Science.gov

Sample records for large volume czt

  1. Annealing as grown large volume CZT single crystals increased spectral resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Longxia Li

    2008-03-19

    The spectroscopic performance of current large-volume Cadmium 10% Zinc Telluride, Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te, (CZT) detectors is impaired by cumulative effect of tellurium precipitates (secondary phases) presented in CZT single-crystal grown by low-pressure Bridgman techniques(1). This statistical effect may limit the energy resolution of large-volume CZT detectors (typically 2-5% at 662 keV for 12-mm thick devices). The stochastic nature of the interaction prevents the use of any electronic or digital charge correction techniques without a significant reduction in the detector efficiency. This volume constraint hampers the utility of CZT since the detectors are inefficient at detecting photons >1MeV and/or in low fluency situations. During the project, seven runs CZT ingots have been grown, in these ingots the indium dopant concentrations have been changed in the range between 0.5ppm to 6ppm. The I-R mapping imaging method has been employed to study the Te-precipitates. The Teprecipitates in as-grown CZT wafers, and after annealing wafers have been systematically studied by using I-R mapping system (home installed, resolution of 1.5 {micro}m). We employed our I-R standard annealing CZT (Zn=4%) procedure or two-steps annealing into radiation CZT (Zn=10%), we achieved the 'non'-Te precipitates (size < 1 {micro}m) CZT n+-type with resistivity > 10{sup 9-10} {Omega}-cm. We believe that the Te-precipitates are the p-type defects, its reducing number causes the CZT became n+-type, therefore we varied or reduced the indium dapant concentration during the growth and changed the Te-precipitates size and density by using different Cd-temperature and different annealing procedures. We have made the comparisons among Te-precipitates size, density and Indium dopant concentrations, and we found that the CZT with smaller size of Te-precipitates is suitable for radiation uses but non-Te precipitates is impossible to be used in the radiation detectors, because the CZT would became

  2. Determination of 235U enrichment with a large volume CZT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortreau, Patricia; Berndt, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    Room-temperature CdZnTe and CdTe detectors have been routinely used in the field of Nuclear Safeguards for many years [Ivanov et al., Development of large volume hemispheric CdZnTe detectors for use in safeguards applications, ESARDA European Safeguards Research and Development Association, Le Corum, Montpellier, France, 1997, p. 447; Czock and Arlt, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 458 (2001) 175; Arlt et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 428 (1999) 127; Lebrun et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 448 (2000) 598; Aparo et al., Development and implementation of compact gamma spectrometers for spent fuel measurements, in: Proceedings, 21st Annual ESARDA, 1999; Arlt and Rudsquist, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 380 (1996) 455; Khusainov et al., High resolution pin type CdTe detectors for the verification of nuclear material, in: Proceedings, 17th Annual ESARDA European Safeguards Research and Development Association, 1995; Mortreau and Berndt, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 458 (2001) 183; Ruhter et al., UCRL-JC-130548, 1998; Abbas et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 405 (1998) 153; Ruhter and Gunnink, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 353 (1994) 716]. Due to their performance and small size, they are ideal detectors for hand-held applications such as verification of spent and fresh fuel, U/Pu attribute tests as well as for the determination of 235U enrichment. The hemispherical CdZnTe type produced by RITEC (Riga, Latvia) [Ivanov et al., 1997] is the most widely used detector in the field of inspection. With volumes ranging from 2 to 1500 mm 3, their spectral performance is such that the use of electronic processing to correct the pulse shape is not required. This paper reports on the work carried out with a large volume (15×15×7.5 mm 3) and high efficiency hemispherical CdZnTe detector for the determination of 235U enrichment. The measurements were made with certified uranium samples whose enrichment ranging from 0.31% to 92.42%, cover the whole range of in-field measurement conditions. The interposed

  3. Opto-electrical characterization and X-ray mapping of large-volume cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Yao, H.W.; Kim, K.; and James, R.B.

    2009-04-13

    Large-volume cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) radiation detectors would greatly improve radiation detection capabilities and, therefore, attract extensive scientific and commercial interests. CZT crystals with volumes as large as hundreds of centimeters can be achieved today due to improvements in the crystal growth technology. However, the poor performance of large-volume CZT detectors is still a challenging problem affecting the commercialization of CZT detectors and imaging arrays. We have employed Pockels effect measurements and synchrotron X-ray mapping techniques to investigate the performance-limiting factors for large-volume CZT detectors. Experimental results with the above characterization methods reveal the non-uniform distribution of internal electric field of large-volume CZT detectors, which help us to better understand the responsible mechanism for the insufficient carrier collection in large-volume CZT detectors.

  4. Improved CZT for Gamma Detection

    SciTech Connect

    JAMES, R.

    2015-03-16

    The goal of the project is to advance the state of the art for spectroscopic and imaging detectors for nonproliferation uses by developing a fundamental understanding of defects limiting the performance of large-volume CZT detectors and fixing them, and increasing the detector size and electron mobility-lifetime product while reducing the cost of detector-grade crystals. Interaction points can be precisely determined in 3D for CZT detectors.

  5. Advantages of semiconductor CZT for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Parnham, Kevin; Sundal, Bjorn; Maehlum, Gunnar; Chowdhury, Samir; Meier, Dirk; Vandehei, Thor; Szawlowski, Marek; Patt, Bradley E.

    2007-09-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe, or CZT) is a room-temperature semiconductor radiation detector that has been developed in recent years for a variety of applications. CZT has been investigated for many potential uses in medical imaging, especially in the field of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). CZT can also be used in positron emission tomography (PET) as well as photon-counting and integration-mode x-ray radiography and computed tomography (CT). The principal advantages of CZT are 1) direct conversion of x-ray or gamma-ray energy into electron-hole pairs; 2) energy resolution; 3) high spatial resolution and hence high space-bandwidth product; 4) room temperature operation, stable performance, high density, and small volume; 5) depth-of-interaction (DOI) available through signal processing. These advantages will be described in detail with examples from our own CZT systems. The ability to operate at room temperature, combined with DOI and very small pixels, make the use of multiple, stationary CZT "mini-gamma cameras" a realistic alternative to today's large Anger-type cameras that require motion to obtain tomographic sampling. The compatibility of CZT with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-fields is demonstrated for a new type of multi-modality medical imaging, namely SPECT/MRI. For pre-clinical (i.e., laboratory animal) imaging, the advantages of CZT lie in spatial and energy resolution, small volume, automated quality control, and the potential for DOI for parallax removal in pinhole imaging. For clinical imaging, the imaging of radiographically dense breasts with CZT enables scatter rejection and hence improved contrast. Examples of clinical breast images with a dual-head CZT system are shown.

  6. Development of x-ray and gamma-ray CZT detectors for homeland security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kuen; Martin, J. W.; Garson, A. B., III; Beilicke, M.; Guo, Q.; Li, Q.; de Geronimo, G.; Groza, M.; Burger, A.; Krawczynski, H.

    2010-04-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) continues to progress in quality and cost as a material for the detection of hard X-ray and gamma-ray photons with excellent spatial and energy resolutions. We are developing large-volume (0.5×3.9×3.9 cm3) cross-strip CZT detectors with the objective to combine the excellent performance achieved so far only with pixelated CZT detectors with a reduced number of readout channels. In this contribution, we discuss the spectroscopic performance of large volume CZT detectors from the company Orbotech when contacted as pixelated detectors. Subsequently, we present results obtained when the same substrates where contacted with cross-strip contacts. Finally, we use the results from a simulation study to discuss the optimization of the design of the strip contacts and the readout electronics.

  7. Charge transport optimization in CZT ring-drift detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boothman, V.; Alruhaili, A.; Perumal, V.; Sellin, P.; Lohstroh, A.; Sawhney, K.; Kachanov, S.

    2015-12-01

    Ring-drift design has been applied to large (7.5~\\text{mm}× 7.5~\\text{mm}× 2.3 mm) cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) devices. This low-noise, single-carrier-sensing configuration is the gold standard for spectroscopic silicon x-ray detectors. By combining the advantages of ring-drift with the high quantum efficiency and room-temperature operating capabilities of CZT, a simple and compact device for high-resolution spectroscopy of x-rays in the range 50-500 keV can be created. Quality of CZT crystals has improved greatly in recent years and electron-only sensing overcomes the problem of inherently poor hole transport in II-VI semiconductors. The spatial response of our 3-ring CZT device was studied by microbeam scanning while the voltages applied to all electrodes were systematically varied. Maximum active radius extended to 2.3 mm, beyond the second ring. Resolution was limited by electronic noise. Our results show that the lateral field and its ratio to the bulk field exert a crucial influence on active area, peak position and sensitivity. CZT and the device geometry were modelled in 3D with Sentaurus TCAD. Line scans were simulated and trends in performance with bias conditions matched experimental data, validating the model. We aimed to optimize the resolution, sensitivity and active radius of the device. Fields and charge drift were visualized and the active volume was mapped in 3D to improve understanding of the factors governing performance including number of rings, their widths, positions and bias.

  8. Towards improved CZT crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Ward, Donald K.; Doty, F. Patrick; Wong, Bryan Matthew; Zhou, Xiao Wang

    2010-03-01

    Past experimental efforts to improve CZT crystals for gamma spectrometer applications have been focused on reducing micron-scale defects such as tellurium inclusions and precipitates. While these micron-scale defects are important, experiments have shown that the micron-scale variations in transport can be caused by the formation and aggregation of atomic-scale defects such as dislocations and point defect clusters. Moreover, dislocation cells have been found to act as nucleation sites that cause the formation of large precipitates. To better solve the uniformity problem of CZT, atomic-scale defects must be understood and controlled. To this end, we have begun to develop an atomistic model that can be used to reveal the effects of small-scale defects and to guide experiments for reducing both atomic- and micron-scale (tellurium inclusions and precipitates) defects. Our model will be based upon a bond order potential (BOP) to enable large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of material structures at a high-fidelity level that was not possible with alternative methods. To establish how BOP improves over existing approaches, we report here our recent work on the assessment of two representative literature CdTe interatomic potentials that are currently widely used: the Stillinger-Weber (SW) potential and the Tersoff-Rockett (TR) potential. Careful examinations of phases, defects, and surfaces of the CdTe system were performed. We began our study by using both potentials to evaluate the lattice constants and cohesive energies of various Cd, Te, and CdTe phases including dimer, trimer, chain, square, rhomboid, tetrahedron, diamond-cubic (dc), simple-cubic (sc), body-centered-cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal-close-packed (hcp), graphite-sheet, A8, zinc-blende (zb), wurtzite (wz), NaCl, CsCl, etc. We then compared the results with our calculations using the density functional theory (DFT) quantum mechanical method. We also evaluated the suitability of the

  9. Handheld CZT radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

    2004-08-24

    A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

  10. CZT Virtual Frisch-grid Detector: Principles and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cui,Y.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Hossain, A.; James, R. B.

    2009-03-24

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) is a very attractive material for using as room-temperature semiconductor detectors, because it has a wide bandgap and a high atomic number. However, due to the material's poor hole mobility, several special techniques were developed to ensure its suitability for radiation detection. Among them, the virtual Frisch-grid CZT detector is an attractive option, having a simple configuration, yet delivering an outstanding spectral performance. The goal of our group in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is to improve the performance of Frisch-ring CZT detectors; most recently, that effort focused on the non-contacting Frisch-ring detector, allowing us to build an inexpensive, large-volume detector array with high energy-resolution and a large effective area. In this paper, the principles of virtual Frisch-grid detectors are described, especially BNL's innovative improvements. The potential applications of virtual Frisch-grid detectors are discussed, and as an example, a hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer using a CZT virtual Frischgrid detector array is introduced, which is a self-contained device with a radiation detector, readout circuit, communication circuit, and high-voltage supply. It has good energy resolution of 1.4% (FWHM of 662-keV peak) with a total detection volume of {approx}20 cm{sup 3}. Such a portable inexpensive device can be used widely in nonproliferation applications, non-destructive detection, radiation imaging, and for homeland security. Extended systems based on the same technology have potential applications in industrial- and nuclear-medical-imaging.

  11. Study on thermal annealing of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Fochuk, P.M.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Horace, J.; McCall, B.; Gul, R.; Xu, L.; Kopach, O.V.; and James, R.B.

    2010-08-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) has attracted increasing interest with its promising potential as a room-temperature nuclear-radiation-detector material. However, different defects in CZT crystals, especially Te inclusions and dislocations, can degrade the performance of CZT detectors. Post-growth annealing is a good approach potentially to eliminate the deleterious influence of these defects. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we built up different facilities for investigating post-growth annealing of CZT. Here, we report our latest experimental results. Cd-vapor annealing reduces the density of Te inclusions, while large temperature gradient promotes the migration of small-size Te inclusions. Simultaneously, the annealing lowers the density of dislocations. However, only-Cd-vapor annealing decreases the resistivity, possibly reflecting the introduction of extra Cd in the lattice. Subsequent Te-vapor annealing is needed to ensure the recovery of the resistivity after removing the Te inclusions.

  12. Study of Thick CZT Detectors for X-ray and Gamma-ray Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Q.; De Geronimo G.; Beilicke, M.; Lee, K.; Garson III, A.; Guo, Q.; Martin, J.; Yin, Y.; Dowkontt, P.; Jung, I.; Krawczynski, H.

    2011-02-12

    CdZnTe (CZT) is a wide bandgap II-VI semiconductor developed for the spectroscopic detection of X-rays and {gamma}-rays at room temperature. The Swift Burst Alert Telescope is using an 5240 cm{sup 2} array of 2 mm thick CZT detectors for the detection of 15-150 keV X-rays from Gamma-ray Bursts. We report on the systematic tests of thicker (0.5 cm) CZT detectors with volumes between 2 cm{sup 3} and 4 cm{sup 3} which are potential detector choices for a number of future X-ray telescopes that operate in the 10 keV to a few MeV energy range. The detectors contacted in our laboratory achieve Full Width Half Maximum energy resolutions of 2.7 keV (4.5%) at 59 keV, 3 keV (2.5%) at 122 keV and 4 keV (0.6%) at 662 keV. The 59 keV and 122 keV energy resolutions are among the world-best results for 0.5 cm thick CZT detectors. We use the data set to study trends of how the energy resolution depends on the detector thickness and on the pixel pitch. Unfortunately, we do not find clear trends, indicating that even for the extremely good energy resolutions reported here, the achievable energy resolutions are largely determined by the properties of individual crystals. Somewhat surprisingly, we achieve the reported results without applying a correction of the anode signals for the depth of the interaction. Measuring the interaction depths thus does not seem to be a pre-requisite for achieving sub-1% energy resolutions at 662 keV.

  13. Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) nanowire sensors for detection of low energy gamma-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, T.; Raja, K. S.; Misra, M.

    2008-04-01

    Bulk single crystals of CdZnTe compound semiconductor is used for room temperature radiation detection in commercial radiation sensors. A large volume of detector material with low defect density is required for increasing the detection efficiency. Manufacture of such a bulky detector-quality material with low defect density is expensive. In this communication, synthesis of nanowires arrays of CdZnTe that can be used for detecting low energy radiation is reported for the first time. CdZnTe ternary compound semiconductor, referred as CZT, was electrodeposited in the form of nanowires onto a TiO II nanotubular template in non-aqueous electrolytes using a pulse-reverse process at 130 °C. Very high electrical resistivity of the CZT nanowires (in the order of 10 10 Ω-cm) was obtained. Such a high resistivity was attributed to the presence of deep defect states such as cadmium vacancies created by the anodic cycle of the pulse-reverse electrodeposition process. Stacks of series connected CZT nanowire arrays were impressed with different bias potentials. The leakage current was in the order of tens of PicoAmperes. When exposed to a radiation source (Am -241, 60 keV), the current flow in the circuit increased. The preliminary results indicate that the CZT nanowire arrays can be used as radiation detector materials at room temperature with a much low bias potential (0.7 - 2.3 V) as against 300 - 500 V applied to the bulk detector materials.

  14. Large volume manufacture of dymalloy

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-22

    The purpose of this research was to test the commercial viability and feasibility of Dymalloy, a composite material to measure thermal conductivity. Dymalloy was developed as part of a CRADA with Sun Microsystems. Sun Microsystems was a potential end user of Dymalloy as a substrate for MCMS. Sun had no desire to be involved in the manufacture of this material. The goal of this small business CRADA with Spectra Mat was to establish the high volume commercial manufacturing industry source for Dymalloy required by an end-user such as Sun Microsystems. The difference between the fabrication technique developed during the CRADA and this proposed work related to the mechanical technique of coating the diamond powder. Mechanical parts for the high-volume diamond powder coating process existed; however, they needed to be installed in an existing coating system for evaluation. Sputtering systems similar to the one required for this project were available at LLNL. Once the diamond powder was coated, both LLNL and Spectra Mat could make and test the Dymalloy composites. Spectra Mat manufactured Dymalloy composites in order to evaluate and establish a reasonable cost estimate on their existing processing capabilities. This information was used by Spectra Mat to define the market and cost-competitive products that could be commercialized from this new substrate material.

  15. Distributed shared memory for roaming large volumes.

    PubMed

    Castanié, Laurent; Mion, Christophe; Cavin, Xavier; Lévy, Bruno

    2006-01-01

    We present a cluster-based volume rendering system for roaming very large volumes. This system allows to move a gigabyte-sized probe inside a total volume of several tens or hundreds of gigabytes in real-time. While the size of the probe is limited by the total amount of texture memory on the cluster, the size of the total data set has no theoretical limit. The cluster is used as a distributed graphics processing unit that both aggregates graphics power and graphics memory. A hardware-accelerated volume renderer runs in parallel on the cluster nodes and the final image compositing is implemented using a pipelined sort-last rendering algorithm. Meanwhile, volume bricking and volume paging allow efficient data caching. On each rendering node, a distributed hierarchical cache system implements a global software-based distributed shared memory on the cluster. In case of a cache miss, this system first checks page residency on the other cluster nodes instead of directly accessing local disks. Using two Gigabit Ethernet network interfaces per node, we accelerate data fetching by a factor of 4 compared to directly accessing local disks. The system also implements asynchronous disk access and texture loading, which makes it possible to overlap data loading, volume slicing and rendering for optimal volume roaming. PMID:17080865

  16. Segregation and interface shape control during EDG growth of CZT crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derby, Jeffrey J.; Zhang, Nan; Yeckel, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Computational models are applied to analyze the segregation of zinc and the shape of the solid-liquid interface during the growth of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) via an electrodynamic gradient freeze (EDG) process. Validation of the computational model is presented via a comparison between predicted and experimentally measured zinc distributions. Analysis of a large-scale CZT EDG growth system, previously analyzed by Gasperino et al. (JCG 311, 2327-2335, 2009), shows anomalous zinc segregation that features anomalous, non-monotonic axial concentrations and several local minima and maxima radially across the boule. A mechanistic explanation is put forth for this effect based on the evolution of multi-cellular melt flow structures, a particularly common feature of CZT growth. Optimized EDG furnace profiles are presented that promote the growth of CZT crystals with a uniformly convex interface shape. Such interface shapes are expected to improve the single-crystalline yield of this material.

  17. Electric Field Distribution of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,G.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; James, R.B.

    2009-08-02

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is attracting increasing interest with its promise as a room-temperature nuclear-radiation-detector material. The distribution of the electric field in CZT detectors substantially affects their detection performance. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we employed a synchrotron X-Ray mapping technique and a Pockels-effect measurement system to investigate this distribution in different detectors. Here, we report our latest experimental results with three detectors of different width/height ratios. A decrease in this ratio aggravates the non-uniform distribution of electric field, and focuses it on the central volume. Raising the bias voltage effectively can minimize such non-uniformity of the electric field distribution. The position of the maximum electric field is independent of the bias voltage; the difference between its maximum- and minimum-intensity of electric field increases with the applied bias voltage.

  18. Large volume axionic Swiss cheese inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Aalok; Shukla, Pramod

    2008-09-01

    Continuing with the ideas of (Section 4 of) [A. Misra, P. Shukla, Moduli stabilization, large-volume dS minimum without anti-D3-branes, (non-)supersymmetric black hole attractors and two-parameter Swiss cheese Calabi Yau's, arXiv: 0707.0105 [hep-th], Nucl. Phys. B, in press], after inclusion of perturbative and non-perturbative α corrections to the Kähler potential and (D1- and D3-) instanton generated superpotential, we show the possibility of slow roll axionic inflation in the large volume limit of Swiss cheese Calabi Yau orientifold compactifications of type IIB string theory. We also include one- and two-loop corrections to the Kähler potential but find the same to be subdominant to the (perturbative and non-perturbative) α corrections. The NS NS axions provide a flat direction for slow roll inflation to proceed from a saddle point to the nearest dS minimum.

  19. Large volume flow-through scintillating detector

    DOEpatents

    Gritzo, Russ E.; Fowler, Malcolm M.

    1995-01-01

    A large volume flow through radiation detector for use in large air flow situations such as incinerator stacks or building air systems comprises a plurality of flat plates made of a scintillating material arranged parallel to the air flow. Each scintillating plate has a light guide attached which transfers light generated inside the scintillating plate to an associated photomultiplier tube. The output of the photomultiplier tubes are connected to electronics which can record any radiation and provide an alarm if appropriate for the application.

  20. CZT vs FFT: Flexibility vs Speed

    SciTech Connect

    S. Sirin

    2003-10-01

    Bluestein's Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), commonly called the Chirp-Z Transform (CZT), is a little-known algorithm that offers engineers a high-resolution FFT combined with the ability to specify bandwidth. In the field of digital signal processing, engineers are always challenged to detect tones, frequencies, signatures, or some telltale sign that signifies a condition that must be indicated, ignored, or controlled. One of these challenges is to detect specific frequencies, for instance when looking for tones from telephones or detecting 60-Hz noise on power lines. The Goertzel algorithm described in Embedded Systems Programming, September 2002, offered a powerful tool toward finding specific frequencies faster than the FFT.Another challenge involves analyzing a range of frequencies, such as recording frequency response measurements, matching voice patterns, or displaying spectrum information on the face of an amateur radio. To meet this challenge most engineers use the well-known FFT. The CZT gives the engineer the flexibility to specify bandwidth and outputs real and imaginary frequency components from which the magnitude and phase can be computed. A description of the CZT and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of CZT versus the FFT and Goertzel algorithms will be followed by situations in which the CZT would shine. The reader will find that the CZT is very useful but that flexibility has a price.

  1. LARGE volume string compactifications at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguelova, Lilia; Calò, Vincenzo; Cicoli, Michele

    2009-10-01

    We present a detailed study of the finite-temperature behaviour of the LARGE Volume type IIB flux compactifications. We show that certain moduli can thermalise at high temperatures. Despite that, their contribution to the finite-temperature effective potential is always negligible and the latter has a runaway behaviour. We compute the maximal temperature Tmax, above which the internal space decompactifies, as well as the temperature T*, that is reached after the decay of the heaviest moduli. The natural constraint T* < Tmax implies a lower bound on the allowed values of the internal volume Script V. We find that this restriction rules out a significant range of values corresponding to smaller volumes of the order Script V ~ 104ls6, which lead to standard GUT theories. Instead, the bound favours values of the order Script V ~ 1015ls6, which lead to TeV scale SUSY desirable for solving the hierarchy problem. Moreover, our result favours low-energy inflationary scenarios with density perturbations generated by a field, which is not the inflaton. In such a scenario, one could achieve both inflation and TeV-scale SUSY, although gravity waves would not be observable. Finally, we pose a two-fold challenge for the solution of the cosmological moduli problem. First, we show that the heavy moduli decay before they can begin to dominate the energy density of the Universe. Hence they are not able to dilute any unwanted relics. And second, we argue that, in order to obtain thermal inflation in the closed string moduli sector, one needs to go beyond the present EFT description.

  2. SUSY's Ladder: reframing sequestering at Large Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, Matthew; Xue, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Theories with approximate no-scale structure, such as the Large Volume Scenario, have a distinctive hierarchy of multiple mass scales in between TeV gaugino masses and the Planck scale, which we call SUSY's Ladder. This is a particular realization of Split Supersymmetry in which the same small parameter suppresses gaugino masses relative to scalar soft masses, scalar soft masses relative to the gravitino mass, and the UV cutoff or string scale relative to the Planck scale. This scenario has many phenomenologically interesting properties, and can avoid dangers including the gravitino problem, flavor problems, and the moduli-induced LSP problem that plague other supersymmetric theories. We study SUSY's Ladder using a superspace formalism that makes the mysterious cancelations in previous computations manifest. This opens the possibility of a consistent effective field theory understanding of the phenomenology of these scenarios, based on power-counting in the small ratio of string to Planck scales. We also show that four-dimensional theories with approximate no-scale structure enforced by a single volume modulus arise only from two special higher-dimensional theories: five-dimensional supergravity and ten-dimensional type IIB supergravity. This gives a phenomenological argument in favor of ten dimensional ultraviolet physics which is different from standard arguments based on the consistency of superstring theory.

  3. Comments on large-N volume independence

    SciTech Connect

    Poppitz, Erich; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-06-02

    We study aspects of the large-N volume independence on R{sup 3} X L{sup {Gamma}}, where L{sup {Gamma}} is a {Gamma}site lattice for Yang-Mills theory with adjoint Wilson-fermions. We find the critical number of lattice sites above which the center-symmetry analysis on L{sup {Gamma}} agrees with the one on the continuum S{sup 1}. For Wilson parameter set to one and {Gamma}{>=}2, the two analyses agree. One-loop radiative corrections to Wilson-line masses are finite, reminiscent of the UV-insensitivity of the Higgs mass in deconstruction/Little-Higgs theories. Even for theories with {Gamma}=1, volume independence in QCD(adj) may be guaranteed to work by tuning one low-energy effective field theory parameter. Within the parameter space of the theory, at most three operators of the 3d effective field theory exhibit one-loop UV-sensitivity. This opens the analytical prospect to study 4d non-perturbative physics by using lower dimensional field theories (d=3, in our example).

  4. A new large-volume multianvil system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, D. J.; Poe, B. T.; Trønnes, R. G.; Liebske, C.; Duba, A.; Rubie, D. C.

    2004-06-01

    A scaled-up version of the 6-8 Kwai-type multianvil apparatus has been developed at the Bayerisches Geoinstitut for operation over ranges of pressure and temperature attainable in conventional systems but with much larger sample volumes. This split-cylinder multianvil system is used with a hydraulic press that can generate loads of up to 5000 t (50 MN). The six tool-steel outer-anvils define a cubic cavity of 100 mm edge-length in which eight 54 mm tungsten carbide cubic inner-anvils are compressed. Experiments are performed using Cr 2O 3-doped MgO octahedra and pyrophyllite gaskets. Pressure calibrations at room temperature and high temperature have been performed with 14/8, 18/8, 18/11, 25/17 and 25/15 OEL/TEL (octahedral edge-length/anvil truncation edge-length, in millimetre) configurations. All configurations tested reach a limiting plateau where the sample-pressure no longer increases with applied load. Calibrations with different configurations show that greater sample-pressure efficiency can be achieved by increasing the OEL/TEL ratio. With the 18/8 configuration the GaP transition is reached at a load of 2500 t whereas using the 14/8 assembly this pressure cannot be reached even at substantially higher loads. With an applied load of 2000 t the 18/8 can produce MgSiO 3 perovskite at 1900 °C with a sample volume of ˜20 mm 3, compared with <3 mm 3 in conventional multianvil systems at the same conditions. The large octahedron size and use of a stepped LaCrO 3 heater also results in significantly lower thermal gradients over the sample.

  5. Small pixel CZT detector for hard X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew David; Cernik, Robert; Chen, Henry; Hansson, Conny; Iniewski, Kris; Jones, Lawrence L.; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C.

    2011-10-01

    A new small pixel cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has been developed for hard X-ray spectroscopy. The X-ray performance of four detectors is presented and the detectors are analysed in terms of the energy resolution of each pixel. The detectors were made from CZT crystals grown by the travelling heater method (THM) bonded to a 20×20 application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and data acquisition (DAQ) system. The detectors had an array of 20×20 pixels on a 250 μm pitch, with each pixel gold-stud bonded to an energy resolving circuit in the ASIC. The DAQ system digitised the ASIC output with 14 bit resolution, performing offset corrections and data storage to disc in real time at up to 40,000 frames per second. The detector geometry and ASIC design was optimised for X-ray spectroscopy up to 150 keV and made use of the small pixel effect to preferentially measure the electron signal. A 241Am source was used to measure the spectroscopic performance and uniformity of the detectors. The average energy resolution (FWHM at 59.54 keV) of each pixel ranged from 1.09±0.46 to 1.50±0.57 keV across the four detectors. The detectors showed good spectral performance and uniform response over almost all pixels in the 20×20 array. A large area 80×80 pixel detector will be built that will utilise the scalable design of the ASIC and the large areas of monolithic spectroscopic grade THM grown CZT that are now available. The large area detector will have the same performance as that demonstrated here.

  6. Large volumes and spectroscopy of walking theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Debbio, L.; Lucini, B.; Patella, A.; Pica, C.; Rago, A.

    2016-03-01

    A detailed investigation of finite-size effects is performed for SU(2) gauge theory with two fermions in the adjoint representation, which previous lattice studies have shown to be inside the conformal window. The system is investigated with different spatial and temporal boundary conditions on lattices of various spatial and temporal extensions, for two values of the bare fermion mass representing a heavy and light fermion regime. Our study shows that the infinite-volume limit of masses and decay constants in the mesonic sector is reached only when the mass of the pseudoscalar particle MPS and the spatial lattice size L satisfy the relation L MPS≥15 . This bound, which is at least a factor of three higher than what is observed in QCD, is a likely consequence of the different spectral signatures of the two theories, with the scalar isosinglet (0++ glueball) being the lightest particle in our model. In addition to stressing the importance of simulating large lattice sizes, our analysis emphasizes the need to understand quantitatively the full spectrum of the theory rather than just the spectrum in the mesonic isotriplet sector. While for the lightest fermion measuring masses from gluonic operators proves to be still challenging, reliable results for glueball states are obtained at the largest fermion mass and, in the mesonic sector, for both fermion masses. As a byproduct of our investigation, we perform a finite-size scaling of the pseudoscalar mass and decay constant. The data presented in this work support the conformal behavior of this theory with an anomalous dimension γ*≃0.37 .

  7. Large-volume sampling and preconcentration for trace explosives detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin Lane

    2004-05-01

    A trace explosives detection system typically contains three subsystems: sample collection, preconcentration, and detection. Sample collection of trace explosives (vapor and particulate) through large volumes of airflow helps reduce sampling time while increasing the amount of dilute sample collected. Preconcentration of the collected sample before introduction into the detector improves the sensitivity of the detector because of the increase in sample concentration. By combining large-volume sample collection and preconcentration, an improvement in the detection of explosives is possible. Large-volume sampling and preconcentration is presented using a systems level approach. In addition, the engineering of large-volume sampling and preconcentration for the trace detection of explosives is explained.

  8. Large space systems technology, 1980, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriver, F., III (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    The technological and developmental efforts in support of the large space systems technology are described. Three major areas of interests are emphasized: (1) technology pertient to large antenna systems; (2) technology related to large space systems; and (3) activities that support both antenna and platform systems.

  9. Large mode-volume, large beta, photonic crystal laser resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Dezfouli, Mohsen Kamandar; Dignam, Marc M.

    2014-12-15

    We propose an optical resonator formed from the coupling of 13, L2 defects in a triangular-lattice photonic crystal slab. Using a tight-binding formalism, we optimized the coupled-defect cavity design to obtain a resonator with predicted single-mode operation, a mode volume five times that of an L2-cavity mode and a beta factor of 0.39. The results are confirmed using finite-difference time domain simulations. This resonator is very promising for use as a single mode photonic crystal vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with high saturation output power compared to a laser consisting of one of the single-defect cavities.

  10. Improving the growth of CZT crystals for radiation detectors: a modeling perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derby, Jeffrey J.; Zhang, Nan; Yeckel, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    The availability of large, single crystals of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) with uniform properties is key to improving the performance of gamma radiation detectors fabricated from them. Towards this goal, we discuss results obtained by computational models that provide a deeper understanding of crystal growth processes and how the growth of CZT can be improved. In particular, we discuss methods that may be implemented to lessen the deleterious interactions between the ampoule wall and the growing crystal via engineering a convex solidification interface. For vertical Bridgman growth, a novel, bell-curve furnace temperature profile is predicted to achieve macroscopically convex solid-liquid interface shapes during melt growth of CZT in a multiple-zone furnace. This approach represents a significant advance over traditional gradient-freeze profiles, which always yield concave interface shapes, and static heat transfer designs, such as pedestal design, that achieve convex interfaces over only a small portion of the growth run. Importantly, this strategy may be applied to any Bridgman configuration that utilizes multiple, controllable heating zones. Realizing a convex solidification interface via this adaptive bell-curve furnace profile is postulated to result in better crystallinity and higher yields than conventional CZT growth techniques.

  11. Technologies for imaging neural activity in large volumes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Na; Freeman, Jeremy; Smith, Spencer L

    2016-08-26

    Neural circuitry has evolved to form distributed networks that act dynamically across large volumes. Conventional microscopy collects data from individual planes and cannot sample circuitry across large volumes at the temporal resolution relevant to neural circuit function and behaviors. Here we review emerging technologies for rapid volume imaging of neural circuitry. We focus on two critical challenges: the inertia of optical systems, which limits image speed, and aberrations, which restrict the image volume. Optical sampling time must be long enough to ensure high-fidelity measurements, but optimized sampling strategies and point-spread function engineering can facilitate rapid volume imaging of neural activity within this constraint. We also discuss new computational strategies for processing and analyzing volume imaging data of increasing size and complexity. Together, optical and computational advances are providing a broader view of neural circuit dynamics and helping elucidate how brain regions work in concert to support behavior. PMID:27571194

  12. Large volume continuous counterflow dialyzer has high efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandeles, S.; Woods, E. C.

    1967-01-01

    Dialyzer separates macromolecules from small molecules in large volumes of solution. It takes advantage of the high area/volume ratio in commercially available 1/4-inch dialysis tubing and maintains a high concentration gradient at the dialyzing surface by counterflow.

  13. Large Volume Injection Techniques in Capillary Gas Chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large volume injection (LVI) is a prerequisite of modern gas chromatographic (GC) analysis, especially when trace sample components have to be determined at very low concentration levels. Injection of larger than usual sample volumes increases sensitivity and/or reduces (or even eliminates) the need...

  14. Large-Volume Gravid Traps Enhance Collection of Culex Vectors.

    PubMed

    Popko, David A; Walton, William E

    2016-06-01

    Gravid mosquito collections were compared among several large-volume (infusion volume ≥35 liters) gravid trap designs and the small-volume (infusion volume  =  6 liters) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) gravid trap used routinely by vector control districts for vector and pathogen surveillance. The numbers of gravid Culex quinquefasciatus, Cx. tarsalis, and Cx. stigmatosoma collected by large gravid traps were greater than by the CDC gravid trap during nearly all overnight trials. Large-volume gravid traps collected on average 6.6-fold more adult female Culex mosquitoes compared to small-volume CDC gravid traps across 3 seasons during the 3 years of the studies. The differences in gravid mosquito collections between large-versus small-volume gravid traps were greatest during spring, when 8- to 56-fold more Culex individuals were collected using large-volume gravid traps. The proportion of gravid females in collections did not differ appreciably among the more effective trap designs tested. Important determinants of gravid trap performance were infusion container size and type as well as infusion volume, which determined the distance between the suction trap and the infusion surface. Of lesser importance for gravid trap performance were the number of suction traps, method of suction trap mounting, and infusion concentration. Fermentation of infusions between 1 and 4 wk weakly affected total mosquito collections, with Cx. stigmatosoma collections moderately enhanced by comparatively young and organically enriched infusions. A suction trap mounted above 100 liters of organic infusion housed in a 121-liter black plastic container collected the most gravid mosquitoes over the greatest range of experimental conditions, and a 35-liter infusion with side-mounted suction traps was a promising lesser-volume alternative design. PMID:27280347

  15. Novel Method for Growing Te-Inclusion-Free CZT

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov,A.

    2008-06-17

    The authors propose a new method for growth of detector-grade CdZnTe (CZT) with reduced concentration and sizes of Te inclusions. The method is designed to impede the formation of Te-rich inclusions in crystals due to the use of new CZT growth method and a unique ampoule design.

  16. Cosmological moduli problem in large volume scenario and thermal inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kiwoon; Park, Wan-Il; Shin, Chang Sub E-mail: wipark@kias.re.kr

    2013-03-01

    We show that in a large volume scenario of type IIB string or F-theory compactifications, single thermal inflation provides only a partial solution to the cosmological problem of the light volume modulus. We then clarify the conditions for double thermal inflation, being a simple extension of the usual single thermal inflation scenario, to solve the cosmological moduli problem in the case of relatively light moduli masses. Using a specific example, we demonstrate that double thermal inflation can be realized in large volume scenario in a natural manner, and the problem of the light volume modulus can be solved for the whole relevant mass range. We also find that right amount of baryon asymmetry and dark matter can be obtained via a late-time Affleck-Dine mechanism and the decays of the visible sector NLSP to flatino LSP.

  17. EFFECTS OF MATERIAL IMPROVEMENT ON CZT DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CHU, M.; CARINI, G.A.; ET AL.

    2006-08-13

    CZT material quality improvement has been achieved by optimizing the crystal growth process. N-type conductivity has been measured on as-grown, undoped, Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te. Cd{sub 0.85}Zn{sub 0.15}Te crystals have been grown. for producing high resistivity CZT radiation detectors. The best FWHM of {sup 57}Co 122KeV spectrum was measured to be 3.7% and ({mu}{tau}){sub e} was 3 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}V{sup -1}. The microscopic gamma ray response using a beam size of 10 {micro}m has been used to map the entire 4 mm x 4 mm detector. Several black spots indicating no signal responses were observed while all other areas showed an average of 65-70% collection efficiency. The black spots suggest that at those locations, the Te precipitates are larger than 10 {micro}m. Detailed microscopic infrared transmission measurement on the sample found that most Te precipitates have sizes of 4-6 {micro}m. Theoretical analysis of the results suggests that singly and doubly ionized Te{sub Cd}V{sub Cd}{sup 2} might be the shallow and deep donors previously assigned to Te{sub Cd} by us.

  18. High-Resolution Compton-Suppressed CZT Detector for Fission Products Identification

    SciTech Connect

    R. Aryaeinejd; J. K. Hartwell; Wade W. Scates

    2004-10-01

    Room temperature semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors are currently limited to total detector volumes of 1-2 cm3, which is dictated by the poor charge transport characteristics. Because of this size limitation one of the problems in accurately determining isotope identification is the enormous background from the Compton scattering events. Eliminating this background will not only increase the sensitivity and accuracy of measurements but also help us to resolve peaks buried under the background and peaks in close vicinity of others. We are currently developing a fission products detection system based on the Compton-suppressed CZT detector. In this application, the detection system is required to operate in high radiation fields. Therefore, a small 10x10x5 mm3 CZT detector is placed inside the center of a well-shielded 3" in diameter by 3" long Nal detector. So far we have been able to successfully reduce the Compton background by a factor of 5.4 for a 137Cs spectrum. This reduction of background will definitely enhance the quality of the gamma-ray spectrum in the information-rich energy range below 1 MeV, which consequently increases the detection sensitivity. In this work, we will discuss the performance of this detection system as well as its applications.

  19. Large-Volume High-Pressure Mineral Physics in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebermann, Robert C.; Prewitt, Charles T.; Weidner, Donald J.

    American high-pressure research with large sample volumes developed rapidly in the 1950s during the race to produce synthetic diamonds. At that time the piston cylinder, girdle (or belt), and tetrahedral anvil devices were invented. However, this development essentially stopped in the late 1950s, and while the diamond anvil cell has been used extensively in the United States with spectacular success for high-pressure experiments in small sample volumes, most of the significant technological advances in large-volume devices have taken place in Japan. Over the past 25 years, these technical advances have enabled a fourfold increase in pressure, with many important investigations of the chemical and physical properties of materials synthesized at high temperatures and pressures that cannot be duplicated with any apparatus currently available in the United States.

  20. A Warm Magnetoactive Plasma in a Large Volume of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiles, C.

    1984-01-01

    A diffuse ionized warm gas fills a large volume of space in the general direction of Radio Loop II. There are three types of observational evidence: Faraday rotation measures (RM's) of extragalactic sources; emission measures (EM's) derived from the H alpha emission line in the diffuse interstellar medium; and magnetic field strengths in HI clouds derived from Zeeman splitting observations.

  1. Large discharge-volume, silent discharge spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Michael

    1995-01-01

    A large discharge-volume spark plug for providing self-limiting microdischarges. The apparatus includes a generally spark plug-shaped arrangement of a pair of electrodes, where either of the two coaxial electrodes is substantially shielded by a dielectric barrier from a direct discharge from the other electrode, the unshielded electrode and the dielectric barrier forming an annular volume in which self-terminating microdischarges occur when alternating high voltage is applied to the center electrode. The large area over which the discharges occur, and the large number of possible discharges within the period of an engine cycle, make the present silent discharge plasma spark plug suitable for use as an ignition source for engines. In the situation, where a single discharge is effective in causing ignition of the combustible gases, a conventional single-polarity, single-pulse, spark plug voltage supply may be used.

  2. Annual Report: Property Improvement in CZT via Modeling and Processing Innovations

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Setyawan, Wahyu; Gao, Fei; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Bliss, Mary; Riley, Brian J.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Stave, Jean A.

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this project is to develop growth models of CZT crystals from the melt using vertical gradient freeze (VGF) or vertical Bridgman growth as a typical process. Further, the project will perform critical experiments including single crystal growth to validate the growth models and to provide detailed data for modeling and simulation. Ideally, the project will develop growth models that will provide, for the first time, choices for optimal CZT single crystal growth from the melt based on model input. The overarching goal that guides this research proposal is to produce large, single crystals of CZT with good yield and reproducible properties. In our view this depends on 1) understanding crystal growth processes, including annealing and cool-down processing, and 2) understanding the role of defects on detector response since it is not possible, yet, to produce defect-free materials. Models of defect structure and formation are addressed. Validated models and experiments on reducing defects in melt-grown crystals are used to guide our understanding of growth processes and in-furnace annealing plus cool-down.

  3. Charge transport properties of as-grown CZT by traveling heater method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, U. N.; Weiler, S.; Stein, J.; Groza, M.; Buliga, V.; Burger, A.

    2011-10-01

    In this present work we have grown Cd 0.9Zn 0.1Te doped with indium by the traveling heater method (THM) technique. Large 2 in diameter CZT ingots of more than 1 kg each were successfully grown by the THM technique in vertical configuration. In order to evaluate our as-grown CZT samples, charge transport characteristics were studied at and below room temperature. The key parameter investigated for as-grown CZT samples was the mobility-trapping time product and its temperature variation. Mobility-trapping time values as high as 9×10 -3 cm 2/V at 30 °C were measured for samples exhibiting resistivities in the 1-2×10 10 Ω cm range. The as-grown samples showed moderately good resolution of 1.5-3.5% at 662 keV when fabricated. The variation of the internal electric field along the depth of the detector was studied for as-grown material to evaluate deformations inside the crystal due to the presence of residual stress or other defects.

  4. Spatial considerations during cryopreservation of a large volume sample.

    PubMed

    Kilbride, Peter; Lamb, Stephen; Milne, Stuart; Gibbons, Stephanie; Erro, Eloy; Bundy, James; Selden, Clare; Fuller, Barry; Morris, John

    2016-08-01

    There have been relatively few studies on the implications of the physical conditions experienced by cells during large volume (litres) cryopreservation - most studies have focused on the problem of cryopreservation of smaller volumes, typically up to 2 ml. This study explores the effects of ice growth by progressive solidification, generally seen during larger scale cryopreservation, on encapsulated liver hepatocyte spheroids, and it develops a method to reliably sample different regions across the frozen cores of samples experiencing progressive solidification. These issues are examined in the context of a Bioartificial Liver Device which requires cryopreservation of a 2 L volume in a strict cylindrical geometry for optimal clinical delivery. Progressive solidification cannot be avoided in this arrangement. In such a system optimal cryoprotectant concentrations and cooling rates are known. However, applying these parameters to a large volume is challenging due to the thermal mass and subsequent thermal lag. The specific impact of this to the cryopreservation outcome is required. Under conditions of progressive solidification, the spatial location of Encapsulated Liver Spheroids had a strong impact on post-thaw recovery. Cells in areas first and last to solidify demonstrated significantly impaired post-thaw function, whereas areas solidifying through the majority of the process exhibited higher post-thaw outcome. It was also found that samples where the ice thawed more rapidly had greater post-thaw viability 24 h post-thaw (75.7 ± 3.9% and 62.0 ± 7.2% respectively). These findings have implications for the cryopreservation of large volumes with a rigid shape and for the cryopreservation of a Bioartificial Liver Device. PMID:27256662

  5. Ray Casting of Large Multi-Resolution Volume Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lux, C.; Fröhlich, B.

    2009-04-01

    High quality volume visualization through ray casting on graphics processing units (GPU) has become an important approach for many application domains. We present a GPU-based, multi-resolution ray casting technique for the interactive visualization of massive volume data sets commonly found in the oil and gas industry. Large volume data sets are represented as a multi-resolution hierarchy based on an octree data structure. The original volume data is decomposed into small bricks of a fixed size acting as the leaf nodes of the octree. These nodes are the highest resolution of the volume. Coarser resolutions are represented through inner nodes of the hierarchy which are generated by down sampling eight neighboring nodes on a finer level. Due to limited memory resources of current desktop workstations and graphics hardware only a limited working set of bricks can be locally maintained for a frame to be displayed. This working set is chosen to represent the whole volume at different local resolution levels depending on the current viewer position, transfer function and distinct areas of interest. During runtime the working set of bricks is maintained in CPU- and GPU memory and is adaptively updated by asynchronously fetching data from external sources like hard drives or a network. The CPU memory hereby acts as a secondary level cache for these sources from which the GPU representation is updated. Our volume ray casting algorithm is based on a 3D texture-atlas in GPU memory. This texture-atlas contains the complete working set of bricks of the current multi-resolution representation of the volume. This enables the volume ray casting algorithm to access the whole working set of bricks through only a single 3D texture. For traversing rays through the volume, information about the locations and resolution levels of visited bricks are required for correct compositing computations. We encode this information into a small 3D index texture which represents the current octree

  6. AdS/CFT and Large-N Volume Independence

    SciTech Connect

    Poppitz, Erich; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-08-26

    We study the Eguchi-Kawai reduction in the strong-coupling domain of gauge theories via the gravity dual of N=4 super-Yang-Mills on R{sup 3} x S{sup 1}. We show that D-branes geometrize volume independence in the center-symmetric vacuum and give supergravity predictions for the range of validity of reduced large-N models at strong coupling.

  7. Large volume multiple-path nuclear pumped laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hohl, F.; Deyoung, R.J.

    1981-11-01

    Large volumes of gas are excited by using internal high reflectance mirrors that are arranged so that the optical path crosses back and forth through the excited gaseous medium. By adjusting the external dielectric mirrors of the laser, the number of paths through the laser cavity can be varied. Output powers were obtained that are substantially higher than the output powers of previous nuclear laser systems. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  8. Cadium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) Gamma Ray Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    William Quam

    2001-09-01

    This report describes CZT crystals and their use in large arrays for generation of gamma ray spectra. Laboratory spectra will be shown together with spectra accumulated by various battery powered portable instruments (see Appendix A). One of these portable instruments was specifically constructed to minimize power consumption and yet provide reasonable isotope identification capability. Detailed data will be presented covering gamma energy resolution, gamma peak shapes, system background, and detector efficiency. Nearly all data were taken with very small crystals of CZT; cubes 5 mm on a side. A few spectra will be presented from cylindrical crystals of about the same size (see Appendix A). The small crystal size leads to low counting rates and extended counting times for reliable isotope identification. We have addressed this problem by using arrays of CZT crystals, initially two crystals and, at present, arrays of eight crystals. Data will be shown relating spectral parameters for these two arrays. System MDA is one way of combining resolution, efficiency, and background that will enable direct comparison of various detector types for individual isotope identification. We have calculated the MDA for an early dual crystal array and the current eight crystal array. Data derived from each array will be presented. In addition, it is possible to extrapolate the MDA methodology to much larger arrays. A 32-crystal array is under construction and extrapolations to 256 and 1024 crystals are considered possible. Estimated MDA values for these larger arrays are also presented. Several 8-crystal arrays have been constructed and versions have been incorporated into portable instruments. Descriptions of these small instruments are given covering physical size, weight, and general configuration. These instruments have been tested for shock and temperature effects and data will be presented on the results of these tests. The MDA concept will also allow extrapolation to large

  9. Staged-volume radiosurgery for large arteriovenous malformations: a review.

    PubMed

    AlKhalili, Kenan; Chalouhi, Nohra; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula; Rosenwasser, Robert; Jabbour, Pascal

    2014-09-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective management strategy for properly selected patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, the risk of postradiosurgical radiation-related injury is higher in patients with large AVMs. Multistaged volumetric management of large AVMs was undertaken to limit the radiation exposure to the surrounding normal brain. This strategy offers a promising method for obtaining high AVM obliteration rates with minimal normal tissue damage. The use of embolization as an adjunctive method in the treatment of large AVMs remains controversial. Unfortunately, staged-volume radiosurgery (SVR) has a number of potential pitfalls that affect the outcome. The aim of this article is to highlight the role of SVR in the treatment of large AVMs, to discuss the outcome comparing it to other treatment modalities, and to discuss the potential improvement that could be introduced to this method of treatment. PMID:25175440

  10. Parallel Rendering of Large Time-Varying Volume Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbutt, Alexander E.

    2005-01-01

    Interactive visualization of large time-varying 3D volume datasets has been and still is a great challenge to the modem computational world. It stretches the limits of the memory capacity, the disk space, the network bandwidth and the CPU speed of a conventional computer. In this SURF project, we propose to develop a parallel volume rendering program on SGI's Prism, a cluster computer equipped with state-of-the-art graphic hardware. The proposed program combines both parallel computing and hardware rendering in order to achieve an interactive rendering rate. We use 3D texture mapping and a hardware shader to implement 3D volume rendering on each workstation. We use SGI's VisServer to enable remote rendering using Prism's graphic hardware. And last, we will integrate this new program with ParVox, a parallel distributed visualization system developed at JPL. At the end of the project, we Will demonstrate remote interactive visualization using this new hardware volume renderer on JPL's Prism System using a time-varying dataset from selected JPL applications.

  11. Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Sokolov, D A; Huxley, A D; Kamenev, K V

    2011-07-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements typically require two orders of magnitude longer data collection times and larger sample sizes than neutron diffraction studies. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on pressurised samples are particularly challenging since standard high-pressure apparatus restricts sample volume, attenuates the incident and scattered beams, and contributes background scattering. Here, we present the design of a large volume two-layered piston-cylinder pressure cell with optimised transmission for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The design and the materials selected for the construction of the cell enable its safe use to a pressure of 1.8 GPa with a sample volume in excess of 400 mm(3). The design of the piston seal eliminates the need for a sample container, thus providing a larger sample volume and reduced absorption. The integrated electrical plug with a manganin pressure gauge offers an accurate measurement of pressure over the whole range of operational temperatures. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by an inelastic neutron scattering study of UGe(2). PMID:21806195

  12. Geometric Measures of Large Biomolecules: Surface, Volume and Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Mach, Paul; Koehl, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Geometry plays a major role in our attempt to understand the activity of large molecules. For example, surface area and volume are used to quantify the interactions between these molecules and the water surrounding them in implicit solvent models. In addition, the detection of pockets serves as a starting point for predictive studies of biomolecule-ligand interactions. The alpha shape theory provides an exact and robust method for computing these geometric measures. Several implementations of this theory are currently available. We show however that these implementations fail on very large macromolecular systems. We show that these difficulties are not theoretical; rather, they are related to the architecture of current computers that rely on the use of cache memory to speed up calculation. By rewriting the algorithms that implement the different steps of the alpha shape theory such that we enforce locality, we show that we can remediate these cache problems; the corresponding code, UnionBall has an apparent (n) behavior over a large range of values of n (up to tens of millions), where n is the number of atoms. As an example, it takes 136 seconds with UnionBall to compute the contribution of each atom to the surface area and volume of a viral capsid with more than five million atoms on a commodity PC. UnionBall includes functions for computing the surface area and volume of the intersection of two, three and four spheres that are fully detailed in an appendix. UnionBall is available as an OpenSource software. PMID:21823134

  13. Improving the spatial resolution in CZT detectors using charge sharing effect and transient signal analysis: Simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaoqing; Cheng, Zeng; Deen, M. Jamal; Peng, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) semiconductor detectors are capable of providing superior energy resolution and three-dimensional position information of gamma ray interactions in a large variety of fields, including nuclear physics, gamma-ray imaging and nuclear medicine. Some dedicated Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems, for example, for breast cancer detection, require higher contrast recovery and more accurate event location compared with a whole-body PET system. The spatial resolution is currently limited by electrode pitch in CZT detectors. A straightforward approach to increase the spatial resolution is by decreasing the detector electrode pitch, but this leads to higher fabrication cost and a larger number of readout channels. In addition, inter-electrode charge spreading can negate any improvement in spatial resolution. In this work, we studied the feasibility of achieving sub-pitch spatial resolution in CZT detectors using two methods: charge sharing effect and transient signal analysis. We noted that their valid ranges of usage were complementary. The dependences of their corresponding valid ranges on electrode design, depth-of-interaction (DOI), voltage bias and signal triggering threshold were investigated. The implementation of these two methods in both pixelated and cross-strip configuration of CZT detectors were discussed. Our results show that the valid range of charge sharing effect increases as a function of DOI, but decreases with increasing gap width and bias voltage. For a CZT detector of 5 mm thickness, 100 μm gap and biased at 400 V, the valid range of charge sharing effect was found to be about 112.3 μm around the gap center. This result complements the valid range of the transient signal analysis within one electrode pitch. For a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of ~17 and preliminary measurements, the sub-pitch spatial resolution is expected to be ~30 μm and ~250 μm for the charge sharing and transient signal analysis methods

  14. Effect of large volume paracentesis on plasma volume--a cause of hypovolemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, H.W.; Rakov, N.E.; Savage, E.; Reynolds, T.B.

    1985-05-01

    Large volume paracentesis, while effectively relieving symptoms in patients with tense ascites, has been generally avoided due to reports of complications attributed to an acute reduction in intravascular volume. Measurements of plasma volume in these subjects have been by indirect methods and have not uniformly confirmed hypovolemia. We have prospectively evaluated 18 patients (20 paracenteses) with tense ascites and peripheral edema due to chronic liver disease undergoing 5 liter paracentesis for relief of symptoms. Plasma volume pre- and postparacentesis was assessed by a /sup 125/I-labeled human serum albumin dilution technique as well as by the change in hematocrit and postural blood pressure difference. No significant change in serum sodium, urea nitrogen, hematocrit or postural systolic blood pressure difference was noted at 24 or 48 hr after paracentesis. Serum creatinine at 24 hr after paracentesis was unchanged but a small but statistically significant increase in serum creatinine was noted at 48 hr postparacentesis. Plasma volume changed -2.7% (n = 6, not statistically significant) during the first 24 hr and -2.8% (n = 12, not statistically significant) during the 0- to 48-hr period. No complications from paracentesis were noted. These results suggest that 5 liter paracentesis for relief of symptoms is safe in patients with tense ascites and peripheral edema from chronic liver disease.

  15. Large volume loss during cleavage formation, Hamburg sequence, Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutner, Edward C.; Charles, Emmanuel G.

    1985-11-01

    Green reduction spots in red slate of the Hamburg sequence exposed near Shartlesville, Pennsylvania, have axial ratios of 1.42:1.0:0.28 on the limbs of near-isoclinal folds and 1.0:0.79:0.41 in fold hinge zones. Conodont cusps and denticles within the reduction spots have been brittlely pulled apart and give independent measures of extension in various directions. Comparison of conodont extensions with reduction spot shapes on limbs and hinges indicates that sedimentary compaction of 44% preceded the tectonic strain associated with cleavage formation. This strain, having identical maximum extensions but greater shortening in fold hinges as compared to limbs, was characterized by 41% extension in X, no change in Y, 50% to 59% shortening in Z, and 29% to 42% tectonic volume loss. The general lack of directed overgrowths on grains reflects the large volume loss and contrasts with other slates, where deformation was an almost constant volume process and extension in X compensated for shortening in Z. *Present address: Department of Geology, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056

  16. Strengthened electric field technique implemented on CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jianqiang; Li, Yulan; Zhang, Lan; Du, Yingshuai; Yang, Yigang; Liu, Yinong; Niu, Libo; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Yilin; Li, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Yanqing; Li, Yuanjing

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a simple electrode structure which only requires a simple readout and is suitable for a large cube CZT crystal, such as a 10×10×10 mm3 crystal. A technique named the strengthened electric field (SEF) is investigated in detail and implemented to improve the performance of the detector. Signal processing was also studied to demonstrate its feasibility to further improve the detector's performance. A SEF line anode (SEFLA) prototype and an SEF point anode (SEFPA) prototype were designed, fabricated and tested. Experimental results demonstrated the effectiveness of the SEF technique. The SEFLA detector achieved an energy resolution of 1.6% (FWHM)@662 keV with 4.0 keV noise (FWHM) and SEFPA 1.8% with 5.0 keV noise. Cathode signal is used to do both the rejection and the correction in the SEFLA prototype. At the cost of detection efficiency, the low energy tail is reduced, while the energy resolution and the P/C ratio are further improved. Possible improvements of the detectors are discussed.

  17. Efficient Large Volume Lentiviral Vector Production Using Flow Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Witting, Scott R.; Li, Lin-Hong; Jasti, Aparna; Allen, Cornell; Cornetta, Kenneth; Brady, James; Shivakumar, Rama

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Lentiviral vectors are beginning to emerge as a viable choice for human gene therapy. Here, we describe a method that combines the convenience of a suspension cell line with a scalable, nonchemically based, and GMP-compliant transfection technique known as flow electroporation (EP). Flow EP parameters for serum-free adapted HEK293FT cells were optimized to limit toxicity and maximize titers. Using a third generation, HIV-based, lentiviral vector system pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis glycoprotein envelope, both small- and large-volume transfections produced titers over 1×108 infectious units/mL. Therefore, an excellent option for implementing large-scale, clinical lentiviral productions is flow EP of suspension cell lines. PMID:21933028

  18. Analysis of volume holographic storage allowing large-angle illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamir, Joseph

    2005-05-01

    Advanced technological developments have stimulated renewed interest in volume holography for applications such as information storage and wavelength multiplexing for communications and laser beam shaping. In these and many other applications, the information-carrying wave fronts usually possess narrow spatial-frequency bands, although they may propagate at large angles with respect to each other or a preferred optical axis. Conventional analytic methods are not capable of properly analyzing the optical architectures involved. For mitigation of the analytic difficulties, a novel approximation is introduced to treat narrow spatial-frequency band wave fronts propagating at large angles. This approximation is incorporated into the analysis of volume holography based on a plane-wave decomposition and Fourier analysis. As a result of the analysis, the recently introduced generalized Bragg selectivity is rederived for this more general case and is shown to provide enhanced performance for the above indicated applications. The power of the new theoretical description is demonstrated with the help of specific examples and computer simulations. The simulations reveal some interesting effects, such as coherent motion blur, that were predicted in an earlier publication.

  19. Modeling the growth of CZT by the EDG process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derby, Jeffrey J.; Gasperino, David; Lun, Lisa; Yeckel, Andrew

    2008-08-01

    The overall goal of this research is to develop and apply computational modeling to better understand the processes used to grow bulk crystals employed in radiation detectors. Specifically, the work discussed here aims at understanding the growth of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), a material of long interest to the detector community. We consider the growth of CZT via gradient freeze processes in electrodynamic multizone furnaces and show how crucible mounting and design are predicted to affect conditions for crystal growth. Analysis of these systems will be essential for for significant materials improvement, i.e., growing larger crystals with superior quality and at a lower cost.

  20. SUSY’s Ladder: Reframing sequestering at Large Volume

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reece, Matthew; Xue, Wei

    2016-04-07

    Theories with approximate no-scale structure, such as the Large Volume Scenario, have a distinctive hierarchy of multiple mass scales in between TeV gaugino masses and the Planck scale, which we call SUSY's Ladder. This is a particular realization of Split Supersymmetry in which the same small parameter suppresses gaugino masses relative to scalar soft masses, scalar soft masses relative to the gravitino mass, and the UV cutoff or string scale relative to the Planck scale. This scenario has many phenomenologically interesting properties, and can avoid dangers including the gravitino problem, flavor problems, and the moduli-induced LSP problem that plague othermore » supersymmetric theories. We study SUSY's Ladder using a superspace formalism that makes the mysterious cancelations in previous computations manifest. This opens the possibility of a consistent effective field theory understanding of the phenomenology of these scenarios, based on power-counting in the small ratio of string to Planck scales. We also show that four-dimensional theories with approximate no-scale structure enforced by a single volume modulus arise only from two special higher-dimensional theories: five-dimensional supergravity and ten-dimensional type IIB supergravity. As a result, this gives a phenomenological argument in favor of ten dimensional ultraviolet physics which is different from standard arguments based on the consistency of superstring theory.« less

  1. Large volume water sprays for dispersing warm fogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, V. W.; Anderson, B. J.; Burns, R. A.; Lala, G. G.; Meyer, M. B.

    A new method for dispersing of warm fogs which impede visibility and alter schedules is described. The method uses large volume recycled water sprays to create curtains of falling drops through which the fog is processed by the ambient wind and spray-induced air flow; the fog droplets are removed by coalescence/rainout. The efficiency of this fog droplet removal process depends on the size spectra of the spray drops and optimum spray drop size is calculated as between 0.3-1.0 mm in diameter. Water spray tests were conducted in order to determine the drop size spectra and temperature response of sprays produced by commercially available fire-fighting nozzles, and nozzle array tests were utilized to study air flow patterns and the thermal properties of the overall system. The initial test data reveal that the fog-dispersal procedure is effective.

  2. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Phase A study of the Large Space Telescope (LST) is reported. The study defines an LST concept based on the broad mission guidelines provided by the Office of Space Science (OSS), the scientific requirements developed by OSS with the scientific community, and an understanding of long range NASA planning current at the time the study was performed. The LST is an unmanned astronomical observatory facility, consisting of an optical telescope assembly (OTA), scientific instrument package (SIP), and a support systems module (SSM). The report consists of five volumes. The report describes the constraints and trade off analyses that were performed to arrive at a reference design for each system and for the overall LST configuration. A low cost design approach was followed in the Phase A study. This resulted in the use of standard spacecraft hardware, the provision for maintenance at the black box level, growth potential in systems designs, and the sharing of shuttle maintenance flights with other payloads.

  3. Large volume water sprays for dispersing warm fogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.; Anderson, B. J.; Burns, R. A.; Lala, G. G.; Meyer, M. B.

    1986-01-01

    A new method for dispersing of warm fogs which impede visibility and alter schedules is described. The method uses large volume recycled water sprays to create curtains of falling drops through which the fog is processed by the ambient wind and spray-induced air flow; the fog droplets are removed by coalescence/rainout. The efficiency of this fog droplet removal process depends on the size spectra of the spray drops and optimum spray drop size is calculated as between 0.3-1.0 mm in diameter. Water spray tests were conducted in order to determine the drop size spectra and temperature response of sprays produced by commercially available fire-fighting nozzles, and nozzle array tests were utilized to study air flow patterns and the thermal properties of the overall system. The initial test data reveal that the fog-dispersal procedure is effective.

  4. Striped Bass, morone saxatilis, egg incubation in large volume jars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, C.J.; Wrege, B.M.; Jeffery, Isely J.

    2010-01-01

    The standard McDonald jar was compared with a large volume jar for striped bass, Morone saxatilis, egg incubation. The McDonald jar measured 16 cm in diameter by 45 cm in height and had a volume of 6 L. The experimental jar measured 0.4 m in diameter by 1.3 m in height and had a volume of 200 L. The hypothesis is that there is no difference in percent survival of fry hatched in experimental jars compared with McDonald jars. Striped bass brood fish were collected from the Coosa River and spawned using the dry spawn method of fertilization. Four McDonald jars were stocked with approximately 150 g of eggs each. Post-hatch survival was estimated at 48, 96, and 144 h. Stocking rates resulted in an average egg loading rate (??1 SE) in McDonald jars of 21.9 ?? 0.03 eggs/mL and in experimental jars of 10.9 ?? 0.57 eggs/mL. The major finding of this study was that average fry survival was 37.3 ?? 4.49% for McDonald jars and 34.2 ?? 3.80% for experimental jars. Although survival in experimental jars was slightly less than in McDonald jars, the effect of container volume on survival to 48 h (F = 6.57; df = 1,5; P > 0.05), 96 h (F = 0.02; df = 1, 4; P > 0.89), and 144 h (F = 3.50; df = 1, 4; P > 0.13) was not statistically significant. Mean survival between replicates ranged from 14.7 to 60.1% in McDonald jars and from 10.1 to 54.4% in experimental jars. No effect of initial stocking rate on survival (t = 0.06; df = 10; P > 0.95) was detected. Experimental jars allowed for incubation of a greater number of eggs in less than half the floor space of McDonald jars. As hatchery production is often limited by space or water supply, experimental jars offer an alternative to extending spawning activities, thereby reducing labor and operations cost. As survival was similar to McDonald jars, the experimental jar is suitable for striped bass egg incubation. ?? Copyright by the World Aquaculture Society 2010.

  5. Volume visualization of multiple alignment of large genomicDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Nameeta; Dillard, Scott E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Hamann, Bernd

    2005-07-25

    Genomes of hundreds of species have been sequenced to date, and many more are being sequenced. As more and more sequence data sets become available, and as the challenge of comparing these massive ''billion basepair DNA sequences'' becomes substantial, so does the need for more powerful tools supporting the exploration of these data sets. Similarity score data used to compare aligned DNA sequences is inherently one-dimensional. One-dimensional (1D) representations of these data sets do not effectively utilize screen real estate. As a result, tools using 1D representations are incapable of providing informatory overview for extremely large data sets. We present a technique to arrange 1D data in 3D space to allow us to apply state-of-the-art interactive volume visualization techniques for data exploration. We demonstrate our technique using multi-millions-basepair-long aligned DNA sequence data and compare it with traditional 1D line plots. The results show that our technique is superior in providing an overview of entire data sets. Our technique, coupled with 1D line plots, results in effective multi-resolution visualization of very large aligned sequence data sets.

  6. Characterization of secondary phases in modified vertical bridgman growth czt

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, Martine

    2009-07-10

    CdZnTe or 'CZT' crystals are highly suitable for use as a room temperature based spectrometer for the detection and characterization of gamma radiation. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. For example, various structural heterogeneities within the CZT crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SP) can have a negative impact on the detector performance. In this study, a CZT material was grown by the modified vertical Bridgman growth (MVB) method with zone leveled growth without excess Te in the melt. Visual observations of material from the growth of this material revealed significant voids and SP. Three samples from this material was analyzed using various analytical techniques to evaluate its electrical properties, purity and detector performance as radiation spectrometers and to determine the morphology, dimension and elemental/structural composition of one of the SP in this material. This material was found to have a high resistivity but poor radiation spectrometer performance. It had SP that were rich in polycrystalline aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), metallic Te and polycrystalline CdZnTe and 15 to 50 {micro}m in diameter. Bulk elemental analyses of sister material from elsewhere in the boule did not contain high levels of Al so there is considerable elemental impurity heterogeneity within the boule from this growth.

  7. Successful pregnancies with directional freezing of large volume buck semen.

    PubMed

    Gacitua, H; Arav, A

    2005-02-01

    Artificial insemination with frozen-thawed buck semen shows variable results which depend on many factors related to semen quality and the cryopreservation processing. We conducted experiments based on a new freezing method, directional freezing, of large volumes (8 ml). In the first experiment semen from three Saanen bucks, ages 1-2-years-old and genetically selected for milk improvement, was frozen individually. Two to three-years-old Saanen females (n = 164) were synchronized with controlled internal drug release (CIDR), pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin (PMSG) and prostaglandin. Double cervical inseminations were performed with frozen-thawed semen and fresh semen as control. In the second experiment we used pooled, washed frozen semen to examine the effect of washed seminal plasma. The motility after washing was 80-90% and after thawing was 55-65% for all bucks. The sperm concentration increased with the collections and the advance into the breeding season from 1.9 x 10(9) to 4.4 x 10(9) cell/ml average. Two inseminations were carried out at 8h intervals. The first insemination was performed at 32 h after CIDR withdrawal with fresh and frozen-thawed semen. Pregnancy rates were assessed by ultrasonography conducted 40 and 90 days post-insemination (from three bucks). Results were 58, 67, 50% with fresh semen, and for frozen semen were 33, 37 and 53%; these results were significantly different in one of the three bucks (P < 0.005). In the second experiment with pooled, washed semen the pregnancy rate was 41.6%, which compared with the average results of the frozen semen in the first experiment 38.9% no significant difference was found. We conclude that freezing buck semen in large volumes (8 ml) is possible. Cryobanking of buck semen will facilitate a genetic breeding program in goats and preservation of biodiversity. Washed semen did not improve the fertility of the semen when Andromed bull extender is used. PMID:15629809

  8. A large volume flat coil probe for oriented membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Gor'kov, Peter L; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Fu, Riqiang; Hu, Jun; Cross, Timothy A; Cotten, Myriam; Brey, William W

    2006-07-01

    15N detection of mechanically aligned membrane proteins benefits from large sample volumes that compensate for the low sensitivity of the observe nuclei, dilute sample preparation, and for the poor filling factor arising from the presence of alignment plates. Use of larger multi-tuned solenoids, however, is limited by wavelength effects that lead to inhomogeneous RF fields across the sample, complicating cross-polarization experiments. We describe a 600 MHz 15N-1H solid-state NMR probe with large (580 mm3) RF solenoid for high-power, multi-pulse sequence experiments, such as polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA). In order to provide efficient detection for 15N, a 4-turn solenoidal sample coil is used that exceeds 0.27 lambda at the 600 MHz 1H resonance. A balanced tuning-matching circuit is employed to preserve RF homogeneity across the sample for adequate magnetization transfer from 1H to 15N. We describe a procedure for optimization of the shorted 1/4 lambda coaxial trap that allows for the sufficiently strong RF fields in both 1H and 15N channels to be achieved within the power limits of 300 W 1H and 1 kW 15N amplifiers. The 8 x 6 x 12 mm solenoid sustains simultaneous B1 irradiation of 100 kHz at 1H frequency and 51 kHz at 15N frequency for at least 5 ms with 265 and 700 W of input power in the respective channels. The probe functionality is demonstrated by 2D 15N-1H PISEMA spectroscopy for two applications at 600 MHz. PMID:16580852

  9. Novel multi-slit large-volume air sampler.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, L M; Decker, H M; Frisque, D E; Phillips, C R; Dahlgren, C M

    1968-08-01

    Scientific investigators who are interested in the various facets of airborne transmission of disease in research laboratories and hospitals need a simple, continuous, high-volume sampling device that will recover a high percentage of viable microorganisms from the atmosphere. Such a device must sample a large quantity of air. It should effect direct transfer of the air into an all-purpose liquid medium in order to collect bacteria, viruses, rickettsia, and fungi, and it should be easy to use. A simple multi-slit impinger sampler that fulfills these requirements has been developed. It operates at an air-sampling rate of 500 liters/min, has a high collection efficiency, functions at a low pressure drop, and, in contrast to some earlier instruments, does not depend upon electrostatic precipitation at high voltages. When compared to the all-glass impinger, the multi-slit impinger sampler collected microbial aerosols of Serratia marcescens at 82% efficiency, and aerosols of Bacillus subtilis var. niger at 78% efficiency. PMID:4970892

  10. New Large Volume Press Beamlines at the Canadian Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, H. J.; Hormes, J.; Lauterjung, J.; Secco, R.; Hallin, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Canadian Light Source, the German Research Centre for Geosciences and the Western University recently agreed to establish two new large volume press beamlines at the Canadian Lightsource. As the first step a 250 tons DIA-LVP will be installed at the IDEAS beamline in 2014. The further development is associated with the construction of a superconducting wiggler beamline at the Brockhouse sector. A 1750 tons DIA LVP will be installed there about 2 years later. Up to the completion of this wiggler beamline the big press will be used for offline high pressure high temperature experiments under simulated Earth's mantle conditions. In addition to X-ray diffraction, all up-to-date high pressure techniques as ultrasonic interferometry, deformation analyses by X-radiography, X-ray densitometry, falling sphere viscosimetry, multi-staging etc. will be available at both beamlines. After the required commissioning the beamlines will be open to the worldwide user community from Geosciences, general material sciences, physics, chemistry, biology etc. based on the evaluation and ranking of the submitted user proposals by an international review panel.

  11. A novel CZT detector using strengthened electric field line anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jian-Qiang; Li, Yu-Lan; Zhang, Lan; Niu, Li-Bo; Jiang, Hao; Li, Yuan-Jing

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we report on the design, simulation and testing of a novel CZT detector with an electrode named the Strengthened Electric Field Line Anode (SEFLA). The Strengthened Electric Field (SEF) technique and Single Polarity Charge Sensing (SPCS) technique are implemented. It could achieve the same performance as Coplanar Grid, Pixel Array CZT detectors but requires only a simple readout system. Geant4, Ansoft Maxwell and a self-developed Induced Current Calculator (ICC) package are used to develop an understanding of how the energy spectrum is formed, and the parameters of the detector are optimized. A prototype is fabricated. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of this design. The test shows that the SEFLA detector achieves a FWHM of 6.0% @59.5 keV and 1.6% @662 keV, which matches well with the simulations.

  12. Performance Improvement of CZT Detectors by Line Electrode Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jun; Liu, Yanqing; Li, Yulan; Li, Yuanjing; Liu, Yinong; Fu, Jianqiang; Jiang, Hao; Deng, Zhi; Xue, Tao; Luo, Jie

    2014-02-01

    Due to their high efficiency and high energy resolution, applications of CdZnTe (CZT) detectors have spread into many areas such as room temperature detectors. To improve the performance and decrease the effects of hole trapping and crystal non-uniformity, special contact geometries are applied to the detectors, such as Coplanar, 3D pixel, Frisch grid, Capture and so on. In this paper, we introduce a new line electrode geometry to greatly improve CZT detector performance. A line anode collects electrons, while a planar cathode collects holes. Due to the low electric field close to the cathode and the low hole μτ value, this geometry is also a single charge sensitive structure. The calculated energy resolution of a 20 mm x 20 mm x 15 mm detector could be improved up to 1.51% for 662 keV gamma rays. Both simulations and experimental results are presented here.

  13. Resonant RF network antennas for large-area and large-volume inductively coupled plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenstein, Ch; Guittienne, Ph; Howling, A. A.

    2013-10-01

    Large-area and large-volume radio frequency (RF) plasmas are produced by different arrangements of an elementary electrical mesh consisting of two conductors interconnected by a capacitor at each end. The obtained cylindrical and planar RF networks are resonant and generate very high RF currents. The input impedance of such RF networks shows the behaviour of an RLC parallel resonance equivalent circuit. The real impedance at the resonance frequency is of great advantage for power matching compared with conventional inductive devices. Changes in the RLC equivalent circuit during the observed E-H transition will allow future interpretation of the plasma-antenna coupling. Furthermore, high power transfer efficiencies are found during inductively coupled plasma (ICP) operation. For the planar RF antenna network it is shown that the E-H transition occurs simultaneously over the entire antenna. The underlying physics of these discharges induced by the resonant RF network antenna is found to be identical to that of the conventional ICP devices described in the literature. The resonant RF network antenna is a new versatile plasma source, which can be adapted to applications in industry and research.

  14. The 1980 Large space systems technology. Volume 2: Base technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriver, F., III (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    Technology pertinent to large antenna systems, technology related to large space platform systems, and base technology applicable to both antenna and platform systems are discussed. Design studies, structural testing results, and theoretical applications are presented with accompanying validation data. A total systems approach including controls, platforms, and antennas is presented as a cohesive, programmatic plan for large space systems.

  15. Performance of large electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Kaw, P. K.; Singh, R.

    2014-03-15

    This paper describes an in-house designed large Electron Energy Filter (EEF) utilized in the Large Volume Plasma Device (LVPD) [S. K. Mattoo, V. P. Anita, L. M. Awasthi, and G. Ravi, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 3864 (2001)] to secure objectives of (a) removing the presence of remnant primary ionizing energetic electrons and the non-thermal electrons, (b) introducing a radial gradient in plasma electron temperature without greatly affecting the radial profile of plasma density, and (c) providing a control on the scale length of gradient in electron temperature. A set of 19 independent coils of EEF make a variable aspect ratio, rectangular solenoid producing a magnetic field (B{sub x}) of 100 G along its axis and transverse to the ambient axial field (B{sub z} ∼ 6.2 G) of LVPD, when all its coils are used. Outside the EEF, magnetic field reduces rapidly to 1 G at a distance of 20 cm from the center of the solenoid on either side of target and source plasma. The EEF divides LVPD plasma into three distinct regions of source, EEF and target plasma. We report that the target plasma (n{sub e} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} and T{sub e} ∼ 2 eV) has no detectable energetic electrons and the radial gradients in its electron temperature can be established with scale length between 50 and 600 cm by controlling EEF magnetic field. Our observations reveal that the role of the EEF magnetic field is manifested by the energy dependence of transverse electron transport and enhanced transport caused by the plasma turbulence in the EEF plasma.

  16. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 3: Optical telescope assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the optical telescope assembly for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The systems considerations are based on mission-related parameters and optical equipment requirements. Information is included on: (1) structural design and analysis, (2) thermal design, (3) stabilization and control, (4) alignment, focus, and figure control, (5) electronic subsystem, and (6) scientific instrument design.

  17. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 4: Scientific instrument package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design and characteristics of the scientific instrument package for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The subjects include: (1) general scientific objectives, (2) package system analysis, (3) scientific instrumentation, (4) imaging photoelectric sensors, (5) environmental considerations, and (6) reliability and maintainability.

  18. RADON DIAGNOSTIC MEASUREMENT GUIDANCE FOR LARGE BUILDINGS - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development of radon diagnostic procedures and mitigation strategies applicable to a variety of large non-residential buildings commonly found in Florida. The investigations document and evaluate the nature of radon occurrence and entry mechanisms for rad...

  19. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 5: Support systems module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the support systems module for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The following systems and described: (1) thermal control, (2) electrical, (3) communication and data landing, (4) attitude control system, and (5) structural features. Analyses of maintainability and reliability considerations are included.

  20. Detailed Studies of Pixelated CZT Detectors Grown with the Modified Horizontal Bridgman Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, I.; Krawczynski, H.; Burger, A.; Guo, M.; Groza, M.

    2007-01-01

    The detector material Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) achieves excellent spatial resolution and good energy resolution over a broad energy range, several keV up to some MeV. Presently, there are two main methods to grow CZT crystals, the Modified High-Pressure Bridgman (MHB) and the High-Pressure Bridgman (HPB) process. The study presented in this paper is based on MHB CZT substrates from the company Orbotech Medical Solutions Ltd. [Orbotech Medical Solutions Ltd., 10 Plaut St., Park Rabin, P.O. Box 2489, Rehovot, Israel, 76124]. Former studies have shown that high-work-function materials on the cathode side reduce the leakage current and, therefore, improve the energy resolution at lower energies. None of the studies have emphasized on the anode contact material. Therefore, we present in this paper the result of a detailed study in which for the first time the cathode material was kept constant and the anode material was varied. We used four different anode materials: Indium, Titanium, Chromium and Gold, metals with work-functions between 4.1 eV and 5.1 eV. The detector size was 2.0 x 2.0 x 0.5 cu cm with 8 x 8 pixels and a pitch of 2.46 mm. The best performance was achieved with the low-work-function materials Indium and Titanium with energy resolutions of 2.0 keV (at 59 keV) and 1.9 keV (at 122 keV) for Titanium and 2.1 keV (at 59 keV) and 2.9 keV (at 122 keV) for Indium. Taking into account the large pixel pitch of 2.46 mm, these resolutions are very competitive in comparison to those achieved with detectors made of material produced with the more expensive conventional HPB method. We present a detailed comparison of our detector response with 3D simulations. The latter comparisons allow us to determine the mobility-lifetime-products (mu tau-products) for electrons and holes. Finally, we evaluated the temperature dependency of the detector performance and ls-products. For many applications temperature dependence is important, therefore, we extended the scope of

  1. CZT detectors for high-energy flare spectroscopy: the Room Temperature Semiconductor Spectrometer (RTeSS) on the JAWSAT satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestrand, Thomas W.; Cutlip, H. H.; Forrest, D. J.; Levenson, Ken A.; Marci, J. R.; Ryan, James M.

    1998-07-01

    We report on the design and construction of a solar flare spectrometer that will employ four 15 X 15 X 15 mm CZT detectors with coplanar electrodes. The compact spectrometer, which will provide measurements in the 40 - 800 keV energy range, is being constructed for flight on the Joint Air Force Academy/Weber State University Satellite (JAWSAT). JAWSAT is scheduled for a Minuteman II launch into a 650 km sun-synchronous orbit early during the next solar maximum. The terminator orbit will allow our Room Temperature Semiconductor Spectrometer (RTeSS) to monitor solar hard x-ray and gamma-ray emission nearly continuously during the 23rd solar sunspot maximum. The primary scientific objective of the RTeSS is measurement of the broad line complex near 450 keV that is generated in solar flare spectra by the interaction of energetic alpha particles with helium in the solar atmosphere. The RTeSS spectral resolution of approximately 4% FWHM at 662 keV is well matched to the line splitting expected for likely alpha particle angular distributions and should allow us to place important constraints on the acceleration and the transport of flare ions. The primary technological objective of the RTeSS program is to test the feasibility of using CZT detectors for the construction of solar flare spectrometers that are capable of high resolution observations when operating at room temperature. If successful in low earth orbit, CZT solar flare spectrometers could lead to significant savings in mass, volume, and power consumption over conventional high-resolution spectrometers.

  2. Spectroscopic CZT detectors development for x- and gamma-ray imaging instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadrini, Egidio M.; Uslenghi, Michela; Alderighi, Monica; Casini, Fabio; D'Angelo, Sergio; Fiorini, Mauro; La Palombara, Nicola; Mancini, Marcello; Monti, Serena; Bazzano, Angela; Di Cosimo, Sergio; Frutti, Massimo; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Ubertini, Pietro; Guadalupi, Giuseppe M.; Sassi, Matteo; Negri, Barbara

    2007-09-01

    In the context of R&D studies financed by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), a feasibility study to evaluate the Italian Industry interest in medium-large scale production of enhanced CZT detectors has been performed by an Italian Consortium. The R&D investment aims at providing in-house source of high quality solid state spectrometers for Space Astrophysics applications. As a possible spin-off industrial applications to Gamma-ray devices for non-destructive inspections in medical, commercial and security fields have been considered by ASI. The short term programme mainly consists of developing proprietary procedures for 2-3" CZT crystals growth, including bonding and contact philosophy, and a newly designed low-power electronics readout chain. The prototype design and breadboarding is based on a fast signal AD conversion with the target in order to perform a new run for an already existing low-power (<0.7 mW/pixel) ASIC. The prototype also provides digital photon energy reconstruction with particular care for multiple events and polarimetry evaluations. Scientific requirement evaluations for Space Astrophysics Satellite applications have been carried out in parallel, targeted to contribute to the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 Announcement of Opportunity. Detailed accommodation studies are undergoing, as part of this programme, to size a "Large area arcsecond angular resolution Imager" for the Gamma Ray Imager satellite (Knödlseder et al., this conference).and a new Gamma-ray Wide Field Camera for the "EDGE" proposal (Piro et al., this conference). Finally, an extended market study for cost analysis evaluation in view of the foreseen massive detector production has been performed.

  3. Radiation damage effects in CZT drift strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Joergensen, Carl; Korsbech, Uffe; Jensen, H. J.

    2003-03-01

    At DSRI, in collaboration with the cyclotron facility at Copenhagen University Hospital, we have performed a study of radiation effects exposing a 2.7 mm thick CZT drift strip detector to 30 MeV protons. The detector characteristics were evaluated after exposure to a number of dose loads in the range from 2*108 to 60*108 p+/cm2. Even for the highest dose loads, which had a dramatic effect on the spectroscopic performance, we were able to recover the detectors after an appropriate annealing procedure. The radiation damage was studied as function of depth inside the detector material. A numerical model that emulates the physical processes of the charge transport in the CZT detector was used to derive the charge trapping parameter , μτe (the product of charge mobility and trapping time) as function of dose. The analysis showed that the electron trapping increased proportional with the proton dose. The radiation contribution to the electron trapping was found to obey the following relation: (μτe)-1rad =(2.5±0.2)*10-7*Φ (V/cm2) with the proton fluence, Φ in p+/cm2. The trapping depth dependence, however, did not agree well the damage profile calculated using the standard Monte Carlo simulations, TRIM for the proton induced radiation effects. The present results suggest that proton induced nuclear reactions contribute significantly to the radiation damage. Further work will elaborate on these effects. The detector energy resolution was investigated as function of proton dose. It was found that the observed degradation is well explained by the decrease of μτe when the fluctuations of the electron path length are taken into account. The proton irradiation produced In meta stable isotopes in the CZT material. Their decay and production yield as function of depth were analyzed.

  4. Growth of CZT using additionally zone-refined raw materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuteson, David J.; Berghmans, Andre; Kahler, David; Wagner, Brian; King, Matthew; Mclaughlin, Sean; Bolotnikov, Aleksey; James, Ralph; Singh, Narsingh B.

    2012-10-01

    Results will be presented for the growth of CdZnTe by the low pressure Bridgman growth technique. To decrease deeplevel trapping and improve detector performance, high purity commercial raw materials will be further zone refined to reduce impurities. The purified materials will then be compounded into a charge for crystal growth. The crystals will be grown in the programmable multi-zone furnace (PMZF), which was designed and built at Northrop Grumman's Bethpage facility to grow CZT on Space Shuttle missions. Results of the purification and crystal growth will be presented as well as characterization of crystal quality and detector performance.

  5. Zinc mapping in THM grown detector grade CZT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, U. N.; Weiler, S.; Stein, J.; Cui, Y.; Groza, M.; Buliga, V.; Burger, A.

    2012-05-01

    We have employed photoluminescence mapping at room temperature of detector grade CZT grown by modified Traveling Heater Method (THM) technique and estimated the spatial variation of Zn composition. The composition was found to be fairly uniform over the major portion of the ingot length except near the conical part of the ingot and the upper part of the ingot. Unlike Bridgman growth technique, no detectable striations were observed. The composition was within ±0.3% over the length little more than 4 cm of the ingot. The growth interface revealed from the composition mapping was found to be reasonably flat.

  6. Real-time visualization of large volume datasets on standard PC hardware.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kai; Yang, Jie; Zhu, Y M

    2008-05-01

    In medical area, interactive three-dimensional volume visualization of large volume datasets is a challenging task. One of the major challenges in graphics processing unit (GPU)-based volume rendering algorithms is the limited size of texture memory imposed by current GPU architecture. We attempt to overcome this limitation by rendering only visible parts of large CT datasets. In this paper, we present an efficient, high-quality volume rendering algorithm using GPUs for rendering large CT datasets at interactive frame rates on standard PC hardware. We subdivide the volume dataset into uniform sized blocks and take advantage of combinations of early ray termination, empty-space skipping and visibility culling to accelerate the whole rendering process and render visible parts of volume data. We have implemented our volume rendering algorithm for a large volume data of 512 x 304 x 1878 dimensions (visible female), and achieved real-time performance (i.e., 3-4 frames per second) on a Pentium 4 2.4GHz PC equipped with NVIDIA Geforce 6600 graphics card ( 256 MB video memory). This method can be used as a 3D visualization tool of large CT datasets for doctors or radiologists. PMID:18243401

  7. Special Properties of Coherence Scanning Interferometers for large Measurement Volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, W.

    2011-08-01

    In contrast to many other optical methods the uncertainty of Coherence Scanning Interferometer (CSI) in vertical direction is independent from the field of view. Therefore CSIs are ideal instruments for measuring 3D-profiles of larger areas (36×28mm2, e.g.) with high precision. This is of advantage for the determination of form parameters like flatness, parallelism and steps heights within a short time. In addition, using a telecentric beam path allows measurements of deep lying surfaces (<70mm) and the determination of form parameters with large step-heights. The lateral and spatial resolution, however, are reduced. In this presentation different metrological characteristics together with their potential errors are analyzed for large-scale measuring CSIs. Therefore these instruments are ideal tools in quality control for good/bad selections, e.g. The consequences for the practical use in industry and for standardization are discussed by examples of workpieces of automotive suppliers or from the steel industry.

  8. Design Studies of a CZT-based Detector Combined with a Pixel-Geometry-Matching Collimator for SPECT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Weng, Fenghua; Bagchi, Srijeeta; Huang, Qiu; Seo, Youngho

    2013-10-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) suffers limited efficiency due to the need for collimators. Collimator properties largely decide the data statistics and image quality. Various materials and configurations of collimators have been investigated in many years. The main thrust of our study is to evaluate the design of pixel-geometry-matching collimators to investigate their potential performances using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations. Here, a pixel-geometry-matching collimator is defined as a collimator which is divided into the same number of pixels as the detector's and the center of each pixel in the collimator is a one-to-one correspondence to that in the detector. The detector is made of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT), which is one of the most promising materials for applications to detect hard X-rays and γ-rays due to its ability to obtain good energy resolution and high light output at room temperature. For our current project, we have designed a large-area, CZT-based gamma camera (20.192 cm×20.192 cm) with a small pixel pitch (1.60 mm). The detector is pixelated and hence the intrinsic resolution can be as small as the size of the pixel. Materials of collimator, collimator hole geometry, detection efficiency, and spatial resolution of the CZT detector combined with the pixel-matching collimator were calculated and analyzed under different conditions. From the simulation studies, we found that such a camera using rectangular holes has promising imaging characteristics in terms of spatial resolution, detection efficiency, and energy resolution. PMID:25378898

  9. Design Studies of a CZT-based Detector Combined with a Pixel-Geometry-Matching Collimator for SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Fenghua; Bagchi, Srijeeta; Huang, Qiu; Seo, Youngho

    2014-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) suffers limited efficiency due to the need for collimators. Collimator properties largely decide the data statistics and image quality. Various materials and configurations of collimators have been investigated in many years. The main thrust of our study is to evaluate the design of pixel-geometry-matching collimators to investigate their potential performances using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations. Here, a pixel-geometry-matching collimator is defined as a collimator which is divided into the same number of pixels as the detector’s and the center of each pixel in the collimator is a one-to-one correspondence to that in the detector. The detector is made of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT), which is one of the most promising materials for applications to detect hard X-rays and γ-rays due to its ability to obtain good energy resolution and high light output at room temperature. For our current project, we have designed a large-area, CZT-based gamma camera (20.192 cm×20.192 cm) with a small pixel pitch (1.60 mm). The detector is pixelated and hence the intrinsic resolution can be as small as the size of the pixel. Materials of collimator, collimator hole geometry, detection efficiency, and spatial resolution of the CZT detector combined with the pixel-matching collimator were calculated and analyzed under different conditions. From the simulation studies, we found that such a camera using rectangular holes has promising imaging characteristics in terms of spatial resolution, detection efficiency, and energy resolution. PMID:25378898

  10. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Joseph D.; Baird, James K.; Coates, Leighton; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M.; Hodge, Teresa A.; Huang, Sijay

    2015-03-30

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for the growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. We report that these include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations.

  11. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Ng, Joseph D; Baird, James K; Coates, Leighton; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M; Hodge, Teresa A; Huang, Sijay

    2015-04-01

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for the growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. These include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations. PMID:25849493

  12. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ng, Joseph D.; Baird, James K.; Coates, Leighton; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M.; Hodge, Teresa A.; Huang, Sijay

    2015-03-30

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for themore » growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. We report that these include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations.« less

  13. Property Improvement in CZT via Modeling and Processing Innovations . Te-particles in vertical gradient freeze CZT: Size and Spatial Distributions and Constitutional Supercooling

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Bliss, Mary; Riley, Brian J.; Stave, Jean A.

    2014-10-01

    A section of a vertical gradient freeze CZT boule approximately 2100-mm3 with a planar area of 300-mm2 was prepared and examined using transmitted IR microscopy at various magnifications to determine the three-dimensional spatial and size distributions of Te-particles over large longitudinal and radial length scales. The boule section was approximately 50-mm wide by 60-mm in length by 7-mm thick and was doubly polished for TIR work. Te-particles were imaged through the thickness using extended focal imaging to locate the particles in thickness planes spaced 15-µm apart and then in plane of the image using xy-coordinates of the particle center of mass so that a true three dimensional particle map was assembled for a 1-mm by 45-mm longitudinal strip and for a 1-mm by 50-mm radial strip. Te-particle density distributions were determined as a function of longitudinal and radial positions in these strips, and treating the particles as vertices of a network created a 3D image of the particle spatial distribution. Te-particles exhibited a multi-modal log-normal size density distribution that indicated a slight preference for increasing size with longitudinal growth time, while showing a pronounced cellular network structure throughout the boule that can be correlated to dislocation network sizes in CZT. Higher magnification images revealed a typical Rayleigh-instability pearl string morphology with large and small satellite droplets. This study includes solidification experiments in small crucibles of 30:70 mixtures of Cd:Te to reduce the melting point below 1273 K (1000°C). These solidification experiments were performed over a wide range of cooling rates and clearly demonstrated a growth instability with Te-particle capture that is suggested to be responsible for one of the peaks in the size distribution using size discrimination visualization. The results are discussed with regard to a manifold Te-particle genesis history as 1) Te

  14. Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors

    DOEpatents

    Paulus, Michael J.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Simpson, Michael L.; Britton, Jr., Charles L.

    2002-01-01

    A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a tracer compound tagged with a .gamma.-ray emitting nuclide; directing an x-ray source toward the subject; rotating the x-ray source around the subject; emitting x-rays during the rotating step; rotating a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) two-sided detector on an opposite side of the subject from the source; simultaneously detecting the position and energy of each pulsed x-ray and each emitted .gamma.-ray captured by the CZT detector; recording data for each position and each energy of each the captured x-ray and .gamma.-ray; and, creating CT and SPECT images from the recorded data. The transmitted energy levels of the x-rays lower are biased lower than energy levels of the .gamma.-rays. The x-ray source is operated in a continuous mode. The method can be implemented at ambient temperatures.

  15. Radiation from Large Gas Volumes and Heat Exchange in Steam Boiler Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, A. N.

    2015-09-15

    Radiation from large cylindrical gas volumes is studied as a means of simulating the flare in steam boiler furnaces. Calculations of heat exchange in a furnace by the zonal method and by simulation of the flare with cylindrical gas volumes are described. The latter method is more accurate and yields more reliable information on heat transfer processes taking place in furnaces.

  16. Sand tank experiment of a large volume biodiesel spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, K.; Mayer, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    Although petroleum hydrocarbon releases in the subsurface have been well studied, the impacts of subsurface releases of highly degradable alternative fuels, including biodiesel, are not as well understood. One concern is the generation of CH4­ which may lead to explosive conditions in underground structures. In addition, the biodegradation of biodiesel consumes O2 that would otherwise be available for the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons that may be present at a site. Until now, biodiesel biodegradation in the vadose zone has not been examined in detail, despite being critical to understanding the full impact of a release. This research involves a detailed study of a laboratory release of 80 L of biodiesel applied at surface into a large sandtank to examine the progress of biodegradation reactions. The experiment will monitor the onset and temporal evolution of CH4 generation to provide guidance for site monitoring needs following a biodiesel release to the subsurface. Three CO2 and CH4 flux chambers have been deployed for long term monitoring of gas emissions. CO2 fluxes have increased in all chambers over the 126 days since the start of the experiment. The highest CO2 effluxes are found directly above the spill and have increased from < 0.5 μmol m-2 s-1 to ~3.8 μmol m-2 s-1, indicating an increase in microbial activity. There were no measurable CH4 fluxes 126 days into the experiment. Sensors were emplaced to continuously measure O2, CO2, moisture content, matric potential, EC, and temperature. In response to the release, CO2 levels have increased across all sensors, from an average value of 0.1% to 0.6% 126 days after the start of the experiment, indicating the rapid onset of biodegradation. The highest CO2 values observed from samples taken in the gas ports were 2.5%. Average O2 concentrations have decreased from 21% to 17% 126 days after the start of the experiment. O2 levels in the bottom central region of the sandtank declined to approximately 12%.

  17. Large-volume high-resolution cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors: recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Awadalla, S. A.; Iniewski, K.; Lu, P. H.; Harris, F.; Mackenzie, J.; Hasanen, T.; Chen, W.; Redden, R.; Bindley, G.; Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Luke, P.; Amman, M.; Lee, J. S.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; James, R. B.

    2007-09-01

    The excellent room temperature spectral performance of cadmium zinc telluride detectors grown via the Traveling Heater Method (THM) makes this approach suitable for the mass deployment of radiation detectors for applications in homeland security and medical imaging. This paper reports our progress in fabricating thicker and larger area detectors from THM grown CZT. We discuss the performance of such 20x20x10 mm 3, and 10x10x10 mm 3 monolithic pixellated detectors and virtual Frisch-Grid 4x4x12 mm3 devices, and describe the various physical properties of the materials.

  18. Center-stabilized Yang-Mills Theory:Confinement and Large N Volume Independence

    SciTech Connect

    Unsal, Mithat; Yaffe, Laurence G.; /Washington U., Seattle

    2008-03-21

    We examine a double trace deformation of SU(N) Yang-Mills theory which, for large N and large volume, is equivalent to unmodified Yang-Mills theory up to O(1/N{sup 2}) corrections. In contrast to the unmodified theory, large N volume independence is valid in the deformed theory down to arbitrarily small volumes. The double trace deformation prevents the spontaneous breaking of center symmetry which would otherwise disrupt large N volume independence in small volumes. For small values of N, if the theory is formulated on R{sup 3} x S{sup 1} with a sufficiently small compactification size L, then an analytic treatment of the non-perturbative dynamics of the deformed theory is possible. In this regime, we show that the deformed Yang-Mills theory has a mass gap and exhibits linear confinement. Increasing the circumference L or number of colors N decreases the separation of scales on which the analytic treatment relies. However, there are no order parameters which distinguish the small and large radius regimes. Consequently, for small N the deformed theory provides a novel example of a locally four-dimensional pure gauge theory in which one has analytic control over confinement, while for large N it provides a simple fully reduced model for Yang-Mills theory. The construction is easily generalized to QCD and other QCD-like theories.

  19. Necessary conditions on Calabi-Yau manifolds for large volume vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, James; He, Yang-Hui; Jejjala, Vishnu; Jurke, Benjamin; Nelson, Brent; Simón, Joan

    2012-11-01

    We describe an efficient, construction independent, algorithmic test to determine whether Calabi-Yau threefolds admit a structure compatible with the large volume moduli stabilization scenario of type IIB superstring theory. Using the algorithm, we scan complete intersection and toric hypersurface Calabi-Yau threefolds with 2≤h1,1≤4 and deduce that 418 among 4434 manifolds have a large volume limit with a single large four-cycle. We describe major extensions to this survey, which are currently underway.

  20. Epitaxial growth of CZT(S,Se) on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Bojarczuk, Nestor A.; Gershon, Talia S.; Guha, Supratik; Shin, Byungha; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-15

    Techniques for epitaxial growth of CZT(S,Se) materials on Si are provided. In one aspect, a method of forming an epitaxial kesterite material is provided which includes the steps of: selecting a Si substrate based on a crystallographic orientation of the Si substrate; forming an epitaxial oxide interlayer on the Si substrate to enhance wettability of the epitaxial kesterite material on the Si substrate, wherein the epitaxial oxide interlayer is formed from a material that is lattice-matched to Si; and forming the epitaxial kesterite material on a side of the epitaxial oxide interlayer opposite the Si substrate, wherein the epitaxial kesterite material includes Cu, Zn, Sn, and at least one of S and Se, and wherein a crystallographic orientation of the epitaxial kesterite material is based on the crystallographic orientation of the Si substrate. A method of forming an epitaxial kesterite-based photovoltaic device and an epitaxial kesterite-based device are also provided.

  1. Hybrid contacts for CZT virtual Frisch-grid detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarda, G. S.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Chan, W.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2011-09-01

    In our previous design of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, the charge drift-lines can be terminated at the side surfaces before the carriers reach the collecting anode; this results in a loss of signal from the interacting events near the detector's edges. Here, we describe our new design for the anode contact that reduces these edge effects by focusing the electric field towards the detectors' central axes. Four detectors were fabricated with the new hybrid anode contact, and their performances were evaluated and compared to those from the previous design for our virtual Frisch-grid detectors. The results obtained for all four showed similar improvement: therefore, we illustrate them with the findings from one detector.

  2. Energy resolution improvement in room-temperature CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachers, Y.; Stewart, D. Y.

    2007-12-01

    We present methods to improve the energy resolution of single channel, room-temperature Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detectors. A new preamplifier design enables the acquisition of the actual transient current from the crystals and straightforward data analysis methods yield unprecedented energy resolution for our test-detectors. These consist of an eV-CAPture Plus crystal as standard and 1 cm cube Frisch collar crystals created in-house from low-grade coplanar grid detectors. Energy resolutions of 1.9% for our collar detectors and 0.8% for the eV crystal at 662 keV were obtained. The latter compares favourably to the best existing energy resolution results from pixel detectors.

  3. Studies of Bulk Properties of CZT and CMT Crystals for X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Detection at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egarievwe, S. U.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Roy, U. N.; Babalola, S. O.; Kassu, A.; Jow, J.; Camarda, G.; Fochuk, P.; Chan, W.; Kim, K. H.; Stein, J.; James, R. B.; Burger, A.

    2010-10-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) and Cadmium Manganese Telluride (CMT) crystals have emerged as promising advanced materials for X-ray and gamma-ray detection at ambient temperature. An understanding of the bulk properties in relation to energy resolution and device performance has led to the development of CZT into commercial devices, and is contributing to the improvement of CMT. The key detector attributes are large band-gap energy (˜1.6 eV, tunable by Zn or Mn concentration), high atomic number, and high density (˜6 g/cm^3). The techniques used in this study include infrared transmission microscopy, synchrotron X-ray diffraction topography, micro-scale X-ray mapping, and Pockels effect. We found that point defects and Te inclusions in CZT and CMT can trap the charge carriers generated by the absorption of X-rays, gamma-rays, and charged particles. We propose the use of thermal annealing and doping techniques to eliminate the deleterious effects caused by Te inclusions.

  4. Endoclips vs large or small-volume epinephrine in peptic ulcer recurrent bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ljubicic, Neven; Budimir, Ivan; Biscanin, Alen; Nikolic, Marko; Supanc, Vladimir; Hrabar, Davor; Pavic, Tajana

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare the recurrent bleeding after endoscopic injection of different epinephrine volumes with hemoclips in patients with bleeding peptic ulcer. METHODS: Between January 2005 and December 2009, 150 patients with gastric or duodenal bleeding ulcer with major stigmata of hemorrhage and nonbleeding visible vessel in an ulcer bed (Forrest IIa) were included in the study. Patients were randomized to receive a small-volume epinephrine group (15 to 25 mL injection group; Group 1, n = 50), a large-volume epinephrine group (30 to 40 mL injection group; Group 2, n = 50) and a hemoclip group (Group 3, n = 50). The rate of recurrent bleeding, as the primary outcome, was compared between the groups of patients included in the study. Secondary outcomes compared between the groups were primary hemostasis rate, permanent hemostasis, need for emergency surgery, 30 d mortality, bleeding-related deaths, length of hospital stay and transfusion requirements. RESULTS: Initial hemostasis was obtained in all patients. The rate of early recurrent bleeding was 30% (15/50) in the small-volume epinephrine group (Group 1) and 16% (8/50) in the large-volume epinephrine group (Group 2) (P = 0.09). The rate of recurrent bleeding was 4% (2/50) in the hemoclip group (Group 3); the difference was statistically significant with regard to patients treated with either small-volume or large-volume epinephrine solution (P = 0.0005 and P = 0.045, respectively). Duration of hospital stay was significantly shorter among patients treated with hemoclips than among patients treated with epinephrine whereas there were no differences in transfusion requirement or even 30 d mortality between the groups. CONCLUSION: Endoclip is superior to both small and large volume injection of epinephrine in the prevention of recurrent bleeding in patients with peptic ulcer. PMID:22611315

  5. Commonalities and Contrasts in Location, Morphology and Emplacement of Large-volume Evolved Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagall, A. S.; Gregg, T. K.

    2008-12-01

    Observations of active dacite domes and evolved (SiO2 wt.% >65) plinian-style eruptions are considered to reveal typical behaviors of Si-rich volcanic systems. However, despite lack of mention in modern volcanology textbooks, large-volume (>4 km3) evolved lava flows exist globally. These large- volume evolved lava flows have many characteristics in common regardless of location and precise tectonic setting: they are associated with other large-volume deposits (both lava flow units and ignimbrites); are commonly found with large silicic systems; regionally, they are associated with bimodal volcanism and eruption of these large-volume evolved flows does not generate a caldera. Large-volume evolved lava flows have low aspect ratios, tend to be uniform in thickness from the vent to the distal margins and abruptly decrease in thickness at the flow front where they may form enormous pahoehoe-like lobes. A lack of pyroclastic textures such as bubble wall shards, pumice fragments, broken phenocrysts and lithics is taken as evidence for their lava flow origin rather than an ignimbrite origin despite their high SiO2 contents. Presence of a pervasive basal breccia and lobate distal margins also suggest a lava flow emplacement origin, that only the most intensely rheomorphic ignimbrite could potentially mimic. Our own studies and those from the literature suggest high eruption temperatures and peralkaline chemistries may be responsible for producing unusually low viscosities to account for large lateral extents; emplacement via fissure vents and insulations of the flow may also be key in attaining great volumes.

  6. Development of Tiled Imaging CZT Detectors for Sensitive Wide-Field Hard X-Ray Surveys to EXIST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J.; Hong, J.; Allen, B.; Barthelmy, S.; Baker, R.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the proposed EXIST mission, a "medium-class" space observatory to survey black holes and the Early Universe proposed to the 2010 NAS/NRC Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey, we have developed the first "large" area 256 sq cm close-tiled (0.6 mm gaps) hard X-ray (20-600 keV) imaging detector employing pixelated (2.5 mm) CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, each 2 x 2 x 0.5 cubic cm. We summarize the design, development and operation of this detector array (8 x 8 CZTs) and its performance as the imager for a coded aperture telescope on a high altitude (40 km) balloon flight in October. 2009, as the ProtoEX1STl payload. We then outline our current development of a second-generation imager, ProtcEXIST2. with 0.6 mm pixels on a 32 x 32 array on each CZT, and how it will lead to the ultimate imaging system needed for EXIST. Other applications of this technology will also be mentioned.

  7. Development of tiled imaging CZT detectors for sensitive wide-field hard X-ray surveys to EXIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, J.; Hong, J.; Allen, B.; Barthelmy, S.; Baker, R.

    2011-10-01

    Motivated by the proposed EXIST mission, a "medium-class" space observatory to survey black holes and the Early Universe proposed to the 2010 NAS/NRC Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey, we have developed the first "large" area 256 cm 2 close-tiled (0.6 mm gaps) hard X-ray (20-600 keV) imaging detector employing pixelated (2.5 mm) CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, each 2×2×0.5 cm 3. We summarize the design, development and operation of this detector array (8×8 CZTs) and its performance as the imager for a coded aperture telescope on a high altitude (40 km) balloon flight in October, 2009, as the ProtoEXIST1 payload. We then outline our current development of a second-generation imager, ProtoEXIST2, with 0.6 mm pixels on a 32×32 array on each CZT, and how it will lead to the ultimate imaging system needed for EXIST. Other applications of this technology will also be mentioned.

  8. Growth of detector-grade CZT by Traveling Heater Method (THM): An advancement

    SciTech Connect

    ROY, U.N.; JAMES, R.; WEILER, S.; STEIN, J.; GROZA, M.; BURGER, A.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CAMARDA, G.S.; HOSSAIN, A.; YANG, G.

    2011-04-25

    In this present work we report the growth of Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te doped with In by a modified THM technique. It has been demonstrated that by controlling the microscopically flat growth interface, the size distribution and concentration can be drastically reduced in the as-grown ingots. This results in as-grown detector-grade CZT by the THM technique. The three-dimensional size distribution and concentrations of Te inclusions/precipitations were studied. The size distributions of the Te precipitations/inclusions were observed to be below the 10-{micro}m range with the total concentration less than 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}. The relatively low value of Te inclusions/precipitations results in excellent charge transport properties of our as-grown samples. The ({mu}{tau}){sub e} values for different as-grown samples varied between 6-20 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/V. The as-grown samples also showed fairly good detector response with resolution of {approx}1.5%, 2.7% and about 3.8% at 662 keV for quasi-hemispherical geometry for detector volumes of 0.18 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3} and 4.2 cm{sup 3}, respectively.

  9. SIDERALE plus BIT: a small stratospheric balloon CZT based experiment at Polar Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroli, Ezio; Alderighi, Monica; Quadrini, Egidio M.; Cortiglioni, Stefano; Ronchi, Enrico; Miatto, Paolo; Del Sordo, Stefano; Natalucci, Lorenzo

    SIDERALE was a small experiment hosted as a piggy back payload on the SoRa LDB (Sounding Radar Long Distance Balloon) stratospheric balloon mission by the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The balloon was launched on July 1st from Longyearbyen, Svalbard (Norway), and flew for 4 days at a float altitude of about 39 km along the 78 North parallel and landed on the Baffin Island (Canada) on July 4th at 10:30 UTC. SIDERALE was aimed to test in a pseudo spatial environment a detector for high energy astrophysics applications based on a 44 pixel CZT solid state sensor. An onboard data handling computer, a mass memory and a power supply units were integrated in the SIDERALE payload. Furthermore an innovative modular and low cost telemetry system BIT (Bidirectional Iridium Telemetry), developed in a collaboration between INAF/IASF-Bologna and LEN srl, was used in order to make SIDERALE autonomous and independent from the hosting payload. The detector was measuring X and ray radiation for the whole flight according to dynamically set operating modes. Four to six events per second were measured by the sensitive detector volume in an energy range of between 40 keV and 400 keV. Acquired data were 100The overall payload (SIDERALE+BIT) was successfully recovered together with the onboard stored data and arrived back to Italy in autumn 2009. The paper presents the experiment and its main characteristics together with a preliminary analysis of flight and scientific data.

  10. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, G.D.

    1998-11-24

    Microwave injection methods are disclosed for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant ``volume`` ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources. 5 figs.

  11. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, Gerald D.

    1998-01-01

    Microwave injection methods for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant "volume" ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources.

  12. Large-volume en-bloc staining for electron microscopy-based connectomics

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yunfeng; Laserstein, Philip; Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale connectomics requires dense staining of neuronal tissue blocks for electron microscopy (EM). Here we report a large-volume dense en-bloc EM staining protocol that overcomes the staining gradients, which so far substantially limited the reconstructable volumes in three-dimensional (3D) EM. Our protocol provides densely reconstructable tissue blocks from mouse neocortex sized at least 1 mm in diameter. By relaxing the constraints on precise topographic sample targeting, it makes the correlated functional and structural analysis of neuronal circuits realistic. PMID:26235643

  13. CZT detectors used in different irradiation geometries: Simulations and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Shannon G.; Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2009-04-15

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate potential advantages and limitations of CZT detectors used in surface-on, edge-on, and tilted angle irradiation geometries. Simulations and experimental investigations of the energy spectrum measured by a CZT detector have been performed using different irradiation geometries of the CZT. Experiments were performed using a CZT detector with 10x10 mm{sup 2} size and 3 mm thickness. The detector was irradiated with collimated photon beams from Am-241 (59.5 keV) and Co-57 (122 keV). The edge-scan method was used to measure the detector response function in edge-on illumination mode. The tilted angle mode was investigated with the radiation beam directed to the detector surface at angles of 90 degree sign , 15 degree sign , and 10 degree sign . The Hecht formalism was used to simulate theoretical energy spectra. The parameters used for simulations were matched to experiment to compare experimental and theoretical results. The tilted angle CZT detector suppressed the tailing of the spectrum and provided an increase in peak-to-total ratio from 38% at 90 degree sign to 83% at 10 degree sign tilt angle for 122 keV radiation. The corresponding increase for 59 keV radiation was from 60% at 90 degree sign to 85% at 10 degree sign tilt angle. The edge-on CZT detector provided high energy resolution when the beam thickness was much smaller than the thickness of CZT. The FWHM resolution in edge-on illumination mode was 4.2% for 122 keV beam with 0.3 mm thickness, and rapidly deteriorated when the thickness of the beam was increased. The energy resolution of surface-on geometry suffered from strong tailing effect at photon energies higher than 60 keV. It is concluded that tilted angle CZT provides high energy resolution but it is limited to a 1D linear array configuration. The surface-on CZT provides 2D pixel arrays but suffers from tailing effect and charge build up. The edge-on CZT is considered suboptimal as it requires small beam

  14. Toxicity Profile With a Large Prostate Volume After External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkawa, Michael Fischedick, Karin; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Piroth, Marc D.; Nussen, Sandra; Eble, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of prostate volume on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) before and at different intervals after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A group of 204 patients was surveyed prospectively before (Time A), at the last day (Time B), 2 months after (Time C), and 16 months (median) after (Time D) radiotherapy, with a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). The group was divided into subgroups with a small (11-43 cm{sup 3}) and a large (44-151 cm{sup 3}) prostate volume. Results: Patients with large prostates presented with lower urinary bother scores (median 79 vs. 89; p = 0.01) before treatment. Urinary function/bother scores for patients with large prostates decreased significantly compared to patients with small prostates due to irritative/obstructive symptoms only at Time B (pain with urination more than once daily in 48% vs. 18%; p < 0.01). Health-related quality of life did not differ significantly between both patient groups at Times C and D. In contrast to a large prostate, a small initial bladder volume (with associated higher dose-volume load) was predictive for lower urinary bother scores both in the acute and late phase; at Time B it predisposed for pollakiuria but not for pain. Patients with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy reached significantly lower HRQOL scores in several domains (affecting only incontinence in the urinary domain), despite a smaller prostate volume (34 cm{sup 3} vs. 47 cm{sup 3}; p < 0.01). Conclusions: Patients with a large prostate volume have a great risk of irritative/obstructive symptoms (particularly dysuria) in the acute radiotherapy phase. These symptoms recover rapidly and do not influence long-term HRQOL.

  15. Rapid estimate of solid volume in large tuff cores using a gas pycnometer

    SciTech Connect

    Thies, C.; Geddis, A.M.; Guzman, A.G.

    1996-09-01

    A thermally insulated, rigid-volume gas pycnometer system has been developed. The pycnometer chambers have been machined from solid PVC cylinders. Two chambers confine dry high-purity helium at different pressures. A thick-walled design ensures minimal heat exchange with the surrounding environment and a constant volume system, while expansion takes place between the chambers. The internal energy of the gas is assumed constant over the expansion. The ideal gas law is used to estimate the volume of solid material sealed in one of the chambers. Temperature is monitored continuously and incorporated into the calculation of solid volume. Temperature variation between measurements is less than 0.1{degrees}C. The data are used to compute grain density for oven-dried Apache Leap tuff core samples. The measured volume of solid and the sample bulk volume are used to estimate porosity and bulk density. Intrinsic permeability was estimated from the porosity and measured pore surface area and is compared to in-situ measurements by the air permeability method. The gas pycnometer accommodates large core samples (0.25 m length x 0.11 m diameter) and can measure solid volume greater than 2.20 cm{sup 3} with less than 1% error.

  16. Optimization of the electric field distribution in a large volume tissue-equivalent proportional counter.

    PubMed

    Verma, P K; Waker, A J

    1992-10-01

    Large volume tissue-equivalent proportional counters are of interest in radiation protection metrology, as the sensitivity in terms of counts per unit absorbed dose in these devices increases as the square of the counter diameter. Conventional solutions to the problem of maintaining a uniform electric field within a counter result in sensitive volume to total volume ratios which are unacceptably low when counter dimensions of the order of 15 cm diameter are considered and when overall compactness is an important design criterion. This work describes the design and optimization of an arrangement of field discs set at different potentials which enable sensitive volume to total volume ratios to approach unity. The method has been used to construct a 12.7 cm diameter right-cylindrical tissue-equivalent proportional counter in which the sensitive volume accounts for over 95% of the total device volume and the gas gain uniformity is maintained to within 3% along the entire length of the anode wire. PMID:1438550

  17. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring DOENA27323-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, E.L.

    2006-07-28

    Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume germanium detectors for field applications. To accomplish this we are utilizing a newly available generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers to operate the very largest volume germanium detectors with no maintenance. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The flip of a switch will bring a system to life in ~ 1 hour for measurements. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed 5 years. These features are necessary for remote long-duration liquid-nitrogen free deployment of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detector systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring. The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) will greatly benefit from the availability of such detectors by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen at RASA sites while still allowing the very largest available germanium detectors to be reliably utilized.

  18. A system for the disposal of large volumes of air containing oxygen-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J. M.; Quaglia, L.; del Fiore, G.; Hannay, J.; Fissore, A.

    1991-01-01

    A method is described which permits large volumes of air containing the radionuclide 15O to be vented into the atmosphere. The short half-life of this isotope (124 s) enables use to be made of a large number of small vessels connected in series. Such a device has the effect of increasing the mean transit time. The system as installed results in a reduction of the radioactive concentration in the vented air to levels below the maximum permitted values.

  19. A New Electropositive Filter for Concentrating Enterovirus and Norovirus from Large Volumes of Water - MCEARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The detection of enteric viruses in environmental water usually requires the concentration of viruses from large volumes of water. The 1MDS electropositive filter is commonly used for concentrating enteric viruses from water but unfortunately these filters are not cost-effective...

  20. Development of a Solid Phase Extraction Method for Agricultural Pesticides in Large-Volume Water Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method using solid phase extraction (SPE) and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was developed for the trace determination of a variety of agricultural pesticides and selected transformation products in large-volume high-elevation lake water sa...

  1. An efficient out-of-core volume ray casting method for the visualization of large medical data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jian; Tian, Jie; Chen, Jian; Dai, Yakang

    2007-03-01

    Volume ray casting algorithm is widely recognized for high quality volume visualization. However, when rendering very large volume data sets, the original ray casting algorithm will lead to very inefficient random accesses in disk and make it very slowly to render the whole volume data set. In order to solve this problem, an efficient out-of-core volume ray casting method with a new out-of-core framework for processing large volume data sets based on consumer PC hardware is proposed in this paper. The new framework gives a transparent and efficient access to the volume data set cached in disk, while the new volume ray casting method minimizes the data exchange between hard disk and physical memory and performs comparatively fast high quality volume rendering. The experimental results indicate that the new method and framework are effective and efficient for the visualization of very large medical data sets.

  2. Evaluation of Bacillus oleronius as a Biological Indicator for Terminal Sterilization of Large-Volume Parenterals.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masamitsu; Fujifuru, Masato; Okada, Aki; Takai, Katsuya; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Udagawa, Takeshi; Miyake, Makoto; Naruyama, Shintaro; Tokuda, Hiroshi; Nishioka, Goro; Yoden, Hikaru; Aoki, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    In the production of large-volume parenterals in Japan, equipment and devices such as tanks, pipework, and filters used in production processes are exhaustively cleaned and sterilized, and the cleanliness of water for injection, drug materials, packaging materials, and manufacturing areas is well controlled. In this environment, the bioburden is relatively low, and less heat resistant compared with microorganisms frequently used as biological indicators such as Geobacillus stearothermophilus (ATCC 7953) and Bacillus subtilis 5230 (ATCC 35021). Consequently, the majority of large-volume parenteral solutions in Japan are manufactured under low-heat sterilization conditions of F0 <2 min, so that loss of clarity of solutions and formation of degradation products of constituents are minimized. Bacillus oleronius (ATCC 700005) is listed as a biological indicator in "Guidance on the Manufacture of Sterile Pharmaceutical Products Produced by Terminal Sterilization" (guidance in Japan, issued in 2012). In this study, we investigated whether B. oleronius is an appropriate biological indicator of the efficacy of low-heat, moist-heat sterilization of large-volume parenterals. Specifically, we investigated the spore-forming ability of this microorganism in various cultivation media and measured the D-values and z-values as parameters of heat resistance. The D-values and z-values changed depending on the constituents of large-volume parenteral products. Also, the spores from B. oleronius showed a moist-heat resistance that was similar to or greater than many of the spore-forming organisms isolated from Japanese parenteral manufacturing processes. Taken together, these results indicate that B. oleronius is suitable as a biological indicator for sterility assurance of large-volume parenteral solutions subjected to low-heat, moist-heat terminal sterilization. PMID:26889054

  3. Understanding Subcutaneous Tissue Pressure for Engineering Injection Devices for Large-Volume Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Diane V; Clawson, Corbin Z; Lambert, William; Subramony, J Anand

    2016-07-01

    Subcutaneous injection allows for self-administration of monoclonal antibodies using prefilled syringes, autoinjectors, and on-body injector devices. However, subcutaneous injections are typically limited to 1 mL due to concerns of injection pain from volume, viscosity, and formulation characteristics. Back pressure can serve as an indicator for changes in subcutaneous mechanical properties leading to pain during injection. The purpose of this study was to investigate subcutaneous pressures and injection site reactions as a function of injection volume and flow rate. A pressure sensor in the fluid path recorded subcutaneous pressures in the abdomen of Yorkshire swine. The subcutaneous tissue accommodates large-volume injections and with little back pressure as long as low flow rates are used. A 1 mL injection in 10 seconds (360 mL/h flow rate) generated a pressure of 24.0 ± 3.4 kPa, whereas 10 mL delivered in 10 minutes (60 mL/h flow rate) generated a pressure of 7.4 ± 7.8 kPa. After the injection, the pressure decays to 0 over several seconds. The subcutaneous pressures and mechanical strain increased with increasing flow rate but not increasing dose volume. These data are useful for the design of injection devices to mitigate back pressure and pain during subcutaneous large-volume injection. PMID:27287520

  4. Large Eddy Simulations of Volume Restriction Effects on Canopy-Induced Increased-Uplift Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatziefstratiou, E.; Bohrer, G.; Velissariou, V.

    2012-12-01

    ABSTRACT Previous modeling and empirical work have shown the development of important areas of increased uplift past forward-facing steps, and recirculation zones past backward-facing steps. Forests edges represent a special kind of step - a semi-porous one. Current models of the effects of forest edges on the flow represent the forest with a prescribed drag term and does not account for the effects of the solid volume in the forest that restrict the airflow. The RAMS-based Forest Large Eddy Simulation (RAFLES) resolves flows inside and above forested canopies. RAFLES is spatially explicit, and uses the finite volume method to solve a descretized set of Navier-Stokes equations. It accounts for vegetation drag effects on the flow and on the flux exchange between the canopy and the canopy air, proportional to the local leaf density. For a better representation of the vegetation structure in the numerical grid within the canopy sub-domain, the model uses a modified version of the cut cell coordinate system. The hard volume of vegetation elements, in forests, or buildings, in urban environments, within each numerical grid cell is represented via a sub-grid-scale process that shrinks the open apertures between grid cells and reduces the open cell volume. We used RAFLES to simulate the effects of a canopy of varying foliage and stem densities on flow over virtual qube-shaped barriers under neutrally buoyant conditions. We explicitly tested the effects of the numerical representation of volume restriction, independent of the effects of the leaf drag by comparing drag-only simulations, where we prescribed no volume or aperture restriction to the flow, restriction-only simulations, where we prescribed no drag, and control simulations, where both drag and volume plus aperture restriction were included. Our simulations show that representation of the effects of the volume and aperture restriction due to obstacles to flow is important (figure 1) and leads to differences in the

  5. The large volume radiometric calorimeter system: A transportable device to measure scrap category plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M.F.; Wetzel, J.R.; Breakall, K.L.; Lemming, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    An innovative design concept has been used to design a large volume calorimeter system. The new design permits two measuring cells to fit in a compact, nonevaporative environmental bath. The system is mounted on a cart for transportability. Samples in the power range of 0.50 to 12.0 W can be measured. The calorimeters will receive samples as large as 22.0 cm in diameter by 43.2 cm high, and smaller samples can be measured without lengthening measurement time or increasing measurement error by using specially designed sleeve adapters. This paper describes the design considerations, construction, theory, applications, and performance of the large volume calorimeter system. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Material properties limiting the performance of CZT gamma-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov,A.E.; Babalola, S.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, S. U.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2009-03-16

    CdZnTe (CZT) nuclear radiation detectors are advanced sensors that utilize innovative technologies developed for wide band-gap semiconductor industry and microelectronics. They open opportunities for new types of room-temperature operating, field deployable instruments that provide accurate identification of potential radiological threats and timely awareness for both the civilian and military communities. Room-temperature radiation detectors are an emerging technology that relies on the use of high-quality CZT crystals whose availability is currently limited by material non-uniformities and the presence of extended defects. To address these issues, which are most critical to CZT sensor developments, we developed X-ray mapping and IR transmission microscopy systems to characterize both CZT crystals and devices. Since a customized system is required for such X-ray measurements, we use synchrotron radiation beams available at BNL's National Synchrotron Light Source. A highly-collimated and high-intensity X-ray beam supports measurements of areas as small as 10 x 10 {micro}m{sup 2}, and allowed us to see fluctuations in collected charge over the entire area of the detector in a reasonable time. The IR microscopy system allows for 3D visualization of Te inclusions and other extended defects. In this paper, we describe the experimental techniques used in our measurements and typical results obtained from CZT samples produced by different suppliers.

  7. Development of CZT detectors for x-ray and gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kuen; Martin, J. W.; Garson, A., III; Guo, Q.; Matteson, J.; Groza, M.; Beilicke, M.; Burger, A.; de Geronimo, G.; Krawczynski, H.

    2011-09-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is the detector material of choice for the detection of X-rays in the 10 keV-1MeV energy band with excellent spatial and energy resolutions and without cryogenic cooling. In this contribution, we report on recent results of the CZT detector development program and several astrophysical experiments which make use of CZT detectors. In the first part of the paper, we discuss the performance of pixel and cross-strip CZT detectors read out with an ASIC developed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Our pixel detectors achieve some of the best energy resolutions reported in the literature. Cross-strip detectors are found to give an inferior performance and we investigate the reason for this performance difference. We also present results from a precision measurement of the effect of a steering grid on multi-pixel events obtained with a 200 micrometer collimator. In the second part of the paper, we describe the design and performance of the hard X-ray polarimeter X-Calibur. The polarimeter uses a 14 cm long scintillator scatterer, surrounded by an assembly of 32 2-5 mm thick CZT detectors. We discuss the sensitivity of the polarimeter to measure the linear polarization of 10 keV-80 keV X-rays on short and long balloon flights and results from testing the polarimeter in the laboratory.

  8. Development of a CZT drift ring detector for X and γ ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alruhaili, A.; Sellin, P. J.; Lohstroh, A.; Boothman, V.; Veeramani, P.; Veale, M. C.; Sawhney, K. J. S.; Kachkanov, V.

    2015-04-01

    CdTe and CZT detectors are considered better choices for high energy γ and X-ray spectroscopy in comparison to Si and HPGe detectors due to their good quantum efficiency and room temperature operation. The performance limitations in CdTe and CZT detectors are mainly associated with poor hole transport and trapping phenomena. Among many techniques that can be used to eliminate the effect of the poor charge transport properties of holes in CdTe and CZT material, the drift ring technique shows promising results. In this work, the performance of a 2.3 mm thick CZT drift ring detector is investigated. Spatially resolved measurements were carried out with an X-ray microbeam (25 and 75 keV) at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron to study the response uniformity and extent of the active area. Higher energy photon irradiation was also carried out at up to 662 keV using different radioisotopes to complement the microbeam data. Different biasing schemes were investigated in terms of biasing the cathode rear electrode (bulk field) and the ring electrodes (lateral fields). The results show that increasing the bulk field with fixed-ratio ring biases and lateral fields with fixed bulk fields increase the active area of the device significantly, which contrasts with previous studies in CdTe, where only an increasing lateral field resulted in an improvement of device performance. This difference is attributed to the larger thickness of the CZT device reported here.

  9. Constitutive modeling of large inelastic deformation of amorphous polymers: Free volume and shear transformation zone dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyiadjis, George Z.; Samadi-Dooki, Aref

    2016-06-01

    Due to the lack of the long-range order in their molecular structure, amorphous polymers possess a considerable free volume content in their inter-molecular space. During finite deformation, these free volume holes serve as the potential sites for localized permanent plastic deformation inclusions which are called shear transformation zones (STZs). While the free volume content has been experimentally shown to increase during the course of plastic straining in glassy polymers, thermal analysis of stored energy due to the deformation shows that the STZ nucleation energy decreases at large plastic strains. The evolution of the free volume, and the STZs number density and nucleation energy during the finite straining are formulated in this paper in order to investigate the uniaxial post-yield softening-hardening behavior of the glassy polymers. This study shows that the reduction of the STZ nucleation energy, which is correlated with the free volume increase, brings about the post-yield primary softening of the amorphous polymers up to the steady-state strain value; and the secondary hardening is a result of the increased number density of the STZs, which is required for large plastic strains, while their nucleation energy is stabilized beyond the steady-state strain. The evolutions of the free volume content and STZ nucleation energy are also used to demonstrate the effect of the strain rate, temperature, and thermal history of the sample on its post-yield behavior. The obtained results from the model are compared with the experimental observations on poly(methyl methacrylate) which show a satisfactory consonance.

  10. Lossless compression of very large volume data with fast dynamic access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rongkai; Tao, Tao; Gabriel, Michael; Belford, Geneva

    2002-09-01

    The volumetric data set is important in many scientific and biomedical fields. Since such sets may be extremely large, a compression method is critical to store and transmit them. To achieve a high compression rate, most of the existing volume compression methods are lossy, which is usually unacceptable in biomedical applications. We developed a new context-based non-linear prediction method to preprocess the volume data set in order to effectively lower the prediction entropy. The prediction error is further encoded using Huffman code. Unlike the conventional methods, the volume is divided into cubical blocks to take advantage of the data's spatial locality. Instead of building one Huffman tree for each block, we developed a novel binning algorithm that build a Huffman tree for each group (bin) of blocks. Combining all the effects above, we achieved an excellent compression rate compared to other lossless volume compression methods. In addition, an auxiliary data structure, Scalable Hyperspace File (SHSF) is used to index the huge volume so that we can obtain many other benefits including parallel construction, on-the-fly accessing of compressed data without global decompression, fast previewing, efficient background compressing, and scalability etc.

  11. Array of virtual Frisch-grid CZT detectors with common cathode readout and pulse-height correction

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, E.U.; Fochuk, P.M.; Fuerstnau, M.; Gul, R.; Hossain, A.; Jones, F.; Kim, K.; Kopach, O.V.; Taggart, R.; Yang, G.; Ye, Z.; Xu, L.; and James, R.B.

    2010-08-01

    We present our new results from testing 15-mm-long virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors with a common-cathode readout for correcting pulse-height distortions. The array employs parallelepiped-shaped CdZnTe (CZT) detectors of a large geometrical aspect ratio, with two planar contacts on the top and bottom surfaces (anode and cathode) and an additional shielding electrode on the crystal's sides to create the virtual Frisch-grid effect. We optimized the geometry of the device and improved its spectral response. We found that reducing to 5 mm the length of the shielding electrode placed next to the anode had no adverse effects on the device's performance. At the same time, this allowed corrections for electron loss by reading the cathode signals to obtain depth information.

  12. CZT pixel detectors equipped with effective Ohmic contacts; their spectroscopic performance and the enigma of why they thus behave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hanany, Uri; Shahar, Allon; Tsigelman, A.

    1999-10-01

    The performance of CZT pixel detectors, with dedicated ICs and electronic processors, have been demonstrated. These nuclear imaging modules, developed primarily for the medical market, may be utilized for other applications, such as large area nuclear spectrometers. An improved crystal growth technique ensures a practical supply of wafers of which high performance detectors are fabricated. We believe that the high spectroscopic quality of these detectors stems from their effective Ohmic behavior, coupled with the geometrical, 'small pixel' effect. The Ohmic operation of these detectors has been described in a schematic way only, where the detailed non-equilibrium mechanism, responsible for it, still remains to be explained in detail. The IMARAD detector type 2, with contacts which strongly limit the dark current, exhibit even improved spectroscopic behavior, due to a dynamic Ohmic behavior of these contacts.

  13. HYBRID BRIDGMAN ANVIL DESIGN: AN OPTICAL WINDOW FOR IN-SITU SPECTROSCOPY IN LARGE VOLUME PRESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Lipp, M J; Evans, W J; Yoo, C S

    2005-07-29

    The absence of in-situ optical probes for large volume presses often limits their application to high-pressure materials research. In this paper, we present a unique anvil/optical window-design for use in large volume presses, which consists of an inverted diamond anvil seated in a Bridgman type anvil. A small cylindrical aperture through the Bridgman anvil ending at the back of diamond anvil allows optical access to the sample chamber and permits direct optical spectroscopy measurements, such as ruby fluorescence (in-situ pressure) or Raman spectroscopy. This performance of this anvil-design has been demonstrated by loading KBr to a pressure of 14.5 GPa.

  14. Assembly, operation and disassembly manual for the Battelle Large Volume Water Sampler (BLVWS)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, V.W.; Campbell, R.M.

    1984-12-01

    Assembly, operation and disassembly of the Battelle Large Volume Water Sampler (BLVWS) are described in detail. Step by step instructions of assembly, general operation and disassembly are provided to allow an operator completely unfamiliar with the sampler to successfully apply the BLVWS to his research sampling needs. The sampler permits concentration of both particulate and dissolved radionuclides from large volumes of ocean and fresh water. The water sample passes through a filtration section for particle removal then through sorption or ion exchange beds where species of interest are removed. The sampler components which contact the water being sampled are constructed of polyvinylchloride (PVC). The sampler has been successfully applied to many sampling needs over the past fifteen years. 9 references, 8 figures.

  15. The large volume calorimeter for measuring the pressure cooker'' shipping container

    SciTech Connect

    Kasperski, P.W.; Duff, M.F.; Wetzel, J.R. ); Baker, L.B.; MacMurdo, K.W. )

    1991-01-01

    A precise, low wattage, large volume calorimeter system has been developed at Mound to measure two configurations of the 12081 containment vessel. This system was developed and constructed to perform verification measurements at the Savannah River Site. The calorimeter system has performance design specifications of {plus minus}0.3% error above the 2-watt level, and {plus minus}(0.03% plus 0.006 watts) at power levels below 2 watts (one sigma). Data collected during performance testing shows measurement errors well within this range, even down to 0.1-watt power levels. The development of this calorimeter shows that ultra-precise measurements can be achieved on extremely large volume sample configurations. 1 ref., 5 figs.

  16. Performance characteristics of pixelated CZT crystals used on the GammaTracker project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Eric M.; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Erikson, Luke E.; Morris, Scott J.; Balvage, Duane T.; Lundy, Richard P.

    2011-09-01

    GammaTracker is a handheld radioisotope identification device in development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that uses eighteen pixelated Cadmium-Zinc Telluride (CZT) crystals to provide energy resolution approaching that of high-purity germanium without the need for cryogenic cooling. Additionally, these crystals can be used to provide directional and imaging capabilities that cannot be found in other handheld detectors. A significant number of CZT crystals have been procured during the development of the GammaTracker system; the majority of these were procured with the same set of specifications. Each of these detectors has been characterized in terms of key parameters, including current-voltage response and pixel-by-pixel energy resolution. The results of this testing indicate that the overall quality of CZT crystals is improving over time.

  17. Anti-de Sitter-space/conformal-field-theory correspondence and large-N volume independence

    SciTech Connect

    Poppitz, Erich; Uensal, Mithat

    2010-09-15

    We study the Eguchi-Kawai reduction in the strong-coupling domain of gauge theories via the gravity dual of N=4 super-Yang-Mills on R{sup 3}xS{sup 1}. We show that D-branes geometrize volume independence in the center-symmetric vacuum and give supergravity predictions for the range of validity of reduced large-N models at strong coupling.

  18. Rapid Adaptive Optical Recovery of Optimal Resolution over LargeVolumes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Milkie, Dan; Saxena, Ankur; Engerer, Peter; Misgeld, Thomas; Bronner, Marianne E.; Mumm, Jeff; Betzig, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Using a de-scanned, laser-induced guide star and direct wavefront sensing, we demonstrate adaptive correction of complex optical aberrations at high numerical aperture and a 14 ms update rate. This permits us to compensate for the rapid spatial variation in aberration often encountered in biological specimens, and recover diffraction-limited imaging over large (> 240 μm)3 volumes. We applied this to image fine neuronal processes and subcellular dynamics within the zebrafish brain. PMID:24727653

  19. Characterization of stable brush-shaped large-volume plasma generated at ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Jie; Cao Wenqing; Zhao Wei; Wang Yishan; Duan Yixiang

    2012-01-15

    A brush-shaped, large-volume plasma was generated at ambient pressure with a dc power supply and flowing argon gas, as well as a narrow outlet slit. Based on the V-I curve and emission profiles obtained in our experiment, the plasma shows some typical glow discharge characteristics. The electron density in the positive column close to the anode is about 1.4x10{sup 14}cm{sup -3} high, which is desirable for generating abundant amounts of reactive species in the plasma. Emission spectroscopy diagnosis indicates that many reactive species, such as excited argon atoms, excited oxygen atoms, excited nitrogen molecules, OH and C{sub 2} radicals, etc., generated within the plasma are distributed symmetrically and uniformly, which is preferable to some chemical reactions in practical applications. Spectral measurement also shows that the concentration of some excited argon atoms increases with the argon flow rate when the applied voltage is unvaried, while that of these excited argon atoms declines with the discharge current in the normal/subnormal glow discharge mode with the argon flow rate fixed. The plasma size is about 15 mm x 1 mm x 19 mm (L, W, H), when 38-W of discharge power is used. Such a laminar brush-shaped large-volume plasma device ensures not only efficient utilization of the plasma gas, but also effective processing of objects with large volume and complicated structure that are susceptible to high temperatures.

  20. A reference voltage in capacitor-resister hybrid SAR ADC for front-end readout system of CZT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Liu; Tingcun, Wei; Bo, Li; Lifeng, Yang; Yongcai, Hu

    2016-01-01

    An on-chip reference voltage has been designed in capacitor-resister hybrid SAR ADC for CZT detector with the TSMC 0.35 μm 2P4M CMOS process. The voltage reference has a dynamic load since using variable capacitors and resistances, which need a large driving ability to deal with the current related to the time and sampling rate. Most of the previous articles about the reference for ADC present only the bandgap part for a low temperature coefficient and high PSRR. However, it is not enough and overall, it needs to consider the output driving ability. The proposed voltage reference is realized by the band-gap reference, voltage generator and output buffer. Apart from a low temperature coefficient and high PSRR, it has the features of a large driving ability and low power consumption. What is more, for CZT detectors application in space, a radiation-hardened design has been considered. The measurement results show that the output reference voltage of the buffer is 4.096 V. When the temperature varied from 0 to 80 °C, the temperature coefficient is 12.2 ppm/°C. The PSRR was -70 dB @ 100 kHz. The drive current of the reference can reach up to 10 mA. The area of the voltage reference in the SAR ADC chip is only 449 × 614 μm2. The total power consumption is only 1.092 mW. Project supported by the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project (No. 2011YQ040082), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61376034), and the Shaanxi Province Science and Technology Innovation Project (No. 2015KTZDGY03-03).

  1. Evaluation of quantitative accuracy in CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT for various isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.-J.; Yu, A. R.; Kim, Y.-s.; Kang, W.-S.; Jin, S. S.; Kim, J.-S.; Son, T. J.; Kim, H.-J.

    2015-05-01

    In vivo pre-clinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a valuable tool for functional small animal imaging, but several physical factors, such as scatter radiation, limit the quantitative accuracy of conventional scintillation crystal-based SPECT. Semiconductor detectors such as CZT overcome these deficiencies through superior energy resolution. To our knowledge, little scientific information exists regarding the accuracy of quantitative analysis in CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT systems for different isotopes. The aim of this study was to assess the quantitative accuracy of CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT for four isotopes: 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In. The quantitative accuracy of the CZT-based Triumph X-SPECT (Gamma-Medica Ideas, Northridge, CA, U.S.A.) was compared with that of a conventional SPECT using GATE simulation. Quantitative errors due to the attenuation and scatter effects were evaluated for all four isotopes with energy windows of 5%, 10%, and 20%. A spherical source containing the isotope was placed at the center of the air-or-water-filled mouse-sized cylinder phantom. The CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT was more accurate than the conventional SPECT. For example, in the conventional SPECT with an energy window of 10%, scatter effects degraded quantitative accuracy by up to 11.52%, 5.10%, 2.88%, and 1.84% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In, respectively. However, with the CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT, the degradations were only 9.67%, 5.45%, 2.36%, and 1.24% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In, respectively. As the energy window was increased, the quantitative errors increased in both SPECT systems. Additionally, the isotopes with lower energy of photon emissions had greater quantitative error. Our results demonstrated that the CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT had lower overall quantitative errors due to reduced scatter and high detection efficiency. Furthermore, the results of this systematic assessment quantifying the accuracy of these SPECT

  2. Large-N volume independence in conformal and confining gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Unsal, Mithat; Yaffe, Laurence G.; /Washington U., Seattle

    2010-08-26

    Consequences of large N volume independence are examined in conformal and confining gauge theories. In the large N limit, gauge theories compactified on R{sup d-k} x (S{sup 1}){sup k} are independent of the S{sup 1} radii, provided the theory has unbroken center symmetry. In particular, this implies that a large N gauge theory which, on R{sup d}, flows to an IR fixed point, retains the infinite correlation length and other scale invariant properties of the decompactified theory even when compactified on R{sup d-k} x (S{sup 1}){sup k}. In other words, finite volume effects are 1/N suppressed. In lattice formulations of vector-like theories, this implies that numerical studies to determine the boundary between confined and conformal phases may be performed on one-site lattice models. In N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, the center symmetry realization is a matter of choice: the theory on R{sup 4-k} x (S{sup 1}){sup k} has a moduli space which contains points with all possible realizations of center symmetry. Large N QCD with massive adjoint fermions and one or two compactified dimensions has a rich phase structure with an infinite number of phase transitions coalescing in the zero radius limit.

  3. Detection and Volume Estimation of Large Landslides by Using Multi-temporal Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yu-chung; Hou, Chin-Shyong; Chan, Yu-Chang; Hu, Jyr-Ching; Fei, Li-Yuan; Chen, Hung-Jen; Chiu, Cheng-Lung

    2014-05-01

    Large landslides are frequently triggered by strong earthquakes and heavy rainfalls in the mountainous areas of Taiwan. The heavy rainfall brought by the Typhoon Morakot has triggered a large amount of landslides. The most unfortunate case occurred in the Xiaolin village, which was totally demolished by a catastrophic landslide in less than a minute. Continued and detailed study of the characteristics of large landslides is urgently needed to mitigate loss of lives and properties in the future. Traditionally known techniques cannot effectively extract landslide parameters, such as depth, amount and volume, which are essential in all the phases of landslide assessment. In addition, it is very important to record the changes of landslide deposits after the landslide events as accurately as possible to better understand the landslide erosion process. The acquisition of digital elevation models (DEMs) is considered necessary for achieving accurate, effective and quantitative landslide assessments. A new technique is presented in this study for quickly assessing extensive areas of large landslides. The technique uses DEMs extracted from several remote sensing approaches, including aerial photogrammetry, airborne LiDAR and UAV photogrammetry. We chose a large landslide event that occurred after Typhoon Sinlaku in Meiyuan the mount, central Taiwan in 2008. We collected and processed six data sets, including aerial photos, airborne LiDAR data and UAVphotos, at different times from 2005 to 2013. Our analyses show the landslide volume being 17.14 × 106 cubic meters, deposition volume being 12.75 × 106 cubic meters, and about 4.38 × 106 cubic meters being washed out of the region. Residual deposition ratio of this area is about 74% in 2008; while, after a few years, the residual deposition ratio is down below 50%. We also analyzed riverbed changes and sediment transfer patterns from 2005 to 2013 by multi-temporal remote sensing data with desirable accuracy. The developed

  4. A pyramid-based approach to visual exploration of a large volume of vehicle trajectory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Li, Xiang

    2012-12-01

    Advances in positioning and wireless communicating technologies make it possible to collect large volumes of trajectory data of moving vehicles in a fast and convenient fashion. These data can be applied to traffic studies. Behind this application, a methodological issue that still requires particular attention is the way these data should be spatially visualized. Trajectory data physically consists of a large number of positioning points. With the dramatic increase of data volume, it becomes a challenge to display and explore these data. Existing commercial software often employs vector-based indexing structures to facilitate the display of a large volume of points, but their performance downgrades quickly when the number of points is very large, for example, tens of millions. In this paper, a pyramid-based approach is proposed. A pyramid method initially is invented to facilitate the display of raster images through the tradeoff between storage space and display time. A pyramid is a set of images at different levels with different resolutions. In this paper, we convert vector-based point data into raster data, and build a gridbased indexing structure in a 2D plane. Then, an image pyramid is built. Moreover, at the same level of a pyramid, image is segmented into mosaics with respect to the requirements of data storage and management. Algorithms or procedures on grid-based indexing structure, image pyramid, image segmentation, and visualization operations are given in this paper. A case study with taxi trajectory data in Shanghai is conducted. Results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the existing commercial software.

  5. Volume-staged radiosurgery for large arteriovenous malformations: an evolving paradigm.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Zachary A; Sneed, Penny K; Gupta, Nalin; Lawton, Michael T; Molinaro, Annette M; Young, William; Dowd, Christopher F; Halbach, Van V; Higashida, Randall T; McDermott, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Large arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) remain difficult to treat, and ideal treatment parameters for volume-staged stereotactic radiosurgery (VS-SRS) are still unknown. The object of this study was to compare VS-SRS treatment outcomes for AVMs larger than 10 ml during 2 eras; Era 1 was 1992-March 2004, and Era 2 was May 2004-2008. In Era 2 the authors prospectively decreased the AVM treatment volume, increased the radiation dose per stage, and shortened the interval between stages. METHODS All cases of VS-SRS treatment for AVM performed at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS Of 69 patients intended for VS-SRS, 63 completed all stages. The median patient age at the first stage of VS-SRS was 34 years (range 9-68 years). The median modified radiosurgery-based AVM score (mRBAS), total AVM volume, and volume per stage in Era 1 versus Era 2 were 3.6 versus 2.7, 27.3 ml versus 18.9 ml, and 15.0 ml versus 6.8 ml, respectively. The median radiation dose per stage was 15.5 Gy in Era 1 and 17.0 Gy in Era 2, and the median clinical follow-up period in living patients was 8.6 years in Era 1 and 4.8 years in Era 2. All outcomes were measured from the first stage of VS-SRS. Near or complete obliteration was more common in Era 2 (log-rank test, p = 0.0003), with 3- and 5-year probabilities of 5% and 21%, respectively, in Era 1 compared with 24% and 68% in Era 2. Radiosurgical dose, AVM volume per stage, total AVM volume, era, compact nidus, Spetzler-Martin grade, and mRBAS were significantly associated with near or complete obliteration on univariate analysis. Dose was a strong predictor of response (Cox proportional hazards, p < 0.001, HR 6.99), with 3- and 5-year probabilities of near or complete obliteration of 5% and 16%, respectively, at a dose < 17 Gy versus 23% and 74% at a dose ≥ 17 Gy. Dose per stage, compact nidus, and total AVM volume remained significant predictors of near or complete obliteration on multivariate analysis. Seventeen

  6. Very Large Area/Volume Microwave ECR Plasma and Ion Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor); Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for producing very large area and large volume plasmas. The invention utilizes electron cyclotron resonances in conjunction with permanent magnets to produce dense, uniform plasmas for long life ion thruster applications or for plasma processing applications such as etching, deposition, ion milling and ion implantation. The large area source is at least five times larger than the 12-inch wafers being processed to date. Its rectangular shape makes it easier to accommodate to materials processing than sources that are circular in shape. The source itself represents the largest ECR ion source built to date. It is electrodeless and does not utilize electromagnets to generate the ECR magnetic circuit, nor does it make use of windows.

  7. The complex aerodynamic footprint of desert locusts revealed by large-volume tomographic particle image velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Schanz, Daniel; Geisler, Reinhard; Schröder, Andreas; Bomphrey, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry has been the preferred experimental technique with which to study the aerodynamics of animal flight for over a decade. In that time, hardware has become more accessible and the software has progressed from the acquisition of planes through the flow field to the reconstruction of small volumetric measurements. Until now, it has not been possible to capture large volumes that incorporate the full wavelength of the aerodynamic track left behind during a complete wingbeat cycle. Here, we use a unique apparatus to acquire the first instantaneous wake volume of a flying animal's entire wingbeat. We confirm the presence of wake deformation behind desert locusts and quantify the effect of that deformation on estimates of aerodynamic force and the efficiency of lift generation. We present previously undescribed vortex wake phenomena, including entrainment around the wing-tip vortices of a set of secondary vortices borne of Kelvin–Helmholtz instability in the shear layer behind the flapping wings. PMID:26040598

  8. Generation of large volume hydrostatic pressure to 8 GPa for ultrasonic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozuki, Yasushi; Yoneda, Akira; Fujimura, Akio; Sawamoto, Hiroshi; Kumazawa, Mineo

    1986-09-01

    The design and performance of a liquid-solid hybrid cell to generate high hydrostatic pressures in a relatively large volume (for use in measurements of the pressure dependence of the physical properties of materials) are reported. A 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture is employed in 12-mm-side and 20-mm-side versions of an eight-cubic-anvil apparatus driven by a 10-kt press. Pressures up to 8 GPa are obtained safely in a 16-cu cm volume by applying uniaxial force of 3 kt. The cell is used to obtain measurements of the velocity of ultrasonic waves in fused quartz: the experimental setup is described, and sample results are presented graphically.

  9. Digital fringe projection system for large-volume 360-deg shape measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnik, Robert; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Woznicki, Jerzy M.

    2002-02-01

    We present a system for 3-D shape measurement in large volumes based on combined digital-fringe--Gray-code projection. With the help of a new calibration procedure, the system provides accurate results despite its crossed-axis configuration and unknown aberrations of the digital light projector and CCD camera. Also, the separate clouds of points captured from different directions are automatically merged into the main cloud. The system delivers results in the form of (x,y,z) coordinates of the object points with additional (R,G,B) color information about their texture. Applicability of the system is proven by presenting sample results of measurements performed on complex objects. The uncertainty of the system was estimated at 10 -4 of the measurement volume.

  10. The complex aerodynamic footprint of desert locusts revealed by large-volume tomographic particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Schanz, Daniel; Geisler, Reinhard; Schröder, Andreas; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-07-01

    Particle image velocimetry has been the preferred experimental technique with which to study the aerodynamics of animal flight for over a decade. In that time, hardware has become more accessible and the software has progressed from the acquisition of planes through the flow field to the reconstruction of small volumetric measurements. Until now, it has not been possible to capture large volumes that incorporate the full wavelength of the aerodynamic track left behind during a complete wingbeat cycle. Here, we use a unique apparatus to acquire the first instantaneous wake volume of a flying animal's entire wingbeat. We confirm the presence of wake deformation behind desert locusts and quantify the effect of that deformation on estimates of aerodynamic force and the efficiency of lift generation. We present previously undescribed vortex wake phenomena, including entrainment around the wing-tip vortices of a set of secondary vortices borne of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear layer behind the flapping wings. PMID:26040598

  11. Dynamic dialysis: an efficient technique for large-volume sample desalting.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Le, Zhen; Zhong, Lipeng; Huang, Chunhong

    2015-08-18

    Dialysis is a well-known technique for laboratory separation. However, its efficiency is commonly restricted by the dialyzer volume and its passive diffusion manner. In addition, the sample is likely to be precipitated and inactive during a long dialysis process. To overcome these drawbacks, a dynamic dialysis method was described and evaluated. The dynamic dialysis was performed by two peristaltic pumps working in reverse directions, in order to drive countercurrent parallel flow of sample and buffer, respectively. The efficiency and capacity of this dynamic dialysis method was evaluated by recording and statistically comparing the variation of conductance from retentate under different conditions. The dynamic method was proven to be effective in dialyzing a large-volume sample, and its efficiency changes proportionally to the flow rate of sample. To sum up, circulating the sample and the buffer creates the highest possible concentration gradient to significantly improve dialysis capacity and shorten dialysis time. PMID:25036273

  12. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Neclear Explosion Monitoring DOENA27323-2

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, E.L.

    2006-10-30

    Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume high-resolution gamma-ray detectors for field applications. To accomplish this we are utilizing a newly available generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers to operate the very largest volume germanium detectors with no maintenance. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed 5 years. Three important factors affect the operation of mechanically cooled germanium detectors: temperature, vacuum, and vibration. These factors will be studied in the laboratory at the most fundamental levels to insure a solid understanding of the physical limitations each factor places on a practical mechanically cooled germanium detector system. Using this knowledge, mechanically cooled germanium detector prototype systems will be designed and fabricated.

  13. A Novel Technique for Endovascular Removal of Large Volume Right Atrial Tumor Thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, Barbara; McClure, Timothy Moriarty, John

    2015-08-15

    Venous thromboembolic disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the setting of large volume pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy has been shown to be a successful treatment modality; however, its use somewhat limited due to the risk of hemorrhage and potential for distal embolization in the setting of large mobile thrombi. In patients where either thrombolysis is contraindicated or unsuccessful, and conventional therapies prove inadequate, surgical thrombectomy may be considered. We present a case of percutaneous endovascular extraction of a large mobile mass extending from the inferior vena cava into the right atrium using the Angiovac device, a venovenous bypass system designed for high-volume aspiration of undesired endovascular material. Standard endovascular methods for removal of cancer-associated thrombus, such as catheter-directed lysis, maceration, and exclusion, may prove inadequate in the setting of underlying tumor thrombus. Where conventional endovascular methods either fail or are unsuitable, endovascular thrombectomy with the Angiovac device may be a useful and safe minimally invasive alternative to open resection.

  14. GMP cryopreservation of large volumes of cells for regenerative medicine: active control of the freezing process.

    PubMed

    Massie, Isobel; Selden, Clare; Hodgson, Humphrey; Fuller, Barry; Gibbons, Stephanie; Morris, G John

    2014-09-01

    Cryopreservation protocols are increasingly required in regenerative medicine applications but must deliver functional products at clinical scale and comply with Good Manufacturing Process (GMP). While GMP cryopreservation is achievable on a small scale using a Stirling cryocooler-based controlled rate freezer (CRF) (EF600), successful large-scale GMP cryopreservation is more challenging due to heat transfer issues and control of ice nucleation, both complex events that impact success. We have developed a large-scale cryocooler-based CRF (VIA Freeze) that can process larger volumes and have evaluated it using alginate-encapsulated liver cell (HepG2) spheroids (ELS). It is anticipated that ELS will comprise the cellular component of a bioartificial liver and will be required in volumes of ∼2 L for clinical use. Sample temperatures and Stirling cryocooler power consumption was recorded throughout cooling runs for both small (500 μL) and large (200 mL) volume samples. ELS recoveries were assessed using viability (FDA/PI staining with image analysis), cell number (nuclei count), and function (protein secretion), along with cryoscanning electron microscopy and freeze substitution techniques to identify possible injury mechanisms. Slow cooling profiles were successfully applied to samples in both the EF600 and the VIA Freeze, and a number of cooling and warming profiles were evaluated. An optimized cooling protocol with a nonlinear cooling profile from ice nucleation to -60°C was implemented in both the EF600 and VIA Freeze. In the VIA Freeze the nucleation of ice is detected by the control software, allowing both noninvasive detection of the nucleation event for quality control purposes and the potential to modify the cooling profile following ice nucleation in an active manner. When processing 200 mL of ELS in the VIA Freeze-viabilities at 93.4% ± 7.4%, viable cell numbers at 14.3 ± 1.7 million nuclei/mL alginate, and protein secretion at 10.5 ± 1.7

  15. Optimized algorithm module for large volume remote sensing image processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Changfeng; Liu, Nan; Liu, Renyi; Wang, Jiawen; Zhang, Qin

    2007-12-01

    A new remote sensing image processing system's algorithm module has been introduced in this paper, which is coded with Visual C++ 6.0 program language and can process large volume of remote sensing image. At the same time, adopted key technologies in algorithm module are given. Two defects of American remote sensing image processing system called ERDAS has been put forward in image filter algorithm and the storage of pixel values that are out of data type range. In author's system two optimized methods has been implemented in these two aspects. By contrasted with ERDAS IMAGINE System, the two methods had been proved to be effective in image analysis.

  16. Leak testing of cryogenically pumped large-volume high-vacuum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherlock, Charles N.

    1988-01-01

    The problems that may occur in the cryogenically pumped large-volume high-vacuum chambers (LVHVCs), used for the environmental testing of aerospace components and systems, are examined. Consideration is given to the designs of the LVHVCs and the cryogenic pumps. In the procedure of leak testing with tracer gas, the success of testing depends on attaining the required test sensitivity with speed, economy, and reliability. The steps required to speed up the leak location phase of the leak testing procedure and to thoroughly clean every penetration (i.e., fitting or nozzle) of the system are discussed.

  17. Large Volume, Optical and Opto-Mechanical Metrology Techniques for ISIM on JWST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadjimichael, Theo

    2015-01-01

    The final, flight build of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element of the James Webb Space Telescope is the culmination of years of work across many disciplines and partners. This paper covers the large volume, ambient, optical and opto-mechanical metrology techniques used to verify the mechanical integration of the flight instruments in ISIM, including optical pupil alignment. We present an overview of ISIM's integration and test program, which is in progress, with an emphasis on alignment and optical performance verification. This work is performed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, in close collaboration with the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, and the Mid-Infrared Instrument European Consortium.

  18. GMP Cryopreservation of Large Volumes of Cells for Regenerative Medicine: Active Control of the Freezing Process

    PubMed Central

    Massie, Isobel; Selden, Clare; Hodgson, Humphrey; Gibbons, Stephanie; Morris, G. John

    2014-01-01

    Cryopreservation protocols are increasingly required in regenerative medicine applications but must deliver functional products at clinical scale and comply with Good Manufacturing Process (GMP). While GMP cryopreservation is achievable on a small scale using a Stirling cryocooler-based controlled rate freezer (CRF) (EF600), successful large-scale GMP cryopreservation is more challenging due to heat transfer issues and control of ice nucleation, both complex events that impact success. We have developed a large-scale cryocooler-based CRF (VIA Freeze) that can process larger volumes and have evaluated it using alginate-encapsulated liver cell (HepG2) spheroids (ELS). It is anticipated that ELS will comprise the cellular component of a bioartificial liver and will be required in volumes of ∼2 L for clinical use. Sample temperatures and Stirling cryocooler power consumption was recorded throughout cooling runs for both small (500 μL) and large (200 mL) volume samples. ELS recoveries were assessed using viability (FDA/PI staining with image analysis), cell number (nuclei count), and function (protein secretion), along with cryoscanning electron microscopy and freeze substitution techniques to identify possible injury mechanisms. Slow cooling profiles were successfully applied to samples in both the EF600 and the VIA Freeze, and a number of cooling and warming profiles were evaluated. An optimized cooling protocol with a nonlinear cooling profile from ice nucleation to −60°C was implemented in both the EF600 and VIA Freeze. In the VIA Freeze the nucleation of ice is detected by the control software, allowing both noninvasive detection of the nucleation event for quality control purposes and the potential to modify the cooling profile following ice nucleation in an active manner. When processing 200 mL of ELS in the VIA Freeze—viabilities at 93.4%±7.4%, viable cell numbers at 14.3±1.7 million nuclei/mL alginate, and protein secretion at 10.5±1.7

  19. Cryogenic loading of large volume presses for high-pressure experimentation and synthesis of novel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lipp, M J; Evans, W J; Yoo, C S

    2005-01-21

    We present an efficient easily implemented method for loading cryogenic fluids in a large volume press. We specifically apply this method to the high-pressure synthesis of an extended solid derived from CO using a Paris-Edinburgh cell. This method employs cryogenic cooling of Bridgman type WC anvils well insulated from other press components, condensation of the load gas within a brass annulus surrounding the gasket between the Bridgman anvils. We demonstrate the viability of the described approach by synthesizing macroscopic amounts (several milligrams) of polymeric CO-derived material, which were recovered to ambient conditions after compression of pure CO to 5 GPa or above.

  20. Large volume/high horsepower submersible pumping problems in water source wells

    SciTech Connect

    Hoestenbach, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    Various problems are encountered in, or compounded by, installing large volume/high horsepower submersible pumping equipment in water source wells, in the range of 30,000 to 90,000 bbl of water/day at 320 to 1020 hp. This study discusses the many problems that have appeared during the past 12 yr in Shell Oil Co's W. Texas water supply system and the solutions that were subsequently applied. The majority of these problems will be encountered in almost any project of this type. Specifically detailed are motor, pump, and protector anomalies, accessory equipment, surface production facilities, and the protective schemes utilized to optimize equipment life.

  1. Large-volume, high-horsepower submersible pumping problems in water source wells

    SciTech Connect

    Hoestenbach, R.D.

    1982-10-01

    Little has been written concerning problems that can be encountered in, or compounded by, installing large volume, high-horsepower submersible pumping equipment in water source wells in the range of 30,000 to 90,000 BWPD at 320 to 1,020 hp. This report addresses many problems of the past 12 years in Shell Oil Co.'s west Texas water supply system and the solutions that subsequently were applied. We feel that the majority of these problems are encountered in almost any project of this type. Motor, pump, and protector anomalies, accessory equipment, surface production facilities, and the protective schemes to optimize equipment life are discussed in detail.

  2. Thickness scalability of large volume cadmium zinc telluride high resolution radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awadalla, S. A.; Chen, H.; Mackenzie, J.; Lu, P.; Iniewski, K.; Marthandam, P.; Redden, R.; Bindley, G.; He, Z.; Zhang, F.

    2009-06-01

    This work focuses on the thickness scalability of traveling heater method (THM) grown CdZnTe crystals to produce large volume detectors with optimized spectroscopic performance. To meet this challenge, we have tuned both our THM growth process, to grow 75 mm diameter ingots, and our postgrowth annealing process. We have increased the thickness of our sliced wafers from 6 to 12 and 18 mm allowing the production of 10 and 15 mm thick detectors. As the detectors' thickness is scaled up, the energy resolution of both types, as pseudo-Frisch grid and pixelated monolithic detectors showed no degradation indicating improved materials uniformity and transport properties.

  3. A scale down process for the development of large volume cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kilbride, Peter; Morris, G John; Milne, Stuart; Fuller, Barry; Skepper, Jeremy; Selden, Clare

    2014-12-01

    The process of ice formation and propagation during cryopreservation impacts on the post-thaw outcome for a sample. Two processes, either network solidification or progressive solidification, can dominate the water-ice phase transition with network solidification typically present in small sample cryo-straws or cryo-vials. Progressive solidification is more often observed in larger volumes or environmental freezing. These different ice phase progressions could have a significant impact on cryopreservation in scale-up and larger volume cryo-banking protocols necessitating their study when considering cell therapy applications. This study determines the impact of these different processes on alginate encapsulated liver spheroids (ELS) as a model system during cryopreservation, and develops a method to replicate these differences in an economical manner. It was found in the current studies that progressive solidification resulted in fewer, but proportionally more viable cells 24h post-thaw compared with network solidification. The differences between the groups diminished at later time points post-thaw as cells recovered the ability to undertake cell division, with no statistically significant differences seen by either 48 h or 72 h in recovery cultures. Thus progressive solidification itself should not prove a significant hurdle in the search for successful cryopreservation in large volumes. However, some small but significant differences were noted in total viable cell recoveries and functional assessments between samples cooled with either progressive or network solidification, and these require further investigation. PMID:25219980

  4. A scale down process for the development of large volume cryopreservation☆

    PubMed Central

    Kilbride, Peter; Morris, G. John; Milne, Stuart; Fuller, Barry; Skepper, Jeremy; Selden, Clare

    2014-01-01

    The process of ice formation and propagation during cryopreservation impacts on the post-thaw outcome for a sample. Two processes, either network solidification or progressive solidification, can dominate the water–ice phase transition with network solidification typically present in small sample cryo-straws or cryo-vials. Progressive solidification is more often observed in larger volumes or environmental freezing. These different ice phase progressions could have a significant impact on cryopreservation in scale-up and larger volume cryo-banking protocols necessitating their study when considering cell therapy applications. This study determines the impact of these different processes on alginate encapsulated liver spheroids (ELS) as a model system during cryopreservation, and develops a method to replicate these differences in an economical manner. It was found in the current studies that progressive solidification resulted in fewer, but proportionally more viable cells 24 h post-thaw compared with network solidification. The differences between the groups diminished at later time points post-thaw as cells recovered the ability to undertake cell division, with no statistically significant differences seen by either 48 h or 72 h in recovery cultures. Thus progressive solidification itself should not prove a significant hurdle in the search for successful cryopreservation in large volumes. However, some small but significant differences were noted in total viable cell recoveries and functional assessments between samples cooled with either progressive or network solidification, and these require further investigation. PMID:25219980

  5. First large volume characterization of the QIE10/11 custom front-end integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, D.; Baumbaugh, A.; Dal Monte, L.; Freeman, J.; Hirschauer, J.; Hughes, E.; Roy, T.; Whitbeck, A.; Yumiceva, F.; Zimmerman, T.

    2016-02-01

    The CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will upgrade the photon detection and readout systems of its barrel and endcap hadron calorimeters (HCAL) through the second long shutdown of the LHC in 2018. A central feature of this upgrade is the development of two new versions of the QIE (Charge Integrator and Encoder), a Fermilab-designed custom ASIC for measurement of charge from detectors in high-rate environments. These most recent additions to the QIE family feature 17-bits of dynamic range with 1% digitization precision for high charge and a time-to-digital converter (TDC) with half nanosecond resolution all with 16 bits of readout per bunch crossing. For the first time, the CMS experiment has produced and characterized in great detail a large volume of chips. The characteristics and performance of the new QIE and their related chip-to-chip variations as measured in a sample of 10,000 chips is described.

  6. Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering on Large, Multi-core Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howison, Mark; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank

    2010-07-12

    This work studies the performance and scalability characteristics of"hybrid'"parallel programming and execution as applied to raycasting volume rendering -- a staple visualization algorithm -- on a large, multi-core platform. Historically, the Message Passing Interface (MPI) has become the de-facto standard for parallel programming and execution on modern parallel systems. As the computing industry trends towards multi-core processors, with four- and six-core chips common today and 128-core chips coming soon, we wish to better understand how algorithmic and parallel programming choices impact performance and scalability on large, distributed-memory multi-core systems. Our findings indicate that the hybrid-parallel implementation, at levels of concurrency ranging from 1,728 to 216,000, performs better, uses a smaller absolute memory footprint, and consumes less communication bandwidth than the traditional, MPI-only implementation.

  7. Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering on Large, Multi-core Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howison, Mark; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank

    2010-06-14

    This work studies the performance and scalability characteristics of"hybrid" parallel programming and execution as applied to raycasting volume rendering -- a staple visualization algorithm -- on a large, multi-core platform. Historically, the Message Passing Interface (MPI) has become the de-facto standard for parallel programming and execution on modern parallel systems. As the computing industry trends towards multi-core processors, with four- and six-core chips common today and 128-core chips coming soon, we wish to better understand how algorithmic and parallel programming choices impact performance and scalability on large, distributed-memory multi-core systems. Our findings indicate that the hybrid-parallel implementation, at levels of concurrency ranging from 1,728 to 216,000, performs better, uses a smaller absolute memory footprint, and consumes less communication bandwidth than the traditional, MPI-only implementation.

  8. MPI-hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering on Large, Multi-core Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howison, Mark; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank

    2010-03-20

    This work studies the performance and scalability characteristics of"hybrid'" parallel programming and execution as applied to raycasting volume rendering -- a staple visualization algorithm -- on a large, multi-core platform. Historically, the Message Passing Interface (MPI) has become the de-facto standard for parallel programming and execution on modern parallel systems. As the computing industry trends towards multi-core processors, with four- and six-core chips common today and 128-core chips coming soon, we wish to better understand how algorithmic and parallel programming choices impact performance and scalability on large, distributed-memory multi-core systems. Our findings indicate that the hybrid-parallel implementation, at levels of concurrency ranging from 1,728 to 216,000, performs better, uses a smaller absolute memory footprint, and consumes less communication bandwidth than the traditional, MPI-only implementation.

  9. Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering on Large, Multi- and Many-core Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howison, Mark; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank

    2011-01-01

    With the computing industry trending towards multi- and many-core processors, we study how a standard visualization algorithm, ray-casting volume rendering, can benefit from a hybrid parallelism approach. Hybrid parallelism provides the best of both worlds: using distributed-memory parallelism across a large numbers of nodes increases available FLOPs and memory, while exploiting shared-memory parallelism among the cores within each node ensures that each node performs its portion of the larger calculation as efficiently as possible. We demonstrate results from weak and strong scaling studies, at levels of concurrency ranging up to 216,000, and with datasets as large as 12.2 trillion cells. The greatest benefit from hybrid parallelism lies in the communication portion of the algorithm, the dominant cost at higher levels of concurrency. We show that reducing the number of participants with a hybrid approach significantly improves performance.

  10. Points based reconstruction and rendering of 3D shapes from large volume dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingchang; Tian, Jie; He, Huiguang; Li, Guangming

    2003-05-01

    In the field of medical imaging, researchers often need visualize lots of 3D datasets to get the informaiton contained in these datasets. But the huge data genreated by modern medical imaging device challenge the real time processing and rendering algorithms at all the time. Spurring by the great achievement of Points Based Rendering (PBR) in the fields of computer graphics to render very large meshes, we propose a new algorithm to use the points as basic primitive of surface reconstruction and rendering to interactively reconstruct and render very large volume dataset. By utilizing the special characteristics of medical image datasets, we obtain a fast and efficient points-based reconstruction and rendering algorithm in common PC. The experimental results show taht this algorithm is feasible and efficient.

  11. Multiple distal basin plains reveal a common distribution for large volume turbidity current recurrence intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clare, M. A.; Talling, P. J.; Hunt, J.; Challenor, P. G.

    2013-12-01

    Remarkably large volume (>>1 km3) deposits emplaced by turbidity currents in distal basin plains result from large submarine landslides. Such landslides may generate tsunamis, and the turbidity currents pose threats to seafloor structures as well as being one of the most important processes for sediment transport across our planet. It is therefore important to understand the recurrence intervals and timing of landslides and the turbidity currents they generate. An understanding of their frequency provides information to assist in forward-looking geohazard analyses, including probabilistic modelling of potential damage. Analysis of their frequency distribution may also help to unravel links to triggering and conditioning mechanisms. We present long term records (up to 17 Ma) of landslide-triggered turbidity current recurrence intervals. We document the distribution of recurrence intervals for large volume turbidites in four basin-plains in disparate locations worldwide, including two recent systems and two outcrop studies. The recurrence times of turbidity currents is inferred from intervals of hemipelagic mud that form by fallout of background sediment between turbidity currents, and the average accumulation rate of hemipelagic mud between dated horizons. There is very little erosion below turbidite beds in the study locations; hence they represent an almost continuous sedimentary record. This method has the advantage of providing information on the timing of many different events from a small number of cores, with such large numbers (N> 100) of beds needed for robust statistical analysis. A common frequency distribution of turbidite recurrence intervals is observed, despite their variable ages and disparate locations, suggesting similar underlying controls on triggering mechanism and frequency. This common distribution closely approximates a temporally-random Poisson distribution, such that the probability of an event occurring along the basin margin is

  12. Study of electrode pattern design for a CZT-based PET detector

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Y; Levin, C S

    2014-01-01

    We are developing a 1 mm resolution small animal positron emission tomography (PET) system using 3-D positioning Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) photon detectors comprising 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm crystals metalized with a cross-strip electrode pattern with a 1 mm anode strip pitch. We optimized the electrode pattern design for intrinsic sensitivity and spatial, energy and time resolution performance using a test detector comprising cathode and steering electrode strips of varying dimensions. The study found 3 mm and 5 mm width cathode strips locate charge-shared photon interactions near cathode strip boundaries with equal precision. 3 mm width cathode strips exhibited large time resolution variability as a function of photon interaction location between the anode and cathode planes (~26 ns to ~127.5 ns FWHM for 0.5 mm and 4.2 mm depths, respectively). 5 mm width cathode strips by contrast exhibited more stable time resolution for the same interaction locations (~34 ns to ~83 ns FWHM), provided more linear spatial positioning in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes, and as much as 68.4% improvement in photon sensitivity over the 3 mm wide cathode strips. The results were understood by analyzing the cathode strips’ weighting functions, which indicated a stronger “small pixel” effect in the 3 mm wide cathode strips. Photon sensitivity and anode energy resolution were seen to improve with decreasing steering electrode bias from 0 V to −80 V w.r.t the anode potential. A slight improvement in energy resolution was seen for wider steering electrode strips (400 μm vs. 100 μm) for charge-shared photon interactions. Although this study successfully focused on electrode pattern features for PET performance, the results are generally applicable to semiconductor photon detectors employing cross-trip electrode patterns. PMID:24786208

  13. Pathways of deep cyclones associated with large volume changes (LVCs) and major Baltic inflows (MBIs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Andreas; Höflich, Katharina; Post, Piia; Myrberg, Kai

    2016-04-01

    Large volume changes (LVCs) and major Baltic inflows (MBIs) are essential processes for the water exchange and renewal of the deep stagnant deep water in the Baltic Sea deep basins. MBIs are considered as subset of LVCs transporting with the large water volume a big amount of highly saline and oxygenated water into the Baltic Sea. Since the early 1980s the frequency of MBIs has dropped drastically from 5 to 7 events to only one inflow per decade, and long lasting periods without MBIs became the usual state. Only in January 1993, 2003 and December 2014 MBIs occurred that were able to interrupt the stagnation periods in the deep basins of the Baltic Sea. However, in spite of the decreasing frequency of MBIs, there is no obvious decrease of LVCs. Large volume changes have been calculated for the period 1887-2014 filtering daily time series of Landsort sea surface elevation anomalies. The Landsort sea level is known to reflect the mean sea level of the Baltic Sea very well. Thus, LVCs can be calculated from the mean sea level variations. The cases with local minimum and maximum difference resulting of at least 100 km³ of water volume change have been chosen for a closer study of characteristic pathways of deep cyclones. The average duration of a LVC is about 40 days. During this time, 5-6 deep cyclones will move along characteristic storm tracks. We obtained three main routes of deep cyclones which were associated with LVCs, but also with the climatology. One is approaching from the west at about 58-62°N, passing the northern North Sea, Oslo, Sweden and the Island of Gotland, while a second, less frequent one, is approaching from the west at about 65°N, crossing Scandinavia south-eastwards passing the Sea of Bothnia and entering Finland. A third very frequent one is entering the study area north of Scotland turning north-eastwards along the northern coast of Scandinavia. Thus, the conditions for a LVC to happen are a temporal clustering of deep cyclones in certain

  14. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Ethan L.; Pehl, Richard H.; Lathrop, James R.; Martin, Gregory N.; Mashburn, R. B.; Miley, Harry S.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Bowyer, Ted W.

    2006-09-21

    Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume (~570 cm3, ~3 kg, 140% or larger) germanium detectors for field applications. We are using a new generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers for operating the very largest volume germanium detectors with absolutely no maintenance or liquid nitrogen requirements. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The flip of a switch will bring a system to life in ~1 hour for measurements. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed five years. These features are necessary for remote long-duration liquid-nitrogen free deployment of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detector systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring (NEM). The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) will greatly benefit from the availability of such detectors by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen at RASA sites while still allowing the very largest available germanium detectors to be utilized. These mechanically cooled germanium detector systems being developed here will provide the largest, most sensitive detectors possible for use with the RASA. To provide such systems, the appropriate technical fundamentals are being researched. Mechanical cooling of germanium detectors has historically been a difficult endeavor. The success or failure of mechanically cooled germanium detectors stems from three main technical issues: temperature, vacuum, and vibration. These factors affect one another. There is a particularly crucial relationship between vacuum and temperature. These factors will be experimentally studied both separately and together to insure a solid understanding of the physical limitations each factor places on a practical mechanically cooled germanium detector system for field use. Using this knowledge, a series of mechanically cooled germanium detector prototype systems are being designed and fabricated. Our collaborators

  15. Large-volume flux closure during plasmoid-mediated reconnection in coaxial helicity injection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ebrahimi, F.; Raman, R.

    2016-03-23

    A large-volume flux closure during transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI) in NSTX-U is demonstrated through resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations. Several major improvements, including the improved positioning of the divertor poloidal field coils, are projected to improve the CHI start-up phase in NSTX-U. Simulations in the NSTX-U configuration with constant in time coil currents show that with strong flux shaping the injected open field lines (injector flux) rapidly reconnect and form large volume of closed flux surfaces. This is achieved by driving parallel current in the injector flux coil and oppositely directed currents in the flux shaping coils to form amore » narrow injector flux footprint and push the injector flux into the vessel. As the helicity and plasma are injected into the device, the oppositely directed field lines in the injector region are forced to reconnect through a local Sweet-Parker type reconnection, or to spontaneously reconnect when the elongated current sheet becomes MHD unstable to form plasmoids. In these simulations for the first time, it is found that the closed flux is over 70% of the initial injector flux used to initiate the discharge. Furthermore, these results could work well for the application of transient CHI in devices that employ super conducting coils to generate and sustain the plasma equilibrium.« less

  16. Large-volume sample stacking for analysis of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Lifeng; Marimuthu, Arun; Yang, Zhaoguang

    2002-09-01

    A simple, quick, and sensitive capillary electrophoretic technique-large volume stacking using the electroosmotic flow (EOF) pump (LVSEP) - has been developed for determining ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in drinking water for the first time. It is based on a precapillary complexation of EDTA with Fe(III) ions, followed by large-volume sample stacking and direct UV detection at 258 nm. The curve of peak response versus concentration was linear from 5.0 to 600.0 microg/L, and 0.7 to 30.0 mg/L. The regression coefficients were 0.9988 and 0.9990, respectively. The detection limit of the current technique for EDTA analysis was 0.2 microg/L with an additional 10-fold preconcentration procedure, based on the signal-to-noise ratio of 3. As opposed to the classical capillary zone electrophoresis (CE) method, the detection limit was improved about 1000-fold by using this LVSEP method. To the best of our knowledge, it represents the highest sensitivity for EDTA analysis via CE. Several drinking water samples were tested by this novel method with satisfactory results. PMID:12207295

  17. Controlled ice nucleation--Is it really needed for large-volume sperm cryopreservation?

    PubMed

    Saragusty, Joseph; Osmers, Jan-Hendrik; Hildebrandt, Thomas Bernd

    2016-04-15

    Controlled ice nucleation (CIN) is an integral stage of slow freezing process when relatively large volumes (usually 1 mL or larger) of biological samples in suspension are involved. Without it, a sample will supercool to way below its melting point before ice crystals start forming, resulting in multiple damaging processes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that when freezing large volumes by the directional freezing technique, a CIN stage is not needed. Semen samples collected from ten bulls were frozen in 2.5-mL HollowTubes in a split-sample manner with and without a CIN stage. Thawed samples were evaluated for viability, acrosome integrity, rate of normal morphology, and, using computer-aided sperm analysis system, for a wide range of motility parameters that were also evaluated after 3 hours of incubation at 37 °C. Analysis of the results found no difference between freezing with and without CIN stage in any and all of the 29 parameters compared (P > 0.1 for all). This similarity was maintained through 3 hours of incubation at 37 °C. Possibly, because of its structure, the directional freezing device promotes continuous ice nucleation so a specific CIN stage is no longer needed, thus reducing costs, energy use, and carbon footprint. PMID:26806291

  18. Broadband frequency ECR ion source concepts with large resonant plasma volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    New techniques are proposed for enhancing the performances of ECR ion sources. The techniques are based on the use of high-power, variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, or broadband microwave radiation, derived from standard TWT technology, to effect large resonant ``volume`` ECR sources. The creation of a large ECR plasma ``volume`` permits coupling of more power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present forms of the ECR ion source. If successful, these developments could significantly impact future accelerator designs and accelerator-based, heavy-ion-research programs by providing multiply-charged ion beams with the energies and intensities required for nuclear physics research from existing ECR ion sources. The methods described in this article can be used to retrofit any ECR ion source predicated on B-minimum plasma confinement techniques.

  19. Generation of Diffuse Large Volume Plasma by an Ionization Wave from a Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, Mounir; Razavi, Hamid

    2015-09-01

    Low temperature plasma jets emitted in ambient air are the product of fast ionization waves that are guided within a channel of a gas flow, such as helium. This guided ionization wave can be transmitted through a dielectric material and under some conditions can ignite a discharge behind the dielectric material. Here we present a novel way to produce large volume diffuse low pressure plasma inside a Pyrex chamber that does not have any electrodes or electrical energy directly applied to it. The diffuse plasma is ignited inside the chamber by a plasma jet located externally to the chamber and that is physically and electrically unconnected to the chamber. Instead, the plasma jet is just brought in close proximity to the external wall/surface of the chamber or to a dielectric tubing connected to the chamber. The plasma thus generated is diffuse, large volume and with physical and chemical characteristics that are different than the external plasma jet that ignited it. So by using a plasma jet we are able to ``remotely'' ignite volumetric plasma under controlled conditions. This novel method of ``remote'' generation of a low pressure, low temperature diffuse plasma can be useful for various applications including material processing and biomedicine.

  20. Colloids Versus Albumin in Large Volume Paracentesis to Prevent Circulatory Dysfunction: Evidence-based Case Report.

    PubMed

    Widjaja, Felix F; Khairan, Paramita; Kamelia, Telly; Hasan, Irsan

    2016-04-01

    Large volume paracentesis may cause paracentesis induced circulatory dysfunction (PICD). Albumin is recommended to prevent this abnormality. Meanwhile, the price of albumin is too expensive and there should be another alternative that may prevent PICD. This report aimed to compare albumin to colloids in preventing PICD. Search strategy was done using PubMed, Scopus, Proquest, dan Academic Health Complete from EBSCO with keywords of "ascites", "albumin", "colloid", "dextran", "hydroxyethyl starch", "gelatin", and "paracentesis induced circulatory dysfunction". Articles was limited to randomized clinical trial and meta-analysis with clinical question of "In hepatic cirrhotic patient undergone large volume paracentesis, whether colloids were similar to albumin to prevent PICD". We found one meta-analysis and four randomized clinical trials (RCT). A meta analysis showed that albumin was still superior of which odds ratio 0.34 (0.23-0.51). Three RCTs showed the same results and one RCT showed albumin was not superior than colloids. We conclude that colloids could not constitute albumin to prevent PICD, but colloids still have a role in patient who undergone paracentesis less than five liters. PMID:27550886

  1. Large-volume flux closure during plasmoid-mediated reconnection in coaxial helicity injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, F.; Raman, R.

    2016-04-01

    A large-volume flux closure during transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI) in NSTX-U is demonstrated through resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations. Several major improvements, including the improved positioning of the divertor poloidal field coils, are projected to improve the CHI start-up phase in NSTX-U. Simulations in the NSTX-U configuration with constant in time coil currents show that with strong flux shaping the injected open field lines (injector flux) rapidly reconnect and form large volume of closed flux surfaces. This is achieved by driving parallel current in the injector flux coil and oppositely directed currents in the flux shaping coils to form a narrow injector flux footprint and push the injector flux into the vessel. As the helicity and plasma are injected into the device, the oppositely directed field lines in the injector region are forced to reconnect through a local Sweet-Parker type reconnection, or to spontaneously reconnect when the elongated current sheet becomes MHD unstable to form plasmoids. In these simulations for the first time, it is found that the closed flux is over 70% of the initial injector flux used to initiate the discharge. These results could work well for the application of transient CHI in devices that employ super conducting coils to generate and sustain the plasma equilibrium.

  2. Development of large volume double ring penning plasma discharge source for efficient light emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Ram; Vyas, Gheesa Lal; Jain, Jalaj; Prajapati, Jitendra; Pal, Udit Narayan; Chowdhuri, Malay Bikas; Manchanda, Ranjana

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the development of large volume double ring Penning plasma discharge source for efficient light emissions is reported. The developed Penning discharge source consists of two cylindrical end cathodes of stainless steel having radius 6 cm and a gap 5.5 cm between them, which are fitted in the top and bottom flanges of the vacuum chamber. Two stainless steel anode rings with thickness 0.4 cm and inner diameters 6.45 cm having separation 2 cm are kept at the discharge centre. Neodymium (Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B) permanent magnets are physically inserted behind the cathodes for producing nearly uniform magnetic field of {approx}0.1 T at the center. Experiments and simulations have been performed for single and double anode ring configurations using helium gas discharge, which infer that double ring configuration gives better light emissions in the large volume Penning plasma discharge arrangement. The optical emission spectroscopy measurements are used to complement the observations. The spectral line-ratio technique is utilized to determine the electron plasma density. The estimated electron plasma density in double ring plasma configuration is {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}, which is around one order of magnitude larger than that of single ring arrangement.

  3. Diethylaminoethyl-cellulose clean-up of a large volume naphthenic acid extract.

    PubMed

    Frank, Richard A; Kavanagh, Richard; Burnison, B Kent; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M; Der Kraak, Glen Van; Solomon, Keith R

    2006-08-01

    The Athabasca oil sands of Alberta, Canada contain an estimated 174 billion barrels of bitumen. During oil sands refining processes, an extraction tailings mixture is produced that has been reported as toxic to aquatic organisms and is therefore collected in settling ponds on site. Investigation into the toxicity of these tailings pond waters has identified naphthenic acids (NAs) and their sodium salts as the major toxic components, and a multi-year study has been initiated to identify the principal toxic components within NA mixtures. Future toxicity studies require a large volume of a NA mixture, however, a well-defined bulk extraction technique is not available. This study investigated the use of a weak anion exchanger, diethylaminoethyl-cellulose (DEAE-cellulose), to remove humic-like material present after collecting the organic acid fraction of oil sands tailings pond water. The NA extraction and clean-up procedure proved to be a fast and efficient method to process large volumes of tailings pond water, providing an extraction efficiency of 41.2%. The resulting concentrated NA solution had a composition that differed somewhat from oil sands fresh tailings, with a reduction in the abundance of lower molecular weight NAs being the most significant difference. This reduction was mainly due to the initial acidification of tailings pond water. The DEAE-cellulose treatment had only a minor effect on the NA concentration, no noticeable effect on the NA fingerprint, and no significant effect on the mixture toxicity towards Vibrio fischeri. PMID:16469358

  4. Large volume susy breaking with a solution to the decompactification problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraggi, Alon E.; Kounnas, Costas; Partouche, Hervé

    2015-10-01

    We study heterotic ground states in which supersymmetry is broken by coupling the momentum and winding charges of two large extra dimensions to the R-charges of the supersymmetry generators. The large dimensions give rise to towers of heavy string thresholds that contribute to the running of the gauge couplings. In the general case, these contributions are proportional to the volume of the two large dimensions and invalidate the perturbative string expansion. The problem is evaded if the susy breaking sectors arise as a spontaneously broken phase of N = 4 → N = 2 → N = 0 supersymmetry, provided that N = 4 supersymmetry is restored on the boundary of the moduli space. We discuss the mechanism in the case of Z2 ×Z2 orbifolds, which requires that the twisted sector that contains the large extra dimensions has no fixed points. We analyze the full string partition function and show that the twisted sectors distribute themselves in non-aligned N = 2 orbits, hence preserving the solution to the string decompactification problem. Remarkably, we find that the contribution to the vacuum energy from the N = 2 → N = 0 sectors is suppressed, and the only substantial contribution arises from the breaking of the N = 4 sector to N = 0.

  5. The Oligocene Lund Tuff, Great Basin, USA: a very large volume monotonous intermediate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maughan, Larissa L.; Christiansen, Eric H.; Best, Myron G.; Grommé, C. Sherman; Deino, Alan L.; Tingey, David G.

    2002-03-01

    Unusual monotonous intermediate ignimbrites consist of phenocryst-rich dacite that occurs as very large volume (>1000 km 3) deposits that lack systematic compositional zonation, comagmatic rhyolite precursors, and underlying plinian beds. They are distinct from countless, usually smaller volume, zoned rhyolite-dacite-andesite deposits that are conventionally believed to have erupted from magma chambers in which thermal and compositional gradients were established because of sidewall crystallization and associated convective fractionation. Despite their great volume, or because of it, monotonous intermediates have received little attention. Documentation of the stratigraphy, composition, and geologic setting of the Lund Tuff - one of four monotonous intermediate tuffs in the middle-Tertiary Great Basin ignimbrite province - provides insight into its unusual origin and, by implication, the origin of other similar monotonous intermediates. The Lund Tuff is a single cooling unit with normal magnetic polarity whose volume likely exceeded 3000 km 3. It was emplaced 29.02±0.04 Ma in and around the coeval White Rock caldera which has an unextended north-south diameter of about 50 km. The tuff is monotonous in that its phenocryst assemblage is virtually uniform throughout the deposit: plagioclase>quartz≈hornblende>biotite>Fe-Ti oxides≈sanidine>titanite, zircon, and apatite. However, ratios of phenocrysts vary by as much as an order of magnitude in a manner consistent with progressive crystallization in the pre-eruption chamber. A significant range in whole-rock chemical composition (e.g., 63-71 wt% SiO 2) is poorly correlated with phenocryst abundance. These compositional attributes cannot have been caused wholly by winnowing of glass from phenocrysts during eruption, as has been suggested for the monotonous intermediate Fish Canyon Tuff. Pumice fragments are also crystal-rich, and chemically and mineralogically indistinguishable from bulk tuff. We postulate that

  6. Large volume recycling of oceanic lithosphere over short time scales: geochemical constraints from the Caribbean Large Igneous Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauff, F.; Hoernle, K.; Tilton, G.; Graham, D. W.; Kerr, A. C.

    2000-01-01

    isochron diagrams suggests that the age of separation of enriched and depleted components from the depleted MORB source mantle could have been ≤500 Ma before CLIP formation and interpreted to reflect the recycling time of the CLIP source. Mantle plume heads may provide a mechanism for transporting large volumes of possibly young recycled oceanic lithosphere residing in the lower mantle back into the shallow MORB source mantle.

  7. Calcium Isolation from Large-Volume Human Urine Samples for 41Ca Analysis by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Miller, James J; Hui, Susanta K; Jackson, George S; Clark, Sara P; Einstein, Jane; Weaver, Connie M; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H

    2013-01-01

    Calcium oxalate precipitation is the first step in preparation of biological samples for 41Ca analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry. A simplified protocol for large-volume human urine samples was characterized, with statistically significant increases in ion current and decreases in interference. This large-volume assay minimizes cost and effort and maximizes time after 41Ca administration during which human samples, collected over a lifetime, provide 41Ca:Ca ratios that are significantly above background. PMID:23672965

  8. Large volume serial section tomography by Xe Plasma FIB dual beam microscopy.

    PubMed

    Burnett, T L; Kelley, R; Winiarski, B; Contreras, L; Daly, M; Gholinia, A; Burke, M G; Withers, P J

    2016-02-01

    Ga(+) Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscopes (FIB-SEM) have revolutionised the level of microstructural information that can be recovered in 3D by block face serial section tomography (SST), as well as enabling the site-specific removal of smaller regions for subsequent transmission electron microscope (TEM) examination. However, Ga(+) FIB material removal rates limit the volumes and depths that can be probed to dimensions in the tens of microns range. Emerging Xe(+) Plasma Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscope (PFIB-SEM) systems promise faster removal rates. Here we examine the potential of the method for large volume serial section tomography as applied to bainitic steel and WC-Co hard metals. Our studies demonstrate that with careful control of milling parameters precise automated serial sectioning can be achieved with low levels of milling artefacts at removal rates some 60× faster. Volumes that are hundreds of microns in dimension have been collected using fully automated SST routines in feasible timescales (<24h) showing good grain orientation contrast and capturing microstructural features at the tens of nanometres to the tens of microns scale. Accompanying electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) maps show high indexing rates suggesting low levels of surface damage. Further, under high current Ga(+) FIB milling WC-Co is prone to amorphisation of WC surface layers and phase transformation of the Co phase, neither of which have been observed at PFIB currents as high as 60nA at 30kV. Xe(+) PFIB dual beam microscopes promise to radically extend our capability for 3D tomography, 3D EDX, 3D EBSD as well as correlative tomography. PMID:26683814

  9. Random forest classification of large volume structures for visuo-haptic rendering in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastmeyer, Andre; Fortmeier, Dirk; Handels, Heinz

    2016-03-01

    For patient-specific voxel-based visuo-haptic rendering of CT scans of the liver area, the fully automatic segmentation of large volume structures such as skin, soft tissue, lungs and intestine (risk structures) is important. Using a machine learning based approach, several existing segmentations from 10 segmented gold-standard patients are learned by random decision forests individually and collectively. The core of this paper is feature selection and the application of the learned classifiers to a new patient data set. In a leave-some-out cross-validation, the obtained full volume segmentations are compared to the gold-standard segmentations of the untrained patients. The proposed classifiers use a multi-dimensional feature space to estimate the hidden truth, instead of relying on clinical standard threshold and connectivity based methods. The result of our efficient whole-body section classification are multi-label maps with the considered tissues. For visuo-haptic simulation, other small volume structures would have to be segmented additionally. We also take a look into these structures (liver vessels). For an experimental leave-some-out study consisting of 10 patients, the proposed method performs much more efficiently compared to state of the art methods. In two variants of leave-some-out experiments we obtain best mean DICE ratios of 0.79, 0.97, 0.63 and 0.83 for skin, soft tissue, hard bone and risk structures. Liver structures are segmented with DICE 0.93 for the liver, 0.43 for blood vessels and 0.39 for bile vessels.

  10. Determination of the large scale volume weighted halo velocity bias in simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Pengjie; Jing, Yipeng

    2015-06-01

    A profound assumption in peculiar velocity cosmology is bv=1 at sufficiently large scales, where bv is the volume-weighted halo(galaxy) velocity bias with respect to the matter velocity field. However, this fundamental assumption has not been robustly verified in numerical simulations. Furthermore, it is challenged by structure formation theory (Bardeen, Bond, Kaiser and Szalay, Astrophys. J. 304, 15 (1986); Desjacques and Sheth, Phys. Rev D 81, 023526 (2010), which predicts the existence of velocity bias (at least for proto-halos) due to the fact that halos reside in special regions (local density peaks). The major obstacle to measuring the volume-weighted velocity from N-body simulations is an unphysical sampling artifact. It is entangled in the measured velocity statistics and becomes significant for sparse populations. With recently improved understanding of the sampling artifact (Zhang, Zheng and Jing, 2015, PRD; Zheng, Zhang and Jing, 2015, PRD), for the first time we are able to appropriately correct this sampling artifact and then robustly measure the volume-weighted halo velocity bias. (1) We verify bv=1 within 2% model uncertainty at k ≲0.1 h /Mpc and z =0 - 2 for halos of mass ˜1012- 1013h-1M⊙ and, therefore, consolidate a foundation for the peculiar velocity cosmology. (2) We also find statistically significant signs of bv≠1 at k ≳0.1 h /Mpc . Unfortunately, whether this is real or caused by a residual sampling artifact requires further investigation. Nevertheless, cosmology based on the k ≳0.1 h /Mpc velocity data should be careful with this potential velocity bias.

  11. Measurements of Elastic and Inelastic Properties under Simulated Earth's Mantle Conditions in Large Volume Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    The interpretation of highly resolved seismic data from Earths deep interior require measurements of the physical properties of Earth's materials under experimental simulated mantle conditions. More than decade ago seismic tomography clearly showed subduction of crustal material can reach the core mantle boundary under specific circumstances. That means there is no longer space for the assumption deep mantle rocks might be much less complex than deep crustal rocks known from exhumation processes. Considering this geophysical high pressure research is faced the challenge to increase pressure and sample volume at the same time to be able to perform in situ experiments with representative complex samples. High performance multi anvil devices using novel materials are the most promising technique for this exciting task. Recent large volume presses provide sample volumes 3 to 7 orders of magnitude bigger than in diamond anvil cells far beyond transition zone conditions. The sample size of several cubic millimeters allows elastic wave frequencies in the low to medium MHz range. Together with the small and even adjustable temperature gradients over the whole sample this technique makes anisotropy and grain boundary effects in complex systems accessible for elastic and inelastic properties measurements in principle. The measurements of both elastic wave velocities have also no limits for opaque and encapsulated samples. The application of triple-mode transducers and the data transfer function technique for the ultrasonic interferometry reduces the time for saving the data during the experiment to about a minute or less. That makes real transient measurements under non-equilibrium conditions possible. A further benefit is, both elastic wave velocities are measured exactly simultaneously. Ultrasonic interferometry necessarily requires in situ sample deformation measurement by X-radiography. Time-resolved X-radiography makes in situ falling sphere viscosimetry and even the

  12. Probing the Earth’s interior with a large-volume liquid scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochmuth, Kathrin A.; Feilitzsch, Franz V.; Fields, Brian D.; Undagoitia, Teresa Marrodán; Oberauer, Lothar; Potzel, Walter; Raffelt, Georg G.; Wurm, Michael

    2007-02-01

    A future large-volume liquid scintillator detector would provide a high-statistics measurement of terrestrial antineutrinos originating from β-decays of the uranium and thorium chains. In addition, the forward displacement of the neutron in the detection reaction ν+p→n+e provides directional information. We investigate the requirements on such detectors to distinguish between certain geophysical models on the basis of the angular dependence of the geoneutrino flux. Our analysis is based on a Monte-Carlo simulation with different levels of light yield, considering both unloaded and gadolinium-loaded scintillators. We find that a 50 kt detector such as the proposed LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) will detect deviations from isotropy of the geoneutrino flux significantly. However, with an unloaded scintillator the time needed for a useful discrimination between different geophysical models is too large if one uses the directional information alone. A Gd-loaded scintillator improves the situation considerably, although a 50 kt detector would still need several decades to distinguish between a geophysical reference model and one with a large neutrino source in the Earth’s core. However, a high-statistics measurement of the total geoneutrino flux and its spectrum still provides an extremely useful glance at the Earth’s interior.

  13. Detection of fast flying nanoparticles by light scattering over a large volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettazzi, F.; Bäumer, S.; van der Donck, J.; Deutz, A.

    2015-06-01

    is a well-known detection method which is applied in many different scientific and technology domains including atmospheric physics, environmental control, and biology. It allows contactless and remote detection of sub-micron size particles. However, methods for detecting a single fast moving particle smaller than 100 nm are lacking. In the present work we report a preliminary design study of an inline large area detector for nanoparticles larger than 50 nm which move with velocities up to 100 m/s. The detector design is based on light scattering using commercially available components. The presented design takes into account all challenges connected to the inline implementation of the scattering technique in the system: the need for the detector to have a large field of view to cover a volume with a footprint commensurate to an area of 100mm x 100mm, the necessity to sense nanoparticles transported at high velocity, and the requirement of large capture rate with a false detection as low as one false positive per week. The impact of all these stringent requirements on the expected sensitivity and performances of the device is analyzed by mean of a dedicated performance model.

  14. A large volume cell for in situ neutron diffraction studies of hydrothermal crystallizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Fang; Qian, Gujie; Brugger, Joël; Studer, Andrew; Olsen, Scott; Pring, Allan

    2010-10-01

    A hydrothermal cell with 320 ml internal volume has been designed and constructed for in situ neutron diffraction studies of hydrothermal crystallizations. The cell design adopts a dumbbell configuration assembled with standard commercial stainless steel components and a zero-scattering Ti-Zr alloy sample compartment. The fluid movement and heat transfer are simply driven by natural convection due to the natural temperature gradient along the fluid path, so that the temperature at the sample compartment can be stably sustained by heating the fluid in the bottom fluid reservoir. The cell can operate at temperatures up to 300 °C and pressures up to 90 bars and is suitable for studying reactions requiring a large volume of hydrothermal fluid to damp out the negative effect from the change of fluid composition during the course of the reactions. The capability of the cell was demonstrated by a hydrothermal phase transformation investigation from leucite (KAlSi2O6) to analcime (NaAlSi2O6ṡH2O) at 210 °C on the high intensity powder diffractometer Wombat in ANSTO. The kinetics of the transformation has been resolved by collecting diffraction patterns every 10 min followed by Rietveld quantitative phase analysis. The classical Avrami/Arrhenius analysis gives an activation energy of 82.3±1.1 kJ mol-1. Estimations of the reaction rate under natural environments by extrapolations agree well with petrological observations.

  15. Evaluation of Large Volume SrI2(Eu) Scintillator Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, B W; Cherepy, N J; Drury, O B; Thelin, P A; Fisher, S E; Magyar, A F; Payne, S A; Burger, A; Boatner, L A; Ramey, J O; Shah, K S; Hawrami, R

    2010-11-18

    There is an ever increasing demand for gamma-ray detectors which can achieve good energy resolution, high detection efficiency, and room-temperature operation. We are working to address each of these requirements through the development of large volume SrI{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator detectors. In this work, we have evaluated a variety of SrI{sub 2} crystals with volumes >10 cm{sup 3}. The goal of this research was to examine the causes of energy resolution degradation for larger detectors and to determine what can be done to mitigate these effects. Testing both packaged and unpackaged detectors, we have consistently achieved better resolution with the packaged detectors. Using a collimated gamma-ray source, it was determined that better energy resolution for the packaged detectors is correlated with better light collection uniformity. A number of packaged detectors were fabricated and tested and the best spectroscopic performance was achieved for a 3% Eu doped crystal with an energy resolution of 2.93% FWHM at 662keV. Simulations of SrI{sub 2}(Eu) crystals were also performed to better understand the light transport physics in scintillators and are reported. This study has important implications for the development of SrI{sub 2}(Eu) detectors for national security purposes.

  16. Large-Volume Resonant Microwave Discharge for Plasma Cleaning of a CEBAF 5-Cell SRF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    J. Mammosser, S. Ahmed, K. Macha, J. Upadhyay, M. Nikoli, S. Popovi, L. Vuakovi

    2012-07-01

    We report the preliminary results on plasma generation in a 5-cell CEBAF superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity for the application of cavity interior surface cleaning. CEBAF currently has {approx}300 of these five cell cavities installed in the Jefferson Lab accelerator which are mostly limited by cavity surface contamination. The development of an in-situ cavity surface cleaning method utilizing a resonant microwave discharge could lead to significant CEBAF accelerator performance improvement. This microwave discharge is currently being used for the development of a set of plasma cleaning procedures targeted to the removal of various organic, metal and metal oxide impurities. These contaminants are responsible for the increase of surface resistance and the reduction of RF performance in installed cavities. The CEBAF five cell cavity volume is {approx} 0.5 m2, which places the discharge in the category of large-volume plasmas. CEBAF cavity has a cylindrical symmetry, but its elliptical shape and transversal power coupling makes it an unusual plasma application, which requires special consideration of microwave breakdown. Our preliminary study includes microwave breakdown and optical spectroscopy, which was used to define the operating pressure range and the rate of removal of organic impurities.

  17. Lotung large-scale seismic test strong motion records. Volume 1, General description: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in cooperation with the Taiwan Power Company (TPC), constructed two models (1/4 scale and 1/12 scale) of a nuclear plant concrete containment structure at a seismically active site in Lotung, Taiwan. Extensive instrumentation was deployed to record both structural and ground responses during earthquakes. The experiment, generally referred to as the Lotung Large-Scale Seismic Test (LSST), was used to gather data for soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis method evaluation and validation as well as for site ground response investigation. A number of earthquakes having local magnitudes ranging from 4.5 to 7.0 have been recorded at the LSST site since the completion of the test facility in September 1985. This report documents the earthquake data, both raw and processed, collected from the LSST experiment. Volume 1 of the report provides general information on site location, instrument types and layout, data acquisition and processing, and data file organization. The recorded data are described chronologically in subsequent volumes of the report.

  18. A large volume uniform plasma generator for the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Min; Li Xiaoping; Xie Kai; Liu Donglin; Liu Yanming

    2013-01-15

    A large volume uniform plasma generator is proposed for the experiments of electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in plasma, to reproduce a 'black out' phenomenon with long duration in an environment of the ordinary laboratory. The plasma generator achieves a controllable approximate uniform plasma in volume of 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 180 mm without the magnetic confinement. The plasma is produced by the glow discharge, and the special discharge structure is built to bring a steady approximate uniform plasma environment in the electromagnetic wave propagation path without any other barriers. In addition, the electron density and luminosity distributions of plasma under different discharge conditions were diagnosed and experimentally investigated. Both the electron density and the plasma uniformity are directly proportional to the input power and in roughly reverse proportion to the gas pressure in the chamber. Furthermore, the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma are conducted in this plasma generator. Blackout phenomena at GPS signal are observed under this system and the measured attenuation curve is of reasonable agreement with the theoretical one, which suggests the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Alveolar albumin leakage during large tidal volume ventilation and surfactant dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Liu, J M; Evander, E; Zhao, J; Wollmer, P; Jonson, B

    2001-07-01

    Detergent given as an aerosol and large tidal volume ventilation (LTVV) have been observed, by us, to promote lung injury by an additive effect on alveolocapillary barrier function. The surfactant system may be further damaged if protein leakage occurs into the alveoli. The aim was to study the effect of detergent and LTVV on the alveolar leakage of albumin and also the effect of detergent on surface activity of lung washings and lung tissue extracts. Technetium-99m-labelled human serum albumin was given intravenously. The alveolar leakage of albumin was measured after perturbing the surfactant system with the detergent dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate either singly or in combination with LTVV. Four groups of rabbits were studied after 3 h of experimental ventilation. Surface tension measurements of tissue extracts, lung mechanics and gas exchange did not show any differences between groups. Wet lung weight and albumin leakage were significantly increased in the two groups subjected to LTVV compared with groups given normal tidal volume ventilation. Low doses of detergent did not affect surface activity of lung tissue extracts or alveolar leakage of albumin. LTVV increased alveolar leakage of albumin and produced oedema. No additive effect was seen when detergent and LTVV were combined. PMID:11442575

  20. Detection and Isolation of H5N1 Influenza virus from Large Volumes of Natural Water

    PubMed Central

    Khalenkov, Alexey; Laver, W. Graeme; Webster, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Various species of aquatic or wetlands birds can be the natural reservoir of avian influenza A viruses of all hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes. Shedding of the virus into water leads to transmission between waterfowl and is a major threat for epidemics in poultry and pandemics in humans. Concentrations of the influenza virus in natural water reservoirs are often too low to be detected by most methods. The procedure was designed to detect low concentrations of the influenza virus in large volumes of water without the need for costly installations and reagents. The virus was adsorbed onto formalin-fixed erythrocytes and subsequently isolated in chicken embryos. Sensitivity of the method was determined using a reverse-genetic H5N1 virus. A concentration as low as 0.03 of the 50% egg infection dose per milliliter (EID50/ml) of the initial volume of water was effectively detected. The probability of detection was ∼13%, which is comparable to that of detecting the influenza virus M-gene by PCR amplification. The method can be used by field workers, ecologists, ornithologists, and researchers who need a simple method to isolate H5N1 influenza virus from natural reservoirs. The detection and isolation of virus in embryonated chicken eggs may help epidemiologic, genetic, and vaccine studies. PMID:18325605

  1. Large volume liquid helium relief device verifacation apparatus for the alpha magnetic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimas, Richard John; McIntyre, P.; Colvin, John; Zeigler, John; Van Sciver, Steven; Ting, Samual

    2012-06-01

    Here we present details of an experiment for verifying the liquid helium vessel relief device for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-02 (AMS-02). The relief device utilizes a series of rupture discs designed to open in the event of a vacuum failure of the AMS-02 cryogenic system. A failure of this type is classified to be a catastrophic loss of insulating vacuum accident. This apparatus differs from other approaches due to the size of the test volumes used. The verification apparatus consists of a 250 liter vessel used for the test quantity of liquid helium that is located inside a vacuum insulated vessel. A large diameter valve is suddenly opened to simulate the loss of insulating vacuum in a repeatable manner. Pressure and temperature vs. time data are presented and discussed in the context of the AMS-02 hardware configuration.

  2. Measurement of the Velocity of Neutrinos from the CNGS Beam with the Large Volume Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonova, N. Yu.; Aglietta, M.; Antonioli, P.; Ashikhmin, V. V.; Bari, G.; Bertoni, R.; Bressan, E.; Bruno, G.; Dadykin, V. L.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Garbini, M.; Ghia, P. L.; Giusti, P.; Kemp, E.; Mal'gin, A. S.; Miguez, B.; Molinario, A.; Persiani, R.; Pless, I. A.; Ryasny, V. G.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Saavedra, O.; Sartorelli, G.; Shakyrianova, I. R.; Selvi, M.; Trinchero, G. C.; Vigorito, C.; Yakushev, V. F.; Zichichi, A.; Razeto, A.

    2012-08-01

    We report the measurement of the time of flight of ˜17GeV νμ on the CNGS baseline (732 km) with the Large Volume Detector (LVD) at the Gran Sasso Laboratory. The CERN-SPS accelerator has been operated from May 10th to May 24th 2012, with a tightly bunched-beam structure to allow the velocity of neutrinos to be accurately measured on an event-by-event basis. LVD has detected 48 neutrino events, associated with the beam, with a high absolute time accuracy. These events allow us to establish the following limit on the difference between the neutrino speed and the light velocity: -3.8×10-6<(vν-c)/c<3.1×10-6 (at 99% C.L.). This value is an order of magnitude lower than previous direct measurements.

  3. Isolation of organic acids from large volumes of water by adsorption chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, George R.

    1984-01-01

    The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon from most natural waters ranges from 1 to 20 milligrams carbon per liter, of which approximately 75 percent are organic acids. These acids can be chromatographically fractionated into hydrophobic organic acids, such as humic substances, and hydrophilic organic acids. To effectively study any of these organic acids, they must be isolated from other organic and inorganic species, and concentrated. Usually, large volumes of water must be processed to obtain sufficient quantities of material, and adsorption chromatography on synthetic, macroporous resins has proven to be a particularly effective method for this purpose. The use of the nonionic Amberlite XAD-8 and Amberlite XAD-4 resins and the anion exchange resin Duolite A-7 for isolating and concentrating organic acids from water is presented.

  4. Measurement of the velocity of neutrinos from the CNGS beam with the large volume detector.

    PubMed

    Agafonova, N Yu; Aglietta, M; Antonioli, P; Ashikhmin, V V; Bari, G; Bertoni, R; Bressan, E; Bruno, G; Dadykin, V L; Fulgione, W; Galeotti, P; Garbini, M; Ghia, P L; Giusti, P; Kemp, E; Mal'gin, A S; Miguez, B; Molinario, A; Persiani, R; Pless, I A; Ryasny, V G; Ryazhskaya, O G; Saavedra, O; Sartorelli, G; Shakyrianova, I R; Selvi, M; Trinchero, G C; Vigorito, C; Yakushev, V F; Zichichi, A; Razeto, A

    2012-08-17

    We report the measurement of the time of flight of ∼17 GeV ν(μ) on the CNGS baseline (732 km) with the Large Volume Detector (LVD) at the Gran Sasso Laboratory. The CERN-SPS accelerator has been operated from May 10th to May 24th 2012, with a tightly bunched-beam structure to allow the velocity of neutrinos to be accurately measured on an event-by-event basis. LVD has detected 48 neutrino events, associated with the beam, with a high absolute time accuracy. These events allow us to establish the following limit on the difference between the neutrino speed and the light velocity: -3.8 × 10(-6) < (v(ν)-c)/c < 3.1 × 10(-6) (at 99% C.L.). This value is an order of magnitude lower than previous direct measurements. PMID:23006352

  5. Monte Carlo calculations of the HPGe detector efficiency for radioactivity measurement of large volume environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Azbouche, Ahmed; Belgaid, Mohamed; Mazrou, Hakim

    2015-08-01

    A fully detailed Monte Carlo geometrical model of a High Purity Germanium detector with a (152)Eu source, packed in Marinelli beaker, was developed for routine analysis of large volume environmental samples. Then, the model parameters, in particular, the dead layer thickness were adjusted thanks to a specific irradiation configuration together with a fine-tuning procedure. Thereafter, the calculated efficiencies were compared to the measured ones for standard samples containing (152)Eu source filled in both grass and resin matrices packed in Marinelli beaker. From this comparison, a good agreement between experiment and Monte Carlo calculation results was obtained highlighting thereby the consistency of the geometrical computational model proposed in this work. Finally, the computational model was applied successfully to determine the (137)Cs distribution in soil matrix. From this application, instructive results were achieved highlighting, in particular, the erosion and accumulation zone of the studied site. PMID:25982445

  6. A large volume 2000 MPA air source for the radiatively driven hypersonic wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Constantino, M

    1999-07-14

    An ultra-high pressure air source for a hypersonic wind tunnel for fluid dynamics and combustion physics and chemistry research and development must provide a 10 kg/s pure air flow for more than 1 s at a specific enthalpy of more than 3000 kJ/kg. The nominal operating pressure and temperature condition for the air source is 2000 MPa and 900 K. A radial array of variable radial support intensifiers connected to an axial manifold provides an arbitrarily large total high pressure volume. This configuration also provides solutions to cross bore stress concentrations and the decrease in material strength with temperature. [hypersonic, high pressure, air, wind tunnel, ground testing

  7. Aerodynamics of the Large-Volume, Flow-Through Detector System. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, H.; Saric, W.; Laananen, D.; Martinez, C.; Carrillo, R.; Myers, J.; Clevenger, D.

    1996-03-01

    The Large-Volume Flow-Through Detector System (LVFTDS) was designed to monitor alpha radiation from Pu, U, and Am in mixed-waste incinerator offgases; however, it can be adapted to other important monitoring uses that span a number of potential markets, including site remediation, indoor air quality, radon testing, and mine shaft monitoring. Goal of this effort was to provide mechanical design information for installation of LVFTDS in an incinerator, with emphasis on ability to withstand the high temperatures and high flow rates expected. The work was successfully carried out in three stages: calculation of pressure drop through the system, materials testing to determine surrogate materials for wind-tunnel testing, and wind-tunnel testing of an actual configuration.

  8. Position-Sensitive CZT Detectors for High Energy X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, J.; Coburn, W.; Heindl, W.; Peterson, L.; Pelling, M.; Rothschild, R.; Skelton, R.; Hink, P.; Slavis, K.

    1998-05-01

    We report recent progress on CZT (Cadmium Zinc Telluride) detectors by the UCSD/WU collaboration. CZT, a room- temperature semiconductor, is a very promising detector material for high energy X-ray astronomy. It can operate from <10 keV to >200 keV, and give sub-keV energy resolution and sub-mm spatial resolution. We have developed an advanced CZT detector that uses two innovations to improve spectral response, give it 3-D localization of energy loss events, and reduce background at high altitudes and in space. The detector measures 12 x 12 x 2 mm(3) and was manufactured by eV Products. Each face has a strip readouts with 500 micron pitch electrodes. The 2 faces' strips are orthogonal, which provides x-y localization into 500 micron pixels. One innovation is "steering electrodes", which are located between the anode strips. They improve the anode charge collection and energy resolution, and tailing due to hole trapping is nearly totally eliminated. The energy resolution at 60 keV is 4 keV and the peak to valley ratio is 50. The other innovation is 3-D localization of energy losses. This is done by comparing the signals from the anode strips, cathode strips, and steering electrodes. There is a strong depth of interaction signature, which can be used to accept events which interact close to the cathode strips (where X-rays of interest are incident) and reject deeper interactions (which are likely to be background). The detector was tested in a balloon flight at 108,000 feet in October 1997. Background was reduced by passive shielding, consisting of lead graded with tin and copper. The lead thickness was changed by command during the flight, and was 7, 2, and 0 mm thick. With the 2 mm thickness the 20 - 40 keV background for the central 30 pixels was 8x10(-4) c/cm(2) -s-keV when the depth of interaction signature was used to reject background, and 7 times greater when this information was not used. The lower background is 12 times less than other workers have obtained

  9. Anatomic Landmarks Versus Fiducials for Volume-Staged Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Large Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, Paula L. . E-mail: ppetti@radonc.ucsf.edu; Coleman, Joy; McDermott, Michael; Smith, Vernon; Larson, David A.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to compare the accuracy of using internal anatomic landmarks instead of surgically implanted fiducials in the image registration process for volume-staged gamma knife (GK) radiosurgery for large arteriovenous malformations. Methods and Materials: We studied 9 patients who had undergone 10 staged GK sessions for large arteriovenous malformations. Each patient had fiducials surgically implanted in the outer table of the skull at the first GK treatment. These markers were imaged on orthogonal radiographs, which were scanned into the GK planning system. For the same patients, 8-10 pairs of internal landmarks were retrospectively identified on the three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance imaging studies that had been obtained for treatment. The coordinate transformation between the stereotactic frame space for subsequent treatment sessions was then determined by point matching, using four surgically embedded fiducials and then using four pairs of internal anatomic landmarks. In both cases, the transformation was ascertained by minimizing the chi-square difference between the actual and the transformed coordinates. Both transformations were then evaluated using the remaining four to six pairs of internal landmarks as the test points. Results: Averaged over all treatment sessions, the root mean square discrepancy between the coordinates of the transformed and actual test points was 1.2 {+-} 0.2 mm using internal landmarks and 1.7 {+-} 0.4 mm using the surgically implanted fiducials. Conclusion: The results of this study have shown that using internal landmarks to determine the coordinate transformation between subsequent magnetic resonance imaging scans for volume-staged GK arteriovenous malformation treatment sessions is as accurate as using surgically implanted fiducials and avoids an invasive procedure.

  10. Building high-performance system for processing a daily large volume of Chinese satellites imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Huawu; Huang, Shicun; Wang, Qi; Pan, Zhiqiang; Xin, Yubin

    2014-10-01

    The number of Earth observation satellites from China increases dramatically recently and those satellites are acquiring a large volume of imagery daily. As the main portal of image processing and distribution from those Chinese satellites, the China Centre for Resources Satellite Data and Application (CRESDA) has been working with PCI Geomatics during the last three years to solve two issues in this regard: processing the large volume of data (about 1,500 scenes or 1 TB per day) in a timely manner and generating geometrically accurate orthorectified products. After three-year research and development, a high performance system has been built and successfully delivered. The high performance system has a service oriented architecture and can be deployed to a cluster of computers that may be configured with high end computing power. The high performance is gained through, first, making image processing algorithms into parallel computing by using high performance graphic processing unit (GPU) cards and multiple cores from multiple CPUs, and, second, distributing processing tasks to a cluster of computing nodes. While achieving up to thirty (and even more) times faster in performance compared with the traditional practice, a particular methodology was developed to improve the geometric accuracy of images acquired from Chinese satellites (including HJ-1 A/B, ZY-1-02C, ZY-3, GF-1, etc.). The methodology consists of fully automatic collection of dense ground control points (GCP) from various resources and then application of those points to improve the photogrammetric model of the images. The delivered system is up running at CRESDA for pre-operational production and has been and is generating good return on investment by eliminating a great amount of manual labor and increasing more than ten times of data throughput daily with fewer operators. Future work, such as development of more performance-optimized algorithms, robust image matching methods and application

  11. Lens-free optical tomographic microscope with a large imaging volume on a chip

    PubMed Central

    Isikman, Serhan O.; Bishara, Waheb; Mavandadi, Sam; Yu, Frank W.; Feng, Steve; Lau, Randy; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-01-01

    We present a lens-free optical tomographic microscope, which enables imaging a large volume of approximately 15 mm3 on a chip, with a spatial resolution of < 1 μm ×  < 1 μm ×  < 3 μm in x, y and z dimensions, respectively. In this lens-free tomography modality, the sample is placed directly on a digital sensor array with, e.g., ≤ 4 mm distance to its active area. A partially coherent light source placed approximately 70 mm away from the sensor is employed to record lens-free in-line holograms of the sample from different viewing angles. At each illumination angle, multiple subpixel shifted holograms are also recorded, which are digitally processed using a pixel superresolution technique to create a single high-resolution hologram of each angular projection of the object. These superresolved holograms are digitally reconstructed for an angular range of ± 50°, which are then back-projected to compute tomograms of the sample. In order to minimize the artifacts due to limited angular range of tilted illumination, a dual-axis tomography scheme is adopted, where the light source is rotated along two orthogonal axes. Tomographic imaging performance is quantified using microbeads of different dimensions, as well as by imaging wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans. Probing a large volume with a decent 3D spatial resolution, this lens-free optical tomography platform on a chip could provide a powerful tool for high-throughput imaging applications in, e.g., cell and developmental biology. PMID:21504943

  12. Designing an elastomeric binder for large-volume-change electrodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zonghai

    It is of commercial importance to develop high capacity negative and positive electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries to meet the energy requirements of portable electronic devices. Excellent capacity retention has been achieved for thin sputtered films of amorphous Si, Ge and Si-Sn alloys even when cycled to 2000 mAh/g and above, which suggests that amorphous alloys are capable of extended cycling. However, PVDF-based composite electrodes incorporating a-Si0.64Sn0.36/Ag powder (10 wt% silver coating) (˜10mum) still suffer from severe capacity fading because of the huge volumetric changes of a-Si0.64Sn0.36/Ag during charge/discharge cycling. It is the objective of this thesis to understand the problem scientifically and to propose practical solutions to solve this problem. Mechanical studies of binders for lithium battery electrodes have never been reported in the literature. The mechanical properties of commonly used binders, such as poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), haven't been challenged because commercially used active materials, such as LiCoO2 and graphite, have small volumetric changes (<10%) during charge/discharge cycling. However, the recently proposed metallic alloys have huge volumetric changes (up to 250%) during cycling. In this case, the mechanical properties of the binder become critical. A tether model is proposed to qualitatively understand the capacity fading of high-volume-change electrodes, and to predict the properties of a good binder system. A crosslinking/coupling route was used to modify the binder system according to the requirements of the tether model. A poly(vinylidene fluoride-tetrafluoroethylenepropylene)-based elastomeric binder system was designed to successfully improve the capacity retention of a-Si0.64 Sn0.36/Ag composite electrodes. In this thesis, it has also proven nontrivial to maximize the capacity retention of large-volume-change electrodes even when a fixed elastomeric binder system was used. The parameters that

  13. Frontiers of High-Pressure Research: Next Generation Large Volume Gem Anvil Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Yan, C.; Xu, J.; Mao, W.; Mao, H.

    2003-12-01

    By any measure, the diamond anvil cell has revolutionized static high-pressure research, and in particular experimental study of Earth and planetary deep interiors. Despite the prowess of the technique, however, its range of applicability is in many ways quite limited and its potential not yet fully realized. We have embarked on a program to develop the next generation high-pressure devices that will allow new classes of in situ high P-T measurements critical to understanding the structure, dynamics, and evolution of planetary bodies. A crucial component of this effort is the enlargement of sample volume without sacrificing the unmatched pressure range and versatility of diamond anvil cells. In conventional studies, pressures to several hundred GPa are generated on sample volumes down to the picoliter range. The small sample size is determined by the availability of perfect diamonds as anvils, which are currently of order of 0.2-0.4 up to a few carats. The small sample size has precluded, or greatly limited the accuracy of, certain classes of high pressure experiments. The production of high-quality single-crystal diamond by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at very high growth rate of 50-150 μ m/h has opened new opportunities for the creation of large perfect single crystal diamond as anvils.1 This morphology, photoluminescence, Raman spectra, and mechanical properties of the CVD diamond have been examined in detail. Of particular interest is our finding of very high strength and improved optical properties of CVD diamond annealed at high pressures and temperatures.2 In addition, hybrid conventional synthetic/CVD single crystals have been successfully used to generate pressures in the multimegabar range (>200 GPa).3 A parallel initiative involves the continued development of moissanite anvils, which can already be produced as large, perfect crystals and can reach pressures above 60 GPa. Recent advances include the design and fabrication of

  14. Large Volume Coagulation Utilizing Multiple Cavitation Clouds Generated by Array Transducer Driven by 32 Channel Drive Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kotaro; Asai, Ayumu; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2013-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment is a noninvasive treatment, in which focused ultrasound is generated outside the body and coagulates a diseased tissue. The advantage of this method is minimal physical and mental stress to the patient, and the disadvantage is the long treatment time caused by the smallness of the therapeutic volume by a single exposure. To improve the efficiency and shorten the treatment time, we are focusing attention on utilizing cavitation bubbles. The generated microbubbles can convert the acoustic energy into heat with a high efficiency. In this study, using the class D amplifiers, which we have developed, to drive the array transducer, we demonstrate a new method to coagulate a large volume by a single HIFU exposure through generating cavitation bubbles distributing in a large volume and vibrating all of them. As a result, the coagulated volume by the proposed method was 1.71 times as large as that of the conventional method.

  15. Large-volume methacrylate monolith for plasmid purification. Process engineering approach to synthesis and application.

    PubMed

    Danquah, Michael K; Forde, Gareth M

    2008-04-25

    The extent of exothermicity associated with the construction of large-volume methacrylate monolithic columns has somewhat obstructed the realisation of large-scale rapid biomolecule purification especially for plasmid-based products which have proven to herald future trends in biotechnology. A novel synthesis technique via a heat expulsion mechanism was employed to prepare a 40 mL methacrylate monolith with a homogeneous radial pore structure along its thickness. Radial temperature gradient was recorded to be only 1.8 degrees C. Maximum radial temperature recorded at the centre of the monolith was 62.3 degrees C, which was only 2.3 degrees C higher than the actual polymerisation temperature. Pore characterisation of the monolithic polymer showed unimodal pore size distributions at different radial positions with an identical modal pore size of 400 nm. Chromatographic characterisation of the polymer after functionalisation with amino groups displayed a persistent dynamic binding capacity of 15.5 mg of plasmid DNA/mL. The maximum pressure drop recorded was only 0.12 MPa at a flow rate of 10 mL/min. The polymer demonstrated rapid separation ability by fractionating Escherichia coli DH5alpha-pUC19 clarified lysate in only 3 min after loading. The plasmid sample collected after the fast purification process was tested to be a homogeneous supercoiled plasmid with DNA electrophoresis and restriction analysis. PMID:18329651

  16. Major risk from rapid, large-volume landslides in Europe (EU Project RUNOUT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilburn, Christopher R. J.; Pasuto, Alessandro

    2003-08-01

    Project RUNOUT has investigated methods for reducing the risk from large-volume landslides in Europe, especially those involving rapid rates of emplacement. Using field data from five test sites (Bad Goisern and Köfels in Austria, Tessina and Vajont in Italy, and the Barranco de Tirajana in Gran Canaria, Spain), the studies have developed (1) techniques for applying geomorphological investigations and optical remote sensing to map landslides and their evolution; (2) analytical, numerical, and cellular automata models for the emplacement of sturzstroms and debris flows; (3) a brittle-failure model for forecasting catastrophic slope failure; (4) new strategies for integrating large-area Global Positioning System (GPS) arrays with local geodetic monitoring networks; (5) methods for raising public awareness of landslide hazards; and (6) Geographic Information System (GIS)-based databases for the test areas. The results highlight the importance of multidisciplinary studies of landslide hazards, combining subjects as diverse as geology and geomorphology, remote sensing, geodesy, fluid dynamics, and social profiling. They have also identified key goals for an improved understanding of the physical processes that govern landslide collapse and runout, as well as for designing strategies for raising public awareness of landslide hazards and for implementing appropriate land management policies for reducing landslide risk.

  17. Te Inclusions in CZT Detectors: New Method for Correcting Their Adverse Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A.E.; Babalola, S.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, S.U.; Hawrami, R.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; James, R.B.

    2009-10-25

    Both Te inclusions and point defects can trap the charge carriers generated by ionizing particles in CdZnTe (CZT) detectors. The amount of charge trapped by point defects is proportional to the carriers’ drift time and can be corrected electronically. In the case of Te inclusions, the charge loss depends upon their random locations with respect to the electron cloud. Consequently, inclusions introduce fluctuations in the charge signals, which cannot be easily corrected. In this paper, we describe direct measurements of the cumulative effect of Te inclusions and its influence on the response of CZT detectors of different thicknesses and different sizes and concentrations of Te inclusions. We also discuss a means of partially correcting their adverse effects.

  18. THE EFFECT OF VARIOUS DETECTOR GEOMETRIES ON THE PERFORMANCE OF CZT USING ONE CRYSTAL

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, A.; Duff, M.; Teague, L.

    2011-06-21

    CdZnTe (CZT) continues to be a major thrust interest mainly due to its potential application as a room temperature radiation detector. The performance of CZT detectors is directly related to the charge collection ability which can be affected by the configuration of the electrical contact. The charge collection efficiency is determined in part by the specific geometry of the anode contact which serves as the readout electrode. In this report, contact geometries including single pixel, planar, coplanar, and dual anode will be systematically explored by comparing the performance efficiencies of the detector using both low and high energy gamma rays. To help eliminate the effect of crystal quality variations, the contact geometries were fabricated on the same crystal detector with minimal polishing between contact placements.

  19. Characterization of Single-Sided Charge-Sharing CZT Strip Detectors for Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donmez, Burcin; Macri, John R.; Ryan, James M.; Legere, Jason S.; McConnell, Mark L.; Widholm, Mark; Narita, Tomohiko; Hamel, Louis-Andre

    2006-01-01

    We report progress in the study of thick single-sided charge-sharing cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) strip detector modules designed to perform spectroscopy and 3-D imaging of gamma-rays. We report laboratory measurements including spectroscopy, efficiency and 3-D imaging capability of prototype detectors (15 15 7.5 cu mm) with 11x11 unit cells. We also report on Monte Carlo simulations (GEANT4 v7.1) to investigate the effect of multihits on detector performance in both spectroscopy and imaging. We compare simulation results with data obtained from laboratory measurements and discuss the implications for future strip detector designs. Keywords: CZT, strip detectors, gamma-ray

  20. The oligocene Lund Tuff, Great Basin, USA: A very large volume monotonous intermediate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maughan, L.L.; Christiansen, E.H.; Best, M.G.; Gromme, C.S.; Deino, A.L.; Tingey, D.G.

    2002-01-01

    Unusual monotonous intermediate ignimbrites consist of phenocryst-rich dacite that occurs as very large volume (> 1000 km3) deposits that lack systematic compositional zonation, comagmatic rhyolite precursors, and underlying plinian beds. They are distinct from countless, usually smaller volume, zoned rhyolite-dacite-andesite deposits that are conventionally believed to have erupted from magma chambers in which thermal and compositional gradients were established because of sidewall crystallization and associated convective fractionation. Despite their great volume, or because of it, monotonous intermediates have received little attention. Documentation of the stratigraphy, composition, and geologic setting of the Lund Tuff - one of four monotonous intermediate tuffs in the middle-Tertiary Great Basin ignimbrite province - provides insight into its unusual origin and, by implication, the origin of other similar monotonous intermediates. The Lund Tuff is a single cooling unit with normal magnetic polarity whose volume likely exceeded 3000 km3. It was emplaced 29.02 ?? 0.04 Ma in and around the coeval White Rock caldera which has an unextended north-south diameter of about 50 km. The tuff is monotonous in that its phenocryst assemblage is virtually uniform throughout the deposit: plagioclase > quartz ??? hornblende > biotite > Fe-Ti oxides ??? sanidine > titanite, zircon, and apatite. However, ratios of phenocrysts vary by as much as an order of magnitude in a manner consistent with progressive crystallization in the pre-eruption chamber. A significant range in whole-rock chemical composition (e.g., 63-71 wt% SiO2) is poorly correlated with phenocryst abundance. These compositional attributes cannot have been caused wholly by winnowing of glass from phenocrysts during eruption, as has been suggested for the monotonous intermediate Fish Canyon Tuff. Pumice fragments are also crystal-rich, and chemically and mineralogically indistinguishable from bulk tuff. We

  1. Application of a CZT detector to in situ environmental radioactivity measurement in the Fukushima area.

    PubMed

    Kowatari, M; Kubota, T; Shibahara, Y; Fujii, T; Fukutani, S; Takamiya, K; Mizuno, S; Yamana, H

    2015-11-01

    Instead of conventional Ge semiconductor detectors and NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometers, an application of a CdZnTe semiconductor (CZT) whose crystal has the dimension of 1 cm cubic to the in situ environmental radioactivity measurement was attempted in deeply affected areas in Fukushima region. Results of deposition density on soil for (134)Cs/(137)Cs obtained seemed consistent, comparing obtained results with those measured by the Japanese government. PMID:25953790

  2. Monte Carlo based performance assessment of different animal PET architectures using pixellated CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visvikis, D.; Lefevre, T.; Lamare, F.; Kontaxakis, G.; Santos, A.; Darambara, D.

    2006-12-01

    The majority of present position emission tomography (PET) animal systems are based on the coupling of high-density scintillators and light detectors. A disadvantage of these detector configurations is the compromise between image resolution, sensitivity and energy resolution. In addition, current combined imaging devices are based on simply placing back-to-back and in axial alignment different apparatus without any significant level of software or hardware integration. The use of semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors is a promising alternative to scintillators for gamma-ray imaging systems. At the same time CZT detectors have the potential properties necessary for the construction of a truly integrated imaging device (PET/SPECT/CT). The aims of this study was to assess the performance of different small animal PET scanner architectures based on CZT pixellated detectors and compare their performance with that of state of the art existing PET animal scanners. Different scanner architectures were modelled using GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission). Particular scanner design characteristics included an overall cylindrical scanner format of 8 and 24 cm in axial and transaxial field of view, respectively, and a temporal coincidence window of 8 ns. Different individual detector modules were investigated, considering pixel pitch down to 0.625 mm and detector thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Modified NEMA NU2-2001 protocols were used in order to simulate performance based on mouse, rat and monkey imaging conditions. These protocols allowed us to directly compare the performance of the proposed geometries with the latest generation of current small animal systems. Results attained demonstrate the potential for higher NECR with CZT based scanners in comparison to scintillator based animal systems.

  3. A 3D CZT high resolution detector for x- and gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvvetli, I.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Zappettini, A.; Zambelli, N.; Benassi, G.; Kalemci, E.; Caroli, E.; Stephen, J. B.; Auricchio, N.

    2014-07-01

    At DTU Space we have developed a high resolution three dimensional (3D) position sensitive CZT detector for high energy astronomy. The design of the 3D CZT detector is based on the CZT Drift Strip detector principle. The position determination perpendicular to the anode strips is performed using a novel interpolating technique based on the drift strip signals. The position determination in the detector depth direction, is made using the DOI technique based the detector cathode and anode signals. The position determination along the anode strips is made with the help of 10 cathode strips orthogonal to the anode strips. The position resolutions are at low energies dominated by the electronic noise and improve therefore with increased signal to noise ratio as the energy increases. The achievable position resolution at higher energies will however be dominated by the extended spatial distribution of the photon produced ionization charge. The main sources of noise contribution of the drift signals are the leakage current between the strips and the strip capacitance. For the leakage current, we used a metallization process that reduces the leakage current by means of a high resistive thin layer between the drift strip electrodes and CZT detector material. This method was applied to all the proto type detectors and was a very effective method to reduce the surface leakage current between the strips. The proto type detector was recently investigated at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble which provided a fine 50 × 50 μm2 collimated X-ray beam covering an energy band up to 600 keV. The Beam positions are resolved very well with a ~ 0.2 mm position resolution (FWHM ) at 400 keV in all directions.

  4. Beautiful small: Misleading large randomized controlled trials? The example of colloids for volume resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, Christian J; Wiedermann, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In anesthesia and intensive care, treatment benefits that were claimed on the basis of small or modest-sized trials have repeatedly failed to be confirmed in large randomized controlled trials. A well-designed small trial in a homogeneous patient population with high event rates could yield conclusive results; however, patient populations in anesthesia and intensive care are typically heterogeneous because of comorbidities. The size of the anticipated effects of therapeutic interventions is generally low in relation to relevant endpoints. For regulatory purposes, trials are required to demonstrate efficacy in clinically important endpoints, and therefore must be large because clinically important study endpoints such as death, sepsis, or pneumonia are dichotomous and infrequently occur. The rarer endpoint events occur in the study population; that is, the lower the signal-to-noise ratio, the larger the trials must be to prevent random events from being overemphasized. In addition to trial design, sample size determination on the basis of event rates, clinically meaningful risk ratio reductions and actual patient numbers studied are among the most important characteristics when interpreting study results. Trial size is a critical determinant of generalizability of study results to larger or general patient populations. Typical characteristics of small single-center studies responsible for their known fragility include low variability of outcome measures for surrogate parameters and selective publication and reporting. For anesthesiology and intensive care medicine, findings in volume resuscitation research on intravenous infusion of colloids exemplify this, since both the safety of albumin infusion and the adverse effects of the artificial colloid hydroxyethyl starch have been confirmed only in large-sized trials. PMID:26330723

  5. Beautiful small: Misleading large randomized controlled trials? The example of colloids for volume resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Wiedermann, Christian J; Wiedermann, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In anesthesia and intensive care, treatment benefits that were claimed on the basis of small or modest-sized trials have repeatedly failed to be confirmed in large randomized controlled trials. A well-designed small trial in a homogeneous patient population with high event rates could yield conclusive results; however, patient populations in anesthesia and intensive care are typically heterogeneous because of comorbidities. The size of the anticipated effects of therapeutic interventions is generally low in relation to relevant endpoints. For regulatory purposes, trials are required to demonstrate efficacy in clinically important endpoints, and therefore must be large because clinically important study endpoints such as death, sepsis, or pneumonia are dichotomous and infrequently occur. The rarer endpoint events occur in the study population; that is, the lower the signal-to-noise ratio, the larger the trials must be to prevent random events from being overemphasized. In addition to trial design, sample size determination on the basis of event rates, clinically meaningful risk ratio reductions and actual patient numbers studied are among the most important characteristics when interpreting study results. Trial size is a critical determinant of generalizability of study results to larger or general patient populations. Typical characteristics of small single-center studies responsible for their known fragility include low variability of outcome measures for surrogate parameters and selective publication and reporting. For anesthesiology and intensive care medicine, findings in volume resuscitation research on intravenous infusion of colloids exemplify this, since both the safety of albumin infusion and the adverse effects of the artificial colloid hydroxyethyl starch have been confirmed only in large-sized trials. PMID:26330723

  6. Analytical and Experimental Investigation of Mixing in Large Passive Containment Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Per F. Peterson

    2002-10-17

    This final report details results from the past three years of the three-year UC Berkeley NEER investigation of mixing phenomena in large-scale passive reactor containments. We have completed all of our three-year deliverables specified in our proposal, as summarized for each deliverable in the body of this report, except for the experiments of steam condensation in the presence of noncondensable gas. We have particularly exiting results from the experiments studying the mixing in large insulated containment with a vertical cooling plate. These experiments now have shown why augmentation has been observed in wall-condensation experiments due to the momentum of the steam break-flow entering large volumes. More importantly, we also have shown that the forced-jet augmentation can be predicted using relatively simple correlations, and that it is independent of the break diameter and depends only on the break flow orientation, location, and momentum. This suggests that we will now be able to take credit for this augmentation in reactor safety analysis, improving safety margins for containment structures. We have finished the version 1 of 1-D Lagrangian flow and heat transfer code BMIX++. This version has ability to solve many complex stratified problems, such as multi-components problems, multi-enclosures problems (two enclosures connected by one connection for the current version), incompressible and compressible problems, multi jets, plumes, sinks in one enclosure problems, problems with wall conduction, and the combinations of the above problems. We believe the BMIX++ code is a very powerful computation tool to study stratified enclosures mixing problems.

  7. Deflagration to detonation transition on large confined volume of lean hydrogen-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Dorofeev, S.B.; Sidorov, V.P.; Dvoinishnikov, A.E.; Breitung, W.

    1996-01-01

    The results of large-scale experiments on turbulent flame propagation and transition to detonation in a confined volume of lean hydrogen-air mixtures are presented. The experiments were in a strong concrete enclosure of 480 m{sup 3}, and of 69.9 m length. The experimental volume consists first of a channel (34.6 m length, 2.3 m height, 2.5 m width) with or without obstacles, a canyon (10.55 {times} 6.3 {times} 2.5 m), and a final channel. Ignition was with a weak electric spark at the beginning of the first channel. The effect of hydrogen concentration (9.8%--14% vol.) on turbulent flame propagation and transition to detonation was studied. The obstacle configuration in the first channel (blockage ratio 0.3, 0.6, and no obstacles), exit cross section to the canyon (1.4, 2, and 5.6 m{sup 2}), and vent area at the end (0, 2.5, and 4 m{sup 2}) were varied in the tests. Details of turbulent flame propagation, of pressure field, and of detonation onset are presented. A minimum of 12.5% of hydrogen was found to be necessary for transition to detonation. This is a much less sensitive mixture than those in which the onset of spontaneous detonation has previously been observed (minimum of 15% of hydrogen in air). The effect of scale on the onset conditions for spontaneous detonation is discussed. The characteristic geometrical size of the mixture for transition to detonation is shown to be strongly related to the mixture sensitivity.

  8. Analysis of CZT crystals and detectors grown in Russia and the Ukraine by high-pressure Bridgman methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hermon, H.; Schieber, M. |; James, R.B.

    1999-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is leading an effort to evaluate vertical high pressure Bridgman (VHPB) Cd{sub 1{minus}x}Zn{sub x}Te (CZT) crystals grown in the former Soviet Union (FSU) (Ukraine and Russia), in order to study the parameters limiting the crystal quality and the radiation detector performance. The stoichiometry of the CZT crystals, with 0.04 < x < 0.25, has been determined by methods such as proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE), x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis and laser ablation ICP mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP/MS). Other methods such as triaxial double crystal x-ray diffraction (TADXRD), infrared transmission spectroscopy (IR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), thermoelectric emission spectroscopy (TEES) and laser induced transient charge technique (TCT) were also used to evaluate the material properties. The authors have measured the zinc distribution in a CZT ingot along the axial direction and also its homogeneity. The (Cd+Zn)/Te average ratio measured on the Ukraine crystals was 1.2, compared to the ratio of 0.9--1.06 on the Russian ingots. The IR transmission showed highly decorated grain boundaries with precipitates and hollow bubbles. Microprobe elemental analysis and LA-ICP/MS showed carbon precipitates in the CZT bulk and carbon deposits along grain boundaries. The higher concentration of impurities and the imperfect crystallinity lead to shorter electron and hole lifetimes in the range of 0.5--2 and 0.1 {micro}s, respectively, compared to 3--20 and 1--7 {micro}s measured on US spectrometer grade CZT detectors. These results are consistent with the lower resistivity and worse crystalline perfection of these crystals, compared to US-grown CZT. However, recently grown CZT from FSU exhibited better detector performance and good response to alpha particles.

  9. Analysis of CZT crystals and detectors grown in Russia and the Ukraine by high-pressure Bridgman methods

    SciTech Connect

    H. Hermon; M. Schieber; R. B. James; E. Y. Lee; N. Yang; A. J. Antolak; D. H. Morse; C. Hackett; E. Tarver; N. N. P. Kolesnikov; Yu N. Ivanov; V. Komar; M. S. Goorsky; H. Yoon

    2000-01-10

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is leading an effort to evaluate vertical high pressure Bridgman (VHPB) Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te (CZT) crystals grown in the former Soviet Union (FSU) (Ukraine and Russia), in order to study the parameters limiting the crystal quality and the radiation detector performance. The stoichiometry of the CZT crystals, with 0.04 < x < 0.25, has been determined by methods such as proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), X-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis and laser ablation ICP mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP/MS). Other methods such as triaxial double crystal x-ray diffraction (TADXRD), infrared transmission spectroscopy (IR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), thermoelectric emission spectroscopy (TEES) and laser induced transient charge technique (TCT) were also used to evaluate the material properties. The authors have measured the zinc distribution in a CZT ingot along the axial direction and also its homogeneity. The (Cd+Zn)/Te average ratio measured on the Ukraine crystals was 1.2, compared to the ratio of 0.9-1.06 on the Russian ingots. The IR transmission showed highly decorated grain boundaries with precipitates and hollow bubbles. Microprobe elemental analysis and LA-ICP/MS showed carbon precipitates in the CZT bulk and carbon deposits along grain boundaries. The higher concentration of impurities and the imperfect crystallinity lead to shorter electron and hole lifetimes in the range of 0.5--2 {micro}s and 0.1 {micro}s respectively, compared to 3--20 {micro}s and 1--7 {micro}s measured on US spectrometer grade CZT detectors. These results are consistent with the lower resistivity and worse crystalline perfection of these crystals, compared to US grown CZT. However, recently grown CZT from FSU exhibited better detector performance and good response to alpha particles.

  10. Detecting Boosted Dark Matter from the Sun with Large Volume Neutrino Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Joshua; Cui, Yanou; Zhao, Yue; /Stanford U., ITP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2015-04-02

    We study novel scenarios where thermal dark matter (DM) can be efficiently captured in the Sun and annihilate into boosted dark matter. In models with semi-annihilating DM, where DM has a non-minimal stabilization symmetry, or in models with a multi-component DM sector, annihilations of DM can give rise to stable dark sector particles with moderate Lorentz boosts. We investigate both of these possibilities, presenting concrete models as proofs of concept. Both scenarios can yield viable thermal relic DM with masses O(1)-O(100) GeV. Taking advantage of the energetic proton recoils that arise when the boosted DM scatters off matter, we propose a detection strategy which uses large volume terrestrial detectors, such as those designed to detect neutrinos or proton decays. In particular, we propose a search for proton tracks pointing towards the Sun. We focus on signals at Cherenkov-radiation-based detectors such as Super-Kamiokande (SK) and its upgrade Hyper-Kamiokande (HK). We find that with spin-dependent scattering as the dominant DM-nucleus interaction at low energies, boosted DM can leave detectable signals at SK or HK, with sensitivity comparable to DM direct detection experiments while being consistent with current constraints. Our study provides a new search path for DM sectors with non-minimal structure.

  11. Plasma response to electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    An electron energy filter (EEF) is embedded in the Large Volume Plasma Device plasma for carrying out studies on excitation of plasma turbulence by a gradient in electron temperature (ETG) described in the paper of Mattoo et al. [S. K. Mattoo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255007 (2012)]. In this paper, we report results on the response of the plasma to the EEF. It is shown that inhomogeneity in the magnetic field of the EEF switches on several physical phenomena resulting in plasma regions with different characteristics, including a plasma region free from energetic electrons, suitable for the study of ETG turbulence. Specifically, we report that localized structures of plasma density, potential, electron temperature, and plasma turbulence are excited in the EEF plasma. It is shown that structures of electron temperature and potential are created due to energy dependence of the electron transport in the filter region. On the other hand, although structure of plasma density has origin in the particle transport but two distinct steps of the density structure emerge from dominance of collisionality in the source-EEF region and of the Bohm diffusion in the EEF-target region. It is argued and experimental evidence is provided for existence of drift like flute Rayleigh-Taylor in the EEF plasma.

  12. A Parallel, Finite-Volume Algorithm for Large-Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    1999-01-01

    A parallel, finite-volume algorithm has been developed for large-eddy simulation (LES) of compressible turbulent flows. This algorithm includes piecewise linear least-square reconstruction, trilinear finite-element interpolation, Roe flux-difference splitting, and second-order MacCormack time marching. Parallel implementation is done using the message-passing programming model. In this paper, the numerical algorithm is described. To validate the numerical method for turbulence simulation, LES of fully developed turbulent flow in a square duct is performed for a Reynolds number of 320 based on the average friction velocity and the hydraulic diameter of the duct. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) results are available for this test case, and the accuracy of this algorithm for turbulence simulations can be ascertained by comparing the LES solutions with the DNS results. The effects of grid resolution, upwind numerical dissipation, and subgrid-scale dissipation on the accuracy of the LES are examined. Comparison with DNS results shows that the standard Roe flux-difference splitting dissipation adversely affects the accuracy of the turbulence simulation. For accurate turbulence simulations, only 3-5 percent of the standard Roe flux-difference splitting dissipation is needed.

  13. A uniform laminar air plasma plume with large volume excited by an alternating current voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Bao, Wenting; Chu, Jingdi; Zhang, Panpan; Jia, Pengying

    2015-12-01

    Using a plasma jet composed of two needle electrodes, a laminar plasma plume with large volume is generated in air through an alternating current voltage excitation. Based on high-speed photography, a train of filaments is observed to propagate periodically away from their birth place along the gas flow. The laminar plume is in fact a temporal superposition of the arched filament train. The filament consists of a negative glow near the real time cathode, a positive column near the real time anode, and a Faraday dark space between them. It has been found that the propagation velocity of the filament increases with increasing the gas flow rate. Furthermore, the filament lifetime tends to follow a normal distribution (Gaussian distribution). The most probable lifetime decreases with increasing the gas flow rate or decreasing the averaged peak voltage. Results also indicate that the real time peak current decreases and the real time peak voltage increases with the propagation of the filament along the gas flow. The voltage-current curve indicates that, in every discharge cycle, the filament evolves from a Townsend discharge to a glow one and then the discharge quenches. Characteristic regions including a negative glow, a Faraday dark space, and a positive column can be discerned from the discharge filament. Furthermore, the plasma parameters such as the electron density, the vibrational temperature and the gas temperature are investigated based on the optical spectrum emitted from the laminar plume.

  14. A study on high strength concrete prepared with large volumes of low calcium fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Poon, C.S.; Lam, L.; Wong, Y.L.

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory study on high strength concrete prepared with large volumes of low calcium fly ash. The parameters studied included compressive strength, heat of hydration, chloride diffusivity, degree of hydration, and pore structures of fly ash/cement concrete and corresponding pastes. The experimental results showed that concrete with a 28-day compressive strength of 80 MPA could be obtained with a water-to-binder (w/b) ratio of 0.24, with a fly ash content of 45%. Such concrete has lower heat of hydration and chloride diffusivity than the equivalent plain cement concrete or concrete prepared with lower fly ash contents. The test results showed that at lower w/b ratios, the contribution to strength by the fly ash was higher than in the mixes prepared with higher w/b ratios. The study also quantified the reaction rates of cement and fly ash in the cementitious materials. The results demonstrated the dual effects of fly ash in concrete: (1) act as a micro-aggregate and (2) being a pozzolana. It was also noted that the strength contribution of fly ash in concrete was better than in the equivalent cement/fly ash pastes suggesting the fly ash had improved the interfacial bond between the past and the aggregates in the concrete. Such an improvement was also reflected in the results of the mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) test.

  15. Detecting boosted dark matter from the Sun with large volume neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Joshua; Cui, Yanou; Zhao, Yue E-mail: ycui@perimeterinstitute.ca

    2015-02-01

    We study novel scenarios where thermal dark matter (DM) can be efficiently captured in the Sun and annihilate into boosted dark matter. In models with semi-annihilating DM, where DM has a non-minimal stabilization symmetry, or in models with a multi-component DM sector, annihilations of DM can give rise to stable dark sector particles with moderate Lorentz boosts. We investigate both of these possibilities, presenting concrete models as proofs of concept. Both scenarios can yield viable thermal relic DM with masses O(1)-O(100) GeV. Taking advantage of the energetic proton recoils that arise when the boosted DM scatters off matter, we propose a detection strategy which uses large volume terrestrial detectors, such as those designed to detect neutrinos or proton decays. In particular, we propose a search for proton tracks pointing towards the Sun. We focus on signals at Cherenkov-radiation-based detectors such as Super-Kamiokande (SK) and its upgrade Hyper-Kamiokande (HK). We find that with spin-dependent scattering as the dominant DM-nucleus interaction at low energies, boosted DM can leave detectable signals at SK or HK, with sensitivity comparable to DM direct detection experiments while being consistent with current constraints. Our study provides a new search path for DM sectors with non-minimal structure.

  16. Development testing of large volume water sprays for warm fog dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.; Anderson, B. J.; Burns, R. A.; Lala, G. G.; Meyer, M. B.; Beard, K. V.

    1986-01-01

    A new brute-force method of warm fog dispersal is described. The method uses large volume recycled water sprays to create curtains of falling drops through which the fog is processed by the ambient wind and spray induced air flow. Fog droplets are removed by coalescence/rainout. The efficiency of the technique depends upon the drop size spectra in the spray, the height to which the spray can be projected, the efficiency with which fog laden air is processed through the curtain of spray, and the rate at which new fog may be formed due to temperature differences between the air and spray water. Results of a field test program, implemented to develop the data base necessary to assess the proposed method, are presented. Analytical calculations based upon the field test results indicate that this proposed method of warm fog dispersal is feasible. Even more convincingly, the technique was successfully demonstrated in the one natural fog event which occurred during the test program. Energy requirements for this technique are an order of magnitude less than those to operate a thermokinetic system. An important side benefit is the considerable emergency fire extinguishing capability it provides along the runway.

  17. Configuration Analysis of the ERS Points in Large-Volume Metrology System

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhangjun; Yu, Cijun; Li, Jiangxiong; Ke, Yinglin

    2015-01-01

    In aircraft assembly, multiple laser trackers are used simultaneously to measure large-scale aircraft components. To combine the independent measurements, the transformation matrices between the laser trackers’ coordinate systems and the assembly coordinate system are calculated, by measuring the enhanced referring system (ERS) points. This article aims to understand the influence of the configuration of the ERS points that affect the transformation matrix errors, and then optimize the deployment of the ERS points to reduce the transformation matrix errors. To optimize the deployment of the ERS points, an explicit model is derived to estimate the transformation matrix errors. The estimation model is verified by the experiment implemented in the factory floor. Based on the proposed model, a group of sensitivity coefficients are derived to evaluate the quality of the configuration of the ERS points, and then several typical configurations of the ERS points are analyzed in detail with the sensitivity coefficients. Finally general guidance is established to instruct the deployment of the ERS points in the aspects of the layout, the volume size and the number of the ERS points, as well as the position and orientation of the assembly coordinate system. PMID:26402685

  18. Performance of the Goulden large volume sampler for acidic compounds in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Headley, J.; Dickson, L.; Swyngedouw, C.; Crosley, D.; Whitley, G.

    1995-12-31

    The Goulden large volume sampler (LVX) has received extensive use for monitoring and surveillance surveys of natural waters impacted by pulp and paper mills, and agricultural run-off water. Despite this use, there is a lack of performance criteria for acidic contaminants, There are concerns about whether this sampler which was originally developed for extractions of OCs, PCBs and PAHs, was suitable for sampling polar acidic compounds. Performance tests conducted in this work, indicated that with the exception of 4-bromophenol and dichlorophenylacetic acid, surrogate compounds were recovered from pH 2 adjusted samples (20 1) at approximately 80 {+-} 15--35% recovery. Although these recoveries were comparable to values attainable for neutral pesticides, the standard deviations were up to four times greater than values reported for neutral compounds, for concentrations of analytes at low ppt levels. Specific performance criteria (percent recoveries where the number of determinations are given in parenthesis) observed for the proposed surrogates heptadecanoic acid, dichlorophenylacetic acid, 4-bromophenol, o-methylpodocarpic acid and 2,4,6-tribromophenol were: 86.6(19) {+-} 26.8; 46.1(18) {+-} 14.5; 31.6(19) {+-} 24.1; 78.4(18) {+-} 14.7; and95.2(18) {+-} 33.6 respectively. These values can be used to provide guidelines for acceptable surrogate recoveries, and validation of extractions of acidic polar compounds.

  19. Twinning in vapour-grown, large volume Cd1-xZnxTe crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, B. K.; Mullins, J. T.; Pym, A. T. G.; Maneuski, D.

    2016-08-01

    The onset of twinning from (2 bar 1 bar 1 bar) to (1 bar 3 bar 3 bar) in large volume Cd1-xZnxTe crystals, grown by vapour transport on (2 bar 1 bar 1 bar) , often referred to as (211)B, oriented GaAs seeds, has been investigated using X-ray diffraction imaging (X-ray topography). Twinning is not associated with strains at the GaAs/CdTe interface as the initial growth was always in (2 bar 1 bar 1 bar) orientation. Nor is twinning related to lattice strains associated with injection of Zn subsequent to initial nucleation and growth of pure CdTe as in both cases twinning occurred after growth of several mm length of Cd1-xZnxTe. While in both cases examined, there was a region of disturbed growth prior to the twinning transition, in neither crystal does this strain appear to have nucleated the twinning process. In both cases, un-twinned material remained after twinning was observed, the scale of the resulting twin boundaries being sub-micron. Simultaneous twinning across the whole sample surface was observed in one sample, whereas in the other, twinning was nucleated at different points and times in the growth.

  20. Analysis of Nucleosides in Municipal Wastewater by Large-Volume Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Alex J.; Lunte, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosides are components of both DNA and RNA, and contain either a ribose (RNA) or 2deoxyribose (DNA) sugar and a purine or pyrimidine base. In addition to DNA and RNA turnover, modified nucleosides found in urine have been correlated to a diminished health status associated with AIDS, cancers, oxidative stress and age. Nucleosides found in municipal wastewater influent are potentially useful markers of community health status, and as of now, remain uninvestigated. A method was developed to quantify nucleosides in municipal wastewater using large-volume injection, liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry. Method accuracy ranged from 92 to 139% when quantified by using isotopically labeled internal standards. Precision ranged from 6.1 to 19% of the relative standard deviation. The method’s utility was demonstrated by the analysis of twenty-four hour composite wastewater influent samples that were collected over a week to investigate community nucleoside excretion. Nucleosides originating from RNA were more abundant that DNA over the study period, with total loads of nucleosides ranging from 2 to 25 kg/day. Given this relatively high amount of nucleosides found over the study period they present an attractive analyte for the investigation of community health. PMID:26322136

  1. Spectroscopic properties of large-volume virtual Frisch-grid CdMnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Park, Chansun; Kim, Pilsu; Cho, Shinhaeng; Lee, Jinseo; Hong, T. K.; Hossain, A.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; James, R. B.

    2015-06-01

    CdMnTe(CMT) is a promising alternative material for use as a room-temperature radiation detector. Frisch-grid detectors have a simple configuration and outstanding spectral performance compared with other single-carrier collection techniques. The energy resolution of large-volume virtual Frisch-grid CMT detectors was tested by using several isotopes such as 57Co, 22 Na, 133Ba, and 137Cs together or separately. Energy resolutions of 6.7% and 2.1% were obtained for 122-keV 57Co and 662-keV 137Cs gamma rays, respectively, without using any additional signal processing techniques. Also, a 12-mm-thick CMT detector detected the 511-keV and 1.277-MeV gamma peaks of 22Na with values of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 2.7% and 1.5%, respectively. In addition, multiple low- and high-energy gamma peaks of 133Ba were well separated. The mobilitylifetime product calculated from the shift of the 662-keV photo-peak vs. bias by using Hecht's equation was 7 × 10 -3 cm2/V. These results show the possibility of using CMT detectors in response to various requirements for gamma-ray detection at room-temperature.

  2. A large-volume microwave plasma source based on parallel rectangular waveguides at low pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Guixin; Wang, Shumin; Wang, Liming

    2011-02-01

    A large-volume microwave plasma with good stability, uniformity and high density is directly generated and sustained. A microwave cavity is assembled by upper and lower metal plates and two adjacently parallel rectangular waveguides with axial slots regularly positioned on their inner wide side. Microwave energy is coupled into the plasma chamber shaped by quartz glass to enclose the space of working gas at low pressures. The geometrical properties of the source and the existing modes of the electric field are determined and optimized by a numerical simulation without a plasma. The calculated field patterns are in agreement with the observed experimental results. Argon, helium, nitrogen and air are used to produce a plasma for pressures ranging from 1000 to 2000 Pa and microwave powers above 800 W. The electron density is measured with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer to be on the order of 1014 cm-3 and the electron temperature is obtained using atomic emission spectrometry to be in the range 2222-2264 K at a pressure of 2000 Pa at different microwave powers. It can be seen from the interferograms at different microwave powers that the distribution of the plasma electron density is stable and uniform.

  3. A new large-volume metal reference standard for radioactive waste management

    PubMed Central

    Tzika, F.; Hult, M.; Stroh, H.; Marissens, G.; Arnold, D.; Burda, O.; Kovář, P.; Suran, J.; Listkowska, A.; Tyminski, Z.

    2016-01-01

    A new large-volume metal reference standard has been developed. The intended use is for calibration of free-release radioactivity measurement systems and is made up of cast iron tubes placed inside a box of the size of a Euro-pallet (80 × 120 cm). The tubes contain certified activity concentrations of 60Co (0.290±0.006 Bq g−1) and 110mAg (3.05±0.09 Bq g−1) (reference date: 30 September 2013). They were produced using centrifugal casting from a smelt into which 60Co was first added and then one piece of neutron irradiated silver wire was progressively diluted. The iron castings were machined to the desirable dimensions. The final material consists of 12 iron tubes of 20 cm outer diameter, 17.6 cm inner diameter, 40 cm length/height and 245.9 kg total mass. This paper describes the reference standard and the process of determining the reference activity values. PMID:25977349

  4. Plasma response to electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    An electron energy filter (EEF) is embedded in the Large Volume Plasma Device plasma for carrying out studies on excitation of plasma turbulence by a gradient in electron temperature (ETG) described in the paper of Mattoo et al. [S. K. Mattoo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255007 (2012)]. In this paper, we report results on the response of the plasma to the EEF. It is shown that inhomogeneity in the magnetic field of the EEF switches on several physical phenomena resulting in plasma regions with different characteristics, including a plasma region free from energetic electrons, suitable for the study of ETG turbulence. Specifically, we report that localized structures of plasma density, potential, electron temperature, and plasma turbulence are excited in the EEF plasma. It is shown that structures of electron temperature and potential are created due to energy dependence of the electron transport in the filter region. On the other hand, although structure of plasma density has origin in the particle transport but two distinct steps of the density structure emerge from dominance of collisionality in the source-EEF region and of the Bohm diffusion in the EEF-target region. It is argued and experimental evidence is provided for existence of drift like flute Rayleigh-Taylor in the EEF plasma.

  5. Quantitative analysis of cytoskeletal reorganization during epithelial tissue sealing by large-volume electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Eltsov, Mikhail; Dubé, Nadia; Yu, Zhou; Pasakarnis, Laurynas; Haselmann-Weiss, Uta; Brunner, Damian; Frangakis, Achilleas S

    2015-05-01

    The closure of epidermal openings is an essential biological process that causes major developmental problems such as spina bifida in humans if it goes awry. At present, the mechanism of closure remains elusive. Therefore, we reconstructed a model closure event, dorsal closure in fly embryos, by large-volume correlative electron tomography. We present a comprehensive, quantitative analysis of the cytoskeletal reorganization, enabling separated epidermal cells to seal the epithelium. After establishing contact through actin-driven exploratory filopodia, cells use a single lamella to generate 'roof tile'-like overlaps. These shorten to produce the force, 'zipping' the tissue closed. The shortening overlaps lack detectable actin filament ensembles but are crowded with microtubules. Cortical accumulation of shrinking microtubule ends suggests a force generation mechanism in which cortical motors pull on microtubule ends as for mitotic spindle positioning. In addition, microtubules orient filopodia and lamellae before zipping. Our 4D electron microscopy picture describes an entire developmental process and provides fundamental insight into epidermal closure. PMID:25893916

  6. Configuration Analysis of the ERS Points in Large-Volume Metrology System.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhangjun; Yu, Cijun; Li, Jiangxiong; Ke, Yinglin

    2015-01-01

    In aircraft assembly, multiple laser trackers are used simultaneously to measure large-scale aircraft components. To combine the independent measurements, the transformation matrices between the laser trackers' coordinate systems and the assembly coordinate system are calculated, by measuring the enhanced referring system (ERS) points. This article aims to understand the influence of the configuration of the ERS points that affect the transformation matrix errors, and then optimize the deployment of the ERS points to reduce the transformation matrix errors. To optimize the deployment of the ERS points, an explicit model is derived to estimate the transformation matrix errors. The estimation model is verified by the experiment implemented in the factory floor. Based on the proposed model, a group of sensitivity coefficients are derived to evaluate the quality of the configuration of the ERS points, and then several typical configurations of the ERS points are analyzed in detail with the sensitivity coefficients. Finally general guidance is established to instruct the deployment of the ERS points in the aspects of the layout, the volume size and the number of the ERS points, as well as the position and orientation of the assembly coordinate system. PMID:26402685

  7. On `light' fermions and proton stability in `big divisor' D3/ D7 large volume compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Aalok; Shukla, Pramod

    2011-06-01

    Building on our earlier work (Misra and Shukla, Nucl. Phys. B 827:112, 2010; Phys. Lett. B 685:347-352, 2010), we show the possibility of generating "light" fermion mass scales of MeV-GeV range (possibly related to the first two generations of quarks/leptons) as well as eV (possibly related to first two generations of neutrinos) in type IIB string theory compactified on Swiss-Cheese orientifolds in the presence of a mobile space-time filling D3-brane restricted to (in principle) stacks of fluxed D7-branes wrapping the "big" divisor Σ B . This part of the paper is an expanded version of the latter half of Sect. 3 of a published short invited review (Misra, Mod. Phys. Lett. A 26:1, 2011) written by one of the authors [AM]. Further, we also show that there are no SUSY GUT-type dimension-five operators corresponding to proton decay, and we estimate the proton lifetime from a SUSY GUT-type four-fermion dimension-six operator to be 1061 years. Based on GLSM calculations in (Misra and Shukla, Nucl. Phys. B 827:112, 2010) for obtaining the geometric Kähler potential for the "big divisor," using further the Donaldson's algorithm, we also briefly discuss in the first of the two appendices the metric for the Swiss-Cheese Calabi-Yau used, which we obtain and which becomes Ricci flat in the large-volume limit.

  8. Curling probe measurement of large-volume pulsed plasma confined by surface magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Anil; Sakakibara, Wataru; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Keiji; Sugai, Hideo; Chubu University Team; DOWA Thermotech Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Curling probe (CP) has recently been developed which enables the local electron density measurement even in plasma for non-conducting film CVD. The electron density is obtained from a shift of resonance frequency of spiral antenna in discharge ON and OFF monitored by a network analyzer (NWA). In case of a pulsed glow discharge, synchronization of discharge pulse with frequency sweep of NWA must be established. In this paper, we report time and space-resolved CP measurement of electron density in a large volume plasma (80 cm diameter, 110 cm length) confined by surface magnetic field (multipole cusp field ~0.03 T). For plasma-aided modification of metal surface, the plasma is produced by 1 kV glow discharge at pulse frequency of 0.3 - 25 kHz with various duty ratio in gas (Ar, N2, C2H2) at pressure ~ 1 Pa. A radially movable CP revealed a remarkable effect of surface magnetic confinement: detach of plasma from the vessel wall and a fairly uniform plasma in the central region. In afterglow phase, the electron density was observed to decrease much faster in C2H2 discharge than in Ar discharge.

  9. Thermal runaway features of large format prismatic lithium ion battery using extended volume accelerating rate calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xuning; Fang, Mou; He, Xiangming; Ouyang, Minggao; Lu, Languang; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Mingxuan

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the thermal runaway features of a 25 Ah large format prismatic lithium ion battery with Li(NixCoyMnz)O2 (NCM) cathode are evaluated using the extended volume-accelerating rate calorimetry (EV-ARC). 4 thermocouples are set at different positions of the battery. The temperature inside the battery is 870 °C or so, much higher than that outside the battery. The temperature difference is calculated from the recorded data. The temperature difference within the battery stays lower than 1 °C for 97% of the test period, while it rises to its highest, approximately 520 °C, when thermal runaway happens. The voltage of the battery is also measured during the test. It takes 15-40 s from the sharp drop of voltage to the instantaneous rise of temperature. Such a time interval is beneficial for early warning of the thermal runaway. Using a pulse charge/discharge profile, the internal resistance is derived from the quotient of the pulse voltage and the current during the ARC test. The internal resistance of the battery increases slowly from 20 mΩ to 60 mΩ before thermal runaway, while it rises to 370 mΩ when thermal runaway happens indicating the loss of the integrity of the separator or the battery swell.

  10. High-resolution and large-volume tomography reconstruction for x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chang-Chieh; Hwu, Yeukuang; Ching, Yu-Tai

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a method of X-ray image acquisition for the high-resolution tomography reconstruction that uses a light source of synchrotron radiation to reconstruct a three-dimensional tomographic volume dataset for a nanoscale object. For large objects, because of the limited field-of-view, a projection image of an object should to be taken by several shots from different locations, and using an image stitching method to combine these image blocks together. In this study, the overlap of image blocks should be small because our light source is the synchrotron radiation and the X-ray dosage should be minimized as possible. We use the properties of synchrotron radiation to enable the image stitching and alignment success when the overlaps between adjacent image blocks are small. In this study, the size of overlaps can reach to 15% of the size of each image block. During the reconstruction, the mechanical stability should be considered because it leads the misalignment problem in tomography. We adopt the feature-based alignment

  11. A new large-volume metal reference standard for radioactive waste management.

    PubMed

    Tzika, F; Hult, M; Stroh, H; Marissens, G; Arnold, D; Burda, O; Kovář, P; Suran, J; Listkowska, A; Tyminski, Z

    2016-03-01

    A new large-volume metal reference standard has been developed. The intended use is for calibration of free-release radioactivity measurement systems and is made up of cast iron tubes placed inside a box of the size of a Euro-pallet (80 × 120 cm). The tubes contain certified activity concentrations of (60)Co (0.290 ± 0.006 Bq g(-1)) and (110m)Ag (3.05 ± 0.09 Bq g(-1)) (reference date: 30 September 2013). They were produced using centrifugal casting from a smelt into which (60)Co was first added and then one piece of neutron irradiated silver wire was progressively diluted. The iron castings were machined to the desirable dimensions. The final material consists of 12 iron tubes of 20 cm outer diameter, 17.6 cm inner diameter, 40 cm length/height and 245.9 kg total mass. This paper describes the reference standard and the process of determining the reference activity values. PMID:25977349

  12. Large volume flow electroporation of mRNA: clinical scale process.

    PubMed

    Li, Linhong; Allen, Cornell; Shivakumar, Rama; Peshwa, Madhusudan V

    2013-01-01

    Genetic modification for enhancing cellular function has been continuously pursued for fighting diseases. Messenger RNA (mRNA) transfection is found to be a promising solution in modifying hematopoietic and immune cells for therapeutic purpose. We have developed a flow electroporation-based system for large volume electroporation of cells with various molecules, including mRNA. This allows robust and scalable mRNA transfection of primary cells of different origin. Here we describe transfection of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) mRNA into NK cells to modulate the ability of NK cells to target tumor cells. High levels of CAR expression in NK cells can be maintained for 3-7 days post transfection. CD19-specific CAR mRNA transfected NK cells demonstrate targeted lysis of CD19-expressing tumor cells OP-1, primary B-CLL tumor cells, and autologous CD19+ B cells in in vitro assays with enhanced potency: >80% lysis at effector-target ratio of 1:1. This allows current good manufacturing practices (cGMP) and regulatory compliant manufacture of CAR mRNA transfected NK cells for clinical delivery. PMID:23296932

  13. High-density three-dimensional localization microscopy across large volumes.

    PubMed

    Legant, Wesley R; Shao, Lin; Grimm, Jonathan B; Brown, Timothy A; Milkie, Daniel E; Avants, Brian B; Lavis, Luke D; Betzig, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Extending three-dimensional (3D) single-molecule localization microscopy away from the coverslip and into thicker specimens will greatly broaden its biological utility. However, because of the limitations of both conventional imaging modalities and conventional labeling techniques, it is a challenge to localize molecules in three dimensions with high precision in such samples while simultaneously achieving the labeling densities required for high resolution of densely crowded structures. Here we combined lattice light-sheet microscopy with newly developed, freely diffusing, cell-permeable chemical probes with targeted affinity for DNA, intracellular membranes or the plasma membrane. We used this combination to perform high-localization precision, ultrahigh-labeling density, multicolor localization microscopy in samples up to 20 μm thick, including dividing cells and the neuromast organ of a zebrafish embryo. We also demonstrate super-resolution correlative imaging with protein-specific photoactivable fluorophores, providing a mutually compatible, single-platform alternative to correlative light-electron microscopy over large volumes. PMID:26950745

  14. Multi-stage polymer systems for the autonomic regeneration of large damage volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santa Cruz, Windy Ann

    Recovery of catastrophic damage requires a robust chemistry capable of addressing the complex challenges encountered by autonomic regeneration. Although self-healing polymers have the potential to increase material lifetimes and safety, these systems have been limited to recovery of internal microcracks and surface damage. Current technologies thereby fail to address the restoration of large, open damage volumes. A regenerative chemistry was developed by incorporating a gel scaffold within liquid healing agents. The healing system undergoes two stages, sol-gel and gel-polymer. Stage 1, rapid formation of a crosslinked gel, creates a synthetic support for the healing agents as they deposit across the damage region. Stage 2 comprises the polymerization of monomer using a room temperature redox initiation system to recover the mechanical properties of the substrate. The two stages are chemically compatible and only react when a specific reaction trigger is introduced -- an acid catalyst for gelation and initiator-promoter for polymerization. Cure kinetics, chemical and mechanical properties can be tuned by employing different monomer systems. The versatile gelation chemistry gels over 20 vinyl monomers to yield both thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers. The healing efficacy of the two-stage system was studied in thin, vascularized epoxy sheets. By splitting the chemistry into two low viscosity fluids, we demonstrated regeneration of gaps up to 9 mm in diameter. The combination of microvascular networks and a new healing chemistry demonstrates an innovative healing system that significantly exceeds the performance of traditional methods.

  15. Optimal energy window selection of a CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Su-Jin; Yu, A. Ram; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has desirable characteristics such as superior energy resolution, but data acquisition for SPECT imaging has been widely performed with a conventional energy window. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal energy window settings for technetium-99 m (99mTc) and thallium-201 (201Tl), the most commonly used isotopes in SPECT imaging, using CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy. We experimentally investigated quantitative measurements with respect to primary count rate, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and scatter fraction (SF) within various energy window settings using Triumph X-SPECT. The two ways of energy window settings were considered: an on-peak window and an off-peak window. In the on-peak window setting, energy centers were set on the photopeaks. In the off-peak window setting, the ratios of energy differences between the photopeak from the lower- and higher-threshold varied from 4:6 to 3:7. In addition, the energy-window width for 99mTc varied from 5% to 20%, and that for 201Tl varied from 10% to 30%. The results of this study enabled us to determine the optimal energy windows for each isotope in terms of primary count rate, CNR, and SF. We selected the optimal energy window that increases the primary count rate and CNR while decreasing SF. For 99mTc SPECT imaging, the energy window of 138-145 keV with a 5% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was determined to be the optimal energy window. For 201Tl SPECT imaging, the energy window of 64-85 keV with a 30% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was selected as the optimal energy window. Our results demonstrated that the proper energy window should be carefully chosen based on quantitative measurements in order to take advantage of desirable characteristics of CZT-based small-animal SPECT. These results provided valuable reference information for the establishment of new protocol for CZT

  16. A simple method for the production of large volume 3D macroporous hydrogels for advanced biotechnological, medical and environmental applications

    PubMed Central

    Savina, Irina N.; Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Cundy, Andrew B.; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    The development of bulk, three-dimensional (3D), macroporous polymers with high permeability, large surface area and large volume is highly desirable for a range of applications in the biomedical, biotechnological and environmental areas. The experimental techniques currently used are limited to the production of small size and volume cryogel material. In this work we propose a novel, versatile, simple and reproducible method for the synthesis of large volume porous polymer hydrogels by cryogelation. By controlling the freezing process of the reagent/polymer solution, large-scale 3D macroporous gels with wide interconnected pores (up to 200 μm in diameter) and large accessible surface area have been synthesized. For the first time, macroporous gels (of up to 400 ml bulk volume) with controlled porous structure were manufactured, with potential for scale up to much larger gel dimensions. This method can be used for production of novel 3D multi-component macroporous composite materials with a uniform distribution of embedded particles. The proposed method provides better control of freezing conditions and thus overcomes existing drawbacks limiting production of large gel-based devices and matrices. The proposed method could serve as a new design concept for functional 3D macroporous gels and composites preparation for biomedical, biotechnological and environmental applications. PMID:26883390

  17. A simple method for the production of large volume 3D macroporous hydrogels for advanced biotechnological, medical and environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savina, Irina N.; Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Cundy, Andrew B.; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V.

    2016-02-01

    The development of bulk, three-dimensional (3D), macroporous polymers with high permeability, large surface area and large volume is highly desirable for a range of applications in the biomedical, biotechnological and environmental areas. The experimental techniques currently used are limited to the production of small size and volume cryogel material. In this work we propose a novel, versatile, simple and reproducible method for the synthesis of large volume porous polymer hydrogels by cryogelation. By controlling the freezing process of the reagent/polymer solution, large-scale 3D macroporous gels with wide interconnected pores (up to 200 μm in diameter) and large accessible surface area have been synthesized. For the first time, macroporous gels (of up to 400 ml bulk volume) with controlled porous structure were manufactured, with potential for scale up to much larger gel dimensions. This method can be used for production of novel 3D multi-component macroporous composite materials with a uniform distribution of embedded particles. The proposed method provides better control of freezing conditions and thus overcomes existing drawbacks limiting production of large gel-based devices and matrices. The proposed method could serve as a new design concept for functional 3D macroporous gels and composites preparation for biomedical, biotechnological and environmental applications.

  18. Performance tests of a large volume cerium tribromide (CeBr3) scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Khiari, F Z; Liadi, F A; Khateeb-Ur-Rehman; Isab, A A

    2016-08-01

    The response of a large cylindrical 76mm×76mm (height×diameter) cerium tribromide (CeBr3) detector was measured for prompt gamma rays. The total intrinsic activity of the CeBr3 detector, which was measured over 0.33-3.33MeV range, was found to be 0.022±0.001 counts/s/cm(3). The partial intrinsic activity ( due to (227)Ac contamination), was measured over a energy range of 1.22-2.20MeV energy, was found to be 0.007±0.001 counts/s/cm(3). Compared to intrinsic activities of LaBr3:Ce and LaCl3:Ce detectors of equivalent volume, the CeBr3 detector has 7-8 times less total intrinsic activity. The detector response for low energy prompt gamma rays was measured over 0.3-0.6MeVgamma energy range using a portable neutron generator-based Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) setup. The experimental yield of boron, cadmium and mercury prompt gamma-rays was measured from water samples contaminated with 0.75-2.5wt% mercury, 0.31-2.50wt% boron, and 0.0625-0.500wt% cadmium, respectively. An excellent agreement has been observed between the calculated and experimental yields of the gamma rays. Also minimum detection limit (MDC) of the CeBr3 detector was measured for boron, cadmium and mercury samples. The CeBr3 detector has 23% smaller value of MDCB and 18% larger value of MDCCd than those of a LaBr3:Ce detector of equivalent size. This study has shown that CeBr3 detector has an excellent response for the low energy prompt gamma-rays with almost an order of magnitude low intrinsic activity as compared to LaCl3:Ce and LaBr3:Ce detectors of equivalent volume. PMID:27180221

  19. “Finite” non-Gaussianities and tensor-scalar ratio in large volume Swiss-cheese compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Aalok; Shukla, Pramod

    2009-03-01

    Developing on the ideas of (Section 4 of) [A. Misra, P. Shukla, Moduli stabilization, large-volume dS minimum without anti-D3-branes, (non-)supersymmetric black hole attractors and two-parameter Swiss cheese Calabi-Yau's, Nucl. Phys. B 799 (2008) 165-198, arXiv: 0707.0105] and [A. Misra, P. Shukla, Large volume axionic Swiss-cheese inflation, Nucl. Phys. B 800 (2008) 384-400, arXiv: 0712.1260 [hep-th

  20. Evaluation of a laser scanner for large volume coordinate metrology: a comparison of results before and after factory calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrucci, M.; Muralikrishnan, B.; Sawyer, D.; Phillips, S.; Petrov, P.; Yakovlev, Y.; Astrelin, A.; Milligan, S.; Palmateer, J.

    2014-10-01

    Large volume laser scanners are increasingly being used for a variety of dimensional metrology applications. Methods to evaluate the performance of these scanners are still under development and there are currently no documentary standards available. This paper describes the results of extensive ranging and volumetric performance tests conducted on a large volume laser scanner. The results demonstrated small but clear systematic errors that are explained in the context of a geometric error model for the instrument. The instrument was subsequently returned to the manufacturer for factory calibration. The ranging and volumetric tests were performed again and the results are compared against those obtained prior to the factory calibration.

  1. Pyrometry in the Multianvil Press: New approach for temperature measurement in large volume press experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanehira, T.; Wang, Y.; Prakapenka, V.; Rivers, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    Temperature measurement in large volume press experiments has been based on thermocouple emf, which has well known problems: unknown pressure dependence of emf [e.g., 1], chemical reaction between thermocouple and other materials, deformation related texture development in the thermocouple wires [2], and so on. Thus, different techniques to measure temperatures in large volume press experiments other than thermocouples are required to measure accurate temperatures under high pressures. Here we report a new development using pyrometry in the multianvil press, where temperatures are derived on the basis of spectral radiometry. Several high pressure runs were conducted using the 1000 ton press with a DIA module installed at 13 ID-D GSECARS beamline at Advanced Photon Source (APS) [3]. The cubic pressure medium, 14 mm edge length, was made of soft-fired pyrophyllite with a graphite furnace. A moissanite (SiC) single crystal was built inside the pressure medium as a window for the thermal emission signal to go through. An MgO disk with 1.0 mm thickness was inserted in a gap between the top of the SiC crystal and thermocouple hot junction. The bottom of the window crystal was in direct contact with the tip of the anvil, which had a 1.5 mm diameter hole drilled all the way through the anvil axis. An optical fiber was inserted in this hole and the open end of fiber was in contact with the SiC crystal. Thermal spectral radiance from the inner cell assembly was obtained via the fiber and recorded by an Ocean Optics HP2000 spectrometer. The system response of spectrometer was calibrated by a tungsten ribbon ramp (OL550S, Optronic Laboratories, Inc.) with standard of spectral radiance. The cell assembly was compressed up to target value of 15 tons and then temperature was increased up to 1573 K. Radiation spectra were mainly obtained above 873 K and typical integration time was 1 ms or 10 ms. Data collection was done in the process of increase and decrease of temperature. In

  2. NT-proBNP Changes in Patients with Ascites during Large Volume Paracentesis

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Rob; Harnett, Paul; Chan, Henry; Vootakuru, Nikitha; Khan, Montaha; Phillips, Shani; George, Jacob; van der Poorten, David

    2013-01-01

    Background. N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a hormone involved in the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis. Changes in serum NT-proBNP during large volume paracentesis (LVP) in patients with ascites have never before been examined. Aims. To determine if significant changes in serum NT-proBNP occur in patients undergoing LVP and the associated clinical correlates in patients with cirrhosis. Method. A total of 45 patients with ascites were prospectively recruited. Serum NT-proBNP, biochemistry, and haemodynamics were determined at baseline and at key time points during and after paracentesis. Results. 34 patients were analysed; 19 had ascites due to cirrhosis and 15 from malignancy. In those with cirrhosis, NT-proBNP decreased by 77.3 pg/mL at 2 L of drainage and 94.3 pg/mL at the end of paracentesis, compared with an increase of 10.5 pg/mL and 77.2 pg/mL in cancer patients at the same time points (P = 0.05 and P = 0.03). Only congestive cardiac failure (CCF) was an independent predictor of significant NT-proBNP changes at the end of drainage in cirrhotic patients (P < 0.01). There were no significant changes in haemodynamics or renal biochemistry for either group. Conclusion. Significant reductions in serum NT-proBNP during LVP occur in patients with cirrhosis but not malignancy, and only comorbid CCF appeared to predict such changes.

  3. Large-volume lava flow fields on Venus: Dimensions and morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, M. G.; Guest, J. E.; Roberts, K. M.; Head, James W., III

    1992-01-01

    Of all the volcanic features identified in Magellan images, by far the most extensive and really important are lava flow fields. Neglecting the widespread lava plains themselves, practically every C1-MIDR produced so far contains several or many discrete lava flow fields. These range in size from a few hundred square kilometers in area (like those fields associated with small volcanic edifices for example), through all sizes up to several hundred thousand square kilometers in extent (such as many rift related fields). Most of these are related to small, intermediate, or large-scale volcanic edifices, coronae, arachnoids, calderas, fields of small shields, and rift zones. An initial survey of 40 well-defined flow fields with areas greater than 50,000 sq km (an arbitrary bound) has been undertaken. Following Columbia River Basalt terminology, these have been termed great flow fields. This represents a working set of flow fields, chosen to cover a variety of morphologies, sources, locations, and characteristics. The initial survey is intended to highlight representative flow fields, and does not represent a statistical set. For each flow field, the location, total area, flow length, flow widths, estimated flow thicknesses, estimated volumes, topographic slope, altitude, backscatter, emissivity, morphology, and source has been noted. The flow fields range from about 50,000 sq km to over 2,500,000 sq km in area, with most being several hundred square kilometers in extent. Flow lengths measure between 140 and 2840 km, with the majority of flows being several hundred kilometers long. A few basic morphological types have been identified.

  4. Testbed for large volume surveillance through distributed fusion and resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valin, Pierre; Guitouni, Adel; Bossé, Éloi; Wehn, Hans; Yates, Richard; Zwick, Harold

    2007-04-01

    DRDC Valcartier has initiated, through a PRECARN partnership project, the development of an advanced simulation testbed for the evaluation of the effectiveness of Network Enabled Operations in a coastal large volume surveillance situation. The main focus of this testbed is to study concepts like distributed information fusion, dynamic resources and networks configuration management, and self synchronising units and agents. This article presents the requirements, design and first implementation builds, and reports on some preliminary results. The testbed allows to model distributed nodes performing information fusion, dynamic resource management planning and scheduling, as well as configuration management, given multiple constraints on the resources and their communications networks. Two situations are simulated: cooperative and non-cooperative target search. A cooperative surface target behaves in ways to be detected (and rescued), while an elusive target attempts to avoid detection. The current simulation consists of a networked set of surveillance assets including aircraft (UAVs, helicopters, maritime patrol aircraft), and ships. These assets have electrooptical and infrared sensors, scanning and imaging radar capabilities. Since full data sharing over datalinks is not feasible, own-platform data fusion must be simulated to evaluate implementation and performance of distributed information fusion. A special emphasis is put on higher-level fusion concepts using knowledge-based rules, with level 1 fusion already providing tracks. Surveillance platform behavior is also simulated in order to evaluate different dynamic resource management algorithms. Additionally, communication networks are modeled to simulate different information exchange concepts. The testbed allows the evaluation of a range of control strategies from independent platform search, through various levels of platform collaboration, up to a centralized control of search platforms.

  5. Trace analysis of semivolatile organic compounds in large volume samples of snow, lake water, and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Usenko, Sascha; Hageman, Kimberly J; Schmedding, Dave W; Wilson, Glenn R; Simonich, Staci L

    2005-08-15

    An analytical method was developed for the trace analysis of a wide range of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) in 50-L high-elevation snow and lake water samples. The method was validated for 75 SOCs from seven different chemical classes (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, amides, triazines, polychlorinated biphenyls, thiocarbamates, and phosphorothioates) that covered a wide range of physical-chemical properties including 7 orders of magnitude of octanol-water partition coefficient (log K(ow) = 1.4-8.3). The SOCs were extracted using a hydrophobically and hydrophilically modified divinylbenzene solid-phase extraction device (modified Speedisk). The average analyte recovery from 50 L of reverse osmosis water, using the modified Speedisk, was 99% with an average relative standard deviation of 4.8%. Snow samples were collected from the field, melted, and extracted using the modified Speedisk and a poly(tetrafluoroethylene) remote sample adapter in the laboratory. Lake water was sampled, filtered, and extracted in situ using an Infiltrex 100 fitted with a 1-microm glass fiber filter to trap particulate matter and the modified Speedisk to trap dissolved SOCs. The extracts were analyzed by gas chromatographic mass spectrometry with electron impact ionization and electron capture negative ionization using isotope dilution and selective ion monitoring. Estimated method detection limits for snow and lake water ranged from 0.2 to 125 pg/L and 0.5-400 pg/L, respectively. U.S. historic and current-use pesticides were identified and quantified in snow and lake water samples collected from Rocky Mountain National Park, CO. The application of the analytical method to the analysis of SOCs in large-volume groundwater samples is also shown. PMID:16173557

  6. Bichromatic Cooling used to Achieve a Large Number of Cold Atoms in a Compact Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubel Liebisch, Tara; Donley, Elizabeth; Blanshan, Eric; Kitching, John

    2010-03-01

    For cold atomic samples to be used in emerging technologies such as compact atomic clocks and sensors it is necessary to achieve small sample sizes with a large number of cold atoms. This is a challenge because in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) the number of cooled and trapped atoms scales as d^4, where d is the diameter of the laser beams (Gibble et.al.OL17, 526 (1992)). In a MOT the maximum radiation force is limited by spontaneous emission to hkγ/2. Bichromatic cooling first studied by Söding et.al. (PRL78,1420(1997)), takes advantage of stimulated emission and driven Rabi oscillations to cool atoms over a broad velocity range with forces >> hkγ/2. With the faster cooling rates, larger atom numbers can be obtained in very small cooling volumes. We report on preliminary results of cooling a thermal beam down to MOT capture velocities over distances of <1cm, our experimental set up, and theoretical results using our experimental parameters. We expect to be able to load a MOT with 1mm diameter beams with a factor of 100 more atoms than if loaded from a background vapor. With this atom sample we estimate we could achieve a clock stability of 1E-12 @ 1s with a Ramsey time of 4ms, a cycle time of 10ms, and a clock transition frequency of 6.8GHz. [0pt] We would like to acknowledge funding from NIST, DARPA, and NRC.

  7. A pomegranate-inspired nanoscale design for large-volume-change lithium battery anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nian; Lu, Zhenda; Zhao, Jie; McDowell, Matthew T.; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Zhao, Wenting; Cui, Yi

    2014-03-01

    Silicon is an attractive material for anodes in energy storage devices, because it has ten times the theoretical capacity of its state-of-the-art carbonaceous counterpart. Silicon anodes can be used both in traditional lithium-ion batteries and in more recent Li-O2 and Li-S batteries as a replacement for the dendrite-forming lithium metal anodes. The main challenges associated with silicon anodes are structural degradation and instability of the solid-electrolyte interphase caused by the large volume change (~300%) during cycling, the occurrence of side reactions with the electrolyte, and the low volumetric capacity when the material size is reduced to a nanometre scale. Here, we propose a hierarchical structured silicon anode that tackles all three of these problems. Our design is inspired by the structure of a pomegranate, where single silicon nanoparticles are encapsulated by a conductive carbon layer that leaves enough room for expansion and contraction following lithiation and delithiation. An ensemble of these hybrid nanoparticles is then encapsulated by a thicker carbon layer in micrometre-size pouches to act as an electrolyte barrier. As a result of this hierarchical arrangement, the solid-electrolyte interphase remains stable and spatially confined, resulting in superior cyclability (97% capacity retention after 1,000 cycles). In addition, the microstructures lower the electrode-electrolyte contact area, resulting in high Coulombic efficiency (99.87%) and volumetric capacity (1,270 mAh cm-3), and the cycling remains stable even when the areal capacity is increased to the level of commercial lithium-ion batteries (3.7 mAh cm-2).

  8. Hepatic Arterial Embolization and Chemoembolization in the Management of Patients with Large-Volume Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, Paresh P.; Gupta, Sanjay Ensor, Joe E.; Murthy, Ravi; Ahrar, Kamran; Madoff, David C.; Wallace, Michael J.; Hicks, Marshall E.

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the role of hepatic arterial embolization (HAE) and chemoembolization (HACE) in patients with large-volume liver metastases. Patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors, melanomas, or gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) with >75% liver involvement who underwent HAE or HACE were included in the study. Radiologic response, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and postprocedure complications were assessed. Sixty patients underwent 123 treatment sessions. Of the 48 patients for whom follow-up imaging was available, partial response was seen in 12 (25%) patients, minimal response in 6 (12%), stable disease in 22 (46%), and progressive disease in 8 (17%). Median OS and PFS were 9.3 and 4.9 months, respectively. Treatment resulted in radiologic response or disease stabilization in 82% and symptomatic response in 65% of patients with neuroendocrine tumors. Patients with neuroendocrine tumors had higher response rates (44% vs. 27% and 0%; p = 0.31) and longer PFS (9.2 vs. 2.0 and 2.3 months; p < 0.0001) and OS (17.9 vs. 2.4 and 2.3 months; p < 0.0001) compared to patients with melanomas and GISTs. Major complications occurred in 21 patients after 23 (19%) of the 123 sessions. Nine of the 12 patients who developed major complications resulting in death had additional risk factors-carcinoid heart disease, sepsis, rapidly worsening performance status, or anasarca. In conclusion, in patients with neuroendocrine tumors with >75% liver involvement, HAE/HACE resulted in symptom palliation and radiologic response or disease stabilization in the majority of patients. Patients with hepatic metastases from melanomas and GISTs, however, did not show any appreciable benefit from this procedure. Patients with massive liver tumor burden, who have additional risk factors, should not be subjected to HAE/HACE because of the high risk of procedure-related mortality.

  9. Toroidal transducer with two large focal zones for increasing the coagulated volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenot, J.; Melodelima, D.; Kocot, A.; Chavrier, F.; Chapelon, J. Y.

    2012-11-01

    Toroidal HIFU transducers have been shown to generate large conical ablations (7 cm3 in 40 seconds). The focal zone is composed of a first ring-shaped focal zone and an overlap of ultrasound beams behind this first focus. A HIFU device has been developed on this principle to treat liver metastases during an open procedure. Although these large lesions contribute to reduce treatment time, it is still needed to juxtapose 4 to 9 single HIFU lesions to treat liver metastasis (2 cm in diameter) with safety margins. In this work, a different toroidal geometry was used. With this transducer, the overlap area is located between the probe and the focal ring. The objective was to use this transducer with electronic focusing in order to create a spherical shape lesion with sufficient volume for the destruction of a metastasis of 2 cm in diameter without any mechanical displacement. The operating frequency of the toroidal transducer was 2.5 MHz. The radius of curvature was 70 mm with a diameter of 67 mm. The focal ring had a radius of 15 mm. The overlap zone extent between 35 to 55 mm from the emitting surface. An ultrasound-imaging probe (working at 7.5 MHz) was placed in a central circular opening of 26 mm in the HIFU transducer and was aligned with the focal plane. The transducer was divided into 32 rings of 78 mm2. Using a 32 channels amplifier with a phase resolution of 1.4 degrees, it was possible to change the diameter (0 to 15 mm) and depth (45 to 85 mm) of the focus circle to maximize dimensions of the lesion. Tests were conducted in vitro, in bovine liver samples. This toroidal geometry and the use of electronic beam steering allow the creation of roughly spherical lesions (diameter of 47 mm, depth of 35 mm). This treatment was obtained in 6 minutes and 10 seconds without any mechanical displacement of the transducer. The lesions obtained were homogeneous and no untreated area was observed. In conclusion, these results indicate that the treatment of a liver

  10. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  11. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  12. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  13. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  14. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF NOX CONTROL ON A SPARK-IGNITED LARGE BORE RECIPROCATING INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE. VOLUME 2. DATA SUPPLEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume II of the report is a compendium of detailed emission and test data from field tests of a large-bore, spark-ignited reciprocating engine and laboratory analyses of collected samples. The engine was tested in two operating modes: a baseline (normal) operation, and with incr...

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF NOX CONTROL ON A COMPRESSION IGNITION LARGE BORE RECIPROCATING INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE. VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume I of the report gives emission results from field tests of the exhaust gas from a large-bore, compression-ignition reciprocating engine burning diesel fuel. An objective of the tests was to evaluate the operating efficiency of the engine with combustion modification NOx co...

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF NOX CONTROL ON A COMPRESSION IGNITION LARGE BORE RECIPROCATING INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE. VOLUME 2. DATA SUPPLEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume II of the report is a compendium of detailed emission and test data from field tests of a large-bore, compression-ignition reciprocating engine burning diesel fuel. The engine was tested during two operating modes: at baseline (normal operation), and with fuel injection re...

  18. Effect of filtration rates on hollow fiber ultrafilter concentration of viruses and protozoans from large volumes of water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To describe the ability of tangential flow hollow-fiber ultrafiltration to recover viruses from large volumes of water when run either at high filtration rates or lower filtration rates and recover Cryptosporidium parvum at high filtration rates. Methods and Results: Wate...

  19. ANALYSIS OF LOW-LEVEL PESTICIDES FROM HIGH-ELEVATION LAKE WATERS BY LARGE VOLUME INJECTION GCMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the method development for the determination of ultra-low level pesticides from high-elevation lake waters by large-volume injection programmable temperature vaporizer (LVI-PTV) GC/MS. This analytical method is developed as a subtask of a larger study, backgr...

  20. Development of deployable structures for large space platform systems. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, R. L.; Nelson, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Candidate deployable linear platform system concepts suitable for development to technology readiness by 1986 are reviewed. The systems concepts were based on trades of alternate deployable/retractable structure concepts, integration of utilities, and interface approaches for docking and assembly of payloads and subsystems. The deployable volume studies involved generation of concepts for deployable volumes which could be used as unpressurized or pressurized hangars, habitats and interconnecting tunnels. Concept generation emphasized using flexible materials and deployable truss structure technology.

  1. Dosimetric Comparison of Split Field and Fixed Jaw Techniques for Large IMRT Target Volumes in the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Shiv P.; Das, Indra J.; Kumar, Arvind; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2011-04-01

    Some treatment planning systems (TPSs), when used for large-field (>14 cm) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), create split fields that produce excessive multiple-leaf collimator segments, match-line dose inhomogeneity, and higher treatment times than nonsplit fields. A new method using a fixed-jaw technique (FJT) forces the jaw to stay at a fixed position during optimization and is proposed to reduce problems associated with split fields. Dosimetric comparisons between split-field technique (SFT) and FJT used for IMRT treatment is presented. Five patients with head and neck malignancies and regional target volumes were studied and compared with both techniques. Treatment planning was performed on an Eclipse TPS using beam data generated for Varian 2100C linear accelerator. A standard beam arrangement consisting of nine coplanar fields, equally spaced, was used in both techniques. Institutional dose-volume constraints used in head and neck cancer were kept the same for both techniques. The dosimetric coverage for the target volumes between SFT and FJT for head and neck IMRT plan is identical within {+-}1% up to 90% dose. Similarly, the organs at risk (OARs) have dose-volume coverage nearly identical for all patients. When the total monitor unit (MU) and segments were analyzed, SFT produces statistically significant higher segments (17.3 {+-} 6.3%) and higher MU (13.7 {+-} 4.4%) than the FJT. There is no match line in FJT and hence dose uniformity in the target volume is superior to the SFT. Dosimetrically, SFT and FJT are similar for dose-volume coverage; however, the FJT method provides better logistics, lower MU, shorter treatment time, and better dose uniformity. The number of segments and MU also has been correlated with the whole body radiation dose with long-term complications. Thus, FJT should be the preferred option over SFT for large target volumes.

  2. Associations Between IQ, Total and Regional Brain Volumes and Demography in a Large Normative Sample of Healthy Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Nicholas; Froimowitz, Michael P.; Bigler, Erin D.; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2010-01-01

    In the course of efforts to establish quantitative MRI-based norms for healthy brain development (Brain Development Cooperative Group, 2006), previously unreported associations of parental education and temporal and frontal lobe volumes with full scale IQ and its verbal and performance subscales were discovered. Our findings were derived from the largest, most representative MRI sample to date of healthy children and adolescents, ages 4 years 10 months to 18 years 4 months. We first find that parental education has a strong association with IQ in children that is not mediated by total or regional brain volumes. Second, we find that our observed associations between temporal gray matter, temporal white matter and frontal white matter volumes with full scale IQ, between 0.14 to 0.27 in children and adolescents, are due in large part to their correlations with performance IQ and not verbal IQ. The volumes of other lobar gray and white matter, subcortical gray matter (thalamus, caudate nucleus, putamen and globus pallidus), cerebellum and brainstem do not contribute significantly to IQ variation. Third, we find that head circumference is an insufficient index of cerebral volume in typically developing older children and adolescents. The relations between total and regional brain volumes and IQ can best be discerned when additional variables known to be associated with IQ, especially parental education and other demographic measures, are considered concurrently. PMID:20446134

  3. An energy-optimized collimator design for a CZT-based SPECT camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Fenghua; Bagchi, Srijeeta; Zan, Yunlong; Huang, Qiu; Seo, Youngho

    2016-01-01

    In single photon emission computed tomography, it is a challenging task to maintain reasonable performance using only one specific collimator for radiotracers over a broad spectrum of diagnostic photon energies, since photon scatter and penetration in a collimator differ with the photon energy. Frequent collimator exchanges are inevitable in daily clinical SPECT imaging, which hinders throughput while subjecting the camera to operational errors and damage. Our objective is to design a collimator, which is independent of the photon energy, performs reasonably well for commonly used radiotracers with low- to medium-energy levels of gamma emissions. Using the Geant4 simulation toolkit, we simulated and evaluated a parallel-hole collimator mounted to a CZT detector. With the pixel-geometry-matching collimation, the pitch of the collimator hole was fixed to match the pixel size of the CZT detector throughout this work. Four variables, hole shape, hole length, hole radius/width and the source-to-collimator distance were carefully studied. Scatter and penetration of the collimator, sensitivity and spatial resolution of the system were assessed for four radionuclides including 57Co, 99mTc, 123I and 111In, with respect to the aforementioned four variables. An optimal collimator was then decided upon such that it maximized the total relative sensitivity (TRS) for the four considered radionuclides while other performance parameters, such as scatter, penetration and spatial resolution, were benchmarked to prevalent commercial scanners and collimators. Digital phantom studies were also performed to validate the system with the optimal square-hole collimator (23 mm hole length, 1.28 mm hole width, and 0.32 mm septal thickness) in terms of contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio and recovery ratio. This study demonstrates promise of our proposed energy-optimized collimator to be used in a CZT-based gamma camera, with comparable or even better imaging performance versus commercial

  4. An energy-optimized collimator design for a CZT-based SPECT camera

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Fenghua; Bagchi, Srijeeta; Zan, Yunlong; Huang, Qiu; Seo, Youngho

    2015-01-01

    In single photon emission computed tomography, it is a challenging task to maintain reasonable performance using only one specific collimator for radio-tracers over a broad spectrum of diagnostic photon energies, since photon scatter and penetration in a collimator differ with the photon energy. Frequent collimator exchanges are inevitable in daily clinical SPECT imaging, which hinders throughput while subjecting the camera to operational errors and damage. Our objective is to design a collimator, which independent of the photon energy performs reasonably well for commonly used radiotracers with low- to medium-energy levels of gamma emissions. Using the Geant4 simulation toolkit, we simulated and evaluated a parallel-hole collimator mounted to a CZT detector. With the pixel-geometry-matching collimation, the pitch of the collimator hole was fixed to match the pixel size of the CZT detector throughout this work. Four variables, hole shape, hole length, hole radius/width and the source-to-collimator distance were carefully studied. Scatter and penetration of the collimator, sensitivity and spatial resolution of the system were assessed for four radionuclides including 57Co, 99mTc, 123I and 111In, with respect to the aforementioned four variables. An optimal collimator was then decided upon such that it maximized the total relative sensitivity (TRS) for the four considered radionuclides while other performance parameters, such as scatter, penetration and spatial resolution, were benchmarked to prevalent commercial scanners and collimators. Digital phantom studies were also performed to validate the system with the optimal square-hole collimator (23 mm hole length, 1.28 mm hole width, 0.32 mm septal thickness) in terms of contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio and recovery ratio. This study demonstrates promise of our proposed energy-optimized collimator to be used in a CZT-based gamma camera, with comparable or even better imaging performance versus commercial collimators

  5. Large Volume Self-Organization of Polymer/Nanoparticle Hybrids with Millimeter Scale Grain Sizes using Brush Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dongpo; Watkins, James

    The lack of sufficient long-range order in self-assembled nanostructures is a bottleneck for many nanotechnology applications. In this work, we report that exceptionally large volume of highly ordered arrays (single grains) on the order of millimeters in scale can be rapidly created through a unique innate guiding mechanism of brush block copolymers (BBCPs). The grain volume is over 1 billion times larger relative to that of typical self-assembled linear BCPs (LBCPs). The use of strong interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and BBCPs enables the high loadings of functional materials, up to 76 wt% (46 vol%) in the target domain, while maintaining excellent long-range order. Overall this work provides a simple route to precisely control the spatial orientation of functionalities at nanometer length scales over macroscopic volumes, thereby enabling the production of hybrid materials for many important applications.

  6. Systems and methods for the detection of low-level harmful substances in a large volume of fluid

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, Michael V.; Roybal, Lyle G.; Lindquist, Alan; Gallardo, Vincente

    2016-03-15

    A method and device for the detection of low-level harmful substances in a large volume of fluid comprising using a concentrator system to produce a retentate and analyzing the retentate for the presence of at least one harmful substance. The concentrator system performs a method comprising pumping at least 10 liters of fluid from a sample source through a filter. While pumping, the concentrator system diverts retentate from the filter into a container. The concentrator system also recirculates at least part of the retentate in the container again through the filter. The concentrator system controls the speed of the pump with a control system thereby maintaining a fluid pressure less than 25 psi during the pumping of the fluid; monitors the quantity of retentate within the container with a control system, and maintains a reduced volume level of retentate and a target volume of retentate.

  7. Detection of triazole deicing additives in soil samples from airports with low, mid, and large volume aircraft deicing activities.

    PubMed

    McNeill, K S; Cancilla, D A

    2009-03-01

    Soil samples from three USA airports representing low, mid, and large volume users of aircraft deicing fluids (ADAFs) were analyzed by LC/MS/MS for the presence of triazoles, a class of corrosion inhibitors historically used in ADAFs. Triazoles, specifically the 4-methyl-1H-benzotriazole and the 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole, were detected in a majority of samples and ranged from 2.35 to 424.19 microg/kg. Previous studies have focused primarily on ground and surface water impacts of larger volume ADAF users. The detection of triazoles in soils at low volume ADAF use airports suggests that deicing activities may have a broader environmental impact than previously considered. PMID:19082516

  8. Dual-domain microchip-based process for volume reduction solid phase extraction of nucleic acids from dilute, large volume biological samples.

    PubMed

    Reedy, Carmen R; Hagan, Kristin A; Strachan, Briony C; Higginson, Joshua J; Bienvenue, Joan M; Greenspoon, Susan A; Ferrance, Jerome P; Landers, James P

    2010-07-01

    A microfluidic device was developed to carry out integrated volume reduction and purification of nucleic acids from dilute, large volume biological samples commonly encountered in forensic genetic analysis. The dual-phase device seamlessly integrates two orthogonal solid-phase extraction (SPE) processes, a silica solid phase using chaotrope-driven binding and an ion exchange phase using totally aqueous chemistry (chitosan phase), providing the unique capability of removing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors used in silica-based extractions (guanidine and isopropanol). Nucleic acids from a large volume sample are shown to undergo a substantial volume reduction on the silica phase, followed by a more stringent extraction on the chitosan phase. The key to interfacing the two steps is mixing of the eluted nucleic acids from the first phase with loading buffer which is facilitated by flow-mediated mixing over a herringbone mixing region in the device. The complete aqueous chemistry associated with the second purification step yields a highly concentrated PCR-ready eluate of nucleic acids devoid of PCR inhibitors that are reagent-based (isopropanol) and sample-based (indigo dye), both of which are shown to be successfully removed using the dual-phase device but not by the traditional microfluidic SPE (muSPE). The utility of the device for purifying DNA was demonstrated with dilute whole blood, dilute semen, a semen stain, and a blood sample inhibited with indigo dye, with the resultant DNA from all shown to be PCR amplifiable. The same samples purified using muSPE were not all PCR amplifiable due to a smaller concentration of the DNA and the lack of PCR-compatible aqueous chemistry in the extraction method. The utility of the device for the purification of RNA was also demonstrated, by the extraction of RNA from a dilute semen sample, with the resulting RNA amplified using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The vrSPE-SPE device reliably yields a volume reduction for

  9. Development of deployable structures for large space platforms. Volume 2: Design development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1983-01-01

    Design evolution, test article design, test article mass properties, and structural analysis of deployable platform systems are discussed. Orbit transfer vehicle (OTV) hangar development, OTV hangar concept selection, and manned module development are discussed. Deployable platform systems requirements, material data base, technology development needs, concept selection and deployable volume enclosures are also discussed.

  10. COMPARISON OF TWO DIFFERENT SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION/LARGE VOLUME INJECTION PROCEDURES FOR METHOD 8270

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two solid phase (SPE) and one traditional continuous liquid-liquid extraction method are compared for analysis of Method 8270 SVOCs. Productivity parameters include data quality, sample volume, analysis time and solvent waste.

    One SPE system, unique in the U.S., uses aut...

  11. Fabrics, Facies And Flow Through A Large-Volume Ignimbrite: Pampa De Oxaya, Chile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzman, Ellen; Cooper, Frances

    2016-04-01

    Large volume pyroclastic currents form during some of the most destructive volcanic eruptions on the planet, yet because they are underrepresented in the geological record they remain poorly understood. The Miocene Oxaya ignimbrites, exposed along the western Andean slopes in northern Chile, form one of the largest ignimbrite provinces on earth. We use anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) in conjunction with rock magnetic measurements to investigate flow behavior and depositional processes in one of the largest members of the Oxaya succession, the Cardones ignimbrite. Despite its prominence the location of the source caldera remains unknown and fundamental processes remain poorly constrained. During 2012 nearly 8km (7,773m) of core was recovered from the early Miocene ignimbrites in 11 holes at elevations ranging from 2336m to 3805m along the Andean escarpment east of Arica, Chile. The drill cores are remarkable in that they penetrate through the entirety of the ignimbrite sequence and into the basement below. Samples for this study were collected from a > 1 km long core drilled at an altitude 3692m. The core sampled 981 m of Cardones ignimbrite and 15 m of underlying sediments and volcaniclastics before penetrating 148 m of basement. Detailed measurements of the variation in bulk magnetic properties including natural remanent magnetization (NRM), susceptibility, ARM, and IRM, were used to monitor changes in concentration, composition and grainsize of the magnetic components though the ignimbrite. AMS in conjunction with detailed rock magnetic measurements were used to constrain flow processes. The data reveal a well-defined flow direction and systematic variations in flow processes with depth. Low field bulk magnetic susceptibility averages 3.2x10-3 SI. Rock magnetic studies and petrographic examination indicate that magnetite is likely to be the dominant magnetic phase although paramagnetic mineral phases also contribute to the magnetic fabric. The degree

  12. Pre-caldera forming pyroclastic deposits: Implications for the origin of the large volume Rainier Mesa ash-flow sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Huysken, K.T.; Vogel, T.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Small ash-flow layers directly underlying the voluminous Rainier Mesa ash-flow sheet are chemically equivalent to the overlying ash-flow. However, chemical variability of these precaldera-collapse pyroclastic deposits indicates they could not have erupted from the large volume Rainier Mesa Member (RMM) magma body. The RMM is a voluminous chemically and mineralogically layered and zoned ash-flow sheet. Directly underlying the RMM is a sequence of tephra-fall deposits interbedded with thin ash-flow layers, traditionally interpreted as pre-caldera-collapse deposits from the large magma body. Chemical comparison of 14 thin flows with the overlying RMM was made in order to decipher the relationship between earlier erupted ash-flow layers and the large ash-flow sheet. Within each thin ash-flow layer, there is substantial variation in major, trace, and REE concentrations over a thickness of only 0.5 to 5 m. The extremely small volume of pre-Rainier Mesa ash-flow layers would represent a negligible volume of the magma body. The observed chemical zoning would not occur if these small volume deposits erupted from the RMM magma body. Major and trace element variation among the small ash-flow layers spans that of the entire high-silica portion of the RMM ash-flow sheet, which makes up 90% of the total volume of the ash-flow. Moreover, REE concentrations among the thin ash-flow layers are as variable as the REE concentrations of the entire overlying ash-flow sheet. Because there is significant chemical variation both within and among small ash-flow layers underlying the RMM, the authors reject the possibility of a larger differentiating magma body as the source of the small pre-Rainier ash-flow layers.

  13. Optical property analysis of high-resistivity CZT:In single crystals before and after annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pengfei; Jie, Wanqi

    2014-05-01

    In-doped CdZnTe:In (CZT:In) single crystals with high resistivity were annealed by an effective method containing Cd/Zn atmosphere annealing and Te atmosphere annealing. They were mainly measured by IR transmittance and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The results indicated Te inclusions were eliminated completely after annealing. Both of the resistivity and IR transmittance decreased notably after Cd/Zn atmosphere annealing, and then increased tremendously after Te atmosphere annealing. For PL measurements, (A0, X) disappeared, the intensity of (D0, X) peak increased, and FWHM was obviously reduced after annealing. These indicated the crystal quality was enhanced. The donor-acceptor pair peak decreased in annealed CZT:In crystal, which might be due to the dissociation of [VCd-InCd] complex and the remove of the impurities. Moreover, Dcomplex peak containing two peaks was caused by Cd vacancy-related (D1) and dislocation-related defects (D2) in as-grown crystal. However, after annealing, the intensities of D1 and D2 peaks decreased because of the compensation of Cd vacancies and the elimination of Te inclusions, respectively.

  14. High energy γ-ray detection using CZT detectors with virtual Frisch grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Sandeep K.; Krishna, Ramesh M.; Zavalla, Kelvin J.; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2012-10-01

    The spectroscopic performance of two Frisch collar CdZnTe (CZT) detectors with different dimensions has been tested and evaluated after exposing to high energy gamma rays. The dimensions of one of the detectors, detector A, were 4.2×6.2×6.5 mm3 and that of detector B were 3.0×4.0×9.0 mm3. Detector grade CZT crystals were grown from zone refined Cd, Zn, and Te (~7N) precursor materials, using the tellurium solvent method. Detectors with virtual Frisch grid configuration were fabricated from these crystals. I-V measurements revealed low leakage currents at room-temperature, ~ 11 nA at 1100V for detector A and 14.5 nA at 1800V for detector B. For the spectroscopic measurements, the detectors were irradiated using a 137Cs source. Detector A showed an impressive energy resolution of 1.4% and detector B showed an energy resolution of ~5.9 % for 662 keV from Cs-137 radioisotope. A digital technique based biparametric correlation study showed that the performance of detector B was limited by the operating bias voltage. Further, a digital correction scheme has been described and was applied to recover the effect of charge (electron) - loss.

  15. Effect of Bra Use during Radiotherapy for Large-Breasted Women: Acute Toxicity and Treated Heart and Lung Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Lanea; Cohen, Randi; Sopka, Dennis M; Li, Tianyu; Li, Linna; Anderson, Penny R; Fowble, Barbara L.; Freedman, Gary M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Large breast size presents special problems during radiation simulation, planning and patient treatment, including increased skin toxicity, in women undergoing breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCT). We report our experience using a bra during radiation in large-breasted women and its effect on acute toxicity and heart and lung dosimetry. Materials and methods From 2001 to 2006, 246 consecutive large-breasted women (bra size ≥ 38 and/or ≥ D cup) were treated with BCT using either 3D conformal (3D-CRT) or Intensity Modulated Radiation (IMRT). In 58 cases, at the physicians’ discretion, a custom-fit bra was used during simulation and treatment. Endpoints were acute radiation dermatitis, and dosimetric comparison of heart and lung volumes in a subgroup of 12 left-sided breast cancer patients planned with and without a bra. Results The majority of acute skin toxicities were grade 2 and were experienced by 90% of patients in a bra compared to 70% of patients not in a bra (p=0.003). On multivariate analysis significant predictors of grade 2/3 skin toxicity included 3D-CRT instead of IMRT (OR=3.9, 95% CI:1.8-8.5) and the use of a bra (OR=5.5, 95% CI:1.6-18.8). For left-sided patients, use of a bra was associated with a volume of heart in the treatment fields decreased by 63.4% (p=0.002), a volume of left lung decreased by 18.5% (p=0.25), and chest wall separation decreased by a mean of 1 cm (p=0.03). Conclusions The use of a bra to augment breast shape and position in large-breasted women is an alternative to prone positioning and associated with reduced chest wall separation and reduced heart volume within the treatment field. PMID:23459714

  16. Melt production in large-scale impact events: Calculations of impact-melt volumes and crater scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cintala, Mark J.; Grieve, Richard A. F.

    1992-01-01

    Along with an apparent convergence in estimates of impact-melt volumes produced during planetary impact events, intensive efforts at deriving scaling relationships for crater dimensions have also yielded results. It is now possible to examine a variety of phenomena associated with impact-melt production during large cratering events and apply them to planetary problems. This contribution describes a method of combining calculations of impact-melt production with crater scaling to investigate the relationship between the two.

  17. Genetic influences on schizophrenia and subcortical brain volumes: large-scale proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Franke, Barbara; Stein, Jason L; Ripke, Stephan; Anttila, Verneri; Hibar, Derrek P; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Smoller, Jordan W; Nichols, Thomas E; Neale, Michael C; McIntosh, Andrew M; Lee, Phil; McMahon, Francis J; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mattheisen, Manuel; Andreassen, Ole A; Gruber, Oliver; Sachdev, Perminder S; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Saykin, Andrew J; Ehrlich, Stefan; Mather, Karen A; Turner, Jessica A; Schwarz, Emanuel; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Yao, Yin; Ho, Yvonne Y W; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; O'Donovan, Michael C; Thompson, Paul M; Neale, Benjamin M; Medland, Sarah E; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2016-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating psychiatric illness with high heritability. Brain structure and function differ, on average, between people with schizophrenia and healthy individuals. As common genetic associations are emerging for both schizophrenia and brain imaging phenotypes, we can now use genome-wide data to investigate genetic overlap. Here we integrated results from common variant studies of schizophrenia (33,636 cases, 43,008 controls) and volumes of several (mainly subcortical) brain structures (11,840 subjects). We did not find evidence of genetic overlap between schizophrenia risk and subcortical volume measures either at the level of common variant genetic architecture or for single genetic markers. These results provide a proof of concept (albeit based on a limited set of structural brain measures) and define a roadmap for future studies investigating the genetic covariance between structural or functional brain phenotypes and risk for psychiatric disorders. PMID:26854805

  18. Gravitational search for cryptovolcanism on the Moon: Evidence for large volumes of early igneous activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sori, Michael M.; Zuber, Maria T.; Head, James W.; Kiefer, Walter S.

    2016-07-01

    We define lunar cryptovolcanism as volcanic deposits on the Moon hidden by overlying material. Notably, cryptovolcanism includes both cryptomaria (subsurface extrusive basaltic deposits that are obscured by overlying higher albedo basin and crater ejecta) and earlier candidate extrusives, such as the Mg-suite. Knowledge of the volume and extent of cryptovolcanism is necessary for a comprehensive understanding of lunar volcanic history, particularly in early (pre 3.8 Ga) epochs when abundant impact craters and basins obscured surface volcanic deposits by lateral emplacement of ejecta. We use Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) gravity and Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) topography data to construct maps of the Moon's positive Bouguer and isostatic gravity anomalies, and explore the possibility that these features are due to mass excesses associated with cryptovolcanism by cross-referencing the regions with geologic data such as dark halo craters. We model the potential cryptovolcanic deposits as buried high-density rectangular prisms at depth in the upper crust, and find a volume of candidate buried cryptovolcanism between 0.4 × 106 km3 and 4.8 × 106 km3, depending on assumptions about density and crustal compensation state. These candidate deposits correspond to a surface area of between 0.50 × 106 km2 and 1.14 × 106 km2, which would increase the amount of the lunar surface containing volcanic deposits from 16.6% to between 17.9% and 19.5%. The inferred volume of cryptovolcanism is comparable to the smallest estimates of the volume of visible mare basalts and up to ∼50% of the largest estimates; the high-resolution GRAIL and LOLA observations thus would collectively indicate that early (pre 3.8 Ga) lunar volcanism is an important element of lunar thermal evolution. Alternatively, the buried material could represent the presence of intrusive Mg-suite sills or plutons.

  19. Effect of radical prostatectomy surgeon volume on complication rates from a large population-based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Almatar, Ashraf; Wallis, Christopher J.D.; Herschorn, Sender; Saskin, Refik; Kulkarni, Girish S.; Kodama, Ronald T.; Nam, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical volume can affect several outcomes following radical prostatectomy (RP). We examined if surgical volume was associated with novel categories of treatment-related complications following RP. Methods: We examined a population-based cohort of men treated with RP in Ontario, Canada between 2002 and 2009. We used Cox proportional hazard modeling to examine the effect of physician, hospital and patient demographic factors on rates of treatment-related hospital admissions, urologic procedures, and open surgeries. Results: Over the study interval, 15 870 men were treated with RP. A total of 196 surgeons performed a median of 15 cases per year (range: 1–131). Patients treated by surgeons in the highest quartile of annual case volume (>39/year) had a lower risk of hospital admission (hazard ratio [HR]=0.54, 95% CI 0.47–0.61) and urologic procedures (HR=0.69, 95% CI 0.64–0.75), but not open surgeries (HR=0.83, 95% CI 0.47–1.45) than patients treated by surgeons in the lowest quartile (<15/year). Treatment at an academic hospital was associated with a decreased risk of hospitalization (HR=0.75, 95% CI 0.67–0.83), but not of urologic procedures (HR=0.94, 95% CI 0.88–1.01) or open surgeries (HR=0.87, 95% CI 0.54–1.39). There was no significant trend in any of the outcomes by population density. Conclusions: The annual case volume of the treating surgeon significantly affects a patient’s risk of requiring hospitalization or urologic procedures (excluding open surgeries) to manage treatment-related complications. PMID:26977206

  20. Large scale prop-fan structural design study. Volume 1: Initial concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, L. C.; Gruska, C. J.; Ladden, R. M.; Leishman, D. K.; Turnberg, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been directed toward improving aircraft fuel consumption. Studies have shown that the inherent efficiency advantage that turboprop propulsion systems have demonstrated at lower cruise speeds may now be extended to the higher speeds of today's turbofan and turbojet-powered aircraft. To achieve this goal, new propeller designs will require features such as thin, high speed airfoils and aerodynamic sweep, features currently found only in wing designs for high speed aircraft. This is Volume 1 of a 2 volume study to establish structural concepts for such advanced propeller blades, to define their structural properties, to identify any new design, analysis, or fabrication techniques which were required, and to determine the structural tradeoffs involved with several blade shapes selected primarily on the basis of aero/acoustic design considerations. The feasibility of fabricating and testing dynamically scaled models of these blades for aeroelastic testing was also established. The preliminary design of a blade suitable for flight use in a testbed advanced turboprop was conducted and is described in Volume 2.

  1. Long-term stability of underground operated CZT detectors based on the analysis of intrinsic 113Cd β--decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, J.; Gößling, C.; Gehre, D.; Hagner, C.; Heidrich, N.; Klingenberg, R.; Kröninger, K.; Nitsch, C.; Oldorf, C.; Quante, T.; Rajek, S.; Rebber, H.; Rohatsch, K.; Tebrügge, J.; Temminghoff, R.; Theinert, R.; Timm, J.; Wonsak, B.; Zatschler, S.; Zuber, K.

    2016-06-01

    The COBRA collaboration operates a demonstrator setup at the underground facility Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS, located in Italy) to prove the technological capabilities of this concept for the search for neutrinoless double beta-decay. The setup consists of 64 (1×1×1) cm3 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detectors in Coplanar-Grid (CPG) configuration. One purpose of this demonstrator is to test if reliable long-term operation of CZT-CPG detectors in such a setup is possible. The demonstrator has been operated under ultra low-background conditions for more than three years and collected data corresponding to a total exposure of 218 kg days. The presented study focuses on the long-term stability of CZT detectors by analyzing the intrinsic, fourfold forbidden non-unique 113Cd single beta-decay. It can be shown that CZT detectors can be operated stably for long periods of time and that the 113Cd single beta-decay can be used as an internal monitor of the detector performance during the runtime of the experiment.

  2. Modification of solid state CdZnTe (CZT) radiation detectors with high sensitivity or high resolution operation

    DOEpatents

    Washington, II, Aaron L; Duff, Martine C; Teague, Lucile C; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael

    2014-11-11

    An apparatus and process is provided to illustrate the manipulation of the internal electric field of CZT using multiple wavelength light illumination on the crystal surface at RT. The control of the internal electric field is shown through the polarization in the IR transmission image under illumination as a result of the Pockels effect.

  3. Systems definition study for shuttle demonstration flights of large space structures. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The development of large space structure technology is discussed, with emphasis on space fabricated structures which are automatically manufactured in space from sheet-strip materials and assembled on-orbit. Definition of a flight demonstration involving an Automated Beam Builder and the building and assembling of large structures is presented.

  4. Very Large Data Volumes Analysis of Collaborative Systems with Finite Number of States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivan, Ion; Ciurea, Cristian; Pavel, Sorin

    2010-01-01

    The collaborative system with finite number of states is defined. A very large database is structured. Operations on large databases are identified. Repetitive procedures for collaborative systems operations are derived. The efficiency of such procedures is analyzed. (Contains 6 tables, 5 footnotes and 3 figures.)

  5. Construction of Large-Volume Tissue Mimics with 3D Functional Vascular Networks.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae-Yun; Hong, Jung Min; Jung, Jin Woo; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    We used indirect stereolithography (SL) to form inner-layered fluidic networks in a porous scaffold by introducing a hydrogel barrier on the luminal surface, then seeded the networks separately with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human lung fibroblasts to form a tissue mimic containing vascular networks. The artificial vascular networks provided channels for oxygen transport, thus reducing the hypoxic volume and preventing cell death. The endothelium of the vascular networks significantly retarded the occlusion of channels during whole-blood circulation. The tissue mimics have the potential to be used as an in vitro platform to examine the physiologic and pathologic phenomena through vascular architecture. PMID:27228079

  6. Construction of Large-Volume Tissue Mimics with 3D Functional Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae-Yun; Hong, Jung Min; Jung, Jin Woo; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    We used indirect stereolithography (SL) to form inner-layered fluidic networks in a porous scaffold by introducing a hydrogel barrier on the luminal surface, then seeded the networks separately with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human lung fibroblasts to form a tissue mimic containing vascular networks. The artificial vascular networks provided channels for oxygen transport, thus reducing the hypoxic volume and preventing cell death. The endothelium of the vascular networks significantly retarded the occlusion of channels during whole-blood circulation. The tissue mimics have the potential to be used as an in vitro platform to examine the physiologic and pathologic phenomena through vascular architecture. PMID:27228079

  7. Estimating the eruptive volume of a large pyroclastic body: the Otowi Member of the Bandelier Tuff, Valles caldera, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Geoffrey W.; Wolff, John A.; Self, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    The 1.60 Ma caldera-forming eruption of the Otowi Member of the Bandelier Tuff produced Plinian and coignimbrite fall deposits, outflow and intracaldera ignimbrite, all of it deposited on land. We present a detailed approach to estimating and reconstructing the original volume of the eroded, partly buried large ignimbrite and distal ash-fall deposits. Dense rock equivalent (DRE) volume estimates for the eruption are 89 + 33/-10 km3 of outflow ignimbrite and 144 ± 72 km3 of intracaldera ignimbrite. Also, there was at least 65 km3 (DRE) of Plinian fall when extrapolated distally, and 107 + 40/-12 km3 of coignimbrite ash was "lost" from the outflow sheet to form an unknown proportion of the distal ash fall. The minimum total volume is 216 km3 and the maximum is 550 km3; hence, the eruption overlaps the low end of the super-eruption spectrum (VEI ˜8.0). Despite an abundance of geological data for the Otowi Member, the errors attached to these estimates do not allow us to constrain the proportions of intracaldera (IC), outflow (O), and distal ash (A) to better than a factor of three. We advocate caution in applying the IC/O/A = 1:1:1 relation of Mason et al. (2004) to scaling up mapped volumes of imperfectly preserved caldera-forming ignimbrites.

  8. Large Deployable Reflector Science and Technology Workshop. Volume 3: Systems and Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidich, C. A. (Editor); Pittman, R. B. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The results of five technology panels which convened to discuss the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) are presented. The proposed LDR is a large, ambient-temperature, far infrared/submillimeter telescope designed for space. Panel topics included optics, materials and structures, sensing and control, science instruments, and systems and missions. The telescope requirements, the estimated technology levels, and the areas in which the generic technology work has to be augmented are enumerated.

  9. Proceedings of the Large Deployable Reflector Science and Technology Workshop. Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidich, C. A.; Pittman, B.

    1984-01-01

    A large ambient temperature, for infrared submillimeter telescope in space was discussed. The results of the scientific and technical activities were summarized. The scientific effort consisted of reviewing the science rationale for the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) and arriving at a concensus set of scientific requirements. The telescope requirements were then compared to the current and anticipated state of the various technologies involved, and the technological shortfalls identified.

  10. Nuclear waste calorimeter for very large drums with 385 litres sample volume

    SciTech Connect

    Jossens, G.; Mathonat, C.; Bachelet, F.

    2015-03-15

    Calorimetry is a very precise and well adapted tool for the classification of drums containing nuclear waste material depending on their level of activities (low, medium, high). A new calorimeter has been developed by SETARAM Instrumentation and the CEA Valduc in France. This new calorimeter is designed for drums having a volume bigger than 100 liters. It guarantees high operator safety by optimizing drum handling and air circulation for cooling, and optimized software for direct measurement of the quantity of nuclear material. The LVC1380 calorimeter makes it possible to work over the range 10 to 3000 mW, which corresponds to approximately 0.03 to 10 g of tritium or 3 to 955 g of {sup 241}Pu in a volume up to 385 liters. This calorimeter is based on the heat flow measurement using Peltier elements which surround the drum in the 3 dimensions and therefore measure all the heat coming from the radioactive stuff whatever its position inside the drum. Calorimeter's insulating layers constitute a thermal barrier designed to filter disturbances until they represent less than 0.001 Celsius degrees and to eliminate long term disturbances associated, for example, with laboratory temperature variations between day and night. A calibration device based on Joule effect has also been designed. Measurement time has been optimized but remains long compared with other methods of measurement such as gamma spectrometry but its main asset is to have a good accuracy for low level activities.

  11. Variability of atmospheric circulation patterns associated with large volume changes of the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, A.; Post, P.

    2015-10-01

    Salinity and stratification in the deep basins of the Baltic Sea are linked to the occurrence of Major Baltic Inflows (MBIs) of higher saline water of North Sea origin, which occur sporadically and transport higher saline and oxygenated water to deeper layers. Since the mid-1970s, the frequency and intensity of MBIs have decreased. They were completely absent between February 1983 and January 1993. However, in spite of the decreasing frequency of MBIs, there was no obvious decrease of larger Baltic Sea volume changes (LVCs). A LVC is defined by a total volume change of at least 100 km3. LVCs can be identified from the sea level changes at Landsort which is known to represent the mean sea level of the Baltic Sea very well. Strong inflows leading to LVCs are associated to a special sequence of atmospheric circulation patterns. Our analysis based on Jenkinson-Collison circulation (JCC) types confirms that most effective inflows occur if about a month before the main inflow period, eastern air flow with anticyclonic vorticity over the western Baltic prevails. These conditions reduce the mean sea level of the Baltic Sea and lead to an increased saline stratification in the Belt Sea area. An immediate period of strong to very strong westerly winds trigger the inflow and force LVCs/MBIs. The lack of MBIs coincide with a negative trend of eastern types and a parallel increase of western type JCCs.

  12. Large scale optimization of beam weights under dose-volume restrictions.

    PubMed

    Langer, M; Brown, R; Urie, M; Leong, J; Stracher, M; Shapiro, J

    1990-04-01

    The problem of choosing weights for beams in a multifield plan which maximizes tumor dose under conditions that recognize the volume dependence of organ tolerance to radiation is considered, and its solution described. Structures are modelled as collections of discrete points, and the weighting problem described as a combinatorial linear program (LP). The combinatorial LP is solved as a mixed 0/1 integer program with appropriate restrictions on normal tissue dose. The method is illustrated through the assignment of weights to a set of 10 beams incident on a pelvic target. Dose-volume restrictions are placed on surrounding bowel, bladder, and rectum, and a limit placed on tumor dose inhomogeneity. Different tolerance restrictions are examined, so that the sensitivity of the target dose to changes in the normal tissue constraints may be explored. It is shown that the distributions obtained satisfy the posed constraints. The technique permits formal solution of the optimization problem, in a time short enough to meet the needs of treatment planners. PMID:2323977

  13. Large scale prop-fan structural design study. Volume 2: Preliminary design of SR-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, L. C.; Gruska, C. J.; Ladden, R. M.; Leishman, D. K.; Turnberg, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been directed toward improving aircraft fuel consumption. Studies have shown that the inherent efficiency advantage that turboprop propulsion systems have demonstrated at lower cruise speeds may now be extended to the higher speeds of today's turbofan and turbojet-powered aircraft. To achieve this goal, new propeller designs will require features such as thin, high speed airfoils and aerodynamic sweep, features currently found only in wing designs for high speed aircraft. This is Volume 2 of a 2 volume study to establish structural concepts for such advanced propeller blades, to define their structural properties, to identify any new design, analysis, or fabrication techniques which were required, and to determine the structural tradeoffs involved with several blade shapes selected primarily on the basis of aero/acoustic design considerations. The feasibility of fabricating and testing dynamically scaled models of these blades for aeroelastic testing was also established. The preliminary design of a blade suitable for flight use in a testbed advanced turboprop was conducted and is described.

  14. Effects of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid infusion on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors.

    PubMed

    Jacobshagen, Claudius; Pax, Anja; Unsöld, Bernhard W; Seidler, Tim; Schmidt-Schweda, Stephan; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Maier, Lars S

    2009-11-01

    International guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend mild hypothermia (32-34 degrees C) for 12-24h in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. To induce therapeutic hypothermia a variety of external and intravascular cooling devices are available. A cheap and effective method for inducing hypothermia is the infusion of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid. There are concerns regarding the effects of rapid infusion of large volumes of fluid on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors. We have retrospectively studied the effects of high volume cold fluid infusion on respiratory function in 52 resuscitated cardiac arrest patients. The target temperature of 32-34 degrees C was achieved after 4.1+/-0.5h (cooling rate 0.48 degrees C/h). During this period 3427+/-210 mL ice-cold fluid was infused. Despite significantly reduced LV-function (EF 35.8+/-2.2%) the respiratory status of these patients did not deteriorate significantly. On intensive care unit admission the mean PaO(2) was 231.4+/-20.6 mmHg at a F(i)O(2) of 0.82+/-0.03 (PaO(2)/F(i)O(2)=290.0+/-24.1) and a PEEP level of 7.14+/-0.31 mbar. Until reaching the target temperature of large volume, ice-cold fluid is an effective and inexpensive method for inducing therapeutic hypothermia. Resuscitation from cardiac arrest is associated with a deterioration in respiratory function. The infusion of large volumes of cold fluid does not cause a statistically significant further deterioration in respiratory function. A larger, randomized and prospective study is required to assess the efficacy and safety of ice-cold fluid infusion for

  15. Enrichment of diluted cell populations from large sample volumes using 3D carbon-electrode dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Islam, Monsur; Natu, Rucha; Larraga-Martinez, Maria Fernanda; Martinez-Duarte, Rodrigo

    2016-05-01

    Here, we report on an enrichment protocol using carbon electrode dielectrophoresis to isolate and purify a targeted cell population from sample volumes up to 4 ml. We aim at trapping, washing, and recovering an enriched cell fraction that will facilitate downstream analysis. We used an increasingly diluted sample of yeast, 10(6)-10(2) cells/ml, to demonstrate the isolation and enrichment of few cells at increasing flow rates. A maximum average enrichment of 154.2 ± 23.7 times was achieved when the sample flow rate was 10 μl/min and yeast cells were suspended in low electrically conductive media that maximizes dielectrophoresis trapping. A COMSOL Multiphysics model allowed for the comparison between experimental and simulation results. Discussion is conducted on the discrepancies between such results and how the model can be further improved. PMID:27375816

  16. Rapid plasma volume decline upon quiet standing reflects large filtration capacity in dependent limbs.

    PubMed

    Lundvall, J; Bjerkhoel, P; Quittenbaum, S; Lindgren, P

    1996-10-01

    The plasma volume (PV) decline upon 1.5, 3, 5, 8, 10, 15 and 35 min periods of quiet standing was studied (Hb/Hct) in male volunteers (n = 7). This approach permitted detailed definition of the time-course of the volume change. PV decreased by as much as 8.5 +/- 0.4% (328 +/- 15 mL) after 3 min standing and by no less than 11.7 +/- 0.4% (466 +/- 22 mL) after 5 min. The reduction was 14.3 +/- 0.7, 16.8 +/- 0.8, 17.7 +/- 0.8 and 17.4 +/- 0.9% after 8, 10, 15 and 35 min, or 568 +/- 30, 671 +/- 39, 707 +/- 41 and 691 +/- 44 mL. These data, in conjunction with the 1.5 min experiments, indicated a very rapid approximately 125 mL min-1 fluid loss initially on standing. However, the PV loss showed marked decline with time and was virtually completed within 10 min. Finally, the observation was made that the rate of PV recovery after standing was inversely related to the duration of standing. It is suggested that (a) the transcapillary hydraulic conductivity in the dependent limbs, the predominant targets for fluid filtration on standing, is about 0.010 mL min-1 100 mL-1 mmHg-1 and much greater than indicated previously. However, protective mechanisms restrict rapid fluid loss to early phases of standing. (b) Decrease in PV may contribute importantly to haemodynamic stress and to orthostatic, fainting reactions during short quiet standing. Apparently, PV loss may be equally important as pooling of blood, traditionally regarded as a dominant cause of adverse orthostatic reactions. (c) The duration of standing, as such, may be critical for the rate of PV recovery after standing. PMID:8899063

  17. A large volume striped bass egg incubation chamber: design and comparison with a traditional method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    I conducted a comparative study of a new jar design (experimental chamber) with a standard egg incubation vessel (McDonald jar). Experimental chambers measured 0.4 m in diameter by 1.3 m in height and had a volume of 200 L. McDonald hatching jars measured 16 cm in diameter by 45 cm in height and had a volume of 6 L. Post-hatch survival was estimated at 48, 96 and 144 h. Stocking rates resulted in an average egg density of 21.9 eggs ml-1 (range = 21.6 – 22.1) for McDonald jars and 10.9 eggs ml-1 (range = 7.0 – 16.8) for experimental chambers. I was unable to detect an effect of container type on survival to 48, 96 or 144 h. At 144 h striped bass fry survival averaged 37.3% for McDonald jars and 34.2% for experimental chambers. Survival among replicates was significantly different. Survival of striped bass significantly decreased between 96 and 144 h. Mean survival among replicates ranged from 12.4 to 57.3%. I was unable to detect an effect of initial stocking density on survival. Experimental jars allow for incubation of a larger number of eggs in a much smaller space. As hatchery production is often limited by space or water supply, experimental chambers offer an alternative to extending spawning activities, thereby reducing manpower and cost. However, the increase in the number of eggs per rearing container does increase the risk associated with catastrophic loss of a production unit. I conclude the experimental chamber is suitable for striped bass egg incubation.

  18. Systems definition study for shuttle demonstration flights of large space structures. Volume 3: Thermal analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    the development of large space structure technology is discussed. A detailed thermal analysis of a model space fabricated 1 meter beam is presented. Alternative thermal coatings are evaluated, and deflections, stresses, and stiffness variations resulting from flight orientations and solar conditions are predicted.

  19. RADON DIAGNOSTIC MEASUREMENT GUIDANCE FOR LARGE BUILDINGS - VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development of radon diagnostic procedures and mitigation strategies applicable to a variety of large non-residential buildings commonly found in Florida. The investigations document and evaluate the nature of radon occurrence and entry mechanisms for rad...

  20. Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD). Volume 2: Application to a large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A conceptual design and set of dynamic equations of a gimbaled AMCD adapted to a Large Space Telescope are presented. Such a system could provide maneuver capability and precision pointing by means of one external gimbal, wheel speed control, and small motions of the rim within the magnetic gap.

  1. Zircon U-Pb geochronology of the Mount Givens Granodiorite: Implications for the genesis of large volumes of eruptible magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazer, Ryan E.; Coleman, Drew S.; Mills, Ryan D.

    2014-04-01

    The Mount Givens Granodiorite, a large pluton in the central Sierra Nevada batholith, California, is similar in area to zoned intrusive suites yet is comparatively chemically and texturally homogenous. New zircon U-Pb geochronology indicates that the pluton was constructed over at least 7 Ma from 97.92 ± 0.06 Ma to 90.87 ± 0.05 Ma. Combining the new geochronology with the exposed volume of the pluton yields an estimated magma flux of <0.001 km3/a. The geochronologic data are at odds with the previously speculated links between plutons such as the Mount Givens Granodiorite and large-volume homogeneous ignimbrites (often termed monotonous intermediates). Existing data indicate that large plutons accumulate at rates of ≤0.001 km3/a, 1-2 orders of magnitude less than fluxes calculated for dated monotonous intermediates. If monotonous intermediates are remobilized, erupted plutons accumulated at rates comparable to dated examples, they should preserve a record of zircon growth of up to 10 Ma. Alternatively, the long history of zircon growth recorded in plutons may be erased during the processes of reheating and remobilization that precede supervolcano eruption. However, zircon dissolution modeling, based on hypothetical temperature-time histories for preeruptive monotonous intermediates, indicates that rejuvenation events would not sufficiently dissolve zircon. We suggest that eruptions of monotonous intermediates occur during high magmatic flux events, leaving little behind in the intrusive rock record, whereas low fluxes favor pluton accumulation.

  2. Ultra-large scale AFM of lipid droplet arrays: investigating the ink transfer volume in dip pen nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förste, Alexander; Pfirrmann, Marco; Sachs, Johannes; Gröger, Roland; Walheim, Stefan; Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Fuchs, Harald; Schimmel, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    There are only few quantitative studies commenting on the writing process in dip-pen nanolithography with lipids. Lipids are important carrier ink molecules for the delivery of bio-functional patters in bio-nanotechnology. In order to better understand and control the writing process, more information on the transfer of lipid material from the tip to the substrate is needed. The dependence of the transferred ink volume on the dwell time of the tip on the substrate was investigated by topography measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM) that is characterized by an ultra-large scan range of 800 × 800 μm2. For this purpose arrays of dots of the phospholipid1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were written onto planar glass substrates and the resulting pattern was imaged by large scan area AFM. Two writing regimes were identified, characterized of either a steady decline or a constant ink volume transfer per dot feature. For the steady state ink transfer, a linear relationship between the dwell time and the dot volume was determined, which is characterized by a flow rate of about 16 femtoliters per second. A dependence of the ink transport from the length of pauses before and in between writing the structures was observed and should be taken into account during pattern design when aiming at best writing homogeneity. The ultra-large scan range of the utilized AFM allowed for a simultaneous study of the entire preparation area of almost 1 mm2, yielding good statistic results.

  3. Soft SUSY breaking parameters and RG running of squark and slepton masses in large volume Swiss Cheese compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Aalok; Shukla, Pramod

    2010-03-01

    We consider type IIB large volume compactifications involving orientifolds of the Swiss Cheese Calabi-Yau WCP[1,1,1,6,9] with a single mobile space-time filling D3-brane and stacks of D7-branes wrapping the “big” divisor ΣB (as opposed to the “small” divisor usually done in the literature thus far) as well as supporting D7-brane fluxes. After reviewing our proposal of [1] (Misra and Shukla, 2010) for resolving a long-standing tension between large volume cosmology and phenomenology pertaining to obtaining a 10 GeV gravitino in the inflationary era and a TeV gravitino in the present era, and summarizing our results of [1] (Misra and Shukla, 2010) on soft supersymmetry breaking terms and open-string moduli masses, we discuss the one-loop RG running of the squark and slepton masses in mSUGRA-like models (using the running of the gaugino masses) to the EW scale in the large volume limit. Phenomenological constraints and some of the calculated soft SUSY parameters identify the D7-brane Wilson line moduli as the first two generations/families of squarks and sleptons and the D3-brane (restricted to the big divisor) position moduli as the two Higgses for MSSM-like models at TeV scale. We also discuss how the obtained open-string/matter moduli make it easier to impose FCNC constraints, as well as RG flow of off-diagonal squark mass(-squared) matrix elements.

  4. Using large volume samplers for the monitoring of particle bound micro pollutants in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittlaus, Steffen; Fuchs, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The requirements of the WFD as well as substance emission modelling at the river basin scale require stable monitoring data for micro pollutants. The monitoring concepts applied by the local authorities as well as by many scientists use single sampling techniques. Samples from water bodies are usually taken in volumes of about one litre and depending on predetermined time steps or through discharge thresholds. For predominantly particle bound micro pollutants the small sample size of about one litre results in a very small amount of suspended particles. To measure micro pollutant concentrations in these samples is demanding and results in a high uncertainty of the measured concentrations, if the concentration is above the detection limit in the first place. In many monitoring programs most of the measured values were below the detection limit. This results in a high uncertainty if river loads were calculated from these data sets. The authors propose a different approach to gain stable concentration values for particle bound micro pollutants from river monitoring: A mixed sample of about 1000 L was pumped in a tank with a dirty-water pump. The sampling usually is done discharge dependant by using a gauge signal as input for the control unit. After the discharge event is over or the tank is fully filled, the suspended solids settle in the tank for 2 days. After this time a clear separation of water and solids can be shown. A sample (1 L) from the water phase and the total mass of the settled solids (about 10 L) are taken to the laboratory for analysis. While the micro pollutants can't hardly be detected in the water phase, the signal from the sediment is high above the detection limit, thus certain and very stable. From the pollutant concentration in the solid phase and the total tank volume the initial pollutant concentration in the sample can be calculated. If the concentration in the water phase is detectable, it can be used to correct the total load. This

  5. Reirradiation of Large-Volume Recurrent Glioma With Pulsed Reduced-Dose-Rate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adkison, Jarrod B.; Tome, Wolfgang; Seo, Songwon; Richards, Gregory M.; Robins, H. Ian; Rassmussen, Karl; Welsh, James S.; Mahler, Peter A.; Howard, Steven P.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Pulsed reduced-dose-rate radiotherapy (PRDR) is a reirradiation technique that reduces the effective dose rate and increases the treatment time, allowing sublethal damage repair during irradiation. Patients and Methods: A total of 103 patients with recurrent glioma underwent reirradiation using PRDR (86 considered to have Grade 4 at PRDR). PRDR was delivered using a series of 0.2-Gy pulses at 3-min intervals, creating an apparent dose rate of 0.0667 Gy/min to a median dose of 50 Gy (range, 20-60) delivered in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions. The mean treatment volume was 403.5 {+-} 189.4 cm{sup 3} according to T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and a 2-cm margin. Results: For the initial or upgraded Grade 4 cohort (n = 86), the median interval from the first irradiation to PRDR was 14 months. Patients undergoing PRDR within 14 months of the first irradiation (n = 43) had a median survival of 21 weeks. Those treated {>=}14 months after radiotherapy had a median survival of 28 weeks (n = 43; p = 0.004 and HR = 1.82 with a 95% CI ranging from 1.25 to 3.10). These data compared favorably to historical data sets, because only 16% of the patients were treated at first relapse (with 46% treated at the second relapse, 32% at the third or fourth relapse, and 4% at the fourth or fifth relapse). The median survival since diagnosis and retreatment was 6.3 years and 11.4 months for low-grade, 4.1 years and 5.6 months for Grade 3, and 1.6 years and 5.1 months for Grade 4 tumors, respectively, according to the initial histologic findings. Multivariate analysis revealed age at the initial diagnosis, initial low-grade disease, and Karnofsky performance score of {>=}80 to be significant predictors of survival after initiation of PRDR. Conclusion: PRDR allowed for safe retreatment of larger volumes to high doses with palliative benefit.

  6. HIGH SPATIAL-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF TE INCLUSIONS IN CZT MATERIAL.

    SciTech Connect

    CAMARDA, G.S.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CARINI, G.A.; CUI, Y.; KOHMAN, K.T.; LI, L.; JAMES, R.B.

    2006-08-13

    We present new results from our studies of defects in current single-crystal CdZnTe material. Our previous measurements, carried out on thin ({approx}1 mm) and long (>12 mm) CZT detectors, indicated that small (1-20 {micro}m) Te inclusions can significantly degrade the device's energy resolution and detection efficiency. We are conducting detailed studies of the effects of Te inclusions by employing different characterization techniques with better spatial resolution, such as quantitative fluorescence mapping, X-ray micro-diffraction, and TEM. Also, IR microscopy and gamma-mapping with pulse-shape analysis with higher spatial resolution generated more accurate results in the areas surrounding the micro-defects (Te inclusions). Our results reveal how the performance of CdZnTe detectors is influenced by Te inclusions, such as their spatial distribution, concentration, and size. We also discuss a model of charge transport through areas populated with Te inclusions.

  7. Evaluation of a Wobbling Method Applied to Correcting Defective Pixels of CZT Detectors in SPECT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhaoheng; Li, Suying; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Ren, Qiushi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a wobbling method to correct bad pixels in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, using information of related images. We build up an automated device that realizes the wobbling correction for small animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. The wobbling correction method is applied to various constellations of defective pixels. The corrected images are compared with the results of conventional interpolation method, and the correction effectiveness is evaluated quantitatively using the factor of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). In summary, the proposed wobbling method, equipped with the automatic mechanical system, provides a better image quality for correcting defective pixels, which could be used for all pixelated detectors for molecular imaging. PMID:27240368

  8. Evaluation of a Wobbling Method Applied to Correcting Defective Pixels of CZT Detectors in SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhaoheng; Li, Suying; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Ren, Qiushi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a wobbling method to correct bad pixels in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, using information of related images. We build up an automated device that realizes the wobbling correction for small animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. The wobbling correction method is applied to various constellations of defective pixels. The corrected images are compared with the results of conventional interpolation method, and the correction effectiveness is evaluated quantitatively using the factor of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). In summary, the proposed wobbling method, equipped with the automatic mechanical system, provides a better image quality for correcting defective pixels, which could be used for all pixelated detectors for molecular imaging. PMID:27240368

  9. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Volume 1: Executive summary, analyses and trades, and system concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Jones, Peter A.

    1989-04-01

    A study was conducted to define reasonable and representative large deployable reflector (LDR) system concepts for the purpose of defining a technology development program aimed at providing the requisite technological capability necessary to start LDR development by the end of 1991. This volume includes the executive summary for the total study, a report of thirteen system analysis and trades tasks (optical configuration, aperture size, reflector material, segmented mirror, optical subsystem, thermal, pointing and control, transportation to orbit, structures, contamination control, orbital parameters, orbital environment, and spacecraft functions), and descriptions of three selected LDR system concepts. Supporting information is contained in appendices.

  10. Implication for the Core-collapse Supernova Rate from 21 Years of Data of the Large Volume Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonova, N. Y.; Aglietta, M.; Antonioli, P.; Ashikhmin, V. V.; Badino, G.; Bari, G.; Bertoni, R.; Bressan, E.; Bruno, G.; Dadykin, V. L.; Dobrynina, E. A.; Enikeev, R. I.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Garbini, M.; Ghia, P. L.; Giusti, P.; Gomez, F.; Kemp, E.; Malgin, A. S.; Molinario, A.; Persiani, R.; Pless, I. A.; Porta, A.; Ryasny, V. G.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Saavedra, O.; Sartorelli, G.; Shakiryanova, I. R.; Selvi, M.; Trinchero, G. C.; Vigorito, C.; Yakushev, V. F.; Zichichi, A.; LVD Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The Large Volume Detector (LVD) has been continuously taking data since 1992 at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory. The LVD is sensitive to neutrino bursts from gravitational stellar collapses with full detection probability over the Galaxy. We have searched for neutrino bursts in LVD data taken over 7,335 days of operation. No evidence of neutrino signals has been found between 1992 June and 2013 December. The 90% C.L. upper limit on the rate of core collapse and failed supernova explosions out to distances of 25 kpc is found to be 0.114 yr-1.

  11. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Volume 1: Executive summary, analyses and trades, and system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Jones, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to define reasonable and representative large deployable reflector (LDR) system concepts for the purpose of defining a technology development program aimed at providing the requisite technological capability necessary to start LDR development by the end of 1991. This volume includes the executive summary for the total study, a report of thirteen system analysis and trades tasks (optical configuration, aperture size, reflector material, segmented mirror, optical subsystem, thermal, pointing and control, transportation to orbit, structures, contamination control, orbital parameters, orbital environment, and spacecraft functions), and descriptions of three selected LDR system concepts. Supporting information is contained in appendices.

  12. Large Deployable Reflector Science and Technology Workshop. Volume 2: Scientific Rationale and Technology Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, D. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    The scientific rationale for the large deployable reflector (LDR) and the overall technological requirements are discussed. The main scientific objectives include studies of the origins of planets, stars and galaxies, and of the ultimate fate of the universe. The envisioned studies require a telescope with a diameter of at least 20 m, diffraction-limited to wavelengths as short as 30-50 micron. In addition, light-bucket operation with 1 arcsec spatial resolution in the 2-4 microns wavelength region would be useful in studies of high-redshifted galaxies. Such a telescope would provide a large increase in spectroscopic sensitivity and spatial resolving power compared with existing or planned infrared telescopes.

  13. Large-area chromogenics: Materials and devices for transmittance control. Volume IS 4

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, C.M.; Granqvist, C.G.

    1990-12-31

    Chromogenic materials can alter their optical properties in a persistent yet reversible manner when subjected to a change in external conditions such as irradiation intensity, temperature, or electric-field strength. In the future chromogenic materials may be used on large scale to regulate the throughput of radiant energy for windows in buildings and cars, so that comfortable lighting and temperature are maintained without excessive air conditioning. The purpose of this book is to give a broad coverage of large-area chromogenics and to discuss their applications. The book is divided into the following areas: applications; photochromic materials; thermochromic materials; inorganic electrochromic materials; inorganic electrochromic materials; organic electrochromic materials; conductors for ions and electrons in electrochromic devices; electrochromic devices; and liquid crystals materials and devices. Separate abstracts were prepared for 33 papers in this book.

  14. Extraterrestrial processing and manufacturing of large space systems. Volume 3: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Facilities and equipment are defined for refining processes to commercial grade of lunar material that is delivered to a 'space manufacturing facility' in beneficiated, primary processed quality. The manufacturing facilities and the equipment for producing elements of large space systems from these materials and providing programmatic assessments of the concepts are also defined. In-space production processes of solar cells (by vapor deposition) and arrays, structures and joints, conduits, waveguides, RF equipment radiators, wire cables, converters, and others are described.

  15. Extraterrestrial processing and manufacturing of large space systems, volume 1, chapters 1-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Space program scenarios for production of large space structures from lunar materials are defined. The concept of the space manufacturing facility (SMF) is presented. The manufacturing processes and equipment for the SMF are defined and the conceptual layouts are described for the production of solar cells and arrays, structures and joints, conduits, waveguides, RF equipment radiators, wire cables, and converters. A 'reference' SMF was designed and its operation requirements are described.

  16. Study of auxiliary propulsion requirements for large space systems, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. W.; Machles, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    A range of single shuttle launched large space systems were identified and characterized including a NASTRAN and loading dynamics analysis. The disturbance environment, characterization of thrust level and APS mass requirements, and a study of APS/LSS interactions were analyzed. State-of-the-art capabilities for chemical and ion propulsion were compared with the generated propulsion requirements to assess the state-of-the-art limitations and benefits of enhancing current technology.

  17. Operation of a DC large aperture volume-production H sup minus source

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, J.W.; Ackerman, G.D.; Anderson, O.A.; Chan, C.F.; Cooper, W.S.; deVries, G.J.; Leung, K.N.; Lietzke, A.F.; Steele, W.F.

    1989-04-01

    In testing a multicusp volume-production H{sup {minus}} ion source (20 cm diameter, 23 cm long), we optimized the gas pressure, the plasma electrode bias potential and the magnetic filter. At the optimum pressure of 9 mT, the H{sup {minus}} beam output increased linearly with discharge power. The maximum H{sup {minus}} beam, measured with a current transformer downstream of the accelerator, was 100 mA while using a 6.67 cm{sup 2} aperture. Presently we are limited by overheating of the cathodes by the plasma ions. Under similar discharge conditions the maximum H{sup {minus}} current density was found to vary as a{sup {minus}0.7} where a is the aperture radius. Results from emittance measurements showed that the effective H{sup {minus}} ion temperature increased with a for a {gt} 0.8 cm. Thus the brightness of the beam decreased with increasing aperture radius. Operating the source with cesium would increase the H{sup {minus}} output however our accelerator must be improved to avoid breakdowns caused by the cesium contamination. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Neutron spectrometry with large volume, heavy-loaded superheated droplet detectors: a simple spin-off.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A R; Giuliani, F; Felizardo, M; Girard, T A; Morlat, T; Marques, J G; Oliveira, C; Limagne, D; Waysand, G; Fernandes, A C

    2005-01-01

    SIMPLE is a superheated droplet detector (SDD) experiment designed to search for the evidence of spin-dependent weakly interacting neutralino dark matter (WIMPs). SDDs, a type of emulsion detector, consist of a uniform suspension of superheated liquid droplets in a compliant material such as a polymeric or aqueous gel. We report on the first neutron spectrometry experiments with SIMPLE SDDs, a spin-off of the neutron detector calibrations performed at the Portuguese Research Reactor. SIMPLE SDDs differ from most SDDs available commercially as they have a 10 times higher loading factor, containing 10(3) times more freon than their commercial counterparts and a 100 times larger volume. We have analysed the response of SIMPLE SDDs to two quasi-monochromatic neutron beams of energies 54 and 144 keV obtained with passive filters. Results show that the characteristic peaks in the fluence distribution of both filters could be determined and their energy position obtained using a simple thermodynamic relation. PMID:16381754

  19. Inclusion of fluid-solid interaction in Volume of Fluid to simulate spreading and dewetting for large contact angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahady, Kyle; Afkhami, Shahriar; Kondic, Lou

    2014-11-01

    The van der Waals (vdW) interaction between molecules is of fundamental importance in determining the behavior of three phase systems in fluid mechanics. This interaction gives rise to interfacial energies, and thus the contact angle for a droplet on a solid surface, and additionally leads to instability of very thin liquid films. We develop a hybrid method for including a Lennard-Jones type vdW interaction in a finite volume, Volume of Fluid (VoF) based solver for the full two-phase Navier-Stokes equations. This method includes the full interaction between each fluid phase and the solid substrate via a finite-volume approximation of the vdW body force. Our work is distinguished from conventional VoF based implementations in that the contact angle arises from simulation of the underlying physics, as well as successfully treating vdW induced film rupture. At the same time, it avoids the simplifications of calculations based on disjoining-pressure, where the vdW interaction is included as a pressure jump across the interface which is derived under the assumption of a flat film. This is especially relevant in the simulation of nanoscale film ruptures involving large contact angles, which have been studied recently in the context of bottom-up nanoparticle fabrication. This work is partially supported by the Grants NSF DMS-1320037 and CBET-1235710.

  20. Large-volume volcanic edifi ce failures in Central America and associated hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siebert, L.; Alvarado, Guillermo E.; Vallance, J.W.; Van Wyk, De Vries, B.

    2006-01-01

    Edifi ce-collapse phenomena have, to date, received relatively little attention in Central America, although ??40 major collapse events (??0.1 km3) from about two dozen volcanoes are known or inferred in this volcanic arc. Volcanoes subjected to gravitational failure are concentrated at the arc's western and eastern ends. Failures correlate positively with volcano elevation, substrate elevation, edifi ce height, volcano volume, and crustal thickness and inversely with slab descent angle. Collapse orientations are strongly infl uenced by the direction of slope of the underlying basement, and hence are predominately perpendicular to the arc (preferentially to the south) at its extremities and display more variable failure directions in the center of the arc. The frequency of collapse events in Central America is poorly constrained because of the lack of precise dating of deposits, but a collapse interval of ??1000-2000 yr has been estimated during the Holocene. These high-impact events fortunately occur at low frequency, but the proximity of many Central American volcanoes to highly populated regions, including some of the region's largest cities, requires evaluation of their hazards. The primary risks are from extremely mobile debris avalanches and associated lahars, which in Central America have impacted now-populated areas up to ??50 km from a source volcano. Lower probability risks associated with volcanic edifi ce collapse derive from laterally directed explosions and tsunamis. The principal hazards of the latter here result from potential impact of debris avalanches into natural or man-made lakes. Much work remains on identifying and describing debris-avalanche deposits in Central America. The identifi cation of potential collapse sites and assessing and monitoring the stability of intact volcanoes is a major challenge for the next decade. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  1. Development of Small-Pixel CZT Detectors for Future High-Resolution Hard X-ray Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilicke, Matthias

    Owing to recent breakthroughs in grazing incidence mirror technology, next-generation hard X-ray telescopes will achieve angular resolutions of between 5 and 10 arc seconds - about an order of magnitude better than that of the NuSTAR hard X-ray telescope. As a consequence, the next generation of hard X-ray telescopes will require pixelated hard X- ray detectors with pixels on a grid with a lattice constant of between 120 and 240 um. Additional detector requirements include a low energy threshold of less than 5 keV and an energy resolution of less than 1 keV. The science drivers for a high angular-resolution hard X-ray mission include studies and measurements of black hole spins, the cosmic evolution of super-massive black holes, AGN feedback, and the behavior of matter at very high densities. We propose a R&D research program to develop, optimize and study the performance of 100-200 um pixel pitch CdTe and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors of 1-2 mm thickness. Our program aims at a comparison of the performance achieved with CdTe and CZT detectors, and the optimization of the pixel, steering grid, and guard ring anode patterns. Although these studies will use existing ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits), our program also includes modest funds for the development of an ultra-low noise ASIC with a 2-D grid of readout pads that can be directly bonded to the 100-200 um pixel pitch CdTe and CZT detectors. The team includes the Washington University group (Prof. M. Beilicke and Co-I Prof. H.S.W. Krawczynski et al.), and co-investigator G. De Geronimo at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Washington University group has a 10 year track record of innovative CZT detector R&D sponsored by the NASA Astronomy and Physics Research and Analysis (APRA) program. The accomplishments to date include the development of CZT detectors with pixel pitches between 350 um and 2.5 mm for the ProtoExist, EXIST, and X-Calibur hard X-ray missions with some of the best

  2. Hierarchical storage of large volume of multidector CT data using distributed servers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratib, Osman; Rosset, Antoine; Heuberger, Joris; Bandon, David

    2006-03-01

    Multidector scanners and hybrid multimodality scanners have the ability to generate large number of high-resolution images resulting in very large data sets. In most cases, these datasets are generated for the sole purpose of generating secondary processed images and 3D rendered images as well as oblique and curved multiplanar reformatted images. It is therefore not essential to archive the original images after they have been processed. We have developed an architecture of distributed archive servers for temporary storage of large image datasets for 3D rendering and image processing without the need for long term storage in PACS archive. With the relatively low cost of storage devices it is possible to configure these servers to hold several months or even years of data, long enough for allowing subsequent re-processing if required by specific clinical situations. We tested the latest generation of RAID servers provided by Apple computers with a capacity of 5 TBytes. We implemented a peer-to-peer data access software based on our Open-Source image management software called OsiriX, allowing remote workstations to directly access DICOM image files located on the server through a new technology called "bonjour". This architecture offers a seamless integration of multiple servers and workstations without the need for central database or complex workflow management tools. It allows efficient access to image data from multiple workstation for image analysis and visualization without the need for image data transfer. It provides a convenient alternative to centralized PACS architecture while avoiding complex and time-consuming data transfer and storage.

  3. Systems definition study for shuttle demonstration flights of large space structures, Volume 2: Technical Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The development of large space structure (LSS) technology is discussed, with emphasis on space fabricated structures which are automatically manufactured in space from sheet-strip materials and assembled on-orbit. It is concluded that an LSS flight demonstration using an Automated Beam Builder and the orbiter as a construction base, could be performed in the 1983-1984 time period. The estimated cost is $24 million exclusive of shuttle launch costs. During the mission, a simple space platform could be constructed in-orbit to accommodate user requirements associated with earth viewing and materials exposure experiments needs.

  4. No evidence of a threshold in traffic volume affecting road-kill mortality at a large spatio-temporal scale

    SciTech Connect

    Grilo, Clara; Ferreira, Flavio Zanchetta; Revilla, Eloy

    2015-11-15

    Previous studies have found that the relationship between wildlife road mortality and traffic volume follows a threshold effect on low traffic volume roads. We aimed at evaluating the response of several species to increasing traffic intensity on highways over a large geographic area and temporal period. We used data of four terrestrial vertebrate species with different biological and ecological features known by their high road-kill rates: the barn owl (Tyto alba), hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus), red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Additionally, we checked whether road-kill likelihood varies when traffic patterns depart from the average. We used annual average daily traffic (AADT) and road-kill records observed along 1000 km of highways in Portugal over seven consecutive years (2003–2009). We fitted candidate models using Generalized Linear Models with a binomial distribution through a sample unit of 1 km segments to describe the effect of traffic on the probability of finding at least one victim in each segment during the study. We also assigned for each road-kill record the traffic of that day and the AADT on that year to test for differences using Paired Student's t-test. Mortality risk declined significantly with traffic volume but varied among species: the probability of finding road-killed red foxes and rabbits occurs up to moderate traffic volumes (< 20,000 AADT) whereas barn owls and hedgehogs occurred up to higher traffic volumes (40,000 AADT). Perception of risk may explain differences in responses towards high traffic highway segments. Road-kill rates did not vary significantly when traffic intensity departed from the average. In summary, we did not find evidence of traffic thresholds for the analysed species and traffic intensities. We suggest mitigation measures to reduce mortality be applied in particular on low traffic roads (< 5000 AADT) while additional measures to reduce barrier effects should take into account

  5. Large-volume data delivery from low-Earth orbit to ground using efficient single-mode optical receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, B. S.; Schieler, C. M.; Boroson, D. M.

    2016-03-01

    Space systems operating in low-Earth orbit are often constrained by how much data can be delivered from space to ground. Traditional data delivery approaches are often limited by either large link losses associated with transmission via a geosynchronous relay satellite or short contact times and spectrum-constrained data rates associated with direct-to-Earth radio-frequency links. Direct-to-Earth optical communication links from low-Earth orbit based on fiber telecommunications technologies that can operate at high data rates (> 100 Gb/s per wavelength channel) can enable the delivery of extremely large volumes of data from space to ground. We analyze the performance of such systems and discuss the performance gains that are enabled by coupling the received signal to an efficient single-mode-fiber-based receiver, even in the presence of turbulence-induced losses.

  6. Characteristics of surface-wave and volume-wave plasmas produced with internally mounted large-area planar microwave launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Nagatsu, Masaaki; Naito, Katsutoshi; Ogino, Akihisa; Ninomiya, Keigo; Nanko, Shohei

    2005-10-17

    We studied discharge characteristics of microwave plasmas excited with a large-area planar microwave launcher installed internally in a 600-mm-diam cylindrical vacuum chamber. With the microwave power less than roughly 400 W, we demonstrated the large volumetric volume-wave plasma (VWP) spread in the entire chamber at a pressure of 14-27 Pa in He. Above 400 W, the plasma discharge made a sudden transition to higher-density, uniform surface-wave plasma (SWP) having a spatial uniformity of {+-}3.5% over 300 mm in diameter. Electron energy probability functions in the downstream region were studied using Langmuir probe measurements with Druyvesteyn method in both the SWP and VWP discharges.

  7. Requirements for a mobile communications satellite system. Volume 3: Large space structures measurements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akle, W.

    1983-01-01

    This study report defines a set of tests and measurements required to characterize the performance of a Large Space System (LSS), and to scale this data to other LSS satellites. Requirements from the Mobile Communication Satellite (MSAT) configurations derived in the parent study were used. MSAT utilizes a large, mesh deployable antenna, and encompasses a significant range of LSS technology issues in the areas of structural/dynamics, control, and performance predictability. In this study, performance requirements were developed for the antenna. Special emphasis was placed on antenna surface accuracy, and pointing stability. Instrumentation and measurement systems, applicable to LSS, were selected from existing or on-going technology developments. Laser ranging and angulation systems, presently in breadboard status, form the backbone of the measurements. Following this, a set of ground, STS, and GEO-operational were investigated. A third scale (15 meter) antenna system as selected for ground characterization followed by STS flight technology development. This selection ensures analytical scaling from ground-to-orbit, and size scaling. Other benefits are cost and ability to perform reasonable ground tests. Detail costing of the various tests and measurement systems were derived and are included in the report.

  8. Pros: concurrent chemo-radiotherapy remains the ideal treatment in fit patients with large volume unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rabatic, Bryan M.

    2016-01-01

    The debate of treating stage III, large volume non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with definitive chemo-radiotherapy continues to be waged. A physically fit patient, having large volume and unresectable disease is the ideal candidate for this treatment approach. The ability of this patient population to successfully complete, and thereby benefit from an aggressive, combined treatment to improve local control and survival, drives the recommendation of treating oncologists for this approach. Until a phase III trial proves otherwise, concurrent chemo-radiotherapy will remain the ideal treatment for fit patients having large volume unresectable stage III NSCLC. PMID:27186513

  9. Aging and large-scale functional networks: white matter integrity, gray matter volume, and functional connectivity in the resting state.

    PubMed

    Marstaller, L; Williams, M; Rich, A; Savage, G; Burianová, H

    2015-04-01

    Healthy aging is accompanied by neurobiological changes that affect the brain's functional organization and the individual's cognitive abilities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of global age-related differences in the cortical white and gray matter on neural activity in three key large-scale networks. We used functional-structural covariance network analysis to assess resting state activity in the default mode network (DMN), the fronto-parietal network (FPN), and the salience network (SN) of young and older adults. We further related this functional activity to measures of cortical thickness and volume derived from structural MRI, as well as to measures of white matter integrity (fractional anisotropy [FA], mean diffusivity [MD], and radial diffusivity [RD]) derived from diffusion-weighted imaging. First, our results show that, in the direct comparison of resting state activity, young but not older adults reliably engage the SN and FPN in addition to the DMN, suggesting that older adults recruit these networks less consistently. Second, our results demonstrate that age-related decline in white matter integrity and gray matter volume is associated with activity in prefrontal nodes of the SN and FPN, possibly reflecting compensatory mechanisms. We suggest that age-related differences in gray and white matter properties differentially affect the ability of the brain to engage and coordinate large-scale functional networks that are central to efficient cognitive functioning. PMID:25644420

  10. Three-dimensional digital holographic aperture synthesis for rapid and highly-accurate large-volume metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, Stephen; Kaylor, Brant M.; Barber, Zeb W.; Reibel, Randy R.

    2015-09-01

    Currently large volume, high accuracy three-dimensional (3D) metrology is dominated by laser trackers, which typically utilize a laser scanner and cooperative reflector to estimate points on a given surface. The dependency upon the placement of cooperative targets dramatically inhibits the speed at which metrology can be conducted. To increase speed, laser scanners or structured illumination systems can be used directly on the surface of interest. Both approaches are restricted in their axial and lateral resolution at longer stand-off distances due to the diffraction limit of the optics used. Holographic aperture ladar (HAL) and synthetic aperture ladar (SAL) can enhance the lateral resolution of an imaging system by synthesizing much larger apertures by digitally combining measurements from multiple smaller apertures. Both of these approaches only produce two-dimensional imagery and are therefore not suitable for large volume 3D metrology. We combined the SAL and HAL approaches to create a swept frequency digital holographic 3D imaging system that provides rapid measurement speed for surface coverage with unprecedented axial and lateral resolution at longer standoff ranges. The technique yields a "data cube" of Fourier domain data, which can be processed with a 3D Fourier transform to reveal a 3D estimate of the surface. In this paper, we provide the theoretical background for the technique and show experimental results based on an ultra-wideband frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) chirped heterodyne ranging system showing ~100 micron lateral and axial precisions at >2 m standoff distances.

  11. A device for the nondestructive decontamination of large volumes of infected egg waste.

    PubMed

    Ackland, N R; Tannock, G A; Young, I F

    1985-04-01

    A device for the decontamination of large numbers of infected eggs which remain as by-products of vaccine production is described. Homogenates of infected eggs were heated to 60 degrees C and maintained at that temperature for 3 h in a specially constructed recirculation tank. The infectivity of all detectable influenza viruses and more than 99% of the bacteria associated with the homogenates was destroyed by this procedure. Eggshell material was separated from the proteins present in the homogenate at the end of the heating cycle by means of a cyclone separator. The proportions of all the amino acids, except cystine, in the proteins remaining in the suspension after the heating cycle were similar to that normally present in whole embryos. PMID:3839121

  12. Study of electrical and chemical propulsion systems for auxiliary propulsion of large space systems, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. W.

    1981-01-01

    The five major tasks of the program are reported. Task 1 is a literature search followed by selection and definition of seven generic spacecraft classes. Task 2 covers the determination and description of important disturbance effects. Task 3 applies the disturbances to the generic spacecraft and adds maneuver and stationkeeping functions to define total auxiliary propulsion systems requirements for control. The important auxiliary propulsion system characteristics are identified and sensitivities to control functions and large space system characteristics determined. In Task 4, these sensitivities are quantified and the optimum auxiliary propulsion system characteristics determined. Task 5 compares the desired characteristics with those available for both electrical and chemical auxiliary propulsion systems to identify the directions technology advances should take.

  13. Critical joints in large composite primary aircraft structures. Volume 2: Technology demonstration test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunin, Bruce L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technology for critical structural joints in composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The results of four large composite multirow bolted joint tests are presented. The tests were conducted to demonstrate the technology for critical joints in highly loaded composite structure and to verify the analytical methods that were developed throughout the program. The test consisted of a wing skin-stringer transition specimen representing a stringer runout and skin splice on the wing lower surface at the side of the fuselage attachment. All tests were static tension tests. The composite material was Toray T-300 fiber with Ciba-Geigy 914 resin in 10 mil tape form. The splice members were metallic, using combinations of aluminum and titanium. Discussions are given of the test article, instrumentation, test setup, test procedures, and test results for each of the four specimens. Some of the analytical predictions are also included.

  14. A device for the nondestructive decontamination of large volumes of infected egg waste.

    PubMed Central

    Ackland, N R; Tannock, G A; Young, I F

    1985-01-01

    A device for the decontamination of large numbers of infected eggs which remain as by-products of vaccine production is described. Homogenates of infected eggs were heated to 60 degrees C and maintained at that temperature for 3 h in a specially constructed recirculation tank. The infectivity of all detectable influenza viruses and more than 99% of the bacteria associated with the homogenates was destroyed by this procedure. Eggshell material was separated from the proteins present in the homogenate at the end of the heating cycle by means of a cyclone separator. The proportions of all the amino acids, except cystine, in the proteins remaining in the suspension after the heating cycle were similar to that normally present in whole embryos. Images PMID:3839121

  15. High-throughput screening of large volumes of whole blood using structured illumination and fluorescent on-chip imaging

    PubMed Central

    Arpali, Serap Altay; Arpali, Caglar; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Chiang, Hsin-Hao; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Undiluted blood samples are difficult to image in large volumes since blood constitutes a highly absorbing and scattering medium. As a result of this limitation, optical imaging of rare cells (e.g., circulating tumour cells) within unprocessed whole blood remains a challenge, demanding the use of special micro-fluidic technologies. Here we demonstrate a new fluorescent on-chip imaging modality that can rapidly screen large volumes of absorbing and scattering media such as undiluted whole blood samples for detection of fluorescent micro-objects at low concentrations (for example ≤ 50–100 particles/mL). In this high-throughput imaging modality, a large area micro-fluidic device (e.g., 7–18 cm2), which contains for example ~0.3–0.7 mL of undiluted whole blood sample, is directly positioned onto a wide-field opto-electronic sensor-array such that the fluorescent emission within the micro-channel can be detected without the use of any imaging lenses. This micro-fluidic device is then illuminated and laterally scanned with an array of Gaussian excitation spots, which is generated through a spatial light modulator. For each scanning position of this excitation array, a lensfree fluorescent image of the blood sample is captured using the opto-electronic sensor-array, resulting in a sequence of images (e.g., 144 lensfree frames captured in ~36 seconds) for the same sample chip. Digitally merging these lensfree fluorescent images based on a Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) algorithm enabled us to significantly boost the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast of the fluorescent micro-objects within whole blood, which normally remain undetected (i.e., hidden) using conventional uniform excitation schemes, involving plane wave illumination. This high-throughput on-chip imaging platform based on structured excitation could be useful for rare cell research by enabling rapid screening of large volume micro-fluidic devices that process whole blood and other optically

  16. Solar neutrino detection in a large volume double-phase liquid argon experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, D.; Giganti, C.; Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Bottino, B.; Canci, N.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Jollet, C.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Pocar, A.; Razeti, M.; Renshaw, A. L.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Suvorov, Y.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Wang, H.; Zavatarelli, S.

    2016-08-01

    Precision measurements of solar neutrinos emitted by specific nuclear reaction chains in the Sun are of great interest for developing an improved understanding of star formation and evolution. Given the expected neutrino fluxes and known detection reactions, such measurements require detectors capable of collecting neutrino-electron scattering data in exposures on the order of 1 ktonne-yr, with good energy resolution and extremely low background. Two-phase liquid argon time projection chambers (LAr TPCs) are under development for direct Dark Matter WIMP searches, which possess very large sensitive mass, high scintillation light yield, good energy resolution, and good spatial resolution in all three cartesian directions. While enabling Dark Matter searches with sensitivity extending to the ``neutrino floor'' (given by the rate of nuclear recoil events from solar neutrino coherent scattering), such detectors could also enable precision measurements of solar neutrino fluxes using the neutrino-electron elastic scattering events. Modeling results are presented for the cosmogenic and radiogenic backgrounds affecting solar neutrino detection in a 300 tonne (100 tonne fiducial) LAr TPC operating at LNGS depth (3,800 meters of water equivalent). The results show that such a detector could measure the CNO neutrino rate with ~15% precision, and significantly improve the precision of the 7Be and pep neutrino rates compared to the currently available results from the Borexino organic liquid scintillator detector.

  17. Study of auxiliary propulsion requirements for large space systems. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. W.; Machles, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    An insight into auxiliary propulsion systems (APS) requirements for large space systems (LSS) launchable by a single shuttle is presented. In an effort to scope the APS requirements for LSS, a set of generic LSSs were defined. For each generic LSS class a specific structural configuration, representative of that most likely to serve the needs of the 1980's and 1990's was defined. The environmental disturbance forces and torques which would be acting on each specific structural configuration in LEO and GEO orbits were then determined. Auxiliary propulsion requirements were determined as a function of: generic class specific configuration, size and openness of structure, orbit, angle of orientation, correction frequency, duty cycle, number and location of thrusters and direction of thrusters and APS/LSS interactions. The results of this analysis were used to define the APS characteristics of: (1) number and distribution of thrusters, (2) thruster modulation, (3) thrust level, (4) mission energy requirements, (5) total APS mass component breakdown, and (6) state of the art adequacy/deficiency.

  18. The Underwater Spectrometric System Based on CZT Detector for Survey of the Bottom of MR Reactor Pool - 13461

    SciTech Connect

    Potapov, Victor; Safronov, Alexey; Ivanov, Oleg; Smirnov, Sergey; Stepanov, Vyacheslav

    2013-07-01

    The underwater spectrometer system for detection of irradiated nuclear fuel on the pool bottom of the reactor was elaborated. During the development process metrological studies of CdZnTe (CZT) detectors were conducted. These detectors are designed for spectrometric measurements in high radiation fields. A mathematical model based on the Monte Carlo method was created to evaluate the capability of such a system. A few experimental models were realized and the characteristics of the spectrometric system are represented. (authors)

  19. A magnetic sorbent for the efficient and rapid extraction of organic micropollutants from large-volume environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mancheng; Zhou, Qing; Li, Aimin; Shuang, Chendong; Wang, Wei; Wang, Mengqiao

    2013-11-01

    A magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) method based on a novel magnetic sorbent was proposed for the extraction of target compounds from large-volume water samples. First, magnetic hypercrosslinked microspheres (NAND-1) were prepared via membrane emulsification-suspension polymerization and post crosslinking reaction. To ensure that the Fe3O4 nanoparticles could completely pass through the membrane without blocking the pores, oleic acid was used to modify the Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which enhanced lipophilicity and monodispersity of the magnetite nanoparticles. The obtained NAND-1 microspheres exhibited super paramagnetic characteristics and excellent magnetic responsiveness with a saturation magnetization of 2.53 emu/g. In addition, a uniform particle size (~8 μm) and a large average surface area (1303.59 m(2)/g) were also observed, which were both beneficial for the extraction of the target compounds. Thus, NAND-1 has the potential to simultaneously exhibit good extraction efficiencies toward different types of organic micropollutants (OMPs), including triazines, carbamazepine and diethyl phthalate. The conditions of the MSPE based on NAND-1 were optimized by single factor and orthogonal design experiments. This MSPE method needed only a small amount of sorbent (50mg/L) for the extraction of OMPs from a large-volume aquatic sample (5L) and reached equilibrium in a short amount of time (30 min). Moreover, the solution volume, the pH, and the salinity had insignificant influences on the extraction of the eight target OMPs. Under the optimum conditions, the recoveries of the eight OMPs calculated by analyzing the spiked samples were from 91.7% to 99.4%. The NAND-1 could be recycled ten times and still achieve recoveries of the eight OMPs higher than 86%. The limits of detection of the eight OMPs ranged from 1.76 to 27.56 ng/L, and the limits of quantification were from 5.71 to 92.05 ng/L. These results indicated that the proposed method, based on the use of NAND-1

  20. Early Miocene Kirka-Phrigian caldera, western Anatolia - an example of large volume silicic magma generation in extensional setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghedi, Ioan; Helvacı, Cahit

    2014-05-01

    Large rhyolitic ignimbrite occurrences are close connected to the Early Miocene initiation of extensional processes in the central-west Anatolia along Taşvanlı-Afyon zones. Field correlations, petrographical, geochemical and geochronological data lead to a substantial reinterpretation of the ignimbrite surrounding Kırka area, known from its world-class borate deposits, as representing the climatic event of a caldera collapse, unknown up to now and newly named "Kırka-Phrigian caldera". The caldera, which is roughly oval (24 km x 15km) in shape, one of the largest in Turkey, is supposed to have been formed in a single stage collapse event, at ~19 Ma that generated huge volume extracaldera outflow ignimbrites. Transtensive/distensive tectonic stresses since 25 Ma ago resulted in the NNW-SSE elongation of the magma chamber and influenced the roughly elliptical shape of the subsided block (caldera floor) belonging to the apex of Eskişehir-Afyon-Isparta volcanic area. Intracaldera post-collapse sedimentation and volcanism (at ~ 18 Ma) was controlled through subsidence-related faults with generation of a series of volcanic structures (mainly domes) showing a large compositional range from saturated silicic rhyolites and crystal-rich trachytes to undersaturated lamproites. Such volcanic rock association is typical for lithospheric extension. In this scenario, enriched mantle components within the subcontinental lithospheric mantle will begin to melt via decompression melting during the initiation of extension. Interaction of these melts with crustal rocks, fractionation processes and crustal anatexis driven by the heat contained in the ascending mantle melts produced the silicic compositions in a large crustal reservoir. Such silicic melts generated the initial eruptions of Kırka-Phrigian caldera ignimbrites. The rock volume and geochemical evidence suggests that silicic volcanic rocks come from a long-lived magma chamber that evolved episodically; after caldera

  1. Simulating Interface Growth and Defect Generation in CZT – Simulation State of the Art and Known Gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Gao, Fei; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Lin, Guang; Bylaska, Eric J.; Zabaras, Nicholas

    2012-11-01

    This one-year, study topic project will survey and investigate the known state-of-the-art of modeling and simulation methods suitable for performing fine-scale, fully 3-D modeling, of the growth of CZT crystals at the melt-solid interface, and correlating physical growth and post-growth conditions with generation and incorporation of defects into the solid CZT crystal. In the course of this study, this project will also identify the critical gaps in our knowledge of modeling and simulation techniques in terms of what would be needed to be developed in order to perform accurate physical simulations of defect generation in melt-grown CZT. The transformational nature of this study will be, for the first time, an investigation of modeling and simulation methods for describing microstructural evolution during crystal growth and the identification of the critical gaps in our knowledge of such methods, which is recognized as having tremendous scientific impacts for future model developments in a wide variety of materials science areas.

  2. Development and Validation of a Concentration Method for the Detection of Influenza A Viruses from Large Volumes of Surface Water▿

    PubMed Central

    Deboosere, Nathalie; Horm, Srey Viseth; Pinon, Anthony; Gachet, Jessica; Coldefy, Chloé; Buchy, Philippe; Vialette, Michèle

    2011-01-01

    Contamination of lakes and ponds plays an essential role as a reservoir of avian influenza A virus (AIV) in the environment. A method to concentrate waterborne AIV is a prerequisite for the detection of virus present at low levels in water. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a method for the concentration and detection of infectious AIV from large volumes of surface water samples. Two filtration systems, glass wool and electropositive NanoCeram filter, were studied. The individual effects of filtration-elution and polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentration parameters on the recovery efficiency of the H1N1 strain from 10-liter surface water samples were assessed. An ultimate 1% recovery rate of infectious viruses was achieved with the optimal protocol, corresponding to filtration through glass wool, followed by a viral elution step and then a PEG concentration. This method was validated for the detection of highly pathogenic H5N1 strains from artificially contaminated larger water volumes, from 10 to up to 50 liters, from different sources. The viral recovery efficiencies ranged from 0.01% to 7.89% and from 3.63% to 13.79% with lake water and rainwater, respectively. A theoretical detection threshold of 2.25 × 102 TCID50 (50% tissue culture infectious dose) in the filtered volume was obtained for seeded lake waters by M gene reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Moreover, the method was used successfully in field studies for the detection of naturally occurring influenza A viruses in lake water in France. PMID:21498756

  3. Does Size Really Matter? Analysis of the Effect of Large Fibroids and Uterine Volumes on Complication Rates of Uterine Artery Embolisation

    SciTech Connect

    Parthipun, A. A. Taylor, J.; Manyonda, I.; Belli, A. M.

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a correlation between large uterine fibroid diameter, uterine volume, number of vials of embolic agent used and risk of complications from uterine artery embolisation (UAE). This was a prospective study involving 121 patients undergoing UAE embolisation for symptomatic uterine fibroids at a single institution. Patients were grouped according to diameter of largest fibroid and uterine volume. Results were also stratified according to the number of vials of embolic agent used and rate of complications. No statistical difference in complication rate was demonstrated between the two groups according to diameter of the largest fibroid (large fibroids were classified as {>=}10 cm; Fisher's exact test P = 1.00), and no statistical difference in complication rate was demonstrated according to uterine volume (large uterine volume was defined as {>=}750 cm{sup 3}; Fisher's exact test P = 0.70). 84 of the 121 patients had documentation of the number of vials used during the procedure. Patients were divided into two groups, with {>=}4 used defined as a large number of embolic agent. There was no statistical difference between these two groups and no associated increased risk of developing complications. This study showed no increased incidence of complications in women with large-diameter fibroids or uterine volumes as defined. In addition, there was no evidence of increased complications according to quantity of embolic material used. Therefore, UAE should be offered to women with large fibroids and uterine volumes.

  4. Plasma properties in a large-volume, cylindrical and asymmetric radio-frequency capacitively coupled industrial-prototype reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazović, Saša; Puač, Nevena; Spasić, Kosta; Malović, Gordana; Cvelbar, Uroš; Mozetič, Miran; Radetić, Maja; Petrović, Zoran Lj

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a large-volume low-pressure cylindrical plasma reactor with a size that matches industrial reactors for treatment of textiles. It was shown that it efficiently produces plasmas with only a small increase in power as compared with a similar reactor with 50 times smaller volume. Plasma generated at 13.56 MHz was stable from transition to streamers and capable of long-term continuous operation. An industrial-scale asymmetric cylindrical reactor of simple design and construction enabled good control over a wide range of active plasma species and ion concentrations. Detailed characterization of the discharge was performed using derivative, Langmuir and catalytic probes which enabled determination of the optimal sets of plasma parameters necessary for successful industry implementation and process control. Since neutral atomic oxygen plays a major role in many of the material processing applications, its spatial profile was measured using nickel catalytic probe over a wide range of plasma parameters. The spatial profiles show diffusion profiles with particle production close to the powered electrode and significant wall losses due to surface recombination. Oxygen atom densities range from 1019 m-3 near the powered electrode to 1017 m-3 near the wall. The concentrations of ions at the same time are changing from 1016 to the 1015 m-3 at the grounded chamber wall.

  5. Determination of pesticides in vegetables using large-volume injection column liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hogenboom, A C; Hofman, M P; Kok, S J; Niessen, W M; Brinkman, U A

    2000-09-15

    Direct injection of a large volume (900 microl) of a sample extract onto a liquid chromatographic (LC) column, LC separation and electrospray tandem mass spectrometric detection were used for the quantitative analysis of a wide polarity range of pesticides in carrots and potatoes. Rapid sample preparation involved extraction of a small amount of sample (2 g) with a small volume of organic solvent (3 ml), clean-up over a filter and dilution of the organic extract with the aqueous LC eluent. The extraction efficiency for the selected pesticides was studied using methanol, acetone and acetonitrile as solvents. Evaluation of the performance of the overall method, using extraction with acetonitrile and detection in the selected-reaction-monitoring mode, showed excellent linearity in the range of 2-100 microg/kg with limits of detection of 0.5-2 microg/kg for both types of vegetable. With relative standard deviations of the MS peak area measurements of less than 6.5% (n=8) the repeatability of the method was fully satisfactory. PMID:11045499

  6. Thermo-mechanical response of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) large volumes exposed to time-dependent environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraldi, M.; Esposito, L.; Perrella, G.; Cutolo, A.

    2014-02-01

    Low thermal conductivity and elevated absorbance of large bulky volumes of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) exposed to moderately aggressive environmental conditions may cooperate to determine critical mechanical conditions, kindling unexpected high thermal stresses values which lead the material to failure. From the engineering point of view, this can be explained as the result of two concomitant phenomena which activate a cascade of events: very sharp thermal gradients engendered by transient thermal processes induced by cyclic environmental conditions, combined with significant bulk heat generation due to the high thermal inertia of massive PMMA volumes, in turn aggravating the steepness of the thermal gradients, may in fact ingenerate severe stress regimes, potentially undermining the structural stability of the material. Moving from these considerations, the present study is aimed to investigate possible rupture of PMMA blocks experiencing heating processes as a consequence of their exposure to outdoor cyclic environmental conditions. The problem is approached by means of both rigorous analytical arguments and the Finite Element based numerical methods, finally exploiting the theoretical outcomes to formulate a hypothesis which might explain the still unclear phenomenon of the sudden breaking of the PMMA structure, named Huge Wine Glass and designed by the world famous Japanese architect Toyo Ito, which occurred in Pescara (Italy) in 2009.

  7. Eruption and emplacement of flood basalt. An example from the large-volume Teepee Butte Member, Columbia River Basalt Group

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, S.P. ); Tolan, T.L. )

    1992-12-01

    Flows of the Teepee Butte Member, Grande Ronde Basalt, issued from a vent system in southeastern Washington, northeastern Oregon, and western Idaho. Three distinct basalt flows were erupted: the Limekiln Rapids flow, the Joseph Creek flow, and the Pruitt Draw flow. Together these mappable flows cover more than 52,000 km[sup 2] and have a volume exceeding 5,000 km[sup 3]. A portion of the vent system for the Joseph Creek flow is exposed in cross section in Joseph Canyon, Washington; it is one of the best preserved Columbia River Basalt Group vent complexes known. The vent complex is about 1 km in cross section, 30 m high, and composed of deposits characteristic of Hawaiian-type volcanism. The vent is asymmetrical; the eastern rampart consists of intercalated pyroclastic deposits and thin pahoehoe flows; the western rampart is composed wholly of pahoehoe flows. Flows of the Teepee Butte Member are compositionally homogeneous and were emplaced as sheet flows, each having several local flow units. Our study supports the importance of linear vent systems and the westward Palouse Slope, along with the large-volume lava flows, in controlling the distribution of Columbia River Basalt Group flows. Other factors, including the number of active fissure segments and topography, modified the shape of the flows and the number of flow units. 45 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Yardea Dacite -large-volume, high-temperature felsic volcanism from the Middle Proterozoic of South Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Creaser, R.A.; White, A.J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The Yardea Dacite is a large-volume felsic volcanic unit from the Middle Proterozoic Gawler Range Volcanics of South Australia; it has been previously described as an ignimbrite. However, some samples contain no petrographic evidence for a pyroclastic origin, but have characteristics compatible with final crystallization from a nonfragmented magma. These samples may have erupted as lavas, but others are likely to be extremely densely welded ignimbrites, suggesting a compound nature for the unit. Geothermometry and phase equilibria indicate that the Yardea Dacite originated from a high-temperature ({approximately}1,000{degree}C) felsic magma with a low water content ({le}2%). The Yardea Dacite is not associated with a known caldera of the Valles type, and shares many characteristics of recently described Cenozoic felsic volcanic rocks from the western United States, interpreted as rheoignimbrites or as unusually extensive lavas.

  9. A 5 kA pulsed power supply for inductive and plasma loads in large volume plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes 5 kA, 12 ms pulsed power supply for inductive load of Electron Energy Filter (EEF) in large volume plasma device. The power supply is based upon the principle of rapid sourcing of energy from the capacitor bank (2.8 F/200 V) by using a static switch, comprising of ten Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs). A suitable mechanism is developed to ensure equal sharing of current and uniform power distribution during the operation of these IGBTs. Safe commutation of power to the EEF is ensured by the proper optimization of its components and by the introduction of over voltage protection (>6 kV) using an indigenously designed snubber circuit. Various time sequences relevant to different actions of power supply, viz., pulse width control and repetition rate, are realized through optically isolated computer controlled interface.

  10. Determination of synthetic phenolic antioxidants in edible oils using microvial insert large volume injection gas-chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cacho, Juan Ignacio; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Three synthetic phenolic antioxidants, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ), were determined in different edible vegetable oil samples. The analyses were carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using microvial insert large volume injection (LVI). Several parameters affecting this sample introduction step, such as temperatures, times and gas flows, were optimised. Quantification was carried out by the matrix-matched calibration method using carvacrol as internal standard, providing quantification limits between 0.08 and 0.10 ng g(-1), depending on the compound. The three phenolic compounds were detected in several of the samples, BHT being the most frequently found. Recovery assays for oil samples spiked at two concentration levels, 2.5 and 10 ng g(-1), provided recoveries in the 86-115% range. PMID:26830586

  11. A 5 kA pulsed power supply for inductive and plasma loads in large volume plasma device.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, P K; Singh, S K; Sanyasi, A K; Awasthi, L M; Mattoo, S K

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes 5 kA, 12 ms pulsed power supply for inductive load of Electron Energy Filter (EEF) in large volume plasma device. The power supply is based upon the principle of rapid sourcing of energy from the capacitor bank (2.8 F/200 V) by using a static switch, comprising of ten Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs). A suitable mechanism is developed to ensure equal sharing of current and uniform power distribution during the operation of these IGBTs. Safe commutation of power to the EEF is ensured by the proper optimization of its components and by the introduction of over voltage protection (>6 kV) using an indigenously designed snubber circuit. Various time sequences relevant to different actions of power supply, viz., pulse width control and repetition rate, are realized through optically isolated computer controlled interface. PMID:27475553

  12. Recovery of Cryptosporidium oocysts from small and large volume water samples using a compressed foam filter system.

    PubMed

    Sartory, D P; Parton, A; Parton, A C; Roberts, J; Bergmann, K

    1998-12-01

    A novel filter system comprising open cell reticulated foam rings compressed between retaining plates and fitted into a filtration housing was evaluated for the recovery of oocysts of Cryptosporidium from water. Mean recoveries of 90.2% from seeded small and large volume (100-2000 l) tap water samples, and 88.8% from 10-20 l river water samples, were achieved. Following a simple potassium citrate flotation concentrate clean-up procedure, mean recoveries were 56.7% for the tap water samples and 60.9% for river water samples. This represents a marked improvement in capture and recovery of Cryptosporidium oocysts from water compared with conventional polypropylene wound cartridge filters and membrane filters. PMID:9871348

  13. The creation and evacuation of a large-volume sediment bar in a coastal ephemeral stream, NW Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, N.; Greenbaum, N.

    2009-12-01

    An unusual 240 mm rainstorm and consequent major flood (peak discharge 110 m3s-1) with an estimated recurrence interval of about 50 years occurred on Dec. 31, 1998 in Nahal Me'arot, an ungauged 25 km2 coastal ephemeral stream in Mt. Carmel, NW Israel. The flood caused morphological modifications along the channel, including intensive stripping of the channel bed and floodplain along several segments and deposition of large gravel bars downstream of these segments. One of such segments served as a study reach; composed of a massive, coarse, 200 m long gravel-bar formed downstream of a segment (150 m long) that was deeply scoured. The bar’s stratigraphy consisted of a very coarse gravel lag, well sorted on the surface overlying much finer sediment characterized by sandy layers mixed with gravel among different types of facies. The difference between its volume and the scoured reach upstream was only 20% (1270 m3 compared to 1010 m3) signifying that scour and aggradation occurred in proximity due to an abrupt gradient change. The diverse sedimentary configurations of the pits and thickness made spatial correlation difficult even when pits were in the same x-section. Despite the initial impression that the bar was stable and a prominent bedform feature for years to come, a careful examination proved otherwise. The initial recovery of the channel started when dense low shrub vegetation re-stabilized along the affected reaches a year later. Two smaller floods, 3 and 4 years later, evacuated and reworked most of the sediment until it lost most of its volume. Using the Lisle and Church (2002) decay function we portray the rapid evacuation of the bar despite the channel inactivity between floods. The study suggests that the flood's large impact and disturbance was local, short-lived and the channel almost returned to its pre-flood state within about 4 years.

  14. A novel stacking method of repetitive large volume sample injection and sweeping MEKC for determination of androgenic steroids in urine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Chi; Chen, Jia-Ling; Chen, Yen-Ling; Cheng, Hui-Ling; Wu, Shou-Mei

    2012-09-26

    In this research, a novel stacking capillary electrophoresis method, repetitive large volume sample injection and sweeping MEKC (rLVSI-sweeping MEKC) were developed to analyze the presence of three androgenic steroids considered as sport doping drugs, testosterone (T), epitestosterone (E) and epitestosterone glucuronide (EG) in urine. This method provides better sensitivity enhancement than the traditional large volume sample stacking-sweeping strategies due to sensitivity enhancement by repetitive injections. This multiple sampling method enhances sensitivity of monitoring of urine samples by UV detection (254 nm). Firstly, the phosphate buffer was filled into an uncoated fused silica capillary and the samples were injected into the capillary at 10 psi for 20s, and then stacked at -10 kV for 1 min using phosphate buffer containing SDS. The above injecting and stacking steps were repeated five times. Finally, separation was performed at -20 kV, using phosphate buffer containing methanol, SDS and (2-hydroxypropyl)-β-cyclodextrin. Method validation showed that calibration plots were linear (r≥0.997) over a range of 5-200 ng mL(-1) for T, 20-200 ng mL(-1) for E and 0.5-500 ng mL(-1) for EG. The limits of detection were 1.0 ng mL(-1) for T, 5.0 ng mL(-1) for E and 200.0 pg mL(-1) for EG. When evaluating precision and accuracy, values of RSD and RE in intra-day (n=3) and inter-day (n=5) analysis were found to be less than 10.0%. Compared with the simple LVSS-sweeping, which is also a stacking strategy, this method further improves sensitivity up to 25 folds (~2500 folds with MEKC without preconcentration). This method was applied to monitor 10 athletes' urine, and did not detect any analyte. The novel stacking method was feasible for monitoring of doping by sportsmen. PMID:22935380

  15. Characterization of large volume 3.5″×8″ LaBr3:Ce detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaz, A.; Pellegri, L.; Riboldi, S.; Camera, F.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Ceruti, S.; Coelli, S.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Csatlòs, M.; Frega, S.; Gulyàs, J.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Lodetti, S.; Million, B.; Owens, A.; Quarati, F.; Stuhl, L.; Wieland, O.

    2013-11-01

    The properties of large volume cylindrical 3.5″×8″ (89 mm×203 mm) LaBr3:Ce scintillation detectors coupled to the Hamamatsu R10233-100SEL photo-multiplier tube were investigated. These crystals are among the largest ones ever produced and still need to be fully characterized to determine how these detectors can be utilized and in which applications. We tested the detectors using monochromatic γ-ray sources and in-beam reactions producing γ rays up to 22.6 MeV; we acquired PMT signal pulses and calculated detector energy resolution and response linearity as a function of γ-ray energy. Two different voltage dividers were coupled to the Hamamatsu R10233-100SEL PMT: the Hamamatsu E1198-26, based on straightforward resistive network design, and the “LABRVD”, specifically designed for our large volume LaBr3:Ce scintillation detectors, which also includes active semiconductor devices. Because of the extremely high light yield of LaBr3:Ce crystals we observed that, depending on the choice of PMT, voltage divider and applied voltage, some significant deviation from the ideally proportional response of the detector and some pulse shape deformation appear. In addition, crystal non-homogeneities and PMT gain drifts affect the (measured) energy resolution especially in case of high-energy γ rays. We also measured the time resolution of detectors with different sizes (from 1″×1″ up to 3.5″×8″), correlating the results with both the intrinsic properties of PMTs and GEANT simulations of the scintillation light collection process. The detector absolute full energy efficiency was measured and simulated up to γ-rays of 30 MeV

  16. a Method to Achieve Large Volume, High Accuracy Photogrammetric Measurements Through the Use of AN Actively Deformable Sensor Mounting Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargeant, B.; Robson, S.; Szigeti, E.; Richardson, P.; El-Nounu, A.; Rafla, M.

    2016-06-01

    When using any optical measurement system one important factor to consider is the placement of the sensors in relation to the workpiece being measured. When making decisions on sensor placement compromises are necessary in selecting the best placement based on the shape and size of the object of interest and the desired resolution and accuracy. One such compromise is in the distance the sensors are placed from the measurement surface, where a smaller distance gives a higher spatial resolution and local accuracy and a greater distance reduces the number of measurements necessary to cover a large area reducing the build-up of errors between measurements and increasing global accuracy. This paper proposes a photogrammetric approach whereby a number of sensors on a continuously flexible mobile platform are used to obtain local measurements while the position of the sensors is determined by a 6DoF tracking solution and the results combined to give a single set of measurement data within a continuous global coordinate system. The ability of this approach to achieve both high accuracy measurement and give results over a large volume is then tested and areas of weakness to be improved upon are identified.

  17. Uncooled amorphous silicon 160 x 120 IRFPA with 25 μm pixel-pitch for large volume applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilain, M.; Tissot, J. L.; Legras, O.; Yon, J. J.; Minassian, C.; Fièque, B.; Chiappa, J. M.

    2008-03-01

    This paper reviews the specifications and performances of a 160 × 120 uncooled infrared focal plane array made from amorphous silicon microbolometers with a pixel-pitch of 25 μm, integrated into a LCC TEC-less package. This detector has been specifically designed for large volume production, while keeping the main features of high end developments, at detection pixel level, as well as at ROIC level, like detector configuration by serial link in order to minimize the number of electrical inputs, low power, large dynamic range...) The main particular features of this achievement are the miniaturized very low weight package, along with easy TEC-less operation naturally afforded via the readout architecture, which leads to very low consumption levels, making it well adapted to low end hand held or helmet mounted thermal imaging cameras. We present in the last part of this paper the main electro-optical characteristics and TEC-less operation, demonstrating wide thermal dynamic range and low power, thanks to the simple single-level amorphous silicon technology, coupled with advanced ROIC design.

  18. The Viking viewer for connectomics: scalable multi-user annotation and summarization of large volume data sets.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J R; Mohammed, S; Grimm, B; Jones, B W; Koshevoy, P; Tasdizen, T; Whitaker, R; Marc, R E

    2011-01-01

    Modern microscope automation permits the collection of vast amounts of continuous anatomical imagery in both two and three dimensions. These large data sets present significant challenges for data storage, access, viewing, annotation and analysis. The cost and overhead of collecting and storing the data can be extremely high. Large data sets quickly exceed an individual's capability for timely analysis and present challenges in efficiently applying transforms, if needed. Finally annotated anatomical data sets can represent a significant investment of resources and should be easily accessible to the scientific community. The Viking application was our solution created to view and annotate a 16.5 TB ultrastructural retinal connectome volume and we demonstrate its utility in reconstructing neural networks for a distinctive retinal amacrine cell class. Viking has several key features. (1) It works over the internet using HTTP and supports many concurrent users limited only by hardware. (2) It supports a multi-user, collaborative annotation strategy. (3) It cleanly demarcates viewing and analysis from data collection and hosting. (4) It is capable of applying transformations in real-time. (5) It has an easily extensible user interface, allowing addition of specialized modules without rewriting the viewer. PMID:21118201

  19. Large Residual Volume, Not Low Packing Density, Is the Most Influential Risk Factor for Recanalization after Coil Embolization of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sadato, Akiyo; Hayakawa, Motoharu; Adachi, Kazuhide; Nakahara, Ichiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Tight coil packing with density of at least 20%–25% is known to be important for preventing recanalization after embolization of cerebral aneurysms. However, large aneurysms sometimes recanalize regardless of the packing density, suggesting that the absolute residual volume which is determined by aneurysm volume and packing density may be more important risk factor for recanalization. To validate this hypothesis, we analyzed the factors affecting the outcomes of treated aneurysms at our institute. Methods and Findings We included 355 small and large aneurysms. The following six factors were obtained from every case: aneurysm volume (mL), neck size (mm), packing density (%), residual volume (mL), rupture status at presentation, and stent assistance (with or without stent). The data were then subjected to multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify significant risk factors for recanalization. Recanalization occurred in 61 aneurysms (17.2%). Significant predictors for recanalization were aneurysm volume (odds ratio, 15.3; P < 0.001) and residual volume (odds ratio, 30.9; P < 0.001), but not packing density (odds ratio, 0.98; P = 0.341). These results showed that for each 0.1-mL increase in aneurysm volume and residual volume, the risk of recanalization increased by 1.3 times and 1.4 times, respectively. Conclusions The most influential risk factor for recanalization after coil embolization was residual volume, not packing density. The larger the aneurysm volume, the greater the packing density has to be to minimize the residual volume and risk of recanalization. Since tight coil packing has already been aimed, further innovation of coil property or embolization technique may be needed. Otherwise, different treatment modality such as flow diverter or parent artery occlusion may have to be considered. PMID:27153192

  20. Development of a 3D CZT detector prototype for Laue Lens telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroli, Ezio; Auricchio, Natalia; Del Sordo, Stefano; Abbene, Leonardo; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Casini, Fabio; Curado da Silva, Rui M.; Kuvvetlli, Irfan; Milano, Luciano; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Quadrini, Egidio M.; Stephen, John B.; Ubertini, Pietro; Zanichelli, Massimiliano; Zappettini, Andrea

    2010-07-01

    We report on the development of a 3D position sensitive prototype suitable as focal plane detector for Laue lens telescope. The basic sensitive unit is a drift strip detector based on a CZT crystal, (~19×8 mm2 area, 2.4 mm thick), irradiated transversally to the electric field direction. The anode side is segmented in 64 strips, that divide the crystal in 8 independent sensor (pixel), each composed by one collecting strip and 7 (one in common) adjacent drift strips. The drift strips are biased by a voltage divider, whereas the anode strips are held at ground. Furthermore, the cathode is divided in 4 horizontal strips for the reconstruction of the third interaction position coordinate. The 3D prototype will be made by packing 8 linear modules, each composed by one basic sensitive unit, bonded on a ceramic layer. The linear modules readout is provided by a custom front end electronics implementing a set of three RENA-3 for a total of 128 channels. The front-end electronics and the operating logics (in particular coincidence logics for polarisation measurements) are handled by a versatile and modular multi-parametric back end electronics developed using FPGA technology.

  1. Large Cohort Dose-Volume Response Analysis of Parotid Gland Function After Radiotherapy: Intensity-Modulated Versus Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dijkema, Tim Terhaard, Chris H.J.; Roesink, Judith M.; Braam, Petra M.; Gils, Carla H. van; Moerland, Marinus A.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To compare parotid gland dose-volume response relationships in a large cohort of patients treated with intensity-modulated (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and materials: A total of 221 patients (64 treated with IMRT, 157 with CRT) with various head-and-neck malignancies were prospectively evaluated. The distribution of tumor subsites in both groups was unbalanced. Stimulated parotid flow rates were measured before and 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after radiotherapy. Parotid gland dose-volume histograms were derived from computed tomography-based treatment planning. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model proposed by Lyman was fit to the data. A complication was defined as stimulated parotid flow ratio <25% of the pretreatment flow rate. The relative risk of complications was determined for IMRT vs. CRT and adjusted for the mean parotid gland dose using Poisson regression modeling. Results: One year after radiotherapy, NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT were comparable with a TD{sub 50} (uniform dose leading to a 50% complication probability) of 38 and 40 Gy, respectively. Until 6 months after RT, corrected for mean dose, different complication probabilities existed for IMRT vs. CRT. The relative risk of a complication for IMRT vs. CRT after 6 weeks was 1.42 (95% CI 1.21-1.67), after 6 months 1.41 (95% CI; 1.12-1.77), and at 1 year 1.21 (95% CI 0.87-1.68), after correcting for mean dose. Conclusions: One year after radiotherapy, no difference existed in the mean dose-based NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT. Early after radiotherapy (up to 6 months) mean dose based (Lyman) models failed to fully describe the effects of radiotherapy on the parotid glands.

  2. Large volume inside the cage leading incomplete interbody bone fusion and residual back pain after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Mikinobu; Kamiya, Mitsuhiro; Wakao, Norimitsu; Hirasawa, Atsuhiko; Kawanami, Katsuhisa; Osuka, Koji; Takayasu, Masakazu

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare intervertebral bone fusion and clinical outcomes in L4-5 posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using the same posterior instrumentation with four combinations of one of three types of interbody cage with one of two bone grafts, iliac and local or only local. In 67 patients who underwent L4-5 PLIF, 19 patients had the Brantigan cage and iliac and local bone graft, 18 with the TELAMON C cage and iliac and local bone graft, 16 with the TELAMON C cage and local bone graft (TL), and 14 with the OIC PEEK cage and local bone graft. Clinical assessments were based on Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores and on the visual analogue scale (VAS). The bone fusion assessments were based on radiography and CT scans according to the Brantigan, Steffee, and Fraser criteria. More than 2 years after surgery, these assessments were made. In the results, the fusion outcome for the group receiving TL was significantly less than those for the other three groups. In TL, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the inside volume of the cage of ≥2.0 mL was the only significant factor for incomplete fusion. Moreover, the VAS (low back pain) score was significantly higher for TL than for the other three groups. In conclusions, we believe that the large volume inside the cage (≥2.0 mL) with local bone graft may lead incomplete interbody bone fusion and residual postsurgical low back pain after PLIF. PMID:25666390

  3. Application of ultradisperse magnetic adsorbents for removal of small concentrations of pollutants from large volumes of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechitailo, Galina S.; Kuznetsov, Anatoli; Kuznetsov, Oleg

    2016-07-01

    Pollution of natural bodies of water (rivers, lakes, ground water, etc) is unfortunately very common, both from natural sources like volcanic activity; and, even more importantly, from human activity, including disposal of industrial and municipal waste, mining, etc. Many toxic substances are harmful for humans and other organisms even in very low concentrations (e.g., less than 1 µg/L of cadmium is harmful, for Hg it is 0.5 µg/L, for phenol - 1 µg/L), and can remain in water for decades or longer. Cleaning large volumes of water even from low concentrations of pollutants is a challenging technological task and is very expensive. We propose to use suspension of ultradisperse magnetic adsorbents, for example, nanostructured ferro-carbon particles, produced by plasmachemical technique, for removing small concentrations of pollutants from large volumes of water. The suspension is introduced into the water. Due to their small sizes and densities similar to water (we measured the density of FC-4 ferro-carbon to be about 1 g/cm3; presumably due to porosity) the particles do not sediment for a long time (hours, days or longer), move due to Brownian motion and adsorb a variety of substances from the water. The particle surface can be modified to provide selectivity of the adsorption. Sorption capacities of ferro-carbon adsorbents is in dozens of percent. Therefore, to collect 1 kg of a pollutant, 2 to 20 kg of the adsorbents is required. Then the particles with the adsorbed contaminant can be collected (e.g., downstream of the river) using a variety of magnetic traps. The traps can consist of ferromagnetic wires and permanent magnets, a variety of simple and inexpensive designs are available. As a model system, the kinetics of adsorption of a highly diluted (0.002 mg/ml) aqueous solution of a low molecular weight compound (toluidine blue) by a small concentration of a ferro-carbon powder (FC-4) was studied by spectrophotometry. Before each measurement, the particles

  4. The Use of Cryogenically Cooled 5A Molecular Sieves for Large Volume Reduction of Tritiated Hydrogen Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniazzi, A.B.; Bartoszek, F.E.; Sherlock, A.M.

    2006-07-01

    A commercial hydrogen isotope separation system based on gas chromatography (AGC-ISS) has been built. The system operates in two modes: stripping and volume reduction. The purpose of the stripping mode is to reduce a large volume of tritiated hydrogen gas to a small volume of tritium rich hydrogen gas. The results here illustrate the effectiveness of the AGC-ISS in the stripping and volume reduction phases. Column readiness for hydrogen isotope separation is confirmed by room temperature air separation tests. Production runs were initially carried out using natural levels of deuterium (110-160 ppm) in high purity hydrogen. After completion of the deuterium/hydrogen runs the system began operations with tritiated hydrogen. The paper presents details of the AGC-ISS design and results of tritium tests. The heart of the AGC-ISS consists of two packed columns (9 m long, 3.8 cm OD) containing 5A molecular sieve material of 40/60 mesh size. Each column has 5 individually controlled heaters along the length of the column and is coiled around an inverted inner dewar. The coiled column and inner dewar are both contained within an outer dewar. In this arrangement liquid nitrogen, used to cryogenically cool the columns, flows into and out off the annular space defined by the two dewars, allowing for alternate heating and cooling cycles. Tritiated hydrogen feed is injected in batch quantities. The batch size is variable with the maximum quantity restricted by the tritium concentration in the exhausted hydrogen. The stripping operations can be carried out in full automated mode or in full manual mode. The average cycle time between injections is about 75 minutes. To date, the maximum throughput achieved is 10.5 m{sup 3}/day. A total of 37.8 m{sup 3} of tritiated hydrogen has been processed during commissioning. The system has demonstrated that venting of >99.95% of the feed gas is possible while retaining 99.98% of the tritium. At a maximum tritium concentration of {approx}7 GBq

  5. Ionization of organic molecules with ultraviolet lasers: A technique for generating large, well-defined ionized volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodworth, J. R.; Green, T. A.; Frost, C. A.

    1985-03-01

    In this paper we report a technique for generating a large, homogeneous volume of ionized gas and for making time-resolved measurements of its electron density. We also report absolute photoionization coefficients for a number of molecules. These coefficients will allow calculation of peak electron densities obtained in other ionization-related experiments. In our technique, the beam from a rare-gas halogen laser photoionizes organic molecules that have been seeded into a buffer gas. Ionization is accomplished by the absorption of two photons. We have analyzed the electron densities produced by photoionization with a microwave interferometer that measures the electron density in the ionized gas with a time-resolution of a few nanoseconds. Some of the organic molecules photoionized in this work produce electron-ion pairs with an efficiency more than five orders of magnitude higher than commonly used laboratory ionization sources such as ArF laser photoionization of NO. We have also studied the effect of attaching gases on the ionized mixtures and have demonstrated that addition of as little as 10 Torr of SF6 can reduce the peak electron density observed by a factor of 103.

  6. Novel experimental design for high pressure-high temperature electrical resistance measurements in a "Paris-Edinburgh" large volume press.

    PubMed

    Matityahu, Shlomi; Emuna, Moran; Yahel, Eyal; Makov, Guy; Greenberg, Yaron

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel experimental design for high sensitivity measurements of the electrical resistance of samples at high pressures (0-6 GPa) and high temperatures (300-1000 K) in a "Paris-Edinburgh" type large volume press. Uniquely, the electrical measurements are carried out directly on a small sample, thus greatly increasing the sensitivity of the measurement. The sensitivity to even minor changes in electrical resistance can be used to clearly identify phase transitions in material samples. Electrical resistance measurements are relatively simple and rapid to execute and the efficacy of the present experimental design is demonstrated by measuring the electrical resistance of Pb, Sn, and Bi across a wide domain of temperature-pressure phase space and employing it to identify the loci of phase transitions. Based on these results, the phase diagrams of these elements are reconstructed to high accuracy and found to be in excellent agreement with previous studies. In particular, by mapping the locations of several well-studied reference points in the phase diagram of Sn and Bi, it is demonstrated that a standard calibration exists for the temperature and pressure, thus eliminating the need for direct or indirect temperature and pressure measurements. The present technique will allow simple and accurate mapping of phase diagrams under extreme conditions and may be of particular importance in advancing studies of liquid state anomalies. PMID:25933866

  7. Colorimetric paper-based detection of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes from large volumes of agricultural water.

    PubMed

    Bisha, Bledar; Adkins, Jaclyn A; Jokerst, Jana C; Chandler, Jeffrey C; Pérez-Méndez, Alma; Coleman, Shannon M; Sbodio, Adrian O; Suslow, Trevor V; Danyluk, Michelle D; Henry, Charles S; Goodridge, Lawrence D

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes rapid colorimetric detection of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes from large volumes (10 L) of agricultural waters. Here, water is filtered through sterile Modified Moore Swabs (MMS), which consist of a simple gauze filter enclosed in a plastic cartridge, to concentrate bacteria. Following filtration, non-selective or selective enrichments for the target bacteria are performed in the MMS. For colorimetric detection of the target bacteria, the enrichments are then assayed using paper-based analytical devices (µPADs) embedded with bacteria-indicative substrates. Each substrate reacts with target-indicative bacterial enzymes, generating colored products that can be detected visually (qualitative detection) on the µPAD. Alternatively, digital images of the reacted µPADs can be generated with common scanning or photographic devices and analyzed using ImageJ software, allowing for more objective and standardized interpretation of results. Although the biochemical screening procedures are designed to identify the aforementioned bacterial pathogens, in some cases enzymes produced by background microbiota or the degradation of the colorimetric substrates may produce a false positive. Therefore, confirmation using a more discriminatory diagnostic is needed. Nonetheless, this bacterial concentration and detection platform is inexpensive, sensitive (0.1 CFU/ml detection limit), easy to perform, and rapid (concentration, enrichment, and detection are performed within approximately 24 hr), justifying its use as an initial screening method for the microbiological quality of agricultural water. PMID:24962090

  8. Analysis of Androgenic Steroids in Environmental Waters by Large-volume Injection Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Backe, Will J.; Ort, Christoph; Brewer, Alex J.; Field, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    A new method was developed for the analysis of natural and synthetic androgenic steroids and their selected metabolites in aquatic environmental matrices using direct large-volume injection (LVI) high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Method accuracy ranged from 88 to 108% for analytes with well-matched internal standards. Precision, quantified by relative standard deviation (RSD), was less than 12%. Detection limits for the method ranged from 1.2 to 360 ng/L. The method was demonstrated on a series of 1-hr composite wastewater influent samples collected over a day with the purpose of assessing temporal profiles of androgen loads in wastewater. Testosterone, androstenedione, boldenone, and nandrolone were detected in the sample series at concentrations up to 290 ng/L and loads up to 535 mg. Boldenone, a synthetic androgen, had a temporal profile that was strongly correlated to testosterone, a natural human androgen, suggesting its source may be endogenous. An analysis of the sample particulate fraction revealed detectable amounts of sorbed testosterone and androstenedione. Androstenedione sorbed to the particulate fraction accounted for an estimated five to seven percent of the total androstenedione mass. PMID:21391574

  9. Novel experimental design for high pressure-high temperature electrical resistance measurements in a "Paris-Edinburgh" large volume press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matityahu, Shlomi; Emuna, Moran; Yahel, Eyal; Makov, Guy; Greenberg, Yaron

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel experimental design for high sensitivity measurements of the electrical resistance of samples at high pressures (0-6 GPa) and high temperatures (300-1000 K) in a "Paris-Edinburgh" type large volume press. Uniquely, the electrical measurements are carried out directly on a small sample, thus greatly increasing the sensitivity of the measurement. The sensitivity to even minor changes in electrical resistance can be used to clearly identify phase transitions in material samples. Electrical resistance measurements are relatively simple and rapid to execute and the efficacy of the present experimental design is demonstrated by measuring the electrical resistance of Pb, Sn, and Bi across a wide domain of temperature-pressure phase space and employing it to identify the loci of phase transitions. Based on these results, the phase diagrams of these elements are reconstructed to high accuracy and found to be in excellent agreement with previous studies. In particular, by mapping the locations of several well-studied reference points in the phase diagram of Sn and Bi, it is demonstrated that a standard calibration exists for the temperature and pressure, thus eliminating the need for direct or indirect temperature and pressure measurements. The present technique will allow simple and accurate mapping of phase diagrams under extreme conditions and may be of particular importance in advancing studies of liquid state anomalies.

  10. Compact uncooled amorphous silicon 160x120 IRFPA with 25 μm pixel-pitch for large volume applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, J. L.; Legras, O.; Minassian, C.; Robert, P.; Fieque, B.; Tinnes, S.; Dupont, B.; Yon, J. J.; Arnaud, A.

    2007-10-01

    This paper reviews specifications and performances of a 160 x 120 uncooled infrared focal plane array made from amorphous silicon micro bolometer with a pixel-pitch of 25 μm, integrated in a LCC package. This detector has been specifically designed for being produced in large volume. The detector has kept all the innovations developed on the full TV format ROIC (detector configuration by serial link, low power consumption or wide electrical dynamic range... ) and offers an advanced TEC-less focal plane array well adapted to low end thermal imaging cameras. The specific appeal of this unit lies in the miniaturization of the packaging and its extremely light weight.In the last part of the paper, we will look more closely at electro-optical performances of this TEC-less product 160 x 120 as well as the other 25 μm products like the 384 x 288. We will insist on the wide thermal dynamic range and the low consumption achieved thanks to the mastering of the amorphous silicon technology coupled with the innovation in the ROIC design.

  11. Detection of s-triazine pesticides in natural waters by modified large-volume direct injection HPLC.

    PubMed

    Beale, David J; Kaserzon, Sarit L; Porter, Nichola A; Roddick, Felicity A; Carpenter, Peter D

    2010-07-15

    There is a need for simple and inexpensive methods to quantify potentially harmful persistent pesticides often found in our water-ways and water distribution systems. This paper presents a simple, relatively inexpensive method for the detection of a group of commonly used pesticides (atrazine, simazine and hexazinone) in natural waters using large-volume direct injection high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) utilizing a monolithic column and a single wavelength ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) detector. The best results for this system were obtained with a mobile phase made up of acetonitrile and water in a 30:70 ratio, a flow rate of 2.0 mL min(-1), and a detector wavelength of 230 nm. Using this method, we achieved retention times of less than three minutes, and detection limits of 5.7 microg L(-1) for atrazine, 4.7 microg L(-1) for simazine and 4.0 microg L(-1) for hexazinone. The performance of this method was validated with an inter-laboratory trial against a National Association of Testing Authorities (NATA) accredited liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method commonly used in commercial laboratories. PMID:20602952

  12. Colorimetric Paper-based Detection of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes from Large Volumes of Agricultural Water

    PubMed Central

    Bisha, Bledar; Adkins, Jaclyn A.; Jokerst, Jana C.; Chandler, Jeffrey C.; Pérez-Méndez, Alma; Coleman, Shannon M.; Sbodio, Adrian O.; Suslow, Trevor V.; Danyluk, Michelle D.; Henry, Charles S.; Goodridge, Lawrence D.

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes rapid colorimetric detection of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes from large volumes (10 L) of agricultural waters. Here, water is filtered through sterile Modified Moore Swabs (MMS), which consist of a simple gauze filter enclosed in a plastic cartridge, to concentrate bacteria. Following filtration, non-selective or selective enrichments for the target bacteria are performed in the MMS. For colorimetric detection of the target bacteria, the enrichments are then assayed using paper-based analytical devices (µPADs) embedded with bacteria-indicative substrates. Each substrate reacts with target-indicative bacterial enzymes, generating colored products that can be detected visually (qualitative detection) on the µPAD. Alternatively, digital images of the reacted µPADs can be generated with common scanning or photographic devices and analyzed using ImageJ software, allowing for more objective and standardized interpretation of results. Although the biochemical screening procedures are designed to identify the aforementioned bacterial pathogens, in some cases enzymes produced by background microbiota or the degradation of the colorimetric substrates may produce a false positive. Therefore, confirmation using a more discriminatory diagnostic is needed. Nonetheless, this bacterial concentration and detection platform is inexpensive, sensitive (0.1 CFU/ml detection limit), easy to perform, and rapid (concentration, enrichment, and detection are performed within approximately 24 hr), justifying its use as an initial screening method for the microbiological quality of agricultural water. PMID:24962090

  13. New Technology CZT Detectors for High-Energy Flare Spectroscopy: The Room Temperature Semiconductor Spectrometer for JAWSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestrand, W. Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The goal of our Room Temperature Semiconductor Spectrometer (RTeSS) project is to develop a small high-energy solar flare spectrometer employing semiconductor detectors that do not require significant cooling when used as high-energy solar flare spectrometers. Specifically, the goal is to test Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors with coplanar grid electrodes as x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers and to design an experiment that can be flown as a "piggy-back" payload on a satellite mission during the next solar maximum.

  14. What Would Be the Effect of Referral to High-Volume Hospitals in a Largely Rural State?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Marcia M.; Jaana, Mirou; Wakefield, Douglas S.; Ohsfeldt, Robert L.; Schneider, John E.; Miller, Thomas; Lei, Yang

    2004-01-01

    Volume of certain surgical procedures has been linked to patient outcomes. The Leapfrog Group and others have recommended evidence-based referral using specific volume thresholds for nonemergent cases. The literature is limited on the effect of such referral on hospitals, especially in rural areas. To examine the impact of evidence-based referral…

  15. Acoustic detection of cracks in the anvil of a large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhaoli; Chen, Bin; Tian, Hao; Cheng, Xiaobin; Yang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    A large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus with three pairs of tungsten carbide anvils is the most popular device for synthetic diamond production. Currently, the consumption of anvils is one of the important costs for the diamond production industry. If one of the anvils is fractured during the production process, the other five anvils in the apparatus may be endangered as a result of a sudden loss of pressure. It is of critical importance to detect and replace cracked anvils before they fracture for reduction of the cost of diamond production and safety. An acoustic detection method is studied in this paper. Two new features, nested power spectrum centroid and modified power spectrum variance, are proposed and combined with linear prediction coefficients to construct a feature vector. A support vector machine model is trained for classification. A sliding time window is proposed for decision-level information fusion. The experiments and analysis show that the recognition rate of anvil cracks is 95%, while the false-alarm rate is as low as 5.8 × 10-4 during a time window; this false-alarm rate indicates that at most one false alarm occurs every 2 months at a confidence level of 90%. An instrument to monitor anvil cracking was designed based on a digital signal processor and has been running for more than eight months in a diamond production field. In this time, two anvil-crack incidents occurred and were detected by the instrument correctly. In addition, no false alarms occurred.

  16. Acoustic detection of cracks in the anvil of a large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhaoli; Chen, Bin; Tian, Hao; Cheng, Xiaobin; Yang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    A large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus with three pairs of tungsten carbide anvils is the most popular device for synthetic diamond production. Currently, the consumption of anvils is one of the important costs for the diamond production industry. If one of the anvils is fractured during the production process, the other five anvils in the apparatus may be endangered as a result of a sudden loss of pressure. It is of critical importance to detect and replace cracked anvils before they fracture for reduction of the cost of diamond production and safety. An acoustic detection method is studied in this paper. Two new features, nested power spectrum centroid and modified power spectrum variance, are proposed and combined with linear prediction coefficients to construct a feature vector. A support vector machine model is trained for classification. A sliding time window is proposed for decision-level information fusion. The experiments and analysis show that the recognition rate of anvil cracks is 95%, while the false-alarm rate is as low as 5.8 × 10(-4) during a time window; this false-alarm rate indicates that at most one false alarm occurs every 2 months at a confidence level of 90%. An instrument to monitor anvil cracking was designed based on a digital signal processor and has been running for more than eight months in a diamond production field. In this time, two anvil-crack incidents occurred and were detected by the instrument correctly. In addition, no false alarms occurred. PMID:26724059

  17. Gas chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric analysis of pesticides residues in produce using concurrent solvent recondensation-large volume injection.

    PubMed

    Walorczyk, Stanisław

    2012-01-27

    In the present work, the feasibility of the combined use of concurrent solvent recondensation-large volume injection (CSR-LVI) and interspersed calibration for pesticide residue analysis was investigated. Splitless injections of 5-20 μL extracts containing 0.25-1g sample per mL(-1) were made into a Carbofrit packed liner and a 0.53 mm I.D., uncoated and deactivated retention gap. The determination was achieved by gas chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS). The evaluation of the proposed approach was based on analysis of real samples representing a diverse range of commodities such as apples, barley malt, blackcurrants, carrots, clemetines, grapes, leek, plums, rapeseed (green plants) rucola, strawberries and tomatoes. The samples contained a total of 36 different incurred pesticides at different concentration levels. Also, analyses were carried out of artificial samples representing six differing matrices (apples, blackcurrants, carrots, huckleberry, strawberry and tomatoes) which were spiked with pesticides at known concentrations before proceeding with the extraction. When using 15 and 20 μL CSR-LVI injection, a decrease of about 30% in peak heights compared with injection of 5 μL was observed. In the case of 5 and 10 μL injections, no significant difference was observed when employing to the quantification of the incurred and spiked pesticide residues. In the evaluated experimental variants, overall recoveries of the pesticides were 92 ± 5% with relative standard deviations of 12 ± 4% on average. All individual recoveries were in the range between 72 and 103 with RSD between 4 and 21%. About 15% of the instrument run time was saved by the application of interspersed calibration with standards injected between sample extracts. PMID:22204933

  18. Acoustic detection of cracks in the anvil of a large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Zhaoli Tian, Hao; Cheng, Xiaobin; Yang, Jun; Chen, Bin

    2015-12-15

    A large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus with three pairs of tungsten carbide anvils is the most popular device for synthetic diamond production. Currently, the consumption of anvils is one of the important costs for the diamond production industry. If one of the anvils is fractured during the production process, the other five anvils in the apparatus may be endangered as a result of a sudden loss of pressure. It is of critical importance to detect and replace cracked anvils before they fracture for reduction of the cost of diamond production and safety. An acoustic detection method is studied in this paper. Two new features, nested power spectrum centroid and modified power spectrum variance, are proposed and combined with linear prediction coefficients to construct a feature vector. A support vector machine model is trained for classification. A sliding time window is proposed for decision-level information fusion. The experiments and analysis show that the recognition rate of anvil cracks is 95%, while the false-alarm rate is as low as 5.8 × 10{sup −4} during a time window; this false-alarm rate indicates that at most one false alarm occurs every 2 months at a confidence level of 90%. An instrument to monitor anvil cracking was designed based on a digital signal processor and has been running for more than eight months in a diamond production field. In this time, two anvil-crack incidents occurred and were detected by the instrument correctly. In addition, no false alarms occurred.

  19. Rain Characteristics and Large-Scale Environments of Precipitation Objects with Extreme Rain Volumes from TRMM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Yaping; Lau, William K M.; Liu, Chuntao

    2013-01-01

    This study adopts a "precipitation object" approach by using 14 years of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Feature (PF) and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis data to study rainfall structure and environmental factors associated with extreme heavy rain events. Characteristics of instantaneous extreme volumetric PFs are examined and compared to those of intermediate and small systems. It is found that instantaneous PFs exhibit a much wider scale range compared to the daily gridded precipitation accumulation range. The top 1% of the rainiest PFs contribute over 55% of total rainfall and have 2 orders of rain volume magnitude greater than those of the median PFs. We find a threshold near the top 10% beyond which the PFs grow exponentially into larger, deeper, and colder rain systems. NCEP reanalyses show that midlevel relative humidity and total precipitable water increase steadily with increasingly larger PFs, along with a rapid increase of 500 hPa upward vertical velocity beyond the top 10%. This provides the necessary moisture convergence to amplify and sustain the extreme events. The rapid increase in vertical motion is associated with the release of convective available potential energy (CAPE) in mature systems, as is evident in the increase in CAPE of PFs up to 10% and the subsequent dropoff. The study illustrates distinct stages in the development of an extreme rainfall event including: (1) a systematic buildup in large-scale temperature and moisture, (2) a rapid change in rain structure, (3) explosive growth of the PF size, and (4) a release of CAPE before the demise of the event.

  20. Measuring and mitigating inhibition during real-time, quantitative PCR analysis of viral nucleic acid extracts from large-volume environmental water samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Naturally-occurring inhibitory compounds are a major concern during qPCR and RT-qPCR analysis of environmental samples, particularly large volume water samples. Here, a standardized method for measuring and mitigating sample inhibition in environmental water concentrates is described. Specifically, ...

  1. Hybrid pixel-waveform CdTe/CZT detector for use in an ultrahigh resolution MRI compatible SPECT system

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Liang; Meng, Ling-Jian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we will present a new small pixel CdTe/CZT detector for sub-500 μm resolution SPECT imaging application inside MR scanner based on a recently developed hybrid pixel-waveform (HPWF) readout circuitry. The HPWF readout system consists of a 2-D multi-pixel circuitry attached to the anode pixels to provide the X–Y positions of interactions, and a high-speed digitizer to read out the pulse-waveform induced on the cathode. The digitized cathode waveform could provide energy deposition information, precise timing and depth-of-interaction information for gamma ray interactions. Several attractive features with this HPWF detector system will be discussed in this paper. To demonstrate the performance, we constructed several prototype HPWF detectors with pixelated CZT and CdTe detectors of 2–5 mm thicknesses, connected to a prototype readout system consisting of energy-resolved photon-counting ASIC for readout anode pixels and an Agilent high-speed digitizer for digitizing the cathode signals. The performances of these detectors based on HPWF are discussed in this paper. PMID:24371365

  2. Hybrid pixel-waveform CdTe/CZT detector for use in an ultrahigh resolution MRI compatible SPECT system.

    PubMed

    Cai, Liang; Meng, Ling-Jian

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we will present a new small pixel CdTe/CZT detector for sub-500 μm resolution SPECT imaging application inside MR scanner based on a recently developed hybrid pixel-waveform (HPWF) readout circuitry. The HPWF readout system consists of a 2-D multi-pixel circuitry attached to the anode pixels to provide the X-Y positions of interactions, and a high-speed digitizer to read out the pulse-waveform induced on the cathode. The digitized cathode waveform could provide energy deposition information, precise timing and depth-of-interaction information for gamma ray interactions. Several attractive features with this HPWF detector system will be discussed in this paper. To demonstrate the performance, we constructed several prototype HPWF detectors with pixelated CZT and CdTe detectors of 2-5 mm thicknesses, connected to a prototype readout system consisting of energy-resolved photon-counting ASIC for readout anode pixels and an Agilent high-speed digitizer for digitizing the cathode signals. The performances of these detectors based on HPWF are discussed in this paper. PMID:24371365

  3. Hybrid pixel-waveform CdTe/CZT detector for use in an ultrahigh resolution MRI compatible SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Liang; Meng, Ling-Jian

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we will present a new small pixel CdTe/CZT detector for sub-500 μm resolution SPECT imaging application inside MR scanner based on a recently developed hybrid pixel-waveform (HPWF) readout circuitry. The HPWF readout system consists of a 2-D multi-pixel circuitry attached to the anode pixels to provide the X-Y positions of interactions, and a high-speed digitizer to read out the pulse-waveform induced on the cathode. The digitized cathode waveform could provide energy deposition information, precise timing and depth-of-interaction information for gamma ray interactions. Several attractive features with this HPWF detector system will be discussed in this paper. To demonstrate the performance, we constructed several prototype HPWF detectors with pixelated CZT and CdTe detectors of 2-5 mm thicknesses, connected to a prototype readout system consisting of energy-resolved photon-counting ASIC for readout anode pixels and an Agilent high-speed digitizer for digitizing the cathode signals. The performances of these detectors based on HPWF are discussed in this paper.

  4. Origin of Large Felsic Rock Volumes in Marie Byrd Land Volcanoes:Possible Influence of Tectonic Environment and Continental Lithospheric Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemasurier, W. E.

    2002-12-01

    The Marie Byrd Land volcanic province, in the West Antarctic rift system, includes several volcanoes with large volumes of peralkaline trachyte, phonolite, and rhyolite. The roughly 780 cu. km. of trachyte at Mt. Takahe volcano, for example, is about twice the volume of Mt. Shasta, the largest Cascade volcano.Geochemical data provide evidence for only minor amounts of crustal contamination, affecting just a small proportion of the felsic rocks, hence crustal assimilation is unlikely to have supplemented the volume of felsic rocks. Most appear to have been derived entirely by fractional crystallization of basaltic magma; but the volumes of felsic rock in Marie Byrd Land volcanoes is much larger than is found in their counterparts in oceanic islands, produced by essentially the same process, suggesting that continental structure and/or tectonic environment may have played a role in felsic rock evolution. The absence of Antarctic plate motion, over at least the past 26 m.y., seems an obvious factor. This has apparently led to repeated replenishment of the same magma chambers, rather than formation of linear chains of volcanoes. In addition, modeling results suggest that a multi-level, polybaric plumbing system within the lithosphere has acted as a filter, delaying the rise of at least some large volume magma batches, thereby prolonging and refining the fractionation process.

  5. A new adsorption-elution technique for the concentration of aquatic extracellular antibiotic resistance genes from large volumes of water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Ning; Liu, Lu; Qiu, Zhi-Gang; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Guo, Xuan; Yang, Dong; Li, Jing; Liu, Wei-Li; Jin, Min; Li, Jun-Wen

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular antibiotic resistance genes (eARGs) that help in the transmission and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are emerging environmental contaminants in water, and there is therefore a growing need to assess environmental levels and associated risks of eARGs. However, as they are present in low amounts, it is difficult to detect eARGs in water directly with PCR techniques. Here, we prepared a new type of nucleic acid adsorption particle (NAAP) with high capacity and developed an optimal adsorption-elution method to concentrate eARGs from large volumes of water. With this technique, we were able to achieve an eARG recovery rate of above 95% from 10 L of water samples. Moreover, combining this new method with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), the sensitivity of the eARG detection was 10(4) times that of single qPCR, with the detection limit lowered to 100 gene copies (GCs)/L. Our analyses showed that the eARG load, virus load and certain water characteristics such as pH, chemical oxygen demand (CODMn), and turbidity affected the eARGs recovery rate. However, high eARGs recovery rates always remained within the standard limits for natural surface water quality, while eARG levels in water were lower than the detection limits of single qPCR assays. The recovery rates were not affected by water temperature and heterotrophic plate counts (HPC). The eARGs whatever located in the plasmids or the short-length linear DNAs can be recovered from the water. Furthermore, the recovery rate was high even in the presence of high concentrations of plasmids in different natural water (Haihe river, well water, raw water for drinking water, Jinhe river, Tuanbo lake and the Yunqiao reservoir). By this technology, eARGs concentrations were found ranging from (2.70 ± 0.73) × 10(2) to (4.58 ± 0.47) × 10(4) GCs/L for the extracellular ampicillin resistance gene and (5.43 ± 0.41) × 10(2) to (2.14 ± 0.23) × 10(4) GCs/L for the extracellular gentamicin

  6. Crystal zoning in a large-volume ignimbrite: constraints on the thermal history of a supervolcano magma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, N. E.; Pyle, D. M.; Wilson, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    Chemical zoning of crystals provides an important archive of information that allows for the reconstruction of complex thermal histories and changes in melt composition of the magma reservoir during crystallization. Here we investigate cathodoluminescence (CL) and Ti zonation in quartz crystals extracted from pumices from the Whakamaru and Rangitaiki ignimbrite units (part of the large-volume Whakamaru Group Ignimbrites), New Zealand, to reconstruct the thermal history of the parent magma chamber(s). CL intensity images are taken as a proxy for Ti content and temperature variation during crystal growth, and direct estimates of temperature are made using the TitaniQ geothermometer (Wark & Watson 2006 Cont. Min. Pet.) based on Ti concentration in quartz. These results are reviewed in comparison with temperatures from Fe-Ti oxide geothermometry. Quartz zoning is also compared to zonation in feldspars (using BSE imaging) from the same pumice clasts in order to establish the degree to which different crystal species record similar or contrasting magmatic histories. Quartz crystals in Whakamaru pumice display a variety of CL zoning patterns and resorption boundaries. Overgrowths typically appear to truncate CL growth zoning within the crystal core, indicating periods of resorption and subsequent re-growth - consistent with magma recharge causing a marked change in conditions (temperature and/or volatile saturation) and multi-stage crystallisation. Crystals typically display a dark (lower Ti) resorbed core, with an abrupt change to a CL-bright rim, although irregular textures and complex variations between crystals are observed. Core-to-rim profiles of Ti concentration in analysed quartz crystals show Ti variations within the range 50-225 ppm, corresponding to crystallisation temperatures of 733-935°C (assuming TiO2 activity in the melt of 0.6), with the lowest values recorded in the crystal core, increasing in a step-wise pattern towards the rim. These values are

  7. Resolving the Effects of Aperture and Volume Restriction of the Flow by Semi-Porous Barriers Using Large-Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatziefstratiou, Efthalia K.; Velissariou, Vasilia; Bohrer, Gil

    2014-09-01

    The Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS)-based Forest Large-Eddy Simulation (RAFLES) model is used to simulate the effects of large rectangular prism-shaped semi-porous barriers of varying densities under neutrally buoyant conditions. RAFLES model resolves flows inside and above forested canopies and other semi-porous barriers, and it accounts for barrier-induced drag on the flow and surface flux exchange between the barrier and the air. Unlike most other models, RAFLES model also accounts for the barrier-induced volume and aperture restriction via a modified version of the cut-cell coordinate system. We explicitly tested the effects of the numerical representation of volume restriction, independent of the effects of the drag, by comparing drag-only simulations (where we prescribed neither volume nor aperture restrictions to the flow), restriction-only simulations (where we prescribed no drag), and control simulations where both drag and volume plus aperture restrictions were included. Previous modelling and empirical work have revealed the development of important areas of increased uplift upwind of forward-facing steps, and recirculation zones downwind of backward-facing steps. Our simulations show that representation of the effects of the volume and aperture restriction due to the presence of semi-porous barriers leads to differences in the strengths and locations of increased-updraft and recirculation zones, and the length and strength of impact and adjustment zones when compared to simulation solutions with a drag-only representation. These are mostly driven by differences to the momentum budget of the streamwise wind velocity by resolved turbulence and pressure gradient fields around the front and back edges of the barrier. We propose that volume plus aperture restriction is an important component of the flow system in semi-porous environments such as forests and cities and should be considered by large-eddy simulation (LES).

  8. Portable waveguide display system with a large field of view by integrating freeform elements and volume holograms

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jian; Liu, Juan; Yao, Xincheng; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-01-01

    A compact waveguide display system integrating freeform elements and volume holograms is presented here for the first time. The use of freeform elements can broaden the field of view, which limits the applications of a holographic waveguide. An optimized system can achieve a diagonal field of view of 45° when the thickness of the waveguide planar is 3mm. Freeform-elements in-coupler and the volume holograms out-coupler were designed in detail in our study, and the influence of grating configurations on diffraction efficiency was analyzed thoroughly. The off-axis aberrations were well compensated by the in-coupler and the diffraction efficiency of the optimized waveguide display system could reach 87.57%. With integrated design, stability and reliability of this monochromatic display system were achieved and the alignment of the system was easily controlled by the record of the volume holograms, which makes mass production possible. PMID:25836207

  9. Development of an absolute method for efficiency calibration of a coaxial HPGe detector for large volume sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Ramírez, Pablo C.

    2015-09-01

    In this work an absolute method for the determination of the full energy peak efficiency of a gamma spectroscopy system for voluminous sources is presented. The method was tested for a high-resolution coaxial HPGe detector and cylindrical homogeneous volume source. The volume source is represented by a set of point sources filling its volume. We found that the absolute efficiency of a volume source can be determined as the average over its volume of the absolute efficiency of each point source. Experimentally, we measure the intrinsic efficiency as a function upon source-detector position. Then, considering the solid angle and the attenuations of the gamma rays emitted to the detector by each point source, considered as embedded in the source matrix, the absolute efficiency for each point source inside of the volume was determined. The factor associate with the solid angle and the self-attenuation of photons in the sample was deduced from first principles without any mathematical approximation. The method was tested by determining the specific activity of 137Cs in cylindrical homogeneous sources, using IAEA reference materials with specific activities between 14.2 Bq/kg and 9640 Bq/kg at the moment of the experimentation. The results obtained shown a good agreement with the expected values. The relative difference was less than 7% in most of the cases. The main advantage of this method is that it does not require of the use of expensive and hard to produce standard materials. In addition it does not require of matrix effect corrections, which are the main cause of error in this type of measurements, and it is easy to implement in any nuclear physics laboratory.

  10. Derivation and representation of dose-volume response from large clinical trial data sets: an example from the RADAR prostate radiotherapy trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M. A.; Foo, K.; Haworth, A.; Gulliford, S. L.; Kearvall, R.; Kennedy, A.; Richardson, S.; Krawiec, M.; Stewart, N.; Joseph, D. J.; Denham, J. W.

    2014-03-01

    Large multicentre radiotherapy trials incorporating assessment of multiple outcomes at multiple timepoints can generate extensive datasets. We have investigated graphical techniques for presentation of this data and the associated underlying dose-volume response information, necessary for guiding statistical analyses and translating outcomes to future patient treatments. A relational database was used to archive reviewed plan data for patients accrued to the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial. Viewing software was used to clean and enhance the data. Scripts were developed to export arbitrary dose-histogram data which was combined with clinical toxicity data with a median follow-up of 72 months. Graphical representations of dose-volume response developed include prevalence atlasing, univariate logistic regression and dose-volume-point odds ratios, and continuous cut-point derivation via ROC analysis. These representations indicate variable association of toxicities across structures and time-points.

  11. Thirty Years on--A Large Anti-Flynn Effect? The Piagetian Test Volume & Heaviness Norms 1975-2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shayer, Michael; Ginsburg, Denise; Coe, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Background: "Volume & Heaviness" was one of three Piagetian tests used in the CSMS survey in 1975/76. However unlike psychometric tests showing the Flynn effect--that is with students showing steady improvements year by year requiring tests to be restandardized--it appeared that the performance of Y7 students has recently been getting steadily…

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF NOX CONTROL ON A SPARK-IGNITED LARGE BORE RECIPROCATING INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE. VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume I of the report gives emission results for a spark-ignited, largebore, reciprocating, internal-combustion engine operating both under baseline (normal) conditions, and with combustion modification controls to reduce NOx emissions to levels below the proposed new source per...

  13. A Distributed GPU-Based Framework for Real-Time 3D Volume Rendering of Large Astronomical Data Cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A. H.; Fluke, C. J.; Barnes, D. G.

    2012-05-01

    We present a framework to volume-render three-dimensional data cubes interactively using distributed ray-casting and volume-bricking over a cluster of workstations powered by one or more graphics processing units (GPUs) and a multi-core central processing unit (CPU). The main design target for this framework is to provide an in-core visualization solution able to provide three-dimensional interactive views of terabyte-sized data cubes. We tested the presented framework using a computing cluster comprising 64 nodes with a total of 128GPUs. The framework proved to be scalable to render a 204GB data cube with an average of 30 frames per second. Our performance analyses also compare the use of NVIDIA Tesla 1060 and 2050GPU architectures and the effect of increasing the visualization output resolution on the rendering performance. Although our initial focus, as shown in the examples presented in this work, is volume rendering of spectral data cubes from radio astronomy, we contend that our approach has applicability to other disciplines where close to real-time volume rendering of terabyte-order three-dimensional data sets is a requirement.

  14. Evaluation of position-estimation methods applied to CZT-based photon-counting detectors for dedicated breast CT

    PubMed Central

    Makeev, Andrey; Clajus, Martin; Snyder, Scott; Wang, Xiaolang; Glick, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Semiconductor photon-counting detectors based on high atomic number, high density materials [cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)/cadmium telluride (CdTe)] for x-ray computed tomography (CT) provide advantages over conventional energy-integrating detectors, including reduced electronic and Swank noise, wider dynamic range, capability of spectral CT, and improved signal-to-noise ratio. Certain CT applications require high spatial resolution. In breast CT, for example, visualization of microcalcifications and assessment of tumor microvasculature after contrast enhancement require resolution on the order of 100  μm. A straightforward approach to increasing spatial resolution of pixellated CZT-based radiation detectors by merely decreasing the pixel size leads to two problems: (1) fabricating circuitry with small pixels becomes costly and (2) inter-pixel charge spreading can obviate any improvement in spatial resolution. We have used computer simulations to investigate position estimation algorithms that utilize charge sharing to achieve subpixel position resolution. To study these algorithms, we model a simple detector geometry with a 5×5 array of 200  μm pixels, and use a conditional probability function to model charge transport in CZT. We used COMSOL finite element method software to map the distribution of charge pulses and the Monte Carlo package PENELOPE for simulating fluorescent radiation. Performance of two x-ray interaction position estimation algorithms was evaluated: the method of maximum-likelihood estimation and a fast, practical algorithm that can be implemented in a readout application-specific integrated circuit and allows for identification of a quadrant of the pixel in which the interaction occurred. Both methods demonstrate good subpixel resolution; however, their actual efficiency is limited by the presence of fluorescent K-escape photons. Current experimental breast CT systems typically use detectors with a pixel size of 194

  15. Performance characterization of a new CZT-based preclinical SPECT system: a comparative study of different collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, A. R.; Park, S.-J.; Choi, Y. Y.; Kim, K. M.; Kim, H.-J.

    2015-09-01

    Triumph X-SPECT is a newly released CZT-based preclinical small-animal SPECT system with interchangeable collimators. The purpose of this work was to evaluate and systematically compare the imaging performances of three different collimators in the CZT-based preclinical small-animal system: a single-pinhole collimator (SPH), a multi-pinhole collimator (MPH) and a parallel-hole collimator. We measured the spatial resolutions and sensitivities of the three collimators with 99mTc sources, considering three distinct energy window widths (5, 10, and 20%), and used the NEMA NU4-2008 Image Quality phantom to test the imaging performance of the three collimators in terms of uniformity and spill-over ratio (SOR) for each energy window. With a 10% energy window width at a radius of rotation (ROR) of 30 mm, the system resolution of the SPH, MPH and parallel-hole collimators was 0.715, 0.855 and 3.270 mm FWHM, respectively. For the same energy window, the sensitivity of the system with SPH, MPH and parallel-hole collimators was 32.860, 152.514 and 49.205 counts/sec/MBq at a 100 mm source-to-detector distance and 6.790, 33.376 and 49.038 counts/sec/MBq at a 130 mm source-to-detector distance, respectively. The image noise and SORair for the three collimators were 20.137, 12.278 and 11.232 (%STDunif) and 0.106, 0.140 and 0.161, respectively. Overall, the results show that the SPH had better spatial resolution than the other collimators. The MPH had the highest sensitivity at 100 mm source-to-collimator distance, and the parallel-hole collimator had the highest sensitivity at 130 mm-source-to-detector distance. Therefore, the proper collimator for Triumph X-SPECT system must be determined by the task. These results provide valuable reference data and insight into the imaging performance of various collimators in CZT-based preclinical small-animal SPECT.

  16. Evaluation of position-estimation methods applied to CZT-based photon-counting detectors for dedicated breast CT.

    PubMed

    Makeev, Andrey; Clajus, Martin; Snyder, Scott; Wang, Xiaolang; Glick, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Semiconductor photon-counting detectors based on high atomic number, high density materials [cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)/cadmium telluride (CdTe)] for x-ray computed tomography (CT) provide advantages over conventional energy-integrating detectors, including reduced electronic and Swank noise, wider dynamic range, capability of spectral CT, and improved signal-to-noise ratio. Certain CT applications require high spatial resolution. In breast CT, for example, visualization of microcalcifications and assessment of tumor microvasculature after contrast enhancement require resolution on the order of [Formula: see text]. A straightforward approach to increasing spatial resolution of pixellated CZT-based radiation detectors by merely decreasing the pixel size leads to two problems: (1) fabricating circuitry with small pixels becomes costly and (2) inter-pixel charge spreading can obviate any improvement in spatial resolution. We have used computer simulations to investigate position estimation algorithms that utilize charge sharing to achieve subpixel position resolution. To study these algorithms, we model a simple detector geometry with a [Formula: see text] array of [Formula: see text] pixels, and use a conditional probability function to model charge transport in CZT. We used COMSOL finite element method software to map the distribution of charge pulses and the Monte Carlo package PENELOPE for simulating fluorescent radiation. Performance of two x-ray interaction position estimation algorithms was evaluated: the method of maximum-likelihood estimation and a fast, practical algorithm that can be implemented in a readout application-specific integrated circuit and allows for identification of a quadrant of the pixel in which the interaction occurred. Both methods demonstrate good subpixel resolution; however, their actual efficiency is limited by the presence of fluorescent [Formula: see text]-escape photons. Current experimental breast CT systems typically use

  17. Local D3/D7 μ-SPLIT SUSY, 125 GeV Higgs and Large Volume Ricci-Flat Swiss-Cheese Metrics:. a Brief Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Aalok

    In this paper, we review briefly recent progress made in realizing local(ized around a mobile spacetime filling D3-brane in) D3/D7 μ-split Supersymmetry in (the large volume limit of Type IIB) String Theory (compactified on Swiss-Cheese Calabi-Yau orientifolds) as well as obtaining a 125 GeV (light) Higgs in the same setup. We also discuss obtaining the geometric Kähler potential (and hence the Ricci-flat metric) for the Swiss-Cheese Calabi-Yau in the large volume limit using the Donaldson's algorithm and intuition from GLSM-based calculations — we present new results for Swiss-Cheese Calabi-Yau (used in the setup) metrics at points finitely away from the "big" divisor.

  18. Genetic influences on schizophrenia and subcortical brain volumes: large-scale proof-of-concept and roadmap for future studies

    PubMed Central

    Anttila, Verneri; Hibar, Derrek P; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Smoller, Jordan W; Nichols, Thomas E; Neale, Michael C; McIntosh, Andrew M; Lee, Phil; McMahon, Francis J; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mattheisen, Manuel; Andreassen, Ole A; Gruber, Oliver; Sachdev, Perminder S; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Saykin, Andrew J; Ehrlich, Stefan; Mather, Karen A; Turner, Jessica A; Schwarz, Emanuel; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Shugart, Yin Yao; Ho, Yvonne YW; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating psychiatric illness with high heritability. Brain structure and function differ, on average, between schizophrenia cases and healthy individuals. As common genetic associations are emerging for both schizophrenia and brain imaging phenotypes, we can now use genome-wide data to investigate genetic overlap. Here we integrated results from common variant studies of schizophrenia (33,636 cases, 43,008 controls) and volumes of several (mainly subcortical) brain structures (11,840 subjects). We did not find evidence of genetic overlap between schizophrenia risk and subcortical volume measures either at the level of common variant genetic architecture or for single genetic markers. The current study provides proof-of-concept (albeit based on a limited set of structural brain measures), and defines a roadmap for future studies investigating the genetic covariance between structural/functional brain phenotypes and risk for psychiatric disorders. PMID:26854805

  19. Quantifying the Impact of Immediate Reconstruction in Postmastectomy Radiation: A Large, Dose-Volume Histogram-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohri, Nisha; Cordeiro, Peter G.; Keam, Jennifer; Ballangrud, Ase; Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang; Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Stein, Nicholas F.; Zhou Ying; McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N.; Ho, Alice Y.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) using dose-volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-seven women underwent PMRT at our center, 196 with implant reconstruction and 51 without reconstruction. Patients with reconstruction were treated with tangential photons, and patients without reconstruction were treated with en-face electron fields and customized bolus. Twenty percent of patients received internal mammary node (IMN) treatment. The DVH data were compared between groups. Ipsilateral lung parameters included V20 (% volume receiving 20 Gy), V40 (% volume receiving 40 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. Heart parameters included V25 (% volume receiving 25 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. IMN coverage was assessed when applicable. Chest wall coverage was assessed in patients with reconstruction. Propensity-matched analysis adjusted for potential confounders of laterality and IMN treatment. Results: Reconstruction was associated with lower lung V20, mean dose, and maximum dose compared with no reconstruction (all P<.0001). These associations persisted on propensity-matched analysis (all P<.0001). Heart doses were similar between groups (P=NS). Ninety percent of patients with reconstruction had excellent chest wall coverage (D95 >98%). IMN coverage was superior in patients with reconstruction (D95 >92.0 vs 75.7%, P<.001). IMN treatment significantly increased lung and heart parameters in patients with reconstruction (all P<.05) but minimally affected those without reconstruction (all P>.05). Among IMN-treated patients, only lower lung V20 in those without reconstruction persisted (P=.022), and mean and maximum heart doses were higher than in patients without reconstruction (P=.006, P=.015, respectively). Conclusions: Implant reconstruction does not compromise the technical quality of PMRT when the IMNs are untreated. Treatment technique, not reconstruction, is the primary

  20. Effects of Surface Processing on the Response of CZT Gamma Detectors: Studies with a Collimated Synchrotron X-Ray Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain,A.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Cui, Y.; Babalola, S.; Burger, A.; James, R.

    2008-01-01

    Using a microscale X-ray mapping technique incorporating a synchrotron beam, we are able to reveal the fine details of the surface properties in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor detectors. A detector, with various degrees of surface roughness, was irradiated by a high-spatial-resolution X-ray beam. The detector's response was analyzed and displayed as a two-dimensional (2-D) map, and the charge collection was obtained from the peak positions in the spectra versus the beam's location, which reflects the local material properties. We noted the correlation between the 2-D image and the spectral response of the charge collection at different locations on the surface area, which indicates that a rough surface tends to contain trapping centers, thereby enhancing leakage current and distorting the signal. We also discuss our observations on the transition effect at the boundary area of a rough and a smooth surface under identical conditions.

  1. Development status of a CZT spectrometer prototype with 3D spatial resolution for hard x-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auricchio, N.; Caroli, E.; Basili, A.; Benassi, G.; Budtz Jørgensen, C.; Curado da Silva, R. M.; Del Sordo, S.; Kuvvetli, I.; Milano, L.; Moscatelli, F.; Stephen, J. B.; Zanichelli, M.; Zappettini, A.

    2012-07-01

    The development of new focusing optics based on wide band Laue lenses operating from ~60 keV up to several hundred keV is particularly challenging. This type of hard X-ray or gamma ray optics requires a high performance focal plane detector in order to exploit to the best their intrinsic capabilities. We describe a three dimensional (3D) position sensitive detector prototype suitable as the basic module for a high efficiency Laue lens focal plane detector. This detector configuration is currently under study for use in a balloon payload dedicated to performing a high significance measurement of the polarization status of the Crab between 100 and 500 keV. The prototype is made by packing 8 linear modules, each composed of one basic sensitive unit bonded onto a thin supporting ceramic layer. Each unit is a drift strip detector based on a CZT crystal, irradiated transversally to the electric field direction. The anode is segmented into 8 detection cells, each comprising one collecting strip and 8 surrounding drift strips. The drift strips are biased by a voltage divider. The cathode is divided into 4 horizontal strips for the reconstruction of the Z interaction position. The detector readout electronics is based on RENA-3 ASIC and the data handling system uses a custom electronics based on FPGA to provide the ASIC setting, the event handling logic, and the data acquisition. This paper mainly describes the components and the status of the undergoing activities for the construction of the proposed 3D CZT prototype and shows the results of the electronics tests.

  2. Multiphase flow modelling using non orthogonal collocated finite volumes : application to fluid catalytical cracking and large scale geophysical flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. M.; Nicolas, A. N.

    2003-04-01

    A modeling approach of gas solid flow, taking into account different physical phenomena such as gas turbulence and inter-particle interactions is presented. Moment transport equations are derived for the second order fluctuating velocity tensor which allow to involve practical closures based on single phase turbulence modeling on one hand and kinetic theory of granular media on the other hand. The model is applied to fluid catalytic cracking processes and explosive volcanism. In the industry as well as in the geophysical community, multiphase flows are modeled using a finite volume approach and a multicorrector algorithm in time in order to determine implicitly the pressures, velocities and volume fractions for each phase. Pressures, and velocities are generally determined at mid-half mesh step from each other following the staggered grid approach. This ensures stability and prevents oscillations in pressure. It allows to treat almost all the Reynolds number ranges for all speeds and viscosities. The disadvantages appear when we want to treat more complex geometries or if a generalized curvilinear formulation of the conservation equations is considered. Too many interpolations have to be done and accuracy is then lost. In order to overcome these problems, we use here a similar algorithm in time and a Rhie and Chow interpolation (1983) of the collocated variables and essentially the velocities at the interface. The Rhie and Chow interpolation of the velocities at the finite volume interfaces allows to have no oscillations of the pressure without checkerboard effects and to stabilize all the algorithm. In a first predictor step, fluxes at the interfaces of the finite volumes are then computed using 2nd and 3rd order shock capturing schemes of MUSCL/TVD or Van Leer type, and the orthogonal stress components are treated implicitly while cross viscous/diffusion terms are treated explicitly. Pentadiagonal linear systems are solved in each geometrical direction (the so

  3. Component mode synthesis and large deflection vibration of complex structures. Volume 2: Single-mode large deflection vibrations of beams and plates using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh

    1987-01-01

    A finite element method is presented for the large amplitude vibrations of complex structures that can be modelled with beam and rectangular plate elements subjected to harmonic excitation. Both inplane deformation and inertia are considered in the formulation. Derivation of the harmonic force and nonlinear stiffness matrices for a beam and a rectangular plate element are presented. Solution procedures and convergence characteristics of the finite element method are described. Nonlinear response to uniform and concentrated harmonic loadings and improved nonlinear free vibration results are presented for beams and rectangular plates of various boundary conditions.

  4. Correlation of the Peach Springs Tuff, a large-volume Miocene ignimbrite sheet in California and Arizona ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glazner, A.F.; Nielson, J.E.; Howard, K.A.; Miller, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The Peach Springs Tuff is a distinctive early Miocene ignimbrite deposit that was first recognized in western Arizona. Recent field studies and phenocryst analyses indicate that adjacent outcrops of similar tuff in the central and eastern Mojave Desert may be correlative. This proposed correlation implies that outcrops of the tuff are scattered over an area of at least 35 000 km2 from the western Colorado Plateau to Barstow, California, and that the erupted volume, allowing for posteruption crustal extension, was at least several hundred cubic kilometres. Thus, the Peach Springs Tuff may be a regional stratigraphic marker, useful for determining regional paleogeography and the time and extent of Tertiary crustal extension. -Authors

  5. Containment at the Source during Waste Volume Reduction of Large Radioactive Components Using Oxylance High-Temperature Cutting Equipment - 13595

    SciTech Connect

    Keeney, G. Neil

    2013-07-01

    As a waste-volume reduction and management technique, highly contaminated Control Element Drive Mechanism (CEDM) housings were severed from the Reactor Pressure Vessel Head (RPVH) inside the San Onofre Unit 2 primary containment utilizing Oxylance high-temperature cutting equipment and techniques. Presented are relevant data concerning: - Radiological profiles of the RPVH and individual CEDMs; - Design overviews of the engineering controls and the specialized confinement housings; - Utilization of specialized shielding; - Observations of apparent metallurgical-contamination coalescence phenomena at high temperatures resulting in positive control over loose-surface contamination conditions; - General results of radiological and industrial hygiene air sampling and monitoring; - Collective dose and personnel contamination event statistics; - Lessons learned. (author)

  6. Postcollapse Volcanism in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico: Magma System Dynamics During a Transition Between Large Volume Explosive and Small Volume Effusive Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spell, T. L.; Gibler, K. I.

    2007-12-01

    The Valles Caldera formed during eruption of the ~250 km3 upper Bandelier Tuff at 1.26 Ma. Following caldera collapse a series of 3 intracaldera rhyolites (Deer Canyon, Redondo Creek and Del Medio) erupted within 54 ka. They are petrographically diverse, ranging from coarsely porphyritic (Deer Canyon type B, Redondo Creek) to nearly aphyric (Deer Canyon type A, Del Medio) and contain distinctive phenocryst assemblages. Disequilibrium textures are common and include resorbed quartz, strongly resorbed plagioclase, antirapikivi feldspars, and zoned sanidine and plagioclase. Plagioclase in Deer Canyon rhyolite ranges widely from labradorite (An60) to oligoclase (An24). Most are andesine in composition and often exhibit oscillatory zonation with overgrowths up to ~200 um wide. Alkali feldspars include both anorthoclase and sanidine with a total variability in Or content of ~50%. Plagioclase and alkali feldspars in Redondo Creek rhyolite show less variability, but similarly large ranges. One phenocryst exhibits an andesine core, oligoclase overgrowth, and sanidine rim. Del Medio rhyolite lacks plagioclase, but contains alkali feldspars (both anorthoclase and sanidine) with variability in Or content of ~30%. Patchy zonation is common, with Or content within phenocrysts varying by ~7%. Redondo Creek rhyolite ranges from ~72-74 wt.% SiO2 whereas Deer Canyon and Del Medio are high silica rhyolites with ~76-78 wt.% SiO2. Trace elements show more significant variability. Redondo Creek samples have low Nb, Rb, Sc, and Lu and high La, Sr, Ba and Hf compared to Del Medio samples. In contrast, Deer Canyon samples exhibit extreme variability in trace element concentrations (e.g., Nb ranging from 32-83 ppm). Incompatible trace element ratios (Th/Nb, Th/Yb, Ta/Yb) versus Nb plots show that Redondo Creek and Del Medio samples have distinctive, limited compositions, whereas Deer Canyon exhibits widely varying values (e.g., Th/Yb ranging from ~3.5-10.5). 238U/206Pb ion microprobe dating

  7. MIDAS prototype Multispectral Interactive Digital Analysis System for large area earth resources surveys. Volume 2: Charge coupled device investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriegler, F.; Marshall, R.; Sternberg, S.

    1976-01-01

    MIDAS is a third-generation, fast, low cost, multispectral recognition system able to keep pace with the large quantity and high rates of data acquisition from large regions with present and projected sensors. MIDAS, for example, can process a complete ERTS frame in forty seconds and provide a color map of sixteen constituent categories in a few minutes. A principal objective of the MIDAS Program is to provide a system well interfaced with the human operator and thus to obtain large overall reductions in turn-around time and significant gains in throughput. The need for advanced onboard spacecraft processing of remotely sensed data is stated and approaches to this problem are described which are feasible through the use of charge coupled devices. Tentative mechanizations for the required processing operations are given in large block form. These initial designs can serve as a guide to circuit/system designers.

  8. Large-volume, low-δ18O rhyolites of the central Snake River Plain, Idaho, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boroughs, Scott; Wolff, John; Bonnichsen, Bill; Godchaux, Martha; Larson, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The Miocene Bruneau-Jarbidge and adjacent volcanic fields of the central Snake River Plain, southwest Idaho, are dominated by high-temperature rhyolitic tuffs and lavas having an aggregate volume estimated as 7000 km3. Samples from units representing at least 50% of this volume are strongly depleted in 18O, with magmatic feldspar δ18OVSMOW (Vienna standard mean ocean water) values between −1.4‰ and 3.8‰. The magnitude of the 18O depletion and the complete lack of any rhyolites with normal values (7‰–10‰) combine to suggest that assimilation or melting of a caldera block altered by near- contemporaneous hydrothermal activity is unlikely. Instead, we envisage generation of the high-temperature rhyolites by shallow melting of Idaho Batholith rocks, under the influence of the Yellowstone hotspot, affected by Eocene meteoric-hydrothermal events. The seeming worldwide scarcity of strongly 18O-depleted rhyolites may simply reflect a similar scarcity of suitable crustal protoliths.

  9. Rapid determination of technetium-99 in large volume seawater samples using sequential injection extraction chromatographic separation and ICP-MS measurement.

    PubMed

    Shi, Keliang; Qiao, Jixin; Wu, Wangsuo; Roos, Per; Hou, Xiaolin

    2012-08-01

    An automated method was developed for rapid determination of (99)Tc in large volume seawater samples. The analytical procedure involves preconcentration of technetium with coprecipitation, online separation using extraction chromatography (two TEVA columns) implemented in a sequential injection setup, and measurement of (99)Tc by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Chromatographic behaviors of technetium, molybdenum, and ruthenium were investigated, and the mechanism of adsorption and elution of TcO(4)(-) on a TEVA column using HNO(3) was explored. The results show that not only NO(3)(-) but also acidity (or concentration of H(+)) of the loading or eluting solution affect the adsorption and desorption of TcO(4)(-) on TEVA resin. Decontamination factors of more than 1 × 10(6) for ruthenium and 5 × 10(5) for molybdenum are achieved. Chemical yields of technetium in the overall procedure range from 60% to 75% depending on the sample volumes, and a detection limit of 7.5 mBq/m(3) (or 11.5 pg/m(3)) for 200 L of seawater was obtained. Compared with the conventional analytical procedure, the developed method significantly reduces analytical time. A batch of samples (n > 4) can be analyzed within 24 h. The method has been successfully applied for rapid and automated determination of low level (99)Tc in large volume seawater samples. The analytical results of seawater samples collected in Denmark show a good agreement with the values obtained using the conventional method. PMID:22783983

  10. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures. Volume 3, part B: The modelling, dynamics, and stability of large Earth pointing orbiting structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Kumar, V. K.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics and stability of large orbiting flexible beams, and platforms and dish type structures oriented along the local horizontal are treated both analytically and numerically. It is assumed that such structures could be gravitationally stabilized by attaching a rigid light-weight dumbbell at the center of mass by a spring loaded hinge which also could provide viscous damping. For the beam, the small amplitude inplane pitch motion, dumbbell librational motion, and the anti-symmetric elastic modes are all coupled. The three dimensional equations of motion for a circular flat plate and shallow spherical shell in orbit with a two-degree-of freedom gimballed dumbbell are also developed and show that only those elastic modes described by a single nodal diameter line are influenced by the dumbbell motion. Stability criteria are developed for all the examples and a sensitivity study of the system response characteristics to the key system parameters is carried out.

  11. Large-Volume Reconstruction of Brain Tissue from High-Resolution Serial Section Images Acquired by SEM-Based Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuwajima, Masaaki; Mendenhall, John M.; Harris, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    With recent improvements in instrumentation and computational tools, serial section electron microscopy has become increasingly straightforward. A new method for imaging ultrathin serial sections is developed based on a field emission scanning electron microscope fitted with a transmitted electron detector. This method is capable of automatically acquiring high-resolution serial images with a large field size and very little optical and physical distortions. In this chapter, we describe the procedures leading to the generation and analyses of a large-volume stack of high-resolution images (64 μm × 64 μm × 10 μm, or larger, at 2 nm pixel size), including how to obtain large-area serial sections of uniform thickness from well-preserved brain tissue that is rapidly perfusion-fixed with mixed aldehydes, processed with a microwave-enhanced method, and embedded into epoxy resin. PMID:23086880

  12. A filtration and column-adsorption system for onsite concentration and fractionation of organic substances from large volumes of water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Noyes, T.I.

    1984-01-01

    A portable filtration and column-adsorption system which can concentrate suspended sediment and dissolved-aqueous organic substances onsite was developed. Organic solutes also are fractionated into hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-acid, base, and neutral fractions. Subsequent isolation of organic solutes from fraction concentrates and extraction of organic constituents in suspended sediment entrained on filter tubes is performed by a variety of procedures in the laboratory. Three surface-water samples and one ground-water sample ranging in volume from 300 to 1,100 liters were processed through the filtration and column-adsorption system, yielding from about 0.8 to 3.0 grams of recovered organic carbon per sample.

  13. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Volume 2: Technology assessment and technology development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Jones, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to define reasonable and representative LDR system concepts for the purpose of defining a technology development program aimed at providing the requisite technological capability necessary to start LDR development by the end of 1991. This volume presents thirteen technology assessments and technology development plans, as well as an overview and summary of the LDR concepts. Twenty-two proposed augmentation projects are described (selected from more than 30 candidates). The five LDR technology areas most in need of supplementary support are: cryogenic cooling; astronaut assembly of the optically precise LDR in space; active segmented primary mirror; dynamic structural control; and primary mirror contamination control. Three broad, time-phased, five-year programs were synthesized from the 22 projects, scheduled, and funding requirements estimated.

  14. A large volume reduction and calcining profile for large-area YBa2Cu3O7-x film by metalorganic deposition using trifluoroacetates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Takeshi; Hirabayashi, Izumi; Niwa, Toshiharu

    2004-01-01

    We have routinely obtained high critical current density (Jc) YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) film by metalorganic deposition using trifluoroacetates (TFA-MOD). This method requires a relatively long calcining process of 9-17 h to obtain the optimal Jc for 0.15 nm thick film. To apply this method to long wires and tapes, we need to know the thickness dependence of the calcining condition. We found that the optimal time of about 10 h was independent of the final thickness of 150, 180 or 240 nm. Furthermore, the results imply that the chemical reaction during the calcining process was decomposition and that a large-area film could be calcined with the same profile as used for a short one. We successfully calcined seven YBCO films using this profile on 10 × 10 mm LaAlO3 single crystals in a line. All fired films were 156-188 nm thick and had Jc of 5.53-6.73 MA cm-2 (77 K, 0 T) as measured by the four-probe method.

  15. Dosimetric Coverage of the Prostate, Normal Tissue Sparing, and Acute Toxicity with High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Large Prostate Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, George; Strom, Tobin J.; Wilder, Richard B.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Mellon, Eric A.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Biagioli, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes. Materials and Methods One hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL) were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38%) unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4. Results Median follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3%) patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17%) patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p=0.04). There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity. Conclusions Dosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes. PMID:26200536

  16. SemiSPECT: A small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R.; Crawford, Michael J.; Wilson, Donald W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Peterson, Todd E.; Hunter, William C.J.; Liu Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2006-02-15

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cmx2.7 cmx{approx}0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64x64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of -180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using {sup 99m}Tc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3x3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5x10{sup -4} with the energy window of {+-}10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT.

  17. SemiSPECT: a small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R; Crawford, Michael J; Wilson, Donald W; Barber, H Bradford; Peterson, Todd E; Hunter, William C J; Liu, Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M; Barrett, Harrison H

    2006-02-01

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cm x 2.7 cm x -0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64 x 64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of -180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using 99mTc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 x 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5 x 10(-4) with the energy window of +/-10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT. PMID:16532954

  18. SemiSPECT: A small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R.; Crawford, Michael J.; Wilson, Donald W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Peterson, Todd E.; Hunter, William C. J.; Liu, Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2008-01-01

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cm × 2.7 cm × ~ 0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64 × 64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of −180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using 99mTc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 × 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5 × 10−4 with the energy window of ±10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT. PMID:16532954

  19. Performance evaluation of high-resolution square parallel-hole collimators with a CZT room temperature pixelated semiconductor SPECT system: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Kang, W.

    2015-07-01

    The pixelated semiconductor based on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is a promising imaging device that provides many benefits compared with conventional scintillation detectors. By using a high-resolution square parallel-hole collimator with a pixelated semiconductor detector, we were able to improve both sensitivity and spatial resolution. Here, we present a simulation of a CZT pixleated semiconductor single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system with a high-resolution square parallel-hole collimator using various geometric designs of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm X-axis hole size. We performed a simulation study of the eValuator-2500 (eV Microelectronics Inc., Saxonburg, PA, U.S.A.) CZT pixelated semiconductor detector using a Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE). To evaluate the performances of these systems, the sensitivity and spatial resolution was evaluated. Moreover, to evaluate the overall performance of the imaging system, a hot-rod phantom was designed. Our results showed that the average sensitivity of the 2.0 mm collimator X-axis hole size was 1.34, 1.95, and 3.92 times higher than that of the 1.5, 1.0, and 0.5 mm collimator X-axis hole size, respectively. Also, the average spatial resolution of the 0.5 mm collimator X-axis hole size was 28.69, 44.65, and 55.73% better than that of the 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm collimator X-axis hole size, respectively. We discuss the high-resolution square parallel-hole collimator of various collimator geometric designs and our evaluations. In conclusion, we have successfully designed a high-resolution square parallel-hole collimator with a CZT pixelated semiconductor SPECT system.

  20. Note: Measurement method for sound velocity of melts in large volume press and its application to liquid sodium up to 2.0 GPa.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Liu, Yonggang; Wang, Zhigang; Gong, Chaoying; Guo, Jie; Zhou, Wenge; Xie, Hongsen

    2011-08-01

    Based on large volume press and conventional pulse-echo ultrasonic technique, we have overcome the difficulty in determining the length of liquid specimen under high pressure, and the sound velocity in liquid Na has been measured up to 2 GPa. The P-V data deduced by our sound velocity results through equation of state is in an excellent agreement with previous data directly determined by piezometer method. This new experimental technique is convenient and ready for use, being expected to advance investigation on thermodynamic properties of liquid metals and other melts under high pressure. PMID:21895286

  1. Influence of interface sink strength on the reduction of radiation-induced defect concentrations and fluxes in materials with large interface area per unit volume

    SciTech Connect

    Demkowicz, M. J.; Hoagland, R. G.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Misra, A.

    2011-09-01

    We use a reaction-diffusion model to demonstrate that buried interfaces in polycrystalline composites simultaneously reduce both the concentrations and the fluxes of radiation-induced defects. The steady-state radiation-induced defect concentrations, however, are highly sensitive to the interface sink strength {eta}. Materials containing a large volume fraction of interfaces may therefore be resistant to multiple forms of radiation-induced degradation, such as swelling and hardening, as well as to embrittlement by solute segregation, provided that the interfaces have suitable {eta} values.

  2. BROAD SPECTRUM ANALYSIS FOR TRACE ORGANIC POLLUTANTS IN LARGE VOLUMES OF WATER BY XAD RESINS-COLUMN DESIGN-FACTS AND MYTHS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibs, J.; Wicklund, A.; Suffet, I.H.

    1986-01-01

    The 'rule of thumb' that large volumes of water can be sampled for trace organic pollutants by XAD resin columns which are designed by small column laboratory studies or pure compounds is examined and shown to be a problem. A theory of multicomponent breakthrough is presented as a frame of reference to help solve the problem and develop useable criteria to aid the design of resin columns. An important part of the theory is the effect of humic substances on the breakthrough character of multicomponent chemical systems.

  3. Slow Radio-Frequency Processing of Large Oil Shale Volumes to Produce Petroleum-Like Shale Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A K

    2003-08-20

    A process is proposed to convert oil shale by radio frequency heating over a period of months to years to create a product similar to natural petroleum. Electrodes would be placed in drill holes, either vertical or horizontal, and a radio frequency chosen so that the penetration depth of the radio waves is of the order of tens to hundreds of meters. A combination of excess volume production and overburden compaction drives the oil and gas from the shale into the drill holes, where it is pumped to the surface. Electrical energy for the process could be provided initially by excess regional capacity, especially off-peak power, which would generate {approx}3 x 10{sup 5} bbl/day of synthetic crude oil, depending on shale grade. The electricity cost, using conservative efficiency assumptions, is $4.70 to $6.30/bbl, depending on grade and heating rate. At steady state, co-produced gas can generate more than half the electric power needed for the process, with the fraction depending on oil shale grade. This would increase production to 7.3 x 10{sup 5} bbl/day for 104 l/Mg shale and 1.6 x 10{sup 6} bbl/day for 146 l/Mg shale using a combination of off-peak power and power from co-produced gas.

  4. Initial evaluation of a modified dual-energy window scatter correction method for CZT-based gamma cameras for breast SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Steve D.; Tornai, Martin P.

    2015-03-01

    Solid state Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) gamma cameras for SPECT imaging offer significantly improved energy resolution compared to traditional scintillation detectors. However, the photopeak resolution is often asymmetric due to incomplete charge collection within the detector, resulting in many photopeak events incorrectly sorted into lower energy bins ("tailing"). These misplaced events contaminate the true scatter signal, which may negatively impact scatter correction methods that rely on estimates of scatter from the spectra. Additionally, because CZT detectors are organized into arrays, each individual detector element may exhibit different degrees of tailing. Here, we present a modified dualenergy window scatter correction method for emission detection and imaging that attempts to account for positiondependent effects of incomplete charge collection in the CZT gamma camera of our dedicated breast SPECT-CT system. Point source measurements and geometric phantoms were used to estimate the impact of tailing on the scatter signal and extract a better estimate of the ratio of scatter within two energy windows. To evaluate the method, cylindrical phantoms with and without a separate fillable chamber were scanned to determine the impact on quantification in hot, cold, and uniform background regions. Projections were reconstructed using OSEM, and the results for the traditional and modified scatter correction methods were compared. Results show that while modest reduced quantification accuracy was observed in hot and cold regions of the multi-chamber phantoms, the modified scatter correction method yields up to 8% improved quantification accuracy with 4% less added noise than the traditional DEW method within uniform background regions.

  5. MIDAS, prototype Multivariate Interactive Digital Analysis System for large area earth resources surveys. Volume 1: System description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christenson, D.; Gordon, M.; Kistler, R.; Kriegler, F.; Lampert, S.; Marshall, R.; Mclaughlin, R.

    1977-01-01

    A third-generation, fast, low cost, multispectral recognition system (MIDAS) able to keep pace with the large quantity and high rates of data acquisition from large regions with present and projected sensots is described. The program can process a complete ERTS frame in forty seconds and provide a color map of sixteen constituent categories in a few minutes. A principle objective of the MIDAS program is to provide a system well interfaced with the human operator and thus to obtain large overall reductions in turn-around time and significant gains in throughput. The hardware and software generated in the overall program is described. The system contains a midi-computer to control the various high speed processing elements in the data path, a preprocessor to condition data, and a classifier which implements an all digital prototype multivariate Gaussian maximum likelihood or a Bayesian decision algorithm. Sufficient software was developed to perform signature extraction, control the preprocessor, compute classifier coefficients, control the classifier operation, operate the color display and printer, and diagnose operation.

  6. Sensitive and Rapid Detection of Viable Giardia Cysts and Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Large-Volume Water Samples with Wound Fiberglass Cartridge Filters and Reverse Transcription-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kaucner, Christine; Stinear, Timothy

    1998-01-01

    We recently described a reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for detecting low numbers of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts spiked into clarified environmental water concentrates. We have now modified the assay for direct analysis of primary sample concentrates with simultaneous detection of viable C. parvum oocysts, Giardia cysts, and a novel type of internal positive control (IPC). The IPC was designed to assess both efficiency of mRNA isolation and potential RT-PCR inhibition. Sensitivity testing showed that low numbers of organisms, in the range of a single viable cyst and oocyst, could be detected when spiked into 100-μl packed pellet volumes of concentrates from creek and river water samples. The RT-PCR was compared with an immunofluorescence (IF) assay by analyzing 29 nonspiked environmental water samples. Sample volumes of 20 to 1,500 liters were concentrated with a wound fiberglass cartridge filter. Frequency of detection for viable Giardia cysts increased from 24% by IF microscopy to 69% by RT-PCR. Viable C. parvum oocysts were detected only once by RT-PCR (3%) in contrast to detection of viable Cryptosporidium spp. in four samples by IF microscopy (14%), suggesting that Cryptosporidium species other than C. parvum were present in the water. This combination of the large-volume sampling method with RT-PCR represents a significant advance in terms of protozoan pathogen monitoring and in the wider application of PCR technology to this field of microbiology. PMID:9572946

  7. Automated transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM) for large volume analysis at nanoscale resolution.

    PubMed

    Kuwajima, Masaaki; Mendenhall, John M; Lindsey, Laurence F; Harris, Kristen M

    2013-01-01

    Transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM) on a field emission SEM platform was developed for efficient and cost-effective imaging of circuit-scale volumes from brain at nanoscale resolution. Image area was maximized while optimizing the resolution and dynamic range necessary for discriminating key subcellular structures, such as small axonal, dendritic and glial processes, synapses, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, vesicles, microtubules, polyribosomes, and endosomes which are critical for neuronal function. Individual image fields from the tSEM system were up to 4,295 µm(2) (65.54 µm per side) at 2 nm pixel size, contrasting with image fields from a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) system, which were only 66.59 µm(2) (8.160 µm per side) at the same pixel size. The tSEM produced outstanding images and had reduced distortion and drift relative to TEM. Automated stage and scan control in tSEM easily provided unattended serial section imaging and montaging. Lens and scan properties on both TEM and SEM platforms revealed no significant nonlinear distortions within a central field of ∼100 µm(2) and produced near-perfect image registration across serial sections using the computational elastic alignment tool in Fiji/TrakEM2 software, and reliable geometric measurements from RECONSTRUCT™ or Fiji/TrakEM2 software. Axial resolution limits the analysis of small structures contained within a section (∼45 nm). Since this new tSEM is non-destructive, objects within a section can be explored at finer axial resolution in TEM tomography with current methods. Future development of tSEM tomography promises thinner axial resolution producing nearly isotropic voxels and should provide within-section analyses of structures without changing platforms. Brain was the test system given our interest in synaptic connectivity and plasticity; however, the new tSEM system is readily applicable to other biological systems. PMID:23555711

  8. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium annual report, 1987. Volume 9. Computer architectures for very large knowledge bases. Interim report, December 1986-December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Berra, P.B.

    1989-03-01

    The Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium (NAIC) purpose is to conduct pertinent research in artificial intelligence and to perform activities ancillary to this research. This report describes progress that has been made. The topics covered in general are: versatile expert system for equipment maintenance, distributed AI for communications system control, automatic photo interpretation, time-oriented problem solving, speech-understanding systems, knowledge base maintenance, hardware architectures for very large systems, knowledge-based reasoning and planning, and a knowledge acquisition, assistance, and explanation system. The specific topic for this volume is the development of architectures for very large knowledge bases, especially in light of real time requests, parallelism, and the advent of optical computing.

  9. Ultrafast, sensitive and large-volume on-chip real-time PCR for the molecular diagnosis of bacterial and viral infections.

    PubMed

    Houssin, Timothée; Cramer, Jérémy; Grojsman, Rébecca; Bellahsene, Lyes; Colas, Guillaume; Moulet, Hélène; Minnella, Walter; Pannetier, Christophe; Leberre, Maël; Plecis, Adrien; Chen, Yong

    2016-04-21

    To control future infectious disease outbreaks, like the 2014 Ebola epidemic, it is necessary to develop ultrafast molecular assays enabling rapid and sensitive diagnoses. To that end, several ultrafast real-time PCR systems have been previously developed, but they present issues that hinder their wide adoption, notably regarding their sensitivity and detection volume. An ultrafast, sensitive and large-volume real-time PCR system based on microfluidic thermalization is presented herein. The method is based on the circulation of pre-heated liquids in a microfluidic chip that thermalize the PCR chamber by diffusion and ultrafast flow switches. The system can achieve up to 30 real-time PCR cycles in around 2 minutes, which makes it the fastest PCR thermalization system for regular sample volume to the best of our knowledge. After biochemical optimization, anthrax and Ebola simulating agents could be respectively detected by a real-time PCR in 7 minutes and a reverse transcription real-time PCR in 7.5 minutes. These detections are respectively 6.4 and 7.2 times faster than with an off-the-shelf apparatus, while conserving real-time PCR sample volume, efficiency, selectivity and sensitivity. The high-speed thermalization also enabled us to perform sharp melting curve analyses in only 20 s and to discriminate amplicons of different lengths by rapid real-time PCR. This real-time PCR microfluidic thermalization system is cost-effective, versatile and can be then further developed for point-of-care, multiplexed, ultrafast and highly sensitive molecular diagnoses of bacterial and viral diseases. PMID:26952334

  10. Ring-opening metathesis polymerization-derived large-volume monolithic supports for reversed-phase and anion-exchange chromatography of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Bandari, Rajendar; Buchmeiser, Michael R

    2012-07-21

    Preparative-scale monolithic columns up to 433.5 mL in volume were prepared via transition metal-catalyzed ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) from norborn-2-ene (NBE) and trimethylolpropane-tris(5-norbornene-2-carboxylate) (CL) using the 1(st)-generation Grubbs initiator RuCl(2)(PCy(3))(2)(CHPh) (Cy = cyclohexyl) (1) in the presence of a macro- and microporogen, i.e. of 2-propanol and toluene. To prepare large-volume monoliths, bulk polymerizations were completed within borosilicate or PEEK column formats with diameters in the range of 3 to 49 mm. The pore structure of the large-volume monoliths was investigated by electron microscopy and inverse-size exclusion chromatography (ISEC), respectively. Monolithic columns with inner diameters (I.D.s) in the range of 10-49 mm were tested for the separation of a mixture of five proteins, i.e., insulin, cytochrome C, lysozyme, conalbumin, and β-lactoglobulin. Preparative separation of these proteins was achieved within less than 12 min in a 433.5 mL monolithic column by applying gradient elution in the RP-HPLC mode. Furthermore, weak and strong anion exchangers were prepared via post-synthesis grafting of bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-en-2-yl-methyl-N,N-dimethylammonium hydrochloride (4) and bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-en-2-ylmethyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium iodide (5), respectively. The weak and strong anion exchangers were used for the preparative-scale separation of 5'-phosphorylated oligodeoxythymidylic acid fragments of d[pT](12-18) at pH values ranging from 5 to 9. PMID:22673214

  11. Optimisation of programmable temperature vaporizer-based large volume injection for determination of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stajnbaher, Darinka; Zupancic-Kralj, Lucija

    2008-05-01

    The applicability of programmable temperature vaporizer (PTV) solvent vent injection to the gas chromatographic (GC) determination of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables was evaluated with the aim of miniaturizing the current multiresidue method. For that purpose 24 pesticides representing different chemical classes were initially chosen for optimisation of the large volume injection (LVI) parameters. Various parameters related to the optimum injector performance were tested for several types of packed and empty liners using both fast (at-once) and speed-controlled PTV solvent vent injection of standard solutions in ethyl acetate. In the next step, several packed and empty liners were evaluated for their suitability for pesticide multiresidue analysis. Parameters identified as optimal were then applied for PTV solvent vent injection of sample extracts prepared using the miniaturized multiresidue method to assess the long-term stability of the system. The combined use of large volume injection of 10 microl ethyl acetate extract into an empty multi-baffled or a CarboFrit packed liner using PTV injectors and GC-MS analysis enabled the detection and quantification of 124 pesticides in fruit and vegetable samples at the 0.01 mg/kg level using miniaturized reversed-phase solid-phase extraction (RP-SPE) of diluted acetone extract and clean-up on a small anion-exchange SPE column. PMID:18367194

  12. Performance evaluation of a small CZT pixelated semiconductor gamma camera system with a newly designed stack-up parallel-hole collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngjin; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-09-01

    Gamma ray imaging techniques that use a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) or cadmium telluride (CdTe) pixelated semiconductor detectors have rapidly gained popularity as a key tool for nuclear medicine research. By using a pinhole collimator with a pixelated semiconductor gamma camera system, better spatial resolution can be achieved. However, this improvement in spatial resolution is accomplished with a decrease in the sensitivity due to the small collimator hole diameter. Furthermore, few studies have been conducted for novel parallel-hole collimator geometric designs with pixelated semiconductor gamma camera systems. A gamma camera system which combines a CZT pixelated semiconductor detector with a newly designed stack-up parallel-hole collimator was developed and evaluated. The eValuator-2500 CZT pixelated semiconductor detector (eV product, Saxonburg, PA) was selected for the gamma camera system. This detector consisted of a row of four CZT crystals of 12.8 mm in length with 3 mm in thickness. The proposed parallel-hole collimator consists of two layers. The upper layer results in a fourfold increase in hole size compared to a matched square hole parallel-hole collimator with an equal hole and pixel size, while the lower layer also consisted of fourfold holes size and pretty acts as a matched square hole parallel-hole collimator. The overlap ratios of these collimators were 1:1, 1:2, 2:1, 1:5, and 5:1. These collimators were mounted on the eValuator-2500 CZT pixelated semiconductor detector. The basic performance of the imaging system was measured for a 57Co gamma source (122 keV). The measured averages of sensitivity and spatial resolution varied depending on the overlap ratios of the proposed parallel-hole collimator and source-to-collimator distances. One advantage of our system is the use of stacked collimators that can select the best combination of system sensitivity and spatial resolution. With low counts, we can select a high sensitivity collimator with a 1

  13. Note: Double-beveled multilayer stagger-split die for a large volume high-pressure apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bolong; Li, Mingzhe; Yang, Yunfei; Liu, Zhiwei

    2015-08-01

    A high-pressure device with a large cavity was investigated using finite-element analysis. This device is called a double-beveled multilayer stagger-split die, and consists of two supported rings and a multilayer divided body assemblage. Each divided cylinder body has two bevels in the pressurized surface. We simulated the pressure capacity of this device according to different failure criteria. The results were compared with those of a multilayer stagger-split die and belt type die. The bearing capacity of the double-beveled multilayer stagger-split die was more than 7.3 GPa. A group of comparative experiments were conducted to validate the simulated results, and the experimental results show the actual pressure capacity was higher than the simulation.

  14. Determination of nifuroxazide in biological fluids by automated high-performance liquid chromatography with large-volume injection.

    PubMed

    Guinebault, P R; Broquaire, M; Braithwaite, R A

    1981-01-16

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the measurement of nifuroxazide in plasma is described. The technique is based on the single extraction of the drug from buffered plasma with chloroform, using nifuratel as internal standard. The chromatographic system consisted of a 15 cm x 4.6 mm I.D. stainless-steel column packed with Spherisorb ODS, 5 micrometer, and the mobile phase was acetonitrile-orthophosphoric acid (pH 2.5) (30:70). The method was able to measure accurately plasma nifuroxazide concentrations down to 2 ng . ml-1 using 2 ml of sample with no interference from endogenous compounds. The coefficients of variation of the method at 200 and 2 ng . ml-1 were 3% and 15%, respectively, and the calibration graph was linear in this range. The use of automatic injection makes the method suitable for the routine analysis of large numbers of samples. PMID:7217261

  15. Monitoring a large volume CO2 injection: Year two results from SECARB project at Denbury's Cranfield, Mississippi, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hovorka, S.D.; Meckel, T.A.; Trevino, R.H.; Lu, J.; Nicot, J.-P.; Choi, J.-W.; Freeman, D.; Cook, P.; Daley, T.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J. B.; Freifeild, B.M.; Doughty, C.; Carrigan, C.R.; La-Brecque, D.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Thordsen, J.J.; Phelps, T.J.; Yang, C.; Romanak, K.D.; Zhang, T.; Holt, R.M.; Lindler, J.S.; Butsch, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) early project in western Mississippi has been testing monitoring tools and approaches to document storage efficiency and storage permanence under conditions of CO2 EOR as well as downdip injection into brine. Denbury Onshore LLC is host for the study and has brought a depleted oil and gas reservoir, Cranfield Field, under CO2 flood. Injection was started in July 2008 and has now achieved injection rates greater than 1.2 million tons/year though 23 wells, with cumulative mass injected as of August, 2010 of 2.2 million metric tons. Injection is into coarse grained fluvial deposits of the Cretaceous lower Tuscaloosa Formation in a gentle anticline at depths of 3300 m. A team of researchers from 10 institutions has collected data from five study areas, each with a different goal and different spatial and temporal scale. The Phase 2 study began at the start of injection and has been using pressure and temperature as a tool for assessing permanence mostly in the oil productive interval. Real-time read-out shows high sensitivity to distant changes in injection rate and confirms the geologic model of reservoir compartmentalization. Above-zone pressure monitoring ???120 m above the injection interval is used to test the sensitivity of this approach for documentation of integrity of the confining system in an area of numerous well completions as pressure increase is induced in the reservoir by more than 70 bar. Monitoring of the High Volume Injection Test (HiVIT) area includes repeat measurements of aqueous geochemistry in the injection zone. Rock-water-CO 2 interactions in the reservoir as CO2 dissolves are minimized by mineral "armoring" by abundant chlorite cement in high permeability reservoir sandstone. Geochemical monitoring of confined freshwater aquifers at depths of 70-100 m is underway. Groundwater analysis focuses on assessment of the sensitivity of this method to detect leakage above background

  16. JUICE: a data management system that facilitates the analysis of large volumes of information in an EST project workflow

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Mariano; Silva, Herman; Saba, Juan; Guziolowski, Carito; Vizoso, Paula; Martinez, Veronica; Maldonado, Jonathan; Morales, Andrea; Caroca, Rodrigo; Cambiazo, Veronica; Campos-Vargas, Reinaldo; Gonzalez, Mauricio; Orellana, Ariel; Retamales, Julio; Meisel, Lee A

    2006-01-01

    Background Expressed sequence tag (EST) analyses provide a rapid and economical means to identify candidate genes that may be involved in a particular biological process. These ESTs are useful in many Functional Genomics studies. However, the large quantity and complexity of the data generated during an EST sequencing project can make the analysis of this information a daunting task. Results In an attempt to make this task friendlier, we have developed JUICE, an open source data management system (Apache + PHP + MySQL on Linux), which enables the user to easily upload, organize, visualize and search the different types of data generated in an EST project pipeline. In contrast to other systems, the JUICE data management system allows a branched pipeline to be established, modified and expanded, during the course of an EST project. The web interfaces and tools in JUICE enable the users to visualize the information in a graphical, user-friendly manner. The user may browse or search for sequences and/or sequence information within all the branches of the pipeline. The user can search using terms associated with the sequence name, annotation or other characteristics stored in JUICE and associated with sequences or sequence groups. Groups of sequences can be created by the user, stored in a clipboard and/or downloaded for further analyses. Different user profiles restrict the access of each user depending upon their role in the project. The user may have access exclusively to visualize sequence information, access to annotate sequences and sequence information, or administrative access. Conclusion JUICE is an open source data management system that has been developed to aid users in organizing and analyzing the large amount of data generated in an EST Project workflow. JUICE has been used in one of the first functional genomics projects in Chile, entitled "Functional Genomics in nectarines: Platform to potentiate the competitiveness of Chile in fruit exportation

  17. Growth and stability of stress corrosion cracks in large-diameter BWR piping. Volume 1: summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, D A; Heald, J D; Horn, R M; Jewett, C W; Kass, J N; Mehta, H S; Ranganath, S; Sharma, S R

    1982-07-01

    This report presents the results of a research program conducted to evaluate the behavior of hypothetical stress corrosion cracks in large diameter austenitic piping. The program included major tasks, a design margin assessment, an evaluation of crack growth and crack arrest, and development of a predictive model. As part of the margin assessment, the program developed diagrams which predicted net section collapse as a function of crack size. In addition, plasticity and dynamic load effects were also considered in evaluating collapse. Analytical methods for evaluating these effects were developed and were benchmarked by dynamic tests of 4-in.-diameter piping. The task of evaluating the growth behavior of stress corrosion cracks focused on developing constant load and cyclic growth rate data that could be used with the predictive model. Secondly, laboratory tests were performed to evaluate the conditions under which growing stress corrosion cracks would arrest when they intersected stress corrosion resistant weld metal. The third task successfully developed a model to predict the behavior of cracks in austenitic piping. This model relies on crack growth data and the critical crack size predicted by the net section collapse approach.

  18. Growth and stability of stress corrosion cracks in large-diameter BWR piping. Volume 2: appendixes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, D A; Heald, J D; Horn, R M; Jewett, C W; Kass, J N; Mehta, H S; Ranganath, S; Sharma, S R

    1982-07-01

    This report presents the results of a research program conducted to evaluate the behavior of hypothetical stress corrosion cracks in large diameter austenitic piping. The program included major tasks, a design margin assessment, an evaluation of crack growth and crack arrest, and development of a predictive model. As part of the margin assessment, the program developed diagrams which predicted net section collapse as a function of crack size. In addition, plasticity and dynamic load effects were also considered in evaluating collapse. Analytical methods for evaluating these effects were developed and were benchmarked by dynamic tests of 4-in.-diameter piping. The task of evaluating the growth behavior of stress corrosion cracks focused on developing constant load and cyclic growth rate data that could be used with the predictive model. Secondly, laboratory tests were performed to evaluate the conditions under which growing stress corrosion cracks would arrest when they intersected stress corrosion resistant weld metal. The third task successfully developed a model to predict the behavior of cracks in austenitic piping.

  19. The large-volume high-pressure facility at GSECARS: A 'Swiss-army-knife' approach to synchrotron-based experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanbin; Rivers, Mark; Sutton, Steve; Nishiyama, Norimasa; Uchida, Takeyuki; Sanehira, Takeshi

    2009-06-01

    A number of new techniques have been developed at the large-volume press (LVP) high-pressure facility at the GeoSoilEnviroCARS (GSECARS) sector of the advanced photon source (APS). This article describes the 10 MN (1000 T) and 2.5 MN (250 T) hydraulic presses in the insertion device (ID) and bending magnet (BM) beamlines, respectively, with several apparatus and various diffraction and imaging techniques developed since the inception of the facility. Several Kawai-type high-pressure modules, whose second-stage anvils range from 10 mm to 25.4 mm in edge lengths, are used in the hydraulic presses, with pressure (P) and temperature (T) capabilities up to 30 GPa and 3000 K. A DIA-type apparatus can be compressed in both presses for studies requiring large sample volumes. A deformation DIA (D-DIA) has been developed to allow controlled deformation studies on both crystalline and glass materials, using monochromatic diffraction and imaging, up to 20 GPa and 1800 K. A high-pressure tomography apparatus is available for conducting tomography studies at high P and T, with a typical spatial resolution of a few micrometers. Toroidal anvil modules provide large 2{theta} angles for studies of non-crystalline materials, and a new large D-DIA module is under construction for double-stage megabar pressure generation as well as deformation on large samples with the capability of acoustic emission detection. The flexible design of the monochromator at the BM beamline makes it feasible to switch between monochromatic and white-beam mode during an experiment, ideal for monochromatic imaging studies (e.g., high-P tomography) with energy-dispersive diffraction for pressure measurements. A new angle-dispersive diffraction technique has been developed for high P-T crystallography studies, where a solid-state detector is step-scanned, thereby collecting a large number of angle-dispersive spectra over a wide range of photon energies recorded in the multi-channel analyzer. An ultrasonic

  20. Tc99m/T1201 cross-talk corrections on a dedicated cardiac CZT SPECT camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiasson, Stephanie

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a standard method for evaluating heart disease. A new dedicated cardiac camera with CZT detectors offers improved energy resolution and sensitivity compared to standard SPECT systems. Simultaneous Tc99m/T1201 protocols are fast, but correction for cross-talk between isotopes is necessary to achieve good image quality. The Triple-Energy-Window (TEW) correction method is easy to implement and provides accurate scatter estimation in single-isotope studies. We retrospectively assessed the cross-talk correction using clinically acquired single-isotope studies: 52 T1201 studies and 52 Tc99m-tetrofosmin studies, matched by gender and BMI. Projection data from Tl-stress and Tc-rest studies were combined to create contaminated data before reconstruction. TEW corrections were evaluated in both primary energy windows. Modifications to the corrections were required. The modified approach results in residual cross-talk as low as 2% but high noise levels were present in the corrected images. Further modifications are needed to reduce noise.

  1. Characteristics of a multichannel low-noise front-end ASIC for CZT-based small animal PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, W.; Liu, H.; Gan, B.; Hu, Y.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present the design and characteristics of a novel low-noise front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit dedicated to CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for a small animal PET imaging system. A low-noise readout method based on the charge integration and the delayed peak detection is proposed. An eight-channel front-end readout prototype chip is designed and implemented in a 0.35 μm CMOS process. The die size is 2.3 mm ×2.3 mm. The prototype chip is tested in different methods including electronic test, energy spectrum test and irradiation test. The input range of the ASIC is from 2000e- to 180,000e-, reflecting the energy of the gamma ray from 11.2 keV to 1 MeV. The gain of the readout channel is 65 mV/fC at the shaping time of 1 μs. The best test result of the equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 58.9 e- at zero farad plus 5.4 e- per picofarad. The nonlinearity and the crosstalk are less than 3% and less than 2%, respectively, at the room temperature. The static power dissipation is about 3 mW/channel.

  2. Pre-column dilution large volume injection ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of multi-class pesticides in cabbages.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qisheng; Shen, Lingling; Liu, Jiaqi; Yu, Dianbao; Li, Siming; Yao, Jinting; Zhan, Song; Huang, Taohong; Hashi, Yuki; Kawano, Shin-ichi; Liu, Zhaofeng; Zhou, Ting

    2016-04-15

    Pre-column dilution large volume injection (PD-LVI), a novel sample injection technique for reverse phase ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS), was developed in this study. The PD-LVI UHPLC-MS/MS system was designed by slightly modifying the commercial UHPLC-MS/MS equipment with a mixer chamber. During the procedure of PD-LVI, sample solution of 200μL was directly carried by the organic mobile phase to the mixer and diluted with the aqueous mobile phase. After the mixture was introduced to the UHPLC column in a mobile phase of acetonitrile-water (15/85, v/v), the target analytes were stacked on the head of the column until following separation. Using QuEChERS extraction, no additional steps such as solvent evaporation or residue redissolution were needed before injection. The features of PD-LVI UHPLC-MS/MS system were systematically investigated, including the injection volume, the mixer volume, the precondition time and the gradient elution. The efficiency of this approach was demonstrated by direct analysis of 24 pesticides in cabbages. Under the optimized conditions, low limits of detection (0.00074-0.8 ng/kg) were obtained. The recoveries were in the range of 63.3-109% with relative standard deviations less than 8.1%. Compared with common UHPLC-MS/MS technique, PD-LVI UHPLC-MS/MS showed significant advantages such as excellent sensitivity and reliability. The mechanism of PD-LVI was demonstrated to be based on the column-head stacking effect with pre-column dilution. Based on the results, PD-LVI as a simple and effective sample injection technique of reverse phase UHPLC-MS/MS for the analysis of trace analytes in complex samples showed a great promising prospect. PMID:26979268

  3. Evaluation of Helium Purge & Vent Process to Reduce Hydrogen Concentrations in the Large Diameter Container & Cask Void Volumes at T Plant

    SciTech Connect

    PACKER, M.J.

    2002-10-15

    The purpose of this document is to provide calculations for two primary activities: (1) Model a Helium Purge/Vent Cycle Process to reduce hydrogen gas concentration (i.e., H{sub 2} mole fraction) to a required limit in the Cask and Large Diameter Container (LDC) void volumes prior to T-Plant Operations activities. (2) Predict a hydrogen generation rate within each sludge-contained LDC, after the T-Plant helium purge/vent process (aka Post Purge/Vent Cycle Duration) to determine the transient hydrogen concentration. The calculations will evaluate a helium purge process to reduce the hydrogen concentration in the void spaces of the LDC after receipt at T-Plant. During transport from K-Basins to T-Plant, the hydrogen concentration will increase but the low or absent oxygen concentration from the K-Basin helium purge/vent process will ensure a non-flammable event. Upon receipt at T-Plant, the increased hydrogen concentration will require a process reduction (i.e., helium purge/vent cycling) prior to removing the Cask lid, otherwise, the removed lid permits air ingress and associated oxygen with the assumed high hydrogen concentration. In addition, once the Cask lid is removed at T-Plant, and the LDC is moved to the process cell, two threaded caps must be removed from the LDC to allow the escape of hydrogen during long-term storage. It is essential that the T-Plant helium purge/vent system reduces the hydrogen in both the Cask and LDC void volumes below the required limit. The calculations will also aide in predicting actual hydrogen generation rates and concentrations in each of the void volumes after the helium purge/vent cycle process is completed. Transient hydrogen plots or figures will be provided to help achieve this objective.

  4. Large-scale three-dimensional phase-field simulations for phase coarsening at ultrahigh volume fraction on high-performance architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hui; Wang, K. G.; Jones, Jim E.

    2016-06-01

    A parallel algorithm for large-scale three-dimensional phase-field simulations of phase coarsening is developed and implemented on high-performance architectures. From the large-scale simulations, a new kinetics in phase coarsening in the region of ultrahigh volume fraction is found. The parallel implementation is capable of harnessing the greater computer power available from high-performance architectures. The parallelized code enables increase in three-dimensional simulation system size up to a 5123 grid cube. Through the parallelized code, practical runtime can be achieved for three-dimensional large-scale simulations, and the statistical significance of the results from these high resolution parallel simulations are greatly improved over those obtainable from serial simulations. A detailed performance analysis on speed-up and scalability is presented, showing good scalability which improves with increasing problem size. In addition, a model for prediction of runtime is developed, which shows a good agreement with actual run time from numerical tests.

  5. A large-volume high-pressure and high-temperature apparatus for in situ X-ray observation, ' SPEED-Mk.II'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Tomoo; Funakoshi, Ken-ichi; Kubo, Atsushi; Nishiyama, Norimasa; Tange, Yoshinori; Sueda, Yu-ichiro; Kubo, Tomoaki; Utsumi, Wataru

    2004-06-01

    SPEED-Mk.II, the second KAWAI-type high P- T apparatus for in situ X-ray observation that was installed at the bending magnet beam line at SPring-8, is described. The guide block system was designed so that the change of the relative dimension of the cubic compression space with press load can be minimized by repeated adjustments. The hydraulic system was designed so as to enable smooth compression and decompression. These precise controls should be advantageous for high-pressure generation, especially when sintered diamond (SD) anvils are used. An oscillation system was equipped for the first time in a large volume press, making it possible to obtain high-quality diffraction patterns even when the number of sample grains is limited. The use of the oscillation system also reduces errors in pressure determination that may be caused by insufficient averaging of diffraction angles over grains in a limited diffraction volume, because the oscillating grains should sweep through the 2 θ range that is allowed by the finite widths of the optical slits.

  6. Quantitation of fluoride ion released sarin in red blood cell samples by gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry using isotope dilution and large-volume injection.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, E M; McGuire, J M; Evans, R A; Edwards, J L; Hulet, S W; Benton, B J; Forster, J S; Burnett, D C; Muse, W T; Matson, K; Crouse, C L; Mioduszewski, R J; Thomson, S A

    2004-01-01

    A new method for measuring fluoride ion released isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (sarin, GB) in the red blood cell fraction was developed that utilizes an autoinjector, a large-volume injector port (LVI), positive ion ammonia chemical ionization detection in the SIM mode, and a deuterated stable isotope internal standard. This method was applied to red blood cell (RBC) and plasma ethyl acetate extracts from spiked human and animal whole blood samples and from whole blood of minipigs, guinea pigs, and rats exposed by whole-body sarin inhalation. Evidence of nerve agent exposure was detected in plasma and red blood cells at low levels of exposure. The linear method range of quantitation was 10-1000 pg on-column with a detection limit of approximately 2-pg on-column. In the course of method development, several conditions were optimized for the LVI, including type of injector insert, injection volume, initial temperature, pressure, and flow rate. RBC fractions had advantages over the plasma with respect to assessing nerve agent exposure using the fluoride ion method especially in samples with low serum butyrylcholinesterase activity. PMID:15239856

  7. Development of a bar adsorptive micro-extraction-large-volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometric method for pharmaceuticals and personal care products in environmental water matrices.

    PubMed

    Neng, N R; Nogueira, J M F

    2012-01-01

    The combination of bar adsorptive micro-extraction using activated carbon (AC) and polystyrene-divinylbenzene copolymer (PS-DVB) sorbent phases, followed by liquid desorption and large-volume injection gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, under selected ion monitoring mode acquisition, was developed for the first time to monitor pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in environmental water matrices. Assays performed on 25 mL water samples spiked (100 ng L(-1)) with caffeine, gemfibrozil, triclosan, propranolol, carbamazepine and diazepam, selected as model compounds, yielded recoveries ranging from 74% to 99% under optimised experimental conditions (equilibrium time, 16 h (1,000 rpm); matrix characteristics: pH 5, 5% NaCl for AC phase; LD: methanol/acetonitrile (1:1), 45 min). The analytical performance showed good precision (RSD < 18%), convenient detection limits (5-20 ng L(-1)) and excellent linear dynamic range (20-800 ng L(-1)) with remarkable determination coefficients (r(2) > 0.99), where the PS-DVB sorbent phase showed a much better efficiency. By using the standard addition methodology, the application of the present analytical approach on tap, ground, sea, estuary and wastewater samples allowed very good performance at the trace level. The proposed method proved to be a suitable sorption-based micro-extraction alternative for the analysis of priority pollutants with medium-polar to polar characteristics, showing to be easy to implement, reliable, sensitive and requiring a low sample volume to monitor PPCPs in water matrices. PMID:22076312

  8. Biosynthesis of indigo using recombinant E. coli: Development of a biological system for the cost-effective production of a large volume chemical

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, A.; Battist, S.; Chotani, G.

    1995-11-01

    Cost-effective production of any large-volume chemical by fermentation requires extensive manipulation of both the production organism and the fermentation and recovery processes. We have developed a recombinant E. coli system for the production of tryptophan and several other products derived from the aromatic amino acid pathway. By linking our technology for low-cost production of tryptophan from glucose with the enzyme naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO), we have achieved an overall process for the production of indigo dye from glucose. To successfully join these two technologies, both the tryptophan pathway and NDO were extensively modified via genetic engineering. In addition, systems were developed to remove deleterious by-products generated during the chemical oxidations leading to indigo formation. Low-cost fermentation processes were developed that utilized minimal-salts media containing glucose as the sole carbon source. Finally, economical recovery processes were used that preserved the environmental friendliness of the biosynthetic route to indigo.

  9. Large-eddy simulations of 3D Taylor-Green vortex: comparison of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, Lattice Boltzmann and Finite Volume methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajzer, A.; Pozorski, J.; Szewc, K.

    2014-08-01

    In the paper we present Large-eddy simulation (LES) results of 3D Taylor- Green vortex obtained by the three different computational approaches: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) and Finite Volume Method (FVM). The Smagorinsky model was chosen as a subgrid-scale closure in LES for all considered methods and a selection of spatial resolutions have been investigated. The SPH and LBM computations have been carried out with the use of the in-house codes executed on GPU and compared, for validation purposes, with the FVM results obtained using the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM. A comparative study in terms of one-point statistics and turbulent energy spectra shows a good agreement of LES results for all methods. An analysis of the GPU code efficiency and implementation difficulties has been made. It is shown that both SPH and LBM may offer a significant advantage over mesh-based CFD methods.

  10. Determination of Atto- to Femtogram Levels of Americium and Curium Isotopes in Large-Volume Urine Samples by Compact Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiongxin; Christl, Marcus; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2016-03-01

    Ultralow level analysis of actinides in urine samples may be required for dose assessment in the event of internal exposures to these radionuclides at nuclear facilities and nuclear power plants. A new bioassay method for analysis of sub-femtogram levels of Am and Cm in large-volume urine samples was developed. Americium and curium were co-precipitated with hydrous titanium oxide from the urine matrix and purified by column chromatography separation. After target preparation using mixed titanium/iron oxides, the final sample was measured by compact accelerator mass spectrometry. Urine samples spiked with known quantities of Am and Cm isotopes in the range of attogram to femtogram levels were measured for method evaluation. The results are in good agreement with the expected values, demonstrating the feasibility of compact accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for the determination of minor actinides at the levels of attogram/liter in urine samples to meet stringent sensitivity requirements for internal dosimetry assessment. PMID:26822907

  11. Predictions of long-term behavior of a large-volume pilot test for CO2 geological storage in a saline formation in the Central Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Christine; Myer, Larry R.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2008-11-01

    The long-term behavior of a CO{sub 2} plume injected into a deep saline formation is investigated, focusing on mechanisms that lead to plume stabilization. Key measures are plume migration distance and the time evolution of CO{sub 2} phase-partitioning, which are examined by developing a numerical model of the subsurface at a proposed power plant with CO{sub 2} capture in the San Joaquin Valley, California, where a large-volume pilot test of CO{sub 2} injection will be conducted. The numerical model simulates a four-year CO{sub 2} injection period and the subsequent evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume until it stabilizes. Sensitivity studies are carried out to investigate the effect of poorly constrained model parameters permeability, permeability anisotropy, and residual gas saturation.

  12. A Large Sample Volume Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for In-Situ Investigations with Constant Flow of Reactants

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Sears, Jesse A.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ford, Joseph J.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhu, Kake; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun; Hoyt, David W.; Peden, Charles HF

    2012-02-21

    A large-sample-volume constant-flow magic angle sample spinning (CF-MAS) NMR probe is reported for in-situ studies of the reaction dynamics, stable intermediates/transition states, and mechanisms of catalytic reactions. In our approach, the reactants are introduced into the catalyst bed using a fixed tube at one end of the MAS rotor while a second fixed tube, linked to a vacuum pump, is attached at the other end of the rotor. The pressure difference between both ends of the catalyst bed inside the sample cell space forces the reactants flowing through the catalyst bed, which improves the diffusion of the reactants and products. This design allows the use of a large sample volume for enhanced sensitivity and thus permitting in-situ 13C CF-MAS studies at natural abundance. As an example of application, we show that reactants, products and reaction transition states associated with the 2-butanol dehydration reaction over a mesoporous silicalite supported heteropoly acid catalyst (HPA/meso-silicalite-1) can all be detected in a single 13C CF-MAS NMR spectrum at natural abundance. Coke products can also be detected at natural 13C abundance and under the stopped flow condition. Furthermore, 1H CF-MAS NMR is used to identify the surface functional groups of HPA/meso-silicalite-1 under the condition of in-situ drying . We also show that the reaction dynamics of 2-butanol dehydration using HPA/meso-silicalite-1 as a catalyst can be explored using 1H CF-MAS NMR.

  13. Multiparametric Flow System for the Automated Determination of Sodium, Potassium, Calcium, and Magnesium in Large-Volume Parenteral Solutions and Concentrated Hemodialysis Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Pistón, Mariela; Dol, Isabel

    2006-01-01

    A multiparametric flow system based on multicommutation and binary sampling has been designed for the automated determination of sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium in large-volume parenteral solutions and hemodialysis concentrated solutions. The goal was to obtain a computer-controlled system capable of determining the four metals without extensive modifications. The system involved the use of five solenoid valves under software control, allowing the establishment of the appropriate flow conditions for each analyte, that is, sample size, dilution, reagent addition, and so forth. Detection was carried out by either flame atomic emission spectrometry (sodium, potassium) or flame atomic absorption spectrometry (calcium, magnesium). The influence of several operating parameters was studied. Validation was carried out by analyzing artificial samples. Figures of merit obtained include linearity, accuracy, precision, and sampling frequency. Linearity was satisfactory: sodium, r 2 >0.999 ( 0.5 – 3.5 g/L), potassium, r 2 >0.996 (50–150 mg/L), calcium, r 2 >0.999 (30–120 mg/L), and magnesium, r 2 >0.999 (20–40 mg/L). Precision ( s r , %, n=5 ) was better than 2.1 %, and accuracy (evaluated through recovery assays) was in the range of 99.8 %– 101.0 % (sodium), 100.8 – 102.5 % (potassium), 97.3 %– 101.3 % (calcium), and 97.1 %– 99.8 % (magnesium). Sampling frequencies ( h −1 ) were 70 (sodium), 75 (potassium), 70 (calcium), and 58 (magnesium). According to the results obtained, the use of an automated multiparametric system based on multicommutation offers several advantages for the quality control of large-volume parenteral solutions and hemodialysis concentrated solutions. PMID:17671619

  14. Phenocryst abundances and glass and phenocryst compositions as indicators of magmatic environments of large-volume ash flow sheets in southwestern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, R. G.; Byers, F. M., Jr.; Broxton, D. E.; Freeman, S. H.; Hagan, R. C.

    1989-05-10

    The Topopah Spring, Tiva Canyon, Rainier Mesa, and Ammonia Tanks tuffsare large-volume, silicic ash flow sheets that provide samples of fourmagmatic systems in southwestern Nevada. Successively erupted within a span of2 m.y. from the same source area, they allow comparison of the sequentialevolution of large-volume, mature Cordilleran magmatic systems. Each largesheet has a rhyolitic lower zone and quartz latitic upper zone. Coevalbasaltic andesite and basalt show petrochemical continuity with these sheetsand may represent mantle contributions that triggered eruptions of themidcrustal silicic portion. Abundance of phenocrysts and accessory phasesincrease upward with whole rock Fe (FeOt) from the base of all four sheets tomaximum values unique for each system. Although maximum abundances of eachmineral are unique for each sheet, each maximum occupies the same relativeposition within each sheet. High-temperature minerals such as plagioclaseincrease in abundance continuously with FeOt in each system, showing a decreasewith FeOt only within basaltic andesite at the base of the Rainier Mesasystem. Late crystallizing minerals such as quartz and sphene show maximumabundances at much lower FeOt, at or near the top of the rhyolitic zone.Minerals that normally form at intermediate stages of crystallization, such assanidine, show maxima at intermediate FeOt for each sheet. A continuum ofglass and phenocryst compositions occurs within the Topopah Spring andRainier Mesa sheets. Variations in phenocryst compositions with FeOt aregenerally consistent with those expected for crystallization within magmareservoirs characterized by vertical thermal and compositional gradients.However, simple fractional crystallization does not adequately explain theclose relationship in each sheet among the mineral chemistry, glass (magma)chemistry, and phase assemblages, which indicate a close approach to equilibriumwithin each magma system.

  15. Crystal- and fragment- size distributions of quartz and zircon in pumice: growth and fragmentation conditions in large and small-volume magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindeman, I.

    2003-12-01

    I describe an acid (HF and HBF4) technique to extract phenocrysts from individual vesiculated pumice clasts, coupled with camera- and computer-assisted measurements of phenocryst length, width, 3D shape, and vol abundance. CSDs of quartz and zircon are presented for several well-known voluminous ash-flow tuffs and small-volume lavas: Bishop, Lava Creek, Lower Bandelier, Toba, Katmai, and Timber Mt. Measured CSDs of quartz and zircon from these clasts provide a quenched "snapshot" view of growth conditions in preclimactic magma chambers. A common feature of CSDs of unfragmented phenocrysts is a concave-down, lognormal shape in contrast to the reported linear CSDs in more mafic systems.In addition, there are no crystals smaller than a threshold size. These features in silicic magmas are interpreted to be a general result of surface-controlled crystal growth (with growth rate dispersion) by layer nucleation. CSD slopes on log-linear frequency- size graphs in large volume tuffs, and smaller volume intracaldera lavas are similar, and do not simply correlate to the eruptive volume, or SHRIMP-determined zircon ages. CSDs of quartz in clasts with known stratigraphic positions document single evolving reservoir, fingerprint different magma batches (L Bandelier and Lava Creek), and overgrowth and gravitational redistribution (Bishop). Fragment size distributions (FSDs) in the same clasts document fragmentation due to 1) decrepitation of melt inclusions decompression- and heating-induced), and 2)syneruptive breakage. FSDs are treated with lognormal, Weibull, and fractal distributions. Among studied clasts, asymptotic and fractal FSDs are found to be more common. However, the genesis mechanisms (e.g. fractal, scale-invariant vs. size-dependent lognormal) inferred from CSD or FSD should be treated with caution. Decrepitation results in a smaller number of fragments (2-6) than crushing and in shapes that can be distinguished on perimeter/area vs. length diagrams. CSD and FSD

  16. Geochronology, geochemistry, and tectonic characterization of Quaternary large-volume travertine deposits in the southwestern United States and their implications for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priewisch, Alexandra

    Travertines are freshwater carbonates that precipitate from carbonic groundwater due to the degassing of CO2. Travertine deposits are often situated along faults that serve as conduits for CO2-charged groundwater and their geochemistry often records mixing of deeply-derived fluids and volatiles with shallow meteoric water. Travertines are surface expressions of dynamic mantle processes related to the tectonic setting. This dissertation includes four chapters that focus on different aspects of travertine formation and their scientific value. They are excellent, although underestimated, diagnostic tools for climatology, hydrology, tectonics, geochemistry, geomicrobiology, and they can inform carbon sequestration models. Quaternary large-volume travertine deposits in New Mexico and Arizona occur in an extensional tectonic stress regime on the southeastern Colorado Plateau and along the Rio Grande rift. They accumulated above fault systems during episodes of high hydraulic head in confined aquifers, increased regional volcanic activity, and high input of mantle-derived volatiles such as CO 2 and He. Stable isotope and trace element geochemistry of travertines is controlled by groundwater geochemistry as well as the degassing of CO 2. The geochemical composition allows for distinguishing different travertine facies and evaluating past groundwater flow. The travertine deposits in New Mexico are interpreted to be extinct CO2 fields due to the large volumes that accumulated and in analogy to the travertine deposits in Arizona that are associated with an active CO2-gas field. Travertines are natural analogues for CO2 leakage along fault systems that bypassed regional cap rocks and they provide important insight into the migration of CO2 from a reservoir to the surface. The volume of travertine can be used to infer the integrated CO2 leakage along a fault system over geologic time. This leakage is estimated as: (1) CO2 that becomes fixed in CaCO3/travertine (tons of carbon

  17. Managing Large Volumes of Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, James; Hagen, John, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In spring 2003, the Distance Education Network (DEN), Viterbi School of Engineering at the University of Southern California (USC), had 860 students and more than 1,000 enrollments in 70 courses toward 10 different degrees. Typically, for assignments in engineering courses, professors require students to show how their answers are derived so that…

  18. Origin and emplacement of the andesite of Burroughs Mountain, a zoned, large-volume lava flow at Mount Rainier, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockstill, K.R.; Vogel, T.A.; Sisson, T.W.

    2002-01-01

    Burroughs Mountain, situated at the northeast foot of Mount Rainier, WA, exposes a large-volume (3.4 km3) andesitic lava flow, up to 350 m thick and extending 11 km in length. Two sampling traverses from flow base to eroded top, over vertical sections of 245 and 300 m, show that the flow consists of a felsic lower unit (100 m thick) overlain sharply by a more mafic upper unit. The mafic upper unit is chemically zoned, becoming slightly more evolved upward; the lower unit is heterogeneous and unzoned. The lower unit is also more phenocryst-rich and locally contains inclusions of quenched basaltic andesite magma that are absent from the upper unit. Widespread, vuggy, gabbronorite-to-diorite inclusions may be fragments of shallow cumulates, exhumed from the Mount Rainier magmatic system. Chemically heterogeneous block-and-ash-flow deposits that conformably underlie the lava flow were the earliest products of the eruptive episode. The felsic-mafic-felsic progression in lava composition resulted from partial evacuation of a vertically-zoned magma reservoir, in which either (1) average depth of withdrawal increased, then decreased, during eruption, perhaps due to variations in effusion rate, or (2) magmatic recharge stimulated ascent of a plume that brought less evolved magma to shallow levels at an intermediate stage of the eruption. Pre-eruptive zonation resulted from combined crystallization- differentiation and intrusion(s) of less evolved magma into the partly crystallized resident magma body. The zoned lava flow at Burroughs Mountain shows that, at times, Mount Rainier's magmatic system has developed relatively large, shallow reservoirs that, despite complex recharge events, were capable of developing a felsic-upward compositional zonation similar to that inferred from large ash-flow sheets and other zoned lava flows. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigation of the Relationship Between Gross Tumor Volume Location and Pneumonitis Rates Using a Large Clinical Database of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Tucker, Susan L.; Liao Zhongxing; Martel, Mary K.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Studies have suggested that function may vary throughout the lung, and that patients who have tumors located in the base of the lung are more susceptible to radiation pneumonitis. The purpose of our study was to investigate the relationship between gross tumor volume (GTV) location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of 547 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The GTV centroids of all patients were mapped onto one common coordinate system, in which the boundaries of the coordinate system were defined by the extreme points of each individual patient lung. The data were qualitatively analyzed by graphing all centroids and displaying the data according to the presence of severe pneumonitis, tumor stage, and smoking status. The centroids were grouped according to superior-inferior segments, and the pneumonitis rates were analyzed. In addition, we incorporated the GTV centroid information into a Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal tissue complication probability model and tested whether adding spatial information significantly improved the fit of the model. Results: Of the 547 patients analyzed, 111 (20.3%) experienced severe radiation pneumonitis. The pneumonitis incidence rates were 16%, 23%, and 21% for the superior, middle, and inferior thirds of the lung, respectively. Qualitatively, the GTV centroids of nonsmokers were notably absent from the superior portion of the lung. In addition, the GTV centroids of patients who had Stage III and IV clinical staging were concentrated toward the medial edge of the lung. The comparison between the GTV centroid model and the conventional dose-volume model did not yield a statistically significant difference in model fit. Conclusions: Lower pneumonitis rates were noted for the superior portion of the lung; however the differences were not statistically significant. For our patient cohort, incorporating GTV centroid information did not lead to a statistically significant improvement

  20. Integrated strong cation-exchange hybrid monolith coupled with capillary zone electrophoresis and simultaneous dynamic pH junction for large-volume proteomic analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenbin; Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Yan, Xiaojing; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-06-01

    A sulfonate-silica hybrid strong cation-exchange (SCX) monolith was synthesized at the proximal end of a capillary zone electrophoresis column and used for on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) sample preconcentration. Sample was prepared in an acidic buffer and deposited onto the SCX-SPE monolith and eluted using a basic buffer. Electrophoresis was performed in an acidic buffer. This combination of buffers results in formation of a dynamic pH junction, which allows use of relatively large elution buffer volume while maintaining peak efficiency and resolution. All experiments were performed with a 50 µm ID capillary, a 1cm long SCX-SPE monolith, a 60cm long separation capillary, and a electrokinetically pumped nanospray interface. The volume of the capillary is 1.1 µL. By loading 21 µL of a 1×10(-7) M angiotensin II solution, an enrichment factor of 3000 compared to standard electrokinetic injection was achieved on this platform while retaining efficient electrophoretic performance (N=44,000 plates). The loading capacity of the sulfonate SCX hybrid monolith was determined to be ~15 pmol by frontal analysis with 10(-5) M angiotensin II. The system was also applied to the analysis of a 10(-4) mg/mL bovine serum albumin tryptic digest; the protein coverage was 12% and 11 peptides were identified. Finally, by loading 5.5 µL of a 10(-3) mg/mL E. coli digest, 109 proteins and 271 peptides were identified in a 20 min separation; the median separation efficiency generated by these peptides was 25,000 theoretical plates. PMID:25863379

  1. A dosimetric comparison of 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy with an SIB for large and small breast volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Andrea; Atyeo, John; Cox, Jennifer; Rinks, Marianne; Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian

    2014-07-01

    Radiation therapy to the breast is a complex task, with many different techniques that can be employed to ensure adequate dose target coverage while minimizing doses to the organs at risk. This study compares the dose planning outcomes of 3 radiation treatment modalities, 3 dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and static tomotherapy, for left-sided whole-breast radiation treatment with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Overall, 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer were separated into 2 cohorts, small and large, based on breast volume. Dose plans were produced for each patient using 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy. All patients were prescribed a dose of 45 Gy in 20 fractions to the breast with an SIB of 56 Gy in 20 fractions to the tumor bed and normalized so that D{sub 98%} > 95% of the prescription dose. Dosimetric comparisons were made between the 3 modalities and the interaction of patient size. All 3 modalities offered adequate planning target volume (PTV) coverage with D{sub 98%} > 95% and D{sub 2%} < 107%. Static tomotherapy offered significantly improved (p = 0.006) dose homogeneity to the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.079 ± 0.011) and breast minus the SIB volume (Breast{sub SIB}) (p < 0.001, 0.15 ± 0.03) compared with the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.085 ± 0.008, 0.088 ± 0.12) and Breast{sub SIB} (0.22 ± 0.05, 0.23 ± 0.03) for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively. Static tomotherapy also offered statistically significant reductions (p < 0.001) in doses to the ipsilateral lung mean dose of 6.79 ± 2.11 Gy compared with 7.75 ± 2.54 Gy and 8.29 ± 2.76 Gy for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively, and significantly (p < 0.001) reduced heart doses (mean = 2.83 ± 1.26 Gy) compared to both IMRT and 3D-CRT (mean = 3.70 ± 1.44 Gy and 3.91 ± 1.58 Gy). Static tomotherapy is the dosimetrically superior modality for the whole breast with an SIB compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT. IMRT is superior to 3D

  2. Large volume submarine ignimbrites in the Shikoku Basin: An example for explosive volcanism in the Western Pacific during the Late Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutterolf, Steffen; Schindlbeck, Julie C.; Scudder, Rachel P.; Murray, Richard W.; Pickering, Kevin T.; Freundt, Armin; Labanieh, Shasa; Heydolph, Ken; Saito, Sanny; Naruse, Hajime; Underwood, Michael B.; Wu, Huaichun

    2014-05-01

    17 km3 (Dense Rock Equivalent (DRE)). We conclude that several large volume eruptions occurred during the Late Miocene time next to the collision zone of paleo-Honshu and Izu-Bonin arc and covered the entire Philippine Sea plate with meter thick, sheet-like pyroclastic deposits that are now subducted in the Nankai subduction zone.

  3. Towards large volume big divisor D3/D7 " μ-split supersymmetry" and Ricci-flat Swiss-cheese metrics, and dimension-six neutrino mass operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhuria, Mansi; Misra, Aalok

    2012-02-01

    We show that it is possible to realize a " μ-split SUSY" scenario (Cheng and Cheng, 2005) [1] in the context of large volume limit of type IIB compactifications on Swiss-cheese Calabi-Yau orientifolds in the presence of a mobile space-time filling D3-brane and a (stack of) D7-brane(s) wrapping the "big" divisor. For this, we investigate the possibility of getting one Higgs to be light while other to be heavy in addition to a heavy higgsino mass parameter. Further, we examine the existence of long lived gluino that manifests one of the major consequences of μ-split SUSY scenario, by computing its decay width as well as lifetime corresponding to the three-body decays of the gluino into either a quark, a squark and a neutralino or a quark, squark and goldstino, as well as two-body decays of the gluino into either a neutralino and a gluon or a goldstino and a gluon. Guided by the geometric Kähler potential for Σ obtained in Misra and Shukla (2010) [2] based on GLSM techniques, and the Donaldson's algorithm (Barun et al., 2008) [3] for obtaining numerically a Ricci-flat metric, we give details of our calculation in Misra and Shukla (2011) [4] pertaining to our proposed metric for the full Swiss-cheese Calabi-Yau (the geometric Kähler potential being needed to be included in the full moduli space Kähler potential in the presence of the mobile space-time filling D3-brane), but for simplicity of calculation, close to the big divisor, which is Ricci-flat in the large volume limit. Also, as an application of the one-loop RG flow solution for the higgsino mass parameter, we show that the contribution to the neutrino masses at the EW scale from dimension-six operators arising from the Kähler potential, is suppressed relative to the Weinberg-type dimension-five operators.

  4. Improving the Sensitivity, Resolution, and Peak Capacity of Gradient Elution in Capillary Liquid Chromatography with Large-Volume Injections by Using Temperature-Assisted On-Column Solute Focusing.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rachael E; Groskreutz, Stephen R; Weber, Stephen G

    2016-05-17

    Capillary HPLC (cLC) with gradient elution is the separation method of choice for the fields of proteomics and metabolomics. This is due to the complementary nature of cLC flow rates and electrospray or nanospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The small column diameters result in good mass sensitivity. Good concentration sensitivity is also possible by injection of relatively large volumes of solution and relying on solvent-based solute focusing. However, if the injection volume is too large or solutes are poorly retained during injection, volume overload occurs which leads to altered peak shapes, decreased sensitivity, and lower peak capacity. Solutes that elute early even with the use of a solvent gradient are especially vulnerable to this problem. In this paper, we describe a simple, automated instrumental method, temperature-assisted on-column solute focusing (TASF), that is capable of focusing large volume injections of small molecules and peptides under gradient conditions. By injecting a large sample volume while cooling a short segment of the column inlet at subambient temperatures, solutes are concentrated into narrow bands at the head of the column. Rapidly raising the temperature of this segment of the column leads to separations with less peak broadening in comparison to solvent focusing alone. For large volume injections of both mixtures of small molecules and a bovine serum albumin tryptic digest, TASF improved the peak shape and resolution in chromatograms. TASF showed the most dramatic improvements with shallow gradients, which is particularly useful for biological applications. Results demonstrate the ability of TASF with gradient elution to improve the sensitivity, resolution, and peak capacity of volume overloaded samples beyond gradient compression alone. Additionally, we have developed and validated a double extrapolation method for predicting retention factors at extremes of temperature and mobile phase composition. Using this method

  5. Development of high internal phase emulsion polymeric monoliths for highly efficient enrichment of trace polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from large-volume water samples.

    PubMed

    Su, Rihui; Ruan, Guihua; Nie, Honggang; Xie, Ting; Zheng, Yanjie; Du, Fuyou; Li, Jianping

    2015-07-31

    In this work, polymerized high internal phase emulsion (polyHIPE) monoliths were prepared and applied as monolithic adsorbent materials for proconcentration of trace polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from large-volume water samples. The monolithic polyHIPE columns were prepared by in situ polymerization of the continuous phase of a high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) containing styrene (STY), divinylbenzene (DVB) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) in pipette tips, and the resulting STY/DVB/GMA polyHIPE monoliths exhibited highly interconnected porosity and large surface areas, making them excellent candidates as adsorbents for enrichment of trace aromatic compounds. The prepared STY/DVB/GMA polyHIPE monoliths were applied to the determination of trace PAHs in environmental water samples by combing with high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD). Under the optimized experimental conditions, the polyHIPE monoliths could effectively enrich trace 13 PAHs from 500mL of water samples, the mean recoveries at four spiked levels were ranged from 80.7% to 115.0% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 14%, and the detection limits (LODs) were ranged from 4.0 to 228pg/L. In addition, the prepared polyHIPE monolith was stable enough for more than 200 replicate extraction cycles without measurable loss of performance on the enrichment of PAHs, and good column-to-column repeatability was obtained with RSD less than 13%. The proposed method was applied to simultaneous analysis of 13 PAHs in water samples with satisfactory recoveries. PMID:26077972

  6. Direct analysis of eight chlorophenols in urine by large volume injection online turbulent flow solid-phase extraction liquid chromatography with multiple wavelength ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Liu, Qian; Shi, Jian-bo; Wei, Fu-sheng; Jiang, Gui-bin

    2014-02-01

    A novel method for determining eight chlorophenols (CPs) by large volume injection online turbulent flow solid-phase extraction high performance liquid chromatography in urine samples was developed. An aliquot of 1.0 mL urine sample could be analyzed directly after centrifugation. The analytes were preconcentrated online on a Turboflow C18-P SPE column, eluted in back-flush mode, and then separated on an Acclaim PA2 analytical column. Major parameters such as SPE column type, sample loading flow rate and elution time were optimized in detail. Eight CPs from monochlorophenol to pentacholophenol were measured by multiple-wavelength UV detection at four different wavelengths. The limits of detection (LODs) were between 0.5 and 2 ng/mL. The linearity range was from the limit of quantification to 1000 ng/mL for each compound, with the coefficients of determination (r(2)) ranging from 0.9990 to 0.9996. The reproducibility of intraday and interday relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 0.6% to 4.5% (n=5). The method was successfully applied to analyze eight CPs in urine samples. Good recoveries, ranging from 76.3% to 122.9%, were obtained. This simple, sensitive and accurate method provides an alternative way to rapidly analyze and monitor CPs in urine samples, especially for matters of occupational exposure. PMID:24401430

  7. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of nitrophenols in soils by microvial insert large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cacho, J I; Campillo, N; Viñas, P; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2016-07-22

    A rapid and sensitive procedure for the determination of six NPs in soils by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is proposed. Ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) is used for NP extraction from soil matrices to an organic solvent, while the environmentally friendly technique dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) is used for the preconcentration of the resulting UAE extracts. NPs were derivatized by applying an "in-situ" acetylation procedure, before being injected into the GC-MS system using microvial insert large volume injection (LVI). Several parameters affecting UAE, DLLME, derivatization and injection steps were investigated. The optimized procedure provided recoveries of 86-111% from spiked samples. Precision values of the procedure (expressed as relative standard deviation, RSD) lower than 12%, and limits of quantification ranging from 1.3 to 2.6ngg(-1), depending on the compound, were obtained. Twenty soil samples, obtained from military, industrial and agricultural areas, were analyzed by the proposed method. Two of the analytes were quantified in two of the samples obtained from industrial areas, at concentrations in the 4.8-9.6ngg(-1) range. PMID:27317004

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of Bubbly Flow and Slag Layer Behavior in Ladle with Discrete Phase Model (DPM)-Volume of Fluid (VOF) Coupled Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linmin; Liu, Zhongqiu; Cao, Maoxue; Li, Baokuan

    2015-07-01

    In the ladle metallurgy process, the bubble movement and slag layer behavior is very important to the refining process and steel quality. For the bubble-liquid flow, bubble movement plays a significant role in the phase structure and causes the unsteady complex turbulent flow pattern. This is one of the most crucial shortcomings of the current two-fluid models. In the current work, a one-third scale water model is established to investigate the bubble movement and the slag open-eye formation. A new mathematical model using the large eddy simulation (LES) is developed for the bubble-liquid-slag-air four-phase flow in the ladle. The Eulerian volume of fluid (VOF) model is used for tracking the liquid-slag-air free surfaces and the Lagrangian discrete phase model (DPM) is used for describing the bubble movement. The turbulent liquid flow is induced by bubble-liquid interactions and is solved by LES. The procedure of bubble coming out of the liquid and getting into the air is modeled using a user-defined function. The results show that the present LES-DPM-VOF coupled model is good at predicting the unsteady bubble movement, slag eye formation, interface fluctuation, and slag entrainment.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions in diesel exhaust using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with programmed temperature vaporization and large volume injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira de Souza, Carolina; Corrêa, Sergio Machado

    2015-02-01

    Diesel engines are significant sources of Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (PAHs) in urban atmospheres. These compounds are widely known for their carcinogenic potential and mutagenic properties. In this study, a method was developed for the analysis of 16 priorities PAHs using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with programmable temperature vaporizer large volume injection (PTV-LVI), which allowed to be obtained detection limits below 2.0 ng mL-1. This method was evaluated in samples from stratified particulate matter and gas phase from the emissions of diesel vehicle employing diesel commercial S10 (sulfur 10 mg L-1) and B5 (biodiesel 5% v/v). A sampling system that does not employ exhaust products dilution was used to evaluate the PAHs gas-particle partition. Six PAHs were identified in extracts and gas-phase PAHs took percentage of 80% in the total PAHs emissions. The sampling system without dilution not caused a strong nucleation/condensation of the most volatile PAHs. PAHs size-particle distribution was found in higher levels in the accumulation mode.

  10. Analysis of Six β-Lactam Residues in Milk and Egg by Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography with Large-Volume Sample Stacking and Polarity Switching.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu-Xiu; Chen, Guan-Hua; Fang, Rou; Zhang, Li; Yi, Ling-Xiao; Meng, Hong-Lian

    2016-05-01

    A new micellar electrokinetic chromatography method with large-volume sample stacking and polarity switching was developed to analyze amoxicllin, cephalexin, oxacillin, penicillin G, cefazolin, and cefoperazone in milk and egg. The important parameters influencing separation and enrichment factors were optimized. The optimized running buffer consisted of 10 mM phosphate and 22 mM SDS at pH 6.7. The sample size was 1.47 kPa × 690 s, the reverse voltage was 20 kV, and the electric current recovery was 95%. Under these optimum conditions, the enrichment factors of six β-lactams were 193-601. Their LODs were <0.26 ng/g, and LOQs were all 2 ng/g, which was only 1/50-1/2 of the maximum residual limits demanded by U.S. and Japanese regulations. The intraday and interday RSDs of method were lower than 3.70 and 3.91%, respectively. The method can be applied to determine these six antibiotic residues in egg and milk. PMID:27088652

  11. Characterization of Large Volume 3.5″ x 8″ LaBr3:Ce Detectors for the HECTOR+ array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Pellegri, L.; Riboldi, S.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Ceruti, S.; Coelli, S.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Csatlòs, M.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Gulyàs, J.; Lodetti, S.; Frega, S.; Miani, A.; Million, B.; Stuhl, L.; Wieland, O.

    2014-03-01

    A selection of the properties of large volume, cylindrical 3.5" x 8" LaBr3:Ce scintillation detectors coupled to a 3.5" PMT (model R10233-1000SEL from HAMAMATSU) and a special designed Voltage Divider (LABRVD) will be discussed. A number of 10 of such detectors constitute the HECTOR+ array which, in fall 2012, measured at GSI coupled to the AGATA DEMOSTRATOR at the PRESPEC experimental setup. These crystals are among the largest ever produced and needed to be characterized. We have performed several tests and here we discuss, in particular, the energy resolution measured using monochromatic γ-ray sources and in-beam reactions producing γ-rays up to 22.6 MeV. As already measured in two previous works a saturation in the energy resolution was observed in case of high energy gamma rays. Crystal non-homogeneities and PMT gain drifts can affect the resolution of measurements especially in case of high energy γ-rays.

  12. Multiresidue method for the analysis of five antifouling agents in marine and coastal waters by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with large-volume injection.

    PubMed

    Agüera, A; Piedra, L; Hernando, M D; Fernández-Alba, A R

    2000-08-11

    A simple multiresidue method has been developed for the determination of five pesticides, commonly used as active ingredients in antifouling paints, in seawater samples. The pesticides studied were: chlorothalonil (2,4,5,6-tetrachloroisophthalonitrile), dichlofluanid (N-dimethyl-N-phenylsulphamide), Sea-Nine 211 (4,5-dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothazolin-3-one), Irgarol 1051 (2-methylthio-4-tert.-butylamino-6-cyclopropylamino-s-triazine) and TCMTB (2-thiocyanomethylthiobenzothiazole). The analytes were extracted from 200 ml water samples, using solid-phase extraction. A copolymer with hydrophilic-lipophilic balance was used as sorbent yielding good recoveries (82-95%) for most compounds except dichlofluanid and Sea-Nine 211 (<60%). Large volume injection (10 microl) gas chromatography and electron impact ionization MS (selected ion monitoring mode) detection enabled these compounds to be identified and quantified at the 1.2-3.0 ng/l level. Analysis of samples performed in three marinas in Almería (Spain) revealed the presence of Irgarol 1051 in all the cases, at concentration levels between 25 and 450 ng/l. PMID:10985557

  13. Separation and online preconcentration by multistep stacking with large-volume injection of anabolic steroids by capillary electrokinetic chromatography using charged cyclodextrins and UV-absorption detection.

    PubMed

    Urban, Pawel L; García-Ruiz, Carmen; García, M Angeles; Marina, M Luisa

    2005-11-01

    The separation of three common anabolic steroids (methyltestosterone, methandrostenolone and testosterone) was performed for the first time by capillary EKC. Different charged CD derivatives and bile salts were tested as dispersed phases in order to achieve the separation. A mixture of 10 mmol/L succinylated-beta-CD with 1 mmol/L beta-CD in a 50 mmol/L borate buffer (pH 9) enabled the separation of the three anabolic steroids in less than 9 min. Concentration LODs, obtained for these compounds with low absorption of UV light, were approximately 5 x 10(-5) mol/L. The use of online reverse migrating sample stacking with large-volume injection (the effective length of the capillary) enabled to improve the detection sensitivity. Sensitivity enhancement factors (SEFs) ranging from 95 (for testosterone) to 149 (for methyltestosterone) were achieved by single stacking preconcentration. Then, the possibilities of multistep stacking to improve the sensitivity for these analytes were investigated. SEFs obtained by double stacking preconcentration ranged from 138 to 185, enabling concentration LODs of 2.79 x 10(-7) mol/L (for methyltestosterone), 3.47 x 10(-7) mol/L (for testosterone) and 3.56 x 10(-7) mol/L (for methandrostenolone). Although online triple stacking preconcentration was achieved, its repeatability was very poor and SEFs for the studied analytes were not calculated. PMID:16318218

  14. Determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychlorinated biphenyls in fishery and aquaculture products using sequential solid phase extraction and large volume injection gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dasheng; Lin, Yuanjie; Feng, Chao; Wang, Dongli; Qiu, Xinlei; Jin, Yu'e; Xiong, Libei; Jin, Ying; Wang, Guoquan

    2014-01-15

    A new method was developed to determine polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in fishery and aquaculture products. Samples were extracted by an accelerated solvent extraction system and cleaned up by sequential solid phase extraction (SPE) including dispersive SPE (D-SPE) and tandem SPE. PBDEs and PCBs were analyzed by a large-volume injection gas chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LVI-GC-QqQ-MS/MS). Good linearity (R(2)≥0.9958) was achieved. Method detection limits (MDLs) were 0.16-3.3pgg(-1) (wet weight, ww) for PBDEs and 0.13-0.97pgg(-1)ww for PCBs. Mean recoveries were 60-140% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of less than 20% in weever fish, scallop and shrimp samples spiked at a lower level of 13-31pgg(-1)ww and a higher level of 50-125pgg(-1)ww. Certified reference materials were analyzed with acceptable results. The method reduced solvent consumption, analytical time and labor, and is suitable for the routine analysis of PBDEs and PCBs in fishery and aquaculture products. PMID:24321764

  15. Development of a compact radiation-hardened low-noise front-end readout ASIC for CZT-based hard X-ray imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, W.; Gan, B.; Li, X.; Wei, T.; Gao, D.; Hu, Y.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we present the development and performances of a radiation-hardened front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) dedicated to CZT detectors for a hard X-ray imager in space applications. The readout channel consists of a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA), a CR-RC shaper, a fast shaper, a discriminator and a driving buffer. With the additional digital filtering, the readout channel can achieve very low noise performances and low power dissipation. An eight-channel prototype ASIC is designed and fabricated in 0.35 μm CMOS process. The energy range of the detected X-rays is evaluated as 1.45 keV to 281 keV. The gain is larger than 100 mV/fC. The equivalent noise charge (ENC) of the ASIC is 53 e- at zero farad plus 10 e- per picofarad. The power dissipation is less than 4.4 mW/channel. Through the measurement with a CZT detector, the energy resolution is less than 3.45 keV (FWHM) under the irradiation of the radioactive source 241Am. The radiation effect experiments indicate that the proposed ASIC can resist the total ionization dose (TID) irradiation of higher than 200 krad (Si).

  16. Scatter and crosstalk corrections for {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 123}I dual-radionuclide imaging using a CZT SPECT system with pinhole collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Peng; Hutton, Brian F.; Holstensson, Maria; Ljungberg, Michael; Hendrik Pretorius, P.; Prasad, Rameshwar; Liu, Chi; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Thorn, Stephanie L.; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: The energy spectrum for a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has a low energy tail due to incomplete charge collection and intercrystal scattering. Due to these solid-state detector effects, scatter would be overestimated if the conventional triple-energy window (TEW) method is used for scatter and crosstalk corrections in CZT-based imaging systems. The objective of this work is to develop a scatter and crosstalk correction method for {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 123}I dual-radionuclide imaging for a CZT-based dedicated cardiac SPECT system with pinhole collimators (GE Discovery NM 530c/570c). Methods: A tailing model was developed to account for the low energy tail effects of the CZT detector. The parameters of the model were obtained using {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I point source measurements. A scatter model was defined to characterize the relationship between down-scatter and self-scatter projections. The parameters for this model were obtained from Monte Carlo simulation using SIMIND. The tailing and scatter models were further incorporated into a projection count model, and the primary and self-scatter projections of each radionuclide were determined with a maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) iterative estimation approach. The extracted scatter and crosstalk projections were then incorporated into MLEM image reconstruction as an additive term in forward projection to obtain scatter- and crosstalk-corrected images. The proposed method was validated using Monte Carlo simulation, line source experiment, anthropomorphic torso phantom studies, and patient studies. The performance of the proposed method was also compared to that obtained with the conventional TEW method. Results: Monte Carlo simulations and line source experiment demonstrated that the TEW method overestimated scatter while their proposed method provided more accurate scatter estimation by considering the low energy tail effect. In the phantom study, improved defect contrasts were

  17. Study of electrode pattern design for a CZT-based PET detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.; Levin, C. S.

    2014-06-01

    We are developing a 1 mm resolution small animal positron emission tomography (PET) system using 3D positioning cadmium zinc telluride photon detectors comprising 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm crystals metalized with a cross-strip electrode pattern with a 1 mm anode strip pitch. We optimized the electrode pattern design for intrinsic sensitivity and spatial, energy and time resolution performance using a test detector comprising cathode and steering electrode strips of varying dimensions. The study found 3 and 5 mm width cathode strips locate charge-shared photon interactions near cathode strip boundaries with equal precision. 3 mm width cathode strips exhibited large time resolution variability as a function of photon interaction location between the anode and cathode planes (˜26 to ˜127.5 ns full width at half maximum (FWHM) for 0.5 mm and 4.2 mm depths, respectively). 5 mm width cathode strips by contrast exhibited more stable time resolution for the same interaction locations (˜34 to ˜83 ns FWHM), provided more linear spatial positioning in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes, and as much as 68.4% improvement in photon sensitivity over the 3 mm wide cathode strips. The results were understood by analyzing the cathode strips’ weighting functions, which indicated a stronger ‘small pixel’ effect in the 3 mm wide cathode strips. Photon sensitivity and anode energy resolution were seen to improve with decreasing steering electrode bias from 0 to -80 V w.r.t. the anode potential. A slight improvement in energy resolution was seen for wider steering electrode strips (400 versus 100 µm) for charge-shared photon interactions. Although this study successfully focused on electrode pattern features for PET performance, the results are generally applicable to semiconductor photon detectors employing cross-trip electrode patterns.

  18. Suspect screening and target quantification of multi-class pharmaceuticals in surface water based on large-volume injection liquid chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, Leendert; Van Langenhove, Herman; Joos, Pieter; Demeestere, Kristof

    2014-04-01

    The ever-growing number of emerging micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals requests rapid and sensitive full-spectrum analytical techniques. Time-of-flight high-resolution mass spectrometry (TOF-HRMS) is a promising alternative for the state-of-the-art tandem mass spectrometry instruments because of its ability to simultaneously screen for a virtually unlimited number of suspect analytes and to perform target quantification. The challenge for such suspect screening is to develop a strategy, which minimizes the false-negative rate without restraining numerous false-positives. At the same time, omitting laborious sample enrichment through large-volume injection ultra-performance liquid chromatography (LVI-UPLC) avoids selective preconcentration. A suspect screening strategy was developed using LVI-UPLC-TOF-MS aiming the detection of 69 multi-class pharmaceuticals in surface water without the a priori availability of analytical standards. As a novel approach, the screening takes into account the signal-intensity-dependent accurate mass error of TOF-MS, hereby restraining 95 % of the measured suspect pharmaceuticals present in surface water. Application on five Belgian river water samples showed the potential of the suspect screening approach, as exemplified by a false-positive rate not higher than 15 % and given that 30 out of 37 restrained suspect compounds were confirmed by the retention time of analytical standards. Subsequently, this paper discusses the validation and applicability of the LVI-UPLC full-spectrum HRMS method for target quantification of the 69 pharmaceuticals in surface water. Analysis of five Belgian river water samples revealed the occurrence of 17 pharmaceuticals in a concentration range of 17 ng L(-1) up to 3.1 μg L(-1). PMID:24633561

  19. High Radiation Dose May Reduce the Negative Effect of Large Gross Tumor Volume in Patients With Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Lujun; West, Brady T.; Hayman, James A.; Lyons, Susan; Cease, Kemp; Kong, F.-M. . E-mail: Fengkong@med.umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the effect of radiation dose varies with gross tumor volume (GTV) in patients with stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 114 consecutive patients with medically inoperable stage I/II NSCLC treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy between 1992 and 2004. The median biologic equivalent dose (BED) was 79.2 Gy (range, 58.2-124.5 Gy). The median GTV was 51.8 cm{sup 3} (range, 2.1-727.8 cm{sup 3}). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Kaplan-Meier estimation and Cox regression models were used for survival analyses. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that there was a significant interaction between radiation dose and GTV (p < 0.001). In patients with BED {<=}79.2 Gy (n = 68), the OS medians for patients with GTV >51.8 cm{sup 3} and {<=}51.8 cm{sup 3} were 18.2 and 23.9 months, respectively (p 0.015). If BED was >79.2 Gy (n = 46), no significant difference was found between GTV groups (p = 0.681). For patients with GTV >51.8 cm{sup 3} (n = 45), the OS medians in those with BED >79.2 Gy and {<=}79.2 Gy were 30.4 and 18.2 months, respectively (p < 0.001). If GTV was {<=}51.8 cm{sup 3} (n = 45), the difference was no longer significant (p = 0.577). Conclusion: High-dose radiation is more important for patients with larger tumors and may be effective in reducing the adverse outcome associated with large GTV. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  20. Direct large volume injection ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry determination of artificial sweeteners sucralose and acesulfame in well water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minghuo; Qian, Yichao; Boyd, Jessica M; Hrudey, Steve E; Le, X Chris; Li, Xing-Fang

    2014-09-12

    Acesulfame (ACE) and sucralose (SUC) have become recognized as ideal domestic wastewater contamination indicators. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) analysis is commonly used; however, the sensitivity of SUC is more than two orders of magnitude lower than that of ACE, limiting the routine monitoring of SUC. To address this issue, we examined the ESI behavior of both ACE and SUC under various conditions. ACE is ionic in aqueous solution and efficiently produces simple [M-H](-) ions, but SUC produces multiple adduct ions, limiting its sensitivity. The formic acid (FA) adducts of SUC [M+HCOO](-) are sensitively and reproducibly generated under the LC-MS conditions. When [M+HCOO](-) is used as the precursor ion for SUC detection, the sensitivity increases approximately 20-fold compared to when [M-H](-) is the precursor ion. To further improve the limit of detection (LOD), we integrated the large volume injection approach (500μL injection) with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS), which reduced the method detection limit (MDL) to 0.2ng/L for ACE and 5ng/L for SUC. To demonstrate the applicability of this method, we analyzed 100 well water samples collected in Alberta. ACE was detected in 24 wells at concentrations of 1-1534ng/L and SUC in 8 wells at concentrations of 65-541ng/L. These results suggest that wastewater is the most likely source of ACE and SUC impacts in these wells, suggesting the need for monitoring the quality of domestic well water. PMID:25085815