increase in PTV margin increases extra tissue volume with a corresponding increase in MU for treatment and NTCP values. Even a small margin increase (eg, 1 mm) may result in increase of more than 20% in relative extra volume and 15% in NTCP value of organs at risk (OARs). With image guidance, the setup uncertainty could be achieved within ± 5 mm for 98% of the treatments, and a margin <5 mm for PTV may seem desirable to reduce the extra tissue irradiated, but at the expense of a more demanding setup accuracy. PMID:25432930

  19. Large Volume Self-Organization of Polymer/Nanoparticle Hybrids with Millimeter Scale Grain Sizes using Brush Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dongpo; Watkins, James

    The lack of sufficient long-range order in self-assembled nanostructures is a bottleneck for many nanotechnology applications. In this work, we report that exceptionally large volume of highly ordered arrays (single grains) on the order of millimeters in scale can be rapidly created through a unique innate guiding mechanism of brush block copolymers (BBCPs). The grain volume is over 1 billion times larger relative to that of typical self-assembled linear BCPs (LBCPs). The use of strong interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and BBCPs enables the high loadings of functional materials, up to 76 wt% (46 vol%) in the target domain, while maintaining excellent long-range order. Overall this work provides a simple route to precisely control the spatial orientation of functionalities at nanometer length scales over macroscopic volumes, thereby enabling the production of hybrid materials for many important applications.

  20. Systems and methods for the detection of low-level harmful substances in a large volume of fluid

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, Michael V.; Roybal, Lyle G.; Lindquist, Alan; Gallardo, Vincente

    2016-03-15

    A method and device for the detection of low-level harmful substances in a large volume of fluid comprising using a concentrator system to produce a retentate and analyzing the retentate for the presence of at least one harmful substance. The concentrator system performs a method comprising pumping at least 10 liters of fluid from a sample source through a filter. While pumping, the concentrator system diverts retentate from the filter into a container. The concentrator system also recirculates at least part of the retentate in the container again through the filter. The concentrator system controls the speed of the pump with a control system thereby maintaining a fluid pressure less than 25 psi during the pumping of the fluid; monitors the quantity of retentate within the container with a control system, and maintains a reduced volume level of retentate and a target volume of retentate.

  1. OPS MCC level B/C formulation requirements: Area targets and space volumes processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, M. J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The level B/C mathematical specifications for the area targets and space volume processor (ATSVP) as well as the characteristics of the system are provided. The mathematical equation necessary to determine whether the spacecraft lies within the area target or space volume is presented. A semianalytical technique for predicting the acquisition of signal (AOS) and loss of signal (LOS) time periods is discussed. A functional overview of the ATSVP which includes an outline of the process required to determine precise AOS and LOS times are given.

  2. Radiation from Large Gas Volumes and Heat Exchange in Steam Boiler Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, A. N.

    2015-09-15

    Radiation from large cylindrical gas volumes is studied as a means of simulating the flare in steam boiler furnaces. Calculations of heat exchange in a furnace by the zonal method and by simulation of the flare with cylindrical gas volumes are described. The latter method is more accurate and yields more reliable information on heat transfer processes taking place in furnaces.

  3. Testbed for large volume surveillance through distributed fusion and resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valin, Pierre; Guitouni, Adel; Bossé, Éloi; Wehn, Hans; Yates, Richard; Zwick, Harold

    2007-04-01

    DRDC Valcartier has initiated, through a PRECARN partnership project, the development of an advanced simulation testbed for the evaluation of the effectiveness of Network Enabled Operations in a coastal large volume surveillance situation. The main focus of this testbed is to study concepts like distributed information fusion, dynamic resources and networks configuration management, and self synchronising units and agents. This article presents the requirements, design and first implementation builds, and reports on some preliminary results. The testbed allows to model distributed nodes performing information fusion, dynamic resource management planning and scheduling, as well as configuration management, given multiple constraints on the resources and their communications networks. Two situations are simulated: cooperative and non-cooperative target search. A cooperative surface target behaves in ways to be detected (and rescued), while an elusive target attempts to avoid detection. The current simulation consists of a networked set of surveillance assets including aircraft (UAVs, helicopters, maritime patrol aircraft), and ships. These assets have electrooptical and infrared sensors, scanning and imaging radar capabilities. Since full data sharing over datalinks is not feasible, own-platform data fusion must be simulated to evaluate implementation and performance of distributed information fusion. A special emphasis is put on higher-level fusion concepts using knowledge-based rules, with level 1 fusion already providing tracks. Surveillance platform behavior is also simulated in order to evaluate different dynamic resource management algorithms. Additionally, communication networks are modeled to simulate different information exchange concepts. The testbed allows the evaluation of a range of control strategies from independent platform search, through various levels of platform collaboration, up to a centralized control of search platforms.

  4. Sand tank experiment of a large volume biodiesel spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, K.; Mayer, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    Although petroleum hydrocarbon releases in the subsurface have been well studied, the impacts of subsurface releases of highly degradable alternative fuels, including biodiesel, are not as well understood. One concern is the generation of CH4­ which may lead to explosive conditions in underground structures. In addition, the biodegradation of biodiesel consumes O2 that would otherwise be available for the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons that may be present at a site. Until now, biodiesel biodegradation in the vadose zone has not been examined in detail, despite being critical to understanding the full impact of a release. This research involves a detailed study of a laboratory release of 80 L of biodiesel applied at surface into a large sandtank to examine the progress of biodegradation reactions. The experiment will monitor the onset and temporal evolution of CH4 generation to provide guidance for site monitoring needs following a biodiesel release to the subsurface. Three CO2 and CH4 flux chambers have been deployed for long term monitoring of gas emissions. CO2 fluxes have increased in all chambers over the 126 days since the start of the experiment. The highest CO2 effluxes are found directly above the spill and have increased from < 0.5 μmol m-2 s-1 to ~3.8 μmol m-2 s-1, indicating an increase in microbial activity. There were no measurable CH4 fluxes 126 days into the experiment. Sensors were emplaced to continuously measure O2, CO2, moisture content, matric potential, EC, and temperature. In response to the release, CO2 levels have increased across all sensors, from an average value of 0.1% to 0.6% 126 days after the start of the experiment, indicating the rapid onset of biodegradation. The highest CO2 values observed from samples taken in the gas ports were 2.5%. Average O2 concentrations have decreased from 21% to 17% 126 days after the start of the experiment. O2 levels in the bottom central region of the sandtank declined to approximately 12%.

  5. Intra and Interfraction Mediastinal Nodal Region Motion: Implications for Internal Target Volume Expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Jonathan G.; Kashani, Rojano; Balter, James M.; Tatro, Daniel; Kong, F.-M.; Pan, Charlie C.

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the intra and interfraction motion of mediastinal lymph node regions. Ten patients with nonsmall-cell lung cancer underwent controlled inhale and exhale computed tomography (CT) scans during two sessions (40 total datasets) and mediastinal nodal stations 1-8 were outlined. Corresponding CT scans from different sessions were registered to remove setup error and, in this reference frame, the centroid of each nodal station was compared for right-left (RL), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) displacement. In addition, an anisotropic volume expansion encompassing the change of the nodal region margins in all directions was used. Intrafraction displacement was determined by comparing same session inhale-exhale scans. Interfraction reproducibility of nodal regions was determined by comparing the same respiratory phase scans between two sessions. Intrafraction displacement of centroid varied between nodal stations. All nodal regions moved posteriorly and superiorly with exhalation, and inferior nodal stations showed the most motion. Based on anisotropic expansion, nodal regions expanded mostly in the RL direction from inhale to exhale. The interpatient variations in intrafraction displacement were large compared with the displacements themselves. Moreover, there was substantial interfractional displacement ({approx}5 mm). Mediastinal lymph node regions clearly move during breathing. In addition, deformation of nodal regions between inhale and exhale occurs. The degree of motion and deformation varies by station and by individual. This study indicates the potential advantage of characterizing individualized nodal region motion to safely maximize conformality of mediastinal nodal targets.

  6. Sparing Healthy Tissue and Increasing Tumor Dose Using Bayesian Modeling of Geometric Uncertainties for Planning Target Volume Personalization

    SciTech Connect

    Herschtal, Alan; Te Marvelde, Luc; Mengersen, Kerrie; Foroudi, Farshad; Eade, Thomas; Pham, Daniel; Caine, Hannah; Kron, Tomas

    2015-06-01

    Objective: To develop a mathematical tool that can update a patient's planning target volume (PTV) partway through a course of radiation therapy to more precisely target the tumor for the remainder of treatment and reduce dose to surrounding healthy tissue. Methods and Materials: Daily on-board imaging was used to collect large datasets of displacements for patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy for solid tumors. Bayesian statistical modeling of these geometric uncertainties was used to optimally trade off between displacement data collected from previously treated patients and the progressively accumulating data from a patient currently partway through treatment, to optimally predict future displacements for that patient. These predictions were used to update the PTV position and margin width for the remainder of treatment, such that the clinical target volume (CTV) was more precisely targeted. Results: Software simulation of dose to CTV and normal tissue for 2 real prostate displacement datasets consisting of 146 and 290 patients treated with a minimum of 30 fractions each showed that re-evaluating the PTV position and margin width after 8 treatment fractions reduced healthy tissue dose by 19% and 17%, respectively, while maintaining CTV dose. Conclusion: Incorporating patient-specific displacement patterns from early in a course of treatment allows PTV adaptation for the remainder of treatment. This substantially reduces the dose to healthy tissues and thus can reduce radiation therapy–induced toxicities, improving patient outcomes.

  7. Center-stabilized Yang-Mills Theory:Confinement and Large N Volume Independence

    SciTech Connect

    Unsal, Mithat; Yaffe, Laurence G.; /Washington U., Seattle

    2008-03-21

    We examine a double trace deformation of SU(N) Yang-Mills theory which, for large N and large volume, is equivalent to unmodified Yang-Mills theory up to O(1/N{sup 2}) corrections. In contrast to the unmodified theory, large N volume independence is valid in the deformed theory down to arbitrarily small volumes. The double trace deformation prevents the spontaneous breaking of center symmetry which would otherwise disrupt large N volume independence in small volumes. For small values of N, if the theory is formulated on R{sup 3} x S{sup 1} with a sufficiently small compactification size L, then an analytic treatment of the non-perturbative dynamics of the deformed theory is possible. In this regime, we show that the deformed Yang-Mills theory has a mass gap and exhibits linear confinement. Increasing the circumference L or number of colors N decreases the separation of scales on which the analytic treatment relies. However, there are no order parameters which distinguish the small and large radius regimes. Consequently, for small N the deformed theory provides a novel example of a locally four-dimensional pure gauge theory in which one has analytic control over confinement, while for large N it provides a simple fully reduced model for Yang-Mills theory. The construction is easily generalized to QCD and other QCD-like theories.

  8. Necessary conditions on Calabi-Yau manifolds for large volume vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, James; He, Yang-Hui; Jejjala, Vishnu; Jurke, Benjamin; Nelson, Brent; Simón, Joan

    2012-11-01

    We describe an efficient, construction independent, algorithmic test to determine whether Calabi-Yau threefolds admit a structure compatible with the large volume moduli stabilization scenario of type IIB superstring theory. Using the algorithm, we scan complete intersection and toric hypersurface Calabi-Yau threefolds with 2≤h1,1≤4 and deduce that 418 among 4434 manifolds have a large volume limit with a single large four-cycle. We describe major extensions to this survey, which are currently underway.

  9. Plasma response to electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    An electron energy filter (EEF) is embedded in the Large Volume Plasma Device plasma for carrying out studies on excitation of plasma turbulence by a gradient in electron temperature (ETG) described in the paper of Mattoo et al. [S. K. Mattoo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255007 (2012)]. In this paper, we report results on the response of the plasma to the EEF. It is shown that inhomogeneity in the magnetic field of the EEF switches on several physical phenomena resulting in plasma regions with different characteristics, including a plasma region free from energetic electrons, suitable for the study of ETG turbulence. Specifically, we report that localized structures of plasma density, potential, electron temperature, and plasma turbulence are excited in the EEF plasma. It is shown that structures of electron temperature and potential are created due to energy dependence of the electron transport in the filter region. On the other hand, although structure of plasma density has origin in the particle transport but two distinct steps of the density structure emerge from dominance of collisionality in the source-EEF region and of the Bohm diffusion in the EEF-target region. It is argued and experimental evidence is provided for existence of drift like flute Rayleigh-Taylor in the EEF plasma.

  10. High-density three-dimensional localization microscopy across large volumes.

    PubMed

    Legant, Wesley R; Shao, Lin; Grimm, Jonathan B; Brown, Timothy A; Milkie, Daniel E; Avants, Brian B; Lavis, Luke D; Betzig, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Extending three-dimensional (3D) single-molecule localization microscopy away from the coverslip and into thicker specimens will greatly broaden its biological utility. However, because of the limitations of both conventional imaging modalities and conventional labeling techniques, it is a challenge to localize molecules in three dimensions with high precision in such samples while simultaneously achieving the labeling densities required for high resolution of densely crowded structures. Here we combined lattice light-sheet microscopy with newly developed, freely diffusing, cell-permeable chemical probes with targeted affinity for DNA, intracellular membranes or the plasma membrane. We used this combination to perform high-localization precision, ultrahigh-labeling density, multicolor localization microscopy in samples up to 20 μm thick, including dividing cells and the neuromast organ of a zebrafish embryo. We also demonstrate super-resolution correlative imaging with protein-specific photoactivable fluorophores, providing a mutually compatible, single-platform alternative to correlative light-electron microscopy over large volumes. PMID:26950745

  11. Plasma response to electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    An electron energy filter (EEF) is embedded in the Large Volume Plasma Device plasma for carrying out studies on excitation of plasma turbulence by a gradient in electron temperature (ETG) described in the paper of Mattoo et al. [S. K. Mattoo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255007 (2012)]. In this paper, we report results on the response of the plasma to the EEF. It is shown that inhomogeneity in the magnetic field of the EEF switches on several physical phenomena resulting in plasma regions with different characteristics, including a plasma region free from energetic electrons, suitable for the study of ETG turbulence. Specifically, we report that localized structures of plasma density, potential, electron temperature, and plasma turbulence are excited in the EEF plasma. It is shown that structures of electron temperature and potential are created due to energy dependence of the electron transport in the filter region. On the other hand, although structure of plasma density has origin in the particle transport but two distinct steps of the density structure emerge from dominance of collisionality in the source-EEF region and of the Bohm diffusion in the EEF-target region. It is argued and experimental evidence is provided for existence of drift like flute Rayleigh-Taylor in the EEF plasma.

  12. Packed domain Rayleigh-Sommerfeld wavefield propagation for large targets.

    PubMed

    Wuttig, Andreas; Kanka, Mario; Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen; Riesenberg, Rainer

    2010-12-20

    For applications in the domain of digital holographic microscopy, we present a fast algorithm to propagate scalar wave fields from a small source area to an extended, parallel target area of coarser sampling pitch, using the first Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction formula. Our algorithm can take full advantage of the fast Fourier transform by decomposing the convolution kernel of the propagation into several convolution kernel patches. Using partial overlapping of the patches together with a soft blending function, the Fourier spectrum of these patches can be reduced to a low number of significant components, which can be stored in a compact sparse array structure. This allows for rapid evaluation of the partial convolution results by skipping over negligible components through the Fourier domain pointwise multiplication and direct mapping of the remaining multiplication results into a Fourier domain representation of the coarsly sampled target patch. The algorithm has been verified experimentally at a numerical aperture of 0.62, not showing any significant resolution limitations. PMID:21196980

  13. The effect of image-guided radiation therapy on the margin between the clinical target volume and planning target volume in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Jun; Li, Minghui; Zhang, Tao; Han, Wei; Chen, Dongfu; Hui, Zhouguang; Lv, Jima; Zhang, Zhong; Zhang, Yin; Zhang, Liansheng; Zheng, Rong; Dai, Jianrong; Wang, Luhua

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on the margin between the clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) in lung cancer. Methods: The CTV and PTV margin were determined in three dimensions by four radiation oncologists using a standard method in 10 lung cancer patients, and compared to consensus values. Transfer error was measured using a rigid phantom containing gold markers. Systematic error and random error set up errors were calculated in three dimensions from pre-treatment and post-treatment cone beam CT scans. Finally, the margin between the CTV and PTV was corrected for set up error and calculated. Results: The margins between the CTV and PTV with IGRT (and without IGRT) were 0.88 cm (0.96 cm), 0.99 cm (1.08 cm) and 1.28 cm (1.82 cm) in the anterior and posterior (AP), left and right (LR) and superior and inferior (SI) directions, respectively. Images from two other patients verified the validity of the corrected margin. The target delineation errors of the radiation oncologists are considered to be the largest compared with the set up errors. The application of IGRT reduced the set up errors and the margins between CTV and PTV. Conclusions: The delineation errors of radiation oncologists are the most important factor to consider for the margin between CTV and PTV for lung cancer. IGRT can reduce the margins by reducing the set up errors, especially in the SI direction. Further research is required to assess whether the reduction in the margin is solely based on set up errors.

  14. The effect of image-guided radiation therapy on the margin between the clinical target volume and planning target volume in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jun; Li, Minghui; Zhang, Tao; Han, Wei; Chen, Dongfu; Hui, Zhouguang; Lv, Jima; Zhang, Zhong; Zhang, Yin; Zhang, Liansheng; Zheng, Rong; Dai, Jianrong; Wang, Luhua

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionThis study aimed to evaluate the effect of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on the margin between the clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) in lung cancer. MethodsThe CTV and PTV margin were determined in three dimensions by four radiation oncologists using a standard method in 10 lung cancer patients, and compared to consensus values. Transfer error was measured using a rigid phantom containing gold markers. Systematic error () and random error () set up errors were calculated in three dimensions from pre-treatment and post-treatment cone beam CT scans. Finally, the margin between the CTV and PTV was corrected for set up error and calculated. ResultsThe margins between the CTV and PTV with IGRT (and without IGRT) were 0.88 cm (0.96 cm), 0.99 cm (1.08 cm) and 1.28 cm (1.82 cm) in the anterior and posterior (AP), left and right (LR) and superior and inferior (SI) directions, respectively. Images from two other patients verified the validity of the corrected margin. The target delineation errors of the radiation oncologists are considered to be the largest compared with the set up errors. The application of IGRT reduced the set up errors and the margins between CTV and PTV. ConclusionsThe delineation errors of radiation oncologists are the most important factor to consider for the margin between CTV and PTV for lung cancer. IGRT can reduce the margins by reducing the set up errors, especially in the SI direction. Further research is required to assess whether the reduction in the margin is solely based on set up errors. PMID:26229633

  15. Endoclips vs large or small-volume epinephrine in peptic ulcer recurrent bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ljubicic, Neven; Budimir, Ivan; Biscanin, Alen; Nikolic, Marko; Supanc, Vladimir; Hrabar, Davor; Pavic, Tajana

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare the recurrent bleeding after endoscopic injection of different epinephrine volumes with hemoclips in patients with bleeding peptic ulcer. METHODS: Between January 2005 and December 2009, 150 patients with gastric or duodenal bleeding ulcer with major stigmata of hemorrhage and nonbleeding visible vessel in an ulcer bed (Forrest IIa) were included in the study. Patients were randomized to receive a small-volume epinephrine group (15 to 25 mL injection group; Group 1, n = 50), a large-volume epinephrine group (30 to 40 mL injection group; Group 2, n = 50) and a hemoclip group (Group 3, n = 50). The rate of recurrent bleeding, as the primary outcome, was compared between the groups of patients included in the study. Secondary outcomes compared between the groups were primary hemostasis rate, permanent hemostasis, need for emergency surgery, 30 d mortality, bleeding-related deaths, length of hospital stay and transfusion requirements. RESULTS: Initial hemostasis was obtained in all patients. The rate of early recurrent bleeding was 30% (15/50) in the small-volume epinephrine group (Group 1) and 16% (8/50) in the large-volume epinephrine group (Group 2) (P = 0.09). The rate of recurrent bleeding was 4% (2/50) in the hemoclip group (Group 3); the difference was statistically significant with regard to patients treated with either small-volume or large-volume epinephrine solution (P = 0.0005 and P = 0.045, respectively). Duration of hospital stay was significantly shorter among patients treated with hemoclips than among patients treated with epinephrine whereas there were no differences in transfusion requirement or even 30 d mortality between the groups. CONCLUSION: Endoclip is superior to both small and large volume injection of epinephrine in the prevention of recurrent bleeding in patients with peptic ulcer. PMID:22611315

  16. Commonalities and Contrasts in Location, Morphology and Emplacement of Large-volume Evolved Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagall, A. S.; Gregg, T. K.

    2008-12-01

    Observations of active dacite domes and evolved (SiO2 wt.% >65) plinian-style eruptions are considered to reveal typical behaviors of Si-rich volcanic systems. However, despite lack of mention in modern volcanology textbooks, large-volume (>4 km3) evolved lava flows exist globally. These large- volume evolved lava flows have many characteristics in common regardless of location and precise tectonic setting: they are associated with other large-volume deposits (both lava flow units and ignimbrites); are commonly found with large silicic systems; regionally, they are associated with bimodal volcanism and eruption of these large-volume evolved flows does not generate a caldera. Large-volume evolved lava flows have low aspect ratios, tend to be uniform in thickness from the vent to the distal margins and abruptly decrease in thickness at the flow front where they may form enormous pahoehoe-like lobes. A lack of pyroclastic textures such as bubble wall shards, pumice fragments, broken phenocrysts and lithics is taken as evidence for their lava flow origin rather than an ignimbrite origin despite their high SiO2 contents. Presence of a pervasive basal breccia and lobate distal margins also suggest a lava flow emplacement origin, that only the most intensely rheomorphic ignimbrite could potentially mimic. Our own studies and those from the literature suggest high eruption temperatures and peralkaline chemistries may be responsible for producing unusually low viscosities to account for large lateral extents; emplacement via fissure vents and insulations of the flow may also be key in attaining great volumes.

  17. A two isocenter IMRT technique with a controlled junction dose for long volume targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, G. G.; Heaton, R. K.; Catton, C. N.; Chung, P. W.; O'Sullivan, B.; Lau, M.; Parent, A.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2007-07-01

    Most IMRT techniques have been designed to treat targets smaller than the field size of conventional linac accelerators. In order to overcome the field size restrictions in applying IMRT, we developed a two isocenter IMRT technique to treat long volume targets. The technique exploits an extended dose gradient throughout a junction region of 4-6 cm to minimize the impact of field match errors on a junction dose and manipulates the inverse planning and IMRT segments to fill in the dose gradient and achieve dose uniformity. Techniques for abutting both conventional fields with IMRT ('Static + IMRT') and IMRT fields ('IMRT + IMRT') using two separate isocenters have been developed. Five long volume sarcoma cases have been planned in Pinnacle (Philips, Madison, USA) using Elekta Synergy and Varian 2100EX linacs; two of the cases were clinically treated with this technique. Advantages were demonstrated with well-controlled junction target uniformity and tolerance to setup uncertainties. The junction target dose heterogeneity was controlled at a level of ±5% for 3 mm setup errors at the field edges, the junction target dose changed less than 5% and the dose sparing to organs at risk (OARs) was maintained. Film measurements confirmed the treatment planning results.

  18. Guidelines for delineation of lymphatic clinical target volumes for high conformal radiotherapy: head and neck region

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The success of radiotherapy depends on the accurate delineation of the clinical target volume. The delineation of the lymph node regions has most impact, especially for tumors in the head and neck region. The purpose of this article was the development an atlas for the delineation of the clinical target volume for patients, who should receive radiotherapy for a tumor of the head and neck region. Literature was reviewed for localisations of the adjacent lymph node regions and their lymph drain in dependence of the tumor entity. On this basis the lymph node regions were contoured on transversal CT slices. The probability for involvement was reviewed and a recommendation for the delineation of the CTV was generated. PMID:21854585

  19. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, G.D.

    1998-11-24

    Microwave injection methods are disclosed for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant ``volume`` ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources. 5 figs.

  20. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, Gerald D.

    1998-01-01

    Microwave injection methods for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant "volume" ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources.

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Craniospinal Irradiation: Target Volume Considerations, Dose Constraints, and Competing Risks

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, William Filion, Edith; Roberge, David; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To report the results of an analysis of dose received to tissues and organs outside the target volume, in the setting of spinal axis irradiation for the treatment of medulloblastoma, using three treatment techniques. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans (total dose, 23.4 Gy) for a standard two-dimensional (2D) technique, a three-dimensional (3D) technique using a 3D imaging-based target volume, and an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique, were compared for 3 patients in terms of dose-volume statistics for target coverage, as well as organ at risk (OAR) and overall tissue sparing. Results: Planning target volume coverage and dose homogeneity was superior for the IMRT plans for V{sub 95%} (IMRT, 100%; 3D, 96%; 2D, 98%) and V{sub 107%} (IMRT, 3%; 3D, 38%; 2D, 37%). In terms of OAR sparing, the IMRT plan was better for all organs and whole-body contour when comparing V{sub 10Gy}, V{sub 15Gy}, and V{sub 20Gy}. The 3D plan was superior for V{sub 5Gy} and below. For the heart and liver in particular, the IMRT plans provided considerable sparing in terms of V{sub 10Gy} and above. In terms of the integral dose, the IMRT plans were superior for liver (IMRT, 21.9 J; 3D, 28.6 J; 2D, 38.6 J) and heart (IMRT, 9 J; 3D, 14.1J; 2D, 19.4 J), the 3D plan for the body contour (IMRT, 349 J; 3D, 337 J; 2D, 555 J). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is a valid treatment option for spinal axis irradiation. We have shown that IMRT results in sparing of organs at risk without a significant increase in integral dose.

  2. Comparison of Various Radiation Therapy Techniques in Breast Cancer Where Target Volume Includes Mammaria Interna Region

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Mehmet Hakan; Zincircioglu, Seyit Burhanedtin Zorlu, Faruk

    2009-04-01

    In breast cancer radiotherapy, the internal mammary lymphatic chain is treated in the target volume in a group of patients with high-risk criteria. Because of the variability of the anatomic region and structures in the irradiation field, there are a number of different techniques in breast radiotherapy. While irradiating the target volume, we also consider minimizing the dose to critical structures such as heart, lung, and contralateral breast tissue. In this study, we evaluated the dose distribution of different radiotherapy techniques in patients with left-sided breast cancer who had breast-conserving surgery. A three-dimensional computerized planning system (3DCPS) was used for each patient to compare wide-field, oblique photon-electron, and perpendicular photon-electron techniques in terms of dose homogeneities in the target volume; the doses received by the contralateral breast, heart, and lung; and the coverage of the internal mammary chain. Data from 3DCPS were controlled by the Rando-phantom and thermoluminescence dosimetry. Critical structures were irradiated with acceptable dose percentages in addition to the internal mammary chain with both wide-field and photon-electron techniques. We detected more frequent hot spots in the oblique photon-electron technique than in the other techniques, and this situation necessitated changing the junctions. The wide-field technique was easy to perform and exposed less radiation dose to the heart than photon-electron techniques. In conclusion, we suggest the use of the wide-field technique in breast irradiation when the internal mammary area is in the target volume.

  3. Postoperative radiation in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and target volume delineation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingming; Li, Minghuan; Kong, Li; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and patients who are treated with surgery alone, without neoadjuvant therapies, experience frequent relapses. Whether postoperative therapies could reduce the recurrence or improve overall survival is still controversial for these patients. The purpose of our review is to figure out the value of postoperative adjuvant therapy and address the disputes about target volume delineation according to published data. Based on the evidence of increased morbidity and disadvantages on patient survival caused by postoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy (RT) alone provided by studies in the early 1990s, the use of postoperative adjuvant therapies in cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma has diminished substantially and has been replaced gradually by neoadjuvant chemoradiation. With advances in surgery and RT, accumulating evidence has recently rekindled interest in the delivery of postoperative RT or chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage T3/T4 or N1 (lymph node positive) carcinomas after radical surgery. However, due to complications with the standard radiation field, a nonconforming modified field has been adopted in most studies. Therefore, we analyze different field applications and provide suggestions on the optimization of the radiation field based on the major sites of relapse and the surgical non-clearance area. For upper and middle thoracic esophageal carcinomas, the bilateral supraclavicular and superior mediastinal areas remain common sites of recurrence and should be encompassed within the clinical target volume. In contrast, a consensus has yet to be reached regarding lower thoracic esophageal carcinomas; the “standard” clinical target volume is still recommended. Further studies of larger sample sizes should focus on different recurrence patterns, categorized by tumor locations, refined classifications, and differing molecular biology, to provide more information on the

  4. ALK Signaling and Target Therapy in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tabbó, Fabrizio; Barreca, Antonella; Piva, Roberto; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    The discovery by Morris et al. (1994) of the genes contributing to the t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation has laid the foundation for a molecular based recognition of anaplastic large cell lymphoma and highlighted the need for a further stratification of T-cell neoplasia. Likewise the detection of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) genetic lesions among many human cancers has defined unique subsets of cancer patients, providing new opportunities for innovative therapeutic interventions. The objective of this review is to appraise the molecular mechanisms driving ALK-mediated transformation, and to maintain the neoplastic phenotype. The understanding of these events will allow the design and implementation of novel tailored strategies for a well-defined subset of cancer patients. PMID:22649787

  5. SU-E-T-578: On Definition of Minimum and Maximum Dose for Target Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Y; Yu, J; Xiao, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the impact of different minimum and maximum dose definitions in radiotherapy treatment plan quality evaluation criteria by using tumor control probability (TCP) models. Methods: Dosimetric criteria used in RTOG 1308 protocol are used in the investigation. RTOG 1308 is a phase III randomized trial comparing overall survival after photon versus proton chemoradiotherapy for inoperable stage II-IIIB NSCLC. The prescription dose for planning target volume (PTV) is 70Gy. Maximum dose (Dmax) should not exceed 84Gy and minimum dose (Dmin) should not go below 59.5Gy in order for the plan to be “per protocol” (satisfactory).A mathematical model that simulates the characteristics of PTV dose volume histogram (DVH) curve with normalized volume is built. The Dmax and Dmin are noted as percentage volumes Dη% and D(100-δ)%, with η and d ranging from 0 to 3.5. The model includes three straight line sections and goes through four points: D95%= 70Gy, Dη%= 84Gy, D(100-δ)%= 59.5 Gy, and D100%= 0Gy. For each set of η and δ, the TCP value is calculated using the inhomogeneously irradiated tumor logistic model with D50= 74.5Gy and γ50=3.52. Results: TCP varies within 0.9% with η; and δ values between 0 and 1. With η and η varies between 0 and 2, TCP change was up to 2.4%. With η and δ variations from 0 to 3.5, maximum of 8.3% TCP difference is seen. Conclusion: When defined maximum and minimum volume varied more than 2%, significant TCP variations were seen. It is recommended less than 2% volume used in definition of Dmax or Dmin for target dosimetric evaluation criteria. This project was supported by NIH grants U10CA180868, U10CA180822, U24CA180803, U24CA12014 and PA CURE Grant.

  6. Delineation of radiation therapy target volumes for patients with postoperative glioblastoma: a review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fen; Li, Minghuan; Kong, Li; Zhang, Guoli; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive and lethal primary malignancy of the brain, and radiotherapy (RT) is a fundamental part of its treatment. However, the optimal radiation treatment conditions are still a matter of debate, and there is no clear consensus concerning the inclusion of peritumoral edema in the clinical target volume calculation. Target delineation calculations that use postoperative residual tumor and cavity volumes plus 2 cm margins result in smaller volumes of normal brain receiving high-dose irradiation, compared to calculations that include expanded edema. Smaller RT fields may be more appropriate than larger RT fields, possibly reducing the risk of late neurological deterioration, especially in patients with significant peritumoral edema. This review focuses on the factors influencing target delineation, such as peritumoral edema, failure patterns, and prognostic factors (clinical and pathological characteristics) of patients with glioblastoma. Based on this information, we make three suggestions for radiation oncologists to refer to in daily practice. Further study is necessary to investigate the unresolved problems related to routine clinical application of RT. PMID:27313465

  7. Toxicity Profile With a Large Prostate Volume After External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkawa, Michael Fischedick, Karin; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Piroth, Marc D.; Nussen, Sandra; Eble, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of prostate volume on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) before and at different intervals after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A group of 204 patients was surveyed prospectively before (Time A), at the last day (Time B), 2 months after (Time C), and 16 months (median) after (Time D) radiotherapy, with a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). The group was divided into subgroups with a small (11-43 cm{sup 3}) and a large (44-151 cm{sup 3}) prostate volume. Results: Patients with large prostates presented with lower urinary bother scores (median 79 vs. 89; p = 0.01) before treatment. Urinary function/bother scores for patients with large prostates decreased significantly compared to patients with small prostates due to irritative/obstructive symptoms only at Time B (pain with urination more than once daily in 48% vs. 18%; p < 0.01). Health-related quality of life did not differ significantly between both patient groups at Times C and D. In contrast to a large prostate, a small initial bladder volume (with associated higher dose-volume load) was predictive for lower urinary bother scores both in the acute and late phase; at Time B it predisposed for pollakiuria but not for pain. Patients with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy reached significantly lower HRQOL scores in several domains (affecting only incontinence in the urinary domain), despite a smaller prostate volume (34 cm{sup 3} vs. 47 cm{sup 3}; p < 0.01). Conclusions: Patients with a large prostate volume have a great risk of irritative/obstructive symptoms (particularly dysuria) in the acute radiotherapy phase. These symptoms recover rapidly and do not influence long-term HRQOL.

  8. Effects of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid infusion on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors.

    PubMed

    Jacobshagen, Claudius; Pax, Anja; Unsöld, Bernhard W; Seidler, Tim; Schmidt-Schweda, Stephan; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Maier, Lars S

    2009-11-01

    International guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend mild hypothermia (32-34 degrees C) for 12-24h in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. To induce therapeutic hypothermia a variety of external and intravascular cooling devices are available. A cheap and effective method for inducing hypothermia is the infusion of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid. There are concerns regarding the effects of rapid infusion of large volumes of fluid on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors. We have retrospectively studied the effects of high volume cold fluid infusion on respiratory function in 52 resuscitated cardiac arrest patients. The target temperature of 32-34 degrees C was achieved after 4.1+/-0.5h (cooling rate 0.48 degrees C/h). During this period 3427+/-210 mL ice-cold fluid was infused. Despite significantly reduced LV-function (EF 35.8+/-2.2%) the respiratory status of these patients did not deteriorate significantly. On intensive care unit admission the mean PaO(2) was 231.4+/-20.6 mmHg at a F(i)O(2) of 0.82+/-0.03 (PaO(2)/F(i)O(2)=290.0+/-24.1) and a PEEP level of 7.14+/-0.31 mbar. Until reaching the target temperature of large volume, ice-cold fluid is an effective and inexpensive method for inducing therapeutic hypothermia. Resuscitation from cardiac arrest is associated with a deterioration in respiratory function. The infusion of large volumes of cold fluid does not cause a statistically significant further deterioration in respiratory function. A larger, randomized and prospective study is required to assess the efficacy and safety of ice-cold fluid infusion for

  9. Rapid estimate of solid volume in large tuff cores using a gas pycnometer

    SciTech Connect

    Thies, C.; Geddis, A.M.; Guzman, A.G.

    1996-09-01

    A thermally insulated, rigid-volume gas pycnometer system has been developed. The pycnometer chambers have been machined from solid PVC cylinders. Two chambers confine dry high-purity helium at different pressures. A thick-walled design ensures minimal heat exchange with the surrounding environment and a constant volume system, while expansion takes place between the chambers. The internal energy of the gas is assumed constant over the expansion. The ideal gas law is used to estimate the volume of solid material sealed in one of the chambers. Temperature is monitored continuously and incorporated into the calculation of solid volume. Temperature variation between measurements is less than 0.1{degrees}C. The data are used to compute grain density for oven-dried Apache Leap tuff core samples. The measured volume of solid and the sample bulk volume are used to estimate porosity and bulk density. Intrinsic permeability was estimated from the porosity and measured pore surface area and is compared to in-situ measurements by the air permeability method. The gas pycnometer accommodates large core samples (0.25 m length x 0.11 m diameter) and can measure solid volume greater than 2.20 cm{sup 3} with less than 1% error.

  10. Optimization of the electric field distribution in a large volume tissue-equivalent proportional counter.

    PubMed

    Verma, P K; Waker, A J

    1992-10-01

    Large volume tissue-equivalent proportional counters are of interest in radiation protection metrology, as the sensitivity in terms of counts per unit absorbed dose in these devices increases as the square of the counter diameter. Conventional solutions to the problem of maintaining a uniform electric field within a counter result in sensitive volume to total volume ratios which are unacceptably low when counter dimensions of the order of 15 cm diameter are considered and when overall compactness is an important design criterion. This work describes the design and optimization of an arrangement of field discs set at different potentials which enable sensitive volume to total volume ratios to approach unity. The method has been used to construct a 12.7 cm diameter right-cylindrical tissue-equivalent proportional counter in which the sensitive volume accounts for over 95% of the total device volume and the gas gain uniformity is maintained to within 3% along the entire length of the anode wire. PMID:1438550

  11. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring DOENA27323-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, E.L.

    2006-07-28

    Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume germanium detectors for field applications. To accomplish this we are utilizing a newly available generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers to operate the very largest volume germanium detectors with no maintenance. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The flip of a switch will bring a system to life in ~ 1 hour for measurements. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed 5 years. These features are necessary for remote long-duration liquid-nitrogen free deployment of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detector systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring. The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) will greatly benefit from the availability of such detectors by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen at RASA sites while still allowing the very largest available germanium detectors to be reliably utilized.

  12. A system for the disposal of large volumes of air containing oxygen-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J. M.; Quaglia, L.; del Fiore, G.; Hannay, J.; Fissore, A.

    1991-01-01

    A method is described which permits large volumes of air containing the radionuclide 15O to be vented into the atmosphere. The short half-life of this isotope (124 s) enables use to be made of a large number of small vessels connected in series. Such a device has the effect of increasing the mean transit time. The system as installed results in a reduction of the radioactive concentration in the vented air to levels below the maximum permitted values.

  13. Development of a Solid Phase Extraction Method for Agricultural Pesticides in Large-Volume Water Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method using solid phase extraction (SPE) and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was developed for the trace determination of a variety of agricultural pesticides and selected transformation products in large-volume high-elevation lake water sa...

  14. A New Electropositive Filter for Concentrating Enterovirus and Norovirus from Large Volumes of Water - MCEARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The detection of enteric viruses in environmental water usually requires the concentration of viruses from large volumes of water. The 1MDS electropositive filter is commonly used for concentrating enteric viruses from water but unfortunately these filters are not cost-effective...

  15. An efficient out-of-core volume ray casting method for the visualization of large medical data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jian; Tian, Jie; Chen, Jian; Dai, Yakang

    2007-03-01

    Volume ray casting algorithm is widely recognized for high quality volume visualization. However, when rendering very large volume data sets, the original ray casting algorithm will lead to very inefficient random accesses in disk and make it very slowly to render the whole volume data set. In order to solve this problem, an efficient out-of-core volume ray casting method with a new out-of-core framework for processing large volume data sets based on consumer PC hardware is proposed in this paper. The new framework gives a transparent and efficient access to the volume data set cached in disk, while the new volume ray casting method minimizes the data exchange between hard disk and physical memory and performs comparatively fast high quality volume rendering. The experimental results indicate that the new method and framework are effective and efficient for the visualization of very large medical data sets.

  16. Optimized planning target volume margin in helical tomotherapy for prostate cancer: Is there a preferred method?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yuan Jie; Lee, Suk; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Jang, Min Sun; Yoon, Won Sup; Yang, Dae Sik; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong

    2015-07-01

    We compare the dosimetrical differences between plans generated for helical tomotherapy by using the 2D or 3D the margining technique for the treatment of prostate cancer. Ten prostate cancer patients were included in this study. For 2D plans, the planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding 5 mm (lateral/anterior-posterior) to the clinical target volume (CTV). For 3D plans, a 5-mm margin was added not only lateral/anterior-posterior, but also superior-inferior, to the CTV. Various dosimetrical indices, including the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF) were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Differences between the 2D and the 3D PTV indices were not significant except for the CI (p = 0.023). 3D margin plans (11195 MUs) resulted in higher (13.0%) monitor units than 2D margin plans (9728 MUs). There were no significant differences in any organs at risk (OARs) between the 2D and the 3D plans. Overall, the average dose for the 2D plan was slightly lower than that for the 3D plan dose. Compared to the 2D plan, the 3D plan increased the average treatment time by 1.5 minutes; however, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.082). We confirmed that the 2D and the 3D margin plans were not significantly different with regard to various dosimetric indices such as the PITV, CI, and HI for PTV and the OARs with tomotherapy.

  17. Evaluation of Bacillus oleronius as a Biological Indicator for Terminal Sterilization of Large-Volume Parenterals.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masamitsu; Fujifuru, Masato; Okada, Aki; Takai, Katsuya; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Udagawa, Takeshi; Miyake, Makoto; Naruyama, Shintaro; Tokuda, Hiroshi; Nishioka, Goro; Yoden, Hikaru; Aoki, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    In the production of large-volume parenterals in Japan, equipment and devices such as tanks, pipework, and filters used in production processes are exhaustively cleaned and sterilized, and the cleanliness of water for injection, drug materials, packaging materials, and manufacturing areas is well controlled. In this environment, the bioburden is relatively low, and less heat resistant compared with microorganisms frequently used as biological indicators such as Geobacillus stearothermophilus (ATCC 7953) and Bacillus subtilis 5230 (ATCC 35021). Consequently, the majority of large-volume parenteral solutions in Japan are manufactured under low-heat sterilization conditions of F0 <2 min, so that loss of clarity of solutions and formation of degradation products of constituents are minimized. Bacillus oleronius (ATCC 700005) is listed as a biological indicator in "Guidance on the Manufacture of Sterile Pharmaceutical Products Produced by Terminal Sterilization" (guidance in Japan, issued in 2012). In this study, we investigated whether B. oleronius is an appropriate biological indicator of the efficacy of low-heat, moist-heat sterilization of large-volume parenterals. Specifically, we investigated the spore-forming ability of this microorganism in various cultivation media and measured the D-values and z-values as parameters of heat resistance. The D-values and z-values changed depending on the constituents of large-volume parenteral products. Also, the spores from B. oleronius showed a moist-heat resistance that was similar to or greater than many of the spore-forming organisms isolated from Japanese parenteral manufacturing processes. Taken together, these results indicate that B. oleronius is suitable as a biological indicator for sterility assurance of large-volume parenteral solutions subjected to low-heat, moist-heat terminal sterilization. PMID:26889054

  18. Understanding Subcutaneous Tissue Pressure for Engineering Injection Devices for Large-Volume Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Diane V; Clawson, Corbin Z; Lambert, William; Subramony, J Anand

    2016-07-01

    Subcutaneous injection allows for self-administration of monoclonal antibodies using prefilled syringes, autoinjectors, and on-body injector devices. However, subcutaneous injections are typically limited to 1 mL due to concerns of injection pain from volume, viscosity, and formulation characteristics. Back pressure can serve as an indicator for changes in subcutaneous mechanical properties leading to pain during injection. The purpose of this study was to investigate subcutaneous pressures and injection site reactions as a function of injection volume and flow rate. A pressure sensor in the fluid path recorded subcutaneous pressures in the abdomen of Yorkshire swine. The subcutaneous tissue accommodates large-volume injections and with little back pressure as long as low flow rates are used. A 1 mL injection in 10 seconds (360 mL/h flow rate) generated a pressure of 24.0 ± 3.4 kPa, whereas 10 mL delivered in 10 minutes (60 mL/h flow rate) generated a pressure of 7.4 ± 7.8 kPa. After the injection, the pressure decays to 0 over several seconds. The subcutaneous pressures and mechanical strain increased with increasing flow rate but not increasing dose volume. These data are useful for the design of injection devices to mitigate back pressure and pain during subcutaneous large-volume injection. PMID:27287520

  19. Large Eddy Simulations of Volume Restriction Effects on Canopy-Induced Increased-Uplift Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatziefstratiou, E.; Bohrer, G.; Velissariou, V.

    2012-12-01

    ABSTRACT Previous modeling and empirical work have shown the development of important areas of increased uplift past forward-facing steps, and recirculation zones past backward-facing steps. Forests edges represent a special kind of step - a semi-porous one. Current models of the effects of forest edges on the flow represent the forest with a prescribed drag term and does not account for the effects of the solid volume in the forest that restrict the airflow. The RAMS-based Forest Large Eddy Simulation (RAFLES) resolves flows inside and above forested canopies. RAFLES is spatially explicit, and uses the finite volume method to solve a descretized set of Navier-Stokes equations. It accounts for vegetation drag effects on the flow and on the flux exchange between the canopy and the canopy air, proportional to the local leaf density. For a better representation of the vegetation structure in the numerical grid within the canopy sub-domain, the model uses a modified version of the cut cell coordinate system. The hard volume of vegetation elements, in forests, or buildings, in urban environments, within each numerical grid cell is represented via a sub-grid-scale process that shrinks the open apertures between grid cells and reduces the open cell volume. We used RAFLES to simulate the effects of a canopy of varying foliage and stem densities on flow over virtual qube-shaped barriers under neutrally buoyant conditions. We explicitly tested the effects of the numerical representation of volume restriction, independent of the effects of the leaf drag by comparing drag-only simulations, where we prescribed no volume or aperture restriction to the flow, restriction-only simulations, where we prescribed no drag, and control simulations, where both drag and volume plus aperture restriction were included. Our simulations show that representation of the effects of the volume and aperture restriction due to obstacles to flow is important (figure 1) and leads to differences in the

  20. The large volume radiometric calorimeter system: A transportable device to measure scrap category plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M.F.; Wetzel, J.R.; Breakall, K.L.; Lemming, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    An innovative design concept has been used to design a large volume calorimeter system. The new design permits two measuring cells to fit in a compact, nonevaporative environmental bath. The system is mounted on a cart for transportability. Samples in the power range of 0.50 to 12.0 W can be measured. The calorimeters will receive samples as large as 22.0 cm in diameter by 43.2 cm high, and smaller samples can be measured without lengthening measurement time or increasing measurement error by using specially designed sleeve adapters. This paper describes the design considerations, construction, theory, applications, and performance of the large volume calorimeter system. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Cas9-Assisted Targeting of CHromosome segments CATCH enables one-step targeted cloning of large gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenjun; Zhao, Xuejin; Gabrieli, Tslil; Lou, Chunbo; Ebenstein, Yuval; Zhu, Ting F.

    2015-01-01

    The cloning of long DNA segments, especially those containing large gene clusters, is of particular importance to synthetic and chemical biology efforts for engineering organisms. While cloning has been a defining tool in molecular biology, the cloning of long genome segments has been challenging. Here we describe a technique that allows the targeted cloning of near-arbitrary, long bacterial genomic sequences of up to 100 kb to be accomplished in a single step. The target genome segment is excised from bacterial chromosomes in vitro by the RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease at two designated loci, and ligated to the cloning vector by Gibson assembly. This technique can be an effective molecular tool for the targeted cloning of large gene clusters that are often expensive to synthesize by gene synthesis or difficult to obtain directly by traditional PCR and restriction-enzyme-based methods. PMID:26323354

  2. Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: Clinical Characteristics Associated with Low Interobserver Concordance

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Ross P.; Truong, Pauline T. Kader, Hosam A.; Berthelet, Eric; Lee, Junella C.; Hilts, Michelle L.; Kader, Adam S.; Beckham, Wayne A.; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To examine variability in target volume delineation for partial breast radiotherapy planning and evaluate characteristics associated with low interobserver concordance. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients who underwent planning CT for adjuvant breast radiotherapy formed the study cohort. Using a standardized scale to score seroma clarity and consensus contouring guidelines, three radiation oncologists independently graded seroma clarity and delineated seroma volumes for each case. Seroma geometric center coordinates, maximum diameters in three axes, and volumes were recorded. Conformity index (CI), the ratio of overlapping volume and encompassing delineated volume, was calculated for each case. Cases with CI {<=}0.50 were analyzed to identify features associated with low concordance. Results: The median time from surgery to CT was 42.5 days. For geometric center coordinates, variations from the mean were 0.5-1.1 mm and standard deviations (SDs) were 0.5-1.8 mm. For maximum seroma dimensions, variations from the mean and SDs were predominantly <5 mm, with the largest SDs observed in the medial-lateral axis. The mean CI was 0.61 (range, 0.27-0.84). Five cases had CI {<=}0.50. Conformity index was significantly associated with seroma clarity (p < 0.001) and seroma volume (p < 0.002). Features associated with reduced concordance included tissue stranding from the surgical cavity, proximity to muscle, dense breast parenchyma, and benign calcifications that may be mistaken for surgical clips. Conclusion: Variability in seroma contouring occurred in three dimensions, with the largest variations in the medial-lateral axis. Awareness of clinical features associated with reduced concordance may be applied toward training staff and refining contouring guidelines for partial breast radiotherapy trials.

  3. Opto-electrical characterization and X-ray mapping of large-volume cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Yao, H.W.; Kim, K.; and James, R.B.

    2009-04-13

    Large-volume cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) radiation detectors would greatly improve radiation detection capabilities and, therefore, attract extensive scientific and commercial interests. CZT crystals with volumes as large as hundreds of centimeters can be achieved today due to improvements in the crystal growth technology. However, the poor performance of large-volume CZT detectors is still a challenging problem affecting the commercialization of CZT detectors and imaging arrays. We have employed Pockels effect measurements and synchrotron X-ray mapping techniques to investigate the performance-limiting factors for large-volume CZT detectors. Experimental results with the above characterization methods reveal the non-uniform distribution of internal electric field of large-volume CZT detectors, which help us to better understand the responsible mechanism for the insufficient carrier collection in large-volume CZT detectors.

  4. Fabrication and testing of gas filled targets for large scale plasma experiments on Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G.F.; Spragge, M.; Wallace, R.J.; Rivers, C.J. |

    1995-03-06

    An experimental campaign on the Nova laser was started in July 1993 to study one st of target conditions for the point design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The targets were specified to investigate the current NIF target conditions--a plasma of {approximately}3 keV electron temperature and an electron density of {approximately}1.0 E + 21 cm{sup {minus}3}. A gas cell target design was chosen to confine as gas of {approximately}0.01 cm{sup 3} in volume at {approximately} 1 atmosphere. This paper will describe the major steps and processes necessary in the fabrication, testing and delivery of these targets for shots on the Nova Laser at LLNL.

  5. Retroperitoneal Sarcoma Target Volume and Organ at Risk Contour Delineation Agreement Among NRG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists

    SciTech Connect

    Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Abrams, Ross A.; Bosch, Walter; Roberge, David; Haas, Rick L.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Olsen, Jeffrey R.; Deville, Curtiland; Chen, Yen-Lin; Finkelstein, Steven E.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Wang, Dian

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variability in target volume and organ at risk (OAR) contour delineation for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Radiation planning computed tomography (CT) scans for 2 cases of RPS were distributed among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists with instructions for contouring gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), high-risk CTV (HR CTV: area judged to be at high risk of resulting in positive margins after resection), and OARs: bowel bag, small bowel, colon, stomach, and duodenum. Analysis of contour agreement was performed using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. Results: Ten radiation oncologists contoured both RPS cases, 1 contoured only RPS1, and 1 contoured only RPS2 such that each case was contoured by 11 radiation oncologists. The first case (RPS 1) was a patient with a de-differentiated (DD) liposarcoma (LPS) with a predominant well-differentiated (WD) component, and the second case (RPS 2) was a patient with DD LPS made up almost entirely of a DD component. Contouring agreement for GTV and CTV contours was high. However, the agreement for HR CTVs was only moderate. For OARs, agreement for stomach, bowel bag, small bowel, and colon was high, but agreement for duodenum (distorted by tumor in one of these cases) was fair to moderate. Conclusions: For preoperative treatment of RPS, sarcoma radiation oncologists contoured GTV, CTV, and most OARs with a high level of agreement. HR CTV contours were more variable. Further clarification of this volume with the help of sarcoma surgical oncologists is necessary to reach consensus. More attention to delineation of the duodenum is also needed.

  6. From anatomical to biological target volumes: the role of PET in radiation treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    Schinagl, D A X; Kaanders, J H A M; Oyen, W J G

    2006-01-01

    Progress in radiation oncology requires a re-evaluation of the methods of target volume delineation beyond anatomical localization. New molecular imaging techniques for tumour visualisation such as positron emission tomography (PET) provide insight into tumour characteristics and can be complementary to the anatomical data of computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. In this review, three issues are discussed: First, can PET identify a tumour more accurately? Second, can biological tumour characteristics be visualised? Third, can intratumoural heterogeneity of these characteristics be identified? PMID:17114062

  7. Constitutive modeling of large inelastic deformation of amorphous polymers: Free volume and shear transformation zone dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyiadjis, George Z.; Samadi-Dooki, Aref

    2016-06-01

    Due to the lack of the long-range order in their molecular structure, amorphous polymers possess a considerable free volume content in their inter-molecular space. During finite deformation, these free volume holes serve as the potential sites for localized permanent plastic deformation inclusions which are called shear transformation zones (STZs). While the free volume content has been experimentally shown to increase during the course of plastic straining in glassy polymers, thermal analysis of stored energy due to the deformation shows that the STZ nucleation energy decreases at large plastic strains. The evolution of the free volume, and the STZs number density and nucleation energy during the finite straining are formulated in this paper in order to investigate the uniaxial post-yield softening-hardening behavior of the glassy polymers. This study shows that the reduction of the STZ nucleation energy, which is correlated with the free volume increase, brings about the post-yield primary softening of the amorphous polymers up to the steady-state strain value; and the secondary hardening is a result of the increased number density of the STZs, which is required for large plastic strains, while their nucleation energy is stabilized beyond the steady-state strain. The evolutions of the free volume content and STZ nucleation energy are also used to demonstrate the effect of the strain rate, temperature, and thermal history of the sample on its post-yield behavior. The obtained results from the model are compared with the experimental observations on poly(methyl methacrylate) which show a satisfactory consonance.

  8. Clinical target volume delineation in glioblastomas: pre-operative versus post-operative/pre-radiotherapy MRI

    PubMed Central

    Farace, P; Giri, M G; Meliadò, G; Amelio, D; Widesott, L; Ricciardi, G K; Dall'Oglio, S; Rizzotti, A; Sbarbati, A; Beltramello, A; Maluta, S; Amichetti, M

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Delineation of clinical target volume (CTV) is still controversial in glioblastomas. In order to assess the differences in volume and shape of the radiotherapy target, the use of pre-operative vs post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 and T2 weighted MRI was compared. Methods 4 CTVs were delineated in 24 patients pre-operatively and post-operatively using T1 contrast-enhanced (T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV) and T2 weighted images (T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV). Pre-operative MRI examinations were performed the day before surgery, whereas post-operative examinations were acquired 1 month after surgery and before chemoradiation. A concordance index (CI) was defined as the ratio between the overlapping and composite volumes. Results The volumes of T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV were not statistically different (248 ± 88 vs 254 ± 101), although volume differences >100 cm3 were observed in 6 out of 24 patients. A marked increase due to tumour progression was shown in three patients. Three patients showed a decrease because of a reduced mass effect. A significant reduction occurred between pre-operative and post-operative T2 volumes (139 ± 68 vs 78 ± 59). Lack of concordance was observed between T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV (CI = 0.67 ± 0.09), T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV (CI = 0.39 ± 0.20) and comparing the portion of the T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV not covered by that defined on T2PRECTV images (CI = 0.45 ± 0.16 and 0.44 ± 0.17, respectively). Conclusion Using T2 MRI, huge variations can be observed in peritumoural oedema, which are probably due to steroid treatment. Using T1 MRI, brain shifts after surgery and possible progressive enhancing lesions produce substantial differences in CTVs. Our data support the use of post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 weighted MRI for planning purposes. PMID:21045069

  9. Pyrometry in the Multianvil Press: New approach for temperature measurement in large volume press experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanehira, T.; Wang, Y.; Prakapenka, V.; Rivers, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    Temperature measurement in large volume press experiments has been based on thermocouple emf, which has well known problems: unknown pressure dependence of emf [e.g., 1], chemical reaction between thermocouple and other materials, deformation related texture development in the thermocouple wires [2], and so on. Thus, different techniques to measure temperatures in large volume press experiments other than thermocouples are required to measure accurate temperatures under high pressures. Here we report a new development using pyrometry in the multianvil press, where temperatures are derived on the basis of spectral radiometry. Several high pressure runs were conducted using the 1000 ton press with a DIA module installed at 13 ID-D GSECARS beamline at Advanced Photon Source (APS) [3]. The cubic pressure medium, 14 mm edge length, was made of soft-fired pyrophyllite with a graphite furnace. A moissanite (SiC) single crystal was built inside the pressure medium as a window for the thermal emission signal to go through. An MgO disk with 1.0 mm thickness was inserted in a gap between the top of the SiC crystal and thermocouple hot junction. The bottom of the window crystal was in direct contact with the tip of the anvil, which had a 1.5 mm diameter hole drilled all the way through the anvil axis. An optical fiber was inserted in this hole and the open end of fiber was in contact with the SiC crystal. Thermal spectral radiance from the inner cell assembly was obtained via the fiber and recorded by an Ocean Optics HP2000 spectrometer. The system response of spectrometer was calibrated by a tungsten ribbon ramp (OL550S, Optronic Laboratories, Inc.) with standard of spectral radiance. The cell assembly was compressed up to target value of 15 tons and then temperature was increased up to 1573 K. Radiation spectra were mainly obtained above 873 K and typical integration time was 1 ms or 10 ms. Data collection was done in the process of increase and decrease of temperature. In

  10. Lossless compression of very large volume data with fast dynamic access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rongkai; Tao, Tao; Gabriel, Michael; Belford, Geneva

    2002-09-01

    The volumetric data set is important in many scientific and biomedical fields. Since such sets may be extremely large, a compression method is critical to store and transmit them. To achieve a high compression rate, most of the existing volume compression methods are lossy, which is usually unacceptable in biomedical applications. We developed a new context-based non-linear prediction method to preprocess the volume data set in order to effectively lower the prediction entropy. The prediction error is further encoded using Huffman code. Unlike the conventional methods, the volume is divided into cubical blocks to take advantage of the data's spatial locality. Instead of building one Huffman tree for each block, we developed a novel binning algorithm that build a Huffman tree for each group (bin) of blocks. Combining all the effects above, we achieved an excellent compression rate compared to other lossless volume compression methods. In addition, an auxiliary data structure, Scalable Hyperspace File (SHSF) is used to index the huge volume so that we can obtain many other benefits including parallel construction, on-the-fly accessing of compressed data without global decompression, fast previewing, efficient background compressing, and scalability etc.

  11. A magnetic sorbent for the efficient and rapid extraction of organic micropollutants from large-volume environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mancheng; Zhou, Qing; Li, Aimin; Shuang, Chendong; Wang, Wei; Wang, Mengqiao

    2013-11-01

    A magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) method based on a novel magnetic sorbent was proposed for the extraction of target compounds from large-volume water samples. First, magnetic hypercrosslinked microspheres (NAND-1) were prepared via membrane emulsification-suspension polymerization and post crosslinking reaction. To ensure that the Fe3O4 nanoparticles could completely pass through the membrane without blocking the pores, oleic acid was used to modify the Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which enhanced lipophilicity and monodispersity of the magnetite nanoparticles. The obtained NAND-1 microspheres exhibited super paramagnetic characteristics and excellent magnetic responsiveness with a saturation magnetization of 2.53 emu/g. In addition, a uniform particle size (~8 μm) and a large average surface area (1303.59 m(2)/g) were also observed, which were both beneficial for the extraction of the target compounds. Thus, NAND-1 has the potential to simultaneously exhibit good extraction efficiencies toward different types of organic micropollutants (OMPs), including triazines, carbamazepine and diethyl phthalate. The conditions of the MSPE based on NAND-1 were optimized by single factor and orthogonal design experiments. This MSPE method needed only a small amount of sorbent (50mg/L) for the extraction of OMPs from a large-volume aquatic sample (5L) and reached equilibrium in a short amount of time (30 min). Moreover, the solution volume, the pH, and the salinity had insignificant influences on the extraction of the eight target OMPs. Under the optimum conditions, the recoveries of the eight OMPs calculated by analyzing the spiked samples were from 91.7% to 99.4%. The NAND-1 could be recycled ten times and still achieve recoveries of the eight OMPs higher than 86%. The limits of detection of the eight OMPs ranged from 1.76 to 27.56 ng/L, and the limits of quantification were from 5.71 to 92.05 ng/L. These results indicated that the proposed method, based on the use of NAND-1

  12. The large volume calorimeter for measuring the pressure cooker'' shipping container

    SciTech Connect

    Kasperski, P.W.; Duff, M.F.; Wetzel, J.R. ); Baker, L.B.; MacMurdo, K.W. )

    1991-01-01

    A precise, low wattage, large volume calorimeter system has been developed at Mound to measure two configurations of the 12081 containment vessel. This system was developed and constructed to perform verification measurements at the Savannah River Site. The calorimeter system has performance design specifications of {plus minus}0.3% error above the 2-watt level, and {plus minus}(0.03% plus 0.006 watts) at power levels below 2 watts (one sigma). Data collected during performance testing shows measurement errors well within this range, even down to 0.1-watt power levels. The development of this calorimeter shows that ultra-precise measurements can be achieved on extremely large volume sample configurations. 1 ref., 5 figs.

  13. HYBRID BRIDGMAN ANVIL DESIGN: AN OPTICAL WINDOW FOR IN-SITU SPECTROSCOPY IN LARGE VOLUME PRESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Lipp, M J; Evans, W J; Yoo, C S

    2005-07-29

    The absence of in-situ optical probes for large volume presses often limits their application to high-pressure materials research. In this paper, we present a unique anvil/optical window-design for use in large volume presses, which consists of an inverted diamond anvil seated in a Bridgman type anvil. A small cylindrical aperture through the Bridgman anvil ending at the back of diamond anvil allows optical access to the sample chamber and permits direct optical spectroscopy measurements, such as ruby fluorescence (in-situ pressure) or Raman spectroscopy. This performance of this anvil-design has been demonstrated by loading KBr to a pressure of 14.5 GPa.

  14. Assembly, operation and disassembly manual for the Battelle Large Volume Water Sampler (BLVWS)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, V.W.; Campbell, R.M.

    1984-12-01

    Assembly, operation and disassembly of the Battelle Large Volume Water Sampler (BLVWS) are described in detail. Step by step instructions of assembly, general operation and disassembly are provided to allow an operator completely unfamiliar with the sampler to successfully apply the BLVWS to his research sampling needs. The sampler permits concentration of both particulate and dissolved radionuclides from large volumes of ocean and fresh water. The water sample passes through a filtration section for particle removal then through sorption or ion exchange beds where species of interest are removed. The sampler components which contact the water being sampled are constructed of polyvinylchloride (PVC). The sampler has been successfully applied to many sampling needs over the past fifteen years. 9 references, 8 figures.

  15. Masked target transform volume clutter metric for human observer visual search modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Richard Kirk

    The Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) develops an imaging system performance model to aid in the design and comparison of imaging systems for military use. It is intended to approximate visual task performance for a typical human observer with an imaging system of specified optical, electrical, physical, and environmental parameters. When modeling search performance, the model currently uses only target size and target-to-background contrast to describe a scene. The presence or absence of other non-target objects and textures in the scene also affect search performance, but NVESD's targeting task performance metric based time limited search model (TTP/TLS) does not currently account for them explicitly. Non-target objects in a scene that impact search performance are referred to as clutter. A universally accepted mathematical definition of clutter does not yet exist. Researchers have proposed a number of clutter metrics based on very different methods, but none account for display geometry or the varying spatial frequency sensitivity of the human visual system. After a review of the NVESD search model, properties of the human visual system, and a literature review of clutter metrics, the new masked target transform volume clutter metric will be presented. Next the results of an experiment designed to show performance variation due to clutter alone will be presented. Then, the results of three separate perception experiments using real or realistic search imagery will be used to show that the new clutter metric better models human observer search performance than the current NVESD model or any of the reviewed clutter metrics.

  16. Anti-de Sitter-space/conformal-field-theory correspondence and large-N volume independence

    SciTech Connect

    Poppitz, Erich; Uensal, Mithat

    2010-09-15

    We study the Eguchi-Kawai reduction in the strong-coupling domain of gauge theories via the gravity dual of N=4 super-Yang-Mills on R{sup 3}xS{sup 1}. We show that D-branes geometrize volume independence in the center-symmetric vacuum and give supergravity predictions for the range of validity of reduced large-N models at strong coupling.

  17. Rapid Adaptive Optical Recovery of Optimal Resolution over LargeVolumes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Milkie, Dan; Saxena, Ankur; Engerer, Peter; Misgeld, Thomas; Bronner, Marianne E.; Mumm, Jeff; Betzig, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Using a de-scanned, laser-induced guide star and direct wavefront sensing, we demonstrate adaptive correction of complex optical aberrations at high numerical aperture and a 14 ms update rate. This permits us to compensate for the rapid spatial variation in aberration often encountered in biological specimens, and recover diffraction-limited imaging over large (> 240 μm)3 volumes. We applied this to image fine neuronal processes and subcellular dynamics within the zebrafish brain. PMID:24727653

  18. Characterization of stable brush-shaped large-volume plasma generated at ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Jie; Cao Wenqing; Zhao Wei; Wang Yishan; Duan Yixiang

    2012-01-15

    A brush-shaped, large-volume plasma was generated at ambient pressure with a dc power supply and flowing argon gas, as well as a narrow outlet slit. Based on the V-I curve and emission profiles obtained in our experiment, the plasma shows some typical glow discharge characteristics. The electron density in the positive column close to the anode is about 1.4x10{sup 14}cm{sup -3} high, which is desirable for generating abundant amounts of reactive species in the plasma. Emission spectroscopy diagnosis indicates that many reactive species, such as excited argon atoms, excited oxygen atoms, excited nitrogen molecules, OH and C{sub 2} radicals, etc., generated within the plasma are distributed symmetrically and uniformly, which is preferable to some chemical reactions in practical applications. Spectral measurement also shows that the concentration of some excited argon atoms increases with the argon flow rate when the applied voltage is unvaried, while that of these excited argon atoms declines with the discharge current in the normal/subnormal glow discharge mode with the argon flow rate fixed. The plasma size is about 15 mm x 1 mm x 19 mm (L, W, H), when 38-W of discharge power is used. Such a laminar brush-shaped large-volume plasma device ensures not only efficient utilization of the plasma gas, but also effective processing of objects with large volume and complicated structure that are susceptible to high temperatures.

  19. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12: galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; White, Martin; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Sheldon, Erin; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Dawson, Kyle; Harding, Paul; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Leauthaud, Alexie; Masters, Karen; McBride, Cameron K.; More, Surhud; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Pforr, Janine; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Schneider, Donald P.; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Simmons, Audrey; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets for which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. The code used, designated MKSAMPLE, is released with this paper.

  20. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey data release 12: Galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rito; White, Marin; Daniel J. Einstein; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J.; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Sheldon, Erin; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia -Hsun; Dawson, Kyle; Harding, Paul; Kitaura, Francisco -Shu; Leauthaud, Alexie; Masters, Karen; McBride, Cameron K.; More, Surhud; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Nuza, Sebastian E.; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Pforr, Janine; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Schneider, Donald P.; Scoccola, Claudia G.; Simmons, Audrey; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2015-11-17

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets for which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. Furthermore, the code used, designated mksample, is released with this paper.

  1. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey data release 12: Galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rito; White, Marin; Daniel J. Einstein; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J.; et al

    2015-11-17

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets formore » which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. Furthermore, the code used, designated mksample, is released with this paper.« less

  2. Three-dimensional digital holographic aperture synthesis for rapid and highly-accurate large-volume metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, Stephen; Kaylor, Brant M.; Barber, Zeb W.; Reibel, Randy R.

    2015-09-01

    Currently large volume, high accuracy three-dimensional (3D) metrology is dominated by laser trackers, which typically utilize a laser scanner and cooperative reflector to estimate points on a given surface. The dependency upon the placement of cooperative targets dramatically inhibits the speed at which metrology can be conducted. To increase speed, laser scanners or structured illumination systems can be used directly on the surface of interest. Both approaches are restricted in their axial and lateral resolution at longer stand-off distances due to the diffraction limit of the optics used. Holographic aperture ladar (HAL) and synthetic aperture ladar (SAL) can enhance the lateral resolution of an imaging system by synthesizing much larger apertures by digitally combining measurements from multiple smaller apertures. Both of these approaches only produce two-dimensional imagery and are therefore not suitable for large volume 3D metrology. We combined the SAL and HAL approaches to create a swept frequency digital holographic 3D imaging system that provides rapid measurement speed for surface coverage with unprecedented axial and lateral resolution at longer standoff ranges. The technique yields a "data cube" of Fourier domain data, which can be processed with a 3D Fourier transform to reveal a 3D estimate of the surface. In this paper, we provide the theoretical background for the technique and show experimental results based on an ultra-wideband frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) chirped heterodyne ranging system showing ~100 micron lateral and axial precisions at >2 m standoff distances.

  3. Effects of breathing variation on gating window internal target volume in respiratory gated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Jing; McLawhorn, Robert; Read, Paul W.; Larner, James M.; Yin, Fang-fang; Benedict, Stanley H.; Sheng, Ke

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of breathing variation on gating window internal target volume (ITV{sub GW}) in respiratory gated radiation therapy. Method and Materials: Two-dimensional dynamic MRI (dMRI) of lung motion was acquired in ten volunteers and eight lung cancer patients. Resorted dMRI using 4DCT acquisition method (RedCAM) was generated for selected subjects by simulating the image rebinning process. A dynamic software generated phantom (dSGP) was created by moving a solid circle (to mimic the ''tumor'') with dMRI-determined motion trajectories. The gating window internal target area (ITA{sub GW}, 2D counterpart of ITV{sub GW}) was determined from both RedCAM and dSGP/dMRI. Its area (A), major axis (L1), minor axis (L2), and similarity (S) were calculated and compared. Results: In the phantom study of 3 cm tumor, measurements of the ITA{sub GW} from dSGP (A=10.0{+-}1.3 cm{sup 2}, L1=3.8{+-}0.4 cm, and L2=3.3{+-}0.1 cm) are significantly (p<0.001) greater than those from RedCAM (A=8.5{+-}0.7 cm{sup 2}, L1=3.5{+-}0.2 cm, and L2=3.1{+-}0.1 cm). Similarly, the differences are significantly greater (p<0.001) for the 1 cm tumor (A=1.9{+-}0.5 cm{sup 2}, L1=1.9{+-}0.4 cm, and L2=1.3{+-}0.1 cm in dSGP; A=1.3{+-}0.1 cm{sup 2}, L1=1.5{+-}0.2 cm, and L2=1.1{+-}0.1 cm in RedCAM). In patient studies, measurements of the ITA{sub GW} from dMRI (A=15.5{+-}8.2 cm{sup 2}, L1=5.0{+-}1.1 cm, and L2=3.8{+-}1.2 cm) are also significantly greater (p<0.05) than those from RedCAM (A=13.2{+-}8.5 cm{sup 2}, L1=4.3{+-}1.4 cm, and L2=3.7{+-}1.2 cm). Similarities were 0.9{+-}0.1, 0.8{+-}0.1, and 0.8{+-}0.1 in the 3 cm tumor phantom, 1 cm tumor phantom, and patient studies, respectively. Conclusion: ITV{sub GW} can be underestimated by 4DCT due to breathing variations. An additional margin may be needed to account for this potential error in generating a PTV{sub GW}. Cautions need to be taken when generating ITV{sub GW} from 4DCT in respiratory gated radiation therapy, especially

  4. Estimated limits of IMRT dose escalation using varied planning target volume margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulet, Christopher C.; Herman, Michael G.; Hillman, David W.; Davis, Brian J.

    2008-07-01

    To estimate the limits of dose escalation for prostate cancer as a function of planning target volume (PTV) margins, the maximum achievable dose (MAD) was determined through iterative plan optimizations from data sets of 18 patients until the dose constraints for rectum, bladder and PTV could no longer be met. PTV margins of 10, 5 and 3 mm yielded a mean MAD of 83.0 Gy (range, 73.8-108.0 Gy), 113.1 Gy (range, 90.0-151.2 Gy) and 135.9 Gy (range, 102.6-189.0 Gy), respectively. All comparisons of MAD among margin groups were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Comparison of prostate volumes of 30-50 mL (n = 8) with volumes of 51-70 mL (n = 7) and 71-105 mL (n = 3) showed an inverse relationship with MAD. Decreases in PTV margin significantly decreased the PTV overlap of the rectum (P < 0.001 for all margin comparisons). With decreases in the PTV margin and maintenance of identical dose constraints, doses well above those currently prescribed for treatment of localized prostate cancer appear feasible. However, the dose escalation suggested by these findings is a theoretical estimate, and additional dose constraints will likely be necessary to limit toxicity to normal tissue.

  5. Colorimetric paper-based detection of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes from large volumes of agricultural water.

    PubMed

    Bisha, Bledar; Adkins, Jaclyn A; Jokerst, Jana C; Chandler, Jeffrey C; Pérez-Méndez, Alma; Coleman, Shannon M; Sbodio, Adrian O; Suslow, Trevor V; Danyluk, Michelle D; Henry, Charles S; Goodridge, Lawrence D

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes rapid colorimetric detection of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes from large volumes (10 L) of agricultural waters. Here, water is filtered through sterile Modified Moore Swabs (MMS), which consist of a simple gauze filter enclosed in a plastic cartridge, to concentrate bacteria. Following filtration, non-selective or selective enrichments for the target bacteria are performed in the MMS. For colorimetric detection of the target bacteria, the enrichments are then assayed using paper-based analytical devices (µPADs) embedded with bacteria-indicative substrates. Each substrate reacts with target-indicative bacterial enzymes, generating colored products that can be detected visually (qualitative detection) on the µPAD. Alternatively, digital images of the reacted µPADs can be generated with common scanning or photographic devices and analyzed using ImageJ software, allowing for more objective and standardized interpretation of results. Although the biochemical screening procedures are designed to identify the aforementioned bacterial pathogens, in some cases enzymes produced by background microbiota or the degradation of the colorimetric substrates may produce a false positive. Therefore, confirmation using a more discriminatory diagnostic is needed. Nonetheless, this bacterial concentration and detection platform is inexpensive, sensitive (0.1 CFU/ml detection limit), easy to perform, and rapid (concentration, enrichment, and detection are performed within approximately 24 hr), justifying its use as an initial screening method for the microbiological quality of agricultural water. PMID:24962090

  6. Colorimetric Paper-based Detection of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes from Large Volumes of Agricultural Water

    PubMed Central

    Bisha, Bledar; Adkins, Jaclyn A.; Jokerst, Jana C.; Chandler, Jeffrey C.; Pérez-Méndez, Alma; Coleman, Shannon M.; Sbodio, Adrian O.; Suslow, Trevor V.; Danyluk, Michelle D.; Henry, Charles S.; Goodridge, Lawrence D.

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes rapid colorimetric detection of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes from large volumes (10 L) of agricultural waters. Here, water is filtered through sterile Modified Moore Swabs (MMS), which consist of a simple gauze filter enclosed in a plastic cartridge, to concentrate bacteria. Following filtration, non-selective or selective enrichments for the target bacteria are performed in the MMS. For colorimetric detection of the target bacteria, the enrichments are then assayed using paper-based analytical devices (µPADs) embedded with bacteria-indicative substrates. Each substrate reacts with target-indicative bacterial enzymes, generating colored products that can be detected visually (qualitative detection) on the µPAD. Alternatively, digital images of the reacted µPADs can be generated with common scanning or photographic devices and analyzed using ImageJ software, allowing for more objective and standardized interpretation of results. Although the biochemical screening procedures are designed to identify the aforementioned bacterial pathogens, in some cases enzymes produced by background microbiota or the degradation of the colorimetric substrates may produce a false positive. Therefore, confirmation using a more discriminatory diagnostic is needed. Nonetheless, this bacterial concentration and detection platform is inexpensive, sensitive (0.1 CFU/ml detection limit), easy to perform, and rapid (concentration, enrichment, and detection are performed within approximately 24 hr), justifying its use as an initial screening method for the microbiological quality of agricultural water. PMID:24962090

  7. Dosimetric Advantages of Midventilation Compared With Internal Target Volume for Radiation Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lens, Eelco Horst, Astrid van der; Versteijne, Eva; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The midventilation (midV) approach can be used to take respiratory-induced pancreatic tumor motion into account during radiation therapy. In this study, the dosimetric consequences for organs at risk and tumor coverage of using a midV approach compared with using an internal target volume (ITV) were investigated. Methods and Materials: For each of the 18 patients, 2 treatment plans (25 × 2.0 Gy) were created, 1 using an ITV and 1 using a midV approach. The midV dose distribution was blurred using the respiratory-induced motion from 4-dimensional computed tomography. The resulting planning target volume (PTV) coverage for this blurred dose distribution was analyzed; PTV coverage was required to be at least V{sub 95%} >98%. In addition, the change in PTV size and the changes in V{sub 10Gy}, V{sub 20Gy}, V{sub 30Gy}, V{sub 40Gy}, D{sub mean} and D{sub 2cc} for the stomach and for the duodenum were analyzed; differences were tested for significance using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Using a midV approach resulted in sufficient target coverage. A highly significant PTV size reduction of 13.9% (P<.001) was observed. Also, all dose parameters for the stomach and duodenum, except the D{sub 2cc} of the duodenum, improved significantly (P≤.002). Conclusions: By using the midV approach to account for respiratory-induced tumor motion, a significant PTV reduction and significant dose reductions to the stomach and to the duodenum can be achieved when irradiating pancreatic tumors.

  8. Large scale optimization of beam weights under dose-volume restrictions.

    PubMed

    Langer, M; Brown, R; Urie, M; Leong, J; Stracher, M; Shapiro, J

    1990-04-01

    The problem of choosing weights for beams in a multifield plan which maximizes tumor dose under conditions that recognize the volume dependence of organ tolerance to radiation is considered, and its solution described. Structures are modelled as collections of discrete points, and the weighting problem described as a combinatorial linear program (LP). The combinatorial LP is solved as a mixed 0/1 integer program with appropriate restrictions on normal tissue dose. The method is illustrated through the assignment of weights to a set of 10 beams incident on a pelvic target. Dose-volume restrictions are placed on surrounding bowel, bladder, and rectum, and a limit placed on tumor dose inhomogeneity. Different tolerance restrictions are examined, so that the sensitivity of the target dose to changes in the normal tissue constraints may be explored. It is shown that the distributions obtained satisfy the posed constraints. The technique permits formal solution of the optimization problem, in a time short enough to meet the needs of treatment planners. PMID:2323977

  9. Large-N volume independence in conformal and confining gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Unsal, Mithat; Yaffe, Laurence G.; /Washington U., Seattle

    2010-08-26

    Consequences of large N volume independence are examined in conformal and confining gauge theories. In the large N limit, gauge theories compactified on R{sup d-k} x (S{sup 1}){sup k} are independent of the S{sup 1} radii, provided the theory has unbroken center symmetry. In particular, this implies that a large N gauge theory which, on R{sup d}, flows to an IR fixed point, retains the infinite correlation length and other scale invariant properties of the decompactified theory even when compactified on R{sup d-k} x (S{sup 1}){sup k}. In other words, finite volume effects are 1/N suppressed. In lattice formulations of vector-like theories, this implies that numerical studies to determine the boundary between confined and conformal phases may be performed on one-site lattice models. In N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, the center symmetry realization is a matter of choice: the theory on R{sup 4-k} x (S{sup 1}){sup k} has a moduli space which contains points with all possible realizations of center symmetry. Large N QCD with massive adjoint fermions and one or two compactified dimensions has a rich phase structure with an infinite number of phase transitions coalescing in the zero radius limit.

  10. Detection and Volume Estimation of Large Landslides by Using Multi-temporal Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yu-chung; Hou, Chin-Shyong; Chan, Yu-Chang; Hu, Jyr-Ching; Fei, Li-Yuan; Chen, Hung-Jen; Chiu, Cheng-Lung

    2014-05-01

    Large landslides are frequently triggered by strong earthquakes and heavy rainfalls in the mountainous areas of Taiwan. The heavy rainfall brought by the Typhoon Morakot has triggered a large amount of landslides. The most unfortunate case occurred in the Xiaolin village, which was totally demolished by a catastrophic landslide in less than a minute. Continued and detailed study of the characteristics of large landslides is urgently needed to mitigate loss of lives and properties in the future. Traditionally known techniques cannot effectively extract landslide parameters, such as depth, amount and volume, which are essential in all the phases of landslide assessment. In addition, it is very important to record the changes of landslide deposits after the landslide events as accurately as possible to better understand the landslide erosion process. The acquisition of digital elevation models (DEMs) is considered necessary for achieving accurate, effective and quantitative landslide assessments. A new technique is presented in this study for quickly assessing extensive areas of large landslides. The technique uses DEMs extracted from several remote sensing approaches, including aerial photogrammetry, airborne LiDAR and UAV photogrammetry. We chose a large landslide event that occurred after Typhoon Sinlaku in Meiyuan the mount, central Taiwan in 2008. We collected and processed six data sets, including aerial photos, airborne LiDAR data and UAVphotos, at different times from 2005 to 2013. Our analyses show the landslide volume being 17.14 × 106 cubic meters, deposition volume being 12.75 × 106 cubic meters, and about 4.38 × 106 cubic meters being washed out of the region. Residual deposition ratio of this area is about 74% in 2008; while, after a few years, the residual deposition ratio is down below 50%. We also analyzed riverbed changes and sediment transfer patterns from 2005 to 2013 by multi-temporal remote sensing data with desirable accuracy. The developed

  11. A pyramid-based approach to visual exploration of a large volume of vehicle trajectory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Li, Xiang

    2012-12-01

    Advances in positioning and wireless communicating technologies make it possible to collect large volumes of trajectory data of moving vehicles in a fast and convenient fashion. These data can be applied to traffic studies. Behind this application, a methodological issue that still requires particular attention is the way these data should be spatially visualized. Trajectory data physically consists of a large number of positioning points. With the dramatic increase of data volume, it becomes a challenge to display and explore these data. Existing commercial software often employs vector-based indexing structures to facilitate the display of a large volume of points, but their performance downgrades quickly when the number of points is very large, for example, tens of millions. In this paper, a pyramid-based approach is proposed. A pyramid method initially is invented to facilitate the display of raster images through the tradeoff between storage space and display time. A pyramid is a set of images at different levels with different resolutions. In this paper, we convert vector-based point data into raster data, and build a gridbased indexing structure in a 2D plane. Then, an image pyramid is built. Moreover, at the same level of a pyramid, image is segmented into mosaics with respect to the requirements of data storage and management. Algorithms or procedures on grid-based indexing structure, image pyramid, image segmentation, and visualization operations are given in this paper. A case study with taxi trajectory data in Shanghai is conducted. Results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the existing commercial software.

  12. Volume-staged radiosurgery for large arteriovenous malformations: an evolving paradigm.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Zachary A; Sneed, Penny K; Gupta, Nalin; Lawton, Michael T; Molinaro, Annette M; Young, William; Dowd, Christopher F; Halbach, Van V; Higashida, Randall T; McDermott, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Large arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) remain difficult to treat, and ideal treatment parameters for volume-staged stereotactic radiosurgery (VS-SRS) are still unknown. The object of this study was to compare VS-SRS treatment outcomes for AVMs larger than 10 ml during 2 eras; Era 1 was 1992-March 2004, and Era 2 was May 2004-2008. In Era 2 the authors prospectively decreased the AVM treatment volume, increased the radiation dose per stage, and shortened the interval between stages. METHODS All cases of VS-SRS treatment for AVM performed at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS Of 69 patients intended for VS-SRS, 63 completed all stages. The median patient age at the first stage of VS-SRS was 34 years (range 9-68 years). The median modified radiosurgery-based AVM score (mRBAS), total AVM volume, and volume per stage in Era 1 versus Era 2 were 3.6 versus 2.7, 27.3 ml versus 18.9 ml, and 15.0 ml versus 6.8 ml, respectively. The median radiation dose per stage was 15.5 Gy in Era 1 and 17.0 Gy in Era 2, and the median clinical follow-up period in living patients was 8.6 years in Era 1 and 4.8 years in Era 2. All outcomes were measured from the first stage of VS-SRS. Near or complete obliteration was more common in Era 2 (log-rank test, p = 0.0003), with 3- and 5-year probabilities of 5% and 21%, respectively, in Era 1 compared with 24% and 68% in Era 2. Radiosurgical dose, AVM volume per stage, total AVM volume, era, compact nidus, Spetzler-Martin grade, and mRBAS were significantly associated with near or complete obliteration on univariate analysis. Dose was a strong predictor of response (Cox proportional hazards, p < 0.001, HR 6.99), with 3- and 5-year probabilities of near or complete obliteration of 5% and 16%, respectively, at a dose < 17 Gy versus 23% and 74% at a dose ≥ 17 Gy. Dose per stage, compact nidus, and total AVM volume remained significant predictors of near or complete obliteration on multivariate analysis. Seventeen

  13. Very Large Area/Volume Microwave ECR Plasma and Ion Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor); Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for producing very large area and large volume plasmas. The invention utilizes electron cyclotron resonances in conjunction with permanent magnets to produce dense, uniform plasmas for long life ion thruster applications or for plasma processing applications such as etching, deposition, ion milling and ion implantation. The large area source is at least five times larger than the 12-inch wafers being processed to date. Its rectangular shape makes it easier to accommodate to materials processing than sources that are circular in shape. The source itself represents the largest ECR ion source built to date. It is electrodeless and does not utilize electromagnets to generate the ECR magnetic circuit, nor does it make use of windows.

  14. Dynamic dialysis: an efficient technique for large-volume sample desalting.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Le, Zhen; Zhong, Lipeng; Huang, Chunhong

    2015-08-18

    Dialysis is a well-known technique for laboratory separation. However, its efficiency is commonly restricted by the dialyzer volume and its passive diffusion manner. In addition, the sample is likely to be precipitated and inactive during a long dialysis process. To overcome these drawbacks, a dynamic dialysis method was described and evaluated. The dynamic dialysis was performed by two peristaltic pumps working in reverse directions, in order to drive countercurrent parallel flow of sample and buffer, respectively. The efficiency and capacity of this dynamic dialysis method was evaluated by recording and statistically comparing the variation of conductance from retentate under different conditions. The dynamic method was proven to be effective in dialyzing a large-volume sample, and its efficiency changes proportionally to the flow rate of sample. To sum up, circulating the sample and the buffer creates the highest possible concentration gradient to significantly improve dialysis capacity and shorten dialysis time. PMID:25036273

  15. Digital fringe projection system for large-volume 360-deg shape measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnik, Robert; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Woznicki, Jerzy M.

    2002-02-01

    We present a system for 3-D shape measurement in large volumes based on combined digital-fringe--Gray-code projection. With the help of a new calibration procedure, the system provides accurate results despite its crossed-axis configuration and unknown aberrations of the digital light projector and CCD camera. Also, the separate clouds of points captured from different directions are automatically merged into the main cloud. The system delivers results in the form of (x,y,z) coordinates of the object points with additional (R,G,B) color information about their texture. Applicability of the system is proven by presenting sample results of measurements performed on complex objects. The uncertainty of the system was estimated at 10 -4 of the measurement volume.

  16. The complex aerodynamic footprint of desert locusts revealed by large-volume tomographic particle image velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Schanz, Daniel; Geisler, Reinhard; Schröder, Andreas; Bomphrey, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry has been the preferred experimental technique with which to study the aerodynamics of animal flight for over a decade. In that time, hardware has become more accessible and the software has progressed from the acquisition of planes through the flow field to the reconstruction of small volumetric measurements. Until now, it has not been possible to capture large volumes that incorporate the full wavelength of the aerodynamic track left behind during a complete wingbeat cycle. Here, we use a unique apparatus to acquire the first instantaneous wake volume of a flying animal's entire wingbeat. We confirm the presence of wake deformation behind desert locusts and quantify the effect of that deformation on estimates of aerodynamic force and the efficiency of lift generation. We present previously undescribed vortex wake phenomena, including entrainment around the wing-tip vortices of a set of secondary vortices borne of Kelvin–Helmholtz instability in the shear layer behind the flapping wings. PMID:26040598

  17. Generation of large volume hydrostatic pressure to 8 GPa for ultrasonic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozuki, Yasushi; Yoneda, Akira; Fujimura, Akio; Sawamoto, Hiroshi; Kumazawa, Mineo

    1986-09-01

    The design and performance of a liquid-solid hybrid cell to generate high hydrostatic pressures in a relatively large volume (for use in measurements of the pressure dependence of the physical properties of materials) are reported. A 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture is employed in 12-mm-side and 20-mm-side versions of an eight-cubic-anvil apparatus driven by a 10-kt press. Pressures up to 8 GPa are obtained safely in a 16-cu cm volume by applying uniaxial force of 3 kt. The cell is used to obtain measurements of the velocity of ultrasonic waves in fused quartz: the experimental setup is described, and sample results are presented graphically.

  18. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Neclear Explosion Monitoring DOENA27323-2

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, E.L.

    2006-10-30

    Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume high-resolution gamma-ray detectors for field applications. To accomplish this we are utilizing a newly available generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers to operate the very largest volume germanium detectors with no maintenance. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed 5 years. Three important factors affect the operation of mechanically cooled germanium detectors: temperature, vacuum, and vibration. These factors will be studied in the laboratory at the most fundamental levels to insure a solid understanding of the physical limitations each factor places on a practical mechanically cooled germanium detector system. Using this knowledge, mechanically cooled germanium detector prototype systems will be designed and fabricated.

  19. The complex aerodynamic footprint of desert locusts revealed by large-volume tomographic particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Schanz, Daniel; Geisler, Reinhard; Schröder, Andreas; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-07-01

    Particle image velocimetry has been the preferred experimental technique with which to study the aerodynamics of animal flight for over a decade. In that time, hardware has become more accessible and the software has progressed from the acquisition of planes through the flow field to the reconstruction of small volumetric measurements. Until now, it has not been possible to capture large volumes that incorporate the full wavelength of the aerodynamic track left behind during a complete wingbeat cycle. Here, we use a unique apparatus to acquire the first instantaneous wake volume of a flying animal's entire wingbeat. We confirm the presence of wake deformation behind desert locusts and quantify the effect of that deformation on estimates of aerodynamic force and the efficiency of lift generation. We present previously undescribed vortex wake phenomena, including entrainment around the wing-tip vortices of a set of secondary vortices borne of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear layer behind the flapping wings. PMID:26040598

  20. [Postoperative radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: Efficacy, target volume, dose].

    PubMed

    Dupic, G; Bellière-Calandry, A

    2016-04-01

    The rate of local failure of stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer is 20 to 40%, even if they are managed with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy improves local control, but its benefit on global survival remains to be demonstrated. Considered for many years as an adjuvant treatment option for pN2 cancers, it continues nevertheless to be deemed too toxic. What is the current status of postoperative radiotherapy? The Lung Adjuvant Radiotherapy Trial (Lung ART) phase III trial should give us a definitive, objective response on global survival, but inclusion of patients is difficult. The results are consequently delayed. The aim of this review is to show all the results about efficacy and tolerance of postoperative radiotherapy and to define the target volume and dose to prescribe. PMID:26996789

  1. Evaluation of potential internal target volume of liver tumors using cine-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Yuichi; Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Masai, Norihisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is widely used for evaluating moving tumors, including lung and liver cancers. For patients with unstable respiration, however, the 4DCT may not visualize tumor motion properly. High-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences (cine-MRI) permit direct visualization of respiratory motion of liver tumors without considering radiation dose exposure to patients. Here, the authors demonstrated a technique for evaluating internal target volume (ITV) with consideration of respiratory variation using cine-MRI. Methods: The authors retrospectively evaluated six patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to hepatocellular carcinoma. Before acquiring planning CT, sagittal and coronal cine-MRI images were acquired for 30 s with a frame rate of 2 frames/s. The patient immobilization was conducted under the same condition as SBRT. Planning CT images were then acquired within 15 min from cine-MRI image acquisitions, followed by a 4DCT scan. To calculate tumor motion, the motion vectors between two continuous frames of cine-MRI images were calculated for each frame using the pyramidal Lucas–Kanade method. The target contour was delineated on one frame, and each vertex of the contour was shifted and copied onto the following frame using neighboring motion vectors. 3D trajectory data were generated with the centroid of the contours on sagittal and coronal images. To evaluate the accuracy of the tracking method, the motion of clearly visible blood vessel was analyzed with the motion tracking and manual detection techniques. The target volume delineated on the 50% (end-exhale) phase of 4DCT was translated with the trajectory data, and the distribution of the occupancy probability of target volume was calculated as potential ITV (ITV {sub Potential}). The concordance between ITV {sub Potential} and ITV estimated with 4DCT (ITV {sub 4DCT}) was evaluated using the Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC). Results

  2. Large intestine-targeted nanoparticle-releasing oral vaccine to control genitorectal viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Talton, James; Zhang, Guofeng; Cunningham, Tshaka; Wang, Zijian; Waters, Robert C.; Kirk, James; Eppler, Bärbel; Dennis M, Klinman; Sui, Yongjun; Gagnon, Susan; Belyakov, Igor M.; Mumper, Russell J.; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    2012-01-01

    Both rectal and vaginal mucosal surfaces serve as transmission routes for pathogenic microorganisms. Vaccination through large intestinal mucosa, previously proven protective for both mucosal sites in animal studies, can be achieved successfully by direct intra-colorectal (i.c.r.) administration, which is, however, clinically impractical. Oral delivery seems preferable, but risks vaccine destruction in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, we designed a large intestine-targeted oral delivery with pH-dependent microparticles containing vaccine nanoparticles, which induced colorectal immunity in mice comparably to colorectal vaccination and protected against rectal or vaginal viral challenge. Conversely, vaccine targeted to the small intestine induced only small intestinal immunity and provided no rectal or vaginal protection, demonstrating functional compartmentalization within the gut mucosal immune system. Therefore, using this oral vaccine delivery system to target the large intestine, but not the small intestine, may represent a feasible novel strategy for immune protection of rectal and vaginal mucosa. PMID:22797811

  3. A Novel Technique for Endovascular Removal of Large Volume Right Atrial Tumor Thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, Barbara; McClure, Timothy Moriarty, John

    2015-08-15

    Venous thromboembolic disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the setting of large volume pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy has been shown to be a successful treatment modality; however, its use somewhat limited due to the risk of hemorrhage and potential for distal embolization in the setting of large mobile thrombi. In patients where either thrombolysis is contraindicated or unsuccessful, and conventional therapies prove inadequate, surgical thrombectomy may be considered. We present a case of percutaneous endovascular extraction of a large mobile mass extending from the inferior vena cava into the right atrium using the Angiovac device, a venovenous bypass system designed for high-volume aspiration of undesired endovascular material. Standard endovascular methods for removal of cancer-associated thrombus, such as catheter-directed lysis, maceration, and exclusion, may prove inadequate in the setting of underlying tumor thrombus. Where conventional endovascular methods either fail or are unsuitable, endovascular thrombectomy with the Angiovac device may be a useful and safe minimally invasive alternative to open resection.

  4. Dosimetric evaluation of planning target volume margin reduction for prostate cancer via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Taejin; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Park, Soah; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Han, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Meyeon; Kim, Kyoung-Joo; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively estimate the dosimetric benefits of the image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system for the prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery. The cases of eleven patients who underwent IMRT for prostate cancer without a prostatectomy at our institution between October 2012 and April 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. For every patient, clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margins were uniformly used: 3 mm, 5 mm, 7 mm, 10 mm, 12 mm, and 15 mm. For each margin size, the IMRT plans were independently optimized by one medical physicist using Pinnalce3 (ver. 8.0.d, Philips Medical System, Madison, WI) in order to maintain the plan quality. The maximum geometrical margin (MGM) for every CT image set, defined as the smallest margin encompassing the rectum at least at one slice, was between 13 mm and 26 mm. The percentage rectum overlapping PTV (%V ROV ), the rectal normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and the mean rectal dose (%RD mean ) increased in proportion to the increase of PTV margin. However the bladder NTCP remained around zero to some extent regardless of the increase of PTV margin while the percentage bladder overlapping PTV (%V BOV ) and the mean bladder dose (%BD mean ) increased in proportion to the increase of PTV margin. Without relatively large rectum or small bladder, the increase observed for rectal NTCP, %RDmean and %BD mean per 1-mm PTV margin size were 1.84%, 2.44% and 2.90%, respectively. Unlike the behavior of the rectum or the bladder, the maximum dose on each femoral head had little effect on PTV margin. This quantitative study of the PTV margin reduction supported that IG-IMRT has enhanced the clinical effects over prostate cancer with the reduction of normal organ complications under the similar level of PTV control.

  5. Targeted Large-Scale Deletion of Bacterial Genomes Using CRISPR-Nickases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Programmable CRISPR-Cas systems have augmented our ability to produce precise genome manipulations. Here we demonstrate and characterize the ability of CRISPR-Cas derived nickases to direct targeted recombination of both small and large genomic regions flanked by repetitive elements in Escherichia coli. While CRISPR directed double-stranded DNA breaks are highly lethal in many bacteria, we show that CRISPR-guided nickase systems can be programmed to make precise, nonlethal, single-stranded incisions in targeted genomic regions. This induces recombination events and leads to targeted deletion. We demonstrate that dual-targeted nicking enables deletion of 36 and 97 Kb of the genome. Furthermore, multiplex targeting enables deletion of 133 Kb, accounting for approximately 3% of the entire E. coli genome. This technology provides a framework for methods to manipulate bacterial genomes using CRISPR-nickase systems. We envision this system working synergistically with preexisting bacterial genome engineering methods. PMID:26451892

  6. Picosecond laser-driven terahertz radiation from large scale preplasmas of solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, G. Q.; Li, Y. T.; Li, C.; Su, L. N.; Zheng, Y.; Liu, M.; Dunn, J.; Nilsen, J.; Hunter, J.; Wang, W. M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2016-05-01

    The terahertz (THz) radiation from the front of solid targets with a large-scale preplasma irradiated by relativistic picosecond laser pulses has been studied. The THz radiation measured at the specular direction nonlinearly increases with laser energy and an optimal plasma density scalelength is observed. Particle-in-cell simulations indicate that the radiation can be attributed to the model of mode conversion. While the THz radiation near the target normal direction is saturated with laser energy and plasma scalelength. Unlike the radiation in the specular direction’ the transient current formed at the plasma-vacuum interface could be responsible for the radiation near the target normal.

  7. Localization Accuracy of the Clinical Target Volume During Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Badawi, Ahmed; Orton, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the position and shape of the originally defined clinical target volume (CTV) over the treatment course, and to assess the impact of gross tumor volume (GTV)-based online computed tomography (CT) guidance on CTV localization accuracy. Methods and Materials: Weekly breath-hold CT scans were acquired in 17 patients undergoing radiotherapy. Deformable registration was used to propagate the GTV and CTV from the first weekly CT image to all other weekly CT images. The on-treatment CT scans were registered rigidly to the planning CT scan based on the GTV location to simulate online guidance, and residual error in the CTV centroids and borders was calculated. Results: The mean GTV after 5 weeks relative to volume at the beginning of treatment was 77% {+-} 20%, whereas for the prescribed CTV, it was 92% {+-} 10%. The mean absolute residual error magnitude in the CTV centroid position after a GTV-based localization was 2.9 {+-} 3.0 mm, and it varied from 0.3 to 20.0 mm over all patients. Residual error of the CTV centroid was associated with GTV regression and anisotropy of regression during treatment (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively; Spearman rank correlation). A residual error in CTV border position greater than 2 mm was present in 77% of patients and 50% of fractions. Among these fractions, residual error of the CTV borders was 3.5 {+-} 1.6 mm (left-right), 3.1 {+-} 0.9 mm (anterior-posterior), and 6.4 {+-} 7.5 mm (superior-inferior). Conclusions: Online guidance based on the visible GTV produces substantial error in CTV localization, particularly for highly regressing tumors. The results of this study will be useful in designing margins for CTV localization or for developing new online CTV localization strategies.

  8. RTOG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists Reach Consensus on Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) and Clinical Target Volume (CTV) on Computed Tomographic Images for Preoperative Radiotherapy of Primary Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity in RTOG Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dian; Bosch, Walter; Roberge, David; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Petersen, Ivy; Haddock, Michael; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Saito, Naoyuki G.; Kirsch, David G.; Hitchcock, Ying J.; Wolfson, Aaron H.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop an Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas delineating gross tumor volume (GTV), and clinical target volume (CTV) to be used for preoperative radiotherapy of primary extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods A consensus meeting was held during the RTOG meeting in January 2010 to reach agreement about GTV and CTV delineation on CT images for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS. Data were presented to address the local extension of STS. Extensive discussion ensued to develop optimal criteria for GTV and CTV delineation on CT images. Results A consensus was reached on appropriate CT-based GTV and CTV. GTV is gross tumor defined by T1 contrast-enhanced MRI images. Fusion of MRI and CT is recommended to delineate the GTV. CTV for high-grade large STS typically includes GTV plus 3 cm margins in the longitudinal directions. If this causes the field to extend beyond the compartment, the field can be shortened to include the end of a compartment. The radial margin from the lesion should be 1.5 cm including any portion of the tumor not confined by an intact fascial barrier, bone or skin surface. Conclusion The consensus on GTV and CTV for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS is available as web-based images as well as descriptive format through the RTOG. This is expected to improve target volume consistency and allow for rigorous evaluation of the benefits and risks of such treatment. PMID:21676552

  9. Cryogenic loading of large volume presses for high-pressure experimentation and synthesis of novel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lipp, M J; Evans, W J; Yoo, C S

    2005-01-21

    We present an efficient easily implemented method for loading cryogenic fluids in a large volume press. We specifically apply this method to the high-pressure synthesis of an extended solid derived from CO using a Paris-Edinburgh cell. This method employs cryogenic cooling of Bridgman type WC anvils well insulated from other press components, condensation of the load gas within a brass annulus surrounding the gasket between the Bridgman anvils. We demonstrate the viability of the described approach by synthesizing macroscopic amounts (several milligrams) of polymeric CO-derived material, which were recovered to ambient conditions after compression of pure CO to 5 GPa or above.

  10. Large Volume, Optical and Opto-Mechanical Metrology Techniques for ISIM on JWST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadjimichael, Theo

    2015-01-01

    The final, flight build of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element of the James Webb Space Telescope is the culmination of years of work across many disciplines and partners. This paper covers the large volume, ambient, optical and opto-mechanical metrology techniques used to verify the mechanical integration of the flight instruments in ISIM, including optical pupil alignment. We present an overview of ISIM's integration and test program, which is in progress, with an emphasis on alignment and optical performance verification. This work is performed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, in close collaboration with the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, and the Mid-Infrared Instrument European Consortium.

  11. GMP Cryopreservation of Large Volumes of Cells for Regenerative Medicine: Active Control of the Freezing Process

    PubMed Central

    Massie, Isobel; Selden, Clare; Hodgson, Humphrey; Gibbons, Stephanie; Morris, G. John

    2014-01-01

    Cryopreservation protocols are increasingly required in regenerative medicine applications but must deliver functional products at clinical scale and comply with Good Manufacturing Process (GMP). While GMP cryopreservation is achievable on a small scale using a Stirling cryocooler-based controlled rate freezer (CRF) (EF600), successful large-scale GMP cryopreservation is more challenging due to heat transfer issues and control of ice nucleation, both complex events that impact success. We have developed a large-scale cryocooler-based CRF (VIA Freeze) that can process larger volumes and have evaluated it using alginate-encapsulated liver cell (HepG2) spheroids (ELS). It is anticipated that ELS will comprise the cellular component of a bioartificial liver and will be required in volumes of ∼2 L for clinical use. Sample temperatures and Stirling cryocooler power consumption was recorded throughout cooling runs for both small (500 μL) and large (200 mL) volume samples. ELS recoveries were assessed using viability (FDA/PI staining with image analysis), cell number (nuclei count), and function (protein secretion), along with cryoscanning electron microscopy and freeze substitution techniques to identify possible injury mechanisms. Slow cooling profiles were successfully applied to samples in both the EF600 and the VIA Freeze, and a number of cooling and warming profiles were evaluated. An optimized cooling protocol with a nonlinear cooling profile from ice nucleation to −60°C was implemented in both the EF600 and VIA Freeze. In the VIA Freeze the nucleation of ice is detected by the control software, allowing both noninvasive detection of the nucleation event for quality control purposes and the potential to modify the cooling profile following ice nucleation in an active manner. When processing 200 mL of ELS in the VIA Freeze—viabilities at 93.4%±7.4%, viable cell numbers at 14.3±1.7 million nuclei/mL alginate, and protein secretion at 10.5±1.7

  12. Large volume/high horsepower submersible pumping problems in water source wells

    SciTech Connect

    Hoestenbach, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    Various problems are encountered in, or compounded by, installing large volume/high horsepower submersible pumping equipment in water source wells, in the range of 30,000 to 90,000 bbl of water/day at 320 to 1020 hp. This study discusses the many problems that have appeared during the past 12 yr in Shell Oil Co's W. Texas water supply system and the solutions that were subsequently applied. The majority of these problems will be encountered in almost any project of this type. Specifically detailed are motor, pump, and protector anomalies, accessory equipment, surface production facilities, and the protective schemes utilized to optimize equipment life.

  13. Large-volume, high-horsepower submersible pumping problems in water source wells

    SciTech Connect

    Hoestenbach, R.D.

    1982-10-01

    Little has been written concerning problems that can be encountered in, or compounded by, installing large volume, high-horsepower submersible pumping equipment in water source wells in the range of 30,000 to 90,000 BWPD at 320 to 1,020 hp. This report addresses many problems of the past 12 years in Shell Oil Co.'s west Texas water supply system and the solutions that subsequently were applied. We feel that the majority of these problems are encountered in almost any project of this type. Motor, pump, and protector anomalies, accessory equipment, surface production facilities, and the protective schemes to optimize equipment life are discussed in detail.

  14. GMP cryopreservation of large volumes of cells for regenerative medicine: active control of the freezing process.

    PubMed

    Massie, Isobel; Selden, Clare; Hodgson, Humphrey; Fuller, Barry; Gibbons, Stephanie; Morris, G John

    2014-09-01

    Cryopreservation protocols are increasingly required in regenerative medicine applications but must deliver functional products at clinical scale and comply with Good Manufacturing Process (GMP). While GMP cryopreservation is achievable on a small scale using a Stirling cryocooler-based controlled rate freezer (CRF) (EF600), successful large-scale GMP cryopreservation is more challenging due to heat transfer issues and control of ice nucleation, both complex events that impact success. We have developed a large-scale cryocooler-based CRF (VIA Freeze) that can process larger volumes and have evaluated it using alginate-encapsulated liver cell (HepG2) spheroids (ELS). It is anticipated that ELS will comprise the cellular component of a bioartificial liver and will be required in volumes of ∼2 L for clinical use. Sample temperatures and Stirling cryocooler power consumption was recorded throughout cooling runs for both small (500 μL) and large (200 mL) volume samples. ELS recoveries were assessed using viability (FDA/PI staining with image analysis), cell number (nuclei count), and function (protein secretion), along with cryoscanning electron microscopy and freeze substitution techniques to identify possible injury mechanisms. Slow cooling profiles were successfully applied to samples in both the EF600 and the VIA Freeze, and a number of cooling and warming profiles were evaluated. An optimized cooling protocol with a nonlinear cooling profile from ice nucleation to -60°C was implemented in both the EF600 and VIA Freeze. In the VIA Freeze the nucleation of ice is detected by the control software, allowing both noninvasive detection of the nucleation event for quality control purposes and the potential to modify the cooling profile following ice nucleation in an active manner. When processing 200 mL of ELS in the VIA Freeze-viabilities at 93.4% ± 7.4%, viable cell numbers at 14.3 ± 1.7 million nuclei/mL alginate, and protein secretion at 10.5 ± 1.7

  15. Optimized algorithm module for large volume remote sensing image processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Changfeng; Liu, Nan; Liu, Renyi; Wang, Jiawen; Zhang, Qin

    2007-12-01

    A new remote sensing image processing system's algorithm module has been introduced in this paper, which is coded with Visual C++ 6.0 program language and can process large volume of remote sensing image. At the same time, adopted key technologies in algorithm module are given. Two defects of American remote sensing image processing system called ERDAS has been put forward in image filter algorithm and the storage of pixel values that are out of data type range. In author's system two optimized methods has been implemented in these two aspects. By contrasted with ERDAS IMAGINE System, the two methods had been proved to be effective in image analysis.

  16. Leak testing of cryogenically pumped large-volume high-vacuum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherlock, Charles N.

    1988-01-01

    The problems that may occur in the cryogenically pumped large-volume high-vacuum chambers (LVHVCs), used for the environmental testing of aerospace components and systems, are examined. Consideration is given to the designs of the LVHVCs and the cryogenic pumps. In the procedure of leak testing with tracer gas, the success of testing depends on attaining the required test sensitivity with speed, economy, and reliability. The steps required to speed up the leak location phase of the leak testing procedure and to thoroughly clean every penetration (i.e., fitting or nozzle) of the system are discussed.

  17. Thickness scalability of large volume cadmium zinc telluride high resolution radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awadalla, S. A.; Chen, H.; Mackenzie, J.; Lu, P.; Iniewski, K.; Marthandam, P.; Redden, R.; Bindley, G.; He, Z.; Zhang, F.

    2009-06-01

    This work focuses on the thickness scalability of traveling heater method (THM) grown CdZnTe crystals to produce large volume detectors with optimized spectroscopic performance. To meet this challenge, we have tuned both our THM growth process, to grow 75 mm diameter ingots, and our postgrowth annealing process. We have increased the thickness of our sliced wafers from 6 to 12 and 18 mm allowing the production of 10 and 15 mm thick detectors. As the detectors' thickness is scaled up, the energy resolution of both types, as pseudo-Frisch grid and pixelated monolithic detectors showed no degradation indicating improved materials uniformity and transport properties.

  18. A scale down process for the development of large volume cryopreservation☆

    PubMed Central

    Kilbride, Peter; Morris, G. John; Milne, Stuart; Fuller, Barry; Skepper, Jeremy; Selden, Clare

    2014-01-01

    The process of ice formation and propagation during cryopreservation impacts on the post-thaw outcome for a sample. Two processes, either network solidification or progressive solidification, can dominate the water–ice phase transition with network solidification typically present in small sample cryo-straws or cryo-vials. Progressive solidification is more often observed in larger volumes or environmental freezing. These different ice phase progressions could have a significant impact on cryopreservation in scale-up and larger volume cryo-banking protocols necessitating their study when considering cell therapy applications. This study determines the impact of these different processes on alginate encapsulated liver spheroids (ELS) as a model system during cryopreservation, and develops a method to replicate these differences in an economical manner. It was found in the current studies that progressive solidification resulted in fewer, but proportionally more viable cells 24 h post-thaw compared with network solidification. The differences between the groups diminished at later time points post-thaw as cells recovered the ability to undertake cell division, with no statistically significant differences seen by either 48 h or 72 h in recovery cultures. Thus progressive solidification itself should not prove a significant hurdle in the search for successful cryopreservation in large volumes. However, some small but significant differences were noted in total viable cell recoveries and functional assessments between samples cooled with either progressive or network solidification, and these require further investigation. PMID:25219980

  19. A scale down process for the development of large volume cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kilbride, Peter; Morris, G John; Milne, Stuart; Fuller, Barry; Skepper, Jeremy; Selden, Clare

    2014-12-01

    The process of ice formation and propagation during cryopreservation impacts on the post-thaw outcome for a sample. Two processes, either network solidification or progressive solidification, can dominate the water-ice phase transition with network solidification typically present in small sample cryo-straws or cryo-vials. Progressive solidification is more often observed in larger volumes or environmental freezing. These different ice phase progressions could have a significant impact on cryopreservation in scale-up and larger volume cryo-banking protocols necessitating their study when considering cell therapy applications. This study determines the impact of these different processes on alginate encapsulated liver spheroids (ELS) as a model system during cryopreservation, and develops a method to replicate these differences in an economical manner. It was found in the current studies that progressive solidification resulted in fewer, but proportionally more viable cells 24h post-thaw compared with network solidification. The differences between the groups diminished at later time points post-thaw as cells recovered the ability to undertake cell division, with no statistically significant differences seen by either 48 h or 72 h in recovery cultures. Thus progressive solidification itself should not prove a significant hurdle in the search for successful cryopreservation in large volumes. However, some small but significant differences were noted in total viable cell recoveries and functional assessments between samples cooled with either progressive or network solidification, and these require further investigation. PMID:25219980

  20. Comparing masked target transform volume (MTTV) clutter metric to human observer evaluation of visual clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, H. A.; Moyer, Steven; Moore, Richard K.

    2010-04-01

    The Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate's current time-limited search (TLS) model, which makes use of the targeting task performance (TTP) metric to describe image quality, does not explicitly account for the effects of visual clutter on observer performance. The TLS model is currently based on empirical fits to describe human performance for a time of day, spectrum and environment. Incorporating a clutter metric into the TLS model may reduce the number of these empirical fits needed. The masked target transform volume (MTTV) clutter metric has been previously presented and compared to other clutter metrics. Using real infrared imagery of rural images with varying levels of clutter, NVESD is currently evaluating the appropriateness of the MTTV metric. NVESD had twenty subject matter experts (SME) rank the amount of clutter in each scene in a series of pair-wise comparisons. MTTV metric values were calculated and then compared to the SME observers rankings. The MTTV metric ranked the clutter in a similar manner to the SME evaluation, suggesting that the MTTV metric may emulate SME response. This paper is a first step in quantifying clutter and measuring the agreement to subjective human evaluation.

  1. Impact of motion velocity on four-dimensional target volumes: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Narita, Yuichiro; Sawada, Akira; Matsugi, Kiyotomo; Nakata, Manabu; Matsuo, Yukinori; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2009-05-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of motion velocity that may cause motion artifacts on target volumes (TVs) using a one-dimensional moving phantom. A 20 mm diameter spherical object embedded in a QUASAR phantom sinusoidally moved with approximately 5.0 or 10.0 mm amplitude (A) along the longitudinal axis of the computed tomography (CT) couch. The motion period was manually set in the range of 2.0-10.0 s at approximately 2.0 s interval. Four-dimensional (4D) CT images were acquired by a four-slice CT scanner (LightSpeed RT; General Electric Medical Systems, Waukesha, WI) with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm in axial cine mode. The minimum gantry rotation of 1.0 s was employed to achieve the maximum in-slice temporal resolution. Projection data over a full gantry rotation (1.0 s) were used for image reconstruction. Reflective marker position was recorded by the real-time positioning management system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). ADVANTAGE 4D software exported ten respiratory phase volumes and the maximum intensity volume generated from all reconstructed data (MIV). The threshold to obtain static object volume (V0, 4.19 ml) was used to automatically segment TVs on CT images, and then the union of TVs on 4D CT images (TV(4D)) was constructed. TVs on MIV (TV(MIV)) were also segmented by the threshold that can determine the area occupied within the central slice of TV(MIV). The maximum motion velocity for each phase bin was calculated using the actual averaged motion period displayed on ADVANTAGE 4D software (T), the range of phases used to construct the target phase bin (phase range), and a mathematical model of sinusoidal function. Each volume size and the motion range of TV in the cranial-caudal (CC) direction were measured. Subsequently, cross-correlation coefficients between TV size and motion velocity as well as phase range were calculated. Both misalignment and motion-blurring artifacts were caused by high motion velocity, Less than 6% phase range was

  2. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation.

    PubMed

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  3. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  4. Enrichment of diluted cell populations from large sample volumes using 3D carbon-electrode dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Islam, Monsur; Natu, Rucha; Larraga-Martinez, Maria Fernanda; Martinez-Duarte, Rodrigo

    2016-05-01

    Here, we report on an enrichment protocol using carbon electrode dielectrophoresis to isolate and purify a targeted cell population from sample volumes up to 4 ml. We aim at trapping, washing, and recovering an enriched cell fraction that will facilitate downstream analysis. We used an increasingly diluted sample of yeast, 10(6)-10(2) cells/ml, to demonstrate the isolation and enrichment of few cells at increasing flow rates. A maximum average enrichment of 154.2 ± 23.7 times was achieved when the sample flow rate was 10 μl/min and yeast cells were suspended in low electrically conductive media that maximizes dielectrophoresis trapping. A COMSOL Multiphysics model allowed for the comparison between experimental and simulation results. Discussion is conducted on the discrepancies between such results and how the model can be further improved. PMID:27375816

  5. Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering on Large, Multi- and Many-core Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howison, Mark; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank

    2011-01-01

    With the computing industry trending towards multi- and many-core processors, we study how a standard visualization algorithm, ray-casting volume rendering, can benefit from a hybrid parallelism approach. Hybrid parallelism provides the best of both worlds: using distributed-memory parallelism across a large numbers of nodes increases available FLOPs and memory, while exploiting shared-memory parallelism among the cores within each node ensures that each node performs its portion of the larger calculation as efficiently as possible. We demonstrate results from weak and strong scaling studies, at levels of concurrency ranging up to 216,000, and with datasets as large as 12.2 trillion cells. The greatest benefit from hybrid parallelism lies in the communication portion of the algorithm, the dominant cost at higher levels of concurrency. We show that reducing the number of participants with a hybrid approach significantly improves performance.

  6. Points based reconstruction and rendering of 3D shapes from large volume dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingchang; Tian, Jie; He, Huiguang; Li, Guangming

    2003-05-01

    In the field of medical imaging, researchers often need visualize lots of 3D datasets to get the informaiton contained in these datasets. But the huge data genreated by modern medical imaging device challenge the real time processing and rendering algorithms at all the time. Spurring by the great achievement of Points Based Rendering (PBR) in the fields of computer graphics to render very large meshes, we propose a new algorithm to use the points as basic primitive of surface reconstruction and rendering to interactively reconstruct and render very large volume dataset. By utilizing the special characteristics of medical image datasets, we obtain a fast and efficient points-based reconstruction and rendering algorithm in common PC. The experimental results show taht this algorithm is feasible and efficient.

  7. Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering on Large, Multi-core Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howison, Mark; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank

    2010-07-12

    This work studies the performance and scalability characteristics of"hybrid'"parallel programming and execution as applied to raycasting volume rendering -- a staple visualization algorithm -- on a large, multi-core platform. Historically, the Message Passing Interface (MPI) has become the de-facto standard for parallel programming and execution on modern parallel systems. As the computing industry trends towards multi-core processors, with four- and six-core chips common today and 128-core chips coming soon, we wish to better understand how algorithmic and parallel programming choices impact performance and scalability on large, distributed-memory multi-core systems. Our findings indicate that the hybrid-parallel implementation, at levels of concurrency ranging from 1,728 to 216,000, performs better, uses a smaller absolute memory footprint, and consumes less communication bandwidth than the traditional, MPI-only implementation.

  8. Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering on Large, Multi-core Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howison, Mark; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank

    2010-06-14

    This work studies the performance and scalability characteristics of"hybrid" parallel programming and execution as applied to raycasting volume rendering -- a staple visualization algorithm -- on a large, multi-core platform. Historically, the Message Passing Interface (MPI) has become the de-facto standard for parallel programming and execution on modern parallel systems. As the computing industry trends towards multi-core processors, with four- and six-core chips common today and 128-core chips coming soon, we wish to better understand how algorithmic and parallel programming choices impact performance and scalability on large, distributed-memory multi-core systems. Our findings indicate that the hybrid-parallel implementation, at levels of concurrency ranging from 1,728 to 216,000, performs better, uses a smaller absolute memory footprint, and consumes less communication bandwidth than the traditional, MPI-only implementation.

  9. MPI-hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering on Large, Multi-core Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howison, Mark; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank

    2010-03-20

    This work studies the performance and scalability characteristics of"hybrid'" parallel programming and execution as applied to raycasting volume rendering -- a staple visualization algorithm -- on a large, multi-core platform. Historically, the Message Passing Interface (MPI) has become the de-facto standard for parallel programming and execution on modern parallel systems. As the computing industry trends towards multi-core processors, with four- and six-core chips common today and 128-core chips coming soon, we wish to better understand how algorithmic and parallel programming choices impact performance and scalability on large, distributed-memory multi-core systems. Our findings indicate that the hybrid-parallel implementation, at levels of concurrency ranging from 1,728 to 216,000, performs better, uses a smaller absolute memory footprint, and consumes less communication bandwidth than the traditional, MPI-only implementation.

  10. First large volume characterization of the QIE10/11 custom front-end integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, D.; Baumbaugh, A.; Dal Monte, L.; Freeman, J.; Hirschauer, J.; Hughes, E.; Roy, T.; Whitbeck, A.; Yumiceva, F.; Zimmerman, T.

    2016-02-01

    The CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will upgrade the photon detection and readout systems of its barrel and endcap hadron calorimeters (HCAL) through the second long shutdown of the LHC in 2018. A central feature of this upgrade is the development of two new versions of the QIE (Charge Integrator and Encoder), a Fermilab-designed custom ASIC for measurement of charge from detectors in high-rate environments. These most recent additions to the QIE family feature 17-bits of dynamic range with 1% digitization precision for high charge and a time-to-digital converter (TDC) with half nanosecond resolution all with 16 bits of readout per bunch crossing. For the first time, the CMS experiment has produced and characterized in great detail a large volume of chips. The characteristics and performance of the new QIE and their related chip-to-chip variations as measured in a sample of 10,000 chips is described.

  11. Multiple distal basin plains reveal a common distribution for large volume turbidity current recurrence intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clare, M. A.; Talling, P. J.; Hunt, J.; Challenor, P. G.

    2013-12-01

    Remarkably large volume (>>1 km3) deposits emplaced by turbidity currents in distal basin plains result from large submarine landslides. Such landslides may generate tsunamis, and the turbidity currents pose threats to seafloor structures as well as being one of the most important processes for sediment transport across our planet. It is therefore important to understand the recurrence intervals and timing of landslides and the turbidity currents they generate. An understanding of their frequency provides information to assist in forward-looking geohazard analyses, including probabilistic modelling of potential damage. Analysis of their frequency distribution may also help to unravel links to triggering and conditioning mechanisms. We present long term records (up to 17 Ma) of landslide-triggered turbidity current recurrence intervals. We document the distribution of recurrence intervals for large volume turbidites in four basin-plains in disparate locations worldwide, including two recent systems and two outcrop studies. The recurrence times of turbidity currents is inferred from intervals of hemipelagic mud that form by fallout of background sediment between turbidity currents, and the average accumulation rate of hemipelagic mud between dated horizons. There is very little erosion below turbidite beds in the study locations; hence they represent an almost continuous sedimentary record. This method has the advantage of providing information on the timing of many different events from a small number of cores, with such large numbers (N> 100) of beds needed for robust statistical analysis. A common frequency distribution of turbidite recurrence intervals is observed, despite their variable ages and disparate locations, suggesting similar underlying controls on triggering mechanism and frequency. This common distribution closely approximates a temporally-random Poisson distribution, such that the probability of an event occurring along the basin margin is

  12. Volume Transmission in Central Dopamine and Noradrenaline Neurons and Its Astroglial Targets.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, Kjell; Agnati, Luigi F; Marcoli, Manuela; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2015-12-01

    Already in the 1960s the architecture and pharmacology of the brainstem dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) neurons with formation of vast numbers of DA and NA terminal plexa of the central nervous system (CNS) indicated that they may not only communicate via synaptic transmission. In the 1980s the theory of volume transmission (VT) was introduced as a major communication together with synaptic transmission in the CNS. VT is an extracellular and cerebrospinal fluid transmission of chemical signals like transmitters, modulators etc. moving along energy gradients making diffusion and flow of VT signals possible. VT interacts with synaptic transmission mainly through direct receptor-receptor interactions in synaptic and extrasynaptic heteroreceptor complexes and their signaling cascades. The DA and NA neurons are specialized for extrasynaptic VT at the soma-dendrtitic and terminal level. The catecholamines released target multiple DA and adrenergic subtypes on nerve cells, astroglia and microglia which are the major cell components of the trophic units building up the neural-glial networks of the CNS. DA and NA VT can modulate not only the strength of synaptic transmission but also the VT signaling of the astroglia and microglia of high relevance for neuron-glia interactions. The catecholamine VT targeting astroglia can modulate the fundamental functions of astroglia observed in neuroenergetics, in the Glymphatic system, in the central renin-angiotensin system and in the production of long-distance calcium waves. Also the astrocytic and microglial DA and adrenergic receptor subtypes mediating DA and NA VT can be significant drug targets in neurological and psychiatric disease. PMID:25894681

  13. Pathways of deep cyclones associated with large volume changes (LVCs) and major Baltic inflows (MBIs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Andreas; Höflich, Katharina; Post, Piia; Myrberg, Kai

    2016-04-01

    Large volume changes (LVCs) and major Baltic inflows (MBIs) are essential processes for the water exchange and renewal of the deep stagnant deep water in the Baltic Sea deep basins. MBIs are considered as subset of LVCs transporting with the large water volume a big amount of highly saline and oxygenated water into the Baltic Sea. Since the early 1980s the frequency of MBIs has dropped drastically from 5 to 7 events to only one inflow per decade, and long lasting periods without MBIs became the usual state. Only in January 1993, 2003 and December 2014 MBIs occurred that were able to interrupt the stagnation periods in the deep basins of the Baltic Sea. However, in spite of the decreasing frequency of MBIs, there is no obvious decrease of LVCs. Large volume changes have been calculated for the period 1887-2014 filtering daily time series of Landsort sea surface elevation anomalies. The Landsort sea level is known to reflect the mean sea level of the Baltic Sea very well. Thus, LVCs can be calculated from the mean sea level variations. The cases with local minimum and maximum difference resulting of at least 100 km³ of water volume change have been chosen for a closer study of characteristic pathways of deep cyclones. The average duration of a LVC is about 40 days. During this time, 5-6 deep cyclones will move along characteristic storm tracks. We obtained three main routes of deep cyclones which were associated with LVCs, but also with the climatology. One is approaching from the west at about 58-62°N, passing the northern North Sea, Oslo, Sweden and the Island of Gotland, while a second, less frequent one, is approaching from the west at about 65°N, crossing Scandinavia south-eastwards passing the Sea of Bothnia and entering Finland. A third very frequent one is entering the study area north of Scotland turning north-eastwards along the northern coast of Scandinavia. Thus, the conditions for a LVC to happen are a temporal clustering of deep cyclones in certain

  14. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Ethan L.; Pehl, Richard H.; Lathrop, James R.; Martin, Gregory N.; Mashburn, R. B.; Miley, Harry S.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Bowyer, Ted W.

    2006-09-21

    Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume (~570 cm3, ~3 kg, 140% or larger) germanium detectors for field applications. We are using a new generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers for operating the very largest volume germanium detectors with absolutely no maintenance or liquid nitrogen requirements. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The flip of a switch will bring a system to life in ~1 hour for measurements. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed five years. These features are necessary for remote long-duration liquid-nitrogen free deployment of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detector systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring (NEM). The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) will greatly benefit from the availability of such detectors by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen at RASA sites while still allowing the very largest available germanium detectors to be utilized. These mechanically cooled germanium detector systems being developed here will provide the largest, most sensitive detectors possible for use with the RASA. To provide such systems, the appropriate technical fundamentals are being researched. Mechanical cooling of germanium detectors has historically been a difficult endeavor. The success or failure of mechanically cooled germanium detectors stems from three main technical issues: temperature, vacuum, and vibration. These factors affect one another. There is a particularly crucial relationship between vacuum and temperature. These factors will be experimentally studied both separately and together to insure a solid understanding of the physical limitations each factor places on a practical mechanically cooled germanium detector system for field use. Using this knowledge, a series of mechanically cooled germanium detector prototype systems are being designed and fabricated. Our collaborators

  15. Generation of Diffuse Large Volume Plasma by an Ionization Wave from a Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, Mounir; Razavi, Hamid

    2015-09-01

    Low temperature plasma jets emitted in ambient air are the product of fast ionization waves that are guided within a channel of a gas flow, such as helium. This guided ionization wave can be transmitted through a dielectric material and under some conditions can ignite a discharge behind the dielectric material. Here we present a novel way to produce large volume diffuse low pressure plasma inside a Pyrex chamber that does not have any electrodes or electrical energy directly applied to it. The diffuse plasma is ignited inside the chamber by a plasma jet located externally to the chamber and that is physically and electrically unconnected to the chamber. Instead, the plasma jet is just brought in close proximity to the external wall/surface of the chamber or to a dielectric tubing connected to the chamber. The plasma thus generated is diffuse, large volume and with physical and chemical characteristics that are different than the external plasma jet that ignited it. So by using a plasma jet we are able to ``remotely'' ignite volumetric plasma under controlled conditions. This novel method of ``remote'' generation of a low pressure, low temperature diffuse plasma can be useful for various applications including material processing and biomedicine.

  16. Colloids Versus Albumin in Large Volume Paracentesis to Prevent Circulatory Dysfunction: Evidence-based Case Report.

    PubMed

    Widjaja, Felix F; Khairan, Paramita; Kamelia, Telly; Hasan, Irsan

    2016-04-01

    Large volume paracentesis may cause paracentesis induced circulatory dysfunction (PICD). Albumin is recommended to prevent this abnormality. Meanwhile, the price of albumin is too expensive and there should be another alternative that may prevent PICD. This report aimed to compare albumin to colloids in preventing PICD. Search strategy was done using PubMed, Scopus, Proquest, dan Academic Health Complete from EBSCO with keywords of "ascites", "albumin", "colloid", "dextran", "hydroxyethyl starch", "gelatin", and "paracentesis induced circulatory dysfunction". Articles was limited to randomized clinical trial and meta-analysis with clinical question of "In hepatic cirrhotic patient undergone large volume paracentesis, whether colloids were similar to albumin to prevent PICD". We found one meta-analysis and four randomized clinical trials (RCT). A meta analysis showed that albumin was still superior of which odds ratio 0.34 (0.23-0.51). Three RCTs showed the same results and one RCT showed albumin was not superior than colloids. We conclude that colloids could not constitute albumin to prevent PICD, but colloids still have a role in patient who undergone paracentesis less than five liters. PMID:27550886

  17. Large-volume flux closure during plasmoid-mediated reconnection in coaxial helicity injection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ebrahimi, F.; Raman, R.

    2016-03-23

    A large-volume flux closure during transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI) in NSTX-U is demonstrated through resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations. Several major improvements, including the improved positioning of the divertor poloidal field coils, are projected to improve the CHI start-up phase in NSTX-U. Simulations in the NSTX-U configuration with constant in time coil currents show that with strong flux shaping the injected open field lines (injector flux) rapidly reconnect and form large volume of closed flux surfaces. This is achieved by driving parallel current in the injector flux coil and oppositely directed currents in the flux shaping coils to form amore » narrow injector flux footprint and push the injector flux into the vessel. As the helicity and plasma are injected into the device, the oppositely directed field lines in the injector region are forced to reconnect through a local Sweet-Parker type reconnection, or to spontaneously reconnect when the elongated current sheet becomes MHD unstable to form plasmoids. In these simulations for the first time, it is found that the closed flux is over 70% of the initial injector flux used to initiate the discharge. Furthermore, these results could work well for the application of transient CHI in devices that employ super conducting coils to generate and sustain the plasma equilibrium.« less

  18. Large-volume sample stacking for analysis of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Lifeng; Marimuthu, Arun; Yang, Zhaoguang

    2002-09-01

    A simple, quick, and sensitive capillary electrophoretic technique-large volume stacking using the electroosmotic flow (EOF) pump (LVSEP) - has been developed for determining ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in drinking water for the first time. It is based on a precapillary complexation of EDTA with Fe(III) ions, followed by large-volume sample stacking and direct UV detection at 258 nm. The curve of peak response versus concentration was linear from 5.0 to 600.0 microg/L, and 0.7 to 30.0 mg/L. The regression coefficients were 0.9988 and 0.9990, respectively. The detection limit of the current technique for EDTA analysis was 0.2 microg/L with an additional 10-fold preconcentration procedure, based on the signal-to-noise ratio of 3. As opposed to the classical capillary zone electrophoresis (CE) method, the detection limit was improved about 1000-fold by using this LVSEP method. To the best of our knowledge, it represents the highest sensitivity for EDTA analysis via CE. Several drinking water samples were tested by this novel method with satisfactory results. PMID:12207295

  19. Controlled ice nucleation--Is it really needed for large-volume sperm cryopreservation?

    PubMed

    Saragusty, Joseph; Osmers, Jan-Hendrik; Hildebrandt, Thomas Bernd

    2016-04-15

    Controlled ice nucleation (CIN) is an integral stage of slow freezing process when relatively large volumes (usually 1 mL or larger) of biological samples in suspension are involved. Without it, a sample will supercool to way below its melting point before ice crystals start forming, resulting in multiple damaging processes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that when freezing large volumes by the directional freezing technique, a CIN stage is not needed. Semen samples collected from ten bulls were frozen in 2.5-mL HollowTubes in a split-sample manner with and without a CIN stage. Thawed samples were evaluated for viability, acrosome integrity, rate of normal morphology, and, using computer-aided sperm analysis system, for a wide range of motility parameters that were also evaluated after 3 hours of incubation at 37 °C. Analysis of the results found no difference between freezing with and without CIN stage in any and all of the 29 parameters compared (P > 0.1 for all). This similarity was maintained through 3 hours of incubation at 37 °C. Possibly, because of its structure, the directional freezing device promotes continuous ice nucleation so a specific CIN stage is no longer needed, thus reducing costs, energy use, and carbon footprint. PMID:26806291

  20. Broadband frequency ECR ion source concepts with large resonant plasma volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    New techniques are proposed for enhancing the performances of ECR ion sources. The techniques are based on the use of high-power, variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, or broadband microwave radiation, derived from standard TWT technology, to effect large resonant ``volume`` ECR sources. The creation of a large ECR plasma ``volume`` permits coupling of more power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present forms of the ECR ion source. If successful, these developments could significantly impact future accelerator designs and accelerator-based, heavy-ion-research programs by providing multiply-charged ion beams with the energies and intensities required for nuclear physics research from existing ECR ion sources. The methods described in this article can be used to retrofit any ECR ion source predicated on B-minimum plasma confinement techniques.

  1. Development of large volume double ring penning plasma discharge source for efficient light emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Ram; Vyas, Gheesa Lal; Jain, Jalaj; Prajapati, Jitendra; Pal, Udit Narayan; Chowdhuri, Malay Bikas; Manchanda, Ranjana

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the development of large volume double ring Penning plasma discharge source for efficient light emissions is reported. The developed Penning discharge source consists of two cylindrical end cathodes of stainless steel having radius 6 cm and a gap 5.5 cm between them, which are fitted in the top and bottom flanges of the vacuum chamber. Two stainless steel anode rings with thickness 0.4 cm and inner diameters 6.45 cm having separation 2 cm are kept at the discharge centre. Neodymium (Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B) permanent magnets are physically inserted behind the cathodes for producing nearly uniform magnetic field of {approx}0.1 T at the center. Experiments and simulations have been performed for single and double anode ring configurations using helium gas discharge, which infer that double ring configuration gives better light emissions in the large volume Penning plasma discharge arrangement. The optical emission spectroscopy measurements are used to complement the observations. The spectral line-ratio technique is utilized to determine the electron plasma density. The estimated electron plasma density in double ring plasma configuration is {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}, which is around one order of magnitude larger than that of single ring arrangement.

  2. Large-volume flux closure during plasmoid-mediated reconnection in coaxial helicity injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, F.; Raman, R.

    2016-04-01

    A large-volume flux closure during transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI) in NSTX-U is demonstrated through resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations. Several major improvements, including the improved positioning of the divertor poloidal field coils, are projected to improve the CHI start-up phase in NSTX-U. Simulations in the NSTX-U configuration with constant in time coil currents show that with strong flux shaping the injected open field lines (injector flux) rapidly reconnect and form large volume of closed flux surfaces. This is achieved by driving parallel current in the injector flux coil and oppositely directed currents in the flux shaping coils to form a narrow injector flux footprint and push the injector flux into the vessel. As the helicity and plasma are injected into the device, the oppositely directed field lines in the injector region are forced to reconnect through a local Sweet-Parker type reconnection, or to spontaneously reconnect when the elongated current sheet becomes MHD unstable to form plasmoids. In these simulations for the first time, it is found that the closed flux is over 70% of the initial injector flux used to initiate the discharge. These results could work well for the application of transient CHI in devices that employ super conducting coils to generate and sustain the plasma equilibrium.

  3. Diethylaminoethyl-cellulose clean-up of a large volume naphthenic acid extract.

    PubMed

    Frank, Richard A; Kavanagh, Richard; Burnison, B Kent; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M; Der Kraak, Glen Van; Solomon, Keith R

    2006-08-01

    The Athabasca oil sands of Alberta, Canada contain an estimated 174 billion barrels of bitumen. During oil sands refining processes, an extraction tailings mixture is produced that has been reported as toxic to aquatic organisms and is therefore collected in settling ponds on site. Investigation into the toxicity of these tailings pond waters has identified naphthenic acids (NAs) and their sodium salts as the major toxic components, and a multi-year study has been initiated to identify the principal toxic components within NA mixtures. Future toxicity studies require a large volume of a NA mixture, however, a well-defined bulk extraction technique is not available. This study investigated the use of a weak anion exchanger, diethylaminoethyl-cellulose (DEAE-cellulose), to remove humic-like material present after collecting the organic acid fraction of oil sands tailings pond water. The NA extraction and clean-up procedure proved to be a fast and efficient method to process large volumes of tailings pond water, providing an extraction efficiency of 41.2%. The resulting concentrated NA solution had a composition that differed somewhat from oil sands fresh tailings, with a reduction in the abundance of lower molecular weight NAs being the most significant difference. This reduction was mainly due to the initial acidification of tailings pond water. The DEAE-cellulose treatment had only a minor effect on the NA concentration, no noticeable effect on the NA fingerprint, and no significant effect on the mixture toxicity towards Vibrio fischeri. PMID:16469358

  4. Targeted Tandem Duplication of a Large Chromosomal Segment in Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Atsushi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Hanya, Yoshiki; Oguma, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    We describe here the first successful construction of a targeted tandem duplication of a large chromosomal segment in Aspergillus oryzae. The targeted tandem chromosomal duplication was achieved by using strains that had a 5′-deleted pyrG upstream of the region targeted for tandem chromosomal duplication and a 3′-deleted pyrG downstream of the target region. Consequently, strains bearing a 210-kb targeted tandem chromosomal duplication near the centromeric region of chromosome 8 and strains bearing a targeted tandem chromosomal duplication of a 700-kb region of chromosome 2 were successfully constructed. The strains bearing the tandem chromosomal duplication were efficiently obtained from the regenerated protoplast of the parental strains. However, the generation of the chromosomal duplication did not depend on the introduction of double-stranded breaks (DSBs) by I-SceI. The chromosomal duplications of these strains were stably maintained after five generations of culture under nonselective conditions. The strains bearing the tandem chromosomal duplication in the 700-kb region of chromosome 2 showed highly increased protease activity in solid-state culture, indicating that the duplication of large chromosomal segments could be a useful new breeding technology and gene analysis method. PMID:24837372

  5. Integrating respiratory-gated PET-based target volume delineation in liver SBRT planning, a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess the feasibility and benefit of integrating four-dimensional (4D) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) – computed tomography (CT) for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning. Methods 8 patients with 14 metastases were accrued in the study. They all underwent a non-gated PET and a 4D PET centered on the liver. The same CT scan was used for attenuation correction, registration, and considered the planning CT for SBRT planning. Six PET phases were reconstructed for each 4D PET. By applying an individualized threshold to the 4D PET, a Biological Internal Target Volume (BITV) was generated for each lesion. A gated Planning Target Volume (PTVg) was created by adding 3 mm to account for set-up margins. This volume was compared to a manual Planning Target Volume (PTV) delineated with the help of a semi-automatic Biological Target Volume (BTV) obtained from the non-gated exam. A 5 mm radial and a 10 mm craniocaudal margins were applied to account for tumor motion and set-up margins to create the PTV. Results One undiagnosed liver metastasis was discovered thanks to the 4D PET. The semi-automatic BTV were significantly smaller than the BITV (p = 0.0031). However, after applying adapted margins, 4D PET allowed a statistically significant decrease in the PTVg as compared to the PTV (p = 0.0052). Conclusions In comparison to non-gated PET, 4D PET may better define the respiratory movements of liver targets and improve SBRT planning for liver metastases. Furthermore, non respiratory-gated PET exams can both misdiagnose liver metastases and underestimate the real internal target volumes. PMID:24885897

  6. Large volume susy breaking with a solution to the decompactification problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraggi, Alon E.; Kounnas, Costas; Partouche, Hervé

    2015-10-01

    We study heterotic ground states in which supersymmetry is broken by coupling the momentum and winding charges of two large extra dimensions to the R-charges of the supersymmetry generators. The large dimensions give rise to towers of heavy string thresholds that contribute to the running of the gauge couplings. In the general case, these contributions are proportional to the volume of the two large dimensions and invalidate the perturbative string expansion. The problem is evaded if the susy breaking sectors arise as a spontaneously broken phase of N = 4 → N = 2 → N = 0 supersymmetry, provided that N = 4 supersymmetry is restored on the boundary of the moduli space. We discuss the mechanism in the case of Z2 ×Z2 orbifolds, which requires that the twisted sector that contains the large extra dimensions has no fixed points. We analyze the full string partition function and show that the twisted sectors distribute themselves in non-aligned N = 2 orbits, hence preserving the solution to the string decompactification problem. Remarkably, we find that the contribution to the vacuum energy from the N = 2 → N = 0 sectors is suppressed, and the only substantial contribution arises from the breaking of the N = 4 sector to N = 0.

  7. The Oligocene Lund Tuff, Great Basin, USA: a very large volume monotonous intermediate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maughan, Larissa L.; Christiansen, Eric H.; Best, Myron G.; Grommé, C. Sherman; Deino, Alan L.; Tingey, David G.

    2002-03-01

    Unusual monotonous intermediate ignimbrites consist of phenocryst-rich dacite that occurs as very large volume (>1000 km 3) deposits that lack systematic compositional zonation, comagmatic rhyolite precursors, and underlying plinian beds. They are distinct from countless, usually smaller volume, zoned rhyolite-dacite-andesite deposits that are conventionally believed to have erupted from magma chambers in which thermal and compositional gradients were established because of sidewall crystallization and associated convective fractionation. Despite their great volume, or because of it, monotonous intermediates have received little attention. Documentation of the stratigraphy, composition, and geologic setting of the Lund Tuff - one of four monotonous intermediate tuffs in the middle-Tertiary Great Basin ignimbrite province - provides insight into its unusual origin and, by implication, the origin of other similar monotonous intermediates. The Lund Tuff is a single cooling unit with normal magnetic polarity whose volume likely exceeded 3000 km 3. It was emplaced 29.02±0.04 Ma in and around the coeval White Rock caldera which has an unextended north-south diameter of about 50 km. The tuff is monotonous in that its phenocryst assemblage is virtually uniform throughout the deposit: plagioclase>quartz≈hornblende>biotite>Fe-Ti oxides≈sanidine>titanite, zircon, and apatite. However, ratios of phenocrysts vary by as much as an order of magnitude in a manner consistent with progressive crystallization in the pre-eruption chamber. A significant range in whole-rock chemical composition (e.g., 63-71 wt% SiO 2) is poorly correlated with phenocryst abundance. These compositional attributes cannot have been caused wholly by winnowing of glass from phenocrysts during eruption, as has been suggested for the monotonous intermediate Fish Canyon Tuff. Pumice fragments are also crystal-rich, and chemically and mineralogically indistinguishable from bulk tuff. We postulate that

  8. Anatomic Boundaries of the Clinical Target Volume (Prostate Bed) After Radical Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Brock, Kristy K.; Haider, Masoom A.; Zwahlen, Daniel; Kong, Vickie; Chan, Elisa; Moseley, Joanne; Bayley, Andrew; Catton, Charles; Chung, Peter W.M.; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Milosevic, Michael; Kneebone, Andrew; Warde, Padraig; Menard, Cynthia

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: We sought to derive and validate an interdisciplinary consensus definition for the anatomic boundaries of the postoperative clinical target volume (CTV, prostate bed). Methods and Materials: Thirty one patients who had planned for radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy were enrolled and underwent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) simulation prior to radiotherapy. Through an iterative process of consultation and discussion, an interdisciplinary consensus definition was derived based on a review of published data, patterns of local failure, surgical practice, and radiologic anatomy. In validation, we analyzed the distribution of surgical clips in reference to the consensus CTV and measured spatial uncertainties in delineating the CTV and vesicourethral anastomosis. Clinical radiotherapy plans were retrospectively evaluated against the consensus CTV (prostate bed). Results: Anatomic boundaries of the consensus CTV (prostate bed) are described. Surgical clips (n = 339) were well distributed throughout the CTV. The vesicourethral anastomosis was accurately localized using central sagittal computed tomography reconstruction, with a mean {+-} standard deviation uncertainty of 1.8 {+-} 2.5 mm. Delineation uncertainties were small for both MRI and computed tomography (mean reproducibility, 0-3.8 mm; standard deviation, 1.0-2.3); they were most pronounced in the anteroposterior and superoinferior dimensions and at the superior/posterior-most aspect of the CTV. Retrospectively, the mean {+-} standard deviation CTV (prostate bed) percentage of volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose was only 77% {+-} 26%. Conclusions: We propose anatomic boundaries for the CTV (prostate bed) and present evidence supporting its validity. In the absence of gross recurrence, the role of MRI in delineating the CTV remains to be confirmed. The CTV is larger than historically practiced at our institution and should be encompassed by a microscopic tumoricidal dose.

  9. Impact Factors for Microinvasion in Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: A Possible System for Defining Clinical Target Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Bi Aihong; Zeng Zhaochong; Ji Yuan; Zeng Haiying; Xu Chen; Tang Zhaoyou; Fan Jia; Zhou Jian; Zeng Mengsu; Tan Yunshan

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To quantify microscopic invasion of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHC) into nontumor tissue and define the gross tumor volume (GTV)-to-clinical target volume (CTV) expansion necessary for radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: One-hundred IHC patients undergoing radical resection from January 2004 to July 2008 were enrolled in this study. Pathologic and clinical data including maximum tumor diameter, tumor boundary type, TNM stage, histologic grade, tumor markers, and liver enzymes were reviewed. The distance of microinvasion from the tumor boundary was measured by microscopy. The contraction coefficient for tumor measurements in radiographs and slide-mounted tissue was calculated. SPSS15.0 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Sixty-five patients (65%) exhibited tumor microinvasions. Microinvasions ranged from 0.4-8 mm, with 96% of patients having a microinvasion distance {<=}6 mm measured on slide. The radiograph-to-slide contraction coefficient was 82.1%. The degree of microinvasion was correlated with tumor boundary type, TNM stage, histologic grade, and serum levels of carbohydrate antigen 19-9, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, {gamma}-glutamyltransferase and alkaline phosphatase. To define CTV accurately, we devised a scoring system based on combination of these factors. According to this system, a score {<=}1.5 is associated with 96.1% sensitivity in detecting patients with a microextension {<=}4.9 mm in radiographs, whereas a score {>=}2 has a 95.1% sensitivity in detecting microextension {<=}7.9 mm measured on radiograph. Conclusions: Patients with a score {<=}1.5 and {>=}2 require a radiographic GTV-to-CTV expansions of 4.9 and 7.9 mm, respectively, to encompass >95% of microinvasions.

  10. Large volume recycling of oceanic lithosphere over short time scales: geochemical constraints from the Caribbean Large Igneous Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauff, F.; Hoernle, K.; Tilton, G.; Graham, D. W.; Kerr, A. C.

    2000-01-01

    isochron diagrams suggests that the age of separation of enriched and depleted components from the depleted MORB source mantle could have been ≤500 Ma before CLIP formation and interpreted to reflect the recycling time of the CLIP source. Mantle plume heads may provide a mechanism for transporting large volumes of possibly young recycled oceanic lithosphere residing in the lower mantle back into the shallow MORB source mantle.

  11. Calcium Isolation from Large-Volume Human Urine Samples for 41Ca Analysis by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Miller, James J; Hui, Susanta K; Jackson, George S; Clark, Sara P; Einstein, Jane; Weaver, Connie M; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H

    2013-01-01

    Calcium oxalate precipitation is the first step in preparation of biological samples for 41Ca analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry. A simplified protocol for large-volume human urine samples was characterized, with statistically significant increases in ion current and decreases in interference. This large-volume assay minimizes cost and effort and maximizes time after 41Ca administration during which human samples, collected over a lifetime, provide 41Ca:Ca ratios that are significantly above background. PMID:23672965

  12. Large area thermal target board: An improvement to environmental effects and system parameters characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Wendell R.; Bean, Brent L.; Munding, Peter D.

    1994-06-01

    Recent field tests have provided excellent opportunities to use a new characterization tool associated with the Mobile Imaging Spectroscopy Laboratory (MISL) of the Battlefield Environment Directorate, formerly the U.S. Army Atmospheric Sciences Laboratory. The MISL large area (1.8 by 1.8 m, uniform temperature, thermal target) was used for characterization and isolation of phenomena which impact target contrast. By viewing the target board from closeup and distant ranges simultaneously with the MISL thermal imagers, the inherent scene content could be calibrated and the degrading effects of atmospheric propagation could be isolated. The target board is equipped with several spatial frequency bar patterns, but only the largest 3.5-cycle full area bar pattern was used for the distant range of 1.6 km. The quantities measured with the target board include the inherent background change, the contrast transmission, and the atmospheric modulation transfer function. The MISL target board has a unique design which makes it lightweight with near perfect transition between the hot and cold portions of the bar pattern. The heated portion of the target is an elongated rectangular even which is tilted back at a 30 deg angle to form a 1.8 by 1.8 m square when viewed from the front. The cold bars we positioned in front of the heated oven surface and can be oriented in either the vertical or horizontal direction. The oven is mounted on a lightweight trailer for one- or two-man positioning. An attached metal and canvas structure is used to shield the entire target from both solar loading and cooling winds. The target board has a thin aluminum sheet front surface which is insulated from the oven's heating structure.

  13. Note: Development of a volume-limited dot target for a high brightness extreme ultraviolet microplasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, Thanh Hung Suzuki, Yuhei; Hara, Hiroyuki; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Hirose, Ryoichi; Ohashi, Hayato; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O’Sullivan, Gerry; Sunahara, Atsushi

    2014-11-15

    We report on production of volume-limited dot targets based on electron beam lithographic and sputtering technologies for use in efficient high brightness extreme ultraviolet microplasma sources. We successfully produced cylindrical tin (Sn) targets with diameters of 10, 15, and 20 μm and a height of 150 nm. The calculated spectrum around 13.5 nm was in good agreement with that obtained experimentally.

  14. Sphaeropsidin A shows promising activity against drug-resistant cancer cells by targeting regulatory volume increase.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Véronique; Chantôme, Aurélie; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Miklos, Walter; Paulitschke, Verena; Mohr, Thomas; Maddau, Lucia; Kornienko, Alexander; Berger, Walter; Vandier, Christophe; Evidente, Antonio; Delpire, Eric; Kiss, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Despite the recent advances in the treatment of tumors with intrinsic chemotherapy resistance, such as melanoma and renal cancers, their prognosis remains poor and new chemical agents with promising activity against these cancers are urgently needed. Sphaeropsidin A, a fungal metabolite whose anticancer potential had previously received little attention, was isolated from Diplodia cupressi and found to display specific anticancer activity in vitro against melanoma and kidney cancer subpanels in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) 60-cell line screen. The NCI data revealed a mean LC50 of ca. 10 µM and a cellular sensitivity profile that did not match that of any other agent in the 765,000 compound database. Subsequent mechanistic studies in melanoma and other multidrug-resistant in vitro cancer models showed that sphaeropsidin A can overcome apoptosis as well as multidrug resistance by inducing a marked and rapid cellular shrinkage related to the loss of intracellular Cl(-) and the decreased HCO3 (-) concentration in the culture supernatant. These changes in ion homeostasis and the absence of effects on the plasma membrane potential were attributed to the sphaeropsidin A-induced impairment of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Preliminary results also indicate that depending on the type of cancer, the sphaeropsidin A effects on RVI could be related to Na-K-2Cl electroneutral cotransporter or Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) anion exchanger(s) targeting. This study underscores the modulation of ion-transporter activity as a promising therapeutic strategy to combat drug-resistant cancers and identifies the fungal metabolite, sphaeropsidin A, as a lead to develop anticancer agents targeting RVI in cancer cells. PMID:25868554

  15. Sphaeropsidin A shows promising activity against drug-resistant cancer cells by targeting regulatory volume increase

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Véronique; Chantôme, Aurélie; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Miklos, Walter; Paulitschke, Verena; Mohr, Thomas; Maddau, Lucia; Kornienko, Alexander; Berger, Walter; Vandier, Christophe; Evidente, Antonio; Delpire, Eric; Kiss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent advances in the treatment of tumors with intrinsic chemotherapy resistance, such as melanoma and renal cancers, their prognosis remains poor and new chemical agents with promising activity against these cancers are urgently needed. Sphaeropsidin A, a fungal metabolite whose anticancer potential had previously received little attention, was isolated from Diplodia cupressi and found to display specific anticancer activity in vitro against melanoma and kidney cancer subpanels in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) 60-cell line screen. The NCI data revealed a mean LC50 of ca. 10 μM and a cellular sensitivity profile that did not match that of any other agent in the 765,000 compound database. Subsequent mechanistic studies in melanoma and other multidrug-resistant in vitro cancer models showed that sphaeropsidin A can overcome apoptosis as well as multidrug resistance by inducing a marked and rapid cellular shrinkage related to the loss of intracellular Cl− and the decreased HCO3− concentration in the culture supernatant. These changes in ion homeostasis and the absence of effects on the plasma membrane potential were attributed to the sphaeropsidin A-induced impairment of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Preliminary results also indicate that depending on the type of cancer, the sphaeropsidin A effects on RVI could be related to Na–K–2Cl electroneutral cotransporter or Cl−/HCO3− anion exchanger(s) targeting. This study underscores the modulation of ion-transporter activity as a promising therapeutic strategy to combat drug-resistant cancers and identifies the fungal metabolite, sphaeropsidin A, as a lead to develop anticancer agents targeting RVI in cancer cells. PMID:25868554

  16. WE-D-17A-04: Magnetically Focused Proton Irradiation of Small Volume Targets

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, G; Slater, J; Wroe, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the advantages of magnetic focusing for small volume proton irradiations and the potential clinical benefits for radiosurgery targets. The primary goal is to create narrow elongated proton beams of elliptical cross section with superior dose delivery characteristics compared to current delivery modalities (eg, collimated beams). In addition, more general beam shapes are also under investigation. Methods: Two prototype magnets consisting of 24 segments of samarium-cobalt (Sm2Co17) permanent magnetic material adhered into hollow cylinders were manufactured for testing. A single focusing magnet was placed on a positioning track on our Gantry 1 treatment table and 15 mm diameter proton beams with energies and modulation relevant to clinical radiosurgery applications (127 to 186 MeV, and 0 to 30 mm modulation) were delivered to a terminal water tank. Beam dose distributions were measured using a PTW diode detector and Gafchromic EBT2 film. Longitudinal and transverse dose profiles were analyzed and compared to data from Monte Carlo simulations analogous to the experimental setup. Results: The narrow elongated focused beam spots showed high elliptical symmetry indicating high magnet quality. In addition, when compared to unfocused beams, peak-to-entrance depth dose ratios were 11 to 14% larger (depending on presence or extent of modulation), and minor axis penumbras were 11 to 20% smaller (again depending on modulation) for focused beams. These results suggest that the use of rare earth magnet assemblies is practical and could improve dose-sparing of normal tissue and organs at risk while delivering enhanced dose to small proton radiosurgery targets. Conclusion: Quadrapole rare earth magnetic assemblies are a promising and inexpensive method to counteract particle out scatter that tends to degrade the peak to entrance performance of small field proton beams. Knowledge gained from current experiments will inform the design of a prototype treatment

  17. Random forest classification of large volume structures for visuo-haptic rendering in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastmeyer, Andre; Fortmeier, Dirk; Handels, Heinz

    2016-03-01

    For patient-specific voxel-based visuo-haptic rendering of CT scans of the liver area, the fully automatic segmentation of large volume structures such as skin, soft tissue, lungs and intestine (risk structures) is important. Using a machine learning based approach, several existing segmentations from 10 segmented gold-standard patients are learned by random decision forests individually and collectively. The core of this paper is feature selection and the application of the learned classifiers to a new patient data set. In a leave-some-out cross-validation, the obtained full volume segmentations are compared to the gold-standard segmentations of the untrained patients. The proposed classifiers use a multi-dimensional feature space to estimate the hidden truth, instead of relying on clinical standard threshold and connectivity based methods. The result of our efficient whole-body section classification are multi-label maps with the considered tissues. For visuo-haptic simulation, other small volume structures would have to be segmented additionally. We also take a look into these structures (liver vessels). For an experimental leave-some-out study consisting of 10 patients, the proposed method performs much more efficiently compared to state of the art methods. In two variants of leave-some-out experiments we obtain best mean DICE ratios of 0.79, 0.97, 0.63 and 0.83 for skin, soft tissue, hard bone and risk structures. Liver structures are segmented with DICE 0.93 for the liver, 0.43 for blood vessels and 0.39 for bile vessels.

  18. Determination of the large scale volume weighted halo velocity bias in simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Pengjie; Jing, Yipeng

    2015-06-01

    A profound assumption in peculiar velocity cosmology is bv=1 at sufficiently large scales, where bv is the volume-weighted halo(galaxy) velocity bias with respect to the matter velocity field. However, this fundamental assumption has not been robustly verified in numerical simulations. Furthermore, it is challenged by structure formation theory (Bardeen, Bond, Kaiser and Szalay, Astrophys. J. 304, 15 (1986); Desjacques and Sheth, Phys. Rev D 81, 023526 (2010), which predicts the existence of velocity bias (at least for proto-halos) due to the fact that halos reside in special regions (local density peaks). The major obstacle to measuring the volume-weighted velocity from N-body simulations is an unphysical sampling artifact. It is entangled in the measured velocity statistics and becomes significant for sparse populations. With recently improved understanding of the sampling artifact (Zhang, Zheng and Jing, 2015, PRD; Zheng, Zhang and Jing, 2015, PRD), for the first time we are able to appropriately correct this sampling artifact and then robustly measure the volume-weighted halo velocity bias. (1) We verify bv=1 within 2% model uncertainty at k ≲0.1 h /Mpc and z =0 - 2 for halos of mass ˜1012- 1013h-1M⊙ and, therefore, consolidate a foundation for the peculiar velocity cosmology. (2) We also find statistically significant signs of bv≠1 at k ≳0.1 h /Mpc . Unfortunately, whether this is real or caused by a residual sampling artifact requires further investigation. Nevertheless, cosmology based on the k ≳0.1 h /Mpc velocity data should be careful with this potential velocity bias.

  19. Large volume serial section tomography by Xe Plasma FIB dual beam microscopy.

    PubMed

    Burnett, T L; Kelley, R; Winiarski, B; Contreras, L; Daly, M; Gholinia, A; Burke, M G; Withers, P J

    2016-02-01

    Ga(+) Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscopes (FIB-SEM) have revolutionised the level of microstructural information that can be recovered in 3D by block face serial section tomography (SST), as well as enabling the site-specific removal of smaller regions for subsequent transmission electron microscope (TEM) examination. However, Ga(+) FIB material removal rates limit the volumes and depths that can be probed to dimensions in the tens of microns range. Emerging Xe(+) Plasma Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscope (PFIB-SEM) systems promise faster removal rates. Here we examine the potential of the method for large volume serial section tomography as applied to bainitic steel and WC-Co hard metals. Our studies demonstrate that with careful control of milling parameters precise automated serial sectioning can be achieved with low levels of milling artefacts at removal rates some 60× faster. Volumes that are hundreds of microns in dimension have been collected using fully automated SST routines in feasible timescales (<24h) showing good grain orientation contrast and capturing microstructural features at the tens of nanometres to the tens of microns scale. Accompanying electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) maps show high indexing rates suggesting low levels of surface damage. Further, under high current Ga(+) FIB milling WC-Co is prone to amorphisation of WC surface layers and phase transformation of the Co phase, neither of which have been observed at PFIB currents as high as 60nA at 30kV. Xe(+) PFIB dual beam microscopes promise to radically extend our capability for 3D tomography, 3D EDX, 3D EBSD as well as correlative tomography. PMID:26683814

  20. Measurements of Elastic and Inelastic Properties under Simulated Earth's Mantle Conditions in Large Volume Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    The interpretation of highly resolved seismic data from Earths deep interior require measurements of the physical properties of Earth's materials under experimental simulated mantle conditions. More than decade ago seismic tomography clearly showed subduction of crustal material can reach the core mantle boundary under specific circumstances. That means there is no longer space for the assumption deep mantle rocks might be much less complex than deep crustal rocks known from exhumation processes. Considering this geophysical high pressure research is faced the challenge to increase pressure and sample volume at the same time to be able to perform in situ experiments with representative complex samples. High performance multi anvil devices using novel materials are the most promising technique for this exciting task. Recent large volume presses provide sample volumes 3 to 7 orders of magnitude bigger than in diamond anvil cells far beyond transition zone conditions. The sample size of several cubic millimeters allows elastic wave frequencies in the low to medium MHz range. Together with the small and even adjustable temperature gradients over the whole sample this technique makes anisotropy and grain boundary effects in complex systems accessible for elastic and inelastic properties measurements in principle. The measurements of both elastic wave velocities have also no limits for opaque and encapsulated samples. The application of triple-mode transducers and the data transfer function technique for the ultrasonic interferometry reduces the time for saving the data during the experiment to about a minute or less. That makes real transient measurements under non-equilibrium conditions possible. A further benefit is, both elastic wave velocities are measured exactly simultaneously. Ultrasonic interferometry necessarily requires in situ sample deformation measurement by X-radiography. Time-resolved X-radiography makes in situ falling sphere viscosimetry and even the

  1. Detection of fast flying nanoparticles by light scattering over a large volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettazzi, F.; Bäumer, S.; van der Donck, J.; Deutz, A.

    2015-06-01

    is a well-known detection method which is applied in many different scientific and technology domains including atmospheric physics, environmental control, and biology. It allows contactless and remote detection of sub-micron size particles. However, methods for detecting a single fast moving particle smaller than 100 nm are lacking. In the present work we report a preliminary design study of an inline large area detector for nanoparticles larger than 50 nm which move with velocities up to 100 m/s. The detector design is based on light scattering using commercially available components. The presented design takes into account all challenges connected to the inline implementation of the scattering technique in the system: the need for the detector to have a large field of view to cover a volume with a footprint commensurate to an area of 100mm x 100mm, the necessity to sense nanoparticles transported at high velocity, and the requirement of large capture rate with a false detection as low as one false positive per week. The impact of all these stringent requirements on the expected sensitivity and performances of the device is analyzed by mean of a dedicated performance model.

  2. Probing the Earth’s interior with a large-volume liquid scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochmuth, Kathrin A.; Feilitzsch, Franz V.; Fields, Brian D.; Undagoitia, Teresa Marrodán; Oberauer, Lothar; Potzel, Walter; Raffelt, Georg G.; Wurm, Michael

    2007-02-01

    A future large-volume liquid scintillator detector would provide a high-statistics measurement of terrestrial antineutrinos originating from β-decays of the uranium and thorium chains. In addition, the forward displacement of the neutron in the detection reaction ν+p→n+e provides directional information. We investigate the requirements on such detectors to distinguish between certain geophysical models on the basis of the angular dependence of the geoneutrino flux. Our analysis is based on a Monte-Carlo simulation with different levels of light yield, considering both unloaded and gadolinium-loaded scintillators. We find that a 50 kt detector such as the proposed LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) will detect deviations from isotropy of the geoneutrino flux significantly. However, with an unloaded scintillator the time needed for a useful discrimination between different geophysical models is too large if one uses the directional information alone. A Gd-loaded scintillator improves the situation considerably, although a 50 kt detector would still need several decades to distinguish between a geophysical reference model and one with a large neutrino source in the Earth’s core. However, a high-statistics measurement of the total geoneutrino flux and its spectrum still provides an extremely useful glance at the Earth’s interior.

  3. Alveolar albumin leakage during large tidal volume ventilation and surfactant dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Liu, J M; Evander, E; Zhao, J; Wollmer, P; Jonson, B

    2001-07-01

    Detergent given as an aerosol and large tidal volume ventilation (LTVV) have been observed, by us, to promote lung injury by an additive effect on alveolocapillary barrier function. The surfactant system may be further damaged if protein leakage occurs into the alveoli. The aim was to study the effect of detergent and LTVV on the alveolar leakage of albumin and also the effect of detergent on surface activity of lung washings and lung tissue extracts. Technetium-99m-labelled human serum albumin was given intravenously. The alveolar leakage of albumin was measured after perturbing the surfactant system with the detergent dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate either singly or in combination with LTVV. Four groups of rabbits were studied after 3 h of experimental ventilation. Surface tension measurements of tissue extracts, lung mechanics and gas exchange did not show any differences between groups. Wet lung weight and albumin leakage were significantly increased in the two groups subjected to LTVV compared with groups given normal tidal volume ventilation. Low doses of detergent did not affect surface activity of lung tissue extracts or alveolar leakage of albumin. LTVV increased alveolar leakage of albumin and produced oedema. No additive effect was seen when detergent and LTVV were combined. PMID:11442575

  4. A large volume cell for in situ neutron diffraction studies of hydrothermal crystallizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Fang; Qian, Gujie; Brugger, Joël; Studer, Andrew; Olsen, Scott; Pring, Allan

    2010-10-01

    A hydrothermal cell with 320 ml internal volume has been designed and constructed for in situ neutron diffraction studies of hydrothermal crystallizations. The cell design adopts a dumbbell configuration assembled with standard commercial stainless steel components and a zero-scattering Ti-Zr alloy sample compartment. The fluid movement and heat transfer are simply driven by natural convection due to the natural temperature gradient along the fluid path, so that the temperature at the sample compartment can be stably sustained by heating the fluid in the bottom fluid reservoir. The cell can operate at temperatures up to 300 °C and pressures up to 90 bars and is suitable for studying reactions requiring a large volume of hydrothermal fluid to damp out the negative effect from the change of fluid composition during the course of the reactions. The capability of the cell was demonstrated by a hydrothermal phase transformation investigation from leucite (KAlSi2O6) to analcime (NaAlSi2O6ṡH2O) at 210 °C on the high intensity powder diffractometer Wombat in ANSTO. The kinetics of the transformation has been resolved by collecting diffraction patterns every 10 min followed by Rietveld quantitative phase analysis. The classical Avrami/Arrhenius analysis gives an activation energy of 82.3±1.1 kJ mol-1. Estimations of the reaction rate under natural environments by extrapolations agree well with petrological observations.

  5. Evaluation of Large Volume SrI2(Eu) Scintillator Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, B W; Cherepy, N J; Drury, O B; Thelin, P A; Fisher, S E; Magyar, A F; Payne, S A; Burger, A; Boatner, L A; Ramey, J O; Shah, K S; Hawrami, R

    2010-11-18

    There is an ever increasing demand for gamma-ray detectors which can achieve good energy resolution, high detection efficiency, and room-temperature operation. We are working to address each of these requirements through the development of large volume SrI{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator detectors. In this work, we have evaluated a variety of SrI{sub 2} crystals with volumes >10 cm{sup 3}. The goal of this research was to examine the causes of energy resolution degradation for larger detectors and to determine what can be done to mitigate these effects. Testing both packaged and unpackaged detectors, we have consistently achieved better resolution with the packaged detectors. Using a collimated gamma-ray source, it was determined that better energy resolution for the packaged detectors is correlated with better light collection uniformity. A number of packaged detectors were fabricated and tested and the best spectroscopic performance was achieved for a 3% Eu doped crystal with an energy resolution of 2.93% FWHM at 662keV. Simulations of SrI{sub 2}(Eu) crystals were also performed to better understand the light transport physics in scintillators and are reported. This study has important implications for the development of SrI{sub 2}(Eu) detectors for national security purposes.

  6. Lotung large-scale seismic test strong motion records. Volume 1, General description: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in cooperation with the Taiwan Power Company (TPC), constructed two models (1/4 scale and 1/12 scale) of a nuclear plant concrete containment structure at a seismically active site in Lotung, Taiwan. Extensive instrumentation was deployed to record both structural and ground responses during earthquakes. The experiment, generally referred to as the Lotung Large-Scale Seismic Test (LSST), was used to gather data for soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis method evaluation and validation as well as for site ground response investigation. A number of earthquakes having local magnitudes ranging from 4.5 to 7.0 have been recorded at the LSST site since the completion of the test facility in September 1985. This report documents the earthquake data, both raw and processed, collected from the LSST experiment. Volume 1 of the report provides general information on site location, instrument types and layout, data acquisition and processing, and data file organization. The recorded data are described chronologically in subsequent volumes of the report.

  7. A large volume uniform plasma generator for the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Min; Li Xiaoping; Xie Kai; Liu Donglin; Liu Yanming

    2013-01-15

    A large volume uniform plasma generator is proposed for the experiments of electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in plasma, to reproduce a 'black out' phenomenon with long duration in an environment of the ordinary laboratory. The plasma generator achieves a controllable approximate uniform plasma in volume of 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 180 mm without the magnetic confinement. The plasma is produced by the glow discharge, and the special discharge structure is built to bring a steady approximate uniform plasma environment in the electromagnetic wave propagation path without any other barriers. In addition, the electron density and luminosity distributions of plasma under different discharge conditions were diagnosed and experimentally investigated. Both the electron density and the plasma uniformity are directly proportional to the input power and in roughly reverse proportion to the gas pressure in the chamber. Furthermore, the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma are conducted in this plasma generator. Blackout phenomena at GPS signal are observed under this system and the measured attenuation curve is of reasonable agreement with the theoretical one, which suggests the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Detection and Isolation of H5N1 Influenza virus from Large Volumes of Natural Water

    PubMed Central

    Khalenkov, Alexey; Laver, W. Graeme; Webster, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Various species of aquatic or wetlands birds can be the natural reservoir of avian influenza A viruses of all hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes. Shedding of the virus into water leads to transmission between waterfowl and is a major threat for epidemics in poultry and pandemics in humans. Concentrations of the influenza virus in natural water reservoirs are often too low to be detected by most methods. The procedure was designed to detect low concentrations of the influenza virus in large volumes of water without the need for costly installations and reagents. The virus was adsorbed onto formalin-fixed erythrocytes and subsequently isolated in chicken embryos. Sensitivity of the method was determined using a reverse-genetic H5N1 virus. A concentration as low as 0.03 of the 50% egg infection dose per milliliter (EID50/ml) of the initial volume of water was effectively detected. The probability of detection was ∼13%, which is comparable to that of detecting the influenza virus M-gene by PCR amplification. The method can be used by field workers, ecologists, ornithologists, and researchers who need a simple method to isolate H5N1 influenza virus from natural reservoirs. The detection and isolation of virus in embryonated chicken eggs may help epidemiologic, genetic, and vaccine studies. PMID:18325605

  9. Measurement of the velocity of neutrinos from the CNGS beam with the large volume detector.

    PubMed

    Agafonova, N Yu; Aglietta, M; Antonioli, P; Ashikhmin, V V; Bari, G; Bertoni, R; Bressan, E; Bruno, G; Dadykin, V L; Fulgione, W; Galeotti, P; Garbini, M; Ghia, P L; Giusti, P; Kemp, E; Mal'gin, A S; Miguez, B; Molinario, A; Persiani, R; Pless, I A; Ryasny, V G; Ryazhskaya, O G; Saavedra, O; Sartorelli, G; Shakyrianova, I R; Selvi, M; Trinchero, G C; Vigorito, C; Yakushev, V F; Zichichi, A; Razeto, A

    2012-08-17

    We report the measurement of the time of flight of ∼17 GeV ν(μ) on the CNGS baseline (732 km) with the Large Volume Detector (LVD) at the Gran Sasso Laboratory. The CERN-SPS accelerator has been operated from May 10th to May 24th 2012, with a tightly bunched-beam structure to allow the velocity of neutrinos to be accurately measured on an event-by-event basis. LVD has detected 48 neutrino events, associated with the beam, with a high absolute time accuracy. These events allow us to establish the following limit on the difference between the neutrino speed and the light velocity: -3.8 × 10(-6) < (v(ν)-c)/c < 3.1 × 10(-6) (at 99% C.L.). This value is an order of magnitude lower than previous direct measurements. PMID:23006352

  10. Monte Carlo calculations of the HPGe detector efficiency for radioactivity measurement of large volume environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Azbouche, Ahmed; Belgaid, Mohamed; Mazrou, Hakim

    2015-08-01

    A fully detailed Monte Carlo geometrical model of a High Purity Germanium detector with a (152)Eu source, packed in Marinelli beaker, was developed for routine analysis of large volume environmental samples. Then, the model parameters, in particular, the dead layer thickness were adjusted thanks to a specific irradiation configuration together with a fine-tuning procedure. Thereafter, the calculated efficiencies were compared to the measured ones for standard samples containing (152)Eu source filled in both grass and resin matrices packed in Marinelli beaker. From this comparison, a good agreement between experiment and Monte Carlo calculation results was obtained highlighting thereby the consistency of the geometrical computational model proposed in this work. Finally, the computational model was applied successfully to determine the (137)Cs distribution in soil matrix. From this application, instructive results were achieved highlighting, in particular, the erosion and accumulation zone of the studied site. PMID:25982445