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Sample records for large-scale field trial

  1. A LARGE-SCALE FIELD TRIAL WITH DICHLORVOS AS A RESIDUAL FUMIGANT INSECTICIDE IN NORTHERN NIGERIA.

    PubMed

    FOLL, C V; PANT, C P; LIETAERT, P E

    1965-01-01

    An extended field trial with dichlorvos was carried out in the Kankiya District of Northern Nigeria during 1963. Two types of dispenser were used-the dichlorvos-impregnated-montan-wax type and the liquid-dichlorvos type. The objective of the trial was to see if dichlorvos would interrupt the transmission of malaria under local conditions when used at a dosage of one dispenser per 15 m(3) of living space. On the basis of epidemiological findings-both parasitological and entomological-it was found that, owing to excessive ventilation in the huts treated, an adequate concentration of dichlorvos was not maintained, and transmission continued uninterrupted. PMID:14315721

  2. A large-scale field trial with dichlorvos as a residual fumigant insecticide in Northern Nigeria*

    PubMed Central

    Foll, C. V.; Pant, C. P.; Lietaert, P. E.

    1965-01-01

    An extended field trial with dichlorvos was carried out in the Kankiya District of Northern Nigeria during 1963. Two types of dispenser were used—the dichlorvos-impregnated-montan-wax type and the liquid-dichlorvos type. The objective of the trial was to see if dichlorvos would interrupt the transmission of malaria under local conditions when used at a dosage of one dispenser per 15 m3 of living space. On the basis of epidemiological findings—both parasitological and entomological—it was found that, owing to excessive ventilation in the huts treated, an adequate concentration of dichlorvos was not maintained, and transmission continued uninterrupted. PMID:14315721

  3. Not a load of rubbish: simulated field trials in large-scale containers.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, M; Stahl, A; Rudloff, J; Wittkop, B; Snowdon, R J

    2016-09-01

    Assessment of yield performance under fluctuating environmental conditions is a major aim of crop breeders. Unfortunately, results from controlled-environment evaluations of complex agronomic traits rarely translate to field performance. A major cause is that crops grown over their complete lifecycle in a greenhouse or growth chamber are generally constricted in their root growth, which influences their response to important abiotic constraints like water or nutrient availability. To overcome this poor transferability, we established a plant growth system comprising large refuse containers (120 L 'wheelie bins') that allow detailed phenotyping of small field-crop populations under semi-controlled growth conditions. Diverse winter oilseed rape cultivars were grown at field densities throughout the crop lifecycle, in different experiments over 2 years, to compare seed yields from individual containers to plot yields from multi-environment field trials. We found that we were able to predict yields in the field with high accuracy from container-grown plants. The container system proved suitable for detailed studies of stress response physiology and performance in pre-breeding populations. Investment in automated large-container systems may help breeders improve field transferability of greenhouse experiments, enabling screening of pre-breeding materials for abiotic stress response traits with a positive influence on yield. PMID:27144906

  4. A large-scale field trial of malathion as an insecticide for antimalarial work in southern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Najera, J. A.; Shidrawi, G. R.; Gibson, F. D.; Stafford, J. S.

    1967-01-01

    Malathion shows promise as a substitute for chlorinated-hydrocarbon insecticides in the control of malaria whenever the latter are unsuitable because of Anopheles resistance or other reasons. A field trial of malathion was carried out in 1963-64, covering an area of about 500 km2 with a population of about 26 000, in Masaka District, southern Uganda. All houses and animal shelters were sprayed with malathion at 2 g/m2 at roughly 4-month intervals. The average combined densities of the females of the two main malaria vectors, Anopheles funestus and An. gambiae, fell from an average of 66 per shelter per day in a pre-trial survey in 1960-61 to 0.0011 at the end of 1964 in the sprayed area; no significant changes were noted in unsprayed comparison areas. The transmission of the infection in humans was apparently interrupted when allowance was made for imported cases. The presence of unsprayed surfaces in houses which had recently been built or altered interfered somewhat with complete coverage. Case detection was reliable and achieved excellent coverage. No toxic effects of malathion in humans were noted, while the effect on mosquitos was considerable even in the absence of direct contact. This effect of malathion lasted for a considerably shorter period of time in houses roofed with corrugated iron than with thatch; this should be borne in mind in the design of spraying programmes. PMID:5299860

  5. Efficacy of a commercial live attenuated Lawsonia intracellularis vaccine in a large scale field trial in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sangshin; Lee, Joong-Bok; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Oh, Yu-Sik; Kim, Man-Ok; Oh, Yu-Ri; Hwang, Min-A; Lee, Jung-Ah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Porcine proliferative enteropathy (PPE) is known as one of the most important risk factors causing economic losses in swine industry worldwide. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a commercial oral attenuated Lawsonia intracellularis vaccine (Enterisol Ileitis) against PPE under a commercial pig farm condition in Korea. Materials and Methods Thirty two-day-old 672 piglets were randomly allocated into vaccinated and control groups. All piglets in the vaccinated group were inoculated with a commercial attenuated L. intracellularis vaccine as following the manufacturer's instruction. Body weights of all pigs in both groups were measured on the vaccination day and 6, 14, and 20 weeks post vaccination and an average daily weight gain (ADWG) was calculated. Health status was observed biweekly during the whole trial. Results The vaccinated group showed significantly higher body weight (p<0.05) and ADWG (p<0.05) than those of the control group. The vaccinated group had significantly reduced impairments in activity, growth, defecation frequency, and stool hardness (p<0.05). Additional health benefits and improved weight gain by the vaccination produced a 4.2:1 return of investment, and the higher gross margin was $4.80 per pig. Conclusion Our finding suggests that the L. intracellularis vaccine program has effects on the substantial health and economic benefits in the Korean swine industry. PMID:23858405

  6. Considerations for Managing Large-Scale Clinical Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Waneta C.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Research management strategies used effectively in a large-scale clinical trial to determine the health effects of exposure to Agent Orange in Vietnam are discussed, including pre-project planning, organization according to strategy, attention to scheduling, a team approach, emphasis on guest relations, cross-training of personnel, and preparing…

  7. Resistance management strategies in malaria vector mosquito control. Baseline data for a large-scale field trial against Anopheles albimanus in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Penilla, R P; Rodríguez, A D; Hemingway, J; Torres, J L; Arredondo-Jiménez, J I; Rodríguez, M H

    1998-07-01

    A high level of DDT resistance and low levels of resistance to organophosphorus, carbamate and pyrethroid insecticides were detected by discriminating dose assays in field populations of Anopheles albimanus in Chiapas, southern Mexico, prior to a large-scale resistance management project described by Hemingway et al. (1997). Biochemical assays showed that the DDT resistance was caused by elevated levels of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity leading to increased rates of metabolism of DDT to DDE. The numbers of individuals with elevated GST and DDT resistance were well correlated, suggesting that this is the only major DDT resistance mechanism in this population. The carbamate resistance in this population is conferred by an altered acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-based resistance mechanism. The level of resistance observed in the bioassays correlates with the frequency of individuals homozygous for the altered AChE allele. This suggests that the level of resistance conferred by this mechanism in its heterozygous state is below the level of detection by the WHO carbamate discriminating dosage bioassay. The low levels of organophosphate (OP) and pyrethroid resistance could be conferred by either the elevated esterase or monooxygenase enzymes. The esterases were elevated only with the substrate pNPA, and are unlikely to be causing broad spectrum OP resistance. The altered AChE mechanism may also be contributing to the OP but not the pyrethroid resistance. Significant differences in resistance gene frequencies were obtained from the F1 mosquitoes resulting from adults obtained by different collection methods. This may be caused by different insecticide selection pressures on the insects immediately prior to collection, or may be an indication that the indoor- and outdoor-resting A. albimanus collections are not from a randomly mating single population. The underlying genetic variability of the populations is currently being investigated by molecular methods. PMID

  8. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. Here I discuss how magnetic helicity has come to help us understand the saturation of and sustenance of large scale dynamos, the need for either local or global helicity fluxes to avoid dynamo quenching, and the associated observational consequences. I also discuss how magnetic helicity acts as a hindrance to turbulent diffusion of large scale fields, and thus a helper for fossil remnant large scale field origin models in some contexts. I briefly discuss the connection between large scale fields and accretion disk theory as well. The goal here is to provide a conceptual primer to help the reader efficiently penetrate the literature.

  9. Large Scale Field Campaign Contributions to Soil Moisture Remote Sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large-scale field experiments have been an essential component of soil moisture remote sensing for over two decades. They have provided test beds for both the technology and science necessary to develop and refine satellite mission concepts. The high degree of spatial variability of soil moisture an...

  10. Lateral stirring of large-scale tracer fields by altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dencausse, Guillaume; Morrow, Rosemary; Rogé, Marine; Fleury, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Ocean surface fronts and filaments have a strong impact on the global ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. Surface Lagrangian advection with time-evolving altimetric geostrophic velocities can be used to simulate the submesoscale front and filament structures in large-scale tracer fields. We study this technique in the Southern Ocean region south of Tasmania, a domain marked by strong meso- to submesoscale features such as the fronts of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Starting with large-scale surface tracer fields that we stir with altimetric velocities, we determine `advected' fields which compare well with high-resolution in situ or satellite tracer data. We find that fine scales are best represented in a statistical sense after an optimal advection time of ˜2 weeks, with enhanced signatures of the ACC fronts and better spectral energy. The technique works best in moderate to high EKE regions where lateral advection dominates. This technique may be used to infer the distribution of unresolved small scales in any physical or biogeochemical surface tracer that is dominated by lateral advection. Submesoscale dynamics also impact the subsurface of the ocean, and the Lagrangian advection at depth shows promising results. Finally, we show that climatological tracer fields computed from the advected large-scale fields display improved fine-scale mean features, such as the ACC fronts, which can be useful in the context of ocean modelling.

  11. Large scale meteorological influence during the Geysers 1979 field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.

    1980-01-01

    A series of meteorological field measurements conducted during July 1979 near Cobb Mountain in Northern California reveals evidence of several scales of atmospheric circulation consistent with the climatic pattern of the area. The scales of influence are reflected in the structure of wind and temperature in vertically stratified layers at a given observation site. Large scale synoptic gradient flow dominates the wind field above about twice the height of the topographic ridge. Below that there is a mixture of effects with evidence of a diurnal sea breeze influence and a sublayer of katabatic winds. The July observations demonstrate that weak migratory circulations in the large scale synoptic meteorological pattern have a significant influence on the day-to-day gradient winds and must be accounted for in planning meteorological programs including tracer experiments.

  12. Relic vector field and CMB large scale anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xingang; Wang, Yi E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk

    2014-10-01

    We study the most general effects of relic vector fields on the inflationary background and density perturbations. Such effects are observable if the number of inflationary e-folds is close to the minimum requirement to solve the horizon problem. We show that this can potentially explain two CMB large scale anomalies: the quadrupole-octopole alignment and the quadrupole power suppression. We discuss its effect on the parity anomaly. We also provide analytical template for more detailed data comparison.

  13. THE LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS OF THIN ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Xinwu; Spruit, Hendrik C. E-mail: henk@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-03-10

    Large-scale magnetic field threading an accretion disk is a key ingredient in the jet formation model. The most attractive scenario for the origin of such a large-scale field is the advection of the field by the gas in the accretion disk from the interstellar medium or a companion star. However, it is realized that outward diffusion of the accreted field is fast compared with the inward accretion velocity in a geometrically thin accretion disk if the value of the Prandtl number P{sub m} is around unity. In this work, we revisit this problem considering the angular momentum of the disk to be removed predominantly by the magnetically driven outflows. The radial velocity of the disk is significantly increased due to the presence of the outflows. Using a simplified model for the vertical disk structure, we find that even moderately weak fields can cause sufficient angular momentum loss via a magnetic wind to balance outward diffusion. There are two equilibrium points, one at low field strengths corresponding to a plasma-beta at the midplane of order several hundred, and one for strong accreted fields, {beta} {approx} 1. We surmise that the first is relevant for the accretion of weak, possibly external, fields through the outer parts of the disk, while the latter one could explain the tendency, observed in full three-dimensional numerical simulations, of strong flux bundles at the centers of disk to stay confined in spite of strong magnetororational instability turbulence surrounding them.

  14. Scalable parallel distance field construction for large-scale applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hongfeng; Xie, Jinrong; Ma, Kwan -Liu; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-10-01

    Computing distance fields is fundamental to many scientific and engineering applications. Distance fields can be used to direct analysis and reduce data. In this paper, we present a highly scalable method for computing 3D distance fields on massively parallel distributed-memory machines. Anew distributed spatial data structure, named parallel distance tree, is introduced to manage the level sets of data and facilitate surface tracking overtime, resulting in significantly reduced computation and communication costs for calculating the distance to the surface of interest from any spatial locations. Our method supports several data types and distance metrics from real-world applications. We demonstrate its efficiency and scalability on state-of-the-art supercomputers using both large-scale volume datasets and surface models. We also demonstrate in-situ distance field computation on dynamic turbulent flame surfaces for a petascale combustion simulation. In conclusion, our work greatly extends the usability of distance fields for demanding applications.

  15. Scalable Parallel Distance Field Construction for Large-Scale Applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongfeng; Xie, Jinrong; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline H

    2015-10-01

    Computing distance fields is fundamental to many scientific and engineering applications. Distance fields can be used to direct analysis and reduce data. In this paper, we present a highly scalable method for computing 3D distance fields on massively parallel distributed-memory machines. A new distributed spatial data structure, named parallel distance tree, is introduced to manage the level sets of data and facilitate surface tracking over time, resulting in significantly reduced computation and communication costs for calculating the distance to the surface of interest from any spatial locations. Our method supports several data types and distance metrics from real-world applications. We demonstrate its efficiency and scalability on state-of-the-art supercomputers using both large-scale volume datasets and surface models. We also demonstrate in-situ distance field computation on dynamic turbulent flame surfaces for a petascale combustion simulation. Our work greatly extends the usability of distance fields for demanding applications. PMID:26357251

  16. Large scale reconstruction of the solar coronal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, T.; Aly, J.-J.; Chopin, P.; Canou, A.; Mikic, Z.

    2014-10-01

    It is now becoming necessary to access the global magnetic structure of the solar low corona at a large scale in order to understand its physics and more particularly the conditions of energization of the magnetic fields and the multiple connections between distant active regions (ARs) which may trigger eruptive events in an almost coordinated way. Various vector magnetographs, either on board spacecraft or ground-based, currently allow to obtain vector synoptic maps, composite magnetograms made of multiple interactive ARs, and full disk magnetograms. We present a method recently developed for reconstructing the global solar coronal magnetic field as a nonlinear force-free magnetic field in spherical geometry, generalizing our previous results in Cartesian geometry. This method is implemented in the new code XTRAPOLS, which thus appears as an extension of our active region scale code XTRAPOL. We apply our method by performing a reconstruction at a specific time for which we dispose of a set of composite data constituted of a vector magnetogram provided by SDO/HMI, embedded in a larger full disk vector magnetogram provided by the same instrument, finally embedded in a synoptic map provided by SOLIS. It turns out to be possible to access the large scale structure of the corona and its energetic contents, and also the AR scale, at which we recover the presence of a twisted flux rope in equilibrium.

  17. Large-scale magnetic fields in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Alexakis, Alexandros

    2013-02-22

    High Reynolds number magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the presence of zero-flux large-scale magnetic fields is investigated as a function of the magnetic field strength. For a variety of flow configurations, the energy dissipation rate [symbol: see text] follows the scaling [Symbol: see text] proportional U(rms)(3)/ℓ even when the large-scale magnetic field energy is twenty times larger than the kinetic energy. A further increase of the magnetic energy showed a transition to the [Symbol: see text] proportional U(rms)(2) B(rms)/ℓ scaling implying that magnetic shear becomes more efficient at this point at cascading the energy than the velocity fluctuations. Strongly helical configurations form nonturbulent helicity condensates that deviate from these scalings. Weak turbulence scaling was absent from the investigation. Finally, the magnetic energy spectra support the Kolmogorov spectrum k(-5/3) while kinetic energy spectra are closer to the Iroshnikov-Kraichnan spectrum k(-3/2) as observed in the solar wind. PMID:23473153

  18. Penetration of Large Scale Electric Field to Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Fok, M. C. H.; Sibeck, D. G.; Wygant, J. R.; Spence, H. E.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    The direct penetration of large scale global electric field to the inner magnetosphere is a critical element in controlling how the background thermal plasma populates within the radiation belts. These plasma populations provide the source of particles and free energy needed for the generation and growth of various plasma waves that, at critical points of resonances in time and phase space, can scatter or energize radiation belt particles to regulate the flux level of the relativistic electrons in the system. At high geomagnetic activity levels, the distribution of large scale electric fields serves as an important indicator of how prevalence of strong wave-particle interactions extend over local times and radial distances. To understand the complex relationship between the global electric fields and thermal plasmas, particularly due to the ionospheric dynamo and the magnetospheric convection effects, and their relations to the geomagnetic activities, we analyze the electric field and cold plasma measurements from Van Allen Probes over more than two years period and simulate a geomagnetic storm event using Coupled Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Model (CIMI). Our statistical analysis of the measurements from Van Allan Probes and CIMI simulations of the March 17, 2013 storm event indicate that: (1) Global dawn-dusk electric field can penetrate the inner magnetosphere inside the inner belt below L~2. (2) Stronger convections occurred in the dusk and midnight sectors than those in the noon and dawn sectors. (3) Strong convections at multiple locations exist at all activity levels but more complex at higher activity levels. (4) At the high activity levels, strongest convections occur in the midnight sectors at larger distances from the Earth and in the dusk sector at closer distances. (5) Two plasma populations of distinct ion temperature isotropies divided at L-Shell ~2, indicating distinct heating mechanisms between inner and outer radiation belts. (6) CIMI

  19. The effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Hertzberg, Mark P.; Senatore, Leonardo

    2012-09-20

    Large scale structure surveys will likely become the next leading cosmological probe. In our universe, matter perturbations are large on short distances and small at long scales, i.e. strongly coupled in the UV and weakly coupled in the IR. To make precise analytical predictions on large scales, we develop an effective field theory formulated in terms of an IR effective fluid characterized by several parameters, such as speed of sound and viscosity. These parameters, determined by the UV physics described by the Boltzmann equation, are measured from N-body simulations. We find that the speed of sound of the effective fluid is c2s ≈ 10–6c2 and that the viscosity contributions are of the same order. The fluid describes all the relevant physics at long scales k and permits a manifestly convergent perturbative expansion in the size of the matter perturbations δ(k) for all the observables. As an example, we calculate the correction to the power spectrum at order δ(k)4. As a result, the predictions of the effective field theory are found to be in much better agreement with observation than standard cosmological perturbation theory, already reaching percent precision at this order up to a relatively short scale k ≃ 0.24h Mpc–1.

  20. A large-scale field trial of thin-layer capping of PCDD/F-contaminated sediments: Sediment-to-water fluxes up to 5 years post-amendment.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Gerard; Schaanning, Morten; Gunnarsson, Jonas S; Eek, Espen

    2016-04-01

    The longer-term effect (3-5 y) of thin-layer capping on in situ sediment-to-surface water fluxes was monitored in a large-scale field experiment in the polychlorinated dibenzodioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) contaminated Grenlandfjords, Norway (4 trial plots of 10,000 to 40,000 m(2) at 30 to 100 m water depth). Active caps (designed thickness 2.5 cm) were established in 2 fjords, consisting of dredged clean clay amended with powdered activated carbon (PAC) from anthracite. These active caps were compared to 2 nonactive caps in one of the fjords (designed thickness 5 cm) consisting of either clay only (i.e., without PAC) or crushed limestone. Sediment-to-water PCDD/F fluxes were measured in situ using diffusion chambers. An earlier study showed that during the first 2 years after thin-layer capping, flux reductions relative to noncapped reference fields were more extensive at the fields capped with nonactive caps (70%-90%) than at the ones with PAC-containing caps (50%-60%). However, the present work shows that between 3 and 5 years after thin-layer capping, this trend was reversed and cap effectiveness in reducing fluxes was increasing to 80% to 90% for the PAC caps, whereas cap effectiveness of the nonactive caps decreased to 20% to 60%. The increasing effectiveness over time of PAC-containing "active" caps is explained by a combination of slow sediment-to-PAC mass transfer of PCDD/Fs and bioturbation by benthic organisms. The decreasing effectiveness of "nonactive" limestone and clay caps is explained by deposition of contaminated particles on top of the caps. The present field data indicate that the capping efficiency of thin active caps (i.e., enriched with PAC) can improve over time as a result of slow diffusive PCDD/F transfer from sediment to PAC particles and better mixing of the PAC by bioturbation. PMID:26012529

  1. Large-scale magnetic fields, dark energy, and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Federico R.; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2010-08-15

    Cosmological magnetic fields are being observed with ever increasing correlation lengths, possibly reaching the size of superclusters, therefore disfavoring the conventional picture of generation through primordial seeds later amplified by galaxy-bound dynamo mechanisms. In this paper we put forward a fundamentally different approach that links such large-scale magnetic fields to the cosmological vacuum energy. In our scenario the dark energy is due to the Veneziano ghost (which solves the U(1){sub A} problem in QCD). The Veneziano ghost couples through the triangle anomaly to the electromagnetic field with a constant which is unambiguously fixed in the standard model. While this interaction does not produce any physical effects in Minkowski space, it triggers the generation of a magnetic field in an expanding universe at every epoch. The induced energy of the magnetic field is thus proportional to cosmological vacuum energy: {rho}{sub EM{approx_equal}}B{sup 2{approx_equal}}(({alpha}/4{pi})){sup 2{rho}}{sub DE}, {rho}{sub DE} hence acting as a source for the magnetic energy {rho}{sub EM}. The corresponding numerical estimate leads to a magnitude in the nG range. There are two unique and distinctive predictions of our proposal: an uninterrupted active generation of Hubble size correlated magnetic fields throughout the evolution of the Universe; the presence of parity violation on the enormous scales 1/H, which apparently has been already observed in CMB. These predictions are entirely rooted into the standard model of particle physics.

  2. Large scale magnetic fields in galaxies at high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernet, M. L.; Miniati, F.; Lilly, S. J.; Kronberg, P. P.; Dessauges-Zavadsky, M.

    2012-09-01

    In a recent study we have used a large sample of extragalactic radio sources to investigate the redshift evolution of the Rotation Measure (RM) of polarized quasars up to z ≈ 3.0. We found that the dispersion in the RM distribution of quasars increases at higher redshifts and hypothesized that MgII intervening systems were responsible for the observed trend. To test this hypothesis, we have recently obtained high-resolution UVES/VLT spectra for 76 quasars in our sample and in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 2.0. We found a clear correlation between the presence of strong MgII systems and large RMs. This implies that normal galaxies at z ≈ 1 already had large-scale magnetic fields comparable to those seen today.

  3. Large-scale velocity fields. [of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Robert F.; Kichatinov, L. L.; Bogart, Richard S.; Ribes, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    The present evaluation of recent observational results bearing on the nature and characteristics of solar rotation gives attention to the status of current understanding on such large-scale velocity-field-associated phenomena as solar supergranulation, mesogranulation, and giant-scale convection. Also noted are theoretical suggestions reconciling theory and observations of giant-scale solar convection. The photosphere's global meridional circulation is suggested by solar rotation models requiring pole-to-equator flows of a few m/sec, as well as by the observed migration of magnetic activity over the solar cycle. The solar rotation exhibits a latitude and cycle dependence which can be understood in terms of a time-dependent convective toroidal roll pattern.

  4. Field-omics—understanding large-scale molecular data from field crops

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersson, Erik; Jacobson, Dan; Vivier, Melané A.; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Andreasson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The recent advances in gene expression analysis as well as protein and metabolite quantification enable genome-scale capturing of complex biological processes at the molecular level in crop field trials. This opens up new possibilities for understanding the molecular and environmental complexity of field-based systems and thus shedding light on the black box between genotype and environment, which in agriculture always is influenced by a multi-stress environment and includes management interventions. Nevertheless, combining different types of data obtained from the field and making biological sense out of large datasets remain challenging. Here we highlight the need to create a cross-disciplinary platform for innovative experimental design, sampling and subsequent analysis of large-scale molecular data obtained in field trials. For these reasons we put forward the term field-omics: “Field-omics strives to couple information from genomes, transcriptomes, proteomes, metabolomes and metagenomes to the long-established practice in crop science of conducting field trials as well as to adapt current strategies for recording and analysing field data to facilitate integration with ‘-omics’ data.” PMID:24999347

  5. Scalable parallel distance field construction for large-scale applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Hongfeng; Xie, Jinrong; Ma, Kwan -Liu; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-10-01

    Computing distance fields is fundamental to many scientific and engineering applications. Distance fields can be used to direct analysis and reduce data. In this paper, we present a highly scalable method for computing 3D distance fields on massively parallel distributed-memory machines. Anew distributed spatial data structure, named parallel distance tree, is introduced to manage the level sets of data and facilitate surface tracking overtime, resulting in significantly reduced computation and communication costs for calculating the distance to the surface of interest from any spatial locations. Our method supports several data types and distance metrics from real-world applications. We demonstrate itsmore » efficiency and scalability on state-of-the-art supercomputers using both large-scale volume datasets and surface models. We also demonstrate in-situ distance field computation on dynamic turbulent flame surfaces for a petascale combustion simulation. In conclusion, our work greatly extends the usability of distance fields for demanding applications.« less

  6. Numerically modelling the large scale coronal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Mayukh; Nandi, Dibyendu

    2016-07-01

    The solar corona spews out vast amounts of magnetized plasma into the heliosphere which has a direct impact on the Earth's magnetosphere. Thus it is important that we develop an understanding of the dynamics of the solar corona. With our present technology it has not been possible to generate 3D magnetic maps of the solar corona; this warrants the use of numerical simulations to study the coronal magnetic field. A very popular method of doing this, is to extrapolate the photospheric magnetic field using NLFF or PFSS codes. However the extrapolations at different time intervals are completely independent of each other and do not capture the temporal evolution of magnetic fields. On the other hand full MHD simulations of the global coronal field, apart from being computationally very expensive would be physically less transparent, owing to the large number of free parameters that are typically used in such codes. This brings us to the Magneto-frictional model which is relatively simpler and computationally more economic. We have developed a Magnetofrictional Model, in 3D spherical polar co-ordinates to study the large scale global coronal field. Here we present studies of changing connectivities between active regions, in response to photospheric motions.

  7. BRAVISSIMO: 12-month results from a large scale prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Bosiers, M; Deloose, K; Callaert, J; Maene, L; Beelen, R; Keirse, K; Verbist, J; Peeters, P; Schroë, H; Lauwers, G; Lansink, W; Vanslembroeck, K; D'archambeau, O; Hendriks, J; Lauwers, P; Vermassen, F; Randon, C; Van Herzeele, I; De Ryck, F; De Letter, J; Lanckneus, M; Van Betsbrugge, M; Thomas, B; Deleersnijder, R; Vandekerkhof, J; Baeyens, I; Berghmans, T; Buttiens, J; Van Den Brande, P; Debing, E; Rabbia, C; Ruffino, A; Tealdi, D; Nano, G; Stegher, S; Gasparini, D; Piccoli, G; Coppi, G; Silingardi, R; Cataldi, V; Paroni, G; Palazzo, V; Stella, A; Gargiulo, M; Muccini, N; Nessi, F; Ferrero, E; Pratesi, C; Fargion, A; Chiesa, R; Marone, E; Bertoglio, L; Cremonesi, A; Dozza, L; Galzerano, G; De Donato, G; Setacci, C

    2013-04-01

    The BRAVISSIMO study is a prospective, non-randomized, multi-center, multi-national, monitored trial, conducted at 12 hospitals in Belgium and 11 hospitals in Italy. This manuscript reports the findings up to the 12-month follow-up time point for both the TASC A&B cohort and the TASC C&D cohort. The primary endpoint of the study is primary patency at 12 months, defined as a target lesion without a hemodynamically significant stenosis on Duplex ultrasound (>50%, systolic velocity ratio no greater than 2.0) and without target lesion revascularization (TLR) within 12 months. Between July 2009 and September 2010, 190 patients with TASC A or TASC B aortoiliac lesions and 135 patients with TASC C or TASC D aortoiliac lesions were included. The demographic data were comparable for the TASC A/B cohort and the TASC C/D cohort. The number of claudicants was significantly higher in the TASC A/B cohort, The TASC C/D cohort contains more CLI patients. The primary patency rate for the total patient population was 93.1%. The primary patency rates at 12 months for the TASC A, B, C and D lesions were 94.0%, 96.5%, 91.3% and 90.2% respectively. No statistical significant difference was shown when comparing these groups. Our findings confirm that endovascular therapy, and more specifically primary stenting, is the preferred treatment for patients with TASC A, B, C and D aortoiliac lesions. We notice similar endovascular results compared to surgery, however without the invasive character of surgery. PMID:23558659

  8. Field-aligned currents and large scale magnetospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, N.

    1980-01-01

    D'Angelo's model of polar cap electric fields (1977) was used to visualize how high-latitude field-aligned currents are driven by the solar wind generator. The region 1 and region 2 currents of Iijima and Potemra (1976) and the cusp field-aligned currents of Wilhjelm et al. (1978) and McDiarmid et al. (1978) are apparently driven by different generators, although in both cases the solar wind is their ultimate source.

  9. Nonlinear density fluctuation field theory for large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Miao, Hai-Xing

    2009-05-01

    We develop an effective field theory of density fluctuations for a Newtonian self-gravitating N-body system in quasi-equilibrium and apply it to a homogeneous universe with small density fluctuations. Keeping the density fluctuations up to second order, we obtain the nonlinear field equation of 2-pt correlation ξ(r), which contains 3-pt correlation and formal ultra-violet divergences. By the Groth-Peebles hierarchical ansatz and mass renormalization, the equation becomes closed with two new terms beyond the Gaussian approximation, and their coefficients are taken as parameters. The analytic solution is obtained in terms of the hypergeometric functions, which is checked numerically. With one single set of two fixed parameters, the correlation ξ(r) and the corresponding power spectrum P(κ) simultaneously match the results from all the major surveys, such as APM, SDSS, 2dfGRS, and REFLEX. The model gives a unifying understanding of several seemingly unrelated features of large scale structure from a field-theoretical perspective. The theory is worth extending to study the evolution effects in an expanding universe.

  10. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-05

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local in space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. Furthermore, we describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/kNL and k/kM, where k is the wavenumber of interest, kNL is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and kM is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.

  11. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-05

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local inmore » space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. Furthermore, we describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/kNL and k/kM, where k is the wavenumber of interest, kNL is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and kM is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.« less

  12. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-01

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local in space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. We describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/kNL and k/kM, where k is the wavenumber of interest, kNL is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and kM is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.

  13. Large-scale electric fields in post-flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinata, Satoshi

    1987-01-01

    As the electrical conductivity along the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere is large, parallel electric fields have been neglected in most investigations. The importance of such fields is demonstrated for post-flare loops, and a model for them is introduced which takes into account the effect of parallel electric fields. The electric field calculated from the model is consistent with the electric field observed by Foukal et al. (1983).

  14. Large-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    Early theoretical work of Parker is presented along with the observational evidence supporting his Archimedes spiral model. Variations present in the interplanetary magnetic field from the spiral angle are related to structures in the solar wind. The causes of these structures are found to be either nonuniform radial solar wind flow or the time evolution of the photospheric field. Coronal magnetic models are related to the connection between the solar magnetic field and the interplanetary magnetic field. Direct extension of the solar field-magnetic nozzle controversy is discussed along with the coronal magnetic models. Effects of active regions on the interplanetary magnetic field is discussed with particular reference to the evolution of interplanetary sectors. Interplanetary magnetic field magnitude variations are shown throughout the solar cycle. The percentage of time the field magnitude is greater than 10 gamma is shown to closely parallel sunspot number. The sun's polar field influence on the interplanetary field and alternative views of the magnetic field structure out of the ecliptic plane are presented. In addition, a variety of significantly different interplanetary field structures are discussed.

  15. Modeling emergent large-scale structures of barchan dune fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worman, S. L.; Murray, A. B.; Littlewood, R.; Andreotti, B.; Claudin, P.

    2013-10-01

    In nature, barchan dunes typically exist as members of larger fields that display striking, enigmatic structures that cannot be readily explained by examining the dynamics at the scale of single dunes, or by appealing to patterns in external forcing. To explore the possibility that observed structures emerge spontaneously as a collective result of many dunes interacting with each other, we built a numerical model that treats barchans as discrete entities that interact with one another according to simplified rules derived from theoretical and numerical work and from field observations: (1) Dunes exchange sand through the fluxes that leak from the downwind side of each dune and are captured on their upstream sides; (2) when dunes become sufficiently large, small dunes are born on their downwind sides (`calving'); and (3) when dunes collide directly enough, they merge. Results show that these relatively simple interactions provide potential explanations for a range of field-scale phenomena including isolated patches of dunes and heterogeneous arrangements of similarly sized dunes in denser fields. The results also suggest that (1) dune field characteristics depend on the sand flux fed into the upwind boundary, although (2) moving downwind, the system approaches a common attracting state in which the memory of the upwind conditions vanishes. This work supports the hypothesis that calving exerts a first-order control on field-scale phenomena; it prevents individual dunes from growing without bound, as single-dune analyses suggest, and allows the formation of roughly realistic, persistent dune field patterns.

  16. Modeling emergent large-scale structures of barchan dune fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worman, S. L.; Murray, A.; Littlewood, R. C.; Andreotti, B.; Claudin, P.

    2013-12-01

    In nature, barchan dunes typically exist as members of larger fields that display striking, enigmatic structures that cannot be readily explained by examining the dynamics at the scale of single dunes, or by appealing to patterns in external forcing. To explore the possibility that observed structures emerge spontaneously as a collective result of many dunes interacting with each other, we built a numerical model that treats barchans as discrete entities that interact with one another according to simplified rules derived from theoretical and numerical work, and from field observations: Dunes exchange sand through the fluxes that leak from the downwind side of each dune and are captured on their upstream sides; when dunes become sufficiently large, small dunes are born on their downwind sides ('calving'); and when dunes collide directly enough, they merge. Results show that these relatively simple interactions provide potential explanations for a range of field-scale phenomena including isolated patches of dunes and heterogeneous arrangements of similarly sized dunes in denser fields. The results also suggest that (1) dune field characteristics depend on the sand flux fed into the upwind boundary, although (2) moving downwind, the system approaches a common attracting state in which the memory of the upwind conditions vanishes. This work supports the hypothesis that calving exerts a first order control on field-scale phenomena; it prevents individual dunes from growing without bound, as single-dune analyses suggest, and allows the formation of roughly realistic, persistent dune field patterns.

  17. CONSTRAINING PRIMORDIAL MAGNETIC FIELDS THROUGH LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Natarajan, Aravind; Battaglia, Nicholas; Maravin, Yurii; Tevzadze, Alexander G.

    2013-06-10

    We study primordial magnetic field effects on the matter perturbations in the universe. We assume magnetic field generation prior to the big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), i.e., during the radiation-dominated epoch of the universe expansion, but do not limit analysis by considering a particular magnetogenesis scenario. Contrary to previous studies, we limit the total magnetic field energy density and not the smoothed amplitude of the magnetic field at large (of the order of 1 Mpc) scales. We review several cosmological signatures, such as halo abundance, thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, and Ly{alpha} data. For a cross-check, we compare our limits with that obtained through the cosmic microwave background faraday rotation effect and BBN. The limits range between 1.5 nG and 4.5 nG for n{sub B} in (- 3; -1.5).

  18. Imprints of massive primordial fields on large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela; Fasiello, Matteo; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Attention has focussed recently on models of inflation that involve a second or more fields with a mass near the inflationary Hubble parameter H, as may occur in supersymmetric theories if the supersymmetry-breaking scale is not far from H. Quasi-single-field (QsF) inflation is a relatively simple family of phenomenological models that serve as a proxy for theories with additional fields with masses m~ H. Since QsF inflation involves fields in addition to the inflaton, the consistency conditions between correlations that arise in single-clock inflation are not necessarily satisfied. As a result, correlation functions in the squeezed limit may be larger than in single-field inflation. Scalar non-Gaussianities mediated by the massive isocurvature field in QsF have been shown to be potentially observable. These are especially interesting since they would convey information about the mass of the isocurvature field. Here we consider non-Gaussian correlators involving tensor modes and their observational signatures. A physical correlation between a (long-wavelength) tensor mode and two scalar modes (tss), for instance, may give rise to local departures from statistical isotropy or, in other words, a non-trivial four-point function. The presence of the tensor mode may moreover be inferred geometrically from the shape dependence of the four-point function. We compute tss and stt (one soft curvature mode and two hard tensors) bispectra in QsF inflation, identifying the conditions necessary for these to "violate" the consistency relations. We find that while consistency conditions are violated by stt correlations, they are preserved by the tss in the minimal QsF model. Our study of primordial correlators which include gravitons in seeking imprints of additional fields with masses m~ H during inflation can be seen as complementary to the recent ``cosmological collider physics'' proposal.

  19. Large Scale High-Latitude Ionospheric Electrodynamic Fields and Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides an overview as well as the application of the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure. AMIE synthesizes observations from various ground-based and space-born instruments to derive global patterns of ionospheric conductance, electric fields, ionospheric equivalent current, horizontal currents, field-aligned currents, and other related electrodynamic fields simultaneously. Examples are presented to illustrate the effects of the different data inputs on the AMIE outputs. The AMIE patterns derived from ground magnetometer data are generally similar to those derived from satellite magnetometer data. But ground magnetometer data yield a cross-polar potential drop that is about 15-45 % smaller than that derived from satellite magnetometer data. Ground magnetometers also grossly underestimate the magnetic perturbations in space when compared with the in situ satellite magnetometer data. However, when satellite magnetometer data are employed, AMIE is able to replicate the observed magnetic perturbations along the satellite tracks with a mean root-mean-square (RMS) error of 17-21 %. In addition to derive snapshots of ionospheric electrodynamic fields, the utility of AMIE can be easily expanded to obtain the average distributions of these fields along with their associated variability. Such information should be valuable to the analysis and interpretation of the Swarm observations.

  20. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Noreña, Jorge; Simonović, Marko; Vernizzi, Filippo E-mail: jorge.norena@icc.ub.edu E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2013-12-01

    We derive consistency relations for the late universe (CDM and ΛCDM): relations between an n-point function of the density contrast δ and an (n+1)-point function in the limit in which one of the (n+1) momenta becomes much smaller than the others. These are based on the observation that a long mode, in single-field models of inflation, reduces to a diffeomorphism since its freezing during inflation all the way until the late universe, even when the long mode is inside the horizon (but out of the sound horizon). These results are derived in Newtonian gauge, at first and second order in the small momentum q of the long mode and they are valid non-perturbatively in the short-scale δ. In the non-relativistic limit our results match with [1]. These relations are a consequence of diffeomorphism invariance; they are not satisfied in the presence of extra degrees of freedom during inflation or violation of the Equivalence Principle (extra forces) in the late universe.

  1. Field-aligned currents and large-scale magnetospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, N.

    1979-01-01

    The existence of field-aligned currents (FAC) at northern and southern high latitudes was confirmed by a number of observations, most clearly by experiments on the TRIAD and ISIS 2 satellites. The high-latitude FAC system is used to relate what is presently known about the large-scale pattern of high-latitude ionospheric electric fields and their relation to solar wind parameters. Recently a simplified model was presented for polar cap electric fields. The model is of considerable help in visualizing the large-scale features of FAC systems. A summary of the FAC observations is given. The simplified model is used to visualize how the FAC systems are driven by their generators.

  2. The need for a large-scale trial of fibrate therapy in diabetes: the rationale and design of the Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) study. [ISRCTN64783481

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Background Fibrates correct the typical lipid abnormalities of type 2 diabetes mellitus, yet no study, to date, has specifically set out to evaluate the role of fibrate therapy in preventing cardiovascular events in this setting. Methods Subjects with type 2 diabetes, aged 50–75 years, were screened for eligibility to participate in a long-term trial of comicronized fenofibrate 200 mg daily compared with matching placebo to assess benefits of treatment on the occurrence of coronary and other vascular events. People with total cholesterol levels 3.0–6.5 mmol/L plus either a total-to-HDLc ratio >4.0 or triglyceride level >1.0 mmol/L with no clear indication for lipid-modifying therapy were eligible. Results A total of 9795 people were randomized into the Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) trial. All received dietary advice, followed by a 6-week single-blind placebo run-in, then a 6-week active run-in period before randomization. Participants are being followed up every 6 months for outcome events and safety assessments. The study is designed to yield at least 500 coronary events (primary endpoint: first nonfatal myocardial infarction or coronary death) over 5 years, to have 80% power to identify as statistically significant at 2P = 0.05 a 22% reduction in such events, using intention-to-treat methods. Conclusions Type 2 diabetes is the most common endocrine disorder worldwide, and its prevalence is increasing. The current evidence about use of fibrates in type 2 diabetes, from around 2000 people treated, will increase with FIELD to evidence from around 12000. FIELD will establish the role of fenofibrate treatment in reducing cardiovascular risk in people with type 2 diabetes. The main results are expected to be available in late 2005. PMID:15571637

  3. Generation of Large-Scale Magnetic Fields by Small-Scale Dynamo in Shear Flows.

    PubMed

    Squire, J; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-10-23

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic nature of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects. PMID:26551120

  4. Generation of large-scale magnetic fields by small-scale dynamo in shear flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-10-20

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Furthermore, given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic naturemore » of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects.« less

  5. Generation of large-scale magnetic fields by small-scale dynamo in shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-10-20

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Furthermore, given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic nature of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects.

  6. Nonlinear Generation of shear flows and large scale magnetic fields by small scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aburjania, G.

    2009-04-01

    EGU2009-233 Nonlinear Generation of shear flows and large scale magnetic fields by small scale turbulence in the ionosphere by G. Aburjania Contact: George Aburjania, g.aburjania@gmail.com,aburj@mymail.ge

  7. Large-scale negative polarity magnetic fields on the sun and particle-emitting flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bumba, V.

    1972-01-01

    Some observational facts about the large-scale patterns formed by solar negative polarity magnetic fields during the 19th and 20th cycles of solar activity are presented. The close relation of the position of occurrence of very large flares accompanied by cosmic ray and PCA events as well as other phenomena of solar activity during the declining part of the 19th cycle of the regularities in the internal structure of large scale negative polarity features are demonstrated.

  8. Techniques for extracting single-trial activity patterns from large-scale neural recordings.

    PubMed

    Churchland, Mark M; Yu, Byron M; Sahani, Maneesh; Shenoy, Krishna V

    2007-10-01

    Large, chronically implanted arrays of microelectrodes are an increasingly common tool for recording from primate cortex and can provide extracellular recordings from many (order of 100) neurons. While the desire for cortically based motor prostheses has helped drive their development, such arrays also offer great potential to advance basic neuroscience research. Here we discuss the utility of array recording for the study of neural dynamics. Neural activity often has dynamics beyond that driven directly by the stimulus. While governed by those dynamics, neural responses may nevertheless unfold differently for nominally identical trials, rendering many traditional analysis methods ineffective. We review recent studies - some employing simultaneous recording, some not - indicating that such variability is indeed present both during movement generation and during the preceding premotor computations. In such cases, large-scale simultaneous recordings have the potential to provide an unprecedented view of neural dynamics at the level of single trials. However, this enterprise will depend not only on techniques for simultaneous recording but also on the use and further development of analysis techniques that can appropriately reduce the dimensionality of the data, and allow visualization of single-trial neural behavior. PMID:18093826

  9. An Empirical Relation between the Large-scale Magnetic Field and the Dynamical Mass in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, F. S.; Martinsson, T. P. K.; Knapen, J. H.; Beckman, J. E.; Koribalski, B.; Elmegreen, B. G.

    2016-02-01

    The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields as well as the influence of the magnetic fields on the evolution of galaxies are unknown. Though not without challenges, the dynamo theory can explain the large-scale coherent magnetic fields that govern galaxies, but observational evidence for the theory is so far very scarce. Putting together the available data of non-interacting, non-cluster galaxies with known large-scale magnetic fields, we find a tight correlation between the integrated polarized flux density, SPI, and the rotation speed, vrot, of galaxies. This leads to an almost linear correlation between the large-scale magnetic field \\bar{B} and vrot, assuming that the number of cosmic-ray electrons is proportional to the star formation rate, and a super-linear correlation assuming equipartition between magnetic fields and cosmic rays. This correlation cannot be attributed to an active linear α-Ω dynamo, as no correlation holds with global shear or angular speed. It indicates instead a coupling between the large-scale magnetic field and the dynamical mass of the galaxies, \\bar{B}˜ \\{M}{{dyn}}0.25-0.4. Hence, faster rotating and/or more massive galaxies have stronger large-scale magnetic fields. The observed \\bar{B}-{v}{{rot}} correlation shows that the anisotropic turbulent magnetic field dominates \\bar{B} in fast rotating galaxies as the turbulent magnetic field, coupled with gas, is enhanced and ordered due to the strong gas compression and/or local shear in these systems. This study supports a stationary condition for the large-scale magnetic field as long as the dynamical mass of galaxies is constant.

  10. What controls the large-scale magnetic fields of M dwarfs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastine, T.; Morin, J.; Duarte, L.; Reiners, A.; Christensen, U.; Wicht, J.

    2014-08-01

    Observations of active M dwarfs show a broad variety of large-scale magnetic fields encompassing dipole-dominated and multipolar geometries. We detail the analogy between some anelastic dynamo simulations and spectropolarimetric observations of 23 M stars. In numerical models, the relative contribution of inertia and Coriolis force -estimated by the so-called local Rossby number- is known to have a strong impact on the magnetic field geometry. We discuss the relevance of this parameter in setting the large-scale magnetic field of M dwarfs.

  11. Observations of large scale steady magnetic fields in the dayside Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.; Mihalov, J. D.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Although the dayside ionosphere of Venus is often field-free except for fine-scale features, large-scale steady ionospheric magnetic fields with magnitudes sometimes exceeding 100 gammas are occasionally observed by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter magnetometer. These fields are mainly horizontal and can assume any angle in the horizontal plane. The orientation of the field may change along the spacecraft trajectory. The field magnitude in the upper ionosphere usually shows a distinct minimum near approximately 200 km altitude, but the altitude profile is otherwise arbitrary. With few exceptions, the observations of these large scale fields occur when periapsis is at solar zenith angles less than 50 deg. The occurrence of large-scale fields is often coincident with the observation of high solar wind dynamic pressures by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter plasma analyzer closely following the ionosphere encounter. However, the detection of this phenomenon even during some orbits for which the dynamic pressure is not extraordinarily high suggests that other factors, such as hysteresis effects, must also play a role in determining the occurrence frequency of large-scale magnetic fields in the dayside Venus ionosphere.

  12. Mechanisation of large-scale agricultural fields in developing countries - a review.

    PubMed

    Onwude, Daniel I; Abdulstter, Rafia; Gomes, Chandima; Hashim, Norhashila

    2016-09-01

    Mechanisation of large-scale agricultural fields often requires the application of modern technologies such as mechanical power, automation, control and robotics. These technologies are generally associated with relatively well developed economies. The application of these technologies in some developing countries in Africa and Asia is limited by factors such as technology compatibility with the environment, availability of resources to facilitate the technology adoption, cost of technology purchase, government policies, adequacy of technology and appropriateness in addressing the needs of the population. As a result, many of the available resources have been used inadequately by farmers, who continue to rely mostly on conventional means of agricultural production, using traditional tools and equipment in most cases. This has led to low productivity and high cost of production among others. Therefore this paper attempts to evaluate the application of present day technology and its limitations to the advancement of large-scale mechanisation in developing countries of Africa and Asia. Particular emphasis is given to a general understanding of the various levels of mechanisation, present day technology, its management and application to large-scale agricultural fields. This review also focuses on/gives emphasis to future outlook that will enable a gradual, evolutionary and sustainable technological change. The study concludes that large-scale-agricultural farm mechanisation for sustainable food production in Africa and Asia must be anchored on a coherent strategy based on the actual needs and priorities of the large-scale farmers. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26940194

  13. Controlled synthesis of large-scale, uniform, vertically standing graphene for high-performance field emitters.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lili; Yang, Tianzhong; Liu, Fei; Dong, Jing; Yao, Zhaohui; Shen, Chengmin; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Liu, Yunqi; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2013-01-11

    Large-scale, uniform, vertically standing graphene with atomically thin edges are controllably synthesized on copper foil using a microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition system. A growth mechanism for this system is proposed. This film shows excellent field-emission properties, with low turn-on field of 1.3 V μm(-1) , low threshold field of 3.0 V μm(-1) and a large field-enhancement factor more than 10 000. PMID:23135968

  14. The Decay of a Weak Large-scale Magnetic Field in Two-dimensional Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondić, Todor; Hughes, David W.; Tobias, Steven M.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the decay of a large-scale magnetic field in the context of incompressible, two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. It is well established that a very weak mean field, of strength significantly below equipartition value, induces a small-scale field strong enough to inhibit the process of turbulent magnetic diffusion. In light of ever-increasing computer power, we revisit this problem to investigate fluids and magnetic Reynolds numbers that were previously inaccessible. Furthermore, by exploiting the relation between the turbulent diffusion of the magnetic potential and that of the magnetic field, we are able to calculate the turbulent magnetic diffusivity extremely accurately through the imposition of a uniform mean magnetic field. We confirm the strong dependence of the turbulent diffusivity on the product of the magnetic Reynolds number and the energy of the large-scale magnetic field. We compare our findings with various theoretical descriptions of this process.

  15. The evolution of large-scale magnetic fields in the ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravens, T. E.; Shinagawa, H.; Nagy, A. F.

    1984-03-01

    Large-scale magnetic fields are often observed in the ionosphere of Venus by the magnetometer on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter, especially near the subsolar point or when the solar wind dynamic pressure is high. An equation for the time evolution of the magnetic field is derived which includes both a term representing the time rate of change of the field due to the convection of magnetic flux by plasma motions, and a magnetic diffusion/dissipation term. The ionospheric plasma velocities required by these equations were obtained by numerically solving the momentum equation. Numerical solutions to the magnetic field equation indicate that large-scale magnetic fields, which are not being actively maintained, decay with time scales ranging from tens of minutes to several hours. The vertical convection of magnetic flux enables magnetic field structures deep within the ionosphere to persist longer than would otherwise be expected. This vertical convection also explains the shape of these structures.

  16. Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray probes of large scale structure and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigl, Günter; Miniati, Francesco; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2004-08-01

    We study signatures of a structured universe in the multi-pole moments, auto-correlation function, and cluster statistics of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays above 1019 eV. We compare scenarios where the sources are distributed homogeneously or according to the baryon density distribution obtained from a cosmological large scale structure simulation. The influence of extragalactic magnetic fields is studied by comparing the case of negligible fields with fields expected to be produced along large scale shocks with a maximal strength consistent with observations. We confirm that strongly magnetized observers would predict considerable anisotropy on large scales, which is already in conflict with current data. In the best fit scenario only the sources are strongly magnetized, although deflection can still be considerable, of order 20° up to 1020 eV, and a pronounced GZK cutoff is predicted. We then discuss signatures for future large scale full-sky detectors such as the Pierre Auger and EUSO projects. Auto-correlations are sensitive to the source density only if magnetic fields do not significantly affect propagation. In contrast, for a weakly magnetized observer, degree scale auto-correlations below a certain level indicate magnetized discrete sources. It may be difficult even for next generation experiments to distinguish between structured and unstructured source distributions.

  17. Large-scale magnetic fields at high Reynolds numbers in magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

    PubMed

    Hotta, H; Rempel, M; Yokoyama, T

    2016-03-25

    The 11-year solar magnetic cycle shows a high degree of coherence in spite of the turbulent nature of the solar convection zone. It has been found in recent high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations that the maintenance of a large-scale coherent magnetic field is difficult with small viscosity and magnetic diffusivity (≲10 (12) square centimenters per second). We reproduced previous findings that indicate a reduction of the energy in the large-scale magnetic field for lower diffusivities and demonstrate the recovery of the global-scale magnetic field using unprecedentedly high resolution. We found an efficient small-scale dynamo that suppresses small-scale flows, which mimics the properties of large diffusivity. As a result, the global-scale magnetic field is maintained even in the regime of small diffusivities-that is, large Reynolds numbers. PMID:27013727

  18. The concentration of the large-scale solar magnetic field by a meridional surface flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devore, C. R.; Boris, J. P.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical and numerical solutions to the magnetic flux transport equation in the absence of new bipolar sources of flux are calculated for several meridional flow profiles and a range of peak flow speeds. It is found that a poleward flow with a broad profile and a nominal 10 m/s maximum speed concentrates the large-scale field into very small caps of less than 15 deg half-angle, with average field strengths of several tens of gauss, contrary to observations. A flow which reaches its peak speed at a relatively low latitude and then decreases rapidly to zero at higher latitudes leads to a large-scale field pattern which is consistent with observations. For such a flow, only lower latitude sunspot groups can contribute to interhemispheric flux annihilation and the resulting decay and reversal of the polar magnetic fields.

  19. Large-scale magnetic fields at high Reynolds numbers in magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M.; Yokoyama, T.

    2016-03-01

    The 11-year solar magnetic cycle shows a high degree of coherence in spite of the turbulent nature of the solar convection zone. It has been found in recent high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations that the maintenance of a large-scale coherent magnetic field is difficult with small viscosity and magnetic diffusivity (≲1012square centimenters per second). We reproduced previous findings that indicate a reduction of the energy in the large-scale magnetic field for lower diffusivities and demonstrate the recovery of the global-scale magnetic field using unprecedentedly high resolution. We found an efficient small-scale dynamo that suppresses small-scale flows, which mimics the properties of large diffusivity. As a result, the global-scale magnetic field is maintained even in the regime of small diffusivities—that is, large Reynolds numbers.

  20. Large-scale perturbations from the waterfall field in hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, José; Wands, David; Sasaki, Misao E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2010-09-01

    We estimate large-scale curvature perturbations from isocurvature fluctuations in the waterfall field during hybrid inflation, in addition to the usual inflaton field perturbations. The tachyonic instability at the end of inflation leads to an explosive growth of super-Hubble scale perturbations, but they retain the steep blue spectrum characteristic of vacuum fluctuations in a massive field during inflation. The power spectrum thus peaks around the Hubble-horizon scale at the end of inflation. We extend the usual δN formalism to include the essential role of these small fluctuations when estimating the large-scale curvature perturbation. The resulting curvature perturbation due to fluctuations in the waterfall field is second-order and the spectrum is expected to be of order 10{sup −54} on cosmological scales.

  1. A Retrospective Look at the Collected Results on the Large Scale Ionospheric Magnetic Fields at Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Ma, Y.-J.; Villarreal, M.; Russell, C. T.; Zhang, T.-L.; Alvarez, K.

    2015-10-01

    We revisit the collected large scale ionospheric magnetic field results obtained by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) and Venus Express (VEX) missions to ask how much we really understand about that field's global structure. To assist in this assessment we make use of several previously described MHD simulations of the solar wind interaction that reproduce its other observed features. These comparisons help to support our conceptual pictures in some cases, and to raise questions in others.

  2. Large-scale solar magnetic fields and H-alpha patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, P. S.

    1972-01-01

    Coronal and interplanetary magnetic fields computed from measurements of large-scale photospheric magnetic fields suffer from interruptions in day-to-day observations and the limitation of using only measurements made near the solar central meridian. Procedures were devised for inferring the lines of polarity reversal from H-alpha solar patrol photographs that map the same large-scale features found on Mt. Wilson magnetograms. These features may be monitored without interruption by combining observations from the global network of observatories associated with NOAA's Space Environment Services Center. The patterns of inferred magnetic fields may be followed accurately as far as 60 deg from central meridian. Such patterns will be used to improve predictions of coronal features during the next solar eclipse.

  3. The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2015-02-01

    We present a new method to resum the effect of large scale motions in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. Because the linear power spectrum in ΛCDM is not scale free the effects of the large scale flows are enhanced. Although previous EFT calculations of the equal-time density power spectrum at one and two loops showed a remarkable agreement with numerical results, they also showed a 2% residual which appeared related to the BAO oscillations. We show that this was indeed the case, explain the physical origin and show how a Lagrangian based calculation removes this differences. We propose a simple method to upgrade existing Eulerian calculations to effectively make them Lagrangian and compare the new results with existing fits to numerical simulations. Our new two-loop results agrees with numerical results up to k∼ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1} to within 1% with no oscillatory residuals. We also compute power spectra involving momentum which is significantly more affected by the large scale flows. We show how keeping track of these velocities significantly enhances the UV reach of the momentum power spectrum in addition to removing the BAO related residuals. We compute predictions for the real space correlation function around the BAO scale and investigate its sensitivity to the EFT parameters and the details of the resummation technique.

  4. Destruction of large-scale magnetic field in non-linear simulations of the shear dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teed, Robert J.; Proctor, Michael R. E.

    2016-05-01

    The Sun's magnetic field exhibits coherence in space and time on much larger scales than the turbulent convection that ultimately powers the dynamo. In the past the α-effect (mean-field) concept has been used to model the solar cycle, but recent work has cast doubt on the validity of the mean-field ansatz under solar conditions. This indicates that one should seek an alternative mechanism for generating large-scale structure. One possibility is the recently proposed `shear dynamo' mechanism where large-scale magnetic fields are generated in the presence of a simple shear. Further investigation of this proposition is required, however, because work has been focused on the linear regime with a uniform shear profile thus far. In this paper we report results of the extension of the original shear dynamo model into the non-linear regime. We find that whilst large-scale structure can initially persist into the saturated regime, in several of our simulations it is destroyed via large increase in kinetic energy. This result casts doubt on the ability of the simple uniform shear dynamo mechanism to act as an alternative to the α-effect in solar conditions.

  5. Generation of large-scale magnetic fields from inflation in teleparallelism

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Geng, Chao-Qiang; Luo, Ling-Wei E-mail: geng@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    2012-10-01

    We explore the generation of large-scale magnetic fields from inflation in teleparallelism, in which the gravitational theory is described by the torsion scalar instead of the scalar curvature in general relativity. In particular, we examine the case that the conformal invariance of the electromagnetic field during inflation is broken by a non-minimal gravitational coupling between the torsion scalar and the electromagnetic field. It is shown that for a power-law type coupling, the magnetic field on 1 Mpc scale with its strength of ∼ 10{sup −9} G at the present time can be generated.

  6. Ocean acoustic field simulations for monitoring large-scale ocean structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, E. C.; Wang, Y. Y.

    1991-04-01

    Substantial numerical simulations of low-frequency acoustic field under different ocean models have been carried out on the CYBER-205 at WPL/NOAA. The purpose of these numerical simulations is to investigate our potential ability to monitor large-scale ocean structures by using modal ocean acoustic tomography (MOAT). For example, the possibility of monitoring El Niño by using MOAT has been illustrated.

  7. Estimating field-of-view loss in bathymetric lidar: application to large-scale simulations.

    PubMed

    Carr, Domenic; Tuell, Grady

    2014-07-20

    When designing a bathymetric lidar, it is important to study simulated waveforms for various combinations of system and environmental parameters. To predict a system's ranging accuracy, it is often necessary to analyze thousands of waveforms. In these large-scale simulations, estimating field-of-view loss is a challenge because the calculation is complex and computationally intensive. This paper describes a new procedure for quickly approximating this loss, and illustrates how it can be used to efficiently predict ranging accuracy. PMID:25090208

  8. Probing the large-scale velocity field with clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, Neta A.; Cen, Renyue; Gramann, Mirt

    1994-01-01

    What is the role of clusters of galaxies in probing the large-scale velocity field of the universe? We investigate the distribution of peculiar velocities of clusters of galaxies in the popular low-density (omega = 0.3) flat cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model, which best fits many large-scale structure observations. An omega = 1 CDM model is also studied for comparison. We find that clusters of galaxies are efficient tracers of the large-scale velocity field. The clusters exhibit a Maxwellian distribution of peculiar velocities, as expected from Gaussian initial density fluctuations. The cluster three-dimensional velocity distribution for the omega = 0.3 model peaks at nu approximately greater than 400 km/s and extends to high velocities of nu approximately 1200 km/s. The rms peculiar velocity of the clusters is 440 km/s. Approximately 10% of all model clusters move with high peculiar velocities nu greater or equal to 700 km/s. The observed velocity distribution of clusters of galaxies is compared with the predictions from cosmological models. The observed data exhibit a larger velocity tail than seen in the model simulations; however, due to the large observational uncertainties, the data are consistent at approximately equal to 3 sigma level with the odel predictions, and with a Gaussian initial density field. The large peculiar velocities reported for some clusters of galaxies (nu approximately greater than 3000 km/s) are likely to be overestimated, if the current model is viable.

  9. PARTICLE ACCELERATION BY COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS CONTAINING LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC-FIELD VARIATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, F.; Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J. E-mail: jokipii@lpl.arizona.ed

    2010-12-10

    Diffusive shock acceleration at collisionless shocks is thought to be the source of many of the energetic particles observed in space. Large-scale spatial variations of the magnetic field have been shown to be important in understanding observations. The effects are complex, so here we consider a simple, illustrative model. Here we solve numerically the Parker transport equation for a shock in the presence of large-scale sinusoidal magnetic-field variations. We demonstrate that the familiar planar-shock results can be significantly altered as a consequence of large-scale, meandering magnetic lines of force. Because the perpendicular diffusion coefficient {kappa}{sub perpendicular} is generally much smaller than the parallel diffusion coefficient {kappa}{sub ||}, the energetic charged particles are trapped and preferentially accelerated along the shock front in the regions where the connection points of magnetic field lines intersecting the shock surface converge, and thus create the 'hot spots' of the accelerated particles. For the regions where the connection points separate from each other, the acceleration to high energies will be suppressed. Further, the particles diffuse away from the 'hot spot' regions and modify the spectra of downstream particle distribution. These features are qualitatively similar to the recent Voyager observations in the Heliosheath. These results are potentially important for particle acceleration at shocks propagating in turbulent magnetized plasmas as well as those which contain large-scale nonplanar structures. Examples include anomalous cosmic rays accelerated by the solar wind termination shock, energetic particles observed in propagating heliospheric shocks, galactic cosmic rays accelerated by supernova blast waves, etc.

  10. Solar large-scale positive polarity magnetic fields and geomagnetic disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bumba, V.

    1972-01-01

    Unlike the negative polarity solar magnetic field large-scale regular features that correlate with enhanced solar activity regions, the positive polarity regular formations formed in the weak and old background magnetic fields seem to correlate well with geomagnetically enhanced periods of time (shifted for 4 days), which means that they seem to be the source of the quiet solar wind. This behavior of the large intervals of heliographic longitude with prevailing positive polarity fields may be followed to the end of the 18th cycle, during the declining part of the 19th cycle, and during the first half of the present 20th cycle of solar activity.

  11. Effects of Large-scale Non-axisymmetric Perturbations in the Mean-field Solar Dynamo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, V. V.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    We explore the response of a nonlinear non-axisymmetric mean-field solar dynamo model to shallow non-axisymmetric perturbations. After a relaxation period, the amplitude of the non-axisymmetric field depends on the initial condition, helicity conservation, and the depth of perturbation. It is found that a perturbation that is anchored at 0.9 R⊙ has a profound effect on the dynamo process, producing a transient magnetic cycle of the axisymmetric magnetic field, if it is initiated at the growing phase of the cycle. The non-symmetric, with respect to the equator, perturbation results in a hemispheric asymmetry of the magnetic activity. The evolution of the axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric fields depends on the turbulent magnetic Reynolds number Rm. In the range of Rm = 104-106 the evolution returns to the normal course in the next cycle, in which the non-axisymmetric field is generated due to a nonlinear α-effect and magnetic buoyancy. In the stationary state, the large-scale magnetic field demonstrates a phenomenon of “active longitudes” with cyclic 180° “flip-flop” changes of the large-scale magnetic field orientation. The flip-flop effect is known from observations of solar and stellar magnetic cycles. However, this effect disappears in the model, which includes the meridional circulation pattern determined by helioseismology. The rotation rate of the non-axisymmetric field components varies during the relaxation period and carries important information about the dynamo process.

  12. Structure and evolution of the large scale solar and heliospheric magnetic fields. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Structure and evolution of large scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields in the interval 1976-1983 were studied using observations from the Stanford Solar Observatory and a potential field model. The solar wind in the heliosphere is organized into large regions in which the magnetic field has a componenet either toward or away from the sun. The model predicts the location of the current sheet separating these regions. Near solar minimum, in 1976, the current sheet lay within a few degrees of the solar equator having two extensions north and south of the equator. Soon after minimum the latitudinal extent began to increase. The sheet reached to at least 50 deg from 1978 through 1983. The complex structure near maximum occasionally included multiple current sheets. Large scale structures persist for up to two years during the entire interval. To minimize errors in determining the structure of the heliospheric field particular attention was paid to decreasing the distorting effects of rapid field evolution, finding the optimum source surface radius, determining the correction to the sun's polar field, and handling missing data. The predicted structure agrees with direct interplanetary field measurements taken near the ecliptic and with coronameter and interplanetary scintillation measurements which infer the three dimensional interplanetary magnetic structure. During most of the solar cycle the heliospheric field cannot be adequately described as a dipole.

  13. Generation and Properties of Large-Scale Non-axisymmetric Magnetic Fields by Solar Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, Valery; Kosovichev, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Large-scale non-axisymmetric magnetic fields generated by the solar dynamo, and presumably responsible for the phenomenon of "active longitudes", play an important role in the distribution of solar activity and flares. By calculating 3D mean-field dynamo models, we show that nonlinear coupling between axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes, e.g. due to the magnetic feedback on the alpha-effect (see, e.g., [1]), can maintain a large-scale non-axisymmetric dynamo process. Non-axisymmetric random fluctuations of dynamo parameters can be another source for the non-axisymmetric magnetic fields on the Sun. Such fluctuations can provide a mechanism of the magnetic energy transfer from the global field to the non-axisymmetric modes. It is shown that the rotational periods of the non-axisymmetric field correspond to the dynamo process operating in the subsurface shear layer which is located in the range of depths 0.85-0.95R. We find that the magnetic helicity conservation quenches generation of the non-axisymmetric dynamo modes as well as it does for the axisymmetric dynamo. It is concluded that the 3D mean-field non-axisymmetric dynamo models can potentially explain the observed distribution of the solar magnetic activity.1. Moss, D.,Non-axisymmetric solar magnetic fields, 1999, MNRAS, 306, 300On 3/18/2015 2:29 PM, Valery Pipin wrote:

  14. Pervasive large-scale magnetic fields in the Venus nightside ionosphere and their implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    When the solar wind dynamic pressure at Venus was extraordinarily high during the primary mission of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO), 'disappearing ionospheres' occurred on the nightside, with accompanying pervasive near-periapsis magnetic fields of tens of nanoteslas. These nightside counterparts of the generally horizontal large-scale magnetic fields in the dayside ionosphere are found to exhibit some dependence of field magnitude on the solar wind pressure but not on solar zenith angle. Their statistical behavior suggests a global configuration in which the low-altitude field wraps around the planet, while the field at higher altitudes is draped like the induced magnetotail field. The toroidal low-altitude field geometry implies the possible existence of magnetic x points in the low-altitude wake.

  15. Time scales for the decay of induced large-scale magnetic fields in the Venus ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Elphic, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Observations made with the aid of a magnetometer on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter have shown large-scale horizontal magnetic fields in the dayside ionosphere of Venus. According to Cloutier and Daniell (1981), the observed magnetic structures may be quasi-steady features produced by an ionospheric current system driven by solar wind interaction. Russell et al. (1983) have suggested that the altitude profiles of the horizontal field on different orbits exhibit a pattern which can be interpreted as phases in the temporal evolution of an initial state in which the ionosphere was permeated with magnetosheath-like fields. The present investigation is concerned with the argument in favor of a temporal versus spatial explanation for some of the observed field structure. A calculation indicates that the diffusion time for ionospheric fields is long enough to justify attributing the observed fields to the 'memory' of the Venus ionosphere in certain regions.

  16. CMB temperature anisotropy at large scales induced by a causal primordial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bonvin, Camille; Caprini, Chiara E-mail: camille.bonvin@cea.fr

    2010-05-01

    We present an analytical derivation of the Sachs Wolfe effect sourced by a primordial magnetic field. In order to consistently specify the initial conditions, we assume that the magnetic field is generated by a causal process, namely a first order phase transition in the early universe. As for the topological defects case, we apply the general relativistic junction conditions to match the perturbation variables before and after the phase transition which generates the magnetic field, in such a way that the total energy momentum tensor is conserved across the transition and Einstein's equations are satisfied. We further solve the evolution equations for the metric and fluid perturbations at large scales analytically including neutrinos, and derive the magnetic Sachs Wolfe effect. We find that the relevant contribution to the magnetic Sachs Wolfe effect comes from the metric perturbations at next-to-leading order in the large scale limit. The leading order term is in fact strongly suppressed due to the presence of free-streaming neutrinos. We derive the neutrino compensation effect dynamically and confirm that the magnetic Sachs Wolfe spectrum from a causal magnetic field behaves as l(l+1) C{sup B}{sub l}∝l{sup 2} as found in the latest numerical analyses.

  17. Large-Scale Field Study of Landfill Covers at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1998-09-01

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for dry environments. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper presents an overview of the ongoing demonstration.

  18. Effects of large-scale magnetic fields in the Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.; Brace, L. H.; Hartle, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical models of the ionosphere of Venus have been constructed in the past without due consideration of the fact that the ionosphere is sometimes magnetized. This paper examines some differences between the magnetized and unmagnetized dayside Venus ionosphere using the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Langmuir probe and magnetometer data. Particular attention is given to the evaluation of the altitude profiles of the thermal electron heating and comparison of the magnitude of the magnetic force with other forces in the ionosphere. Several examples illustrate how heating profiles are different in the magnetized ionosphere with effective heating below 200 km altitude reduced by orders of magnitude compared to the field-free ionosphere. The force associated with the magnetic field is comparable to other forces in the magnetized ionosphere. The measured plasma density, electron temperature and magnetic field thus suggest that large-scale magnetic fields should be included in future ionosphere models.

  19. Effects of the galactic magnetic field upon large scale anisotropies of extragalactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Harari, D.; Mollerach, S.; Roulet, E. E-mail: mollerach@cab.cnea.gov.ar

    2010-11-01

    The large scale pattern in the arrival directions of extragalactic cosmic rays that reach the Earth is different from that of the flux arriving to the halo of the Galaxy as a result of the propagation through the galactic magnetic field. Two different effects are relevant in this process: deflections of trajectories and (de)acceleration by the electric field component due to the galactic rotation. The deflection of the cosmic ray trajectories makes the flux intensity arriving to the halo from some direction to appear reaching the Earth from another direction. This applies to any intrinsic anisotropy in the extragalactic distribution or, even in the absence of intrinsic anisotropies, to the dipolar Compton-Getting anisotropy induced when the observer is moving with respect to the cosmic rays rest frame. For an observer moving with the solar system, cosmic rays traveling through far away regions of the Galaxy also experience an electric force coming from the relative motion (due to the rotation of the Galaxy) of the local system in which the field can be considered as being purely magnetic. This produces small changes in the particles momentum that can originate large scale anisotropies even for an isotropic extragalactic flux.

  20. Alignments of Dark Matter Halos with Large-scale Tidal Fields: Mass and Redshift Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijie; Wang, Huiyuan; Mo, H. J.; Shi, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale tidal fields estimated directly from the distribution of dark matter halos are used to investigate how halo shapes and spin vectors are aligned with the cosmic web. The major, intermediate, and minor axes of halos are aligned with the corresponding tidal axes, and halo spin axes tend to be parallel with the intermediate axes and perpendicular to the major axes of the tidal field. The strengths of these alignments generally increase with halo mass and redshift, but the dependence is only on the peak height, ν \\equiv {δ }{{c}}/σ ({M}{{h}},z). The scaling relations of the alignment strengths with the value of ν indicate that the alignment strengths remain roughly constant when the structures within which the halos reside are still in a quasi-linear regime, but decreases as nonlinear evolution becomes more important. We also calculate the alignments in projection so that our results can be compared directly with observations. Finally, we investigate the alignments of tidal tensors on large scales, and use the results to understand alignments of halo pairs separated at various distances. Our results suggest that the coherent structure of the tidal field is the underlying reason for the alignments of halos and galaxies seen in numerical simulations and in observations.

  1. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures at two loops

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Foreman, Simon; Green, Daniel; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: sfore@stanford.edu E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2014-07-01

    Large scale structure surveys promise to be the next leading probe of cosmological information. It is therefore crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbation theory for the weakly non-linear regime of dark matter, where correlation functions are computed in an expansion of the wavenumber k of a mode over the wavenumber associated with the non-linear scale k{sub NL}. Since most of the information is contained at high wavenumbers, it is necessary to compute higher order corrections to correlation functions. After the one-loop correction to the matter power spectrum, we estimate that the next leading one is the two-loop contribution, which we compute here. At this order in k/k{sub NL}, there is only one counterterm in the EFTofLSS that must be included, though this term contributes both at tree-level and in several one-loop diagrams. We also discuss correlation functions involving the velocity and momentum fields. We find that the EFTofLSS prediction at two loops matches to percent accuracy the non-linear matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k∼ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1}, requiring just one unknown coefficient that needs to be fit to observations. Given that Standard Perturbation Theory stops converging at redshift zero at k∼ 0.1 h Mpc{sup −1}, our results demonstrate the possibility of accessing a factor of order 200 more dark matter quasi-linear modes than naively expected. If the remaining observational challenges to accessing these modes can be addressed with similar success, our results show that there is tremendous potential for large scale structure surveys to explore the primordial universe.

  2. Large-scale magnetic fields can explain the baryon asymmetry of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Kamada, Kohei

    2016-04-01

    Helical hypermagnetic fields in the primordial Universe can produce the observed amount of baryon asymmetry through the chiral anomaly without any ingredients beyond the standard model of particle physics. While they generate no B -L asymmetry, the generated baryon asymmetry survives the spharelon washout effect, because the generating process remains active until the electroweak phase transition. Solving the Boltzmann equation numerically and finding an attractor solution, we show that the baryon asymmetry of our Universe can be explained, if the present large-scale magnetic fields indicated by the blazar observations have a negative helicity and existed in the early Universe before the electroweak phase transition. We also derive the upper bound on the strength of the helical magnetic field, which is tighter than the cosmic microwave background constraint, to avoid the overproduction of baryon asymmetry.

  3. Large-scale well aligned carbon nitride nanotube films: Low temperature growth and electron field emission

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Dingyong; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Guangyu; Wang, E. G.

    2001-06-01

    Large-scale well aligned carbon nitride nanotube films (6 cm in diameter), which are easily processed and show potential for nanomanipulation, have been synthesized by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at a relatively low temperature of 550{degree}C. The characterization, using transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy, shows that the nanotubes are polymerized by nanobells with nitrogen concentration of 10%. We propose a push-out growth mechanism for the formation of the special polymerized nanobell structure. A turn-on field of electron emission as low as 0.8 V/{mu}m is obtained. Fowler{endash}Nordheim, consisting of two straight lines with a gentle slope at low field and a steep one at relatively high field, are interpreted based on a top side emission mechanism related to the nanobell structures. No current saturation is found in the films. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Mantle convection and the large scale structures of the Earth's gravitational field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    The connection between the observed large scale structure of the Earths' gravitational field, as represented by the GEM10 model, and the surface kinematic manifestations of plate tectonics, as represented by the absolute plate motion model of Minster and Jordan, is explored using a somewhat novel method of analysis. Two scalar derivatives of the field of surface plate velocities, namely the horizontal divergence and the radial vorticity, are computed from the plate motion data. These two scalars are respectively determined by the poloidal and toroidal scalars in terms of which any essentially solenoidal vector field may be completely represented. They provide a compact summary of the observed plate boundary types in nature, with oceanic ridges and trenches being essentially boundaries of divergence, and transform faults being essentially boundaries of vorticity.

  5. Coronal holes, large-scale magnetic field, and activity complexes in solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavastsherna, K. S.; Polyakow, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    A correlation among coronal holes (CH), a large-scale magnetic field (LMF), and activity complexes (AC) is studied in this work for 1997-2007 with the use of a coronal hole series obtained from observations at the Kitt Peak Observatory in the HeI 10830 Å line in 1975-2003 and SOHO/EIT-195 Å in 1996-2012 (Tlatov et al., 2014), synoptic Hα charts from Kislovodsk Mountain Astonomical Station, and the catalog of AC cores (Yazev, 2012). From the imposition of CH boundaries on Hα charts, which characterize the positions of neutral lines of the radial components of a large-scale solar magnetic field, it turns out that 70% of CH are located in unipolar regions of their sign during the above period, 10% are in the region of an opposite sign, and 20% are mainly very large CH, which are often crossed by the neutral lines of several unipolar regions. Data on mutual arrangement of CH and AC cores were obtained. It was shown that only some activity comples cores have genetic relationships with CH.

  6. Effects of larval density in Ambystoma opacum: An experiment in large-scale field enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, D.E. )

    1990-02-01

    This experiment was designed to measure the effects of larval density on larval traits in the salamander Ambystoma opacum, and to ascertain whether previous studies conducted at smaller spatial scales or higher densities produced artifactual results. Density effects on larval growth, body size at metamorphosis, length of larval period, and survival to metamorphosis were studied in A. opacum in large-scale (41 m{sup 2} and 23 m{sup 2}) field enclosures in two temporary ponds. Each enclosure contained indigenous populations of prey (zooplankton and insects) and predators, as well as the range of microhabitats present in these natural ponds. Initial larval densities were chosen to represent high and low levels of naturally occurring mean densities. The results suggest that, in natural ponds, the importance of intraspecific competition is dependent upon hydroperiod, and the intensity of competition influences predation risk. Thus, both density-dependent and density-independent factors affect body size and recruitment of larval A. opacum into the adult population. The use of large-scale field enclosures has advantages and disadvantages: it allows the examination of density-dependent processes under natural conditions and provides high statistical power because of low variability in larval traits; however, experimental designs must be simple and underlying mechanisms are difficult to identify.

  7. The Large Scale Structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field and High Energy Cosmic Ray Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Stanev, Todor

    2006-10-01

    Measurements of the magnetic field in our Galaxy are complex and usually difficult to interpret. A spiral regular field in the disk is favored by observations, however the number of field reversals is still under debate. Measurements of the parity of the field across the Galactic plane are also very difficult due to the presence of the disk field itself. In this work we demonstrate that cosmic ray protons in the energy range 1018 to 1019eV, if accelerated near the center of the Galaxy, are sensitive to the large scale structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field (GMF). In particular if the field is of even parity, and the spiral field is bi-symmetric (BSS), ultra high energy protons will predominantly come from the Southern Galactic hemisphere, and predominantly from the Northern Galactic hemisphere if the field is of even parity and axi-symmetric (ASS). There is no sensitivity to the BSS or ASS configurations if the field is of odd parity.

  8. Feasibility of Large-Scale Genomic Testing to Facilitate Enrollment Onto Genomically Matched Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Brusco, Lauren; Shaw, Kenna; Horombe, Chacha; Kopetz, Scott; Davies, Michael A.; Routbort, Mark; Piha-Paul, Sarina A.; Janku, Filip; Ueno, Naoto; Hong, David; De Groot, John; Ravi, Vinod; Li, Yisheng; Luthra, Raja; Patel, Keyur; Broaddus, Russell; Mendelsohn, John; Mills, Gordon B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We report the experience with 2,000 consecutive patients with advanced cancer who underwent testing on a genomic testing protocol, including the frequency of actionable alterations across tumor types, subsequent enrollment onto clinical trials, and the challenges for trial enrollment. Patients and Methods Standardized hotspot mutation analysis was performed in 2,000 patients, using either an 11-gene (251 patients) or a 46- or 50-gene (1,749 patients) multiplex platform. Thirty-five genes were considered potentially actionable based on their potential to be targeted with approved or investigational therapies. Results Seven hundred eighty-nine patients (39%) had at least one mutation in potentially actionable genes. Eighty-three patients (11%) with potentially actionable mutations went on genotype-matched trials targeting these alterations. Of 230 patients with PIK3CA/AKT1/PTEN/BRAF mutations that returned for therapy, 116 (50%) received a genotype-matched drug. Forty patients (17%) were treated on a genotype-selected trial requiring a mutation for eligibility, 16 (7%) were treated on a genotype-relevant trial targeting a genomic alteration without biomarker selection, and 40 (17%) received a genotype-relevant drug off trial. Challenges to trial accrual included patient preference of noninvestigational treatment or local treatment, poor performance status or other reasons for trial ineligibility, lack of trials/slots, and insurance denial. Conclusion Broad implementation of multiplex hotspot testing is feasible; however, only a small portion of patients with actionable alterations were actually enrolled onto genotype-matched trials. Increased awareness of therapeutic implications and access to novel therapeutics are needed to optimally leverage results from broad-based genomic testing. PMID:26014291

  9. Large-scale geometry and temporal variability of the Martian external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelholz, A.; Johnson, C. L.; Langlais, B.

    2014-12-01

    The martian magnetic field is unique among the terrestrial planets, as it results from the interaction of fields caused by crustal remnant magnetization and a planetary ionosphere with the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field. Internal fields of crustal origin have been subject to extensive studies, whereas the focus of our work deals with average spatial structure and time variability in the martian external magnetic field. We use the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) vector magnetic field data to investigate the large-scale geometry and magnitude of such external fields. We analyze the day-time and night-time magnetic signature for the duration of the MGS mission in mapping orbit (2000-2006). We use along-track vector field measurements to estimate the day-time and night-time external fields after the subtraction of predicted crustal magnetic fields at spacecraft altitudes. We also examine day/night differences (i.e., the daily variation) in external fields; these are independent of crustal fields. Because the external fields are modified by the crustal fields, we investigate their structure as a function of latitude in the local time frame and as a function of both latitude and longitude in the body-fixed frame. In the body-fixed-frame BΘis generally dominant in magnitude with a day/night variation described to first order by a zonal degree-2 spherical harmonic structure. Br is strongly correlated with the crustal magnetic field. BΦ shows variable spatial behaviour during both night and day. Seasonal variations are observed as stronger average magnetic fields in the hemisphere pointing towards the sun. Additional shorter time scale variations in the global external field structure are observed.

  10. The large-scale magnetic field in the solar wind. [interplanetary magnetic fields/solar activity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1975-01-01

    A large-scale, three dimensional magnetic field in the interplanetary medium with an expected classical spiral pattern to zeroth order is discussed. Systematic and random deviations which are expected are treated. The sector structure which should be evident at high latitudes is examined. Interplanetary streams are discussed as determining the patterns of magnetic field intensity. It was proposed that the large-scale spiral field can induce a meridional flow which might alter the field geometry somewhat. The nonuniformities caused by streams will probably significantly influence the motion of solar and galactic particles. It was concluded that knowledge of the 3-dimensional field and its dynamical effects can be obtained by in situ measurements by a probe which goes over the sun's poles. Diagrams of the magnetic fields are given.

  11. The structure of the white-light corona and the large-scale solar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sime, D. G.; Mccabe, M. K.

    1990-01-01

    The large-scale density structure of the white-light solar corona is compared to the organization of the solar magnetic field as identified by the appearance of neutral lines in the photosphere to examine whether any consistent relationship exists between the two. During the period covering Carrington rotations 1717 to 1736 brightness enhancements in the low corona tend to lie over the global neutral sheet identified in the photospheric magnetic field. The brightest of these enhancements are associated with neutral lines throguh active regions. These associations are not 1-1, but do hold both in stable and evolving conditions of the corona. A significant number of long-lived neutral lines is found, including filaments seen in H-alpha, for which there are not coronal enhancements.

  12. Generation of large scale field-aligned density irregularities in ionospheric heating experiments. [electromagnetic wave decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejer, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Threshold and growth rate for stimulated Brillouin scattering are calculated for a uniform magnetoplasma. These are then compared with the threshold and growth rate of a new thermal instability in which the nonlinear Lorentz force felt by the electrons at the beat frequency of the two electromagnetic waves is replaced by a pressure force due to differential heating in the interference pattern of the pump wave and the generated electromagnetic wave. This thermal instability, which is still essentially stimulated Brillouin scattering, has a threshold which is especially low when the propagation vector of the beat wave is almost normal to the magnetic field. The threshold is then considerably lower than the threshold for normal stimulated Brillouin scattering and therefore this new instability is probably responsible for the generation of large scale field aligned irregularities and ionospheric spread F.

  13. Rotation of the Large-Scale Solar Magnetic Fields in the Equatorial Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latushko, S.

    1996-07-01

    A study is made of the rotation of large-scale magnetic fields using the synoptic maps from the Kitt Peak National Observatory for the time interval 1976 1985. The auto-correlation method and the mass-centers method of magnetic structures was applied to infer mean differential rotation profiles and rotation profiles separately for each magnetic field polarity. It has been found that in both hemispheres the leading polarity rotates faster than the following polarity at all latitudes by about 0.04° day-1. The maximum rotation rate of the leading polarity is reached at about 6° latitude. In the mean profile for both polarities, this brings about two angular velocity maxima at 6° latitudes in both hemispheres. Such a profile appears as to have a ‘dimple’ on the equator.

  14. Calculation of large scale relative permeabilities from stochastic properties of the permeability field and fluid properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lenormand, R.; Thiele, M.R.

    1997-08-01

    The paper describes the method and presents preliminary results for the calculation of homogenized relative permeabilities using stochastic properties of the permeability field. In heterogeneous media, the spreading of an injected fluid is mainly sue to the permeability heterogeneity and viscosity fingering. At large scale, when the heterogeneous medium is replaced by a homogeneous one, we need to introduce a homogenized (or pseudo) relative permeability to obtain the same spreading. Generally, is derived by using fine-grid numerical simulations (Kyte and Berry). However, this operation is time consuming and cannot be performed for all the meshes of the reservoir. We propose an alternate method which uses the information given by the stochastic properties of the field without any numerical simulation. The method is based on recent developments on homogenized transport equations (the {open_quotes}MHD{close_quotes} equation, Lenormand SPE 30797). The MHD equation accounts for the three basic mechanisms of spreading of the injected fluid: (1) Dispersive spreading due to small scale randomness, characterized by a macrodispersion coefficient D. (2) Convective spreading due to large scale heterogeneities (layers) characterized by a heterogeneity factor H. (3) Viscous fingering characterized by an apparent viscosity ration M. In the paper, we first derive the parameters D and H as functions of variance and correlation length of the permeability field. The results are shown to be in good agreement with fine-grid simulations. The are then derived a function of D, H and M. The main result is that this approach lead to a time dependent . Finally, the calculated are compared to the values derived by history matching using fine-grid numerical simulations.

  15. Far-field pattern of a coherently combined beam from large-scale laser diode arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, Jin H.; Lee, Ja H.; Williams, Michael D.

    1991-01-01

    The far-field pattern of a large-scale amplifier array (LSAA) consisting of a large number (2000) of diode laser amplifiers is numerically simulated, and the power collection efficiencies are determined. Random distributions of phase mismatches, misorientations, and element failures in the LSAA system are considered. Phase mismatches and misorientations of the element amplifiers are found to be the most critical parameters of those affecting the power-collection efficiency. Errors of 0.2 wavelength and 25 percent for phase and diffraction angle, respectively, cause a 10 percent reduction in power-collection efficiency. The results are used to evaluate the concept of space-laser power transmission. It is found that an overall transmission efficiency of 80 percent could be realized with a 5-m-diam. receiver at a distance of 10,000 km when an LSAA transmitter 6 m in diam. is aimed with state-of-the-art pointing accuracy.

  16. The trispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Schutz, Katelin; Solon, Mikhail P.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the connected four point correlation function (the trispectrum in Fourier space) of cosmological density perturbations at one-loop order in Standard Perturbation Theory (SPT) and the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure (EFT of LSS). This paper is a companion to our earlier work on the non-Gaussian covariance of the matter power spectrum, which corresponds to a particular wavenumber configuration of the trispectrum. In the present calculation, we highlight and clarify some of the subtle aspects of the EFT framework that arise at third order in perturbation theory for general wavenumber configurations of the trispectrum. We consistently incorporate vorticity and non-locality in time into the EFT counterterms and lay out a complete basis of building blocks for the stress tensor. We show predictions for the one-loop SPT trispectrum and the EFT contributions, focusing on configurations which have particular relevance for using LSS to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity.

  17. Large-scale dynamic compaction demonstration using WIPP salt: Fielding and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, E.H.; Hansen, F.D.

    1995-10-01

    Reconsolidation of crushed rock salt is a phenomenon of great interest to programs studying isolation of hazardous materials in natural salt geologic settings. Of particular interest is the potential for disaggregated salt to be restored to nearly an impermeable state. For example, reconsolidated crushed salt is proposed as a major shaft seal component for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project. The concept for a permanent shaft seal component of the WIPP repository is to densely compact crushed salt in the four shafts; an effective seal will then be developed as the surrounding salt creeps into the shafts, further consolidating the crushed salt. Fundamental information on placement density and permeability is required to ensure attainment of the design function. The work reported here is the first large-scale compaction demonstration to provide information on initial salt properties applicable to design, construction, and performance expectations. The shaft seals must function for 10,000 years. Over this period a crushed salt mass will become less permeable as it is compressed by creep closure of salt surrounding the shaft. These facts preclude the possibility of conducting a full-scale, real-time field test. Because permanent seals taking advantage of salt reconsolidation have never been constructed, performance measurements have not been made on an appropriately large scale. An understanding of potential construction methods, achievable initial density and permeability, and performance of reconsolidated salt over time is required for seal design and performance assessment. This report discusses fielding and operations of a nearly full-scale dynamic compaction of mine-run WIPP salt, and presents preliminary density and in situ (in place) gas permeability results.

  18. Constraining Large-Scale Solar Magnetic Field Models with Optical Coronal Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Davila, J. M.; Jones, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific success of the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) and Solar Orbiter (SO) missions will depend to a large extent on the accuracy of the available coronal magnetic field models describing the connectivity of plasma disturbances in the inner heliosphere with their source regions. We argue that ground based and satellite coronagraph images can provide robust geometric constraints for the next generation of improved coronal magnetic field extrapolation models. In contrast to the previously proposed loop segmentation codes designed for detecting compact closed-field structures above solar active regions, we focus on the large-scale geometry of the open-field coronal regions located at significant radial distances from the solar surface. Details on the new feature detection algorithms will be presented. By applying the developed image processing methodology to high-resolution Mauna Loa Solar Observatory images, we perform an optimized 3D B-line tracing for a full Carrington rotation using the magnetic field extrapolation code presented in a companion talk by S.Jones at al. Tracing results are shown to be in a good qualitative agreement with the large-scalie configuration of the optical corona. Subsequent phases of the project and the related data products for SSP and SO missions as wwll as the supporting global heliospheric simulations will be discussed.

  19. DYNAMICAL FRICTION IN A GASEOUS MEDIUM WITH A LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Salcedo, F. J.

    2012-02-01

    The dynamical friction force experienced by a massive gravitating body moving through a gaseous medium is modified by sufficiently strong large-scale magnetic fields. Using linear perturbation theory, we calculate the structure of the wake generated by, and the gravitational drag force on, a body traveling in a straight-line trajectory in a uniformly magnetized medium. The functional form of the drag force as a function of the Mach number ({identical_to} V{sub 0}/c{sub s} , where V{sub 0} is the velocity of the body and c{sub s} is the sound speed) depends on the strength of the magnetic field and on the angle between the velocity of the perturber and the direction of the magnetic field. In particular, the peak value of the drag force is not near Mach number {approx}1 for a perturber moving in a sufficiently magnetized medium. As a rule of thumb, we may state that for supersonic motion, magnetic fields act to suppress dynamical friction; for subsonic motion, they tend to enhance dynamical friction. For perturbers moving along the magnetic field lines, the drag force at some subsonic Mach numbers may be stronger than at supersonic velocities. We also mention the relevance of our findings to black hole coalescence in galactic nuclei.

  20. Merged interaction regions and large-scale magnetic field fluctuations during 1991: Voyager 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper analyzes Voyager 2 observations of the magnetic field between 33.6 AU and 36.2 AU during 1991 when extraordinary events were observed on the Sun and in the heliosphere. The magnetic field strength signal B(t) has the unusual form of two large transient merged interaction regions (MIRs) on a fluctuating background. The two MIRs moved past the spacecraft in 32 days and 18 days, respectively. The mean field strength in each transient MIR was approx. equals 2.6 times the mean field during the remaining part of the year (0.11 nT). Each of the MIRs is related to a fast stream. The magnetic field is strong throughout each stream, suggesting that the strong fields are carried by the streams as well as produced by shock and stream compression. The fluctuations in B(t) during 1991 are not multifractal, and the MIRs cannot be approximated as multifractal clusters of intense magnetic fields. The distribution of the hour-averaged magnetic field strengths is approximately lognormal over 90% of its intermediate range, and it has an exponential tail for B greater than the average magnetic field strength. The elevation angles of B have a normal distribution with a standard deviation of 16 deg +/- 4 deg. The distributions of the azimuthal angles of B in the ranges 1 deg - 180 deg and 180 deg - 360 deg are approximately normal over a more limited range, and non-Gaussian tails associated with nearly radial magnetic fields; the standard deviations are approx. equal to 40 deg. Individual sectors are present throughout most of the interval, even in the MIRs, but there is no recurrent sector pattern. A model of the large-scale fluctuations in 1991 will have to include both determinaistic and statistical factors.

  1. Prospective large-scale field study generates predictive model identifying major contributors to colony losses.

    PubMed

    Kielmanowicz, Merav Gleit; Inberg, Alex; Lerner, Inbar Maayan; Golani, Yael; Brown, Nicholas; Turner, Catherine Louise; Hayes, Gerald J R; Ballam, Joan M

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade, unusually high losses of colonies have been reported by beekeepers across the USA. Multiple factors such as Varroa destructor, bee viruses, Nosema ceranae, weather, beekeeping practices, nutrition, and pesticides have been shown to contribute to colony losses. Here we describe a large-scale controlled trial, in which different bee pathogens, bee population, and weather conditions across winter were monitored at three locations across the USA. In order to minimize influence of various known contributing factors and their interaction, the hives in the study were not treated with antibiotics or miticides. Additionally, the hives were kept at one location and were not exposed to potential stress factors associated with migration. Our results show that a linear association between load of viruses (DWV or IAPV) in Varroa and bees is present at high Varroa infestation levels (>3 mites per 100 bees). The collection of comprehensive data allowed us to draw a predictive model of colony losses and to show that Varroa destructor, along with bee viruses, mainly DWV replication, contributes to approximately 70% of colony losses. This correlation further supports the claim that insufficient control of the virus-vectoring Varroa mite would result in increased hive loss. The predictive model also indicates that a single factor may not be sufficient to trigger colony losses, whereas a combination of stressors appears to impact hive health. PMID:25875764

  2. Prospective Large-Scale Field Study Generates Predictive Model Identifying Major Contributors to Colony Losses

    PubMed Central

    Kielmanowicz, Merav Gleit; Inberg, Alex; Lerner, Inbar Maayan; Golani, Yael; Brown, Nicholas; Turner, Catherine Louise; Hayes, Gerald J. R.; Ballam, Joan M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, unusually high losses of colonies have been reported by beekeepers across the USA. Multiple factors such as Varroa destructor, bee viruses, Nosema ceranae, weather, beekeeping practices, nutrition, and pesticides have been shown to contribute to colony losses. Here we describe a large-scale controlled trial, in which different bee pathogens, bee population, and weather conditions across winter were monitored at three locations across the USA. In order to minimize influence of various known contributing factors and their interaction, the hives in the study were not treated with antibiotics or miticides. Additionally, the hives were kept at one location and were not exposed to potential stress factors associated with migration. Our results show that a linear association between load of viruses (DWV or IAPV) in Varroa and bees is present at high Varroa infestation levels (>3 mites per 100 bees). The collection of comprehensive data allowed us to draw a predictive model of colony losses and to show that Varroa destructor, along with bee viruses, mainly DWV replication, contributes to approximately 70% of colony losses. This correlation further supports the claim that insufficient control of the virus-vectoring Varroa mite would result in increased hive loss. The predictive model also indicates that a single factor may not be sufficient to trigger colony losses, whereas a combination of stressors appears to impact hive health. PMID:25875764

  3. From Efficacy Trial to Large Scale Effectiveness Trial: A Tier 2 Mathematics Intervention for First Graders with Difficulties in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolfhus, Eric; Clarke, Ben; Decker, Lauren E.; Williams, Chuck; Dimino, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Large scale longitudinal research (Morgan, Farkas, & Wu, 2009) and a meta-analysis (Duncan et al., 2007) have found that early mathematics achievement is a strong predictor of later mathematics achievement. In fact, end of Kindergarten and end of grade 1 mathematics achievement on ECLS-K and similar mathematics proficiency measures tends to be…

  4. Development of Dynamic Flow Field Pressure Probes Suitable for Use in Large Scale Supersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. Robert

    2000-01-01

    A series of dynamic flow field pressure probes were developed for use in large-scale supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Glenn Research Center. These flow field probes include pitot, static, and five-hole conical pressure probes that are capable of capturing fast acting flow field pressure transients that occur on a millisecond time scale. The pitot and static probes can be used to determine local Mach number time histories during a transient event. The five-hole conical pressure probes are used primarily to determine local flow angularity, but can also determine local Mach number. These probes were designed, developed, and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. They were also used in a NASA Glenn 10-by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) test program where they successfully acquired flow field pressure data in the vicinity of a propulsion system during an engine compressor staff and inlet unstart transient event. Details of the design, development, and subsequent use of these probes are discussed in this report.

  5. Reconstruction of the solar coronal magnetic field, from active region to large scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, T.; Canou, A.; Delyon, F.; Aly, J. J.; Frey, P.; Alauzet, F.

    2011-12-01

    The low solar corona is dominated by the magnetic field which is created inside the sun by a dynamo process and then emerges into the atmosphere. This magnetic field plays an important role in most structures and phenomena observed at various wavelengths such as prominences, small and large scale eruptive events, and continuous heating of the plasma, and therefore it is important to understand its three-dimensional properties in order to elaborate efficient theoretical models. Unfortunately, the magnetic field is difficult to measure locally in the hot and tenuous corona. But this can be done at the level of the cooler and denser photosphere, and several instruments with high resolution vector magnetographs are currently available (THEMIS, Imaging Vector Magnetograph (IVM), the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter (ASP), SOLIS, HINODE, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), or will be shortly available by future telescopes such as EST and solar missions as SOLAR-ORBITER. This has lead solar physicists to develop an approach which consists in " reconstructing" the coronal magnetic field from boundary data given on the photosphere. We will discuss some of the issues encountered in solving this problem as well our recent progress and results at the scale of active region scales or the larger one such as full sun scale.

  6. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Schmittfull, Marcel; Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-10-14

    With this study, given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/kNL, where k is the wavenumber of interest and kNL is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k ≃ 0.3 hmore » Mpc–1 and k ≃ 0.6 h Mpc–1 at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which kNL is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ8=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.« less

  7. Coronal structure of the large scale magnetic field and its influence on stellar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réville, Victor; Brun, Allan Sacha; Matt, Sean; Strugarek, Antoine; Bouvier, Jérôme

    2015-08-01

    The braking of magnetic stars through the extraction of angular momentum by stellar winds has been studied for decades, leading to several formulations as functions of stellar parameters. We recently demonstrated that the dependency of the braking law on the coronal magnetic field topology can be taken into account through a simple scalar parameter : the open magnetic flux. This parameter can be integrated anywhere beyond the last closed coronal loop in steady-state. The Zeeman-Doppler Imaging technique has brought the community a reliable and precise description of the surface magnetic field of distant stars. However reconstruction of the coronal structure of the large scale magnetic field without running costly numerical simulations of the stellar wind is not trivial. An alternative is to use the classical analytical potential field extrapolation to describe the opening of the field lines by the magnetized wind but this technique relies on knowing the so-called radius of the surface source term which must vary from star to star. To resolve this issue, we use our extended set of 2.5D wind simulations published in 2015, to provide a criteria for the field lines opening as well as a simple tool to assess the surface source term radius and the open magnetic flux. This allows us to derive the magnetic torque applied to the star by the wind from any spectropolarimetric observations. We conclude our talk by discussing the case of 3D wind simulations of the BCool sample ; whose surface magnetic field has been obtained by ZDI and to discuss how non-axisymmetry modifies or not our recent findings.

  8. Electric fields and large-scale undulations in the evening sector of the diffuse auroral zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baishev, D. G.; Barkova, E. S.; Stepanov, A. E.; Rich, F.; Yumoto, K.

    2010-02-01

    The synchronous observations of strong electric fields and large-scale undulations observed on December 12, 2004, in the evening sector of the diffuse auroral zone 0900-1000 UT (~1700-1800 MLT) have been analyzed. The appearance of strong northward electric field at ~0900 UT was almost simultaneously registered at Tixie Bay ionospheric station (71.6° N, 128.9° E, L =, 5.6) and on the DMSP F15 satellite. At 0910-1000 UT, the all-sky TV camera at Tixie Bay and the DMSP satellites (F13, F14, and F15) registered eight undulations propagating westward at a velocity of 0.7—0.8 km/s. The undulation parameters registered during the TV observations agree with the satellite measurements. The distinctive feature of the analyzed event consists in that an intense electric field and undulations were localized within the diffuse zone in the region of increased precipitation of keV electrons. A comparison of the ground-based and satellite measurements made it possible to draw the conclusion on the necessary conditions for formation of diffuse undulations.

  9. Primordial Magnetic Field Effects on the CMB and Large-Scale Structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yamazaki, Dai G.; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2010-01-01

    Mmore » agnetic fields are everywhere in nature, and they play an important role in every astronomical environment which involves the formation of plasma and currents. It is natural therefore to suppose that magnetic fields could be present in the turbulent high-temperature environment of the big bang. Such a primordial magnetic field (PMF) would be expected to manifest itself in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies, and also in the formation of large-scale structure. In this paper, we summarize the theoretical framework which we have developed to calculate the PMF power spectrum to high precision. Using this formulation, we summarize calculations of the effects of a PMF which take accurate quantitative account of the time evolution of the cutoff scale. We review the constructed numerical program, which is without approximation, and an improvement over the approach used in a number of previous works for studying the effect of the PMF on the cosmological perturbations. We demonstrate how the PMF is an important cosmological physical process on small scales. We also summarize the current constraints on the PMF amplitude B λ and the power spectral index n B which have been deduced from the available CMB observational data by using our computational framework.« less

  10. Large-scale fluctuations in the number density of galaxies in independent surveys of deep fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, S. I.; Lovyagin, N. Yu.; Baryshev, Yu. V.; Gorokhov, V. L.

    2016-06-01

    New arguments supporting the reality of large-scale fluctuations in the density of the visible matter in deep galaxy surveys are presented. A statistical analysis of the radial distributions of galaxies in the COSMOS and HDF-N deep fields is presented. Independent spectral and photometric surveys exist for each field, carried out in different wavelength ranges and using different observing methods. Catalogs of photometric redshifts in the optical (COSMOS-Zphot) and infrared (UltraVISTA) were used for the COSMOS field in the redshift interval 0.1 < z < 3.5, as well as the zCOSMOS (10kZ) spectroscopic survey and the XMM-COSMOS and ALHAMBRA-F4 photometric redshift surveys. The HDFN-Zphot and ALHAMBRA-F5 catalogs of photometric redshifts were used for the HDF-N field. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the fluctuations in the numbers of galaxies obtained for independent surveys of the same deep field reaches R = 0.70 ± 0.16. The presence of this positive correlation supports the reality of fluctuations in the density of visible matter with sizes of up to 1000 Mpc and amplitudes of up to 20% at redshifts z ~ 2. The absence of correlations between the fluctuations in different fields (the correlation coefficient between COSMOS and HDF-N is R = -0.20 ± 0.31) testifies to the independence of structures visible in different directions on the celestial sphere. This also indicates an absence of any influence from universal systematic errors (such as "spectral voids"), which could imitate the detection of correlated structures.

  11. The Lagrangian-space Effective Field Theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Porto, Rafael A.; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2014-05-01

    We introduce a Lagrangian-space Effective Field Theory (LEFT) formalism for the study of cosmological large scale structures. Unlike the previous Eulerian-space construction, it is naturally formulated as an effective field theory of extended objects in Lagrangian space. In LEFT the resulting finite size effects are described using a multipole expansion parameterized by a set of time dependent coefficients and organized in powers of the ratio of the wavenumber of interest k over the non-linear scale k{sub NL}. The multipoles encode the effects of the short distance modes on the long-wavelength universe and absorb UV divergences when present. There are no IR divergences in LEFT. Some of the parameters that control the perturbative approach are not assumed to be small and can be automatically resummed. We present an illustrative one-loop calculation for a power law universe. We describe the dynamics both at the level of the equations of motion and through an action formalism.

  12. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure part II: resummation and redshift space

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Gleyzes, Jérôme; Vernizzi, Filippo; Simonović, Marko E-mail: jerome.gleyzes@cea.fr E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2014-02-01

    We generalize the recently derived single-field consistency relations of Large Scale Structure in two directions. First, we treat the effect of the long modes (with momentum q) on the short ones (with momentum k) non-perturbatively, by writing resummed consistency relations which do not require k/q⋅δ{sub q} << 1. These relations do not make any assumptions on the short-scales physics and are extended to include (an arbitrary number of) multiple long modes, internal lines with soft momenta and soft loops. We do several checks of these relations in perturbation theory and we verify that the effect of soft modes always cancels out in equal-time correlators. Second, we write the relations directly in redshift space, without assuming the single-stream approximation: not only the long mode affects the short scales as a homogeneous gravitational field, but it also displaces them by its velocity along the line-of-sight. Redshift space consistency relations still vanish when short modes are taken at equal time: an observation of a signal in the squeezed limit would point towards multifield inflation or a violation of the equivalence principle.

  13. RADIAL TRANSPORT OF LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN ACCRETION DISKS. II. RELAXATION TO STEADY STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Taku; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2014-12-20

    We study the time evolution of a large-scale magnetic flux threading an accretion disk. The induction equation of the mean poloidal field is solved under the standard viscous disk model. Magnetic flux evolution is controlled by two timescales: one is the timescale of the inward advection of the magnetic flux, τ{sub adv}. This is induced by the dragging of the flux by the accreting gas. The other is the outward diffusion timescale of the magnetic flux τ{sub dif}. We consider diffusion due to the Ohmic resistivity. These timescales can be significantly different from the disk viscous timescale τ{sub disk}. The behaviors of the magnetic flux evolution are quite different depending on the magnitude relationship of the timescales τ{sub adv}, τ{sub dif}, and τ{sub disk}. The most interesting phenomena occur when τ{sub adv} << τ{sub dif}, τ{sub disk}. In such a case, the magnetic flux distribution approaches a quasi-steady profile much faster than the viscous evolution of the gas disk, and the magnetic flux has also been tightly bundled to the inner part of the disk. In the inner part, although the poloidal magnetic field becomes much stronger than the interstellar magnetic field, the field strength is limited to the maximum value that is analytically given by our previous work. We also find a condition for the initial large magnetic flux, which is a fossil of the magnetic field dragging during the early phase of star formation that survives for a duration in which significant gas disk evolution proceeds.

  14. Spatial distribution of large-scale solar magnetic fields and their relation to the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    The spatial organization of the observed photospheric magnetic field as well as its relation to the polarity of the IMF have been studied using high resolution magnetograms from the Kitt Peak National Observatory. Systematic patterns in the large scale field are due to contributions from both concentrated flux and more diffuse flux. The polarity of the photospheric field, determined on various spatial scales, correlates with the polarity of the IMF. Analyses based on several spatial scales in the photosphere suggest that new flux in the interplanetary medium is often due to relatively small photospheric features which appear in the photosphere up to one month before they are manifest at the earth.

  15. Four large-scale field-aligned current systems in the dayside high-latitude region

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, S.; Potemra, T.A.; Newell, P.T.

    1995-01-01

    A system of four current sheets of large-scale field-aligned currents (FACs) was discovered in the data set of simultaneous Viking and DMSP-F7 crossings of the dayside high-latitude region. This paper reports four examples of this system that were observed in the prenoon sector. The flow polarities of FACs are upward, downward, upward, and downward, from equatorward to poleward. The lowest-latitude upward current is flowing mostly in the CPS precipitation region, often overlapping with the BPS at its poleward edge, and is interpreted as a region 2 current. The pair of downward and upward FACs in the middle of the structure are collocated with structured electron precipitation. The precipitation of high-energy (>1 keV) electrons is more intense in the lower-latitude downward current sheet. The highest-latitude downward flowing current sheet is located in a weak, low-energy particle precipitation region, suggesting that this current is flowing on open field lines. Simultaneous observations in the postnoon local time sector reveal the standard three-sheet structure of FACs, sometimes described as region 2, region 1, and mantle (referred to the midday region 0) currents. A high correlation was found between the occurrence of the four FAC sheet structure and negative interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B{sub Y}. The authors discuss the FAC structure in terms of three types of convection cells: the merging, viscous, and lobe cells. During strongly negative IMF B{sub Y}, two convection reversals exist in the prenoon sector; one is inside the viscous cell, and the other is between the viscous cell and the lobe cell. This structure of convection flow is supported by the Viking electric field and auroral UV image data. Based on the convection pattern, the four FAC sheet structure is interpreted as the latitudinal overlap of midday and morning FAC systems. 47 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  16. LUMINOUS RED GALAXY HALO DENSITY FIELD RECONSTRUCTION AND APPLICATION TO LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Beth A.; Spergel, David N.; Bode, Paul E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu

    2009-09-01

    The nontrivial relationship between observations of galaxy positions in redshift space and the underlying matter field complicates our ability to determine the linear theory power spectrum and extract cosmological information from galaxy surveys. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalog has the potential to place powerful constraints on cosmological parameters. LRGs are bright, highly biased tracers of large-scale structure. However, because they are highly biased, the nonlinear contribution of satellite galaxies to the galaxy power spectrum is large and fingers-of-God (FOGs) are significant. The combination of these effects leads to a {approx}10% correction in the underlying power spectrum at k = 0.1 h Mpc{sup -1} and {approx}40% correction at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1} in the LRG P(k) analysis of Tegmark et al., thereby compromising the cosmological constraints when this potentially large correction is left as a free parameter. We propose an alternative approach to recovering the matter field from galaxy observations. Our approach is to use halos rather than galaxies to trace the underlying mass distribution. We identify FOGs and replace each FOG with a single halo object. This removes the nonlinear contribution of satellite galaxies, the one-halo term. We test our method on a large set of high-fidelity mock SDSS LRG catalogs and find that the power spectrum of the reconstructed halo density field deviates from the underlying matter power spectrum at the {<=}1% level for k {<=} 0.1 h Mpc{sup -1} and {<=}4% at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1}. The reconstructed halo density field also removes the bias in the measurement of the redshift space distortion parameter {beta} induced by the FOG smearing of the linear redshift space distortions.

  17. Seeking large-scale magnetic fields in a pure-disk dwarf galaxy NGC 2976

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drzazga, R. T.; Chyży, K. T.; Heald, G. H.; Elstner, D.; Gallagher, J. S.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: It is still unknown how magnetic field-generation mechanisms could operate in low-mass dwarf galaxies. Here, we present a detailed study of a nearby pure-disk dwarf galaxy NGC 2976. Unlike previously observed dwarf objects, this galaxy possesses a clearly defined disk. We also discuss whether NGC 2976 could serve as a potential source of the intergalactic magnetic field. Methods: For the purpose of our studies, we performed deep multi-frequency polarimetric observations of NGC 2976 with the VLA and Effelsberg radio telescopes. Additionally, we supplement them with re-imaged data from the WSRT-SINGS survey for which a rotation measure (RM) synthesis was performed. A new weighting scheme for the RM synthesis algorithm, consisting of including information about the quality of data in individual frequency channels, was proposed and investigated. Application of this new weighting to the simulated data, as well as to the observed data, results in an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio in the Faraday depth space. Results: The magnetic field morphology discovered in NGC 2976 consists of a southern polarized ridge. This structure does not seem to be due to just a pure large-scale dynamo process (possibly cosmic-ray driven) at work in this object, as indicated by the RM data and dynamo number calculations. Instead, the field of NGC 2976 is modified by past gravitational interactions and possibly also by ram pressure inside the M 81 galaxy group environment. The estimates of total (7 μG) and ordered (3 μG) magnetic field strengths, as well as degree of field order (0.46), which is similar to those observed in spirals, suggest that tidally generated magnetized gas flows can further enhance dynamo action in the object. NGC 2976 is apparently a good candidate for the efficient magnetization of its neighbourhood. It is able to provide an ordered (perhaps also regular) magnetic field into the intergalactic space up to a distance of about 5 kpc. Conclusions: Tidal

  18. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Schmittfull, Marcel; Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-10-14

    With this study, given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/kNL, where k is the wavenumber of interest and kNL is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 and k ≃ 0.6 h Mpc–1 at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which kNL is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ8=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.

  19. Powering up with indirect reciprocity in a large-scale field experiment

    PubMed Central

    Yoeli, Erez; Hoffman, Moshe; Rand, David G.; Nowak, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    A defining aspect of human cooperation is the use of sophisticated indirect reciprocity. We observe others, talk about others, and act accordingly. We help those who help others, and we cooperate expecting that others will cooperate in return. Indirect reciprocity is based on reputation, which spreads by communication. A crucial aspect of indirect reciprocity is observability: reputation effects can support cooperation as long as peoples’ actions can be observed by others. In evolutionary models of indirect reciprocity, natural selection favors cooperation when observability is sufficiently high. Complimenting this theoretical work are experiments where observability promotes cooperation among small groups playing games in the laboratory. Until now, however, there has been little evidence of observability’s power to promote large-scale cooperation in real world settings. Here we provide such evidence using a field study involving 2413 subjects. We collaborated with a utility company to study participation in a program designed to prevent blackouts. We show that observability triples participation in this public goods game. The effect is over four times larger than offering a $25 monetary incentive, the company’s previous policy. Furthermore, as predicted by indirect reciprocity, we provide evidence that reputational concerns are driving our observability effect. In sum, we show how indirect reciprocity can be harnessed to increase cooperation in a relevant, real-world public goods game. PMID:23754399

  20. Large-scale sensor systems based on graphene electrolyte-gated field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Mackin, Charles; Palacios, Tomás

    2016-04-25

    This work reports a novel graphene electrolyte-gated field-effect transistor (EGFET) array architecture along with a compact, self-contained, and inexpensive measurement system that allows DC characterization of hundreds of graphene EGFETs as a function of VDS and VGS within a matter of minutes. We develop a reliable graphene EGFET fabrication process capable of producing 100% yield for a sample size of 256 devices. Large sample size statistical analysis of graphene EGFET electrical performance is performed for the first time. This work develops a compact piecewise DC model for graphene EGFETs that is shown capable of fitting 87% of IDSvs. VGS curves with a mean percent error of 7% or less. The model is used to extract variations in device parameters such as mobility, contact resistance, minimum carrier concentration, and Dirac point. Correlations in variations are presented. Lastly, this work presents a framework for application-specific optimization of large-scale sensor designs based on graphene EGFETs. PMID:26788552

  1. The Origin of Large-scale Primordial Magnetic Fields in the Big Bang Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greyber, Howard D.

    2007-12-01

    Applying the well-known physics of plasma and the theory of first order phase transitions, in particular the known physics of the instability called Spinodal Decomposition, a unique "Strong" Magnetic Field physical model (SMF) explains the origin of a large-scale primordial magnetic field in each DeVaucoleurs Supercluster. The strength of the long-range Electromotive Force is about 10exp40 times stronger than Gravity. Thus, the existence of observed magnetic fields in clusters of galaxies, galaxies, quasars, stars is explained. SMF processes occur at and soon after Combination Time, when the CMB (cosmic microwave background) appears, in the Big Bang model of the Universe. SMF leads to a physical model (Astro-ph0509223) where Gravity continues to attract matter into relatively thin sheets of matter around huge voids, which matches the famous observations of John Huchra and Margaret Geller (Harvard/SAO). Eventually, at some local volume, critical density for gravitational collapse of a cloud along the Supercluster's "shell" is reached and galaxies/quasars begin forming. SMF argues for a new classification of galaxies/quasars by the ratio of magnetic energy to rotational energy in the particular object. However the activity we observe is also a function of the matter accretion rate at the particular time observed. Also, applying SMF, a specific physical model (with an electric current Storage Ring) for the "Central Engine" (AGN) of galaxies, relevant to the formation of galactic spiral arms, jets and gamma ray bursts, is created. SMF embodies two novel concepts used in Nature for the production of electric current, both different from the Faraday/Henry discovery that powers our electric civilization. SMF agrees fully with the comment by Sir Martin Rees that "the phenomena of quasars and radio galaxies cannot be understood until they are placed in the general context of galactic evolution".

  2. VERTICAL STRUCTURE OF STATIONARY ACCRETION DISKS WITH A LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Lovelace, R. V. E. E-mail: RVL1@cornell.edu

    2012-05-10

    In earlier works we pointed out that the disk's surface layers are non-turbulent and thus highly conducting (or non-diffusive) because the hydrodynamic and/or magnetorotational instabilities are suppressed high in the disk where the magnetic and radiation pressures are larger than the plasma thermal pressure. Here, we calculate the vertical profiles of the stationary accretion flows (with radial and azimuthal components), and the profiles of the large-scale, magnetic field taking into account the turbulent viscosity and diffusivity and the fact that the turbulence vanishes at the surface of the disk. Also, here we require that the radial accretion speed be zero at the disk's surface and we assume that the ratio of the turbulent viscosity to the turbulent magnetic diffusivity is of order unity. Thus, at the disk's surface there are three boundary conditions. As a result, for a fixed dimensionless viscosity {alpha}-value, we find that there is a definite relation between the ratio R of the accretion power going into magnetic disk winds to the viscous power dissipation and the midplane plasma-{beta}, which is the ratio of the plasma to magnetic pressure in the disk. For a specific disk model with R of order unity we find that the critical value required for a stationary solution is {beta}{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 2.4r/({alpha}h), where h is the disk's half thickness. For weaker magnetic fields, {beta} > {beta}{sub c}, we argue that the poloidal field will advect outward while for {beta} < {beta}{sub c} it will advect inward. Alternatively, if the disk wind is negligible (R<<1), there are stationary solutions with {beta} >> {beta}{sub c}.

  3. Long Term Effectiveness on Prescribing of Two Multifaceted Educational Interventions: Results of Two Large Scale Randomized Cluster Trials

    PubMed Central

    Magrini, Nicola; Formoso, Giulio; Capelli, Oreste; Maestri, Emilio; Nonino, Francesco; Paltrinieri, Barbara; Giovane, Cinzia Del; Voci, Claudio; Magnano, Lucia; Daya, Lisa; Marata, Anna Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Information on benefits and risks of drugs is a key element affecting doctors’ prescribing decisions. Outreach visits promoting independent information have proved moderately effective in changing prescribing behaviours. Objectives Testing the short and long-term effectiveness on general practitioners’ prescribing of small groups meetings led by pharmacists. Methods Two cluster open randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were carried out in a large scale NHS setting. Ad hoc prepared evidence based material were used considering a therapeutic area approach - TEA, with information materials on osteoporosis or prostatic hyperplasia - and a single drug oriented approach - SIDRO, with information materials on me-too drugs of 2 different classes: barnidipine or prulifloxacin. In each study, all 115 Primary Care Groups in a Northern Italy area (2.2 million inhabitants, 1737 general practitioners) were randomised to educational small groups meetings, in which available evidence was provided together with drug utilization data and clinical scenarios. Main outcomes were changes in the six-months prescription of targeted drugs. Longer term results (24 and 48 months) were also evaluated. Results In the TEA trial, one of the four primary outcomes showed a reduction (prescription of alfuzosin compared to tamsulosin and terazosin in benign prostatic hyperplasia: prescribing ratio −8.5%, p = 0.03). Another primary outcome (prescription of risedronate) showed a reduction at 24 and 48 months (−7.6%, p = 0.02; and −9,8%, p = 0.03), but not at six months (−5.1%, p = 0.36). In the SIDRO trial both primary outcomes showed a statistically significant reduction (prescription of barnidipine −9.8%, p = 0.02; prescription of prulifloxacin −11.1%, p = 0.04), which persisted or increased over time. Interpretation These two cluster RCTs showed the large scale feasibility of a complex educational program in a NHS setting, and its potentially

  4. Regional frequency analysis conditioned on large-scale atmospheric or oceanic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Benjamin; Lall, Upmanu

    2014-12-01

    Many studies report that hydrologic regimes are modulated by large-scale modes of climate variability such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) or the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Climate-informed frequency analysis models have therefore been proposed to condition the distribution of hydrologic variables on climate indices. However, standard climate indices may be poor predictors in some regions. This paper therefore describes a regional frequency analysis framework that conditions the distribution of hydrologic variables directly on atmospheric or oceanic fields, as opposed to predefined climate indices. This framework is based on a two-level probabilistic model describing both climate and hydrologic data. The climate data set (predictor) is typically a time series of atmospheric of oceanic fields defined on a grid over some area, while the hydrologic data set (predictand) is typically a regional data set of station data (e.g., annual average flow at several gauging stations). A Bayesian estimation framework is used, so that a natural quantification of uncertainties affecting hydrologic predictions is available. A case study aimed at predicting the number of autumn flood events in 16 catchments located in Mediterranean France using geopotential heights at 500 hPa over the North-Atlantic region is presented. The temporal variability of hydrologic data is shown to be associated with a particular spatial pattern in the geopotential heights. A cross-validation experiment indicates that the resulting probabilistic climate-informed predictions are skillful: their reliability is acceptable and they are much sharper than predictions based on standard climate indices and baseline predictions that ignore climate information.

  5. Regional frequency analysis conditioned on large-scale atmospheric or oceanic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Benjamin; Lall, Upmanu

    2015-04-01

    Many studies report that hydrologic regimes are modulated by large-scale modes of climate variability such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) or the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Climate-informed frequency analysis models have therefore been proposed to condition the distribution of hydrologic variables on climate indices. However, standard climate indices may be poor predictors in some regions. This paper therefore describes a regional frequency analysis framework that conditions the distribution of hydrologic variables directly on atmospheric or oceanic fields, as opposed to predefined climate indices. This framework is based on a 2-level probabilistic model describing both climate and hydrologic data. The climate dataset (predictor) is typically a time series of atmospheric of oceanic fields defined on a grid over some area, while the hydrologic dataset (predictand) is typically a regional dataset of station data (e.g. annual peak flow at several gauging stations). A Bayesian estimation framework is used, so that a natural quantification of uncertainties affecting hydrologic predictions is available. A case study aimed at predicting the number of autumn flood events in 16 catchments located in Mediterranean France using geopotential heights at 500 hPa over the North-Atlantic region is presented. The temporal variability of hydrologic data is shown to be associated with a particular spatial pattern in the geopotential heights. A cross-validation experiment indicates that the resulting probabilistic climate-informed predictions are skillful: their reliability is acceptable and they are much sharper than predictions based on standard climate indices and baseline predictions that ignore climate information.

  6. Simplified field-in-field technique for a large-scale implementation in breast radiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Kirova, Youlia M.; Campana, Francois; Dendale, Remi; Fourquet, Alain

    2012-07-01

    We wanted to evaluate a simplified 'field-in-field' technique (SFF) that was implemented in our department of Radiation Oncology for breast treatment. This study evaluated 15 consecutive patients treated with a simplified field in field technique after breast-conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. Radiotherapy consisted of whole-breast irradiation to the total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions, and a boost of 16 Gy in 8 fractions to the tumor bed. We compared dosimetric outcomes of SFF to state-of-the-art electronic surface compensation (ESC) with dynamic leaves. An analysis of early skin toxicity of a population of 15 patients was performed. The median volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose was 763 mL (range, 347-1472) for SFF vs. 779 mL (range, 349-1494) for ESC. The median residual 107% isodose was 0.1 mL (range, 0-63) for SFF and 1.9 mL (range, 0-57) for ESC. Monitor units were on average 25% higher in ESC plans compared with SFF. No patient treated with SFF had acute side effects superior to grade 1-NCI scale. SFF created homogenous 3D dose distributions equivalent to electronic surface compensation with dynamic leaves. It allowed the integration of a forward planned concomitant tumor bed boost as an additional multileaf collimator subfield of the tangential fields. Compared with electronic surface compensation with dynamic leaves, shorter treatment times allowed better radiation protection to the patient. Low-grade acute toxicity evaluated weekly during treatment and 2 months after treatment completion justified the pursuit of this technique for all breast patients in our department.

  7. Four large-scale field-aligned current systmes in the dayside high-latitude region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtani, S.; Potemra, T. A.; Newell, P.T.; Zanetti, L. J.; Iijima, T.; Watanabe, M.; Blomberg, L. G.; Elphinstone, R. D.; Murphree, J. S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1995-01-01

    A system of four current sheets of large-scale field-aligned currents (FACs) was discovered in the data set of simultaneous Viking and Defense Meteorological Satellire Program-F7 (DMSP-F7) crossing of the dayside high-latitude region. This paper reports four examples of this system that were observed in the prenoon sector. The flow polarities of FACs are upward, downward, upward, and downward, from equatorward to poleward. The lowest-latitude upward current is flowing mostly in the central plasma sheet (CPS) precipitation region, often overlapping with the boundary plasma sheet (BPS) at its poleward edge, andis interpreted as a region 2 current. The pair of downward and upward FACs in the middle of te structure are collocated with structured electron precipitation. The precipitation of high-energy (greater than 1 keV) electrons is more intense in the lower-latitude downward current sheet. The highest-latitude downward flowing current sheet is located in a weak, low-energy particle precipitation region, suggesting that this current is flowing on open field lines. Simulaneous observations in the postnoon local time sector reveal the standard three-sheet structure of FACs, sometimes described as region 2, region 1, and mantle (referred to the midday region O) currents. A high correlation was found between the occurrence of the four FAC sheet structure and negative interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B(sub Y). We discuss the FAC structurein terms of three types of convection cells: the merging, viscous, andlobe cells. During strongly negative IMF B(sub Y), two convection reversals exist in the prenoon sector; one is inside the viscous cell, and the other is between the viscous cell and the lobe cell. This structure of convection flow is supported by the Viking electric field and auroral UV image data. Based on the convection pattern, the four FAC sheet structure is interpreted as the latitude overlap of midday and morning FAC systems. We suggest that the for

  8. Large-Scale Dynamical Fields Associated with Convectively Coupled Equatorial Waves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Matthew; Kiladis, George N.; Webster, Peter J.

    2000-03-01

    Convectively coupled equatorial waves, as previously detected in studies of wavenumber-frequency spectra of tropical clouds, are studied in more detail. Composite dynamical structures of the waves are obtained using linear regression between selectively filtered satellite-observed outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) data, and various fields from a global reanalysis dataset. The selective filtering of the OLR was designed to isolate the convective variations contributing to spectral peaks that lie along the equatorial wave dispersion curves for equivalent depths in the range of 12-50 m. The waves studied are the Kelvin, n = 1 equatorial Rossby (ER), mixed Rossby-gravity, n = 0 eastward inertio-gravity, n = 1 westward inertio-gravity (WIG), and n = 2 WIG waves.The horizontal structures of the dynamical fields associated with the waves are all generally consistent with those calculated from inviscid equatorial -plane shallow water theory. In the vertical, there are statistically significant structures spanning the depth of the troposphere, and for all but the ER wave there are associated vertically propagating signals extending into the equatorial stratosphere as well. In zonal cross sections, the vertical structure of the temperature anomaly field appears, for all but the ER wave, as a `boomerang'-like shape, with the `elbow' of the boomerang occurring consistently at the 250-hPa level. The tilts of the boomerang imply upward phase propagation throughout most of the troposphere, and downward phase propagation above. The deep convection of the waves occurs in regions of anomalously cold temperatures in the lower troposphere, warm temperatures in the upper troposphere, and cold temperatures at the level of the tropopause. Such a vertical structure appears to indicate that waves of relatively short vertical wavelengths (Lz 10 km) are indeed important for the coupling of large-scale dynamics and convection. The deeper structure of the convectively coupled ER wave, on the

  9. Increasing accuracy and throughput in large-scale microsatellite fingerprinting of cacao field germplasm collections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite-based DNA fingerprinting has been increasingly applied in crop genebank management. However, efficiency and cost-saving remain a major challenge for large scale genotyping, even when middle or high throughput genotyping facility is available. In this study we report on increasing the...

  10. On the statistics of biased tracers in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul; Fasiello, Matteo; Senatore, Leonardo; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2015-09-09

    With the completion of the Planck mission, in order to continue to gather cosmological information it has become crucial to understand the Large Scale Structures (LSS) of the universe to percent accuracy. The Effective Field Theory of LSS (EFTofLSS) is a novel theoretical framework that aims to develop an analytic understanding of LSS at long distances, where inhomogeneities are small. We further develop the description of biased tracers in the EFTofLSS to account for the effect of baryonic physics and primordial non-Gaussianities, finding that new bias coefficients are required. Then, restricting to dark matter with Gaussian initial conditions, we describe the prediction of the EFTofLSS for the one-loop halo-halo and halo-matter two-point functions, and for the tree-level halo-halo-halo, matter-halo-halo and matter-matter-halo three-point functions. Several new bias coefficients are needed in the EFTofLSS, even though their contribution at a given order can be degenerate and the same parameters contribute to multiple observables. We develop a method to reduce the number of biases to an irreducible basis, and find that, at the order at which we work, seven bias parameters are enough to describe this extremely rich set of statistics. We then compare with the output of an N-body simulation where the normalization parameter of the linear power spectrum is set to σ8 = 0.9. For the lowest mass bin, we find percent level agreement up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 for the one-loop two-point functions, and up to k ≃ 0.15 h Mpc–1 for the tree-level three-point functions, with the k-reach decreasing with higher mass bins. In conclusion, this is consistent with the theoretical estimates, and suggests that the cosmological information in LSS amenable to analytical control is much more than previously believed.

  11. On the statistics of biased tracers in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Angulo, Raul; Fasiello, Matteo; Senatore, Leonardo; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2015-09-09

    With the completion of the Planck mission, in order to continue to gather cosmological information it has become crucial to understand the Large Scale Structures (LSS) of the universe to percent accuracy. The Effective Field Theory of LSS (EFTofLSS) is a novel theoretical framework that aims to develop an analytic understanding of LSS at long distances, where inhomogeneities are small. We further develop the description of biased tracers in the EFTofLSS to account for the effect of baryonic physics and primordial non-Gaussianities, finding that new bias coefficients are required. Then, restricting to dark matter with Gaussian initial conditions, we describemore » the prediction of the EFTofLSS for the one-loop halo-halo and halo-matter two-point functions, and for the tree-level halo-halo-halo, matter-halo-halo and matter-matter-halo three-point functions. Several new bias coefficients are needed in the EFTofLSS, even though their contribution at a given order can be degenerate and the same parameters contribute to multiple observables. We develop a method to reduce the number of biases to an irreducible basis, and find that, at the order at which we work, seven bias parameters are enough to describe this extremely rich set of statistics. We then compare with the output of an N-body simulation where the normalization parameter of the linear power spectrum is set to σ8 = 0.9. For the lowest mass bin, we find percent level agreement up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 for the one-loop two-point functions, and up to k ≃ 0.15 h Mpc–1 for the tree-level three-point functions, with the k-reach decreasing with higher mass bins. In conclusion, this is consistent with the theoretical estimates, and suggests that the cosmological information in LSS amenable to analytical control is much more than previously believed.« less

  12. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  13. The persistence of large-scale blowouts in largely vegetated coastal dune fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Fernandez, Irene; Smyth, Thomas; Jackson, Derek; Davidson-Arnott, Robin; Smith, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Coastal dunes move through natural phases of stability and instability during their evolution, displaying various temporal and spatial patterns across the dune field. Recent observations, however, have shown exceptionally rapid rates of stability through increased vegetative growth. This progressive vegetation colonisation and consequent loss of bare sand on coastal dune systems has been noted worldwide. Percentage reductions in bare sand of as much as 80% within just a few decades can been seen in examples from South Africa, Canada and Brazil as well as coastal dune sites across NW Europe. Despite these dramatic trends towards dune stabilisation, it is not uncommon to find particular examples of large-scale active blowouts and parabolic dunes within largely vegetated coastal dunes. While turbulence and airflow dynamics within features such as blowouts and other dune forms has been studied in detail within recent years, there is a lack of knowledge about what maintains dune mobility at these specific points in otherwise largely stabilized dune fields. This work explores the particular example of the 'Devil's Hole' blowout, Sefton Dunes, NW England. Approximately 300 m long by 100 m wide, its basin is below the water-table which leads to frequent flooding. Sefton Dunes in general have seen a dramatic loss of bare sand since the 1940s. However, and coinciding with this period of dune stabilisation, the 'Devil's Hole' has not only remained active but also grown in size at a rate of 4.5 m year-1 along its main axis. An exploration of factors controlling the maintenance of open bare sand areas at this particular location is examined using a variety of techniques including Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) airflow modelling and in situ empirical measurements of (short-term experiments) of wind turbulence and sand transport. Field measurements of wind parameters and transport processes were collected over a 2 week period during October 2015. Twenty three 3D ultrasonic

  14. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure part III: test of the equivalence principle

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Gleyzes, Jérôme; Vernizzi, Filippo; Hui, Lam; Simonović, Marko E-mail: jerome.gleyzes@cea.fr E-mail: msimonov@sissa.it

    2014-06-01

    The recently derived consistency relations for Large Scale Structure do not hold if the Equivalence Principle (EP) is violated. We show it explicitly in a toy model with two fluids, one of which is coupled to a fifth force. We explore the constraints that galaxy surveys can set on EP violation looking at the squeezed limit of the 3-point function involving two populations of objects. We find that one can explore EP violations of order 10{sup −3}÷10{sup −4} on cosmological scales. Chameleon models are already very constrained by the requirement of screening within the Solar System and only a very tiny region of the parameter space can be explored with this method. We show that no violation of the consistency relations is expected in Galileon models.

  15. Large-scale interplanetary magnetic fields: Voyager 1 and 2 observations between 1 AU and 9.5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Klein, L. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Behannon, K. W.

    1984-01-01

    The large-scale radial and temporal variations of the interplanetary magnetic field strength B observed by Voyagers 1 and 2 are discussed. Two components of the magnetic field strength were considered: (1) an average component, B sub zero, based on solar rotation averages, and (2) a fluctuation component, delta B, expressed by 10- or 24-hour averages of B normalized by the best-fit average field for the corresponding time and distance. Observations of the sector structure, interfaces, and shocks are presented to further describe magnetic field strength.

  16. TRMM Latent Heating Retrieval and Comparisons with Field Campaigns and Large-Scale Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Takayabu, Yukuri; Lang, S.; Shige, S.; Olson, W.; Hou, A.; Jiang, X.; Zhang, C.; Lau, W.; Krishnamurti, T.; Waliser, D.; Grecu, M.; Ciesielski, P. E.; Johnson, R. H.; Houze, R.; Kakar, R.; Nakamura, K.; Braun, S.; Hagos, S.; Oki, R.; Bhardwaj, A.

    2012-01-01

    Rainfall production is a fundamental process within the Earth's hydrological cycle because it represents both a principal forcing term in surface water budgets, and its energetics corollary, latent heating (LH), is one of the principal sources of atmospheric diabatic heating. Latent heat release itself is a consequence of phase changes between the vapor, liquid, and frozen states of water. The vertical distribution of LH has a strong influence on the atmosphere, controlling large-scale tropical circulations, exciting and modulating tropical waves, maintaining the intensities of tropical cyclones, and even providing the energetics of midlatitude cyclones and other mobile midlatitude weather systems. Moreover, the processes associated with LH result in significant non-linear changes in atmospheric radiation through the creation, dissipation and modulation of clouds and precipitation. Yanai et al. (1973) utilized the meteorological data collected from a sounding network to present a pioneering work on thermodynamic budgets, which are referred to as the apparent heat source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2). Yanai's paper motivated the development of satellite-based LH algorithms and provided a theoretical background for imposing large-scale advective forcing into cloud-resolving models (CRMs). These CRM-simulated LH and Q1 data have been used to generate the look-up tables used in LH algorithms. This paper examines the retrieval, validation, and application of LH estimates based on rain rate quantities acquired from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite (TRMM). TRMM was launched in November 1997 as a joint enterprise between the American and Japanese space agencies -- with overriding goals of providing accurate four-dimensional estimates of rainfall and LH over the global Tropics and subtropics equatorward of 35o. Other literature has acknowledged the achievement of the first goal of obtaining an accurate rainfall climatology. This paper describes the

  17. Rapid evolution of parasite resistance in a warmer environment: insights from a large scale field experiment.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Gonzalez, Fernando; Sundström, L Fredrik; Schmid, Marian; Björklund, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change is expected to have major effects on host-parasite dynamics, with potentially enormous consequences for entire ecosystems. To develop an accurate prognostic framework, theoretical models must be supported by empirical research. We investigated potential changes in host-parasite dynamics between a fish parasite, the eyefluke Diplostomum baeri, and an intermediate host, the European perch Perca fluviatilis, in a large-scale semi-enclosed area in the Baltic Sea, the Biotest Lake, which since 1980 receives heated water from a nuclear power plant. Two sample screenings, in two consecutive years, showed that fish from the warmer Biotest Lake were now less parasitized than fish from the Baltic Sea. These results are contrasting previous screenings performed six years after the temperature change, which showed the inverse situation. An experimental infection, by which perch from both populations were exposed to D. baeri from the Baltic Sea, revealed that perch from the Baltic Sea were successfully infected, while Biotest fish were not. These findings suggest that the elevated temperature may have resulted, among other outcomes, in an extremely rapid evolutionary change through which fish from the experimental Biotest Lake have gained resistance to the parasite. Our results confirm the need to account for both rapid evolutionary adaptation and biotic interactions in predictive models, and highlight the importance of empirical research in order to validate future projections. PMID:26035300

  18. Rapid Evolution of Parasite Resistance in a Warmer Environment: Insights from a Large Scale Field Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Gonzalez, Fernando; Sundström, L. Fredrik; Schmid, Marian; Björklund, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change is expected to have major effects on host-parasite dynamics, with potentially enormous consequences for entire ecosystems. To develop an accurate prognostic framework, theoretical models must be supported by empirical research. We investigated potential changes in host-parasite dynamics between a fish parasite, the eyefluke Diplostomum baeri, and an intermediate host, the European perch Perca fluviatilis, in a large-scale semi-enclosed area in the Baltic Sea, the Biotest Lake, which since 1980 receives heated water from a nuclear power plant. Two sample screenings, in two consecutive years, showed that fish from the warmer Biotest Lake were now less parasitized than fish from the Baltic Sea. These results are contrasting previous screenings performed six years after the temperature change, which showed the inverse situation. An experimental infection, by which perch from both populations were exposed to D. baeri from the Baltic Sea, revealed that perch from the Baltic Sea were successfully infected, while Biotest fish were not. These findings suggest that the elevated temperature may have resulted, among other outcomes, in an extremely rapid evolutionary change through which fish from the experimental Biotest Lake have gained resistance to the parasite. Our results confirm the need to account for both rapid evolutionary adaptation and biotic interactions in predictive models, and highlight the importance of empirical research in order to validate future projections. PMID:26035300

  19. Low Altitude Large Scale Magnetic Fields in the Venus Ionosphere: Complementary Observations from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter and Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, M. N.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Strangeway, R. J.; Zhang, T.

    2013-12-01

    The ionosphere of Venus has two end member states: magnetized and unmagnetized. When the solar wind dynamic pressure is low and the EUV flux high, the magnetic barrier forms at high altitudes where the plasma is collisionless. In this case the dayside ionosphere shows average weak fields punctuated by small-scale flux ropes and the nightside shows large scale nearly vertical fields associated with depletions or holes in the ionospheric density. When the dynamic pressure is high and the EUV flux is low, the magnetic field barrier is formed at lower altitudes where the ionosphere is collisional. Here the magnetic field enters the ionosphere to be carried downward by the subsolar circulation of the ionosphere. A strong magnetic belt builds up at low altitudes that wraps the planet and wraps around into the night ionosphere, shutting off the trans-terminator source of the nightside ionosphere to create the ';disappearing ionosphere' state with large scale horizontal nightside fields. Venus Express has observed this belt in the polar ionosphere and because of the characteristic spatial pattern of the field along the path of the satellite this belt was initially interpreted as giant flux ropes. These structures are better described as thin magnetic layers and not flux ropes. We re-analyze the VEX data from this perspective to better illustrate the properties of the observed polar field layers and their relationship to the draped magnetosheath fields.

  20. Monthly mean large-scale analyses of upper-tropospheric humidity and wind field divergence derived from three geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmetz, Johannes; Menzel, W. Paul; Velden, Christopher; Wu, Xiangqian; Vandeberg, Leo; Nieman, Steve; Hayden, Christopher; Holmlund, Kenneth; Geijo, Carlos

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the results from a collaborative study between the European Space Operations Center, the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies investigating the relationship between satellite-derived monthly mean fields of wind and humidity in the upper troposphere for March 1994. Three geostationary meteorological satellites GOES-7, Meteosat-3, and Meteosat-5 are used to cover an area from roughly 160 deg W to 50 deg E. The wind fields are derived from tracking features in successive images of upper-tropospheric water vapor (WV) as depicted in the 6.5-micron absorption band. The upper-tropospheric relative humidity (UTH) is inferred from measured water vapor radiances with a physical retrieval scheme based on radiative forward calculations. Quantitative information on large-scale circulation patterns in the upper-troposphere is possible with the dense spatial coverage of the WV wind vectors. The monthly mean wind field is used to estimate the large-scale divergence; values range between about-5 x 10(exp -6) and 5 x 10(exp 6)/s when averaged over a scale length of about 1000-2000 km. The spatial patterns of the UTH field and the divergence of the wind field closely resemble one another, suggesting that UTH patterns are principally determined by the large-scale circulation. Since the upper-tropospheric humidity absorbs upwelling radiation from lower-tropospheric levels and therefore contributes significantly to the atmospheric greenhouse effect, this work implies that studies on the climate relevance of water vapor should include three-dimensional modeling of the atmospheric dynamics. The fields of UTH and WV winds are useful parameters for a climate-monitoring system based on satellite data. The results from this 1-month analysis suggest the desirability of further GOES and Meteosat studies to characterize

  1. Monthly mean large-scale analyses of upper-tropospheric humidity and wind field divergence derived from three geostationary satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Schmetz, J.; Menzel, W.P.; Hayden, C.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the results from a collaborative study between the European Space Operations Center, the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Cooperative Institute for Meterological Satellite Studies investigating the relationship between satellite-derived monthly mean fields of wind and humidity in the upper troposphere for March 1994. Three geostationary meteorological satellites GOES-7, Meteosat-3, and Meteosat-5 are used to cover an area from roughly 160{degrees}W to 50{degrees}E. The wind fields are derived from tracking features in successive images of upper-tropospheric water vapor (WV) as depicted in the 6.5-{mu} absorption band. The upper-tropospheric relative humidity (UTH) is inferred from measured water vapor radiances with a physical retrieval scheme based on radiative forward calculations. Quantitative information on large-scale circulation patterns in the upper troposphere is possible with the dense spatial coverage of the WV wind vectors. The monthly mean wind field is used to estimate the large-scale divergence; values range between about -5 x 10{sup -6} and 5 x 10{sup -6} sec{sup -1} when averaged over a scale length of about 1000-2000 km. The spatial patterns of the UTH field and the divergence of the wind field closely resemble one another, suggesting that UTH patterns are principally determined by the large-scale circulation. Since the upper-tropospheric humidity absorbs upwelling radiation from lower-tropospheric levels and therefore contributes significantly to the atmospheric greenhouse effect, this work implies that studies on the climate relevance of water vapor should include three-dimensional modeling of the atmospheric dynamics. The fields of UTH and WV winds are useful parameters for a climate-monitoring system based on satellite data. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  2. SECTORS AND LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH FLUCTUATIONS IN THE HELIOSHEATH NEAR 110 AU: VOYAGER 1, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F. E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.co

    2010-12-10

    This paper describes observations of daily averages of the magnetic field strength B and the magnetic polarity measured by Voyager 1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009 between 108.5 and 112.1 AU and at heliographic latitude 34.{sup 0}4. A negative magnetic polarity sector was observed during 2009 DOY 43-255. A positive polarity sector was observed during 2009 DOY 256-365. We offer the hypothesis that the existence of the two sectors is the result of the displacement of the wavy heliospheric current sheet to the position of V1 as a result of northward flow in the heliosheath. The large size of the sectors is caused by the slow radial motion of the flow observed by V1 in the heliosheath. The distribution of B during 2009 was lognormal, in contrast to the Gaussian distributions observed by V1 in the heliosheath prior to 2009. The large-scale fluctuations of B, described by the distribution of increments of daily averages of B, have a Tsallis distribution with q = 1.6. The large-scale fluctuations of B observed by V1 during 2009 have a multifractal spectrum with the same parameters that V1 observed during 2005 close to the termination shock at 94 AU. These results suggest that the large-scale magnetic fluctuations of B are in a metastable equilibrium state in the heliosheath between 94 AU and 112.1 AU.

  3. Sectors and Large-Scale Magnetic Field Strength Fluctuations in the Heliosheath Near 110 AU: Voyager 1,2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes observations of daily averages of the magnetic field strength B and the magnetic polarity measured by Voyager 1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009 between 108.5 and 112.1 AU and at heliographic latitude 34. . 4. A negative magnetic polarity sector was observed during 2009 DOY 43.255. A positive polarity sector was observed during 2009 DOY 256.365. We offer the hypothesis that the existence of the two sectors is the result of the displacement of the wavy heliospheric current sheet to the position of V1 as a result of northward flow in the heliosheath. The large size of the sectors is caused by the slow radial motion of the flow observed by V1 in the heliosheath. The distribution of B during 2009 was lognormal, in contrast to the Gaussian distributions observed by V1 in the heliosheath prior to 2009. The large-scale fluctuations of B, described by the distribution of increments of daily averages of B, have a Tsallis distribution with q = 1.6. The large-scale fluctuations of B observed by V1 during 2009 have a multifractal spectrum with the same parameters that V1 observed during 2005 close to the termination shock at 94 AU. These results suggest that the large-scale magnetic fluctuations of B are in a metastable equilibrium state in the heliosheath between 94 AU and 112.1 AU.

  4. Effects and detectability of quasi-single field inflation in the large-scale structure and cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Sefusatti, Emiliano; Fergusson, James R.; Chen, Xingang; Shellard, E.P.S. E-mail: jf334@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: E.P.S.Shellard@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2012-08-01

    Quasi-single field inflation predicts a peculiar momentum dependence in the squeezed limit of the primordial bispectrum which smoothly interpolates between the local and equilateral models. This dependence is directly related to the mass of the isocurvatons in the theory which is determined by the supersymmetry. Therefore, in the event of detection of a non-zero primordial bispectrum, additional constraints on the parameter controlling the momentum-dependence in the squeezed limit becomes an important question. We explore the effects of these non-Gaussian initial conditions on large-scale structure and the cosmic microwave background, with particular attention to the galaxy power spectrum at large scales and scale-dependence corrections to galaxy bias. We determine the simultaneous constraints on the two parameters describing the QSF bispectrum that we can expect from upcoming large-scale structure and cosmic microwave background observations. We find that for relatively large values of the non-Gaussian amplitude parameters, but still well within current uncertainties, galaxy power spectrum measurements will be able to distinguish the QSF scenario from the predictions of the local model. A CMB likelihood analysis, as well as Fisher matrix analysis, shows that there is also a range of parameter values for which Planck data may be able distinguish between QSF models and the related local and equilateral shapes. Given the different observational weightings of the CMB and LSS results, degeneracies can be significantly reduced in a joint analysis.

  5. Generation of low-frequency electric and magnetic fields during large- scale chemical and nuclear explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Adushkin, V.V.; Dubinya, V.A.; Karaseva, V.A.; Soloviev, S.P.; Surkov, V.V.

    1995-06-01

    We discuss the main parameters of the electric field in the surface layer of the atmosphere and the results of the investigations of the natural electric field variations. Experimental investigations of the electromagnetic field for explosions in air are presented. Electromagnetic signals generated by underground nuclear and chemical explosions are discussed and explosions for 1976--1991 are listed. Long term anomalies of the earth`s electromagnetic field in the vicinity of underground explosions were also investigated. Study of the phenomenon of the irreversible shock magnetization showed that in the zone nearest to the explosion the quasistatic magnetic field decreases in inverse proportion to the distance.

  6. Constrained realizations of Gaussian fields - Reconstruction of the large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganon, Galit; Hoffman, Yehuda

    1993-09-01

    The method of constrained realization (CR) of Gaussian random fields is applied to reconstruct our 'local' universe. A large observational data set is sampled and used as constraints imposed on realizations of an assumed primordial Gaussian perturbation field. To illustrate the method, the velocity potential as obtained by the POTENT algorithm from the observed velocity field is sampled at 181 different positions within a sphere of 40/h Mpc radius around us. Numerical realizations of the standard cold dark matter (CDM) model are constructed to yield the actual sampled values. These realizations do reconstruct the density perturbation field of the nearby universe. With only 181 constraints, the CR algorithm recovers the main features of POTENT's density field and, in particular, the Great Attractor region. The 12/h Mpc smoothed potential, which depends on the very long wavelengths of the underlying perturbation field, is used to constrain high-resolution (5/h Mpc smoothing) realizations. Thus, given an assumed model, high-resolution fields are created subject to low-resolution data. The method is easily applicable to the general case where any variable which depends linearly on the Gaussian field can be used to set the constraints.

  7. Large-scale Mapping of Magnetic Fields between the Sun and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Cairns, I. H.; Francis, M. J.; Steward, G. A.; Neudegg, D.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic field lines between the Sun and Earth in the solar equatorial plane are calculated and mapped, using near-Earth spacecraft data and a solar wind model. The model allows a nonzero azimuthal component of magnetic field at the source surface, contrasting with the Parker model. The mapping shows that, typically, but not always, the magnetic fields are open and Parker-like. Nevertheless, the predicted field lines sometimes deviate significantly from the Parker direction, corresponding to when the observed magnetic fields are more azimuthally-oriented than the Parker model. Examples of non-Parker-like and Parker-like cases are shown, both for solar maximum and minimum conditions. Often the predicted magnetic field configurations are stable over consecutive solar rotations. The mapping predictions have important implications for particle propagation studies and for estimates of the length of the actual field lines. The effects on the transport paths of solar energetic particles (SEPs) to Earth are demonstrated briefly for an unusually long-lived SEP event at Earth.

  8. Near-Earth Magnetic Field Effects of Large-Scale Magnetospheric Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Olsen, Nils; Le, Guan

    2016-07-01

    Magnetospheric currents play an important role in the electrodynamics of near-Earth space. This has been the topic of many space science studies. Here we focus on the magnetic fields they cause close to Earth. Their contribution to the geomagnetic field is the second largest after the core field. Significant progress in interpreting the magnetic fields from the different sources has been achieved thanks to magnetic satellite missions like Ørsted, CHAMP and now Swarm. Of particular interest for this article is a proper representation of the magnetospheric ring current effect. Uncertainties in modelling its effect still produce the largest residuals between observations and present-day geomagnetic field models. A lot of progress has been achieved so far, but there are still open issues like the characteristics of the partial ring current. Other currents discussed are those flowing in the magnetospheric tail. Also their magnetic contribution at LEO orbits is non-negligible. Treating them as an independent source is a more recent development, which has cured some of the problems in geomagnetic field modelling. Unfortunately there is no index available for characterising the tail current intensity. Here we propose an approach that may help to properly quantify the magnetic contribution from the tail current for geomagnetic field modelling. Some open questions that require further investigation are mentioned at the end.

  9. Large Scale Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capiluppi, Paolo

    2005-04-01

    Large Scale Computing is acquiring an important role in the field of data analysis and treatment for many Sciences and also for some Social activities. The present paper discusses the characteristics of Computing when it becomes "Large Scale" and the current state of the art for some particular application needing such a large distributed resources and organization. High Energy Particle Physics (HEP) Experiments are discussed in this respect; in particular the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Experiments are analyzed. The Computing Models of LHC Experiments represent the current prototype implementation of Large Scale Computing and describe the level of maturity of the possible deployment solutions. Some of the most recent results on the measurements of the performances and functionalities of the LHC Experiments' testing are discussed.

  10. Observations of large scale steady magnetic fields in the nightside Venus ionosphere and near wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Based on an analysis of a large sample of Pioneer Venus Orbiter magnetometer data, characteristics of the magnetic fields near nightside periapsis are discussed. The observations generally indicate a weak average field of less than 10 gammas between 200 km and the periapsis altitude of 150 km, except when (1) the local solar wind dynamic pressure is high or (2) the spacecraft is in a 70 deg wide solar zenith angle range, which includes the midnight meridian and is centered west of it at 1 hr local time. The presence of radial field of alternating sign at low altitudes and in the nightside ionosphere suggests that the antiparallel magnetotail fields can terminate very close to the planet.

  11. Electron Acceleration at a Coronal Shock Propagating through a Large-scale Streamer-like Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangliang; Chen, Yao; Guo, Fan; Feng, Shiwei; Du, Guohui; Li, Gang

    2016-04-01

    Using a test-particle simulation, we investigate the effect of large-scale coronal magnetic fields on electron acceleration at an outward-propagating coronal shock with a circular front. The coronal field is approximated by an analytical solution with a streamer-like magnetic field featuring a partially open magnetic field and a current sheet at the equator atop the closed region. We show that the large-scale shock-field configuration, especially the relative curvature of the shock and the magnetic field line across which the shock is sweeping, plays an important role in the efficiency of electron acceleration. At low shock altitudes, when the shock curvature is larger than that of the magnetic field lines, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock flanks; at higher altitudes, when the shock curvature is smaller, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock nose around the top of closed field lines. The above process reveals the shift of the efficient electron acceleration region along the shock front during its propagation. We also find that, in general, the electron acceleration at the shock flank is not as efficient as that at the top of the closed field because a collapsing magnetic trap can be formed at the top. In addition, we find that the energy spectra of electrons are power-law-like, first hardening then softening with the spectral index varying in a range of ‑3 to ‑6. Physical interpretations of the results and implications for the study of solar radio bursts are discussed.

  12. Motions of charged particles in the Magnetosphere under the influence of a time-varying large scale convection electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Bewtra, N. K.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The motions of charged particles under the influence of the geomagnetic and electric fields were quite complex in the region of the inner magnetosphere. The Volland-Stern type large scale convection electric field was used successfully to predict both the plasmapause location and particle enhancements determined from Explorer 45 measurements. A time dependence in this electric field was introduced based on the variation in Kp for actual magnetic storm conditions. The particle trajectories were computed as they change in this time-varying electric field. Several storm fronts of particles of different magnetic moments were allowed to be injected into the inner magnetosphere from L = 10 in the equatorial plane. The motions of these fronts are presented in a movie format.

  13. PROBING THE LARGE-SCALE TOPOLOGY OF THE HELIOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD USING JOVIAN ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, M. J.; Horbury, T. S.; Arge, C. N.

    2010-05-10

    Jupiter's magnetosphere acts as a point source of near-relativistic electrons within the heliosphere. In this study, three solar cycles of Jovian electron data in near-Earth space are examined. Jovian electron intensity is found to peak for an ideal Parker spiral connection, but with considerable spread about this point. Assuming the peak in Jovian electron counts indicates the best magnetic connection to Jupiter, we find a clear trend for fast and slow solar wind to be over- and under-wound with respect to the ideal Parker spiral, respectively. This is shown to be well explained in terms of solar wind stream interactions. Thus, modulation of Jovian electrons by corotating interaction regions (CIRs) may primarily be the result of changing magnetic connection, rather than CIRs acting as barriers to cross-field diffusion. By using Jovian electrons to remote sensing magnetic connectivity with Jupiter's magnetosphere, we suggest that they provide a means to validate solar wind models between 1 and 5 AU, even when suitable in situ solar wind observations are not available. Furthermore, using Jovian electron observations as probes of heliospheric magnetic topology could provide insight into heliospheric magnetic field braiding and turbulence, as well as any systematic under-winding of the heliospheric magnetic field relative to the Parker spiral from footpoint motion of the magnetic field.

  14. Development of a Large Scale Field PIV System For Wake Measurement in a Wind Farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Larry; Castillo, Luciano; Sheng, Jian

    2014-11-01

    Efficient utilization of wind energy requires detailed field measurements. Conventional techniques such as LIDAR and sonic anemometers can only provide low resolution point-wise measurement. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is widely used in laboratory scale studies, however, has considerable difficulties for application in the field. The issues mainly arise due to the presence of background sunlight and the requirement of a large seeding volume. To address these issues, a novel, large-format, field PIV system is developed in this study. The PIV system is capable of measuring 2D velocity in a 1 m × 1 m field of view with 0.2 mm spatial resolution and 7.6 mm vector spacing. The instrument achieves a three-decade measurement range, which enables the quantification of wide spectrum of wake structures as well as those in ABL. It can be applied to assess inflow conditions and to identify coherent structures in turbine wakes. The paper will present the principle of measurement and the development of optical, electrical and mechanical systems, as well as the preliminary measurement in an experimental wind farm.

  15. WIPPER: an accurate and efficient field phenotyping platform for large-scale applications

    PubMed Central

    Utsushi, Hiroe; Abe, Akira; Tamiru, Muluneh; Ogasawara, Yumiko; Obara, Tsutomu; Sato, Emiko; Ochiai, Yusuke; Terauchi, Ryohei; Takagi, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    More accurate, rapid, and easy phenotyping tools are required to match the recent advances in high-throughput genotyping for accelerating breeding and genetic analysis. The conventional data recording in field notebooks and then inputting data to computers for further analysis is inefficient, time-consuming, laborious, and prone to human error. Here, we report WIPPER (for Wireless Plant Phenotyper), a new phenotyping platform that combines field phenotyping and data recording with the aid of Bluetooth communication, thus saving time and labor not only for field data recoding but also for inputting data to computers. Additionally, it eliminates the risk of human error associated with phenotyping and inputting data. We applied WIPPER to 100 individuals of a rice recombinant inbred line (RIL) for measuring leaf width and relative chlorophyll content (SPAD value), and were able to record an accurate data in a significantly reduced time compared with the conventional method of data collection. We are currently using WIPPER for routine management of rice germplasm including recording and documenting information on phenotypic data, seeds, and DNA for their accelerated utilization in crop breeding. PMID:26175626

  16. Modeling the Large-Scale Structure and Long-Term Evolution of a Barchan Dune Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worman, S.; Littlewood, R. C.; Murray, A.; Andreotti, B.; Claudin, P.

    2011-12-01

    Barchans are mobile, crescent-shaped dunes that form atop hard, flat surfaces in regions where sediment supply is limited and fluid flow is approximately unidirectional. At the dune-scale, coupled models of sand transport and fluid dynamics have successfully reproduced their characteristic behavior and morphology. However, in nature, dunes rarely exist as isolated individuals but are instead found in highly-structured fields: Within a dune field with a cross-wind dimension on the order of 10 kilometers, patches of dunes can alternate spatially with sparse or dune-free regions, and the patches may have different characteristic dune size and spacing. The origin of such enigmatic structures cannot seem to be explained by differences in external forcing and remains an open research question. We use a partly rule-based numerical model that treats single dunes as discrete entities, based on the results of a dune-scale fluid-dynamics/sediment transport model. Our model integrates all currently known processes through which dunes interact with one another (i.e. sand flux exchange, collision, and calving). A rich array of patterns similar to those observed in nature emerge from these relatively simple interactions, offering a potential explanation of field-scale phenomena. We also develop simple statistics to characterize these structures and furnish testable predictions for future empirical work.

  17. Effective field theory of large scale structure at two loops: The apparent scale dependence of the speed of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Tobias; Mercolli, Lorenzo; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-12-01

    We study the effective field theory (EFT) of large-scale structure for cosmic density and momentum fields. We show that the finite part of the two-loop calculation and its counterterms introduces an apparent scale dependence for the leading-order parameter cs2 of the EFT starting at k =0.1 h Mpc-1 . These terms limit the range over which one can trust the one-loop EFT calculation at the 1% level to k <0.1 h Mpc-1 at redshift z =0 . We construct a well-motivated one-parameter ansatz to fix the relative size of the one- and two-loop counterterms using their high-k sensitivity. Although this one-parameter model is a very restrictive choice for the counterterms, it explains the apparent scale dependence of cs2 seen in simulations. It is also able to capture the scale dependence of the density power spectrum up to k ≈0.3 h Mpc-1 at the 1% level at redshift z =0 . Considering a simple scheme for the resummation of large-scale motions, we find that the two-loop calculation reduces the need for this IR resummation at k <0.2 h Mpc-1 . Finally, we extend our calculation to momentum statistics and show that the same one-parameter model can also describe density-momentum and momentum-momentum statistics.

  18. An analytical dynamo solution for large-scale magnetic fields of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamandy, Luke

    2016-08-01

    We present an effectively global analytical asymptotic galactic dynamo solution for the regular magnetic field of an axisymmetric thin disc in the saturated state. This solution is constructed by combining two well-known types of local galactic dynamo solution, parameterized by the disc radius. Namely, the critical (zero growth) solution obtained by treating the dynamo equation as a perturbed diffusion equation is normalized using a non-linear solution that makes use of the `no-z' approximation and the dynamical α-quenching non-linearity. This overall solution is found to be reasonably accurate when compared with detailed numerical solutions. It is thus potentially useful as a tool for predicting observational signatures of magnetic fields of galaxies. In particular, such solutions could be painted onto galaxies in cosmological simulations to enable the construction of synthetic polarized synchrotron and Faraday rotation measure (RM) datasets. Further, we explore the properties of our numerical solutions, and their dependence on certain parameter values. We illustrate and assess the degree to which numerical solutions based on various levels of approximation, common in the dynamo literature, agree with one another.

  19. Large scale electron acceleration by parallel electric fields during magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egedal, J.; Le, A.; Daughton, W.

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an ubiquitous phenomenon in plasmas. It permits an explosive release of energy through changes in the magnetic field line topology. In the Earth's magnetotail, reconnection energizes electrons up to hundreds of keV and solar flares events can channel up to 50% of the magnetic energy into the electrons resulting in superthermal populations. Electron energization is also fundamentally important to astrophysical applications, where X-rays generated by relativistic electrons provide a unique window into the extreme environments. Here we show that during reconnection powerful energization of electrons by E∥ can occur over spatial scales which hugely exceed what previously thought possible. Thus, our results are contrary to a fundamental assumption that a hot plasma - a highly conducting medium for electrical current - cannot support any significant E∥ over length scales large compared to the small electron inertial length de = c /ωpe . In our model E∥ is supported by strongly anisotropic features in the electron distributions not permitted in standard fluid formulations, but routinely observed by spacecraft in the Earth's magnetosphere. This allows for electron energization in spatial regions that exceed the regular de scale electron diffusion region by at least three orders of magnitude. Magnetic reconnection is an ubiquitous phenomenon in plasmas. It permits an explosive release of energy through changes in the magnetic field line topology. In the Earth's magnetotail, reconnection energizes electrons up to hundreds of keV and solar flares events can channel up to 50% of the magnetic energy into the electrons resulting in superthermal populations. Electron energization is also fundamentally important to astrophysical applications, where X-rays generated by relativistic electrons provide a unique window into the extreme environments. Here we show that during reconnection powerful energization of electrons by E∥ can occur over spatial

  20. Imaginary time propagation code for large-scale two-dimensional eigenvalue problems in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luukko, P. J. J.; Räsänen, E.

    2013-03-01

    We present a code for solving the single-particle, time-independent Schrödinger equation in two dimensions. Our program utilizes the imaginary time propagation (ITP) algorithm, and it includes the most recent developments in the ITP method: the arbitrary order operator factorization and the exact inclusion of a (possibly very strong) magnetic field. Our program is able to solve thousands of eigenstates of a two-dimensional quantum system in reasonable time with commonly available hardware. The main motivation behind our work is to allow the study of highly excited states and energy spectra of two-dimensional quantum dots and billiard systems with a single versatile code, e.g., in quantum chaos research. In our implementation we emphasize a modern and easily extensible design, simple and user-friendly interfaces, and an open-source development philosophy. Catalogue identifier: AENR_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11310 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 97720 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ and Python. Computer: Tested on x86 and x86-64 architectures. Operating system: Tested under Linux with the g++ compiler. Any POSIX-compliant OS with a C++ compiler and the required external routines should suffice. Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes, with OpenMP. RAM: 1 MB or more, depending on system size. Classification: 7.3. External routines: FFTW3 (http://www.fftw.org), CBLAS (http://netlib.org/blas), LAPACK (http://www.netlib.org/lapack), HDF5 (http://www.hdfgroup.org/HDF5), OpenMP (http://openmp.org), TCLAP (http://tclap.sourceforge.net), Python (http://python.org), Google Test (http://code.google.com/p/googletest/) Nature of problem: Numerical calculation

  1. Type I Planet Migration in a Magnetized Disk. I. Effect of Large-scale Vertical and Azimuthal Field Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, Ana; Bans, Alissa; Königl, Arieh

    2015-03-01

    We study the effects of a large-scale, ordered magnetic field in protoplanetary disks on Type I planet migration using a combination of numerical simulations in 2D and 3D and a linear perturbation analysis. Steady-state models of such disks require the inclusion of magnetic diffusivity. To make progress using ideal MHD, we focus on simplified field configurations, involving purely vertical (Bz) and azimuthal ({{B}\\varphi }) field components and a combination of the two. For each of the models we calculate the locations of the relevant resonances and of the turning points, which delineate the propagation regions of the MHD waves that transport angular momentum from the planet to the disk. We use both numerical and semianalytic methods to evaluate the cumulative back torque acting on the planet, and explore the effect of spatial gradients in the disk’s physical variables on the results. We conclude that, under realistic (3D) circumstances, a large-scale magnetic field can slow down the inward migration that characterizes the underlying unmagnetized disk—by up to a factor of ∼2 when the magnetic pressure approaches the thermal pressure—but it cannot reverse it. A previous inference that a pure-Bϕ field whose amplitude decreases fast enough with radius leads to outward migration applies only in 2D. In fact, we find that, in 3D, a pure-Bϕ disk undergoes a rapid transition to turbulence on account of a magnetorotational instability that is triggered by the planet-induced appearance of a weak Bz component.

  2. Large scale electron acceleration by parallel electric fields during magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egedal, J.; Le, A.; Daughton, W.

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an ubiquitous phenomenon in plasmas. It permits an explosive release of energy through changes in the magnetic field line topology. In the Earth's magnetotail, reconnection energizes electrons up to hundreds of keV and solar flares events can channel up to 50% of the magnetic energy into the electrons. Electron energization is also fundamentally important toastrophysical applications, where X-rays generated by relativistic electrons provide a unique window into the extreme environments. Here we show that during reconnection powerful energization of electrons by E∥ can occur over spatial scales which hugely exceed what previously thought possible. Thus, our results are contrary to a fundamental assumption that a hot plasma - a highly conducting medium for electrical current - cannot support any significant E∥ over length scales large compared to the small electron inertial length de = c /ωpe . In our model E∥ is supported by non-thermal and strongly anisotropic features in the electron distributions not permitted in standard fluid formulations, but routinely observed by spacecraft in the Earth's magnetosphere. This allows for electron energization in spatial regions that excide the regular de scale electron diffusion region by at least three orders of magnitude. This work was supported by NSF CAREER Award 0844620.

  3. Large-scale dynamic assembly of metal nanostructures in plasmofluidic field.

    PubMed

    Patra, Partha Pratim; Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Thampi, Sreeja; Tripathi, Ravi P N; Kumar, G V Pavan

    2016-04-12

    We discuss two aspects of the plasmofluidic assembly of plasmonic nanostructures at the metal-fluid interface. First, we experimentally show how three and four spot evanescent-wave excitation can lead to unconventional assembly of plasmonic nanoparticles at the metal-fluid interface. We observed that the pattern of assembly was mainly governed by the plasmon interference pattern at the metal-fluid interface, and further led to interesting dynamic effects within the assembly. The interference patterns were corroborated by 3D finite-difference time-domain simulations. Secondly, we show how anisotropic geometry, such as Ag nanowires, can be assembled and aligned in unstructured and structured plasmofluidic fields. We found that by structuring the metal-film, Ag nanowires can be aligned at the metal-fluid interface with a single evanescent-wave excitation, thus highlighting the prospect of assembling plasmonic circuits in a fluid. An interesting aspect of our method is that we obtain the assembly at locations away from the excitation points, thus leading to remote assembly of nanostructures. The results discussed herein may have implications in realizing a platform for reconfigurable plasmonic metamaterials, and a test-bed to understand the effect of plasmon interference on assembly of nanostructures in fluids. PMID:26765282

  4. A large-scale field assessment of carbon stocks in human-modified tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Berenguer, Erika; Ferreira, Joice; Gardner, Toby Alan; Aragão, Luiz Eduardo Oliveira Cruz; De Camargo, Plínio Barbosa; Cerri, Carlos Eduardo; Durigan, Mariana; Cosme De Oliveira Junior, Raimundo; Vieira, Ima Célia Guimarães; Barlow, Jos

    2014-12-01

    Tropical rainforests store enormous amounts of carbon, the protection of which represents a vital component of efforts to mitigate global climate change. Currently, tropical forest conservation, science, policies, and climate mitigation actions focus predominantly on reducing carbon emissions from deforestation alone. However, every year vast areas of the humid tropics are disturbed by selective logging, understory fires, and habitat fragmentation. There is an urgent need to understand the effect of such disturbances on carbon stocks, and how stocks in disturbed forests compare to those found in undisturbed primary forests as well as in regenerating secondary forests. Here, we present the results of the largest field study to date on the impacts of human disturbances on above and belowground carbon stocks in tropical forests. Live vegetation, the largest carbon pool, was extremely sensitive to disturbance: forests that experienced both selective logging and understory fires stored, on average, 40% less aboveground carbon than undisturbed forests and were structurally similar to secondary forests. Edge effects also played an important role in explaining variability in aboveground carbon stocks of disturbed forests. Results indicate a potential rapid recovery of the dead wood and litter carbon pools, while soil stocks (0-30 cm) appeared to be resistant to the effects of logging and fire. Carbon loss and subsequent emissions due to human disturbances remain largely unaccounted for in greenhouse gas inventories, but by comparing our estimates of depleted carbon stocks in disturbed forests with Brazilian government assessments of the total forest area annually disturbed in the Amazon, we show that these emissions could represent up to 40% of the carbon loss from deforestation in the region. We conclude that conservation programs aiming to ensure the long-term permanence of forest carbon stocks, such as REDD+, will remain limited in their success unless they effectively

  5. SCALES: SEVIRI and GERB CaL/VaL area for large-scale field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Belda, Fernando; Bodas, Alejandro; Crommelynck, Dominique; Dewitte, Steven; Domenech, Carlos; Gimeno, Jaume F.; Harries, John E.; Jorge Sanchez, Joan; Pineda, Nicolau; Pino, David; Rius, Antonio; Saleh, Kauzar; Tarruella, Ramon; Velazquez, Almudena

    2004-02-01

    The main objective of the SCALES Project is to exploit the unique opportunity offered by the recent launch of the first European METEOSAT Second Generation geostationary satellite (MSG-1) to generate and validate new radiation budget and cloud products provided by the GERB (Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget) instrument. SCALES" specific objectives are: (i) definition and characterization of a large reasonably homogeneous area compatible to GERB pixel size (around 50 x 50 km2), (ii) validation of GERB TOA radiances and fluxes derived by means of angular distribution models, (iii) development of algorithms to estimate surface net radiation from GERB TOA measurements, and (iv) development of accurate methodologies to measure radiation flux divergence and analyze its influence on the thermal regime and dynamics of the atmosphere, also using GERB data. SCALES is highly innovative: it focuses on a new and unique space instrument and develops a new specific validation methodology for low resolution sensors that is based on the use of a robust reference meteorological station (Valencia Anchor Station) around which 3D high resolution meteorological fields are obtained from the MM5 Meteorological Model. During the 1st GERB Ground Validation Campaign (18th-24th June, 2003), CERES instruments on Aqua and Terra provided additional radiance measurements to support validation efforts. CERES instruments operated in the PAPS mode (Programmable Azimuth Plane Scanning) focusing the station. Ground measurements were taken by lidar, sun photometer, GPS precipitable water content, radiosounding ascents, Anchor Station operational meteorological measurements at 2m and 15m., 4 radiation components at 2m, and mobile stations to characterize a large area. In addition, measurements during LANDSAT overpasses on June 14th and 30th were also performed. These activities were carried out within the GIST (GERB International Science Team) framework, during GERB Commissioning Period.

  6. Sensitivity analyses for clustered data: an illustration from a large-scale clustered randomized controlled trial in education.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yasuyo; Gee, Kevin A

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the importance of conducting well-thought-out sensitivity analyses for handling clustered data (data in which individuals are grouped into higher order units, such as students in schools) that arise from cluster randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This is particularly relevant given the rise in rigorous impact evaluations that use cluster randomized designs across various fields including education, public health and social welfare. Using data from a recently completed cluster RCT of a school-based teacher professional development program, we demonstrate our use of four commonly applied methods for analyzing clustered data. These methods include: (1) hierarchical linear modeling (HLM); (2) feasible generalized least squares (FGLS); (3) generalized estimating equations (GEE); and (4) ordinary least squares (OLS) regression with cluster-robust (Huber-White) standard errors. We compare our findings across each method, showing how inconsistent results - in terms of both effect sizes and statistical significance - emerged across each method and our analytic approach to resolving such inconsistencies. PMID:25090223

  7. Large-scale flows and magnetic fields in solar-like stars from global simulation with and without tachocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, G.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    The large-scale flows patterns like differential rotation and meridional circulation as well as the mean-field dynamo action in the Sun and solar-like stars are thought to have their origin in helical turbulent motions in the stellar convection zones. In this work we will present recent results of HD and MHD global simulations of stars whose stratification resemble that of the solar interior. The simulations are performed with the EULAG code (Smolarkiewicz et al. 2001). They include implicit modeling of the large-eddy contribution from the turbulent scales to the resolved scales, thus, allowing higher turbulent levels (e.g., Guerrero et al. 2013). In the HD regime, the value of the Rossby (Ro) number defines large-scale flow patterns. Large values of Ro result in an anti-solar differential rotation and a meridional circulation consistent with a single circulation cell per hemisphere. Lower values of Ro result in a solar-type differential rotation and a meridional flow with multiple cells in radius and latitude. Due to the low dissipation of the numerical scheme, the models are also able to reproduce the tachocline and sustain it over a longer time scale. In the MHD regime, both solutions are still allowed, however, the shift from anti-solar to the solar-like rotation happens at a larger value or Ro. A wide range of dynamo solutions is obtained for the magnetic field, including steady and oscillating modes (see e.g., Fig. 1). We also compare models with and without a stable stratified layer at the bottom of the convection zone. We notice that the presence of a naturally developed tachocline plays an important role in the dynamo solution, modifying the morphology of the magnetic field, the cycles period and influencing the large-scale flows.References:Smolarkiewicz, P. K., Margolin, L. G., & Wyszogrodzki, A. A. 2001, JAtS, 58, 349; Guerrero, G., Smolarkiewicz, P. K., Kosovichev, A.K., Mansour, N.N. 2013, ApJ, 779, 176.

  8. Radial transport of large-scale magnetic fields in accretion disks. I. Steady solutions and an upper limit on the vertical field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Taku; Muto, Takayuki

    2014-04-20

    Large-scale magnetic fields are key ingredients of magnetically driven disk accretion. We study how large-scale poloidal fields evolve in accretion disks, with the primary aim of quantifying the viability of magnetic accretion mechanisms in protoplanetary disks. We employ a kinematic mean-field model for poloidal field transport and focus on steady states where inward advection of a field balances with outward diffusion due to effective resistivities. We analytically derive the steady-state radial distribution of poloidal fields in highly conducting accretion disks. The analytic solution reveals an upper limit on the strength of large-scale vertical fields attainable in steady states. Any excess poloidal field will diffuse away within a finite time, and we demonstrate this with time-dependent numerical calculations of the mean-field equations. We apply this upper limit to large-scale vertical fields threading protoplanetary disks. We find that the maximum attainable strength is about 0.1 G at 1 AU, and about 1 mG at 10 AU from the central star. When combined with recent magnetic accretion models, the maximum field strength translates into the maximum steady-state accretion rate of ∼10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, in agreement with observations. We also find that the maximum field strength is ∼1 kG at the surface of the central star provided that the disk extends down to the stellar surface. This implies that any excess stellar poloidal field of strength ≳ kG can be transported to the surrounding disk. This might in part resolve the magnetic flux problem in star formation.

  9. Large-scale variations of the interplanetary magnetic field: Voyager 1 and 2 observations between 1-5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Behannon, K. W.; Klein, L. W.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    Observations by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft of the interplanetary magnetic field between 1 and 5 AU were used to investigate the large scale structure of the IMF in a period of increasing solar activity. The Voyager spacecraft found notable deviations from the Parker axial model. These deviations are attributed both to temporal variations associated with increasing solar activity, and to the effects of fluctuations of the field in the radial direction. The amplitude of the latter fluctuations were found to be large relative to the magnitude of the radial field component itself beyond approximately 3 AU. Both Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 observed decreases with increasing heliocentric distance in the amplitude of transverse fluctuations in the averaged field strength (B) which are consistent with the presence of predominantly undamped Alfven waves in the solar wind, although and necessarily implying the presence of them. Fluctuations in the strength of B (relative to mean field strength) were found to be small in amplitude, with a RMS which is approximately one third of that for the transverse fluctuations and they are essentially independent of distance from the Sun.

  10. Large-Scale Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad-El-Hak, Mohamed

    "Extreme" events - including climatic events, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and drought - can cause massive disruption to society, including large death tolls and property damage in the billions of dollars. Events in recent years have shown the importance of being prepared and that countries need to work together to help alleviate the resulting pain and suffering. This volume presents a review of the broad research field of large-scale disasters. It establishes a common framework for predicting, controlling and managing both manmade and natural disasters. There is a particular focus on events caused by weather and climate change. Other topics include air pollution, tsunamis, disaster modeling, the use of remote sensing and the logistics of disaster management. It will appeal to scientists, engineers, first responders and health-care professionals, in addition to graduate students and researchers who have an interest in the prediction, prevention or mitigation of large-scale disasters.

  11. Structure of ADAFs in a general large-scale B-field: the role of wind and thermal conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosallanezhad, Amin; Khajavi, Mehdi; Abbassi, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    We have explored the structure of a hot flow bathed in a general large-scale magnetic field. The importance of outflow and thermal conduction on the self-similar structure of a hot accretion flow has been investigated. We consider the additional magnetic parameters βr,varphi,z[ = c2r,varphi,z/(2c2s)], where c2r,varphi,z are the Alfvén sound speeds in three directions of cylindrical coordinates. In comparison to the accretion disk without winds, our results show that the radial and rotational velocities of the disk become faster, but the disk becomes cooler because of the angular momentum and energy flux which are taken away by the winds. Moreover, thermal conduction opposes the effect of winds and not only decreases the rotational velocity but also increases the radial velocity as well as the sound speed of the disk. In addition, we study the effect of the global magnetic field on the structure of the disk. Our numerical results show that all the components of a magnetic field can be important and they have a considerable effect on velocities and vertical structure of the disk.

  12. Intervention for First Graders with Limited Number Knowledge: Large-Scale Replication of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gersten, Russell; Rolfhus, Eric; Clarke, Ben; Decker, Lauren E.; Wilkins, Chuck; Dimino, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Replication studies are extremely rare in education. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) is a scale-up replication of Fuchs et al., which in a sample of 139 found a statistically significant positive impact for Number Rockets, a small-group intervention for at-risk first graders that focused on building understanding of number operations. The…

  13. Evaluating Experience-Based Geologic Field Instruction: Lessons Learned from A Large-Scale Eye-Tracking Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarduno, J. A.; Walders, K.; Bono, R. K.; Pelz, J.; Jacobs, R.

    2015-12-01

    A course centered on experience-based learning in field geology has been offered ten times at the University of Rochester. The centerpiece of the course is a 10-day field excursion to California featuring a broad cross-section of the geology of the state, from the San Andreas Fault to Death Valley. Here we describe results from a large-scale eye-tracking experiment aimed at understanding how experts and novices acquire visual geologic information. One ultimate goal of the project is to determine whether expert gaze patterns can be quantified to improve the instruction of beginning geology students. Another goal is to determine if aspects of the field experience can be transferred to the classroom/laboratory. Accordingly, ultra-high resolution segmented panoramic images have been collected at key sites visited during the field excursion. We have found that strict controls are needed in the field to obtain meaningful data; this often involves behavior atypical of geologists (e.g. limiting the field of view prior to data collection and placing time limits on scene viewing). Nevertheless some general conclusions can be made from a select data set. After an initial quick search, experts tend to exhibit scanning behavior that appears to support hypothesis testing. Novice fixations appear to define a scattered search pattern and/or one distracted by geologic noise in a scene. Noise sources include modern erosion features and vegetation. One way to quantify noise is through the use of saliency maps. With the caveat that our expert data set is small, our preliminary analysis suggests that experts tend to exhibit top-down behavior (indicating hypothesis driven responses) whereas novices show bottom-up gaze patterns, influenced by more salient features in a scene. We will present examples and discuss how these observations might be used to improve instruction.

  14. Use of electronic pill boxes to assess risk of poor treatment compliance: results of a large-scale trial.

    PubMed

    Vaur, L; Vaisse, B; Genes, N; Elkik, F; Legrand, C; Poggi, L

    1999-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the predictive factors of treatment compliance in hypertensive patients. This was an open large-scale multicenter study where mild to moderate essential hypertensive patients received trandolapril (2 mg) once daily for 30 to 60 days in addition to their usual treatment. Trandolapril was packed in electronic pill boxes that registered date and time of each opening. The main compliance parameters were the percentage of missed doses, the percentage of delayed doses, and the percentage of correct dosing periods. Predictive factors of poor compliance (correct dosing periods < 80%) were determined using a multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis. Two thousand one hundred seventy-three patients aged 60 +/- 12 years were analyzed. Of the total patients 37% were poor compliers; 29% of patients forgot more than 10% of doses and 36% of patients delayed more than 10% of doses. Ranked predictive factors of poor compliance were: age < 60 years (odds ratio [OR], 1.80 [1.49 to 2.17], P = .0001), the Paris area (OR, 1.70 [1.32 to 2.19], P = .0001), smokers (OR, 1.65 [1.29 to 2.11], P = .0001), monotherapy (OR, 1.40 [1.14 to 1.72], P = .0012), and baseline diastolic blood pressure > or = 100 mm Hg (OR, 1.21 [1.01 to 1.46], P = .044). Therefore, we conclude that young hypertensives, large city dwellers, and smokers are more likely to be poor compliers. The presence of some of these characteristics might incite the physician either to encourage patient compliance or to prescribe antihypertensive drugs that have an effect that persists even beyond 24 h. PMID:10232497

  15. A computationally efficient scheme for the inversion of large scale potential field data: Application to synthetic and real data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Meng, Xiaohong; Li, Fang

    2015-12-01

    Three dimensional (3D) inversion of potential field data from large scale surveys attempts to recover density or magnetic susceptibility distribution in the subspace for geological interpretation. It is computationally challenging and is not feasible on desktop computers. We propose an integrated scheme to address this problem. We adopt adaptive sampling to compress the dataset, and the cross curve of the data compression ratio and correlation coefficient between the initial and sampled data is used to choose the damping factor for adaptive sampling. Then, the conventional inversion algorithm in model space is transformed to data space, using the identity relationship between different matrices, which greatly reduces the memory requirement. Finally, parallel computation is employed to accelerate calculation of the kernel function. We use the conjugate gradient method to minimize the objective function and a damping factor is introduced to stabilize the iterative process. A wide variety of constraint options are also considered, such as depth weighing, sparseness, and boundary limits. We design a synthetic magnetic model with three prismatic susceptibility causative bodies to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. Tests on synthetic data show that the proposed scheme provides significant reduction in memory and time consumption, and the inversion result is reliable. These advantages hold true for practical field magnetic data from the Hawsons mining area in Australia, verifying the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  16. A LARGE-SCALE CLUSTER RANDOMIZED TRIAL TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTS OF COMMUNITY-BASED DIETARY SODIUM REDUCTION – THE CHINA RURAL HEALTH INITIATIVE SODIUM REDUCTION STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nicole; Yan, Lijing L.; Niu, Wenyi; Labarthe, Darwin; Feng, Xiangxian; Shi, Jingpu; Zhang, Jianxin; Zhang, Ruijuan; Zhang, Yuhong; Chu, Hongling; Neiman, Andrea; Engelgau, Michael; Elliott, Paul; Wu, Yangfeng; Neal, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death and disability in China. High blood pressure caused by excess intake of dietary sodium is widespread and an effective sodium reduction program has potential to improve cardiovascular health. Design This study is a large-scale, cluster-randomized, trial done in five Northern Chinese provinces. Two counties have been selected from each province and 12 townships in each county making a total of 120 clusters. Within each township one village has been selected for participation with 1:1 randomization stratified by county. The sodium reduction intervention comprises community health education and a food supply strategy based upon providing access to salt substitute. Subsidization of the price of salt substitute was done in 30 intervention villages selected at random. Control villages continued usual practices. The primary outcome for the study is dietary sodium intake level estimated from assays of 24 hour urine. Trial status The trial recruited and randomized 120 townships in April 2011. The sodium reduction program was commenced in the 60 intervention villages between May and June of that year with outcome surveys scheduled for October to December 2012. Baseline data collection shows that randomisation achieved good balance across groups. Discussion The establishment of the China Rural Health Initiative has enabled the launch of this large-scale trial designed to identify a novel, scalable strategy for reduction of dietary sodium and control of blood pressure. If proved effective, the intervention could plausibly be implemented at low cost in large parts of China and other countries worldwide. PMID:24176436

  17. Large-scale variations of the interplanetary magnetic field: Voyager 1 and 2 observations between 1-5 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L.F.; Lepping, R.P.; Behannon, K.W.; Klein, L.W.; Neubauer, F.M.

    1982-06-01

    Observations by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft of the interplanetary magnetic field between 1 and 5 AU have been used to investigate the large-scale structure of the IMF in the years 1977 to 1979, a period of increasing solar activity. This complements the Pioneer 10, 11 investigation between 1 and 8.5 AU during 1972--1976 when the sun was less active. In contrast to the good agreement of the Pioneer observations with the ideal field configuration of the Parker spiral model during near solar minimum conditions, the Voyager spacecraft found notable deviations from that configuration. We attribute these deviations both to temporal variations associated with increasing solar activity, and to the effects of fluctuations of the field in the radial direction. The amplitude of the latter fluctuations was found to be large relative to the magnitude of the radial field component itself beyond approximately 3 AU. The IMF sector structure was generally not well-developed during the period of this study. Notable differences were found between Voyager 1 and 2 observations. Differences in the region 1--2 AU are attributed to the substantially different latitudes of the two spacecraft during much of the period. Later differences are most likely associated with the fact that the Voyagers moved through the region between 4 and 5 AU at different times. Both Voyager 1 and 2 observed decreases with increasing heliocentric distance in the amplitude of 'transverse' fluctuations in B that are consistent with the presence of predominantly undamped Alfven waves in the solar wind although not necessarily implying the presence of them. The presence of convective structures, compressive modes, and/or a saturated instability of Alfven waves cannot be excluded by these Voyager results.

  18. Very-large-scale coherent structures in the wall pressure field beneath a supersonic turbulent boundary layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Beresh, Steven Jay; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Henfling, John Francis; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2010-11-01

    Previous wind tunnel experiments up to Mach 3 have provided fluctuating wall-pressure spectra beneath a supersonic turbulent boundary layer, which essentially are flat at low frequency and do not exhibit the theorized {psi}{sup 2} dependence. The flat portion of the spectrum extends over two orders of magnitude and represents structures reaching at least 100 {delta} in scale, raising questions about their physical origin. The spatial coherence required over these long lengths may arise from very-large-scale structures that have been detected in turbulent boundary layers due to groupings of hairpin vortices. To address this hypothesis, data have been acquired from a dense spanwise array of fluctuating wall pressure sensors, then invoking Taylor's Hypothesis and low-pass filtering the data allows the temporal signals to be converted into a spatial map of the wall pressure field. This reveals streaks of instantaneously correlated pressure fluctuations elongated in the streamwise direction and exhibiting spanwise alternation of positive and negative events that meander somewhat in tandem. As the low-pass filter cutoff is lowered, the fluctuating pressure magnitude of the coherent structures diminishes while their length increases.

  19. Searching High-Redshift Large-Scale Structures: Photometry of Four Fields around Quasar Pairs at z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boris, N. V.; Sodré, L., Jr.; Cypriano, E. S.; Santos, W. A.; de Oliveira, C. Mendes; West, M.

    2007-09-01

    We have studied the photometric properties of four fields around the high-redshift quasar pairs QP 1310+0007, QP 1355-0032, QP 0110-0219, and QP 0114-3140 at z~1 with the aim of identifying large-scale structures (galaxy clusters or groups) around them. This sample was observed with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectograph (GMOS) at the Gemini North and South telescopes in the g', r', i', and z' bands, and our photometry is complete to a limiting magnitude of i'~24 mag (corresponding to ~M*i'+2 at the redshift of the pairs). Our analysis reveals that QP 0110-0219 shows very strong and QP 1310+0007 and QP 1355-0032 show some evidence for the presence of rich galaxy clusters in direct vicinity of the pairs. On the other hand, QP 0114-3140 could be an isolated pair in a poor environment. This work suggest that z~1 quasar pairs are excellent tracers of high-density environments, and the same technique may be useful to find clusters at higher redshifts.

  20. Large-Scale Variational Two-Electron Reduced-Density-Matrix-Driven Complete Active Space Self-Consistent Field Methods.

    PubMed

    Fosso-Tande, Jacob; Nguyen, Truong-Son; Gidofalvi, Gergely; DePrince, A Eugene

    2016-05-10

    A large-scale implementation of the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method is presented. The active space is described using the variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix (v2RDM) approach, and the algorithm is applicable to much larger active spaces than can be treated using configuration-interaction-driven methods. Density fitting or Cholesky decomposition approximations to the electron repulsion integral tensor allow for the simultaneous optimization of large numbers of external orbitals. We have tested the implementation by evaluating singlet-triplet energy gaps in the linear polyacene series and two dinitrene biradical compounds. For the acene series, we report computations that involve active spaces consisting of as many as 50 electrons in 50 orbitals and the simultaneous optimization of 1892 orbitals. For the dinitrene compounds, we find that the singlet-triplet gaps obtained from v2RDM-driven CASSCF with partial three-electron N-representability conditions agree with those obtained from configuration-interaction-driven approaches to within one-third of 1 kcal mol(-1). When enforcing only the two-electron N-representability conditions, v2RDM-driven CASSCF yields less accurate singlet-triplet energy gaps in these systems, but the quality of the results is still far superior to those obtained from standard single-reference approaches. PMID:27065086

  1. Non-Gaussian covariance of the matter power spectrum in the effective field theory of large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Schutz, Katelin; Solon, Mikhail P.; Walsh, Jonathan R.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the non-Gaussian contribution to the covariance of the matter power spectrum at one-loop order in standard perturbation theory (SPT), using the framework of the effective field theory (EFT) of large scale structure (LSS). The complete one-loop contributions are evaluated for the first time, including the leading EFT corrections that involve seven independent operators, of which four appear in the power spectrum and bispectrum. We compare the non-Gaussian part of the one-loop covariance computed with both SPT and EFT of LSS to two separate simulations. In one simulation, we find that the one-loop prediction from SPT reproduces the simulation well to ki+kj˜0.25 h /Mpc , while in the other simulation we find a substantial improvement of EFT of LSS (with one free parameter) over SPT, more than doubling the range of k where the theory accurately reproduces the simulation. The disagreement between these two simulations points to unaccounted for systematics, highlighting the need for improved numerical and analytic understanding of the covariance.

  2. Very-Large-Scale Coherent Structures in the Wall Pressure Field Beneath a Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresh, Steven; Henfling, John; Spillers, Russell; Pruett, Brian

    2010-11-01

    Previous wind tunnel experiments up to Mach 3 have provided fluctuating wall-pressure spectra beneath a supersonic turbulent boundary layer, which essentially are flat at low frequency and do not exhibit the theorized φ^2 dependence. The flat portion of the spectrum extends over two orders of magnitude and represents structures reaching at least 100 δ in scale, raising questions about their physical origin. The spatial coherence required over these long lengths may arise from very-large-scale structures that have been detected in turbulent boundary layers due to groupings of hairpin vortices. To address this hypothesis, data have been acquired from a dense spanwise array of fluctuating wall pressure sensors, then invoking Taylor's Hypothesis and low-pass filtering the data allows the temporal signals to be converted into a spatial map of the wall pressure field. This reveals streaks of instantaneously correlated pressure fluctuations elongated in the streamwise direction and exhibiting spanwise alternation of positive and negative events that meander somewhat in tandem. As the low-pass filter cutoff is lowered, the fluctuating pressure magnitude of the coherent structures diminishes while their length increases.

  3. Large-scale analysis of peptide sequence variants: the case for high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Creese, Andrew J; Smart, Jade; Cooper, Helen J

    2013-05-21

    Large scale analysis of proteins by mass spectrometry is becoming increasingly routine; however, the presence of peptide isomers remains a significant challenge for both identification and quantitation in proteomics. Classes of isomers include sequence inversions, structural isomers, and localization variants. In many cases, liquid chromatography is inadequate for separation of peptide isomers. The resulting tandem mass spectra are composite, containing fragments from multiple precursor ions. The benefits of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) for proteomics have been demonstrated by a number of groups, but previously work has focused on extending proteome coverage generally. Here, we present a systematic study of the benefits of FAIMS for a key challenge in proteomics, that of peptide isomers. We have applied FAIMS to the analysis of a phosphopeptide library comprising the sequences GPSGXVpSXAQLX(K/R) and SXPFKXpSPLXFG(K/R), where X = ADEFGLSTVY. The library has defined limits enabling us to make valid conclusions regarding FAIMS performance. The library contains numerous sequence inversions and structural isomers. In addition, there are large numbers of theoretical localization variants, allowing false localization rates to be determined. The FAIMS approach is compared with reversed-phase liquid chromatography and strong cation exchange chromatography. The FAIMS approach identified 35% of the peptide library, whereas LC-MS/MS alone identified 8% and LC-MS/MS with strong cation exchange chromatography prefractionation identified 17.3% of the library. PMID:23646896

  4. Large-Scale Prospective T Cell Function Assays in Shipped, Unfrozen Blood Samples: Experiences from the Multicenter TRIGR Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Roy K.; Becker, Dorothy J.; Girgis, Rose; Palmer, Jerry P.; Cuthbertson, David; Krischer, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Broad consensus assigns T lymphocytes fundamental roles in inflammatory, infectious, and autoimmune diseases. However, clinical investigations have lacked fully characterized and validated procedures, equivalent to those of widely practiced biochemical tests with established clinical roles, for measuring core T cell functions. The Trial to Reduce Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in the Genetically at Risk (TRIGR) type 1 diabetes prevention trial used consecutive measurements of T cell proliferative responses in prospectively collected fresh heparinized blood samples shipped by courier within North America. In this article, we report on the quality control implications of this simple and pragmatic shipping practice and the interpretation of positive- and negative-control analytes in our assay. We used polyclonal and postvaccination responses in 4,919 samples to analyze the development of T cell immunocompetence. We have found that the vast majority of the samples were viable up to 3 days from the blood draw, yet meaningful responses were found in a proportion of those with longer travel times. Furthermore, the shipping time of uncooled samples significantly decreased both the viabilities of the samples and the unstimulated cell counts in the viable samples. Also, subject age was significantly associated with the number of unstimulated cells and T cell proliferation to positive activators. Finally, we observed a pattern of statistically significant increases in T cell responses to tetanus toxin around the timing of infant vaccinations. This assay platform and shipping protocol satisfy the criteria for robust and reproducible long-term measurements of human T cell function, comparable to those of established blood biochemical tests. We present a stable technology for prospective disease-relevant T cell analysis in immunological diseases, vaccination medicine, and measurement of herd immunity. PMID:24334687

  5. Characterizing stroke lesions using digital templates and lesion quantification tools in a web-based imaging informatics system for a large-scale stroke rehabilitation clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ximing; Edwardson, Matthew; Dromerick, Alexander; Winstein, Carolee; Wang, Jing; Liu, Brent

    2015-03-01

    Previously, we presented an Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (ICARE) imaging informatics system that supports a large-scale phase III stroke rehabilitation trial. The ePR system is capable of displaying anonymized patient imaging studies and reports, and the system is accessible to multiple clinical trial sites and users across the United States via the web. However, the prior multicenter stroke rehabilitation trials lack any significant neuroimaging analysis infrastructure. In stroke related clinical trials, identification of the stroke lesion characteristics can be meaningful as recent research shows that lesion characteristics are related to stroke scale and functional recovery after stroke. To facilitate the stroke clinical trials, we hope to gain insight into specific lesion characteristics, such as vascular territory, for patients enrolled into large stroke rehabilitation trials. To enhance the system's capability for data analysis and data reporting, we have integrated new features with the system: a digital brain template display, a lesion quantification tool and a digital case report form. The digital brain templates are compiled from published vascular territory templates at each of 5 angles of incidence. These templates were updated to include territories in the brainstem using a vascular territory atlas and the Medical Image Processing, Analysis and Visualization (MIPAV) tool. The digital templates are displayed for side-by-side comparisons and transparent template overlay onto patients' images in the image viewer. The lesion quantification tool quantifies planimetric lesion area from user-defined contour. The digital case report form stores user input into a database, then displays contents in the interface to allow for reviewing, editing, and new inputs. In sum, the newly integrated system features provide the user with readily-accessible web-based tools to identify the vascular territory involved, estimate lesion area

  6. Large-scale field study on thin-layer capping of marine PCDD/F-contaminated sediments in Grenlandfjords, Norway: physicochemical effects.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Gerard; Amstaetter, Katja; Hauge, Audun; Schaanning, Morten; Beylich, Bjørnar; Gunnarsson, Jonas S; Breedveld, Gijs D; Oen, Amy M P; Eek, Espen

    2012-11-01

    A large-scale field experiment on in situ thin-layer capping was carried out in the polychlorinated dibenzodioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) contaminated Grenlandsfjords, Norway. The main focus of the trial was to test the effectiveness of active caps (targeted thickness of 2.5 cm) consisting of powdered activated carbon (AC) mixed into locally dredged clean clay. Nonactive caps (targed thickness of 5 cm) consisting of clay without AC as well as crushed limestone were also tested. Fields with areas of 10,000 to 40,000 m(2) were established at 30 to 100 m water depth. Auxiliary shaken laboratory batch experiments showed that 2% of the applied powdered AC substantially reduced PCDD/F porewater concentrations, by >90% for tetra-, penta- and hexa-clorinated congeners to 60-70% for octachlorinated ones. In-situ AC profiles revealed that the AC was mixed into the sediment to 3 to 5 cm depth in 20 months. Only around 25% of the AC was found inside the pilot fields. Sediment-to-water PCDD/F fluxes measured by in situ diffusion chambers were significantly lower at the capped fields than at reference fields in the same fjord, reductions being largest for the limestone (50-90%) followed by clay (50-70%), and the AC + clay (60%). Also reductions in overlying aqueous PCDD/F concentrations measured by passive samplers were significant in most cases (20-40% reduction), probably because of the large size of the trial fields. The AC was less effective in the field than in the laboratory, probably due to prolonged sediment-to-AC mass transfer times for PCDD/Fs and field factors such as integrity of the cap, new deposition of contaminated sediment particles, and bioturbation. The present field data indicate that slightly thicker layers of limestone and dredged clay can show as good physicochemical effectiveness as thin caps of AC mixed with clay, at least for PCDD/Fs during the first two years after cap placement. PMID:23046183

  7. Clinical evaluation for batch consistency of an inactivated enterovirus 71 vaccine in a large-scale phase 3 clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Juan; Meng, Fan-Yue; Mao, Qunying; Li, Jing-Xin; Wang, Hua; Liang, Zheng-Lun; Zhang, Yun-Tao; Gao, Fan; Chen, Qing-Hua; Hu, Yuemei; Ge, Zi-Jun; Yao, Xin; Guo, Hui-Jie; Zhu, Feng-Cai; Li, Xiu-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The demonstration of batch-to-batch consistency to confirm the reliability of the manufacturing process has become a mandatory step in vaccine development. This is a post-hoc analysis aimed to provide more solid evidence on the immunogenicity and consistency of 3 consecutive batches of a novel inactivated enterovirus 71 (EV71) vaccine. In total 10 245 healthy Chinese children aged 6–35 months had been recruited and randomized to receive one of 3 batches of EV71 vaccine or placebo according to a two-dose immunization schedule in a phase 3 clinical trial. Blood samples were taken just before and 28 days after vaccinations for serological tests of EV71 neutralizing antibody (NTAb) titer from the subjects. Among them, 7263 (70.9%) subjects with seronegative EV71 NTAb at baseline and the data of serological tests post-vaccination available were included for the analysis. The results showed that EV71 vaccine elicited high geometric mean titers (GMTs) of 407.0 U/mL (95% CI, 373.5–443.6) for batch 1, 468.1 U/mL (95% CI, 432.2–507.0) for batch 2, and 520.6 U/mL (95% CI, 481.2–563.3) for batch 3. The two-sided 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the GMT ratios between each pair of vaccine batches were all within an interval of [0.67, 1.5]. Subjects who received EV71 vaccines demonstrated significant higher GMTs than those received placebos did (P < 0.001). In terms of incidence of both local and general adverse reactions, no differences were found among 3 vaccine batches and placebos. EV71 vaccine was highly immunogenic in children, and the 3 consecutive batches were well consistent. PMID:24633366

  8. The large-scale magnetic field in the solar wind. [astronomical models of interplanetary magnetics and the solar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1976-01-01

    A literature review is presented of theoretical models of the interaction of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic fields. Observations of interplanetary magnetic fields by the IMP and OSO spacecraft are discussed. The causes for cosmic ray variations (Forbush decreases) by the solar wind are examined. The model of Parker is emphasized. This model shows the three dimensional magnetic field lines of the solar wind to have the form of spirals wrapped on cones. It is concluded that an out-of-the-ecliptic solar probe mission would allow the testing and verification of the various theoretical models examined. Diagrams of the various models are shown.

  9. Lars Onsager Prize Talk: 1+1d conformal field theories as natural languages for asymptotically large-scale quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedan, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    An abstract argument is offered that the ideal physical systems for asymptotically large-scale quantum computers are near-critical quantum circuits, critical in the bulk, whose bulk universality classes are described by 1+1d conformal field theories. One in particular -- the Monster conformal field theory -- is especially ideal, because all of its bulk couplings are irrelevant.

  10. Large-scale, near-Earth, magnetic fields from external sources and the corresponding induced internal field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Estes, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Data from MAGSAT analyzed as a function of the Dst index to determine the first degree/order spherical harmonic description of the near-Earth external field and its corresponding induced field. The analysis was done separately for data from dawn and dusk. The MAGSAT data was compared with POGO data. A local time variation of the external field persists even during very quiet magnetic conditions; both a diurnal and 8-hour period are present. A crude estimate of Sq current in the 45 deg geomagnetic latitude range is obtained for 1966 to 1970. The current strength, located in the ionosphere and induced in the Earth, is typical of earlier determinations from surface data, although its maximum is displaced in local time from previous results.

  11. Simultaneous excitation of large-scale geomagnetic field fluctuations and plasma density irregularities by powerful radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Kuo, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    The physical mechanism of thermal filamentation instability of radio waves whose frequencies can be as low as in the VLF band and as high as in the SHF band are investigated. This instability can excite large-scale magnetic and plasma density fluctuations simultaneously in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Relevant experiments are reviewed in terms of this instability and other mechanisms.

  12. Rotation Measures of Extragalactic Sources behind the Southern Galactic Plane: New Insights into the Large-Scale Magnetic Field of the Inner Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. C.; Haverkorn, M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Taylor, A. R.; Bizunok, N. S.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Dickey, J. M.; Green, A. J.

    2007-07-01

    We present new Faraday rotation measures (RMs) for 148 extragalactic radio sources behind the southern Galactic plane (253deg<=l<=356deg, |b|<=1.5deg), and use these data in combination with published data to probe the large-scale structure of the Milky Way's magnetic field. We show that the magnitudes of these RMs oscillate with longitude in a manner that correlates with the locations of the Galactic spiral arms. The observed pattern in RMs requires the presence of at least one large-scale magnetic reversal in the fourth Galactic quadrant, located between the Sagittarius-Carina and Scutum-Crux spiral arms. To quantitatively compare our measurements to other recent studies, we consider all available extragalactic and pulsar RMs in the region we have surveyed, and jointly fit these data to simple models in which the large-scale field follows the spiral arms. In the best-fitting model, the magnetic field in the fourth Galactic quadrant is directed clockwise in the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm (as viewed from the north Galactic pole), but is oriented counterclockwise in the Scutum-Crux arm. This contrasts with recent analyses of pulsar RMs alone, in which the fourth-quadrant field was presumed to be directed counterclockwise in the Sagittarius-Carina arm. Also in contrast to recent pulsar RM studies, our joint modeling of pulsar and extragalactic RMs demonstrates that large numbers of large-scale magnetic field reversals are not required to account for observations.

  13. LyMAS: Predicting Large-scale Lyα Forest Statistics from the Dark Matter Density Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirani, Sébastien; Weinberg, David H.; Colombi, Stéphane; Blaizot, Jérémy; Dubois, Yohan; Pichon, Christophe

    2014-03-01

    We describe Lyα Mass Association Scheme (LyMAS), a method of predicting clustering statistics in the Lyα forest on large scales from moderate-resolution simulations of the dark matter (DM) distribution, with calibration from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of smaller volumes. We use the "Horizon-MareNostrum" simulation, a 50 h -1 Mpc comoving volume evolved with the adaptive mesh hydrodynamic code RAMSES, to compute the conditional probability distribution P(Fs |δ s ) of the transmitted flux Fs , smoothed (one-dimensionally, 1D) over the spectral resolution scale, on the DM density contrast δ s , smoothed (three-dimensionally, 3D) over a similar scale. In this study we adopt the spectral resolution of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) at z = 2.5, and we find optimal results for a DM smoothing length σ = 0.3 h -1 Mpc (comoving). In its simplest form, LyMAS draws randomly from the hydro-calibrated P(Fs |δ s ) to convert DM skewers into Lyα forest pseudo-spectra, which are then used to compute cross-sightline flux statistics. In extended form, LyMAS exactly reproduces both the 1D power spectrum and one-point flux distribution of the hydro simulation spectra. Applied to the MareNostrum DM field, LyMAS accurately predicts the two-point conditional flux distribution and flux correlation function of the full hydro simulation for transverse sightline separations as small as 1 h -1 Mpc, including redshift-space distortion effects. It is substantially more accurate than a deterministic density-flux mapping ("Fluctuating Gunn-Peterson Approximation"), often used for large-volume simulations of the forest. With the MareNostrum calibration, we apply LyMAS to 10243 N-body simulations of a 300 h -1 Mpc and 1.0 h -1 Gpc cube to produce large, publicly available catalogs of mock BOSS spectra that probe a large comoving volume. LyMAS will be a powerful tool for interpreting 3D Lyα forest data, thereby transforming measurements from BOSS and

  14. LyMAS: Predicting large-scale Lyα forest statistics from the dark matter density field

    SciTech Connect

    Peirani, Sébastien; Colombi, Stéphane; Dubois, Yohan; Pichon, Christophe; Weinberg, David H.; Blaizot, Jérémy

    2014-03-20

    We describe Lyα Mass Association Scheme (LyMAS), a method of predicting clustering statistics in the Lyα forest on large scales from moderate-resolution simulations of the dark matter (DM) distribution, with calibration from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of smaller volumes. We use the 'Horizon-MareNostrum' simulation, a 50 h {sup –1} Mpc comoving volume evolved with the adaptive mesh hydrodynamic code RAMSES, to compute the conditional probability distribution P(F{sub s} |δ {sub s}) of the transmitted flux F{sub s} , smoothed (one-dimensionally, 1D) over the spectral resolution scale, on the DM density contrast δ {sub s}, smoothed (three-dimensionally, 3D) over a similar scale. In this study we adopt the spectral resolution of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) at z = 2.5, and we find optimal results for a DM smoothing length σ = 0.3 h {sup –1} Mpc (comoving). In its simplest form, LyMAS draws randomly from the hydro-calibrated P(F{sub s} |δ {sub s}) to convert DM skewers into Lyα forest pseudo-spectra, which are then used to compute cross-sightline flux statistics. In extended form, LyMAS exactly reproduces both the 1D power spectrum and one-point flux distribution of the hydro simulation spectra. Applied to the MareNostrum DM field, LyMAS accurately predicts the two-point conditional flux distribution and flux correlation function of the full hydro simulation for transverse sightline separations as small as 1 h {sup –1} Mpc, including redshift-space distortion effects. It is substantially more accurate than a deterministic density-flux mapping ({sup F}luctuating Gunn-Peterson Approximation{sup )}, often used for large-volume simulations of the forest. With the MareNostrum calibration, we apply LyMAS to 1024{sup 3} N-body simulations of a 300 h {sup –1} Mpc and 1.0 h {sup –1} Gpc cube to produce large, publicly available catalogs of mock BOSS spectra that probe a large comoving volume. LyMAS will be a powerful

  15. Evolution of Large-scale Solar Magnetic Fields in a Flux-Transport Model Including a Multi-cell Meridional Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, E.; Dikpati, M.

    2003-12-01

    Advances in helioseismology over the past decade have enabled us to detect subsurface meridional flows in the Sun. Some recent helioseismological analysis (Giles 1999, Haber et al. 2002) has indicated a submerged, reverse flow cell occurring at high latitudes of the Sun's northern hemisphere between 1998 and 2001. Meridional circulation plays an important role in the operation of a class of large-scale solar dynamo, the so-called "flux-transport" dynamo. In such dynamo models, the poleward drift of the large-scale solar magnetic fields and the polar reversal process are explained by the advective-diffusive transport of magnetic flux by a meridional circulation with a poleward surface flow component. Any temporal and spatial variations in the meridional flow pattern are expected to greatly influence the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields in a flux-transport dynamo. The aim of this paper is to explore the implications of a steady, multi-cell flow on the advection of weak, large-scale, magnetic flux. We present a simple, two-cell flux transport model operating in an r-theta cross-section of the northern hemisphere. Azimuthal symmetry is assumed. Performing numerical flux-transport simulations with a reverse flow cell at various latitudes, we demonstrate the effect of this cell on the evolutionary pattern of the large-scale diffuse fields. We also show how a flux concentration may occur at the latitude where the radial flows of the two cells are sinking downward. This work is supported by NASA grants W-19752, W-10107, and W-10175. The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  16. Validation of a simple model to predict the performance of methane oxidation systems, using field data from a large scale biocover test field.

    PubMed

    Geck, Christoph; Scharff, Heijo; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria; Gebert, Julia

    2016-10-01

    On a large scale test field (1060m(2)) methane emissions were monitored over a period of 30months. During this period, the test field was loaded at rates between 14 and 46gCH4m(-2)d(-1). The total area was subdivided into 60 monitoring grid fields at 17.7m(2) each, which were individually surveyed for methane emissions and methane oxidation efficiency. The latter was calculated both from the direct methane mass balance and from the shift of the carbon dioxide - methane ratio between the base of the methane oxidation layer and the emitted gas. The base flux to each grid field was back-calculated from the data on methane oxidation efficiency and emission. Resolution to grid field scale allowed the analysis of the spatial heterogeneity of all considered fluxes. Higher emissions were measured in the upslope area of the test field. This was attributed to the capillary barrier integrated into the test field resulting in a higher diffusivity and gas permeability in the upslope area. Predictions of the methane oxidation potential were estimated with the simple model Methane Oxidation Tool (MOT) using soil temperature, air filled porosity and water tension as input parameters. It was found that the test field could oxidize 84% of the injected methane. The MOT predictions seemed to be realistic albeit the higher range of the predicted oxidations potentials could not be challenged because the load to the field was too low. Spatial and temporal emission patterns were found indicating heterogeneity of fluxes and efficiencies in the test field. No constant share of direct emissions was found as proposed by the MOT albeit the mean share of emissions throughout the monitoring period was in the range of the expected emissions. PMID:27426022

  17. A field study of large-scale oscillation ripples in a very coarse-grained, high-energy marine environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hirschaut, D.W.; Dingler, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Monastery Beach, Carmel, California is a pocket beach that sits within 200 m of the head of Carmel Submarine Canyon. Coarse to very coarse sand covers both the beach and adjacent shelf; in the latter area incoming waves have shaped the sand into large oscillation ripples. The accessibility of this area and a variable wave climate produce a unique opportunity to study large-scale coarse-grained ripples in a high-energy environment. These ripples, which only occur in very coarse sand, form under the intense, wave-generated currents that exist during storm conditions. Once formed, these ripples do not significantly change under lower energy waves. On three separate occasions scuba divers measured ripples and collected sand samples from ripple crests near fixed reference stakes along three transects. Ripple wavelength and grain size decreased with an increase in water depth. Sediment sorting was best closest to the surf zone and poorest at the rim of Carmel Canyon. Cobbles and gravel observed in ripple troughs represent lag deposits. Carmel Canyon refracts waves approaching Monastery Beach such that wave energy is focused towards the northern and southern portions of the beach, leaving the central part of the beach lower in energy. This energy distribution causes spatial variations in the ripples and grain sizes with the shortest wavelengths and smallest grain sizes being in the central part of the shelf.

  18. Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (cCBT) as treatment for depression in primary care (REEACT trial): large scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, Elizabeth; Hewitt, Catherine; Brierley, Gwen; Tharmanathan, Puvan; Araya, Ricardo; Barkham, Michael; Bower, Peter; Cooper, Cindy; Gask, Linda; Kessler, David; Lester, Helen; Lovell, Karina; Parry, Glenys; Richards, David A; Andersen, Phil; Brabyn, Sally; Knowles, Sarah; Shepherd, Charles; Tallon, Debbie; White, David

    2015-01-01

    Study question How effective is supported computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (cCBT) as an adjunct to usual primary care for adults with depression? Methods This was a pragmatic, multicentre, three arm, parallel randomised controlled trial with simple randomisation. Treatment allocation was not blinded. Participants were adults with symptoms of depression (score ≥10 on nine item patient health questionnaire, PHQ-9) who were randomised to receive a commercially produced cCBT programme (“Beating the Blues”) or a free to use cCBT programme (MoodGYM) in addition to usual GP care. Participants were supported and encouraged to complete the programme via weekly telephone calls. Control participants were offered usual GP care, with no constraints on the range of treatments that could be accessed. The primary outcome was severity of depression assessed with the PHQ-9 at four months. Secondary outcomes included health related quality of life (measured by SF-36) and psychological wellbeing (measured by CORE-OM) at four, 12, and 24 months and depression at 12 and 24 months. Study answer and limitations Participants offered commercial or free to use cCBT experienced no additional improvement in depression compared with usual GP care at four months (odds ratio 1.19 (95% confidence interval 0.75 to 1.88) for Beating the Blues v usual GP care; 0.98 (0.62 to 1.56) for MoodGYM v usual GP care). There was no evidence of an overall difference between either programme compared with usual GP care (0.99 (0.57 to 1.70) and 0.68 (0.42 to 1.10), respectively) at any time point. Commercially provided cCBT conferred no additional benefit over free to use cCBT or usual GP care at any follow-up point. Uptake and use of cCBT was low, despite regular telephone support. Nearly a quarter of participants (24%) had dropped out by four months. The study did not have enough power to detect small differences so these cannot be ruled out. Findings cannot be generalised to cCBT offered with a

  19. Large-scale three-dimensional phase-field simulations for phase coarsening at ultrahigh volume fraction on high-performance architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hui; Wang, K. G.; Jones, Jim E.

    2016-06-01

    A parallel algorithm for large-scale three-dimensional phase-field simulations of phase coarsening is developed and implemented on high-performance architectures. From the large-scale simulations, a new kinetics in phase coarsening in the region of ultrahigh volume fraction is found. The parallel implementation is capable of harnessing the greater computer power available from high-performance architectures. The parallelized code enables increase in three-dimensional simulation system size up to a 5123 grid cube. Through the parallelized code, practical runtime can be achieved for three-dimensional large-scale simulations, and the statistical significance of the results from these high resolution parallel simulations are greatly improved over those obtainable from serial simulations. A detailed performance analysis on speed-up and scalability is presented, showing good scalability which improves with increasing problem size. In addition, a model for prediction of runtime is developed, which shows a good agreement with actual run time from numerical tests.

  20. The magnetic shear-current effect: Generation of large-scale magnetic fields by the small-scale dynamo

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-03-14

    A novel large-scale dynamo mechanism, the magnetic shear-current effect, is discussed and explored. Here, the effect relies on the interaction of magnetic fluctuations with a mean shear flow, meaning the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo can drive a large-scale dynamo – in some sense the inverse of dynamo quenching. The dynamo is non-helical, with the mean fieldmore » $${\\it\\alpha}$$coefficient zero, and is caused by the interaction between an off-diagonal component of the turbulent resistivity and the stretching of the large-scale field by shear flow. Following up on previous numerical and analytic work, this paper presents further details of the numerical evidence for the effect, as well as an heuristic description of how magnetic fluctuations can interact with shear flow to produce the required electromotive force. The pressure response of the fluid is fundamental to this mechanism, which helps explain why the magnetic effect is stronger than its kinematic cousin, and the basic idea is related to the well-known lack of turbulent resistivity quenching by magnetic fluctuations. As well as being interesting for its applications to general high Reynolds number astrophysical turbulence, where strong small-scale magnetic fluctuations are expected to be prevalent, the magnetic shear-current effect is a likely candidate for large-scale dynamo in the unstratified regions of ionized accretion disks. Evidence for this is discussed, as well as future research directions and the challenges involved with understanding details of the effect in astrophysically relevant regimes.« less

  1. NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD EXTRAPOLATION OF A CORONAL MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE SUPPORTING A LARGE-SCALE SOLAR FILAMENT FROM A PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETOGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Hu, Qiang; Feng, Xueshang E-mail: wus@uah.edu E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2014-05-10

    Solar filaments are commonly thought to be supported in magnetic dips, in particular, in those of magnetic flux ropes (FRs). In this Letter, based on the observed photospheric vector magnetogram, we implement a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of a coronal magnetic FR that supports a large-scale intermediate filament between an active region and a weak polarity region. This result is a first, in the sense that current NLFFF extrapolations including the presence of FRs are limited to relatively small-scale filaments that are close to sunspots and along main polarity inversion lines (PILs) with strong transverse field and magnetic shear, and the existence of an FR is usually predictable. In contrast, the present filament lies along the weak-field region (photospheric field strength ≲ 100 G), where the PIL is very fragmented due to small parasitic polarities on both sides of the PIL and the transverse field has a low signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, extrapolating a large-scale FR in such a case represents a far more difficult challenge. We demonstrate that our CESE-MHD-NLFFF code is sufficient for the challenge. The numerically reproduced magnetic dips of the extrapolated FR match observations of the filament and its barbs very well, which strongly supports the FR-dip model for filaments. The filament is stably sustained because the FR is weakly twisted and strongly confined by the overlying closed arcades.

  2. Nonlinear Force-free Field Extrapolation of a Coronal Magnetic Flux Rope Supporting a Large-scale Solar Filament from a Photospheric Vector Magnetogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Feng, Xueshang; Hu, Qiang

    2014-05-01

    Solar filaments are commonly thought to be supported in magnetic dips, in particular, in those of magnetic flux ropes (FRs). In this Letter, based on the observed photospheric vector magnetogram, we implement a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of a coronal magnetic FR that supports a large-scale intermediate filament between an active region and a weak polarity region. This result is a first, in the sense that current NLFFF extrapolations including the presence of FRs are limited to relatively small-scale filaments that are close to sunspots and along main polarity inversion lines (PILs) with strong transverse field and magnetic shear, and the existence of an FR is usually predictable. In contrast, the present filament lies along the weak-field region (photospheric field strength <~ 100 G), where the PIL is very fragmented due to small parasitic polarities on both sides of the PIL and the transverse field has a low signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, extrapolating a large-scale FR in such a case represents a far more difficult challenge. We demonstrate that our CESE-MHD-NLFFF code is sufficient for the challenge. The numerically reproduced magnetic dips of the extrapolated FR match observations of the filament and its barbs very well, which strongly supports the FR-dip model for filaments. The filament is stably sustained because the FR is weakly twisted and strongly confined by the overlying closed arcades.

  3. A three-dimensional diffusion/convection model of the large scale magnetic field in the Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensinal diffusion/convection model of the dayside Venus ionosphere magnetic field was developed on the basis of previously published one-dimensional diffusion/convection models, and assuming that the field and flow at the upper boundary (in the magnetic barrier) as well as the ionospheric plasma velocity are known. The results indicate that the low-altitude magnetosheath field draping may be distorted by the interaction with the ionosphere in such a manner that there is an apparent 'focusing' of the field toward the subsolar point, caused by the shear in the horizontal velocity between the magnetosheath and ionospheric flows. A comparison of published magnetic-field observations with the present results indicates that the simple nesting of external and internal velocity fields may be a good approximation to global plasma flows near Venus under normal conditions.

  4. Revisiting the Middle Molecule Hypothesis of Uremic Toxicity: A Systematic Review of Beta 2 Microglobulin Population Kinetics and Large Scale Modeling of Hemodialysis Trials In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Roumelioti, Maria Eleni; Nolin, Thomas; Unruh, Mark L.; Argyropoulos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Background Beta-2 Microglobulin (β2M) is a prototypical “middle molecule” uremic toxin that has been associated with a higher risk of death in hemodialysis patients. A quantitative description of the relative importance of factors determining β2M concentrations among patients with impaired kidney function is currently lacking. Methods Herein we undertook a systematic review of existing studies reporting patient level data concerning generation, elimination and distribution of β2M in order to develop a population model of β2M kinetics. We used this model and previously determined relationships between predialysis β2M concentration and survival, to simulate the population distribution of predialysis β2M and the associated relative risk (RR) of death in patients receiving conventional thrice-weekly hemodialysis with low flux (LF) and high flux (HF) dialyzers, short (SD) and long daily (LD) HF hemodialysis sessions and on-line hemodiafiltration at different levels of residual renal function (RRF). Results We identified 9 studies of 106 individuals and 156 evaluations of or more compartmental kinetic parameters of β2M. These studies used a variety of experimental methods to determine β2M kinetics ranging from isotopic dilution to profiling of intra/inter dialytic concentration changes. Most of the patients (74/106) were on dialysis with minimal RRF, thus facilitating the estimation of non-renal elimination kinetics of β2M. In large scale (N = 10000) simulations of individuals drawn from the population of β2M kinetic parameters, we found that, higher dialytic removal materially affects β2M exposures only when RRF (renal clearance of β2M) was below 2 ml/min. In patients initiating conventional HF hemodialysis, total loss of RRF was predicted to be associated with a RR of death of more than 20%. Hemodiafiltration and daily dialysis may decrease the high risk of death of anuric patients by 10% relative to conventional, thrice weekly HF dialysis. Only daily

  5. Spatial dependence of correlation functions in the decay problem for a passive scalar in a large-scale velocity field

    SciTech Connect

    Vergeles, S. S.

    2006-04-15

    Statistical characteristics of a passive scalar advected by a turbulent velocity field are considered in the decay problem with a low scalar diffusivity {kappa} (large Prandtl number v/{kappa}, where v is kinematic viscosity). A regime in which the scalar correlation length remains smaller than the velocity correlation length is analyzed. The equal-time correlation functions of the scalar field are found to vary according to power laws and have angular singularities reflecting locally layered distribution of the scalar in space.

  6. Evidence for shock acceleration and intergalactic magnetic fields in a large-scale filament of galaxies ZwCl 2341.1+0000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Enßlin, Torsten A.; Miniati, Francesco; Stalin, C. S.; Singh, M.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Humeshkar, N. B.

    2002-07-01

    We report the discovery of large-scale diffuse radio emission from what appears to be a large-scale filamentary network of galaxies in the region of cluster ZwCl 2341.1+0000, and stretching over an area of at least 6 h50-1 Mpc in diameter. Multicolour CCD observations yield photometric redshifts indicating that a significant fraction of the optical galaxies in this region is at a redshift of z=0.3. This is supported by spectroscopic measurements of 4 galaxies in the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey (SDSS) survey at a mean z=0.27. We present VLA images at λ=20 cm (NVSS) and 90 cm, showing the detailed radio structure of the filaments. Comparison with the high resolution FIRST radio survey shows that the diffuse emission is not due to known individual point sources. The diffuse radio-emission has a spectral index α≲-0.5, and is most likely synchrotron emission from relativistic charged particles in an inter-galactic magnetic field. Furthermore, this optical/radio structure is detected in X-rays by the ROSAT all-sky survey. It has a 0.1-2.4 keV luminosity of about 10 44 erg s -1 and shows an extended highly non-relaxed morphology. These observations suggest that ZwCl 2341.1+0000 is possibly a proto-cluster of galaxies in which we are witnessing the process of structure formation. We show that the energetics of accretion shocks generated in forming large-scale structures are sufficient to produce enough high energy cosmic-ray (CR) electrons required to explain the observed radio emission, provided a magnetic field of strength B≳0.3 μG is present there. The latter is only a lower limit and the actual magnetic field is likely to be higher depending on the morphology of the emitting region. Finally, we show results from a numerical simulation of large-scale structure formation including acceleration of CR electrons at cosmological shocks and magnetic field evolution. Our results are in accord with the observed radio synchrotron and X-ray thermal bremsstrahlung fluxes

  7. Report of the Coordinators' Training for Large Scale Field Testing of Developing Mathematical Processes. Technical Report No. 296.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Mary E.; Whitaker, Donald R.

    This report describes a 1972-73 field test regarding the development of procedures and materials for training coordinators to implement the Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP) program. DMP is a research-based, elementary school mathematics program under development at the Wisconsin Research and Development Center for Cognitive Learning. To…

  8. Effects of the scatter in sunspot group tilt angles on the large-scale magnetic field at the solar surface

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.; Cameron, R. H.; Schüssler, M.

    2014-08-10

    The tilt angles of sunspot groups represent the poloidal field source in Babcock-Leighton-type models of the solar dynamo and are crucial for the build-up and reversals of the polar fields in surface flux transport (SFT) simulations. The evolution of the polar field is a consequence of Hale's polarity rules, together with the tilt angle distribution which has a systematic component (Joy's law) and a random component (tilt-angle scatter). We determine the scatter using the observed tilt angle data and study the effects of this scatter on the evolution of the solar surface field using SFT simulations with flux input based upon the recorded sunspot groups. The tilt angle scatter is described in our simulations by a random component according to the observed distributions for different ranges of sunspot group size (total umbral area). By performing simulations with a number of different realizations of the scatter we study the effect of the tilt angle scatter on the global magnetic field, especially on the evolution of the axial dipole moment. The average axial dipole moment at the end of cycle 17 (a medium-amplitude cycle) from our simulations was 2.73 G. The tilt angle scatter leads to an uncertainty of 0.78 G (standard deviation). We also considered cycle 14 (a weak cycle) and cycle 19 (a strong cycle) and show that the standard deviation of the axial dipole moment is similar for all three cycles. The uncertainty mainly results from the big sunspot groups which emerge near the equator. In the framework of Babcock-Leighton dynamo models, the tilt angle scatter therefore constitutes a significant random factor in the cycle-to-cycle amplitude variability, which strongly limits the predictability of solar activity.

  9. Effects of the Scatter in Sunspot Group Tilt Angles on the Large-scale Magnetic Field at the Solar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Cameron, R. H.; Schüssler, M.

    2014-08-01

    The tilt angles of sunspot groups represent the poloidal field source in Babcock-Leighton-type models of the solar dynamo and are crucial for the build-up and reversals of the polar fields in surface flux transport (SFT) simulations. The evolution of the polar field is a consequence of Hale's polarity rules, together with the tilt angle distribution which has a systematic component (Joy's law) and a random component (tilt-angle scatter). We determine the scatter using the observed tilt angle data and study the effects of this scatter on the evolution of the solar surface field using SFT simulations with flux input based upon the recorded sunspot groups. The tilt angle scatter is described in our simulations by a random component according to the observed distributions for different ranges of sunspot group size (total umbral area). By performing simulations with a number of different realizations of the scatter we study the effect of the tilt angle scatter on the global magnetic field, especially on the evolution of the axial dipole moment. The average axial dipole moment at the end of cycle 17 (a medium-amplitude cycle) from our simulations was 2.73 G. The tilt angle scatter leads to an uncertainty of 0.78 G (standard deviation). We also considered cycle 14 (a weak cycle) and cycle 19 (a strong cycle) and show that the standard deviation of the axial dipole moment is similar for all three cycles. The uncertainty mainly results from the big sunspot groups which emerge near the equator. In the framework of Babcock-Leighton dynamo models, the tilt angle scatter therefore constitutes a significant random factor in the cycle-to-cycle amplitude variability, which strongly limits the predictability of solar activity.

  10. Large-scale magnetic field perturbation arising from the 18 May 1980 eruption from Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, R.J.; Johnston, M.J.S.

    1989-01-01

    A traveling magnetic field disturbance generated by the 18 may 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens at 1532 UT was detected on an 800-km linear array of recording magnetometers installed along the San Andreas fault system in California, from San Francisco to the Salton Sea. Arrival times of the disturbance field, from the most northern of these 24 magnetometers (996 km south of the volcano) to the most southern (1493 km S23?? E), are consistent with the generation of a traveling ionospheric disturbance stimulated by the blast pressure wave in the atmosphere. The first arrivals at the north and the south ends of the array occurred at 26 and 48 min, respectively, after the initial eruption. Apparent average wave velocity through the array is 309 ?? 14 m s-1 but may have approached 600 m s-1 close to the volcano. The horizontal phase and the group velocity of ??? 300 m s-1 at periods of 70-80 min, and the attenuation with distance, strongly suggest that the magnetic field perturbations at distances of 1000-1500 km are caused by gravity mode acoustic-gravity waves propagating at F-region heights in the ionosphere. ?? 1989.

  11. A Technique for Incorporating Large-scale Magnetic Fields Within Stellar Models: Implications for the Variability of the Solar Radius, Luminosity, and Pulsation Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lydon, T. J.; Sofia, S.

    1994-12-01

    A set of physically consistent approximations are employed to include the effects of magnetic fields within the equations of stellar structure. A series of solar models are then constructed with large-scale (~0.1R_sun), intense (~10(6) gauss) magnetic fields. The results of such models are then compared to measurements of changes in the solar radius (from the Solar Disk Sextant Experiment) and changes in the solar p-mode frequencies in order to determine if such fields are associated with the solar cycle. This work was supported in part by an appointment to the Global Change Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellowships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health and Enviromental Research, and administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education.

  12. Medium and large-scale variations of dynamo-induced electric fields from AE ion drift measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coley, W. R.; Mcclure, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    Current models of the low latitude electric field are largely based on data from incoherent scatter radars. These observations are extended through the addition of the rather extensive high quality electric field measurements from the Ion Drift Meter (IDM) aboard the Atmosphere Explorer (AE) spacecraft. Some preliminary results obtained from the Unified Abstract files of satellite AE-E are presented. This satellite was active from the end of 1975 through June 1981 in various elliptical and circular orbits having an inclination near 20 deg. The resulting data can be examined for the variation of ion drift with latitude, longitude, season, solar cycle, altitude, and magnetic activity. The results presented deal primarily with latitudinal variations of the drift features. Diagrams of data are given and briefly interpreted. The preliminary results presented here indicate that IDM data from the AE and the more recent Dynamics Explorer B spacecraft should continue to disclose some interesting and previously unobserved dynamical features of the low latitude F region.

  13. Very-large-scale coherent structures in the wall pressure field beneath a supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell W.; Pruett, Brian O. M.

    2013-09-01

    Data have been acquired from a spanwise array of fluctuating wall pressure sensors beneath a wind tunnel wall boundary layer at Mach 2, then invoking Taylor's hypothesis allows the temporal signals to be converted into a spatial map of the wall pressure field. Different frequency ranges of pressure fluctuations may be accessed by bandpass filtering the signals. In all frequency ranges, this reveals signatures of coherent structures where negative pressure events are interspersed amongst positive events, with some degree of alternation in the streamwise direction. Within lower frequency ranges, streaks of instantaneously correlated pressure fluctuations elongated in the streamwise direction exhibit a spanwise meander and show apparent merging of pressure events. Coherent length scales based on single-sensor correlations are artificially shortened by neglecting this meander and merging, but are captured correctly using the sensor array. These measurements are consistent with similar observations by other researchers in the velocity field above the wall, and explain the presence of the flat portion of the wall pressure spectrum at frequencies well below those associated with the boundary layer thickness. However, the pressure data lack the common spanwise alternation of positive and negative events found in velocity data, and conversely demonstrate a weak positive correlation in the spanwise direction at low frequencies.

  14. Gap junctions mediate large-scale Turing structures in a mean-field cortex driven by subcortical noise.

    PubMed

    Steyn-Ross, Moira L; Steyn-Ross, D A; Wilson, M T; Sleigh, J W

    2007-07-01

    One of the grand puzzles in neuroscience is establishing the link between cognition and the disparate patterns of spontaneous and task-induced brain activity that can be measured clinically using a wide range of detection modalities such as scalp electrodes and imaging tomography. High-level brain function is not a single-neuron property, yet emerges as a cooperative phenomenon of multiply-interacting populations of neurons. Therefore a fruitful modeling approach is to picture the cerebral cortex as a continuum characterized by parameters that have been averaged over a small volume of cortical tissue. Such mean-field cortical models have been used to investigate gross patterns of brain behavior such as anesthesia, the cycles of natural sleep, memory and erasure in slow-wave sleep, and epilepsy. There is persuasive and accumulating evidence that direct gap-junction connections between inhibitory neurons promote synchronous oscillatory behavior both locally and across distances of some centimeters, but, to date, continuum models have ignored gap-junction connectivity. In this paper we employ simple mean-field arguments to derive an expression for D2, the diffusive coupling strength arising from gap-junction connections between inhibitory neurons. Using recent neurophysiological measurements reported by Fukuda [J. Neurosci. 26, 3434 (2006)], we estimate an upper limit of D2 approximately 0.6cm2. We apply a linear stability analysis to a standard mean-field cortical model, augmented with gap-junction diffusion, and find this value for the diffusive coupling strength to be close to the critical value required to destabilize the homogeneous steady state. Computer simulations demonstrate that larger values of D2 cause the noise-driven model cortex to spontaneously crystalize into random mazelike Turing structures: centimeter-scale spatial patterns in which regions of high-firing activity are intermixed with regions of low-firing activity. These structures are consistent

  15. Gap junctions mediate large-scale Turing structures in a mean-field cortex driven by subcortical noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyn-Ross, Moira L.; Steyn-Ross, D. A.; Wilson, M. T.; Sleigh, J. W.

    2007-07-01

    One of the grand puzzles in neuroscience is establishing the link between cognition and the disparate patterns of spontaneous and task-induced brain activity that can be measured clinically using a wide range of detection modalities such as scalp electrodes and imaging tomography. High-level brain function is not a single-neuron property, yet emerges as a cooperative phenomenon of multiply-interacting populations of neurons. Therefore a fruitful modeling approach is to picture the cerebral cortex as a continuum characterized by parameters that have been averaged over a small volume of cortical tissue. Such mean-field cortical models have been used to investigate gross patterns of brain behavior such as anesthesia, the cycles of natural sleep, memory and erasure in slow-wave sleep, and epilepsy. There is persuasive and accumulating evidence that direct gap-junction connections between inhibitory neurons promote synchronous oscillatory behavior both locally and across distances of some centimeters, but, to date, continuum models have ignored gap-junction connectivity. In this paper we employ simple mean-field arguments to derive an expression for D2 , the diffusive coupling strength arising from gap-junction connections between inhibitory neurons. Using recent neurophysiological measurements reported by Fukuda [J. Neurosci. 26, 3434 (2006)], we estimate an upper limit of D2≈0.6cm2 . We apply a linear stability analysis to a standard mean-field cortical model, augmented with gap-junction diffusion, and find this value for the diffusive coupling strength to be close to the critical value required to destabilize the homogeneous steady state. Computer simulations demonstrate that larger values of D2 cause the noise-driven model cortex to spontaneously crystalize into random mazelike Turing structures: centimeter-scale spatial patterns in which regions of high-firing activity are intermixed with regions of low-firing activity. These structures are consistent with the

  16. Large scale pattern graphene electrode for high performance in transparent organic single crystal field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Jackson, Biyun Li; Zhu, Jing; Miao, Cong-Qin; Chung, Choong-Heui; Chung, Choon-Heui; Park, Young-Ju; Sun, Ke; Woo, Jason; Xie, Ya-Hong

    2010-07-27

    High quality, large grain size graphene on polycrystalline nickel film on two inch silicon wafers was successfully synthesized by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamping method was used for graphene transferring in this experiment. The graphene transferred onto Al2O3/ITO substrates was patterned into macroscopic dimension electrodes using conventional lithography followed by oxygen plasma etching. Experimental results show that this graphene can serve as transparent source and drain electrodes in high performance organic semiconductor nanoribbon organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), facilitating high hole injection efficiency due to the preferred work function match with the channel material: single crystalline copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) nanoribbons. The nanoribbons were grown on top of the patterned graphene via evaporate-deposition to form the FET device. The carrier mobility and on/off current ratio of such devices were measured to be as high as 0.36 cm2/(V s) and 10(4). PMID:20536162

  17. Small-scale field experiments accurately scale up to predict density dependence in reef fish populations at large scales

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Mark A.; Forrester, Graham E.

    2005-01-01

    Field experiments provide rigorous tests of ecological hypotheses but are usually limited to small spatial scales. It is thus unclear whether these findings extrapolate to larger scales relevant to conservation and management. We show that the results of experiments detecting density-dependent mortality of reef fish on small habitat patches scale up to have similar effects on much larger entire reefs that are the size of small marine reserves and approach the scale at which some reef fisheries operate. We suggest that accurate scaling is due to the type of species interaction causing local density dependence and the fact that localized events can be aggregated to describe larger-scale interactions with minimal distortion. Careful extrapolation from small-scale experiments identifying species interactions and their effects should improve our ability to predict the outcomes of alternative management strategies for coral reef fishes and their habitats. PMID:16150721

  18. Small-scale field experiments accurately scale up to predict density dependence in reef fish populations at large scales.

    PubMed

    Steele, Mark A; Forrester, Graham E

    2005-09-20

    Field experiments provide rigorous tests of ecological hypotheses but are usually limited to small spatial scales. It is thus unclear whether these findings extrapolate to larger scales relevant to conservation and management. We show that the results of experiments detecting density-dependent mortality of reef fish on small habitat patches scale up to have similar effects on much larger entire reefs that are the size of small marine reserves and approach the scale at which some reef fisheries operate. We suggest that accurate scaling is due to the type of species interaction causing local density dependence and the fact that localized events can be aggregated to describe larger-scale interactions with minimal distortion. Careful extrapolation from small-scale experiments identifying species interactions and their effects should improve our ability to predict the outcomes of alternative management strategies for coral reef fishes and their habitats. PMID:16150721

  19. The dependence of coronal hole size on large scale magnetic field strength. [using a mathematical model of the photosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    The importance of mathematical models of the coronal structure for studies of coronal energetics, to simulate global flows of the solar wind, and to obtain reliable solar terrestrial predictions is discussed. Previous coronal models, including an example of a coronal MHD flow model, are reviewed. The development of a coronal model which is a logical extension of earlier models and which allows a closer relationship to the photospheric magnetic field as it is observed daily is described. The calculations are outlined. The assumptions of the model are: axisymmetric flow with no rotation, resulting in two dimensional flow in a meridional plane; zero viscosity and infinite electrical conductivity; polytropic, single fluid flow; and no momentum addition.

  20. Prompt arrival of solar energetic particles from far eastern events: The role of large-scale interplanetary magnetic field structure

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, I.G.; Cane, H.V.; von Rosenvinge, T.T. )

    1991-05-01

    Intensity-time profiles of solar energetic particle enhancements generally show an asymmetry with respect to the heliolongitude of the associated solar event. Particles arrive promptly form events to the west of an observer because of good magnetic connection whereas particle enhancements from poorly connected eastern source regions usually show much slower onsets. However, some 15% of eastern events do show prompt onsets. Two prompt particle enhancements associated with eastern solar events are studied using data from the Goddard Space Flight Center instruments on the ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft. In both events the prompt particle onset was observed when the spacecraft were in a postshock plasma region, apparently within a magnetic bottle. They suggest that the magnetic bottle extended back to the Sun and served as a channel for fast particle propagation to the spacecraft. Particles accelerated at an expanding coronal shock initiated by the eastern event could be injected onto field lines in the foot of the bottle.

  1. Prompt arrival of solar energetic particles from far eastern events - The role of large-scale interplanetary magnetic field structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1991-01-01

    Intensity-time profiles of solar energetic particle enhancements generally show an asymmetry with respect to the heliolongitude of the associated solar event. Particles arrive promptly from events to the west of an observer because of good magnetic connection, whereas particle enhancements from poorly connected eastern source regions usually show much slower onsets. However, some 15 percent of eastern events do show prompt onsets. Two prompt particle enhancements associated with eastern solar events are studied using data from the Goddard Space Flight Center instruments on the ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft. In both events the prompt particle onset was observed when the spacecraft were in a postshock plasma region, apparently within a magnetic bottle. It is suggested that the magnetic bottle extended back to the sun and served as a channel for fast particle propagation to the spacecraft. Particles accelerated at an expanding coronal shock initiated by the eastern event could be injected onto field lines in the foot of the bottle.

  2. Study of mean- and turbulent-velocity fields in a large-scale turbine-vane passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Laser-Doppler velocimetry, and to a lesser extent hot-wire anemometry, were employed to measure three components of the mean velocity and the six turbulent stresses at four planes within the turbine inlet-guide-vane passage. One variation in the turbulent inlet boundary layer thickness and one variation in the blade aspect ratio (span/axial chord) were studied. A longitudinal vortex (passage vortex) was clearly identified in the exit plane of the passage for the three test cases. The maximum turbulence intensities within the longitudinal vortex were found to be on the order of 2 to 4 percent, with large regions appearing nonturbulent. Because a turbulent wall boundary layer was the source of vorticity that produced the passage vortex, these low turbulence levels were not anticipated. For the three test cases studied, the lateral velocity field extended significantly beyond the region of the longitudinal velocity defect. Changing the inlet boundary layer thickness produced a difference in the location, the strength, and the extent of the passage vortex. Changing the aspect ratio of the blade passage had a measurable but less significant effect. The experiment was performed in a 210 mm pitch, 272 mm axial chord model in low speed wind tunnel at an inlet Mach number of 0.07.

  3. Variations over time in latitudinal distribution of the large-scale magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere at heights from the photosphere to the source surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtemov, Z. S.; Andreyeva, O. A.; Rudenko, G. V.; Stepanian, N. N.; Fainshtein, V. G.

    2015-02-01

    Calculations of magnetic field in the solar atmosphere and the "potential field-source surface" model have been used to study time variations in several parameters of the large-scale magnetic field at various heights during the last four solar cycles. At ten heights from the solar surface (R = Ro) to the source surface (R = 2.5Ro), we have constructed synoptic charts (SC) of the radial component Br of the estimated magnetic field. For these SC, we have identified 10-degree latitudinal zones. Within these zones, we found values of Sp (positive Br values averaged within the latitudinal zone over latitude and longitude), Sm (averaged modulus of negative Br values) and S + fields (a part of the latitudinal zone area (in %) occupied by positive Br values). At lower latitudes, cyclic variations in the Sp + Sm parameter are demonstrated to be similar (but not in detail) to time variations in Wolf numbers. Latitudes of 55° and higher exhibited virtually no cyclic peculiarities of time variations in this parameter. The authors believe that this indicates the diverse nature of the large-scale magnetic field in the near-equatorial and polar regions of the solar atmosphere. At R = 2.5Ro, Sp + Sm cyclic variations are almost invisible at all latitudes and only slightly apparent near the equator. The analysis of S + fields variations revealed that at low latitudes at R = 2.5Ro during solar cycles 21, 22 and ascending phase of cycle 23 there were almost no mixed-polarity periods. However, beginning from the maximum of cycle 23, in the near-equatorial region the mixed polarity was observed until the end of the long solar activity minimum. An assumption has been made that this might have been one of the forerunners and manifestations of the prolonged minimum between cycles 23 and 24. It has been found that during solar activity minima poleward there appears motion of magnetic fields with polarity opposite to that of the field at the pole. We have estimated the velocity of such a

  4. Assessment and mitigation of errors associated with a large-scale field investigation of methane emissions from the Marcellus Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulton, D.; Golston, L.; Li, Q.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Pan, D.; Lane, H.; Lu, J.; Fitts, J. P.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work suggests the distribution of methane emissions from fracking operations is a skewed distributed with a small percentage of emitters contributing a large proportion of the total emissions. In order to provide a statistically robust distributions of emitters and determine the presence of super-emitters, errors in current techniques need to be constrained and mitigated. The Marcellus shale, the most productive natural gas shale field in the United States, has received less intense focus for well-level emissions and is here investigated to provide the distribution of methane emissions. In July of 2015 approximately 250 unique well pads were sampled using the Princeton Atmospheric Chemistry Mobile Acquisition Node (PAC-MAN). This mobile lab includes a Garmin GPS unit, Vaisala weather station (WTX520), LICOR 7700 CH4 open path sensor and LICOR 7500 CO2/H2O open path sensor. Sampling sites were preselected based on wind direction, sampling distance and elevation grade. All sites were sampled during low boundary layer conditions (600-1000 and 1800-2200 local time). The majority of sites were sampled 1-3 times while selected test sites were sampled multiple times or resampled several times during the day. For selected sites a sampling tower was constructed consisting of a Metek uSonic-3 Class A sonic anemometer, and an additional LICOR 7700 and 7500. Data were recorded for at least one hour at these sites. A robust study and inter-comparison of different methodologies will be presented. The Gaussian plume model will be used to calculate fluxes for all sites and compare results from test sites with multiple passes. Tower data is used to provide constraints on the Gaussian plume model. Additionally, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) modeling will be used to calculate emissions from the tower sites. Alternative techniques will also be discussed. Results from these techniques will be compared to identify best practices and provide robust error estimates.

  5. Investigation of a laser Doppler velocimeter system to measure the flow field around a large scale V/STOL aircraft in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalay, A. D.; Brashears, M. R.; Jordan, A. J.; Shrider, K. R.; Vought, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    The flow field measured around a hovering 70 percent scale vertical takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft model is described. The velocity measurements were conducted with a ground based laser Doppler velocimeter. The remote sensing instrumentation and experimental tests of the velocity surveys are discussed. The distribution of vertical velocity in the fan jet and fountain; the radial velocity in the wall jet and the horizontal velocity along the aircraft underside are presented for different engine rpms and aircraft height above ground. Results show that it is feasible to use a mobile laser Doppler velocimeter to measure the flow field generated by a large scale V/STOL aircraft operating in ground effect.

  6. Investigation of a laser Doppler velocimeter system to measure the flow field of a large scale V/STOL aircraft in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalay, A. D.; Brashears, M. R.; Jordan, A. J.; Shrider, K. R.; Vought, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental research program for measuring the flow field around a 70 percent scale V/STOL aircraft model in ground effect is described. The velocity measurements were conducted with a ground-based laser Doppler velocimeter at an outdoor test pad. The remote sensing instrumentation, experimental tests, and results of the velocity surveys are discussed. The distribution of vertical velocity in the fan jet and fountain, the radial velocity in the wall jet and the horizontal velocity along the aircraft underside are presented for different engine rpms and aircraft heights above ground. The study shows that it is feasible to use a mobile laser Doppler velocimeter to measure the flow field generated by a large scale V/STOL aircraft operating in ground effect.

  7. The effect of the geomagnetic field on cosmic ray energy estimates and large scale anisotropy searches on data from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-11-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the influence of the geomagnetic field on the energy estimation of extensive air showers with a zenith angle smaller than 60{sup o}, detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory. The geomagnetic field induces an azimuthal modulation of the estimated energy of cosmic rays up to the {approx} 2% level at large zenith angles. We present a method to account for this modulation of the reconstructed energy. We analyse the effect of the modulation on large scale anisotropy searches in the arrival direction distributions of cosmic rays. At a given energy, the geomagnetic effect is shown to induce a pseudo-dipolar pattern at the percent level in the declination distribution that needs to be accounted for. In this work, we have identified and quantified a systematic uncertainty affecting the energy determination of cosmic rays detected by the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This systematic uncertainty, induced by the influence of the geomagnetic field on the shower development, has a strength which depends on both the zenith and the azimuthal angles. Consequently, we have shown that it induces distortions of the estimated cosmic ray event rate at a given energy at the percent level in both the azimuthal and the declination distributions, the latter of which mimics an almost dipolar pattern. We have also shown that the induced distortions are already at the level of the statistical uncertainties for a number of events N {approx_equal} 32 000 (we note that the full Auger surface detector array collects about 6500 events per year with energies above 3 EeV). Accounting for these effects is thus essential with regard to the correct interpretation of large scale anisotropy measurements taking explicitly profit from the declination distribution.

  8. Synthesis of small and large scale dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    Using a closure model for the evolution of magnetic correlations, we uncover an interesting plausible saturated state of the small-scale fluctuation dynamo (SSD) and a novel analogy between quantum mechanical tunnelling and the generation of large-scale fields. Large scale fields develop via the α-effect, but as magnetic helicity can only change on a resistive timescale, the time it takes to organize the field into large scales increases with magnetic Reynolds number. This is very similar to the results which obtain from simulations using the full MHD equations.

  9. Actual Condition of Paddy Field Levee Maintenance by Various Farm Households including Large-scale Farming in the Developed Land Renting Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Yasuyo

    The survey of interview, resource acquisition, photographic operation, and questionnaire were carried out in the “n” Community in the “y” District in Hakusan City in Ishikawa Prefecture to investigate the actual condition of paddy field levee maintenance in the area where land-renting market was proceeding, large-scale farming was dominant, and the problems of geographically scattered farm-land existed. In the study zone, 1) an agricultural production legal person rent-cultivated some of the paddy fields and maintained the levees, 2) another agricultural production legal person rent-cultivated some of the soy bean fields for crop changeover and land owners maintained the levees. The results indicated that sufficient maintenance was executed on the levees of the paddy fields cultivated by the agricultural production legal person, the soy bean fields for crop changeover, and the paddy fields cultivated by the land owners. Each reason is considered to be the managerial strategy, the economic incentive, the mutual monitoring and cross-regulatory mechanism, etc.

  10. The Styx Field Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gemmell, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    A 13-year assessment has been made of the effectiveness of a monthly drug treatment programme for the control of tapeworms in dogs in order to prevent hydatidosis (Echinococcus granulosus) and cysticercosis (Taenia hydatigena and T. ovis) in sheep. The age-specific prevalence of T. hydatigena in lambs was used as the principal indicator. The trial was carried out in the Styx Valley of the Maniototo Plain in the South Island of New Zealand. Over an 8-year period dogs were treated monthly with bunamidine hydrochloride at about 25 mg/kg with little effect on the prevalence of T. hydatigena in lambs. The addition of niclosamide at 50 mg/kg for 1 year also had little effect. Eggs appeared to survive from one season to the next. Those shed prior to the lamb-rearing season gave rise to endemic-type patterns; whereas patent infections occurring during this period rapidly gave rise to an epidemic-type pattern or a ”cysticercosis storm”. In this 9-year period there were 16 ”cysticercosis storms” and all susceptible lambs were infected. These storms did not necessarily give rise to a similar prevalence on neighbouring farms, but may have contributed to the overall infective pattern. A similar situation occurred in the first year that nitroscanate at 100 mg/kg was introduced. During this 10-year period, arecoline surveillance of the dog population was undertaken in the remainder of the county and many dogs were found to harbour tapeworms. Both resident and introduced dogs may have contributed to the infective patterns in the Styx Valley. Treatment with nitroscanate was continued monthly in the Styx Valley and niclosamide was used in the remainder of the County for a further 3 years. There was a marked reduction in the age-specific prevalence and lambs on many farms were free from T. hydatigena at slaughter. However, one ”breakdown” occurred and this was almost certainly autochthonous. Comparisons with an earlier period when arecoline surveillance was used in the

  11. QUANTIFYING THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD FROM LARGE-SCALE CLOUD TO COLLAPSING CORE: SELF-SIMILARITY, MASS-TO-FLUX RATIO, AND STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Patrick M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2012-03-01

    Dust polarization observational results are analyzed for the high-mass star formation region W51 from the largest parent cloud ({approx}2 pc, James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) to the large-scale envelope ({approx}0.5 pc, BIMA array) down to the collapsing core e2 ({approx}60 mpc, Submillimeter Array). Magnetic field and dust emission gradient orientations reveal a correlation which becomes increasingly more tight with higher resolution. The previously developed polarization-intensity-gradient method is applied in order to quantify the magnetic field significance. This technique provides a way to estimate the local magnetic field force compared to gravity without the need of any mass or field strength measurements, solely making use of measured angles which reflect the geometrical imprint of the various forces. All three data sets clearly show regions with distinct features in the field-to-gravity force ratio. Azimuthally averaged radial profiles of this force ratio reveal a transition from a field dominance at larger distances to a gravity dominance closer to the emission peaks. Normalizing these profiles to a characteristic core scale points toward self-similarity. Furthermore, the polarization-intensity-gradient method is linked to the mass-to-flux ratio, providing a new approach to estimate the latter one without mass and field strength inputs. A transition from a magnetically supercritical to a subcritical state as a function of distance from the emission peak is found for the e2 core. Finally, based on the measured radius-dependent field-to-gravity force ratio we derive a modified star formation efficiency with a diluted gravity force. Compared to a standard (free-fall) efficiency, the observed field is capable of reducing the efficiency down to 10% or less.

  12. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  13. Large scale traffic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Barrett, C.L.; Rickert, M.

    1997-04-01

    Large scale microscopic (i.e. vehicle-based) traffic simulations pose high demands on computational speed in at least two application areas: (i) real-time traffic forecasting, and (ii) long-term planning applications (where repeated {open_quotes}looping{close_quotes} between the microsimulation and the simulated planning of individual person`s behavior is necessary). As a rough number, a real-time simulation of an area such as Los Angeles (ca. 1 million travellers) will need a computational speed of much higher than 1 million {open_quotes}particle{close_quotes} (= vehicle) updates per second. This paper reviews how this problem is approached in different projects and how these approaches are dependent both on the specific questions and on the prospective user community. The approaches reach from highly parallel and vectorizable, single-bit implementations on parallel supercomputers for Statistical Physics questions, via more realistic implementations on coupled workstations, to more complicated driving dynamics implemented again on parallel supercomputers. 45 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Inflation and late-time cosmic acceleration in non-minimal Maxwell-F(R) gravity and the generation of large-scale magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Odintsov, Sergei D E-mail: odintsov@aliga.ieec.uab.es

    2008-04-15

    We study inflation and late-time acceleration in the expansion of the universe in non-minimal electromagnetism, in which the electromagnetic field couples to the scalar curvature function. It is shown that power-law inflation can be realized due to the non-minimal gravitational coupling of the electromagnetic field, and that large-scale magnetic fields can be generated due to the breaking of the conformal invariance of the electromagnetic field through its non-minimal gravitational coupling. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that both inflation and the late-time acceleration of the universe can be realized in a modified Maxwell-F(R) gravity which is consistent with solar-system tests and cosmological bounds and free of instabilities. At small curvature typical for the current universe the standard Maxwell theory is recovered. We also consider the classically equivalent form of non-minimal Maxwell-F(R) gravity, and propose the origin of the non-minimal gravitational coupling function based on renormalization-group considerations.

  15. A facile route for the fabrication of large-scale gate-all-around nanofluidic field-effect transistors with low leakage current.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangwoo; Kim, Beom Seok; Song, Jiwoon; Lee, Hwanseong; Cho, Hyung Hee

    2012-07-21

    Active modulation of ions and molecules via field-effect gating in nanofluidic channels is a crucial technology for various promising applications such as DNA sequencing, drug delivery, desalination, and energy conversion. Developing a rapid and facile fabrication method for ionic field-effect transistors (FET) over a large area may offer exciting opportunities for both fundamental research and innovative applications. Here, we report a rapid, cost-effective route for the fabrication of large-scale nanofluidic field-effect transistors using a simple, lithography-free two-step fabrication process that consists of sputtering and barrier-type anodization. A robust alumina gate dielectric layer, which is formed by anodizing sputtered aluminium, can be rapidly fabricated in the order of minutes. When anodizing aluminium, we employ a hemispherical counter electrode in order to give a uniform electric field that encompasses the whole sputtered aluminium layer which has high surface roughness. In consequence, a well-defined thin layer of alumina with perfect step coverage is formed on a highly rough aluminium surface. A gate-all-around nanofluidic FET with a leak-free gate dielectric exhibits outstanding gating performance despite a large channel size. The thin and robust anodized alumina gate dielectric plays a crucial role in achieving such excellent capacitive coupling. The combination of a gate-all-around structure with a leak-free gate dielectric over a large area could yield breakthroughs in areas ranging from biotechnology to energy and environmental applications. PMID:22584915

  16. Large-scale regions of antimatter

    SciTech Connect

    Grobov, A. V. Rubin, S. G.

    2015-07-15

    Amodified mechanism of the formation of large-scale antimatter regions is proposed. Antimatter appears owing to fluctuations of a complex scalar field that carries a baryon charge in the inflation era.

  17. Large-Scale Magnetic Field Fluctuations and Development of the 1999-2000 Global Merged Interaction Region: 1-60 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Wang, C.; Richardson, J. D.; Ness, N. F.

    2003-03-01

    We use a multifluid, spherically symmetric, MHD model with neutral atoms and pickup protons, with 1999 solar wind data at 1 AU as input, to calculate the magnetic field strength (B) profiles that would be observed at various points between 1 and 60 AU with a resolution of 1 day over an interval of ~1 yr. These temporal profiles show radial evolution of the multiscale fluctuations in B near solar maximum. From the daily points in these profiles, one finds the following statistical results for the radial evolution of daily averages of B: (1) the distribution functions of B are approximately lognormal at all distances from 1 to 60 AU; (2) the standard deviation of B divided by the mean value of B, , for the magnetic field profile at a given distance is approximately a constant, independent of distance between 10 and 60 AU; and (3) the power spectrum of B/ evolves such that (a) at small scales the power spectral density decreases with increasing distance from the Sun, (b) at large scales the power spectral density increases with distance, and (c) there is a range of frequencies in which the power spectrum is a power law, the power law extending to ever lower frequencies with increasing distance. All three of these results have been observed by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft over the last 25 yr, between 1 and ~60 AU. The radial evolution of the multiscale changes in B/ is described by analyzing the normalized changes in B at different scales, dBn. The multiscale structure of the probability distributions of dBn changes qualitatively with increasing distance from the Sun. The standard deviation surface, SDn(n, R), shows (1) a ridge at 5 AU (which is a function of scale n), corresponding to the development of shocks and interaction regions at large and intermediate scales; (2) a second ridge at a scale of 64 days (which is a function of R), corresponding to the formation, growth, and initial decay of a large-scale, global merged interaction region; and (3) a

  18. Dynamics of the large-scale open solar magnetic field and its specific features in the zone of the main active longitudes in 2006-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, K. G.; Kharshiladze, A. F.

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of the absolute global values (Φ) of the large-scale open solar magnetic field (LOSMF) fluxes at an interval of one solar rotation in 2006-2012 has been studied based on the Wilcox Solar Observatory data and using the ISOPAK original package for modeling the solar magnetic field. The reference points and the duration of the final quasi-biennial interval in cycle 23 (January 2006-May 2007; 17 months) and the phases of the cycle 24 minimum (May 2007-November 2009; 30 months), growth (November 2009-May 2012; 30 months), and the beginning of the maximum (May 2012-January 2013) have been determined. It has been indicated that the absolute values (Φ) decreased sharply at the beginning of the minimum, growth, and the maximum phases to ˜(2, 1.25, 0.75) × 1022 Mx, respectively. During the entire minimum phase, LOSMF corotated super-quasi-rigidly westward in the direction of solar rotation; at the beginning of the growth phase, this field started corotating mostly eastward. The LOSMF polarity reversal in the current cycle 24 started in May-June 2012 (CR 2123-2124), when fields of southern polarity rushed from the Sun's southern hemisphere toward the north. The statement that the solar cycle is a continuous series of quasi-biennial LOSMF intervals is confirmed. In particular, the minimum and growth phases are characterized by opposite LOSMF rotation directions, i.e., super-quasi-rigid corotation (twisting) and detwisting, with identical duration at least in cycle 24.

  19. A large-scale field study examining effects of exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola on honey bee colony health, development, and overwintering success.

    PubMed

    Cutler, G Christopher; Scott-Dupree, Cynthia D; Sultan, Maryam; McFarlane, Andrew D; Brewer, Larry

    2014-01-01

    In summer 2012, we initiated a large-scale field experiment in southern Ontario, Canada, to determine whether exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola (oil seed rape) has any adverse impacts on honey bees. Colonies were placed in clothianidin seed-treated or control canola fields during bloom, and thereafter were moved to an apiary with no surrounding crops grown from seeds treated with neonicotinoids. Colony weight gain, honey production, pest incidence, bee mortality, number of adults, and amount of sealed brood were assessed in each colony throughout summer and autumn. Samples of honey, beeswax, pollen, and nectar were regularly collected, and samples were analyzed for clothianidin residues. Several of these endpoints were also measured in spring 2013. Overall, colonies were vigorous during and after the exposure period, and we found no effects of exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola on any endpoint measures. Bees foraged heavily on the test fields during peak bloom and residue analysis indicated that honey bees were exposed to low levels (0.5-2 ppb) of clothianidin in pollen. Low levels of clothianidin were detected in a few pollen samples collected toward the end of the bloom from control hives, illustrating the difficulty of conducting a perfectly controlled field study with free-ranging honey bees in agricultural landscapes. Overwintering success did not differ significantly between treatment and control hives, and was similar to overwintering colony loss rates reported for the winter of 2012-2013 for beekeepers in Ontario and Canada. Our results suggest that exposure to canola grown from seed treated with clothianidin poses low risk to honey bees. PMID:25374790

  20. A large-scale field study examining effects of exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola on honey bee colony health, development, and overwintering success

    PubMed Central

    Scott-Dupree, Cynthia D.; Sultan, Maryam; McFarlane, Andrew D.; Brewer, Larry

    2014-01-01

    In summer 2012, we initiated a large-scale field experiment in southern Ontario, Canada, to determine whether exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola (oil seed rape) has any adverse impacts on honey bees. Colonies were placed in clothianidin seed-treated or control canola fields during bloom, and thereafter were moved to an apiary with no surrounding crops grown from seeds treated with neonicotinoids. Colony weight gain, honey production, pest incidence, bee mortality, number of adults, and amount of sealed brood were assessed in each colony throughout summer and autumn. Samples of honey, beeswax, pollen, and nectar were regularly collected, and samples were analyzed for clothianidin residues. Several of these endpoints were also measured in spring 2013. Overall, colonies were vigorous during and after the exposure period, and we found no effects of exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola on any endpoint measures. Bees foraged heavily on the test fields during peak bloom and residue analysis indicated that honey bees were exposed to low levels (0.5–2 ppb) of clothianidin in pollen. Low levels of clothianidin were detected in a few pollen samples collected toward the end of the bloom from control hives, illustrating the difficulty of conducting a perfectly controlled field study with free-ranging honey bees in agricultural landscapes. Overwintering success did not differ significantly between treatment and control hives, and was similar to overwintering colony loss rates reported for the winter of 2012–2013 for beekeepers in Ontario and Canada. Our results suggest that exposure to canola grown from seed treated with clothianidin poses low risk to honey bees. PMID:25374790

  1. Influence of quenching gas injection on the temperature field in pulse-modulated induction thermal plasma for large scale nanopowder synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yasunori; Guo, Weixuan; Kodama, Naoto; Kita, Kentaro; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Shu; Nakamura, Keitaro

    2015-09-01

    We have so far developed a unique and original method for a large-scale nanopowder synthesis method using pulse-modulated induction thermal plasmas with time-controlled feedstock feeding (PMITP-TCFF). The PMITP is sustained by the coil current modulated into a rectangular waveform. Such the current modulation produces an extremely high-temperature thermal plasma in on-time, and in off-time relatively low-temperature thermal plasma. In PMITP-TCFF method, feedstock powder is intermittently injected to the PMITP synchronously during only on-time for its efficient and complete evaporation. That evaporated materials are rapidly cooled down to promote nucleation of nanoparticles during off-time. This report deals with a numerical approach on influence of quenching gas injection on the temperature field in the PMITP. The thermofluid model for the PMITP was developed on the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). This model accounted for the pulse-modulation of the coil current and the quenching gas injection. It was found that the quenching gas injection works to increase the PMITP temperature inside the plasma torch during on-time, and then to decrease it effectively in the reaction chamber. This work is partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 26249034.

  2. Stress fields recorded on large-scale strike-slip fault systems: Effects on the tectonic evolution of crustal slivers during oblique subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloso, Eugenio E.; Gomila, Rodrigo; Cembrano, José; González, Rodrigo; Jensen, Erik; Arancibia, Gloria

    2015-11-01

    In continental margins, large-scale, strike-slip fault-systems resulted from oblique subduction commonly exhibit a complex pattern of faulting where major faults define the inland boundary of tectonic slivers that can be detached from the margin. In turn, subsidiary faults bound and define internal tectonic blocks within the sliver which are expected to rotate, translate and/or internally disrupt in order to accommodate the internal deformation. The geometrical and spatial arrangement of faults and tectonic blocks thus determines the evolution of the sliver given a particular stress field regime. The Paposo segment of the Atacama Fault System in northern Chile displays a series of brittle faults whose orientations are hierarchically arranged: low-order faults splay off higher-order faults forming Riedel-type and strike-slip duplexes geometries at several scales. The master (1st- and highest-order) Paposo Fault defines the inland boundary of a tectonic sliver whereas subsidiary faults bound and disrupt internal tectonic blocks. By using newly collected brittle fault-slip data we estimated the orientations and regimes of the stress fields that acted upon the entire sliver, the different fault-orders and the tectonic blocks. Results indicate that an overall transtensional - with NW-compressional and NE-tensional principal axes - strike-slip regime affected the sliver and triggered the development of left-lateral strike-slip structures. An incomplete split of the stress field imposed by the subduction process resulted in the generation of a nested pattern of R-type faults as well as in a combined strike-slip/normal faulting disruption of the tectonic blocks within the sliver.

  3. Factors associated with sinus bradycardia during crizotinib treatment: a retrospective analysis of two large-scale multinational trials (PROFILE 1005 and 1007).

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Tang, Yiyun; Polli, Anna; Wilner, Keith D; Schnell, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Decreases in heart rate (HR) have been described in patients receiving crizotinib. We performed a large retrospective analysis of HR changes during crizotinib therapy. HRs from vital-sign data for patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive nonsmall cell lung cancer enrolled in PROFILE 1005 and the crizotinib arm of PROFILE 1007 were analyzed. Sinus bradycardia (SB) was defined as HR <60 beats per minute (bpm). Magnitude and timing of HR changes were assessed. Potential risk factors for SB were investigated by logistic regression analysis. Progression-free survival (PFS) was evaluated according to HR decrease by <20 versus ≥20 bpm within the first 50 days of starting treatment. For the 1053 patients analyzed, the mean maximum postbaseline HR decrease was 25 bpm (standard deviation 15.8). Overall, 441 patients (41.9%) had at least one episode of postbaseline SB. The mean precrizotinib treatment HR was significantly lower among patients with versus without postbaseline SB (82.2 bpm vs. 92.6 bpm). The likelihood of experiencing SB was statistically significantly higher among patients with a precrizotinib treatment HR <70 bpm. PFS was comparable among patients with or without HR decrease of ≥20 bpm within the first 50 days of starting crizotinib. Decrease in HR is very common among patients on crizotinib. The likelihood of experiencing SB was statistically significantly higher among patients with a precrizotinib treatment HR <70 bpm. This is the first large-scale report investigating the association between treatment with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and the development of bradycardia. HRs should be closely monitored during crizotinib treatment. PMID:26823131

  4. Large scale superfluid practice

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Taylor, C.; Gilbert, W.S.; Hassenzahl, W.; Rechen, J.; Warren, R.

    1982-07-01

    Since 1979 Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been testing superconducting magnets in He II. The 1 atm pressure, 1.8 K, He II, test facility, is an integral part of the LBL Research and Development program on high field superconducting dipole magnets for particle accelerators. Some of the experience gained in this facility and the details of its operation are reported.

  5. Psychosocial Predictors of Non-Adherence and Treatment Failure in a Large Scale Multi-National Trial of Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV: Data from the ACTG A5175/PEARLS Trial

    PubMed Central

    Safren, Steven A.; Biello, Katie B.; Smeaton, Laura; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Walawander, Ann; Lama, Javier R.; Rana, Aadia; Nyirenda, Mulinda; Kayoyo, Virginia M.; Samaneka, Wadzanai; Joglekar, Anjali; Celentano, David; Martinez, Ana; Remmert, Jocelyn E.; Nair, Aspara; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hakim, James; Campbell, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Background PEARLS, a large scale trial of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV (n = 1,571, 9 countries, 4 continents), found that a once-daily protease inhibitor (PI) based regimen (ATV+DDI+FTC), but not a once-daily non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor/nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI/NRTI) regimen (EFV+FTC/TDF), had inferior efficacy compared to a standard of care twice-daily NNRTI/NRTI regimen (EFV+3TC/ZDV). The present study examined non-adherence in PEARLS. Methods Outcomes: non-adherence assessed by pill count and by self-report, and time to treatment failure. Longitudinal predictors: regimen, quality of life (general health perceptions  =  QOL-health, mental health  =  QOL-mental health), social support, substance use, binge drinking, and sexual behaviors. “Life-Steps” adherence counseling was provided. Results In both pill-count and self-report multivariable models, both once-a-day regimens had lower levels of non-adherence than the twice-a-day standard of care regimen; although these associations attenuated with time in the self-report model. In both multivariable models, hard-drug use was associated with non-adherence, living in Africa and better QOL-health were associated with less non-adherence. According to pill-count, unprotected sex was associated with non-adherence. According to self-report, soft-drug use was associated with non-adherence and living in Asia was associated with less non-adherence. Both pill-count (HR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.15, 2.09, p<.01) and self-report (HR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.13, p<.01) non-adherence were significant predictors of treatment failure over 72 weeks. In multivariable models (including pill-count or self-report nonadherence), worse QOL-health, age group (younger), and region were also significant predictors of treatment failure. Conclusion In the context of a large, multi-national, multi-continent, clinical trial there were variations in adherence over time, with more

  6. Evaluation of targeted therapies in advanced breast cancer: the need for large-scale molecular screening and transformative clinical trial designs.

    PubMed

    Fadoukhair, Z; Zardavas, D; Chad, M A; Goulioti, T; Aftimos, P; Piccart, M

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer (BC) has been classified into four intrinsic subtypes through seminal studies employing gene expression profiling analysis of primary tumours, namely the luminal A and B subtypes, the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-like subtype and the basal-like subtype. More recently, the emergence of high-throughput genomic sequencing techniques, such as next-generation or massive parallel sequencing has expanded our understanding of the complex genomic landscapes of BC, with marked intertumour heterogeneity seen among different patients. In addition, increasing evidence indicates intratumour heterogeneity, with molecular differences observed within one patient, both spatially and longitudinally. These phenomena have an impact on the clinical development of molecularly targeted agents, with the classical paradigm of population-based clinical trials being no longer efficient. In the era of genomically driven oncology, three complementary tools can accelerate the clinical development of targeted agents for advanced BC as follows: (i) the implementation of molecular profiling of metastatic tumour lesions, as exemplified by the AURORA (Aiming to Understand the Molecular Aberrations in Metastatic Breast Cancer) programme; (ii) serial assessments of circulating tumour DNA, allowing a more thorough molecular interrogation of metastatic tumour burden; and (iii) new innovative clinical trial designs able to address the challenges of the increasing molecular fragmentation of BC. PMID:26119941

  7. Challenges for Large Scale Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Matthias

    2010-03-01

    With computational approaches becoming ubiquitous the growing impact of large scale computing on research influences both theoretical and experimental work. I will review a few examples in condensed matter physics and quantum optics, including the impact of computer simulations in the search for supersolidity, thermometry in ultracold quantum gases, and the challenging search for novel phases in strongly correlated electron systems. While only a decade ago such simulations needed the fastest supercomputers, many simulations can now be performed on small workstation clusters or even a laptop: what was previously restricted to a few experts can now potentially be used by many. Only part of the gain in computational capabilities is due to Moore's law and improvement in hardware. Equally impressive is the performance gain due to new algorithms - as I will illustrate using some recently developed algorithms. At the same time modern peta-scale supercomputers offer unprecedented computational power and allow us to tackle new problems and address questions that were impossible to solve numerically only a few years ago. While there is a roadmap for future hardware developments to exascale and beyond, the main challenges are on the algorithmic and software infrastructure side. Among the problems that face the computational physicist are: the development of new algorithms that scale to thousands of cores and beyond, a software infrastructure that lifts code development to a higher level and speeds up the development of new simulation programs for large scale computing machines, tools to analyze the large volume of data obtained from such simulations, and as an emerging field provenance-aware software that aims for reproducibility of the complete computational workflow from model parameters to the final figures. Interdisciplinary collaborations and collective efforts will be required, in contrast to the cottage-industry culture currently present in many areas of computational

  8. Passive remote sensing of large-scale methane emissions from Oil Fields in California's San Joaquin Valley and validation by airborne in-situ measurements - Results from COMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, Konstantin; Krautwurst, Sven; Thompson, David R.; Thorpe, Andrew K.; Kolyer, Richard W.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Krings, Thomas; Frankenberg, Christian; Horstjann, Markus; Leifer, Ira; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Vigil, Sam; Fladeland, Matthew; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2016-04-01

    The CO2 and MEthane EXperiment (COMEX) was a NASA and ESA funded campaign in support of the HyspIRI and CarbonSat mission definition activities. As a part of this effort, seven flights were performed between June 3 and September 4, 2014 with the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) remote sensing instrument (operated by the University of Bremen in cooperation with the German Research Centre for Geosciences - GFZ) over the Kern River, Kern Front, and Poso Creek Oil Fields located in California's San Joaquin Valley. MAMAP was installed for the flights aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft, together with: a Picarro fast in-situ greenhouse gas (GHG) analyzer operated by the NASA Ames Research Center, ARC; a 5-hole turbulence probe; and an atmospheric measurement package operated by CIRPAS measuring aerosols, temperature, dew-point, and other atmospheric parameters. Three of the flights were accompanied by the Next Generation Airborne Visual InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG), operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, installed aboard a second Twin Otter aircraft. Large-scale, high-concentration CH4 plumes were detected by the MAMAP instrument over the fields and tracked over several kilometers. The spatial distribution of the MAMAP observed plumes was compared to high spatial resolution CH4 anomaly maps derived by AVIRIS-NG imaging spectroscopy data. Remote sensing data collected by MAMAP was used to infer CH4 emission rates and their distributions over the three fields. Aggregated emission estimates for the three fields were compared to aggregated emissions inferred by subsequent airborne in-situ validation measurements collected by the Picarro instrument. Comparison of remote sensing and in-situ flux estimates will be presented, demonstrating the ability of airborne remote sensing data to provide accurate emission estimates for concentrations above the

  9. Large-Time Behavior of GW Pollutant Plumes Subject to Biodegradation at the Fringe: Mathematical Analysis and its Application to a Large-Scale (~10 km) Field Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. J.; Kitanidis, P. K.; McCarty, P. L.

    2003-12-01

    instantaneous for the purpose of mathematical modeling. This simplification allows us to efficiently find the steady-state solutions for large scale field problems. We will present a field application which indicates the mixing with the ambient oxygen at the plume fringe may successfully constrain the spread of a high total organic carbon (500mg/L) plume, generated from a passive bio-reactive barrier. But the concentration reduction along the center line of the plume is insignificant.

  10. Seismic texture and amplitude analysis of large scale fluid escape pipes using time lapses seismic surveys: examples from the Loyal Field (Scotland, UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrelli, Daniele; Jihad, Ali; Iacopini, David; Bond, Clare

    2016-04-01

    ) affected by large scale fracture (semblance image) and seem consistent with a suspended mud/sand mixture non-fluidized fluid flow. Near-Middle-Far offsets amplitude analysis confirms that most of the amplitude anomalies within the pipes conduit and terminus are only partly related to gas. An interpretation of the possible texture observed is proposed with a discussion of the noise and artefact induced by resolution and migration problems. Possible hypothetical formation mechanisms for those Pipes are discussed.